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Sample records for antibody variants targeting

  1. Production of different glycosylation variants of the tumour-targeting mAb H10 in Nicotiana benthamiana: influence on expression yield and antibody degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Raffaele; Donini, Marcello; Villani, Maria Elena; Brunetti, Patrizia; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Paul, Matthew; Ma, Julian K-C; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2012-10-01

    We previously described the expression of a tumour-targeting antibody (mAb H10) in Nicotiana benthamiana by vacuum-agro-infiltration and the remarkable yields of highly pure protein achieved. The objective of the present work was to investigate different strategies for transient overexpression of the mAb H10 in which glycan configuration was modulated and assess how these strategies affect the accumulation yield and stability of the antibody. To this aim, three procedures have been assayed: (1) Site-directed mutagenesis to abolish the glycosylation site; (2) endoplasmic reticulum retention (C-terminal SEKDEL fusion) to ensure predominantly high-mannose type glycans; and (3) expression in a N. benthamiana RNAi down-regulated line in which β1,2-xylosyltransferase and α1,3-fucosyltransferase gene expression is silenced. The three antibody variants (H10-Mut) (H10-SEKDEL) (H10(XylT/FucT)) were transiently expressed, purified and characterised for their glycosylation profile, expression/purification yield and antibody degradation pattern. Glycosylation analysis of H10(XylT/FucT) demonstrated the absence of plant complex-type sugars, while H10-SEKDEL, although substantially retained in the ER, revealed the presence of β1,2-xylose and α1,3-fucose residues, indicating a partial escape from the ER retrieval system. Antibody accumulation and purification yields were not enhanced by ER retention. All H10 antibody glyco-forms revealed greater degradation compared to the original, resulting mostly in the formation of Fab fragments. In the case of aglycosylated H10-Mut, more than 95% of the heavy chain was cleaved, confirming the pivotal role of the sugar moiety in protein stability. Identification of possible 'fragile' sites in the H10 antibody hinge region could be of general interest for the development of new strategies to reduce antibody degradation and increase the yield of intact IgGs in plants.

  2. Targeting of Antibodies using Aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The chapter presents a methodology for the rapid selection of aptamers against antibody targets. It is a detailed account of the various methodological steps that describe the selection of aptamers, including PCR steps, buffers to be used, target immobilisation, partitioning and amplification of aptamers, clonning and sequencing, to results in high affinity and specificity ligands for the chosen target antibody.

  3. High throughput functional assays of the variant antigen PfEMP1 reveal a single domain in the 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum genome that binds ICAM1 with high affinity and is targeted by naturally acquired neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V Oleinikov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind endothelial receptors to sequester in vascular beds, and binding to ICAM1 has been implicated in cerebral malaria. Binding to ICAM1 may be mediated by the variant surface antigen family PfEMP1: for example, 6 of 21 DBLbetaC2 domains from the IT4 strain PfEMP1 repertoire were shown to bind ICAM1, and the PfEMP1 containing these 6 domains are all classified as Group B or C type. In this study, we surveyed binding of ICAM1 to 16 DBLbetaC2 domains of the 3D7 strain PfEMP1 repertoire, using a high throughput Bioplex assay format. Only one DBL2betaC2 domain from the Group A PfEMP1 PF11_0521 showed strong specific binding. Among these 16 domains, DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 best preserved the residues previously identified as conserved in ICAM1-binding versus non-binding domains. Our analyses further highlighted the potential role of conserved residues within predominantly non-conserved flexible loops in adhesion, and, therefore, as targets for intervention. Our studies also suggest that the structural/functional DBLbetaC2 domain involved in ICAM1 binding includes about 80 amino acid residues upstream of the previously suggested DBLbetaC2 domain. DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 binding to ICAM1 was inhibited by immune sera from east Africa but not by control US sera. Neutralizing antibodies were uncommon in children but common in immune adults from east Africa. Inhibition of binding was much more efficient than reversal of binding, indicating a strong interaction between DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 and ICAM1. Our high throughput approach will significantly accelerate studies of PfEMP1 binding domains and protective antibody responses.

  4. {sup 68}Ga-labelled recombinant antibody variants for immuno-PET imaging of solid tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, Matthias; Eisenhut, Michael [German Cancer Research Center, Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Knackmuss, Stefan; Gall, Fabrice Le; Reusch, Uwe; Little, Melvyn [Affimed Therapeutics AG, Heidelberg (Germany); Rybin, Vladimir [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter [University of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Recombinant antibodies isolated from human antibody libraries have excellent affinities and high target specificity. As full-length IgGs are cleared inadequately slowly from the circulation, the aim of this work was to figure out which kind of recombinant antibody fragment proves to be appropriate for imaging epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-expressing tumours with the short-living radioisotope {sup 68}Ga. In order to combine the promising tumour targeting properties of antibodies with {sup 68}Ga, four antibody variants with the same specificity and origin only differing in molecular weight were constructed for comparison. Therefore, the binding domains of a single-chain fragment variable (scFv) isolated from a human naive antibody library were modified genetically to construct the respective full-length IgG, the tria- and diabody variants. These molecules were conjugated with the bifunctional chelating agent N,N{sup '}-bis[2-hydroxy-5-(carboxyethyl)benzyl]ethylenediamine-N,N{sup '}-diacetic acid (HBED-CC) to enable {sup 68}Ga labelling at ambient temperature and compared in biodistribution and immuno-PET imaging experiments. The antibody variants with identical specificity proved to have the correct molecular weight, high binding affinity and specificity to their antigen, EpCAM. Radiometal complexation was efficiently performed at room temperature leading to {sup 68}Ga-labelled antibodies with unchanged binding properties compared to the original antibody variants. The best targeting properties were obtained with the scFv and especially with the diabody. The triabody showed higher absolute tumour uptake but only moderate clearance from circulation. The antibody variants differed considerably in normal organ uptake, clearance from circulation and tumour accumulation. The data demonstrate the feasibility of imaging solid tumours with the {sup 68}Ga-labelled diabody format. This type of recombinant protein might be a promising carrier even for the

  5. Discovery of functional antibodies targeting ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Gardener, Matthew J; Williams, Wendy A

    2015-04-01

    Ion channels play critical roles in physiology and disease by modulation of cellular functions such as electrical excitability, secretion, cell migration, and gene transcription. Ion channels represent an important target class for drug discovery that has been largely addressed, to date, using small-molecule approaches. A significant opportunity exists to target these channels with antibodies and alternative formats of biologics. Antibodies display high specificity and affinity for their target antigen, and they have the potential to target ion channels very selectively. Nevertheless, isolating antibodies to this target class is challenging due to the difficulties in expression and purification of ion channels in a format suitable for antibody drug discovery in addition to the complexity of screening for function. In this article, we will review the current state of ion channel biologics discovery and the progress that has been made. We will also highlight the challenges in isolating functional antibodies to these targets and how these challenges may be addressed. Finally, we also illustrate successful approaches to isolating functional monoclonal antibodies targeting ion channels by way of a number of case studies drawn from recent publications.

  6. Discovery and characterization of antibody variants using mass spectrometry-based comparative analysis for biosimilar candidates of monoclonal antibody drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhua; Yang, Bin; Zhou, Dongmei; Xu, Jun; Ke, Zhi; Suen, Wen-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is the most commonly used technique for the characterization of antibody variants. MAb-X and mAb-Y are two approved IgG1 subtype monoclonal antibody drugs recombinantly produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We report here that two unexpected and rare antibody variants have been discovered during cell culture process development of biosimilars for these two approved drugs through intact mass analysis. We then used comprehensive mass spectrometry-based comparative analysis including reduced light, heavy chains, and domain-specific mass as well as peptide mapping analysis to fully characterize the observed antibody variants. The "middle-up" mass comparative analysis demonstrated that the antibody variant from mAb-X biosimilar candidate was caused by mass variation of antibody crystalline fragment (Fc), whereas a different variant with mass variation in antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab) from mAb-Y biosimilar candidate was identified. Endoproteinase Lys-C digested peptide mapping and tandem mass spectrometry analysis further revealed that a leucine to glutamine change in N-terminal 402 site of heavy chain was responsible for the generation of mAb-X antibody variant. Lys-C and trypsin coupled non-reduced and reduced peptide mapping comparative analysis showed that the formation of the light-heavy interchain trisulfide bond resulted in the mAb-Y antibody variant. These two cases confirmed that mass spectrometry-based comparative analysis plays a critical role for the characterization of monoclonal antibody variants, and biosimilar developers should start with a comprehensive structural assessment and comparative analysis to decrease the risk of the process development for biosimilars.

  7. Chromatographic separation of three monoclonal antibody variants using multicolumn countercurrent solvent gradient purification (MCSGP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Späth, Thomas; Aumann, Lars; Melter, Lena; Ströhlein, Guido; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2008-08-15

    Multicolumn countercurrent solvent gradient purification (MCSGP) is a continuous chromatographic process developed in recent years (Aumann and Morbidelli, 2007a; Aumann et al., 2007) that is particularly suited for applications in the field of bioseparations. Like batch chromatography, MCSGP is suitable for three-fraction chromatographic separations and able to perform solvent gradients but it is superior in terms of solvent consumption, yield, purity, and productivity due to the countercurrent movement of the liquid and the solid phases. In this work, the MCSGP process is applied to the separation of three monoclonal antibody variants on a conventional preparative cation exchange resin. The experimental process performance was compared to simulations based on a lumped kinetic model. Yield and purity values of the target variant of 93%, respectively were obtained experimentally. The batch reference process was clearly outperformed by the MCSGP process.

  8. Recombinant horseradish peroxidase variants for targeted cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifert, Günther; Folkes, Lisa; Gmeiner, Christoph; Dachs, Gabi; Spadiut, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    Cancer is a major cause of death. Common chemo- and radiation-therapies damage healthy tissue and cause painful side effects. The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been shown to activate the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to a powerful anticancer agent in in vitro studies, but gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) studies showed ambivalent results. Thus, HRP/IAA in antibody directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT) was investigated as an alternative. However, this approach has not been intensively studied, since the enzyme preparation from plant describes an undefined mixture of isoenzymes with a heterogenic glycosylation pattern incompatible with the human system. Here, we describe the recombinant production of the two HRP isoenzymes C1A and A2A in a Pichia pastoris benchmark strain and a glyco-engineered strain with a knockout of the α-1,6-mannosyltransferase (OCH1) responsible for hypermannosylation. We biochemically characterized the enzyme variants, tested them with IAA and applied them on cancer cells. In the absence of H2 O2 , HRP C1A turned out to be highly active with IAA, independent of its surface glycosylation. Subsequent in vitro cytotoxicity studies with human T24 bladder carcinoma and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells underlined the applicability of recombinant HRP C1A with reduced surface glycoslyation for targeted cancer treatment. Summarizing, this is the first study describing the successful use of recombinantly produced HRP for targeted cancer treatment. Our findings might pave the way for an increased use of the powerful isoenzyme HRP C1A in cancer research in the future.

  9. Nine-year longitudinal study of antibodies to variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, H A; Staalsoe, T; Dodoo, D;

    1999-01-01

    PfEMP1 is an antigenically variable molecule which mediates the adhesion of parasitized erythrocytes to a variety of cell types and which is believed to constitute an important target for naturally acquired protective immune responses in malaria. For 9 years we have monitored individuals living...... in an area of low-intensity, seasonal, and unstable malaria transmission in eastern Sudan, and we have used this database to study the acquisition, specificity, and duration of the antibody response to variant parasitized erythrocyte surface antigens. Both the levels and the spectrum of reactivity...... of these antibodies varied considerably among individuals, ranging from low levels of antibodies recognizing only few parasitized erythrocyte surface antigens to high levels of broad-specificity antibodies. In general, episodes of clinical malaria were associated with increases in the levels of parasitized...

  10. Targeted quantitative mass spectrometric immunoassay for human protein variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedelkov Dobrin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-translational modifications and genetic variations give rise to protein variants that significantly increase the complexity of the human proteome. Modified proteins also play an important role in biological processes. While sandwich immunoassays are routinely used to determine protein concentrations, they are oblivious to protein variants that may serve as biomarkers with better sensitivity and specificity than their wild-type proteins. Mass spectrometry, coupled to immunoaffinity separations, can provide an efficient mean for simultaneous detection and quantification of protein variants. Results Presented here is a mass spectrometric immunoassay method for targeted quantitative proteomics analysis of protein modifications. Cystatin C, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor and a potential marker for several pathological processes, was used as a target analyte. An internal reference standard was incorporated into the assay, serving as a normalization point for cystatin C quantification. The precision, linearity, and recovery characteristics of the assay were established. The new assay was also benchmarked against existing cystatin C ELISA. In application, the assay was utilized to determine the individual concentration of several cystatin C variants across a cohort of samples, demonstrating the ability to fully quantify individual forms of post-translationally modified proteins. Conclusions The mass spectrometric immunoassays can find use in quantifying specific protein modifications, either as a part of a specific protein biomarker discovery/rediscovery effort to delineate the role of these variants in the onset of the disease, progression, and response to therapy, or in a more systematic study to delineate and understand human protein diversity.

  11. Mechanistic modeling of ion-exchange process chromatography of charge variants of monoclonal antibody products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijesh; Leweke, Samuel; von Lieres, Eric; Rathore, Anurag S

    2015-12-24

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEX) is universally accepted as the optimal method for achieving process scale separation of charge variants of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutic. These variants are closely related to the product and a baseline separation is rarely achieved. The general practice is to fractionate the eluate from the IEX column, analyze the fractions and then pool the desired fractions to obtain the targeted composition of variants. This is, however, a very cumbersome and time consuming exercise. A mechanistic model that is capable of simulating the peak profile will be a much more elegant and effective way to make a decision on the pooling strategy. This paper proposes a mechanistic model, based on the general rate model, to predict elution peak profile for separation of the main product from its variants. The proposed approach uses inverse fit of process scale chromatogram for estimation of model parameters using the initial values that are obtained from theoretical correlations. The packed bed column has been modeled along with the chromatographic system consisting of the mixer, tubing and detectors as a series of dispersed plug flow and continuous stirred tank reactors. The model uses loading ranges starting at 25% to a maximum of 70% of the loading capacity and hence is applicable to process scale separations. Langmuir model has been extended to include the effects of salt concentration and temperature on the model parameters. The extended Langmuir model that has been proposed uses one less parameter than the SMA model and this results in a significant ease of estimating the model parameters from inverse fitting. The proposed model has been validated with experimental data and has been shown to successfully predict peak profile for a range of load capacities (15-28mg/mL), gradient lengths (10-30CV), bed heights (6-20cm), and for three different resins with good accuracy (as measured by estimation of residuals). The model has been also

  12. Inferring causative variants in microRNA target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Laurent F; Saito, Takaya; Sætrom, Pål

    2011-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate genes post transcription by pairing with messenger RNA (mRNA). Variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA regulatory regions might result in altered protein levels and disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) aim at identifying genomic regions that contain variants associated with disease, but lack tools for finding causative variants. We present a computational tool that can help identifying SNPs associated with diseases, by focusing on SNPs affecting miRNA-regulation of genes. The tool predicts the effects of SNPs in miRNA target sites and uses linkage disequilibrium to map these miRNA-related variants to SNPs of interest in GWAS. We compared our predicted SNP effects in miRNA target sites with measured SNP effects from allelic imbalance sequencing. Our predictions fit measured effects better than effects based on differences in free energy or differences of TargetScan context scores. We also used our tool to analyse data from published breast cancer and Parkinson's disease GWAS and significant trait-associated SNPs from the NHGRI GWAS Catalog. A database of predicted SNP effects is available at http://www.bigr.medisin.ntnu.no/mirsnpscore/. The database is based on haplotype data from the CEU HapMap population and miRNAs from miRBase 16.0.

  13. A novel llama antibody targeting Fn14 exhibits anti-metastatic activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebing, Johannes; Lang, Isabell; Chopra, Martin; Salzmann, Steffen; Moshir, Mahan; Silence, Karen; Riedel, Simone S; Siegmund, Daniela; Beilhack, Andreas; Otto, Christoph; Wajant, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-inducible 14 (Fn14), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, is typically low in healthy adult organisms, but strong Fn14 expression is induced in tissue injury and tissue remodeling. High Fn14 expression is also observed in solid tumors, which is why this receptor is under consideration as a therapeutic target in oncology. Here, we describe various novel mouse-human cross-reactive llama-derived recombinant Fn14-specific antibodies (5B6, 18D1, 4G5) harboring the human IgG1 Fc domain. In contrast to recombinant variants of the established Fn14-specific antibodies PDL192 and P4A8, all three llama-derived antibodies efficiently bound to the W42A and R56P mutants of human Fn14. 18D1 and 4G5, but not 5B6, efficiently blocked TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis(TWEA K) binding at low concentrations (0.2–2 μg/ml). Oligomerization and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) binding converted all antibodies into strong Fn14 agonists. Variants of 18D1 with enhanced and reduced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity were further analyzed in vivo with respect to their effect on metastasis. In a xenogeneic model using human colon carcinoma cancer cells, both antibody variants were effective in reducing metastasis to the liver. In contrast, only the 18D1 variant with enhanced ADCC activity, but not its ADCC-defective counterpart, suppressed lung metastasis in the RE NCA model. In sum, this suggests that Fn14 targeting might primarily act by triggering of antibody effector functions, but also by blockade of TWEA K-Fn14 interaction in some cases

  14. Malaria-induced acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ofori, Michael F; Dodoo, Daniel; Staalsoe, Trine

    2002-01-01

    In areas of intense Plasmodium falciparum transmission, protective immunity is acquired during childhood in parallel with acquisition of agglutinating antibodies to parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSA) expressed on parasitized red blood cells. In a semi-immune child in such an area, cl...

  15. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  16. Insights into the molecular basis of a bispecific antibody's target selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Yariv; Hansen, Anna; Yang, Chunning; Chowdhury, Partha S; Wang, Jihong; Stephens, Geoffrey; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies constitute a valuable class of therapeutics owing to their ability to bind 2 distinct targets. Dual targeting is thought to enhance biological efficacy, limit escape mechanisms, and increase target selectivity via a strong avidity effect mediated by concurrent binding to both antigens on the surface of the same cell. However, factors that regulate the extent of target selectivity are not well understood. We show that dual targeting alone is not sufficient to promote efficient target selectivity, and report the substantial roles played by the affinity of the individual arms, overall avidity and valence. More particularly, various monovalent bispecific IgGs composed of an anti-CD70 moiety paired with variants of the anti-CD4 mAb ibalizumab were tested for preferential binding and selective depletion of CD4(+)/CD70(+) T cells over cells expressing only one of the target antigens that resulted from antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Variants exhibiting reduced CD4 affinity showed a greater degree of target selectivity, while the overall efficacy of the bispecific molecule was not affected.

  17. Simulation model for overloaded monoclonal antibody variants separations in ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guélat, Bertrand; Ströhlein, Guido; Lattuada, Marco; Delegrange, Lydia; Valax, Pascal; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2012-08-31

    A model was developed for the design of a monoclonal antibody charge variants separation process based on ion-exchange chromatography. In order to account for a broad range of operating conditions in the simulations, an explicit pH and salt concentration dependence has been included in the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The reliability of this model was tested using experimental chromatographic retention times as well as information about the structural characteristics of the different charge variants, e.g. C-terminal lysine groups and deamidated groups. Next, overloaded isocratic elutions at various pH and salt concentrations have been performed to determine the saturation capacity of the ion-exchanger. Furthermore, the column simulation model was applied for the prediction of monoclonal antibody variants separations with both pH and salt gradient elutions. A good prediction of the elution times and peak shapes was observed, even though none of the model parameters was adjusted to fit the experimental data. The trends in the separation performance obtained through the simulations were generally sufficient to identify the most promising operating conditions. The predictive column simulation model thus developed in this work, including a set of parameters determined through specific independent experiments, was experimentally validated and offers a useful basis for a rational optimization of monoclonal antibody variants separation processes on ion-exchange chromatography.

  18. Antibody therapeutics targeting ion channels: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Han; Li, Min

    2013-02-01

    The combination of technological advances, genomic sequences and market success is catalyzing rapid development of antibody-based therapeutics. Cell surface receptors and ion channel proteins are well known drug targets, but the latter has seen less success. The availability of crystal structures, better understanding of gating biophysics and validation of physiological roles now form an excellent foundation to pursue antibody-based therapeutics targeting ion channels to treat a variety of diseases.

  19. Characterization of single chain antibody targets through yeast two hybrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vielemeyer Ole

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to their unique ability to bind their targets with high fidelity, antibodies are used widely not only in biomedical research, but also in many clinical applications. Recombinant antibodies, including single chain variable fragments (scFv, are gaining momentum because they allow powerful in vitro selection and manipulation without loss of function. Regardless of the ultimate application or type of antibody used, precise understanding of the interaction between the antibody's binding site and its specific target epitope(s is of great importance. However, such data is frequently difficult to obtain. Results We describe an approach that allows detailed characterization of a given antibody's target(s using the yeast two-hybrid system. Several recombinant scFv were used as bait and screened against highly complex cDNA libraries. Systematic sequencing of all retained clones and statistical analysis allowed efficient ranking of the prey fragments. Multiple alignment of the obtained cDNA fragments provided a selected interacting domain (SID, efficiently narrowing the epitope-containing region. Interactions between antibodies and their respective targets were characterized for several scFv. For AA2 and ROF7, two conformation-specific sensors that exclusively bind the activated forms of the small GTPases Rab6 and Rab1 respectively, only fragments expressing the entire target protein's core region were retained. This strongly suggested interaction with a non-linear epitope. For two other scFv, TA10 and SF9, which recognize the large proteins giantin and non-muscle myosin IIA, respectively, precise antibody-binding regions within the target were defined. Finally, for some antibodies, secondary targets within and across species could be revealed. Conclusions Our method, utilizing the yeast two-hybrid technology and scFv as bait, is a simple yet powerful approach for the detailed characterization of antibody targets. It allows precise

  20. Tumor targeting of radiolabeled antibodies using HYNIC chelate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Sup; Chung, Wee Sup; Woo, Kwang Sun; Choi, Tae Hyun; Chung, Hye Kyung; Lee, Myung Jin; Kim, So Yeon; Jung, Jae Ho; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Darwati, Siti [National Nuclear Energy Agency, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    2004-07-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of labeled antibodies for diagnosis of cancers as well as for therapy. Various radiolabeling methods have been used in order to obtain better tumor specific targeting for detection and therapy. It was generally used to tumor targeted immunotherapy and immunodetection that lym-1, mouse monoclonal antibody, was specific binding to surface antigen of Raji. The 3E8 antibody was produced from humanized anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibody (AKA) by amino acid change in 95-99 residues of heavy chain complementary determinant regions (HCDRs) 3 using phage displayed library technology. In this study, we are investigating the usefulness of HYNIC chelate as a bifunctional chelating agent in radioimmunodetecton of tumor. Two types of antibodies, Lym-1 and 3E8, were used for the conjugation with HYNIC chelate. Lym-1 and 3E8 are specific antibodies to surface antigen of Non-Hogkin's lymphoma and TAG-72 antigen of colorectal carcinoma, respectively. We prepare HYNIC-antibody conjugates, determine radiolabeling yield with {sup 99m}Tc and evaluate tumor targeting in tumor bearing nude mice model.

  1. Computational prediction of neutralization epitopes targeted by human anti-V3 HIV monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Shmelkov

    Full Text Available The extreme diversity of HIV-1 strains presents a formidable challenge for HIV-1 vaccine design. Although antibodies (Abs can neutralize HIV-1 and potentially protect against infection, antibodies that target the immunogenic viral surface protein gp120 have widely variable and poorly predictable cross-strain reactivity. Here, we developed a novel computational approach, the Method of Dynamic Epitopes, for identification of neutralization epitopes targeted by anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Our data demonstrate that this approach, based purely on calculated energetics and 3D structural information, accurately predicts the presence of neutralization epitopes targeted by V3-specific mAbs 2219 and 447-52D in any HIV-1 strain. The method was used to calculate the range of conservation of these specific epitopes across all circulating HIV-1 viruses. Accurately identifying an Ab-targeted neutralization epitope in a virus by computational means enables easy prediction of the breadth of reactivity of specific mAbs across the diversity of thousands of different circulating HIV-1 variants and facilitates rational design and selection of immunogens mimicking specific mAb-targeted epitopes in a multivalent HIV-1 vaccine. The defined epitopes can also be used for the purpose of epitope-specific analyses of breakthrough sequences recorded in vaccine clinical trials. Thus, our study is a prototype for a valuable tool for rational HIV-1 vaccine design.

  2. Antibodies to rifin: a component of naturally acquired responses to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens on infected erythrocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdel-Latif, M.S.; Cabrera, G.; Kohler, C.; Kremsner, P.G.; Luty, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    We used a pool of recombinant rifin proteins to pre-adsorb antibodies to rifin in the plasma of semi-immune African (Gabonese) adults and showed that this results in a reduction in the level of IgG antibody reactivity to variant surface antigens (VSA) measured in a standardized flow cytometric assay

  3. Enhanced tumor-targeting selectivity by modulating bispecific antibody binding affinity and format valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Yariv; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Yang, Chunning; Hansen, Anna; Filderman, Jessica; Mulgrew, Kathy; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2017-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies are considered attractive bio-therapeutic agents owing to their ability to target two distinct disease mediators. Cross-arm avidity targeting of antigen double-positive cancer cells over single-positive normal tissue is believed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy, restrict major escape mechanisms and increase tumor-targeting selectivity, leading to reduced systemic toxicity and improved therapeutic index. However, the interplay of factors regulating target selectivity is not well understood and often overlooked when developing clinically relevant bispecific therapeutics. We show in vivo that dual targeting alone is not sufficient to endow selective tumor-targeting, and report the pivotal roles played by the affinity of the individual arms, overall avidity and format valence. Specifically, a series of monovalent and bivalent bispecific IgGs composed of the anti-HER2 trastuzumab moiety paired with affinity-modulated VH and VL regions of the anti-EGFR GA201 mAb were tested for selective targeting and eradication of double-positive human NCI-H358 non-small cell lung cancer target tumors over single-positive, non-target NCI-H358-HER2 CRISPR knock out tumors in nude mice bearing dual-flank tumor xenografts. Affinity-reduced monovalent bispecific variants, but not their bivalent bispecific counterparts, mediated a greater degree of tumor targeting selectivity, while the overall efficacy against the targeted tumor was not substantially affected. PMID:28067257

  4. Antibody therapeutics targeting ion channels:are we there yet?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han SUN; Min LI

    2013-01-01

    The combination of technological advances,genomic sequences and market success is catalyzing rapid development of antibodybased therapeutics.Cell surface receptors and ion channel proteins are well known drug targets,but the latter has seen less success.The availability of crystal structures,better understanding of gating biophysics and validation of physiological roles now form an excellent foundation to pursue antibody-based therapeutics targeting ion channels to treat a variety of diseases.

  5. Specific targeting of tumor cells by lyophilisomes functionalized with antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bracht, Etienne; Stolle, Sarah; Hafmans, Theo G.; Boerman, Otto C.; Oosterwijk, Egbert; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Daamen, Willeke F.

    2014-01-01

    Lyophilisomes are a novel class of proteinaceous biodegradable nano/micro drug delivery capsules prepared by freezing, annealing and Iyophilization. In the present study, lyophilisomes were functionalized for active targeting by antibody conjugation in order to obtain a selective drug-carrier system

  6. Overcoming Instability of Antibody-Nanomaterial Conjugates: Next Generation Targeted Nanomedicines Using Bispecific Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Christopher B; Fletcher, Nicholas; Houston, Zachary H; Fuchs, Adrian V; Boase, Nathan R B; Simpson, Joshua D; Raftery, Lyndon J; Ruder, Tim; Jones, Martina L; de Bakker, Christopher J; Mahler, Stephen M; Thurecht, Kristofer J

    2016-08-01

    Targeted nanomaterials promise improved therapeutic efficacy, however their application in nanomedicine is limited due to complexities associated with protein conjugations to synthetic nanocarriers. A facile method to generate actively targeted nanomaterials is developed and exemplified using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-functional nanostructures coupled to a bispecific antibody (BsAb) with dual specificity for methoxy PEG (mPEG) epitopes and cancer targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The EGFR-mPEG BsAb binds with high affinity to recombinant EGFR (KD : 1 × 10(-9) m) and hyperbranched polymer (HBP) consisting of mPEG (KD : 10 × 10(-9) m) and demonstrates higher avidity for HBP compared to linear mPEG. The binding of BsAb-HBP bioconjugate to EGFR on MDA-MB-468 cancer cells is investigated in vitro using a fluorescently labeled polymer, and in in vivo xenograft models by small animal optical imaging. The antibody-targeted nanostructures show improved accumulation in tumor cells compared to non-targeted nanomaterials. This demonstrates a facile approach for tuning targeting ligand density on nanomaterials, by modulating surface functionality. Antibody fragments are tethered to the nanomaterial through simple mixing prior to administration to animals, overcoming the extensive procedures encountered for developing targeted nanomedicines.

  7. GABARAPL1 antibodies: target one protein, get one free!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grand, Jaclyn Nicole; Chakrama, Fatima Zahra; Seguin-Py, Stéphanie; Fraichard, Annick; Delage-Mourroux, Régis; Jouvenot, Michèle; Risold, Pierre-Yves; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël

    2011-11-01

    Atg8 is a yeast protein involved in the autophagic process and in particular in the elongation of autophagosomes. In mammals, several orthologs have been identified and are classed into two subfamilies: the LC3 subfamily and the GABARAP subfamily, referred to simply as the LC3 or GABARAP families. GABARAPL1 (GABARAP-like protein 1), one of the proteins belonging to the GABARAP (GABA(A) receptor-associated protein) family, is highly expressed in the central nervous system and implicated in processes such as receptor and vesicle transport as well as autophagy. The proteins that make up the GABARAP family demonstrate conservation of their amino acid sequences and protein structures. In humans, GABARAPL1 shares 86% identity with GABARAP and 61% with GABARAPL2 (GATE-16). The identification of the individual proteins is thus very limited when working in vivo due to a lack of unique peptide sequences from which specific antibodies can be developed. Actually, and to our knowledge, there are no available antibodies on the market that are entirely specific to GABARAPL1 and the same may be true of the anti-GABARAP antibodies. In this study, we sought to examine the specificity of three antibodies targeted against different peptide sequences within GABARAPL1: CHEM-CENT (an antibody raised against a short peptide sequence within the center of the protein), PTG-NTER (an antibody raised against the N-terminus of the protein) and PTG-FL (an antibody raised against the full-length protein). The results described in this article demonstrate the importance of testing antibody specificity under the conditions for which it will be used experimentally, a caution that should be taken when studying the expression of the GABARAP family proteins.

  8. Genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed receptors harboring TAG-72-specific camelid single domain antibodies as targeting agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the preclinical success of adoptive therapy with T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed antigen receptors (CARs), certain limitations of this therapeutic approach such as the immunogenicity of the antigen binding domain, the emergence of tumor cell escape variants and the blocking...... capacity of soluble antigen still remain. Here, we address these issues using a novel CAR binding moiety based on the oligoclonal camelid single domain antibodies. A unique set of 13 single domain antibodies were selected from an immunized camel phage library based on their target specificity and binding...... to reverse multiple tumor immune evasion mechanisms, avoid CAR immunogenicity, and overcome problems in cancer gene therapy with engineered nanoconstructs....

  9. Local sequence targeting in the AID/APOBEC family differentially impacts retroviral restriction and antibody diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Rahul M; Maul, Robert W; Guminski, Amy F; McClure, Rhonda L; Gajula, Kiran S; Saribasak, Huseyin; McMahon, Moira A; Siliciano, Robert F; Gearhart, Patricia J; Stivers, James T

    2010-12-24

    Nucleic acid cytidine deaminases of the activation-induced deaminase (AID)/APOBEC family are critical players in active and innate immune responses, playing roles as target-directed, purposeful mutators. AID specifically deaminates the host immunoglobulin (Ig) locus to evolve antibody specificity, whereas its close relative, APOBEC3G (A3G), lethally mutates the genomes of retroviral pathogens such as HIV. Understanding the basis for the target-specific action of these enzymes is essential, as mistargeting poses significant risks, potentially promoting oncogenesis (AID) or fostering drug resistance (A3G). AID prefers to deaminate cytosine in WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) motifs, whereas A3G favors deamination of CCC motifs. This specificity is largely dictated by a single, divergent protein loop in the enzyme family that recognizes the DNA sequence. Through grafting of this substrate-recognition loop, we have created enzyme variants of A3G and AID with altered local targeting to directly evaluate the role of sequence specificity on immune function. We find that grafted loops placed in the A3G scaffold all produced efficient restriction of HIV but that foreign loops in the AID scaffold compromised hypermutation and class switch recombination. Local targeting, therefore, appears alterable for innate defense against retroviruses by A3G but important for adaptive antibody maturation catalyzed by AID. Notably, AID targeting within the Ig locus is proportionally correlated to its in vitro ability to target WRC sequences rather than non-WRC sequences. Although other mechanisms may also contribute, our results suggest that local sequence targeting by AID/APOBEC3 enzymes represents an elegant example of co-evolution of enzyme specificity with its target DNA sequence.

  10. Mechanisms of resistance to HER family targeting antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Wheeler, Deric L., E-mail: dlwheeler@wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of receptor tyrosine kinases consists of four members: EGFR (HER1/ErbB1), HER2/neu (ErbB2), HER3 (ErbB3) and HER4 (ErbB4). Receptor activation via ligand binding leads to downstream signaling that influence cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR and HER2 have been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), and breast cancer. With this, intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of the EGFR and HER2 by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab, panitumumab and trastuzumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domains (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Both approaches have shown considerable clinical promise. However, increasing evidence suggests that the majority of patients do not respond to these therapies, and those who show initial response ultimately become refractory to treatment. While mechanisms of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been extensively studied, resistance to monoclonal antibodies is less well understood, both in the laboratory and in the clinical setting. In this review, we discuss resistance to antibody-based therapies against the EGFR and HER2, similarities between these resistance profiles, and strategies to overcome resistance to HER family targeting monoclonal antibody therapy.

  11. Eliminating tyrosine sequence variants in CHO cell lines producing recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Lauren; Carvalhal, Veronica; Yu, X Christopher; Chan, Betty; Michels, David A; Wang, Yajun Jennifer; Shen, Amy; Ressl, Jan; Dusel, Brendon; Laird, Michael W

    2013-04-01

    Amino acid sequence variants are defined as unintended amino acid sequence changes that contribute to product variation with potential impact to product safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy. Therefore, it is important to understand the propensity for sequence variant (SV) formation during the production of recombinant proteins for therapeutic use. During the development of clinical therapeutic products, several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) produced from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells exhibited SVs at low levels (≤3%) in multiple locations throughout the mAbs. In these examples, the cell culture process depleted tyrosine, and the tyrosine residues in the recombinant mAbs were replaced with phenylalanine or histidine. In this work, it is demonstrated that tyrosine supplementation eliminated the tyrosine SVs, while early tyrosine starvation significantly increased the SV level in all mAbs tested. Additionally, it was determined that phenylalanine is the amino acid preferentially misincorporated in the absence of tyrosine over histidine, with no other amino acid misincorporated in the absence of tyrosine, phenylalanine, and histidine. The data support that the tyrosine SVs are due to mistranslation and not DNA mutation, most likely due to tRNA(Tyr) mischarging due to the structural similarities between tyrosine and phenylalanine.

  12. Engineering therapeutic antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Migyeong; Jung, Sang Taek

    2016-02-05

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most attractive therapeutic target classes because of their critical roles in intracellular signaling and their clinical relevance to a variety of diseases, including cancer, infection and inflammation. However, high conformational variability, the small exposed area of extracellular epitopes and difficulty in the preparation of GPCR antigens have delayed both the isolation of therapeutic anti-GPCR antibodies as well as studies on the structure, function and biochemical mechanisms of GPCRs. To overcome the challenges in generating highly specific anti-GPCR antibodies with enhanced efficacy and safety, various forms of antigens have been successfully designed and employed for screening with newly emerged systems based on laboratory animal immunization and high-throughput-directed evolution.

  13. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed.

  14. A High Throughput Protein Microarray Approach to Classify HIV Monoclonal Antibodies and Variant Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Y Dotsey

    Full Text Available In recent years, high throughput discovery of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs has been applied to greatly advance our understanding of the specificity, and functional activity of antibodies against HIV. Thousands of antibodies have been generated and screened in functional neutralization assays, and antibodies associated with cross-strain neutralization and passive protection in primates, have been identified. To facilitate this type of discovery, a high throughput-screening tool is needed to accurately classify mAbs, and their antigen targets. In this study, we analyzed and evaluated a prototype microarray chip comprised of the HIV-1 recombinant proteins gp140, gp120, gp41, and several membrane proximal external region peptides. The protein microarray analysis of 11 HIV-1 envelope-specific mAbs revealed diverse binding affinities and specificities across clades. Half maximal effective concentrations, generated by our chip analysis, correlated significantly (P<0.0001 with concentrations from ELISA binding measurements. Polyclonal immune responses in plasma samples from HIV-1 infected subjects exhibited different binding patterns, and reactivity against printed proteins. Examining the totality of the specificity of the humoral response in this way reveals the exquisite diversity, and specificity of the humoral response to HIV.

  15. Therapeutic antibodies: market considerations, disease targets and bioprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvin, John G; Couston, Ruairidh G; van der Walle, Christopher F

    2013-01-02

    Antibodies are well established in mainstream clinical practice and present an exciting area for collaborative research and development in industry and academia alike. In this review, we will provide an overview of the current market and an outlook to 2015, focussing on whole antibody molecules while acknowledging the next generation scaffolds containing variable fragments. The market will be discussed in the context of disease targets, particularly in the areas of oncology and immune disorders which generate the greatest revenue by a wide margin. Emerging targets include central nervous system disorders which will also stimulate new delivery strategies. It is becoming increasingly apparent that a better understanding of bioprocessing is required in order to optimize the steps involved in the preparation of a protein prior to formulation. The latter is outside the scope of this review and nor is it our intention to discuss protein delivery and pharmacokinetics. The challenges that lie ahead include the discovery of new disease targets and the development of robust bioprocessing operations.

  16. Recognition of influenza H3N2 variant virus by human neutralizing antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangaru, Sandhya; Nieusma, Travis; Kose, Nurgun; Thornburg, Natalie J.; Kaplan, Bryan S.; King, Hannah G.; Singh, Vidisha; Lampley, Rebecca M.; Cisneros, Alberto; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Lai, Lilin; Richt, Juergen A.; Webby, Richard J.; Ward, Andrew B.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2011, over 300 human cases of infection, especially in exposed children, with the influenza A H3N2 variant (H3N2v) virus that circulates in swine in the US have been reported. The structural and genetic basis for the lack of protection against H3N2v induced by vaccines containing seasonal H3N2 antigens is poorly understood. We isolated 17 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralized H3N2v virus from subjects experimentally immunized with an H3N2v candidate vaccine. Six mAbs exhibited very potent neutralizing activity (IC50 < 200 ng/ml) against the H3N2v virus but not against current human H3N2 circulating strains. Fine epitope mapping and structural characterization of antigen-antibody complexes revealed that H3N2v specificity was attributable to amino acid polymorphisms in the 150-loop and the 190-helix antigenic sites on the hemagglutinin protein. H3N2v-specific antibodies also neutralized human H3N2 influenza strains naturally circulating between 1995 and 2005. These results reveal a high level of antigenic relatedness between the swine H3N2v virus and previously circulating human strains, consistent with the fact that early human H3 seasonal strains entered the porcine population in the 1990s and reentered the human population, where they had not been circulating, as H3N2v about a decade later. The data also explain the increased susceptibility to H3N2v viruses in young children, who lack prior exposure to human seasonal strains from the 1990s. PMID:27482543

  17. Separation of monoclonal antibody charge state variants by open tubular capillary electrochromatography with immobilised protein as stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yamin; Wang, Wentao; Xiao, Xue; Jia, Li

    2016-09-30

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are highly heterogeneous and complex glycoproteins requiring powerful analytical tools for characterization and quality control. In this work, we utilize adsorbed bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a stationary phase in open tubular (OT) capillary electrochromatography for separation of charge state variants of mAbs. Poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) was used to assist fabrication of BSA coated OT column by electrostatic self-assembly. Scanning electron microscopy and electroosmotic flow measurement were carried out to characterize the as-prepared BSA coated PDDA OT columns. The electrochromatographic performance of the OT columns was evaluated by separation of basic proteins and different charge state variants of mAbs. The effects of background solution pH and concentration on separation were investigated. A rapid separation of charge state variants of mAbs was successfully achieved in the BSA coated PDDA OT column. Separation of seven variants of the mAb cetuximab was achieved using the prepared column. Two basic variants and one acidic variant of rituximab, and two basic variants and four acidic variants of trastuximab were successfully distinguished from the main forms. In addition, the columns demonstrated good repeatability and stability with the run-to-run, day-to-day and batch-to-batch relative standard deviations of migration times less than 3.7%.

  18. Shark IgNAR antibody mimotopes target a murine immunoglobulin through extended CDR3 loop structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, David P; Streltsov, Victor A; Dolezal, Olan; Hudson, Peter J; Coley, Andrew M; Foley, Michael; Proll, David F; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2008-04-01

    Mimotopes mimic the three-dimensional topology of an antigen epitope, and are frequently recognized by antibodies with affinities comparable to those obtained for the original antibody-antigen interaction. Peptides and anti-idiotypic antibodies are two classes of protein mimotopes that mimic the topology (but not necessarily the sequence) of the parental antigen. In this study, we combine these two classes by selecting mimotopes based on single domain IgNAR antibodies, which display exceptionally long CDR3 loop regions (analogous to a constrained peptide library) presented in the context of an immunoglobulin framework with adjacent and supporting CDR1 loops. By screening an in vitro phage-display library of IgNAR variable domains (V(NAR)s) against the target antigen monoclonal antibody MAb5G8, we obtained four potential mimotopes. MAb5G8 targets a linear tripeptide epitope (AYP) in the flexible signal sequence of the Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA1), and this or similar motifs were detected in the CDR loops of all four V(NAR)s. The V(NAR)s, 1-A-2, -7, -11, and -14, were demonstrated to bind specifically to this paratope by competition studies with an artificial peptide and all showed enhanced affinities (3-46 nM) compared to the parental antigen (175 nM). Crystallographic studies of recombinant proteins 1-A-7 and 1-A-11 showed that the SYP motifs on these V(NAR)s presented at the tip of the exposed CDR3 loops, ideally positioned within bulge-like structures to make contact with the MAb5G8 antibody. These loops, in particular in 1-A-11, were further stabilized by inter- and intra- loop disulphide bridges, hydrogen bonds, electrostatic interactions, and aromatic residue packing. We rationalize the higher affinity of the V(NAR)s compared to the parental antigen by suggesting that adjacent CDR1 and framework residues contribute to binding affinity, through interactions with other CDR regions on the antibody, though of course definitive support of

  19. Antibodies to variant antigens on the surfaces of infected erythrocytes are associated with protection from malaria in Ghanaian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodoo, D; Staalsoe, T; Giha, H;

    2001-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a variant antigen expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Each parasite genome contains about 40 PfEMP1 genes, but only 1 PfEMP1 gene is expressed at a given time. PfEMP1 serves as a parasite-sequestering ligand...... to endothelial cells and enables the parasites to avoid splenic passage. PfEMP1 antibodies may protect from disease by inhibiting sequestration, thus facilitating the destruction of infected erythrocytes in the spleen. In this study, we have measured antibodies in Ghanaian children to a conserved region of Pf......EMP1 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and antibodies to variant molecules on erythrocytes infected with field isolates of P. falciparum by flow cytometry. Based on close clinical monitoring, the children were grouped into those who did (susceptible) and those who did not (protected) have malaria...

  20. Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goris, An; Pauwels, Ine; Gustavsen, Marte W; van Son, Brechtje; Hilven, Kelly; Bos, Steffan D; Celius, Elisabeth Gulowsen; Berg-Hansen, Pål; Aarseth, Jan; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Barizzone, Nadia; Leone, Maurizio A; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Sorosina, Melissa; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Kockum, Ingrid; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Bedri, Sahl Khalid; Hemmer, Bernhard; Buck, Dorothea; Berthele, Achim; Knier, Benjamin; Biberacher, Viola; van Pesch, Vincent; Sindic, Christian; Bang Oturai, Annette; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Sellebjerg, Finn; Jensen, Poul Erik H; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Pérez-Boza, Jennifer; Malhotra, Sunny; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Broadley, Simon; Slee, Mark; Taylor, Bruce; Kermode, Allan G; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Sawcer, Stephen J; Andreassen, Bettina Kullle; Dubois, Bénédicte; Harbo, Hanne F

    2015-03-01

    Immunological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis include the production of antibodies in the central nervous system, expressed as presence of oligoclonal bands and/or an increased immunoglobulin G index-the level of immunoglobulin G in the cerebrospinal fluid compared to serum. However, the underlying differences between oligoclonal band-positive and -negative patients with multiple sclerosis and reasons for variability in immunoglobulin G index are not known. To identify genetic factors influencing the variation in the antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, we have performed a genome-wide association screen in patients collected from nine countries for two traits, presence or absence of oligoclonal bands (n = 3026) and immunoglobulin G index levels (n = 938), followed by a replication in 3891 additional patients. We replicate previously suggested association signals for oligoclonal band status in the major histocompatibility complex region for the rs9271640*A-rs6457617*G haplotype, correlated with HLA-DRB1*1501, and rs34083746*G, correlated with HLA-DQA1*0301 (P comparing two haplotypes = 8.88 × 10(-16)). Furthermore, we identify a novel association signal of rs9807334, near the ELAC1/SMAD4 genes, for oligoclonal band status (P = 8.45 × 10(-7)). The previously reported association of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus with immunoglobulin G index reaches strong evidence for association in this data set (P = 3.79 × 10(-37)). We identify two novel associations in the major histocompatibility complex region with immunoglobulin G index: the rs9271640*A-rs6457617*G haplotype (P = 1.59 × 10(-22)), shared with oligoclonal band status, and an additional independent effect of rs6457617*G (P = 3.68 × 10(-6)). Variants identified in this study account for up to 2-fold differences in the odds of being oligoclonal band positive and 7.75% of the variation in immunoglobulin G index. Both traits are associated with clinical features of disease such

  1. Delivering Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides to Target Telomerase Splice Variants in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radan, Lida; Hughes, Chris S; Teichroeb, Jonathan H; Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Betts, Dean H

    2016-01-01

    Morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) are an innovative tool that provides a means for examining and modifying gene expression outcomes by antisense interaction with targeted RNA transcripts. The site-specific nature of their binding facilitates focused modulation to alter splice variant expression patterns. Here we describe the steric-blocking of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) Δα and Δβ splice variants using MO to examine cellular outcomes related to pluripotency and differentiation in human embryonic stem cells.

  2. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  3. Targeting BCL1 lymphoma with anti-idiotype antibodies: biodistribution kinetics of directly labeled antibodies and bispecific antibody-targeted bivalent haptens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetti, C; Rouvier, E; Gautherot, E; Loucif, E; Barbet, J; Le Doussal, J M

    1997-06-11

    The mouse BCL1 lymphoma model has been used for evaluating immunotherapy with anti-idiotype (anti-Id) antibodies, including Id immunisation, IgG therapy and bispecific (Bs) antibody-targeted cytotoxicity. Here, we provide quantitative data on the targeting of small (25 +/- 12 mg) intrasplenic BCL1 tumours, using anti-Id IgG, F(ab')2 and anti-Id x anti-hapten BsF(ab')2 covalently labelled with 125iodine, as well as noncovalent complexes of BsF(ab')2 and 125I-labelled bivalent hapten. The results are the following: 1) up to 115% of the injected dose per gram (% ID/g) of spleen can be localised in the first hour, corresponding to approximately 600% ID/g of tumour; 2) localisation is specific for cell-surface Id; 3) optimal doses can overcome circulating Id; 4) circulating Id markedly increases the catabolism of IgG, thus impairing tumour localisation; 5) bivalent reagents are internalised by the target cells; 6) iodine covalently bound to bivalent antibodies [IgG, F(ab')2] is rapidly (T(1/2): 6-9 hr) released from the tumour; in contrast, the bivalent hapten is retained for a longer time (T(1/2): 25 hr); and 7) in the absence of bivalent hapten, the monovalent BsF(ab')2 is not rapidly internalised and dissociates from tumour cell-surface Id. Our results suggest that monovalent anti-Id, lacking Fc, can efficiently be targeted to the BCL1 tumour surface. For radioimmunotherapy, the intracellular targeting of catabolism-resistant 125I-labelled bivalent hapten provides optimal tissue selectivity.

  4. Characterization of cysteine related variants in an IgG2 antibody by LC-MS with an automated data analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuling; Bailey, Robert; Nightlinger, Nancy; Gillespie, Alison; Balland, Alain; Rogers, Richard

    2015-08-01

    In this communication, a high-throughput method for automated data analysis of cysteine-related product quality attributes (PQAs) in IgG2 antibodies is reported. This method leverages recent advances in the relative quantification of PQAs to facilitate the characterization of disulfide variants and free sulfhydryls (SHs) in IgG2 antibodies. The method uses samples labeled with a mass tag (N-ethyl maleimide [NEM]) followed by enzymatic digestion under non-reducing conditions to maintain the cysteine connectivity. The digested IgG2 samples are separated and detected by mass spectrometry (MS) and the resulting peptide map is analyzed in an automated fashion using Pinpoint software (Thermo Scientific). Previous knowledge of IgG2 disulfide structures can be fed into the Pinpoint software to create workbooks for various disulfide linkages and hinge disulfide variants. In addition, the NEM mass tag can be added to the workbooks for targeted analysis of labeled cysteine-containing peptides. The established Pinpoint workbooks are a high-throughput approach to quantify relative abundances of unpaired cysteines and disulfide linkages, including complicated hinge disulfide variants. This approach is especially efficient for comparing large sets of similar samples such as those created in comparability and stability studies or chromatographic fractions. Here, the high throughput method is applied to quantify the relative abundance of hinge disulfide variants and unpaired cysteines in the IgG2 fractions from non-reduced reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (nrRP-HPLC). The LC-MS data analyzed by the Pinpoint workbook suggests that the nrRP-HPLC separated peaks contain hinge disulfide isoforms and free cysteine pairs for each major disulfide isoform structure.

  5. An abundance of rare functional variants in 202 drug target genes sequenced in 14.002 people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Matthew R.; Wegmann, Daniel; Ehm, Margaret G.;

    2012-01-01

    Rare genetic variants contribute to complex disease risk; however, the abundance of rare variants in human populations remains unknown. We explored this spectrum of variation by sequencing 202 genes encoding drug targets in 14,002 individuals. We find rare variants are abundant (1 every 17 bases)...

  6. Monoclonal Antibody Fragments for Targeting Therapeutics to Growth Plate Cartilage | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NICHD seeks statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize treatment of skeletal disorders using targeting antibodies.

  7. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding the...

  8. The monoclonal antibody SM5-1 recognizes a fibronectin variant which is widely expressed in melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yajun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have generated the monoclonal antibody SM5-1 by using a subtractive immunization protocol of human melanoma. This antibody exhibits a high sensitivity for primary melanomas of 99% (248/250 tested and for metastatic melanoma of 96% (146/151 tested in paraffin embedded sections. This reactivity is superior to the one obtained by HMB-45, anti-MelanA or anti-Tyrosinase and is comparable to anti-S100. However, as compared to anti-S100, the antibody SM5-1 is highly specific for melanocytic lesions since 40 different neoplasms were found to be negative for SM5-1 by immunohistochemistry. The antigen recognized by SM5-1 is unknown. Methods In order to characterize the antigen recognized by mAb SM5-1, a cDNA library was constructed from the metastatic human melanoma cell line SMMUpos in the Uni-ZAP lambda phage and screened by mAb SM5-1. The cDNA clones identified by this approach were then sequenced and subsequently analyzed. Results Sequence analysis of nine independent overlapping clones (length 3100–5600 bp represent fibronectin cDNA including the ED-A, but not the ED-B region which are produced by alternative splicing. The 89aa splicing variant of the IIICS region was found in 8/9 clones and the 120aa splicing variant in 1/9 clones, both of which are included in the CS1 region of fibronectin being involved in melanoma cell adhesion and spreading. Conclusion The molecule recognized by SM5-1 is a melanoma associated FN variant expressed by virtually all primary and metastatic melanomas and may play an important role in melanoma formation and progression. This antibody is therefore not only of value in immunohistochemistry, but potentially also for diagnostic imaging and immunotherapy.

  9. Research on spatial-variant property of bistatic ISAR imaging plane of space target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭宝锋; 王俊岭; 高梅国; 尚朝轩; 傅雄军

    2015-01-01

    The imaging plane of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) is the projection plane of the target. When taking an image using the range-Doppler theory, the imaging plane may have a spatial-variant property, which causes the change of scatter’s projection position and results in migration through resolution cells. In this study, we focus on the spatial-variant property of the imaging plane of a three-axis-stabilized space target. The innovative contributions are as follows. 1) The target motion model in orbit is provided based on a two-body model. 2) The instantaneous imaging plane is determined by the method of vector analysis. 3) Three Euler angles are introduced to describe the spatial-variant property of the imaging plane, and the image quality is analyzed. The simulation results confirm the analysis of the spatial-variant property. The research in this study is significant for the selection of the imaging segment, and provides the evidence for the following data processing and compensation algorithm.

  10. Target-specific variants of Flp recombinase mediate genome engineering reactions in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Riddhi; Li, Feng; Voziyanova, Eugenia; Voziyanov, Yuri

    2015-09-01

    Genome engineering relies on DNA-modifying enzymes that are able to locate a DNA sequence of interest and initiate a desired genome rearrangement. Currently, the field predominantly utilizes site-specific DNA nucleases that depend on the host DNA repair machinery to complete a genome modification task. We show here that genome engineering approaches that employ target-specific variants of the self-sufficient, versatile site-specific DNA recombinase Flp can be developed into promising alternatives. We demonstrate that the Flp variant evolved to recombine an FRT-like sequence, FL-IL10A, which is located upstream of the human interleukin-10 gene, and can target this sequence in the model setting of Chinese hamster ovary and human embryonic kidney 293 cells. This target-specific Flp variant is able to perform the integration reaction and, when paired with another recombinase, the dual recombinase-mediated cassette exchange reaction. The efficiency of the integration reaction in human cells can be enhanced by 'humanizing' the Flp variant gene and by adding the nuclear localization sequence to the recombinase.

  11. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Torkashvand

    Full Text Available Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44 cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds.

  12. Geographical and temporal conservation of antibody recognition of Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten A; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Lusingu, John

    2004-01-01

    The slow acquisition of protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria probably reflects the extensive diversity of important antigens. The variant surface antigens (VSA) that mediate parasite adhesion to a range of host molecules are regarded as important targets of acquired protective immunit...

  13. Protein adsorption on ion exchange resins and monoclonal antibody charge variant modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guélat, Bertrand; Khalaf, Rushd; Lattuada, Marco; Costioli, Matteo; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-05-20

    A novel multicomponent adsorption equilibrium model for proteins on ion-exchange resins is developed on a statistical thermodynamic basis including surface coverage effects and protein-resin and protein-protein interactions. The resulting model exhibits a general competitive Langmuirian behavior and was applied to the study and optimization of the separation of monoclonal antibody charge variants on two strong cation exchangers. The model accounts explicitly for the effect of both pH and salt concentration, and its parameters can be determined in diluted conditions, that is, through physically sound assumptions, all model parameters can be obtained using solely experiments in diluted conditions, and be used to make predictions in overloaded conditions. The parameterization of the model and optimization of the separation is based on a two-step approach. First, gradient experiments in diluted conditions are undertaken in order to determine the model parameters. Based on these experiments and on information about the proteins of interest and the stationary phase used, all the model parameters can be estimated. Second, using the parameterized model, an initial Pareto optimization is undertaken where overloaded operating conditions are investigated. Experiments from this Pareto set are then used to refine the estimation of the model parameters. A second Pareto optimization can then be undertaken, this time with the refined parameters. This can be repeated until a satisfactory set of model parameters is found. This iterative approach is shown to be extremely efficient and to provide large amounts of knowledge based on only a few experiments. It is shown that due to the strong physical foundation of the model and the very low number of adjustable parameters, the number of iterations is expected to be at most two or three. Furthermore, the model based tool is improved as more experimental knowledge is provided, allowing for better estimations of the chromatographic

  14. Investigating the Interaction between the Neonatal Fc Receptor and Monoclonal Antibody Variants by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Larraillet, Vincent; Schlothauer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    to map sites perturbed by binding on both partners of the IgG-FcRn complex. Several regions in the antibody Fc region and the FcRn were protected from exchange upon complex formation, in good agreement with previous crystallographic studies of FcRn in complex with the Fc fragment. Interestingly, we found......The recycling of immunoglobulins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is of crucial importance in the maintenance of antibody levels in plasma and is responsible for the long half-lives of endogenous and recombinant monoclonal antibodies. From a therapeutic point of view there is great interest...... in understanding and modulating the IgG-FcRn interaction to optimize antibody pharmacokinetics and ultimately improve efficacy and safety. Here we studied the interaction between a full-length human IgG1 and human FcRn via hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and targeted electron transfer dissociation...

  15. Surface plasmon resonance-based competition assay to assess the sera reactivity of variants of humanized antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Noreen R; Schuck, Peter; Schlom, Jeffrey; Kashmiri, Syed V S

    2002-10-15

    While clinical trials are the only way to evaluate the immunogenicity, in patients, of murine or genetically engineered humanized variants of a potentially therapeutic or diagnostic monoclonal antibody (MAb), ethical and logistical considerations of clinical trials do not permit the evaluation of variants of a given MAb that are generated to minimize its immunogenicity. The most promising variant could be identified by comparing the reactivities of the parental antibody (Ab) and its variants to the sera of patients containing anti-variable region (anti-VR) Abs to the administered parental Ab. We have developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based assay to monitor the binding of the sera anti-VR Abs to the parental Ab and the inhibition of this binding by the variants. SPR biosensors allow the real-time detection and monitoring of the binding between an immobilized protein and its soluble ligand without the need for prior purification and labeling of the mobile analyte. This new assay requires no radiolabeling, is relatively less time-consuming, and uses only small amounts of serum (5-20 microl of diluted serum) through a new microfluidic sample handling technique. To validate the assay, we have tested the relative reactivities of the CDR-grafted anti-carcinoma Ab, HuCC49, and its two variants, designated V5 and V10, to the sera of patients who were earlier administered radiolabeled murine CC49 in a clinical trial. A comparison of IC(50)s (the concentrations of the competitor Abs required for 50% inhibition of the binding of sera to immobilized HuCC49) showed that V5 and V10 were less reactive than HuCC49 to the three patients' sera tested. We have also demonstrated, for the first time, the specific detection and comparison of relative amounts of anti-VR Abs present in the sera of different patients without prior removal of anti-murine Fc Abs and/or circulating antigen. This may facilitate the rapid screening, for the presence of anti-VR Abs, of the

  16. Emergence of Ebola Virus Escape Variants in Infected Nonhuman Primates Treated with the MB-003 Antibody Cocktail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugelman, Jeffrey R; Kugelman-Tonos, Johanny; Ladner, Jason T; Pettit, James; Keeton, Carolyn M; Nagle, Elyse R; Garcia, Karla Y; Froude, Jeffrey W; Kuehne, Ana I; Kuhn, Jens H; Bavari, Sina; Zeitlin, Larry; Dye, John M; Olinger, Gene G; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Palacios, Gustavo F

    2015-09-29

    MB-003, a plant-derived monoclonal antibody cocktail used effectively in treatment of Ebola virus infection in non-human primates, was unable to protect two of six animals when initiated 1 or 2 days post-infection. We characterized a mechanism of viral escape in one of the animals, after observation of two clusters of genomic mutations that resulted in five nonsynonymous mutations in the monoclonal antibody target sites. These mutations were linked to a reduction in antibody binding and later confirmed to be present in a viral isolate that was not neutralized in vitro. Retrospective evaluation of a second independent study allowed the identification of a similar case. Four SNPs in previously identified positions were found in this second fatality, suggesting that genetic drift could be a potential cause for treatment failure. These findings highlight the importance selecting different target domains for each component of the cocktail to minimize the potential for viral escape.

  17. Inhibitory Mechanism of an Allosteric Antibody Targeting the Glucagon Receptor*

    OpenAIRE

    Mukund, Susmith; Shang, Yonglei; Clarke, Holly J.; Madjidi, Azadeh; Jacob E Corn; Kates, Lance; Kolumam, Ganesh; Chiang, Vicky; Luis, Elizabeth; Murray, Jeremy; Zhang, Yingnan; Hötzel, Isidro; Koth, Christopher M.; Allan, Bernard B.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated glucagon levels and increased hepatic glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling contribute to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. We have identified a monoclonal antibody that inhibits GCGR, a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), through a unique allosteric mechanism. Receptor inhibition is mediated by the binding of this antibody to two distinct sites that lie outside of the glucagon binding cleft. One site consists of a patch of residues that are surface-exposed on the face of the ext...

  18. Genetic Variants Identified from Epilepsy of Unknown Etiology in Chinese Children by Targeted Exome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Du, Xiaonan; Bin, Rao; Yu, Shanshan; Xia, Zhezhi; Zheng, Guo; Zhong, Jianmin; Zhang, Yunjian; Jiang, Yong-hui; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Genetic factors play a major role in the etiology of epilepsy disorders. Recent genomics studies using next generation sequencing (NGS) technique have identified a large number of genetic variants including copy number (CNV) and single nucleotide variant (SNV) in a small set of genes from individuals with epilepsy. These discoveries have contributed significantly to evaluate the etiology of epilepsy in clinic and lay the foundation to develop molecular specific treatment. However, the molecular basis for a majority of epilepsy patients remains elusive, and furthermore, most of these studies have been conducted in Caucasian children. Here we conducted a targeted exome-sequencing of 63 trios of Chinese epilepsy families using a custom-designed NGS panel that covers 412 known and candidate genes for epilepsy. We identified pathogenic and likely pathogenic variants in 15 of 63 (23.8%) families in known epilepsy genes including SCN1A, CDKL5, STXBP1, CHD2, SCN3A, SCN9A, TSC2, MBD5, POLG and EFHC1. More importantly, we identified likely pathologic variants in several novel candidate genes such as GABRE, MYH1, and CLCN6. Our results provide the evidence supporting the application of custom-designed NGS panel in clinic and indicate a conserved genetic susceptibility for epilepsy between Chinese and Caucasian children. PMID:28074849

  19. Inhibitory mechanism of an allosteric antibody targeting the glucagon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, Susmith; Shang, Yonglei; Clarke, Holly J; Madjidi, Azadeh; Corn, Jacob E; Kates, Lance; Kolumam, Ganesh; Chiang, Vicky; Luis, Elizabeth; Murray, Jeremy; Zhang, Yingnan; Hötzel, Isidro; Koth, Christopher M; Allan, Bernard B

    2013-12-13

    Elevated glucagon levels and increased hepatic glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling contribute to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. We have identified a monoclonal antibody that inhibits GCGR, a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), through a unique allosteric mechanism. Receptor inhibition is mediated by the binding of this antibody to two distinct sites that lie outside of the glucagon binding cleft. One site consists of a patch of residues that are surface-exposed on the face of the extracellular domain (ECD) opposite the ligand-binding cleft, whereas the second binding site consists of residues in the αA helix of the ECD. A docking model suggests that the antibody does not occlude the ligand-binding cleft. We solved the crystal structure of GCGR ECD containing a naturally occurring G40S mutation and found a shift in the register of the αA helix that prevents antibody binding. We also found that alterations in the αA helix impact the normal function of GCGR. We present a model for the allosteric inhibition of GCGR by a monoclonal antibody that may form the basis for the development of allosteric modulators for the treatment of diabetes and other class B GPCR-related diseases.

  20. Rational design of antibodies targeting specific epitopes within intrinsically disordered proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormanni, Pietro; Aprile, Francesco A.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are powerful tools in life sciences research, as well as in diagnostic and therapeutic applications, because of their ability to bind given molecules with high affinity and specificity. Using current methods, however, it is laborious and sometimes difficult to generate antibodies to target specific epitopes within a protein, in particular if these epitopes are not effective antigens. Here we present a method to rationally design antibodies to enable them to bind virtually any chosen disordered epitope in a protein. The procedure consists in the sequence-based design of one or more complementary peptides targeting a selected disordered epitope and the subsequent grafting of such peptides on an antibody scaffold. We illustrate the method by designing six single-domain antibodies to bind different epitopes within three disease-related intrinsically disordered proteins and peptides (α-synuclein, Aβ42, and IAPP). Our results show that all these designed antibodies bind their targets with good affinity and specificity. As an example of an application, we show that one of these antibodies inhibits the aggregation of α-synuclein at substoichiometric concentrations and that binding occurs at the selected epitope. Taken together, these results indicate that the design strategy that we propose makes it possible to obtain antibodies targeting given epitopes in disordered proteins or protein regions. PMID:26216991

  1. Rational design of antibodies targeting specific epitopes within intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormanni, Pietro; Aprile, Francesco A; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-08-11

    Antibodies are powerful tools in life sciences research, as well as in diagnostic and therapeutic applications, because of their ability to bind given molecules with high affinity and specificity. Using current methods, however, it is laborious and sometimes difficult to generate antibodies to target specific epitopes within a protein, in particular if these epitopes are not effective antigens. Here we present a method to rationally design antibodies to enable them to bind virtually any chosen disordered epitope in a protein. The procedure consists in the sequence-based design of one or more complementary peptides targeting a selected disordered epitope and the subsequent grafting of such peptides on an antibody scaffold. We illustrate the method by designing six single-domain antibodies to bind different epitopes within three disease-related intrinsically disordered proteins and peptides (α-synuclein, Aβ42, and IAPP). Our results show that all these designed antibodies bind their targets with good affinity and specificity. As an example of an application, we show that one of these antibodies inhibits the aggregation of α-synuclein at substoichiometric concentrations and that binding occurs at the selected epitope. Taken together, these results indicate that the design strategy that we propose makes it possible to obtain antibodies targeting given epitopes in disordered proteins or protein regions.

  2. Insights into the molecular basis of a bispecific antibody's target selectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Mazor, Yariv; Hansen, Anna; Yang, Chunning; Partha S Chowdhury; Wang, Jihong; Stephens, Geoffrey; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies constitute a valuable class of therapeutics owing to their ability to bind 2 distinct targets. Dual targeting is thought to enhance biological efficacy, limit escape mechanisms, and increase target selectivity via a strong avidity effect mediated by concurrent binding to both antigens on the surface of the same cell. However, factors that regulate the extent of target selectivity are not well understood. We show that dual targeting alone is not sufficient to promote effi...

  3. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowall, S. D.; Graham, V. A.; Corbin-Lickfett, K.; Empig, C.; Schlunegger, K.; Bruce, C. B.; Easterbrook, L.; Hewson, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab) has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity against Ebola virus. PMID:25815346

  4. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Dowall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity against Ebola virus.

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis specific anti-Sa antibodies target citrullinated vimentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenaar, E.R.; Despres, N.; Lapointe, E.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Lora, M.; Senshu, T.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Menard, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    Antibodies directed to the Sa antigen are highly specific for rheumatoid arthritis ( RA) and can be detected in approximately 40% of RA sera. The antigen, a doublet of protein bands of about 50 kDa, is present in placenta and in RA synovial tissue. Although it has been stated that the Sa antigen is

  6. Detection of antibodies to variant antigens on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes by flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, T; Giha, H A; Dodoo, D;

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Naturally induced antibodies binding to surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes can be detected by direct agglutination of infected erythrocytes or by indirect immunofluorescence on intact, unfixed, infected erythrocytes. Agglutinating antibodies have previously...... been shown to recognise Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). This protein is inserted by the parasite into the host cell membrane and mediates the adhesion to the venular endothelium of the host organism in vivo. METHODS: Erythrocytes infected at high parasitaemias...... with ethidium-bromide-labelled mature forms of P. falciparum parasites were sequentially exposed to immune plasma, goat anti-human immunoglobulin (Ig) G, and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated rabbit anti-goat Ig. Plasma antibodies recognising antigens exposed on the surface of parasitised erythrocytes were...

  7. Using llama derived single domain antibodies to target botulinum neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Marla D.; Anderson, George P.; Bernstein, Rachael D.; Liu, Jinny L.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2010-04-01

    Llama serum contains both conventional IgG as well as unique forms of antibody that contain only heavy chains where antigen binding is mediated through a single variable domain. These variable domains can be expressed recombinantly and are referred to as single domain antibodies (sdAb). SdAb are among the smallest known naturally derived antigen binding fragments, possess good solubility, thermal stability, and can refold after heat and chemical denaturation. Llamas were immunized with either BoNT A or B toxoid and phage display libraries prepared. Single domain antibodies (sdAb) that were able to detect botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A and B were selected from their respective libraries. Here, the binders obtained by panning the BoNT B library on either BoNT B toxoid or BoNT B complex toxoid coated plates or BoNT B toxin coupled microspheres are described. Using these panning methods, we selected for binders that showed specificity for BoNT B. Phage displayed binders were screened, moved to a protein expression vector and soluble sdAb was produced. Using a Luminex flow cytometer binders were evaluated in direct binding assays. We have exploited the unique properties of sdAb and used them as biological recognition elements in immuno-based sensors that can detect BoNT B.

  8. Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goris, An; Pauwels, Ine; Gustavsen, Marte W

    2015-01-01

    Immunological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis include the production of antibodies in the central nervous system, expressed as presence of oligoclonal bands and/or an increased immunoglobulin G index-the level of immunoglobulin G in the cerebrospinal fluid compared to serum. However, the underlyi...... in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, including 6950 patients. We confirm that genetic factors underlie these antibody levels and identify both the major histocompatibility complex and immunoglobulin heavy chain region as major determinants....... differences between oligoclonal band-positive and -negative patients with multiple sclerosis and reasons for variability in immunoglobulin G index are not known. To identify genetic factors influencing the variation in the antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, we have performed...... of being oligoclonal band positive and 7.75% of the variation in immunoglobulin G index. Both traits are associated with clinical features of disease such as female gender, age at onset and severity. This is the largest study population so far investigated for the genetic influence on antibody levels...

  9. Targeted deep resequencing identifies coding variants in the PEAR1 gene that play a role in platelet aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonhee Kim

    Full Text Available Platelet aggregation is heritable, and genome-wide association studies have detected strong associations with a common intronic variant of the platelet endothelial aggregation receptor1 (PEAR1 gene both in African American and European American individuals. In this study, we used a sequencing approach to identify additional exonic variants in PEAR1 that may also determine variability in platelet aggregation in the GeneSTAR Study. A 0.3 Mb targeted region on chromosome 1q23.1 including the entire PEAR1 gene was Sanger sequenced in 104 subjects (45% male, 49% African American, age = 52±13 selected on the basis of hyper- and hypo- aggregation across three different agonists (collagen, epinephrine, and adenosine diphosphate. Single-variant and multi-variant burden tests for association were performed. Of the 235 variants identified through sequencing, 61 were novel, and three of these were missense variants. More rare variants (MAF<5% were noted in African Americans compared to European Americans (108 vs. 45. The common intronic GWAS-identified variant (rs12041331 demonstrated the most significant association signal in African Americans (p = 4.020×10(-4; no association was seen for additional exonic variants in this group. In contrast, multi-variant burden tests indicated that exonic variants play a more significant role in European Americans (p = 0.0099 for the collective coding variants compared to p = 0.0565 for intronic variant rs12041331. Imputation of the individual exonic variants in the rest of the GeneSTAR European American cohort (N = 1,965 supports the results noted in the sequenced discovery sample: p = 3.56×10(-4, 2.27×10(-7, 5.20×10(-5 for coding synonymous variant rs56260937 and collagen, epinephrine and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation, respectively. Sequencing approaches confirm that a common intronic variant has the strongest association with platelet aggregation in African Americans

  10. Precipitation effects on the selection of suitable non-variant targets intended for atmospheric correction of satellite remotely sensed imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Retalis, Adrianos; Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Michaelides, Silas

    2013-09-01

    One of the most well-established atmospheric correction methods of satellite imagery is the use of the empirical line method using non-variant targets. Non-variant targets serve as pseudo-invariant targets since their reflectance values are stable across time. A recent adaptation of the empirical line method incorporates the use of ground reflectance measurements of selected non-variant targets. Most of the users are not aware of the existing conditions of the pseudo-invariant targets; i.e., whether they are dry or wet. Any omission of such effects may cause erroneous results; therefore, remote sensing users must be aware of such effects. This study assessed the effects of precipitation on five types of commonly located surfaces, including asphalt, concrete and sand, intended as pseudo-invariant targets for atmospheric correction. Spectroradiometric measurements were taken in wet and dry conditions to obtain the spectral signatures of the targets, from January 2010 to May 2011 (46 campaigns). An atmospheric correction of eleven Landsat TM/ETM + satellite images using the empirical line method was conducted. To identify the effects of precipitation, a comparison was conducted of the atmospheric path radiance component for wet and dry conditions. It was found that precipitation conditions such as rainfall affected the reflectance values of the surfaces, especially sand. Therefore, precipitation conditions need to be considered when using non-variant targets in atmospheric correction methods.

  11. A combinatorial mutagenesis approach for functional epitope mapping on phage-displayed target antigen: application to antibodies against epidermal growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Yanelys Cabrera; Pupo, Amaury; Rojas, Gertrudis

    2014-01-01

    Although multiple different procedures to characterize the epitopes recognized by antibodies have been developed, site-directed mutagenesis remains the method of choice to define the energetic contribution of antigen residues to binding. These studies are useful to identify critical residues and to delineate functional maps of the epitopes. However, they tend to underestimate the roles of residues that are not critical for binding on their own, but contribute to the formation of the target epitope in an additive, or even cooperative, way. Mapping antigenic determinants with a diffuse energetic landscape, which establish multiple individually weak interactions with the antibody paratope, resulting in high affinity and specificity recognition of the epitope as a whole, is thus technically challenging. The current work was aimed at developing a combinatorial strategy to overcome the limitations of site-directed mutagenesis, relying on comprehensive randomization of discrete antigenic regions within phage-displayed antigen libraries. Two model antibodies recognizing epidermal growth factor were used to validate the mapping platform. Abrogation of antibody recognition due to the introduction of simultaneous replacements was able to show the involvement of particular amino acid clusters in epitope formation. The abundance of some of the original residues (or functionally equivalent amino acids sharing their physicochemical properties) among the set of mutated antigen variants selected on a given antibody highlighted their contributions and allowed delineation of a detailed functional map of the corresponding epitope. The use of the combinatorial approach could be expanded to map the interactions between other antigens/antibodies.

  12. Humanization of high-affinity antibodies targeting glypican-3 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Ho, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We have generated a group of high-affinity mouse monoclonal antibodies targeting GPC3. Here, we report the humanization and testing of these antibodies for clinical development. We compared the affinity and cytotoxicity of recombinant immunotoxins containing mouse single-chain variable regions fused with a Pseudomonas toxin. To humanize the mouse Fvs, we grafted the combined KABAT/IMGT complementarity determining regions (CDR) into a human IgG germline framework. Interestingly, we found that the proline at position 41, a non-CDR residue in heavy chain variable regions (VH), is important for humanization of mouse antibodies. We also showed that two humanized anti-GPC3 antibodies (hYP7 and hYP9.1b) in the IgG format induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent-cytotoxicity in GPC3-positive cancer cells. The hYP7 antibody was tested and showed inhibition of HCC xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. This study successfully humanizes and validates high affinity anti-GPC3 antibodies and sets a foundation for future development of these antibodies in various clinical formats in the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:27667400

  13. Clinical Associations of Biallelic and Monoallelic TNFRSF13B Variants in Italian Primary Antibody Deficiency Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Pulvirenti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the prevalence of TNFRSF13B mutations and the clinical correlates in an Italian cohort of 189 CVID, 67 IgAD patients, and 330 healthy controls to substantiate the role of TACI genetic testing in diagnostic workup. We found that 11% of CVID and 13% of IgAD carried at least one mutated TNFRSF13B allele. Seven per cent of CVID had monoallelic-mutations and 4% had biallelic-mutations. The frequency of C104R monoallelic-mutations was not higher than that found in healthy controls. Biallelic-mutations were exclusively found in CVID. CVID patients carrying monoallelic-mutations had an increased prevalence of lymphadenopathy, granulomata, and autoimmune cytopenias. CVID carrying biallelic-mutations had a low prevalence of autoimmunity in comparison with TACI wild-type CVID. Moreover, biallelic-mutated CVID had higher frequency of switched memory B-cells and higher IgM and IgA antibodies to polysaccharide antigens than TACI wild-type and monoallelic-mutated CVID. TACI-mutated IgAD patients had only monoallelic-mutations and did not display clinical difference from IgAD wild-type patients. In conclusion, TNFRSF13B genetic screening of antibody deficiencies may allow the identification of mutational patterns. However, as with counseling for risk assessment, geneticists should be aware that the interpretation of genetic testing for TACI mutations is difficult and the potential impact on clinical management is still limited.

  14. The neutralization sensitivity of viruses representing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants of diverse subtypes from early in infection is dependent on producer cell, as well as characteristics of the specific antibody and envelope variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provine, Nicholas M; Cortez, Valerie; Chohan, Vrasha; Overbaugh, Julie

    2012-05-25

    Neutralization properties of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) are often defined using pseudoviruses grown in transformed cells, which are not biologically relevant HIV-1 producer cells. Little information exists on how these viruses compare to viruses produced in primary lymphocytes, particularly for globally relevant HIV-1 strains. Therefore, replication-competent chimeras encoding envelope variants from the dominant HIV-1 subtypes (A, C, and D) obtained early after infection were generated and the neutralization properties explored. Pseudoviruses generated in 293T cells were the most sensitive to antibody neutralization. Replicating viruses generated in primary lymphocytes were most resistant to neutralization by plasma antibodies and most monoclonal antibodies (b12, 4E10, 2F5, VRC01). These differences were not associated with differences in envelope content. Surprisingly, the virus source did not impact neutralization sensitivity of most viruses to PG9. These findings suggest that producer cell type has a major effect on neutralization sensitivity, but in an antibody dependent manner.

  15. Antibodies to autoantigen targets in myasthenia and their value in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Dedaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is a classic autoimmune disease, which clinical manifestations in the form of weakness and abnormal muscle fatigue, due to the damaging effect of polyclonal antibodies to different structures of the neuromuscular synapse and muscles. The study of autoimmune substrate with myasthenia is routine in many clinics dealing with the problems of neuromuscular pathology, and the identification of high concentration of serum antibodies to a number of antigenic structures is the gold standard in diagnosis.Determination of serum antibodies to various autoimmune targets is an important tool in clinical practice. The majority of patients shows the high concentration of antibodies to AchR that gives the opportunity to use it as an important diagnostic criterion. The specificity of changes in the concentration of AchR-antibodies due to pathogenetic treatment allows to objectify the suppression of autoimmune aggression and evaluate the reliability of remission. However, the absence of AchR-antibodies when there are clear clinical and electromyography signs of myasthenia gravis suggests an autoimmune attack against a number of other targets, the most studied of which is the MuSK. On the contrary, patients with myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma, almost always have a higher level of AchR-antibodies. The presence of thymoma is accompanied by the generation of antibodies to titin and RyR, which is also observed in persons with late-onset myasthenia without thymoma. High concentration of antibodies to these structures can be interpreted as a reliable sign of thymoma in patients younger than 60 years.

  16. Semiautomated pH gradient ion-exchange chromatography of monoclonal antibody charge variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Mohammad; Shellie, Robert A; Hilder, Emily F; Lacher, Nathan A; Haddad, Paul R

    2014-10-07

    A new approach using a chromatography system equipped with isocratic pumps and an electrolytic eluent generator (EG) is introduced, replacing external pH gradient delivery using conventional gradient systems, in which bottled buffers with preadjusted pH are mixed using a gradient pump. The EG is capable of generating high purity base or acid required for online preparation of the buffer at the point of use, utilizing deionized water as the only carrier stream. Typically, the buffer was generated from online titration of a reagent composed of low molecular weight amines. The reagent was delivered isocratically into a static mixing tee, where it was titrated to the required pH with electrolytically generated base or acid. The required pH gradient was thus conveniently generated by electrically controlling the concentration of titrant. Also, since the pH was adjusted at the point of use, this approach offered enhanced throughput in terms of eluent preparation time and labor, and with a more reproducible pH profile. The performance of the system was demonstrated by running pH gradients ranging from pH 8.2 to 10.9 on a polymer monolith cation-exchange column for high throughput profiling of charge heterogeneity of intact, basic therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. A high degree of flexibility in modulating the key parameters of the pH gradient, including the buffer concentration, the pH gradient slope and the operating pH range was demonstrated. This enabled fine-tuning of the separation conditions for each individual antibody in order to enhance the chromatographic resolution.

  17. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  18. Splicing variant of AIMP2 as an effective target against chemoresistant ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Woo Choi; Jeong-Won Lee; Jun Ki Kim; Hye-Kyung Jeon; Jung-Joo Choi; Dae Gyu Kim; Byoung-Gie Kim

    2012-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a main cause for the failure of cancer management and intensive investigation is on-going to control chemoresistant (CR) cancers.Although NF-κB has been suggested as one of the potential targets to alleviate chemoresistance of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC),direct targeting of NF-κB may result in an unexpected effect due to the complex regulatory network via NF-κB.Here we show that AIMP2-DX2,a splicing variant of tumor suppressor AIMP2,can be a therapeutic target to control CR EOC.AIMP2-DX2 was often highly expressed in CR EOC both in vitro and in vivo.AIMP2-DX2 compromised the tumor necrosis factor alpha-dependent pro-apoptotic activity of AIMP2 via the competitive inhibition of AIMP2 binding to TRAF2 that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of NF-κB.The direct delivery of siRNA against AIMP2-DX2 into abdominal metastatic tumors of ovarian cancer using a microneedle converged on microendoscopy significantly suppressed the growth rate of tumors.The treated cancer tissues showed an enhanced apoptosis and the decreased TRAF2 level.Thus,we suggest that the downregulation of AIMP2-DX2 can be a potent adjuvant therapeutic approach for CR EOC that resulted from an aberrant activity of NF-κB.

  19. Tumour antigen targeted monoclonal antibodies incorporating a novel multimerisation domain significantly enhance antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity against colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ajay; Poonia, Bhawna; So, Edward C; Vyzasatya, Ravi; Burch, Erin E; Olsen, Henrik S; Mérigeon, Emmanuel Y; Block, David S; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Schulze, Dan H; Hanna, Nader N; Twadell, William S; Yfantis, Harris G; Chan, Siaw L; Cai, Ling; Strome, Scott E

    2013-10-01

    Tumour antigen targeted antibodies (mAbs) can induce natural killer (NK) cells to kill tumours through antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) upon engagement of NK cell expressed FcγRIIIa. FcγRIIIa polymorphisms partially dictate the potency of the ADCC response. The high affinity FcγRIIIa-158-valine (V) polymorphism is associated with more potent ADCC response than the low affinity FcγRIIIa-158-phenylalanine (F) polymorphism. Because approximately 45% of patients are homozygous for the FcγRIIIa-158-F polymorphism (FF genotype), their ability to mount ADCC is impaired. We investigated whether a novel mAb capable of binding multiple antigen specific targets and engaging multiple low affinity FcγRIIIa receptors could further enhance ADCC against colon cancer in vitro. Specifically, we generated a novel anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody (termed a stradobody) consisting of an unmodified Fab sequence and two Immunoglobulin G, subclass 1 (IgG1) Fc domains separated by an isoleucine zipper domain and the 12 amino-acid IgG2 hinge. The stradobody framework induced multimerisation and was associated with increased binding to the EGFR and FcγRIIIa. From a functional perspective, when compared to an unmodified anti-EGFR mAb with a sequence identical to cetuximab (a commercially available anti-EGFR mAb), stradobodies significantly enhanced ADCC. These effects were observed using both KRAS wild type HT29 and KRAS mutant SW480 colon cancer cells as targets, and by NK cells obtained from healthy donors and a cohort of patients with colon cancer. These data suggest that high avidity cross-linking of multiple tumour surface antigens and multiple NK cell associated FcγRIIIa molecules can enhance ADCC and partially overcome impaired ADCC by FF genotype individuals in vitro.

  20. Combined Linkage and Association Studies Show that HLA Class II Variants Control Levels of Antibodies against Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobat, Aurélie; Guergnon, Julien; Brice, Pauline; Fermé, Christophe; Carde, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Pendeven, Catherine Le-; Amiel, Corinne; Taoufik, Yassine; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Theodorou, Ioannis; Besson, Caroline; Abel, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA) or anti-Epstein Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG levels in a unique cohort of 424 individuals of European origin from 119 French families recruited through a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patient. No major locus controlling anti-VCA antibody levels was identified. However, we found that the HLA region influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers. Refined association studies in this region identified a cluster of HLA class II variants associated with anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers (e.g. p = 5×10–5 for rs9268403). The major allele of rs9268403 conferring a predisposition to high anti-EBNA-1 antibody levels was also associated with an increased risk of HL (p = 0.02). In summary, this study shows that HLA class II variants influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in a European population. It further shows the role of the same variants in the risk of HL. PMID:25025336

  1. Combined linkage and association studies show that HLA class II variants control levels of antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Pedergnana

    Full Text Available Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL. Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA or anti-Epstein Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1 IgG levels in a unique cohort of 424 individuals of European origin from 119 French families recruited through a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL patient. No major locus controlling anti-VCA antibody levels was identified. However, we found that the HLA region influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers. Refined association studies in this region identified a cluster of HLA class II variants associated with anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers (e.g. p = 5×10(-5 for rs9268403. The major allele of rs9268403 conferring a predisposition to high anti-EBNA-1 antibody levels was also associated with an increased risk of HL (p = 0.02. In summary, this study shows that HLA class II variants influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in a European population. It further shows the role of the same variants in the risk of HL.

  2. Therapeutic antibodies that target inflammatory cytokines in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yuping; Dong, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are key regulators of immune responses. Persistent and excessive production of inflammatory cytokines underscores the development of autoimmune diseases. Therefore, neutralizing inflammatory cytokines or antagonizing their receptor function is considered as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat autoimmune diseases. To achieve the success of such a strategy, understanding of the complex actions of these cytokines and cytokine networks is required. In this review we focus on four inflammatory cytokines--tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-23 and IL-17--and dissect how the dysregulation of these cytokines regulates autoimmune diseases. On the basis of pre-clinical and clinical data, we specifically discuss the therapeutic rationale for targeting these cytokines and describe the potential adverse effects.

  3. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44(high)CD24(low)HER2(low) cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells.

  4. Self-assembled Nanoparticles based on Folic Acid Modiifed Carboxymethyl Chitosan Conjugated with Targeting Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zhengyu; ZHENG Hua; LI Dan; XIONG Xiong; TAN Mingyuan; HUANG Dan; GUO Xing; ZHANG Xueqiong; YAN Han

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles conjugated with antibody were designed as active drug delivery system to reduce the toxicity and side effects of drugs for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Moreover, methotrexate (MTX) was chosen as model drug and encapsulate within folic acid modified carboxymethyl chitosan (FA-CMCS) nanoparticles through self-assembling. The chemical structure, morphology, release and targeting of nanoparticles were characterized by routine detection. It is demonstrated that the mean diameter is about 150 nm, the release rate increases with the decreasing of pH, the binding rate of CD33 antibody and FA-CMCS nanoparticles is about 5:2, and nanoparticles can effectively bind onto HL60 cells in vitro. The experimental results indicate that the FA-CMCS nanoparticles conjugated with antibody may be used as a potential pH-sensitive drug delivery system with leukemic targeting properties.

  5. Genomic approach to therapeutic target validation identifies a glucose-lowering GLP1R variant protective for coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert A.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Li, Li; Chu, Audrey Y.; Surendran, Praveen; Young, Robin; Grarup, Niels; Stancáková, Alena; Chen, Yuning; V.Varga, Tibor; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Luan, Jian'an; Zhao, Jing Hua; Willems, Sara M.; Wessel, Jennifer; Wang, Shuai; Maruthur, Nisa; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pirie, Ailith; van der Lee, Sven J.; Gillson, Christopher; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Amouyel, Philippe; Arriola, Larraitz; Arveiler, Dominique; Aviles-Olmos, Iciar; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Barroso, Inês; Garcia, Sara Benlloch; Bis, Joshua C.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boehnke, Michael; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Bowden, Sarah; Caldas, Carlos; Caslake, Muriel; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Cruchaga, Carlos; Czajkowski, Jacek; den Hoed, Marcel; Dunn, Janet A.; Earl, Helena M.; Ehret, Georg B.; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrieres, Jean; Foltynie, Thomas; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gianfagna, Francesco; Gonzalez, Carlos; Grioni, Sara; Hiller, Louise; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kee, Frank; Kerrison, Nicola D.; Key, Timothy J.; Kontto, Jukka; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Chunyu; Marenne, Gaëlle; Mohlke, Karen L.; Morris, Andrew P.; Muir, Kenneth; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Munroe, Patricia B.; Navarro, Carmen; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nilsson, Peter M.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Packard, Chris J.; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Peloso, Gina M.; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Poole, Christopher J.; Quirós, J. Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Salomaa, Veikko; Sánchez, María-José; Sattar, Naveed; Sharp, Stephen J.; Sims, Rebecca; Slimani, Nadia; Smith, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Trompet, Stella; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Walker, Mark; Walter, Klaudia; Abraham, Jean E.; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Aponte, Jennifer L.; Butterworth, Adam S.; Dupuis, Josée; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Franks, Paul W.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hansen, Torben; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Jørgensen, Torben; Kooner, Jaspal; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; McCarthy, Mark I.; Pankow, James S.; Pedersen, Oluf; Riboli, Elio; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Deloukas, Panos; Danesh, John; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Meigs, James B.; Ehm, Margaret G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Waterworth, Dawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory authorities have indicated that new drugs to treat type 2 diabetes (T2D) should not be associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. Human genetics may be able to inform development of antidiabetic therapies by predicting cardiovascular and other health endpoints. We therefore investigated the association of variants in 6 genes that encode drug targets for obesity or T2D with a range of metabolic traits in up to 11,806 individuals by targeted exome sequencing, and follow-up in 39,979 individuals by targeted genotyping, with additional in silico follow up in consortia. We used these data to first compare associations of variants in genes encoding drug targets with the effects of pharmacological manipulation of those targets in clinical trials. We then tested the association those variants with disease outcomes, including coronary heart disease, to predict cardiovascular safety of these agents. A low-frequency missense variant (Ala316Thr;rs10305492) in the gene encoding glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1R), the target of GLP1R agonists, was associated with lower fasting glucose and lower T2D risk, consistent with GLP1R agonist therapies. The minor allele was also associated with protection against heart disease, thus providing evidence that GLP1R agonists are not likely to be associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. Our results provide an encouraging signal that these agents may be associated with benefit, a question currently being addressed in randomised controlled trials. Genetic variants associated with metabolic traits and multiple disease outcomes can be used to validate therapeutic targets at an early stage in the drug development process. PMID:27252175

  6. In vivo tumor targeting and imaging with engineered trivalent antibody fragments containing collagen-derived sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel M Cuesta

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to develop new and effective agents for cancer targeting. In this work, a multivalent antibody is characterized in vivo in living animals. The antibody, termed "trimerbody", comprises a single-chain antibody (scFv fragment connected to the N-terminal trimerization subdomain of collagen XVIII NC1 by a flexible linker. As indicated by computer graphic modeling, the trimerbody has a tripod-shaped structure with three highly flexible scFv heads radially outward oriented. Trimerbodies are trimeric in solution and exhibited multivalent binding, which provides them with at least a 100-fold increase in functional affinity than the monovalent scFv. Our results also demonstrate the feasibility of producing functional bispecific trimerbodies, which concurrently bind two different ligands. A trimerbody specific for the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, a classic tumor-associated antigen, showed efficient tumor targeting after systemic administration in mice bearing CEA-positive tumors. Importantly, a trimerbody that recognizes an angiogenesis-associated laminin epitope, showed excellent tumor localization in several cancer types, including fibrosarcomas and carcinomas. These results illustrate the potential of this new antibody format for imaging and therapeutic applications, and suggest that some laminin epitopes might be universal targets for cancer targeting.

  7. Evaluation of Nine Somatic Variant Callers for Detection of Somatic Mutations in Exome and Targeted Deep Sequencing Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Thomassen, Mads; Lænkholm, Anne Vibeke;

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is extensively applied to catalogue somatic mutations in cancer, in research settings and increasingly in clinical settings for molecular diagnostics, guiding therapy decisions. Somatic variant callers perform paired comparisons of sequencing data from cancer tissue...... a comprehensive evaluation using exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing data of paired tumor-normal samples from five breast cancer patients to evaluate the performance of nine publicly available somatic variant callers: EBCall, Mutect, Seurat, Shimmer, Indelocator, Somatic Sniper, Strelka, VarScan 2...... callers, as for some callers, increased sequencing depth highly improved sensitivity. For SNV calling, we report EBCall, Mutect, Virmid and Strelka to be the most reliable somatic variant callers for both exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing. For indel calling, EBCall is superior due to high...

  8. Evaluation of Nine Somatic Variant Callers for Detection of Somatic Mutations in Exome and Targeted Deep Sequencing Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Thomassen, Mads; Lænkholm, Anne Vibeke;

    2016-01-01

    a comprehensive evaluation using exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing data of paired tumor-normal samples from five breast cancer patients to evaluate the performance of nine publicly available somatic variant callers: EBCall, Mutect, Seurat, Shimmer, Indelocator, Somatic Sniper, Strelka, VarScan 2...... and Virmid for the detection of single nucleotide mutations and small deletions and insertions. We report a large variation in the number of calls from the nine somatic variant callers on the same sequencing data and highly variable agreement. Sequencing depth had markedly diverse impact on individual...... callers, as for some callers, increased sequencing depth highly improved sensitivity. For SNV calling, we report EBCall, Mutect, Virmid and Strelka to be the most reliable somatic variant callers for both exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing. For indel calling, EBCall is superior due to high...

  9. An antibody that confers plant disease resistance targets a membrane-bound glyoxal oxidase in Fusarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiu-Shi; Xing, Shu; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Qu, Bo; Jiang, Jin-He; Fan, Chao; Yang, Peng; Liu, Jin-Long; Hu, Zu-Quan; Xue, Sheng; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-05-01

    Plant germplasm resources with natural resistance against globally important toxigenic Fusarium are inadequate. CWP2, a Fusarium genus-specific antibody, confers durable resistance to different Fusarium pathogens that infect cereals and other crops, producing mycotoxins. However, the nature of the CWP2 target is not known. Thus, investigation of the gene coding for the CWP2 antibody target will likely provide critical insights into the mechanism underlying the resistance mediated by this disease-resistance antibody. Immunoblots and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional electrophoresis gels containing cell wall proteins from Fusarium graminearum (Fg) revealed that a glyoxal oxidase (GLX) is the CWP2 antigen. Cellular localization studies showed that GLX is localized to the plasma membrane. This GLX efficiently catalyzes hydrogen peroxide production; this enzymatic activity was specifically inhibited by the CWP2 antibody. GLX-deletion strains of Fg, F. verticillioides (Fv) and F. oxysporum had significantly reduced virulence on plants. The GLX-deletion Fg and Fv strains had markedly reduced mycotoxin accumulation, and the expression of key genes in mycotoxin metabolism was downregulated. This study reveals a single gene-encoded and highly conserved cellular surface antigen that is specifically recognized by the disease-resistance antibody CWP2 and regulates both virulence and mycotoxin biosynthesis in Fusarium species.

  10. Indocyanine green as effective antibody conjugate for intracellular molecular targeted photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sijia; Hüttmann, Gereon; Rudnitzki, Florian; Diddens-Tschoeke, Heyke; Zhang, Zhenxi; Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin

    2016-07-01

    The fluorescent dye indocyanine green (ICG) is clinically approved and has been applied for ophthalmic and intraoperative angiography, measurement of cardiac output and liver function, or as contrast agent in cancer surgery. Though ICG is known for its photochemical effects, it has played a minor role so far in photodynamic therapy or techniques for targeted protein-inactivation. Here, we investigated ICG as an antibody-conjugate for the selective inactivation of the protein Ki-67 in the nucleus of cells. Conjugates of the Ki-67 antibody TuBB-9 with different amounts of ICG were synthesized and delivered into HeLa and OVCAR-5 cells through conjugation to the nuclear localization sequence. Endosomal escape of the macromolecular antibodies into the cytoplasm was optically triggered by photochemical internalization with the photosensitizer BPD. The second light irradiation at 690 nm inactivated Ki-67 and subsequently caused cell death. Here, we show that ICG as an antibody-conjugate can be an effective photosensitizing agent. Best effects were achieved with 1.8 ICG molecules per antibody. Conjugated to antibodies, the ICG absorption peaks vary proportionally with concentration. The absorption of ICG above 650 nm within the optical window of tissue opens the possibility of selective Ki-67 inactivation deep inside of tissues.

  11. Effect of temperature shift on levels of acidic charge variants in IgG monoclonal antibodies in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishishita, Shohei; Nishikawa, Tomoko; Shinoda, Yasuharu; Nagashima, Hiroaki; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Takuma, Shinya; Aoyagi, Hideki

    2015-06-01

    During the production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), not only enhancement of mAb productivity but also control of quality attributes is critical. Charge variants, which are among the most important quality attributes, can substantially affect the in vitro and in vivo properties of mAbs. During process development for the production of mAbs in a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, we have observed that an improvement in mAb titer is accompanied by an increase in the content of acidic charge variants. Here, to help maintain comparability among mAbs, we aimed to identify the process parameters that controlled the content of acidic charge variants. First, we used a Plackett-Burman design to identify the effect of selected process parameters on the acidic charge variant content. Eight process parameters were selected by using a failure modes and effects analysis. Among these, temperature shift was identified from the Plackett-Burman design as the factor most influencing the acidic charge variant content. We then investigated in more detail the effects of shift temperature and temperature shift timing on this content. The content decreased with a shift to a lower temperature and with earlier timing of this temperature shift. Our observations suggest that Plackett-Burman designs are advantageous for preliminary screening of bioprocess parameters. We report here for the first time that temperature downshift is beneficial for effective control of the acidic peak variant content.

  12. Linker-free conjugation and specific cell targeting of antibody functionalized iron-oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yaolin; Baiu, Dana C.; Sherwood, Jennifer A.; McElreath, Meghan R.; Qin, Ying; Lackey, Kimberly H.; Otto, Mario; Bao, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    Specific targeting is a key step to realize the full potential of iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedical applications, especially tumor-associated diagnosis and therapy. Here, we developed anti-GD2 antibody conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for highly efficient neuroblastoma cell targeting. The antibody conjugation was achieved through an easy, linker-free method based on catechol reactions. The targeting efficiency and specificity of the antibody-conjugated nanoparticles to GD2-positive neuroblastoma cells were confirmed by flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, Prussian blue staining and transmission electron microscopy. These detailed studies indicated that the receptor-recognition capability of the antibody was fully retained after conjugation and the conjugated nanoparticles quickly attached to GD2-positive cells within four hours. Interestingly, longer treatment (12 h) led the cell membrane-bound nanoparticles to be internalized into cytosol, either by directly penetrating the cell membrane or escaping from the endosomes. Last but importantly, the uniquely designed functional surfaces of the nanoparticles allow easy conjugation of other bioactive molecules. PMID:26660881

  13. Progress in the development of therapeutic antibodies targeting prion proteins and β-amyloid peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are characterized by protein misfolding, and can lead to dementia. However, prion diseases are infectious and transmissible, while AD is not. The similarities and differences between these diseases have led researchers to perform comparative studies. In the last 2 decades, progress has been made in immunotherapy using anti-prion protein and anti-β-amyloid antibodies. In this study, we review new ideas and strategies for therapeutic antibodies targeting prion diseases and AD through conformation dependence.

  14. Enhancement of antibody-dependent mechanisms of tumor cell lysis by a targeted activator of complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Masaki; Ohta, Rieko; Varela, Juan C; Song, Hongbin; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2007-10-01

    Complement inhibitors expressed on tumor cells provide a hindrance to the therapeutic efficacy of some monoclonal antibodies (mAb). We investigated a novel strategy to overwhelm complement inhibitor activity and amplify complement activation on tumor cells. The C3-binding domain of human complement receptor 2 (CR2; CD21) was linked to the complement-activating Fc region of human IgG1 (CR2-Fc), and the ability of the construct to target and amplify complement deposition on tumor cells was investigated. CR2 binds C3 activation fragments, and CR2-Fc targeted tumor cells by binding to C3 initially deposited by a tumor-specific antibody. Complement deposition on Du145 cells (human prostate cancer cell line) and anti-MUC1 mAb-mediated complement-dependent lysis of Du145 cells were significantly enhanced by CR2-Fc. Anti-MUC1 antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of Du145 by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was also significantly enhanced by CR2-Fc in both the presence and the absence of complement. Radiolabeled CR2-Fc targeted to s.c. Du145 tumors in nude mice treated with anti-MUC1 mAb, validating the targeting strategy in vivo. A metastatic model was used to investigate the effect of CR2-Fc in a therapeutic paradigm. Administration of CR2-Fc together with mAb therapy significantly improved long-term survival of nude mice challenged with an i.v. injection of EL4 cells. The data show that CR2-Fc enhances the therapeutic efficacy of antibody therapy, and the construct may provide particular benefits under conditions of limiting antibody concentration or low tumor antigen density.

  15. BRCAA1 antibody- and Her2 antibody-conjugated amphiphilic polymer engineered CdSe/ZnS quantum dots for targeted imaging of gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Ji, Yang; Wang, Can; Liang, Shujing; Pan, Fei; Zhang, Chunlei; Chen, Feng; Fu, Hualin; Wang, Kan; Cui, Daxiang

    2014-05-01

    Successful development of safe and highly effective nanoprobes for targeted imaging of in vivo early gastric cancer is a great challenge. Herein, we choose the CdSe/ZnS (core-shell) quantum dots (QDs) as prototypical materials, synthesized one kind of a new amphiphilic polymer including dentate-like alkyl chains and multiple carboxyl groups, and then used the prepared amphiphilic polymer to modify QDs. The resultant amphiphilic polymer engineered QDs (PQDs) were conjugated with BRCAA1 and Her2 monoclonal antibody, and prepared BRCAA1 antibody- and Her2 antibody-conjugated QDs were used for in vitro MGC803 cell labeling and in vivo targeted imaging of gastric cancer cells. Results showed that the PQDs exhibited good water solubility, strong photoluminescence (PL) intensity, and good biocompatibility. BRCAA1 antibody- and Her2 antibody-conjugated QD nanoprobes successfully realized targeted imaging of in vivo gastric cancer MGC803 cells. In conclusion, BRCAA1 antibody- and Her2 antibody-conjugated PQDs have great potential in applications such as single cell labeling and in vivo tracking, and targeted imaging and therapeutic effects' evaluation of in vivo early gastric cancer cells in the near future.

  16. Novel Exons and Splice Variants in the Human Antibody Heavy Chain Identified by Single Cell and Single Molecule Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmers, Christopher; Penland, Lolita; Kanbar, Jad N.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody heavy chains contain a variable and a constant region. The constant region of the antibody heavy chain is encoded by multiple groups of exons which define the isotype and therefore many functional characteristics of the antibody. We performed both single B cell RNAseq and long read single molecule sequencing of antibody heavy chain transcripts and were able to identify novel exons for IGHA1 and IGHA2 as well as novel isoforms for IGHM antibody heavy chain. PMID:25611855

  17. Novel exons and splice variants in the human antibody heavy chain identified by single cell and single molecule sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Vollmers

    Full Text Available Antibody heavy chains contain a variable and a constant region. The constant region of the antibody heavy chain is encoded by multiple groups of exons which define the isotype and therefore many functional characteristics of the antibody. We performed both single B cell RNAseq and long read single molecule sequencing of antibody heavy chain transcripts and were able to identify novel exons for IGHA1 and IGHA2 as well as novel isoforms for IGHM antibody heavy chain.

  18. Targeted localized use of therapeutic antibodies: a review of non-systemic, topical and oral applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Russell G A; Martino, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies provide important tools in the "medicine chest" of today's clinician for the treatment of a range of disorders. Typically monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies are administered in large doses, either directly or indirectly into the circulation, via a systemic route which is well suited for disseminated ailments. Diseases confined within a specific localized tissue, however, may be treated more effectively and at reduced cost by a delivery system which targets directly the affected area. To explore the advantages of the local administration of antibodies, we reviewed current alternative, non-systemic delivery approaches which are in clinical use, being trialed or developed. These less conventional approaches comprise: (a) local injections, (b) topical and (c) peroral administration routes. Local delivery includes intra-ocular injections into the vitreal humor (i.e. Ranibizumab for age-related macular degeneration), subconjunctival injections (e.g. Bevacizumab for corneal neovascularization), intra-articular joint injections (i.e. anti-TNF alpha antibody for persistent inflammatory monoarthritis) and intratumoral or peritumoral injections (e.g. Ipilimumab for cancer). A range of other strategies, such as the local use of antibacterial antibodies, are also presented. Local injections of antibodies utilize doses which range from 1/10th to 1/100th of the required systemic dose therefore reducing both side-effects and treatment costs. In addition, any therapeutic antibody escaping from the local site of disease into the systemic circulation is immediately diluted within the large blood volume, further lowering the potential for unwanted effects. Needle-free topical application routes become an option when the condition is restricted locally to an external surface. The topical route may potentially be utilized in the form of eye drops for infections or corneal neovascularization or be applied to diseased skin for psoriasis, dermatitis, pyoderma

  19. OptMAVEn--a new framework for the de novo design of antibody variable region models targeting specific antigen epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    Full Text Available Antibody-based therapeutics provides novel and efficacious treatments for a number of diseases. Traditional experimental approaches for designing therapeutic antibodies rely on raising antibodies against a target antigen in an immunized animal or directed evolution of antibodies with low affinity for the desired antigen. However, these methods remain time consuming, cannot target a specific epitope and do not lead to broad design principles informing other studies. Computational design methods can overcome some of these limitations by using biophysics models to rationally select antibody parts that maximize affinity for a target antigen epitope. This has been addressed to some extend by OptCDR for the design of complementary determining regions. Here, we extend this earlier contribution by addressing the de novo design of a model of the entire antibody variable region against a given antigen epitope while safeguarding for immunogenicity (Optimal Method for Antibody Variable region Engineering, OptMAVEn. OptMAVEn simulates in silico the in vivo steps of antibody generation and evolution, and is capable of capturing the critical structural features responsible for affinity maturation of antibodies. In addition, a humanization procedure was developed and incorporated into OptMAVEn to minimize the potential immunogenicity of the designed antibody models. As case studies, OptMAVEn was applied to design models of neutralizing antibodies targeting influenza hemagglutinin and HIV gp120. For both HA and gp120, novel computational antibody models with numerous interactions with their target epitopes were generated. The observed rates of mutations and types of amino acid changes during in silico affinity maturation are consistent with what has been observed during in vivo affinity maturation. The results demonstrate that OptMAVEn can efficiently generate diverse computational antibody models with both optimized binding affinity to antigens and reduced

  20. Tumour-targeting properties of antibodies specific to MMP-1A, MMP-2 and MMP-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfaffen, Stefanie; Frey, Katharina; Stutz, Irene; Roesli, Christoph; Neri, Dario [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-08-15

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a group of more than 20 zinc-containing endopeptidases, are upregulated in many diseases, but several attempts to use radiolabelled MMP inhibitors for imaging tumours have proved unsuccessful in mouse models, possibly due to the limited specificity of these agents or their unfavourable pharmacokinetic profiles. In principle, radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies could be considered for the selective targeting and imaging of individual MMPs. We cloned, produced and characterized high-affinity monoclonal antibodies specific to murine MMP-1A, MMP-2 and MMP-3 in SIP (small immunoprotein) miniantibody format using biochemical and immunochemical methods. We also performed comparative biodistribution analysis of their tumour-targeting properties at three time points (3 h, 24 h, 48 h) in mice bearing subcutaneous F9 tumours using radioiodinated protein preparations. The clinical stage L19 antibody, specific to the alternatively spliced EDB domain of fibronectin, was used as reference tumour-targeting agent for in vivo studies. All anti-MMP antibodies and SIP(L19) strongly stained sections of F9 tumours when assessed by immunofluorescence methods. In biodistribution experiments, SIP(SP3), specific to MMP-3, selectively accumulated at the tumour site 24 and 48 h after intravenous injection, but was rapidly cleared from other organs. By contrast, SIP(SP1) and SIP(SP2), specific to MMP-1A and MMP-2, showed no preferential accumulation at the tumour site. Antibodies specific to MMP-3 may serve as vehicles for the efficient and selective delivery of imaging agents or therapeutic molecules to sites of disease. (orig.)

  1. In Vitro Characterization of Human Cytomegalovirus-Targeting Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies LJP538 and LJP539

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hetalkumar D.; Nikitin, Pavel; Gesner, Thomas; Lin, James J.; Barkan, David T.; Ciferri, Claudio; Carfi, Andrea; Akbarnejad Yazdi, Tahmineh; Skewes-Cox, Peter; Wiedmann, Brigitte; Jarousse, Nadine; Zhong, Weidong; Feire, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is usually benign in healthy individuals but can cause life-threatening disease in those with compromised immune systems. Approved drugs available to treat HCMV disease, including ganciclovir, cidofovir, and foscarnet, have significant toxicities that limit their use in certain patient populations. LJP538 and LJP539 are human monoclonal antibodies that are being evaluated as immunoglobulin therapeutics. The antibodies target glycoproteins gB and the gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131a pentameric complex, respectively. Here we present an in vitro characterization of these antibodies. We show that LJP538 and LJP539 are more potent than a marketed immunoglobulin at inhibiting HCMV infection of various cell lines relevant to pathogenesis. We find that LJP538 and LJP539 are active against a panel of clinical isolates in vitro and demonstrate minor-to-moderate synergy in combination. Passage of HCMV in the presence of LJP538 or LJP539 alone resulted in resistance-associated mutations that mapped to the target genes. However, no loss of susceptibility to the combination of antibodies was observed for >400 days in culture. Finally, the binding regions of LJP538 and LJP539 are conserved among clinical isolates. Taken together, these data support the use of LJP538 and LJP539 in combination for clinical trials in HCMV patients. PMID:27270290

  2. Role of antibodies in developing drugs that target G-protein-coupled receptor dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipser, Chris; Bushlin, Ittai; Gupta, Achla; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2010-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are important molecular targets in drug discovery. These receptors play a pivotal role in physiological signaling pathways and are targeted by nearly 50% of currently available drugs. Mounting evidence suggests that G-protein-coupled receptors form dimers, and various studies have shown that dimerization is necessary for receptor maturation, signaling, and trafficking. However, the physiological implications of dimerization in vivo have not been well explored because detection of GPCR dimers in endogenous systems has been a challenging task. One exciting new approach to this challenge is the generation of antibodies against specific G-protein-coupled receptor dimers. Such antibodies could be used as tools for characterization of heteromer-specific function; as reagents for their purification, tissue localization, and regulation in vivo; and as probes for mapping their functional domains. In addition, such antibodies could serve as alternative ligands for G-protein-coupled receptor heteromers. Thus, heteromer-specific antibodies represent novel tools for the exploration and manipulation of G-protein-coupled receptor-dimer pharmacology.

  3. Properties of a general PK/PD model of antibody-ligand interactions for therapeutic antibodies that bind to soluble endogenous targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davda, Jasmine P; Hansen, Ryan J

    2010-01-01

    Antibodies that target endogenous soluble ligands are an important class of biotherapeutic agents. While much focus has been placed on characterization of antibody pharmacokinetics, less emphasis has been given to characterization of antibody effects on their soluble targets. We describe here the properties of a generalized mechanism-based PK/PD model used to characterize the in vivo interaction of an antibody and an endogenous soluble ligand. The assumptions and properties of the model are explored, and situations are described when deviations from the basic assumptions may be necessary. This model is most useful for in vivo situations where both antibody and ligand levels are available following drug administration. For a given antibody exposure, the extent and duration of suppression of free ligand is impacted by the apparent affinity of the interaction, as well as by the rate of ligand turnover. The applicability of the general equilibrium model of in vivo antibody-ligand interaction is demonstrated with an anti-Aß antibody.

  4. The characteristics of human antibody targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in vivo for radioimmunotherapy in a small animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jung; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byoung Soo; Cheon, Gi Jeong [Korea Institue of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Kwang Won; Chang, Ki Hwan; Shin, Yong Won; Ryoo, Kyung Hwan; Shin, Yong Nam; Kim, Se Ho [Green Cross Corp., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as an oncogene has led to the development of anticancer therapeutics directed against EGFR, including Erbitux for colon cancer. Many therapeutic approaches are aimed at the EGFR. Erbitux is example of monoclonal antibody inhibitors. The monoclonal antibodies block the extracellular ligand binding domain. EGFR4-2, IgG human monoclonal antibody, has been developed on the basis of human antibody gene library in Green Cross Corp. Small animal imaging is useful for preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled antibody to see biodistribution and targeting ability at serial time points in same animals

  5. Development of antibody-based c-Met inhibitors for targeted cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dongheon Lee, Eun-Sil Sung, Jin-Hyung Ahn, Sungwon An, Jiwon Huh, Weon-Kyoo You Hanwha Chemical R&D Center, Biologics Business Unit, Daejeon, Republic of Korea Abstract: Signaling pathways mediated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs and their ligands play important roles in the development and progression of human cancers, which makes RTK-mediated signaling pathways promising therapeutic targets in the treatment of cancer. Compared with small-molecule compounds, antibody-based therapeutics can more specifically recognize and bind to ligands and RTKs. Several antibody inhibitors of RTK-mediated signaling pathways, such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor receptor or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, have been developed and are widely used to treat cancer patients. However, since the therapeutic options are still limited in terms of therapeutic efficacy and types of cancers that can be treated, efforts are being made to identify and evaluate novel RTK-mediated signaling pathways as targets for more efficacious cancer treatment. The hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling pathway has come into the spotlight as a promising target for development of potent cancer therapeutic agents. Multiple antibody-based therapeutics targeting hepatocyte growth factor or c-Met are currently in preclinical or clinical development. This review focuses on the development of inhibitors of the hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling pathway for cancer treatment, including critical issues in clinical development and future perspectives for antibody-based therapeutics. Keywords: hepatocyte growth factor, ligands, receptor tyrosine kinase, signaling pathway, therapeutic agent

  6. Efficacy of HER2-targeted therapy in metastatic breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte L; Kümler, Iben; Palshof, Jesper Andreas;

    2013-01-01

    Therapies targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2 are effective in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We review the efficacy of HER2-directed therapies, focussing on monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting HER2 that have been tested in phase II-III studies...... to those obtained for capecitabine plus lapatinib (48%), continuing trastuzumab in combination with capecitabine (48%), pertuzumab plus trastuzumab (24%), and neratinib (24%). Strategies combining multiple HER2-directed therapies might yield additive or synergistic effects and lead to improved outcome...

  7. Targeting medullary thyroid carcinomas with bispecific antibodies and bivalent haptens. Results and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvier, E; Gautherot, E; Meyer, P; Barbet, J

    1997-01-01

    The present article reviews the clinical trials that have been performed in recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma patients with the Affinity Enhancement System. This technique uses bispecific antibodies to target radiolabelled bivalent haptens to tumour cells. Its sensitivity in the detection of known tumour sites is high (90%) and this technique also achieves good sensitivity (61%) in the detection of occult disease as revealed by abnormal thyrocalcitonin blood levels. Due to its high targeting capacity, this technique is now considered for use as a therapeutic agent in medullary thyroid carcinoma patients.

  8. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.; Kwong, Peter D.; Morris, Lynn (NHLS-South Africa); (NIH); (Witwatersrand); (KwaZulu-Natal)

    2016-08-31

    ABSTRACT

    All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage.

    IMPORTANCEThe conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of

  9. Pemphigus vulgaris antibodies target the mitochondrial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that protect keratinocytes from apoptolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyavsky, Alex; Chen, Yumay; Wang, Ping H; Grando, Sergei A

    2015-11-01

    The mechanism of detachment and death of keratinocytes in pemphigus vulgaris (PV) involves pro-apoptotic action of constellations of autoantibodies determining disease severity and response to treatment. The presence of antibodies to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and the therapeutic efficacy of cholinomimetics in PV is well-established. Recently, adsorption of anti-mitochondrial antibodies abolished the ability of PVIgGs to cause acantholysis, demonstrating their pathophysiological significance. Since, in addition to cell membrane, nAChRs are also present on the mitochondrial outer membrane, wherein they act to prevent activation of intrinsic (mitochondrial apoptosis), we hypothesized that mitochondrial (mt)-nAChRs might be targeted by PVIgGs. To test this hypothesis, we employed the immunoprecipitation-western blot assay of keratinocyte mitochondrial proteins that visualized the α3, α5, α7, α9, α10, β2 and β4 mt-nAChR subunits precipitated by PV IgGs, suggesting that functions of mt-nAChRs are compromised in PV. To pharmacologically counteract the pro-apoptotic action of anti-mitochondrial antibodies in PV, we exposed naked keratinocyte mitochondria to PVIgGs in the presence of the nicotinic agonist nicotine ± antagonists, and measured cytochrome c (CytC) release. Nicotine abolished PVIgG-dependent CytC release, showing a dose-dependent effect, suggesting that protection of mitochondria can be a novel mechanism of therapeutic action of nicotinic agonists in PV. The obtained results indicated that the mt-nAChRs targeted by anti-mitochondrial antibodies produced by PV patients are coupled to inhibition of CytC release, and that nicotinergic stimulation can abolish PVIgG-dependent activation of intrinsic apoptosis in KCs. Future studies should determine if and how the distinct anti-mt-nAChR antibodies penetrate KCs and correlate with disease severity.

  10. Extracorporeal adsorption therapy: A Method to improve targeted radiation delivered by radiometal-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemecek, Eneida R.; Green, Damian J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Pagal, John M.; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, A. K.; Durack, Lawrence D.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Wilbur, D. S.; Nilsson, Rune; Sandberg, Bengt; Press, Oliver W.

    2008-04-01

    Many investigators have demonstrated the ability to treat hematologic malignancies with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting hematopoietic antigens such as anti-CD20 and anti-CD45. [1-5] Although the remission rates achieved with radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are relatively high, many patients subsequently relapse presumably due to suboptimal delivery of enough radiation to eradicate the malignancy. The dose-response of leukemia and lymphoma to radiation has been proven. Substantial amounts of radiation can be delivered by RIT if followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation to rescue the bone marrow from myeloablation.[ref] However, the maximum dose of RIT that can be used is still limited by toxicity to normal tissues affected by nonspecific delivery of radiation. Efforts to improve RIT focus on improving the therapeutic ratios of radiation in target versus non-target tissues by removing the fraction of radioisotope that fails to bind to target tissues and circulates freely in the bloodstream perfusing non-target tissues. Our group and others have explored several alternatives for removal of unbound circulating antibody. [refs] One such method, extracorporeal adsorption therapy (ECAT) consists of removing unbound antibody by a method similar to plasmapheresis after critical circulation time and distribution of antibody into target tissues have been achieved. Preclinical studies of ECAT in murine xenograft models demonstrated significant improvement in therapeutic ratios of radioactivity. Chen and colleagues demonstrated that a 2-hour ECAT procedure could remove 40 to 70% of the radioactivity from liver, lung and spleen. [ref] Although isotope concentration in the tumor was initially unaffected, a 50% decrease was noted approximately 36 hours after the procedure. This approach was also evaluated in a limited phase I pilot study of patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. [ref] After radiographic confirmation of tumor localization of a test dose of anti-CD20

  11. Site-specific modification of ED-B-targeting antibody using intein-fusion technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greven Simone

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A promising new approach in cancer therapy is the use of tumor specific antibodies coupled to cytotoxic agents. Currently these immunoconjugates are prepared by rather unspecific coupling chemistries, resulting in heterogeneous products. As the drug load is a key parameter for the antitumor activity, site-specific strategies are desired. Expressed protein ligation (EPL and protein trans-splicing (PTS are methods for the specific C-terminal modification of a target protein. Both include the expression as an intein fusion protein, followed by the exchange of the intein for a functionalized moiety. Results A full-length IgG specific for fibronectin ED-B was expressed as fusion protein with an intein (Mxe GyrA or Npu DnaE attached to each heavy chain. In vitro protocols were established to site-specifically modify the antibodies in high yields by EPL or PTS, respectively. Although reducing conditions had to be employed during the process, the integrity or affinity of the antibody was not affected. The protocols were used to prepare immunoconjugates containing two biotin molecules per antibody, attached to the C-termini of the heavy chains. Conclusion Full-length antibodies can be efficiently and site-specifically modified at the C-termini of their heavy chains by intein-fusion technologies. The described protocols can be used to prepare immunoconjugates of high homogeneity and with a defined drug load of two. The attachment to the C-termini is expected to retain the affinity and effector functions of the antibodies.

  12. Enhanced neutralization potency of botulinum neurotoxin antibodies using a red blood cell-targeting fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad P Adekar

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT potently inhibits cholinergic signaling at the neuromuscular junction. The ideal countermeasures for BoNT exposure are monoclonal antibodies or BoNT antisera, which form BoNT-containing immune complexes that are rapidly cleared from the general circulation. Clearance of opsonized toxins may involve complement receptor-mediated immunoadherence to red blood cells (RBC in primates or to platelets in rodents. Methods of enhancing immunoadherence of BoNT-specific antibodies may increase their potency in vivo. We designed a novel fusion protein (FP to link biotinylated molecules to glycophorin A (GPA on the RBC surface. The FP consists of an scFv specific for murine GPA fused to streptavidin. FP:mAb:BoNT complexes bound specifically to the RBC surface in vitro. In a mouse model of BoNT neutralization, the FP increased the potency of single and double antibody combinations in BoNT neutralization. A combination of two antibodies with the FP gave complete neutralization of 5,000 LD50 BoNT in mice. Neutralization in vivo was dependent on biotinylation of both antibodies and correlated with a reduction of plasma BoNT levels. In a post-exposure model of intoxication, FP:mAb complexes gave complete protection from a lethal BoNT/A1 dose when administered within 2 hours of toxin exposure. In a pre-exposure prophylaxis model, mice were fully protected for 72 hours following administration of the FP:mAb complex. These results demonstrate that RBC-targeted immunoadherence through the FP is a potent enhancer of BoNT neutralization by antibodies in vivo.

  13. Generation and isolation of target-specific single-domain antibodies from shark immune repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mischa Roland; O'Dwyer, Ronan; Kovaleva, Marina; Rudkin, Fiona; Dooley, Helen; Barelle, Caroline Jane

    2012-01-01

    The drive to exploit novel targets and biological pathways has lead to the expansion of classical antibody research into innovative fragment adaptations and novel scaffolds. The hope being that alternative or cryptic epitopes may be targeted, tissue inaccessibility may be overcome, and easier engineering options will facilitate multivalent, multi-targeting approaches. To this end, we have been isolating shark single domains to gain a greater understanding of their potential as therapeutic agents. Their unique shape, small size, inherent stability, and simple molecular architecture make them attractive candidates from a drug discovery perspective. Here we describe protocols to capture the immune repertoire of an immunized shark species and to build and select via phage-display target-specific IgNAR variable domains (VNARs).

  14. Targeted killing of virally infected cells by radiolabeled antibodies to viral proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Dadachova

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The HIV epidemic is a major threat to health in the developing and western worlds. A modality that targets and kills HIV-1-infected cells could have a major impact on the treatment of acute exposure and the elimination of persistent reservoirs of infected cells. The aim of this proof-of-principle study was to demonstrate the efficacy of a therapeutic strategy of targeting and eliminating HIV-1-infected cells with radiolabeled antibodies specific to viral proteins in vitro and in vivo. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 labeled with radioisotopes bismuth 213 ((213Bi and rhenium 188 ((188Re selectively killed chronically HIV-1-infected human T cells and acutely HIV-1-infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs in vitro. Treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice harboring HIV-1-infected hPBMCs in their spleens with a (213Bi- or (188Re-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb to gp41 resulted in a 57% injected dose per gram uptake of radiolabeled mAb in the infected spleens and in a greater than 99% elimination of HIV-1-infected cells in a dose-dependent manner. The number of HIV-1-infected thymocytes decreased 2.5-fold in the human thymic implant grafts of SCID mice treated with the (188Re-labeled antibody to gp41 compared with those treated with the (188Re-control mAb. The treatment did not cause acute hematologic toxicity in the treated mice. CONCLUSIONS: The current study demonstrates the effectiveness of HIV-targeted radioimmunotherapy and may provide a novel treatment option in combination with highly active antiretroviral therapy for the eradication of HIV.

  15. Self-assembly of carbon nanotubes and antibodies on tumours for targeted amplified delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, J. Justin; Villa, Carlos H.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Escorcia, Freddy E.; Casey, Emily; Scheinberg, David A.

    2013-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can deliver imaging agents or drugs to tumours and offer significant advantages over approaches based on antibodies or other nanomaterials. In particular, the nanotubes can carry a substantial amount of cargo (100 times more than a monoclonal antibody), but can still be rapidly eliminated from the circulation by renal filtration, like a small molecule, due to their high aspect ratio. Here we show that SWNTs can target tumours in a two-step approach in which nanotubes modified with morpholino oligonucleotide sequences bind to cancer cells that have been pretargeted with antibodies modified with oligonucleotide strands complementary to those on the nanotubes. The nanotubes can carry fluorophores or radioisotopes, and are shown to selectively bind to cancer cells in vitro and in tumour-bearing xenografted mice. The binding process is also found to lead to antigen capping and internalization of the antibody-nanotube complexes. The nanotube conjugates were labelled with both alpha-particle and gamma-ray emitting isotopes, at high specific activities. Conjugates labelled with alpha-particle-generating 225Ac were found to clear rapidly, thus mitigating radioisotope toxicity, and were shown to be therapeutically effective in vivo.

  16. Targeting the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor with small molecule ligands and antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Terry F; Latif, Rauf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the essential molecule for thyroid growth and thyroid hormone production. Since it is also a key autoantigen in Graves’ disease and is involved in thyroid cancer pathophysiology, the targeting of the TSHR offers a logical model for disease control. Areas covered We review the structure and function of the TSHR and the progress in both small molecule ligands and TSHR antibodies for their therapeutic potential. Expert opinion Stabilization of a preferential conformation for the TSHR by allosteric ligands and TSHR antibodies with selective modulation of the signaling pathways is now possible. These tools may be the next generation of therapeutics for controlling the pathophysiological consequences mediated by the effects of the TSHR in the thyroid and other extrathyroidal tissues. PMID:25768836

  17. Physiological roles of asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs) variants and recent advances in hepatic-targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules via ASGPRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Liu, Jia; Yang, Dongliang; Lu, Mengji; Yin, Jian

    2014-01-01

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is a high-capacity C-type lectin receptor mainly expressed on mammalian hepatic cells. The physiological function of ASGPR has not been completely clarified and is thought to be specific binding and internalization of galactose (Gal) or N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-terminating glycoproteins by hepatocytes. The human ASGPR is comprised of two homologous polypeptides, H1 and H2. ASGPR H1 has two splice variants (H1a and H1b) and ASGPR H2 has three splice variants (H2a, H2b, and H2c). These variants have been discovered to exist both in human liver tissues and in human hepatoma cells. Variant H1b, which has an in-frame deletion of exon 2 resulting in the loss of the transmembrane domain and is secreted as a soluble protein, encodes functional soluble ASGPR (s- ASGPR). Based on our previous results, we proposed the possible physiological function of s-ASGPR, which is well interpreted in the Galactosyl Homeostasis Hypothesis proposed by Weigel. ASGPR is one of the most promising targets for hepatic delivery. In this review, the recent progresses of cationic polysomes and liposomes as effective non-viral delivery system via ASGPR are also presented.

  18. Immunotherapy of melanoma with the immune costimulatory monoclonal antibodies targeting CD137

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li SY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Shi-Yan Li, Yizhen Liu Cancer Research Institute, Scott and White Healthcare, Temple, TX, USA Abstract: Knowledge of how the immune system recognizes and attempts to control cancer growth and development has improved dramatically. The advent of immunotherapies for cancer has resulted in robust clinical responses and confirmed that the immune system can significantly inhibit tumor progression. Until recently, metastatic melanoma was a disease with limited treatment options and a poor prognosis. CD137 (also known as 4-1BB a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor superfamily, is an activation-induced T cell costimulator molecule. Growing evidence indicates that anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies possess strong antitumor properties, the result of their powerful capability to activate CD8+ T cells, to produce interferon (IFN-γ, and to induce cytolytic markers. Combination therapy of anti-CD137 with other anticancer agents, such as radiation, has robust tumor-regressing abilities against nonimmunogenic or poorly immunogenic tumors. Of importance, targeting CD137 eliminates established tumors, and the fact that anti-CD137 therapy acts in concert with other anticancer agents and/or radiation therapy to eradicate nonimmunogenic and weakly immunogenic tumors is an additional benefit. Currently, BMS-663513, a humanized anti-CD137 antibody, is in clinical trials in patients with solid tumors, including melanoma, renal carcinoma, ovarian cancer, and B-cell malignancies. In this review, we discuss the basis of the therapeutic potential of targeting CD137 in cancer treatment, focusing in particular, on BMS-663513 as an immune costimulatory monoclonal antibody for melanoma immunotherapy. Keywords: anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies, immune costimulator molecule, BMS-663513

  19. Innovations that influence the pharmacology of monoclonal antibody guided tumor targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlom, J.; Hand, P.H.; Greiner, J.W.; Colcher, D.; Shrivastav, S.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Reynolds, J.C.; Larson, S.M.; Raubitschek, A. (National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Tumor targeting by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can be enhanced by (a) increasing the percentage of injected dose taken up by the tumor and/or (b) increasing the tumor:nontumor ratios. Several groups have demonstrated that one can increase tumor to nontumor ratios by the use of antibody fragments or the administration of second antibodies. Several other modalities are also possible: (a) the use of recombinant interferons to up-regulate the expression of specific tumor associated antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen or TAG-72 on the surface of carcinoma cells and thus increase MAb tumor binding has proved successful in both in vitro and in vivo studies; (b) the intracavitary administration of MAbs. Recent studies have demonstrated that when radiolabeled B72.3 is administered i.p. to patients with carcinoma of the peritoneal cavity, it localizes tumor masses with greater efficiency than does concurrent i.v. administered antibody. Studies involving the comparative pharmacology of intracavitary administration of radiolabeled MAb in patients and several animal models will be discussed; (c) it has been reported that prior exposure of hepatoma to external beam radiation will increase radiolabeled MAb tumor targeting. We and others have not been able to duplicate this phenomenon with a human colon cancer xenograft model and radiolabeled MAbs to two different colon carcinoma associated antigens. The possible reasons for these differences will be discussed; (d) the cloning and expression of recombinant MAbs with human constant regions and subsequent size modification constructs will also undoubtedly alter the pharmacology of MAb tumor binding in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. 66 references.

  20. New engineered antibodies against prions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrlj, Nives; Dolinar, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A number of recently developed and approved therapeutic agents based on highly specific and potent antibodies have shown the potential of antibody therapy. As the next step, antibody-based therapeutics will be bioengineered in a way that they not only bind pathogenic targets but also address other issues, including drug targeting and delivery. For antibodies that are expected to act within brain tissue, like those that are directed against the pathogenic prion protein isoform, one of the major obstacles is the blood-brain barrier which prevents efficient transfer of the antibody, even of the engineered single-chain variants. We recently demonstrated that a specific prion-specific antibody construct which was injected into the murine tail vein can be efficiently transported into brain tissue. The novelty of the work was in that the cell penetrating peptide was used as a linker connecting both specificity-determining domains of the antibody peptide, thus eliminating the need for the standard flexible linker, composed of an arrangement of three consecutive (Gly4Ser) repeats. This paves the road toward improved bioengineered antibody variants that target brain antigens. PMID:23941991

  1. Growth impairment of small-cell cancer by targeting provasopressin with MAG-1 antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William George North

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPreviously we demonstrated that human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC seems to universally express the vasopressin gene, and this leads to the presence of a cell-surface marker representing the entire prohormone precursor. In this study we show this marker can be targeted with MAG-1, a mouse monoclonal antibody against a C-terminal moiety on provasopressin. In vitro targeting of cell lines derived from primary and recurrent disease demonstrates attachment of antibody to the cell surface followed by internalization. In vivo targeting with 99Tc-labeled Fab fragments of MAG-1 shows selective attachment to xenografts. In vivo treatment of tumors from classical cell line, NCI H345, with either ~1.65 µCi (~1.65 mg/kg bw of 90 Yttrium-labeled MAG-1, or ~1.65 mg/kg bw native MAG-1, delivered every second day for 6 days produced similar reductions in the growth rate to ~50% (p

  2. Intracellular uptake and catabolism of anti-IgM antibodies and bi-specific antibody-targeted hapten by B-lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetti, C; Le Doussal, J M; Rouvier, E; Gruaz-Guyon, A; Barbet, J

    1995-10-09

    The efficiency of radioimmunotherapy with iodine-labelled antibodies is often limited by intracellular internalisation and catabolism after initial binding to the cellular targets. We have developed a technique called affinity enhancement system (AES) which uses bi-specific antibodies to target radiolabelled bivalent haptens to cells. This targeting method has been applied successfully to tumour imaging in colorectal cancer patients and is now considered for therapy. We have investigated the potential of this technique to target iodine radioisotopes by comparing it to targeting with covalently iodine-labelled antibodies in a rapidly internalising antigenic system, the surface IgM of a B-lymphoma cell line. A 5-fold increase in the intracellular retention time of activity as compared to 125I-labelled F(ab')2 or IgG was observed. The radiolabelled hapten did not undergo any catabolism after internalisation. Resistance to cellular proteases and failure of recognition of the hapten by amino acid transporter systems may be potential explanations for these observations. This should make non-covalent targeting, particularly the AES, a method of choice to target modulating antigens for the therapy of malignant hemopathies.

  3. Intestinal barrier gene variants may not explain the increased levels of antigliadin antibodies, suggesting other mechanisms than altered permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Victorien M.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Weijerman, Michel E.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M. W.; Mearin, M. Luisa; Wapenaar, Martin C.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Schreurs, Marco W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Various genes may influence intestinal barrier function, including MAGI2, MY09B, and PARD3, which are associated with celiac disease. Because direct measurement of intestinal permeability is difficult, antibodies against gliadin (AGA) and Baker's yeast (anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies [ASCA

  4. Local overexpression of Su(H-MAPK variants affects Notch target gene expression and adult phenotypes in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin S. Auer

    2015-12-01

    Here we address the consequences of a local induction of three Su(H variants on Notch target gene expression. To this end, wild-type Su(H, a phospho-deficient Su(HMAPK-ko and a phospho-mimetic Su(HMAPK-ac isoform were overexpressed in the central domain of the wing anlagen. The expression of the Notch target genes cut, wingless, E(splm8-HLH and vestigial, was monitored. For the latter two, reporter genes were used (E(splm8-lacZ, vgBE-lacZ. In general, Su(HMAPK-ko induced a stronger response than wild-type Su(H, whereas the response to Su(HMAPK-ac was very weak. Notch target genes cut, wingless and vgBE-lacZ were ectopically activated, whereas E(splm8-lacZ was repressed by overexpression of Su(H proteins. In addition, in epistasis experiments an activated form of the EGF-receptor (DERact or the MAPK (rlSEM and individual Su(H variants were co-overexpressed locally, to compare the resultant phenotypes in adult flies (thorax, wings and eyes as well as to assay the response of the Notch target gene cut in cell clones.

  5. Targeting apoptosis: preclinical and early clinical experience with mapatumumab, an agonist monoclonal antibody targeting TRAIL-R1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Patricia; Hotte, Sébastien J

    2009-03-01

    In spite of the advances in survival with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, many cancer patients continue to experience failure with treatments. Advances in molecular oncology and the development of numerous targeted therapies, used by themselves or in combination with at present available treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation, will hopefully improve the fate of these patients. It has been well understood for many years now that deregulation of apoptosis is a major hallmark of cancer cells. Mapatumumab, a fully human agonistic monoclonal antibody to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 1, has been developed to induce apoptosis in cancer cells although having minimal effects on normal cells. This paper reviews the preclinical and early clinical data of this exciting new agent and discusses options for future development of mapatumumab, mostly in combinations with other therapies.

  6. Cell-penetrating Bispecific Antibodies for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    AR441 antibody or control antibodies. Changes in the levels of PSA mRNA were measured by real time PCR (Fig. 1). The bispecific antibody...depending on which capture antibody was used). These values are very compatible with expected affinities for monoclonal antibodies. Interestingly

  7. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Krüger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1 identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2 assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3 connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities.We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses

  8. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  9. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  10. Clinical Validation and Implementation of a Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Assay to Detect Somatic Variants in Non-Small Cell Lung, Melanoma, and Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kevin E.; Zhang, Linsheng; Wang, Jason; Smith, Geoffrey H.; Newman, Scott; Schneider, Thomas M.; Pillai, Rathi N.; Kudchadkar, Ragini R.; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Lawson, David H.; Delman, Keith A.; El-Rayes, Bassel F.; Wilson, Malania M.; Sullivan, H. Clifford; Morrison, Annie S.; Balci, Serdar; Adsay, N. Volkan; Gal, Anthony A.; Sica, Gabriel L.; Saxe, Debra F.; Mann, Karen P.; Hill, Charles E.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Rossi, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    We tested and clinically validated a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) mutation panel using 80 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor samples. Forty non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), 30 melanoma, and 30 gastrointestinal (12 colonic, 10 gastric, and 8 pancreatic adenocarcinoma) FFPE samples were selected from laboratory archives. After appropriate specimen and nucleic acid quality control, 80 NGS libraries were prepared using the Illumina TruSight tumor (TST) kit and sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq. Sequence alignment, variant calling, and sequencing quality control were performed using vendor software and laboratory-developed analysis workflows. TST generated ≥500× coverage for 98.4% of the 13,952 targeted bases. Reproducible and accurate variant calling was achieved at ≥5% variant allele frequency with 8 to 12 multiplexed samples per MiSeq flow cell. TST detected 112 variants overall, and confirmed all known single-nucleotide variants (n = 27), deletions (n = 5), insertions (n = 3), and multinucleotide variants (n = 3). TST detected at least one variant in 85.0% (68/80), and two or more variants in 36.2% (29/80), of samples. TP53 was the most frequently mutated gene in NSCLC (13 variants; 13/32 samples), gastrointestinal malignancies (15 variants; 13/25 samples), and overall (30 variants; 28/80 samples). BRAF mutations were most common in melanoma (nine variants; 9/23 samples). Clinically relevant NGS data can be obtained from routine clinical FFPE solid tumor specimens using TST, benchtop instruments, and vendor-supplied bioinformatics pipelines. PMID:26801070

  11. The HIV glycan shield as a target for broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doores, Katie J

    2015-12-01

    The HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the sole target for HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). HIV Env is one of the most heavily glycosylated proteins known, with approximately half of its mass consisting of host-derived N-linked glycans. The high density of glycans creates a shield that impedes antibody recognition but, critically, some of the most potent and broadly active bnAbs have evolved to recognize epitopes formed by these glycans. Although the virus hijacks the host protein synthesis and glycosylation machinery to generate glycosylated HIV Env, studies have shown that HIV Env glycosylation diverges from that typically observed on host-derived glycoproteins. In particular, the high density of glycans leads to a nonself motif of underprocessed oligomannose-type glycans that forms the target of some of the most broad and potent HIV bnAbs. This review discusses the changing perception of the HIV glycan shield, and summarizes the protein-directed and cell-directed factors controlling HIV Env glycosylation that impact on HIV bnAb recognition and HIV vaccine design strategies.

  12. Development of tetravalent IgG1 dual targeting IGF-1R-EGFR antibodies with potent tumor inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croasdale, Rebecca; Wartha, Katharina; Schanzer, Juergen M; Kuenkele, Klaus-Peter; Ries, Carola; Mayer, Klaus; Gassner, Christian; Wagner, Martina; Dimoudis, Nikolaos; Herter, Sylvia; Jaeger, Christiane; Ferrara, Claudia; Hoffmann, Eike; Kling, Lothar; Lau, Wilma; Staack, Roland F; Heinrich, Julia; Scheuer, Werner; Stracke, Jan; Gerdes, Christian; Brinkmann, Ulrich; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2012-10-15

    In this study we present novel bispecific antibodies that simultaneously target the insulin-like growth factor receptor type I (IGF-1R) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). For this purpose disulfide stabilized scFv domains of the EGFR/ADCC antibody GA201 were fused via serine-glycine connectors to the C-terminus of the heavy (XGFR2) or light chain (XGFR4), or the N-termini of the light (XGFR5) or heavy chain (XGFR3) of the IGF-1R antibody R1507 as parental IgG1 antibody. The resulting bispecific IGF-1R-EGFR antibodies XGFR2, XGFR3 and XGFR4 were successfully generated with yields and stability comparable to conventional IgG1 antibodies. They effectively inhibited IGF-1R and EGFR phosphorylation and 3D proliferation of H322M and H460M2 tumor cells, induced strong down-modulation of IGF-1R as well as enhanced EGFR down-modulation compared to the parental EGFR antibody GA201 and were ADCC competent. The bispecific XGFR derivatives showed a strong format dependent influence of N- or C-terminal heavy and light chain scFv attachment on ADCC activity and an increase in receptor downregulation over the parental combination in vitro. XGFR2 and XGFR4 were selected for in vivo evaluation and showed potent anti-tumoral efficacy comparable to the combination of monospecific IGF-1R and EGFR antibodies in subcutaneous BxPC3 and H322M xenograft models. In summary, we have managed to overcome issues of stability and productivity of bispecific antibodies, discovered important antibody fusion protein design related differences on ADCC activity and receptor downmodulation and show that IGF-1R-EGFR antibodies represent an attractive therapeutic strategy to simultaneously target two key components de-regulated in multiple cancer types, with the ultimate goal to avoid the formation of resistance to therapy.

  13. Targeting of phage particles towards endothelial cells by antibodies selected through a multi-parameter selection strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrup, Ole A.; Lykkemark, Simon; Kristensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is sustained angiogenesis. Here, normal endothelial cells are activated, and their formation of new blood vessels leads to continued tumour growth. An improved patient condition is often observed when angiogenesis is prevented or normalized through targeting of these genomically stable endothelial cells. However, intracellular targets constitute a challenge in therapy, as the agents modulating these targets have to be delivered and internalized specifically to the endothelial cells. Selection of antibodies binding specifically to certain cell types is well established. It is nonetheless a challenge to ensure that the binding of antibodies to the target cell will mediate internalization. Previously selection of such antibodies has been performed targeting cancer cell lines; most often using either monovalent display or polyvalent display. In this article, we describe selections that isolate internalizing antibodies by sequential combining monovalent and polyvalent display using two types of helper phages, one which increases display valence and one which reduces background. One of the selected antibodies was found to mediate internalization into human endothelial cells, although our results confirms that the single stranded nature of the DNA packaged into phage particles may limit applications aimed at targeting nucleic acids in mammalian cells. PMID:28186116

  14. Insecticide-treated bed nets reduce plasma antibody levels and limit the repertoire of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askjaer, N; Maxwell, C; Chambo, W;

    2001-01-01

    The use of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITN) has been documented to reduce malaria morbidity and mortality in areas with endemic malaria, but concerns have been raised that ITN usage could affect the acquisition of malaria immunity. Several lines of evidence have indicated that antibodies against...

  15. Antibody-directed targeting of lysostaphin adsorbed onto polylactide nanoparticles increases its antimicrobial activity against S. aureus in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satishkumar, R.; Vertegel, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the effect of antibody-directed targeting of S. aureus by comparing the activities of lysostaphin conjugated to biodegradable polylactide nanoparticles (NPs) in the presence and in the absence of co-immobilized anti-S. aureus antibody. Lysostaphin-antibody-NP conjugates were synthesized through physical adsorption at different enzyme:antibody:NP ratios. The synthesized enzyme-NP conjugates were characterized by means of dynamic light scattering and zeta potential analysis, and the total protein binding yield on the NPs was characterized using Alexa Fluor 350 and 594 dyes for the S. aureus antibody and lysostaphin respectively. We observed enhanced antimicrobial activity for both enzyme-coated and enzyme-antibody-coated NPs for lysostaphin coatings corresponding to ~ 40% of the initial monolayer and higher compared to the free enzyme case (p < 0.05). At the highest antibody coating concentration, bacterial lysis rates for antibody-coated samples were significantly higher than for lysostaphin-coated samples lacking the antibody (p < 0.05). Such enzyme-NP conjugates thus have the potential for becoming novel therapeutic agents for treating antibiotic-resistant S. aureus infections.

  16. Chondroitin sulfate A-adhering Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes express functionally important antibody epitopes shared by multiple variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Lea; Dobrilovic, Tina; Magistrado, Pamela;

    2010-01-01

    Acquired protection from Plasmodium falciparum placental malaria, a major cause of maternal, fetal, and infant morbidity, is mediated by IgG specific for the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variant VAR2CSA. This protein enables adhesion of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes to chond......Acquired protection from Plasmodium falciparum placental malaria, a major cause of maternal, fetal, and infant morbidity, is mediated by IgG specific for the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variant VAR2CSA. This protein enables adhesion of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes...

  17. Anti-ganglioside antibodies induced in chickens by an alum-adsorbed anti-idiotype antibody targeting NeuGcGM3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo David Guthmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Racotumomab is a murine anti-idiotype cancer vaccine targeting NeuGcGM3 on melanoma, breast and lung cancer. In order to characterize the immunogenicity of alum-adsorbed racotumomab in a non-clinical setting, Leghorn chickens were immunized in dose levels ranging from 25 µg to 1600 µg. Racotumomab was administered subcutaneously in the birds’ neck with three identical boosters and serum samples were collected before, during and after the immunization schedule. A strong antibody response was obtained across the evaluated dose range, confirming the immunogenicity of racotumomab even at dose levels as low as 25 µg. As previously observed when using Freund´s adjuvant, alum-adsorbed racotumomab induced an idiotype-specific response in all the immunized birds and ganglioside-specific antibodies in 60-100% of the animals. In contrast to the rapid induction anti-idiotype response, detection of ganglioside-specific antibodies in responsive animals may require repeated boosting. Kinetics of anti-NeuGcGM3 antibody titers showed a slight decline two weeks after each booster, arguing in favor of repeated immunizations in order to maintain antibody titer.Interestingly, the intensity of the anti-NeuGcGM3 response paralleled that of anti-mucin antibodies and anti-tumor antibodies, suggesting that the in vitro detection of anti-ganglioside antibodies might be a surrogate for an in vivo activity of racotumomab. Taken together, these results suggest that Leghorn chicken immunization might become the means to test the biological activity of racotumomab intended for clinical use.

  18. Local overexpression of Su(H)-MAPK variants affects Notch target gene expression and adult phenotypes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Jasmin S; Nagel, Anja C; Schulz, Adriana; Wahl, Vanessa; Preiss, Anette

    2015-12-01

    In Drosophila, Notch and EGFR signalling pathways are closely intertwined. Their relationship is mostly antagonistic, and may in part be based on the phosphorylation of the Notch signal transducer Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] by MAPK. Su(H) is a transcription factor that together with several cofactors regulates the expression of Notch target genes. Here we address the consequences of a local induction of three Su(H) variants on Notch target gene expression. To this end, wild-type Su(H), a phospho-deficient Su(H) (MAPK-) (ko) and a phospho-mimetic Su(H) (MAPK-ac) isoform were overexpressed in the central domain of the wing anlagen. The expression of the Notch target genes cut, wingless, E(spl)m8-HLH and vestigial, was monitored. For the latter two, reporter genes were used (E(spl)m8-lacZ, vg (BE) -lacZ). In general, Su(H) (MAPK-) (ko) induced a stronger response than wild-type Su(H), whereas the response to Su(H) (MAPK-ac) was very weak. Notch target genes cut, wingless and vg (BE) -lacZ were ectopically activated, whereas E(spl)m8-lacZ was repressed by overexpression of Su(H) proteins. In addition, in epistasis experiments an activated form of the EGF-receptor (DER (act) ) or the MAPK (rl (SEM) ) and individual Su(H) variants were co-overexpressed locally, to compare the resultant phenotypes in adult flies (thorax, wings and eyes) as well as to assay the response of the Notch target gene cut in cell clones.

  19. HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells revealed by germline-targeting immunogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Joseph G; Kulp, Daniel W; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Sarkar, Anita; Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Sesterhenn, Fabian; Ereño-Orbea, June; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Deresa, Isaiah; Hu, Xiaozhen; Spencer, Skye; Jones, Meaghan; Georgeson, Erik; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; deCamp, Allan C; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Wilson, Ian A; Burton, Dennis R; Crotty, Shane; Schief, William R

    2016-03-25

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a major HIV vaccine goal. Germline-targeting immunogens aim to initiate bnAb induction by activating bnAb germline precursor B cells. Critical unmet challenges are to determine whether bnAb precursor naïve B cells bind germline-targeting immunogens and occur at sufficient frequency in humans for reliable vaccine responses. Using deep mutational scanning and multitarget optimization, we developed a germline-targeting immunogen (eOD-GT8) for diverse VRC01-class bnAbs. We then used the immunogen to isolate VRC01-class precursor naïve B cells from HIV-uninfected donors. Frequencies of true VRC01-class precursors, their structures, and their eOD-GT8 affinities support this immunogen as a candidate human vaccine prime. These methods could be applied to germline targeting for other classes of HIV bnAbs and for Abs to other pathogens.

  20. THE HYDROGENOSOMAL ENZYME HYDROGENASE FROM THE ANAEROBIC FUNGUS NEOCALLIMASTIX SP L2 IS RECOGNIZED BY ANTIBODIES, DIRECTED AGAINST THE C-TERMINAL MICROBODY PROTEIN TARGETING SIGNAL SKL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARVINSIKKEMA, FD; KRAAK, MN; VEENHUIS, M; GOTTSCHAL, JC; PRINS, RA

    1993-01-01

    The question was addressed whether antibodies directed against the general microbody C-terminal protein targeting signal SKL recognized hydrogenosomal proteins from Neocallimastix sp. L2. Immunofluorescence, immunocytochemistry and Western blotting experiments using these antibodies indicated the pr

  1. Cloning,expression and characterization of a single-chain antibody PS-9 targeted to pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎锡蕴; 田波; 李力; 袁玫

    1995-01-01

    Genes encoding single-chain antibodies have been first constructed,which consist of the heavyand light chain variable domains of antibody PS-9 joined together by a flexible peptide linker.The geneswere cloned into coat protein g3p genes of pCANTAB5 phagemids,and expressed as fusion proteins on thephage tips.Immunological assay demonstrated that the engineered antibodies specifically bound to cancer cellsLS-174-T as well as to pure bovine submaxillary gland mucin.Their specificity and affinity appeared the sameas their parent antibodies.Our results supposed that the single-chain antibodies will be a target for thediagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  2. A genomic approach to therapeutic target validation identifies a glucose-lowering GLP1R variant protective for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Robert A.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    . We used these data to first compare associations of variants in genes encoding drug targets with the effects of pharmacological manipulation of those targets in clinical trials. We then tested the association of those variants with disease outcomes, including coronary heart disease, to predict...... associated with protection against heart disease, thus providing evidence that GLP1R agonists are not likely to be associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. Our results provide an encouraging signal that these agents may be associated with benefit, a question currently being addressed...... therefore investigated the association of variants in six genes that encode drug targets for obesity or T2D with a range of metabolic traits in up to 11, 806 individuals by targeted exome sequencing and follow-up in 39, 979 individuals by targeted genotyping, with additional in silico follow-up in consortia...

  3. Functional Characterization of an scFv-Fc Antibody that Immunotherapeutically Targets the Common Cancer Cell Surface Proteoglycan CSPG4

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xinhui; Katayama, Akihiro; Wang, Yangyang; YU Ling; Favoino, Elvira; Sakakura, Koichi; Favole, Alessandra; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Silver, Susan; Watkins, Simon C.; Kageshita, Toshiro; Ferrone, Soldano

    2011-01-01

    Cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) is an attractive target for antibody-based cancer immunotherapy because of its role in tumor cell biology, its high expression on malignant cells including cancer-initiating cells, and its restricted distribution in normal tissues. The clinical use of CSPG4 has been hampered by the lack of a CSPG4-specific chimeric, humanized, or fully human monoclonal antibody. To overcome this limitation, we generated a CSPG4-specific fully human singl...

  4. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology.

  5. Antibody to a conserved antigenic target is protective against diverse prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Skurnik, David; Zaidi, Tanweer; Roux, Damien; Deoliveira, Rosane B; Garrett, Wendy S; Lu, Xi; O'Malley, Jennifer; Kinzel, Kathryn; Zaidi, Tauqeer; Rey, Astrid; Perrin, Christophe; Fichorova, Raina N; Kayatani, Alexander K K; Maira-Litràn, Tomas; Gening, Marina L; Tsvetkov, Yury E; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Pelton, Stephen I; Golenbock, Douglas T; Pier, Gerald B

    2013-06-11

    Microbial capsular antigens are effective vaccines but are chemically and immunologically diverse, resulting in a major barrier to their use against multiple pathogens. A β-(1→6)-linked poly-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) surface capsule is synthesized by four proteins encoded in genetic loci designated intercellular adhesion in Staphylococcus aureus or polyglucosamine in selected Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. We report that many microbial pathogens lacking an identifiable intercellular adhesion or polyglucosamine locus produce PNAG, including Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal pathogens, as well as protozoa, e.g., Trichomonas vaginalis, Plasmodium berghei, and sporozoites and blood-stage forms of Plasmodium falciparum. Natural antibody to PNAG is common in humans and animals and binds primarily to the highly acetylated glycoform of PNAG but is not protective against infection due to lack of deposition of complement opsonins. Polyclonal animal antibody raised to deacetylated glycoforms of PNAG and a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that both bind to native and deacetylated glycoforms of PNAG mediated complement-dependent opsonic or bactericidal killing and protected mice against local and/or systemic infections by Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B, Candida albicans, and P. berghei ANKA, and against colonic pathology in a model of infectious colitis. PNAG is also a capsular polysaccharide for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and nontypable Hemophilus influenzae, and protects cells from environmental stress. Vaccination targeting PNAG could contribute to immunity against serious and diverse prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, and the conserved production of PNAG suggests that it is a critical factor in microbial biology.

  6. Amending HIV Drugs: A Novel Small-Molecule Approach To Target Lupus Anti-DNA Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanPatten, Sonya; Sun, Shan; He, Mingzhu; Cheng, Kai Fan; Altiti, Ahmad; Papatheodorou, Angelos; Kowal, Czeslawa; Jeganathan, Venkatesh; Crawford, James M; Bloom, Ona; Volpe, Bruce T; Grant, Christian; Meurice, Nathalie; Coleman, Thomas R; Diamond, Betty; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2016-10-13

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that can affect numerous tissues and is characterized by the production of nuclear antigen-directed autoantibodies (e.g., anti-dsDNA). Using a combination of virtual and ELISA-based screens, we made the intriguing discovery that several HIV-protease inhibitors can function as decoy antigens to specifically inhibit the binding of anti-dsDNA antibodies to target antigens such as dsDNA and pentapeptide DWEYS. Computational modeling revealed that HIV-protease inhibitors comprised structural features present in DWEYS and predicted that analogues containing more flexible backbones would possess preferred binding characteristics. To address this, we reduced the internal amide backbone to improve flexibility, producing new small-molecule decoy antigens, which neutralize anti-dsDNA antibodies in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. Pharmacokinetic and SLE model studies demonstrated that peptidomimetic FISLE-412,1 a reduced HIV protease inhibitor analogue, was well-tolerated, altered serum reactivity to DWEYS, reduced glomeruli IgG deposition, preserved kidney histology, and delayed SLE onset in NZB/W F1 mice.

  7. Antibody-conjugated soybean oil-filled calcium phosphate nanoshells for targetted delivery of hydrophobic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H T; Kroczynski, M; Maddox, J; Chen, Y; Josephs, R; Ostafin, A E

    2006-11-01

    Hollow calcium phosphate nanoparticles capable of encapsulating poorly water-soluble molecules were produced by self-assembly. Previously reported were solid calcium phosphate nanoparticles and water-filled calcium phosphate nanocapsules suited for encapsulating mostly hydrophilic, but not hydrophobic compounds. Here, calcium phosphate was deposited around 100 nm diameter, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate stabilized soybean oil nanoemulsions using either calcium chloride or NaOH titrations to achieve shell thickness between 20-70 nm. The surface was functionalized with carboxylic acid via the addition of carboxyethylphosphonic acid to attach Molecular Probes AB-594C antibody using sulpho-n-hydroxysuccinimide and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride with an efficiency of approximately 70%, while retaining near complete antibody function. Hydrophobic pyrene was encapsulated with an efficiency of 95%, at concentrations much higher than its water solubility limit, and exhibited spectral features characteristic of a hydrophobic environment. These materials can be used in the targeted delivery of many useful, yet poorly water-soluble pharmaceutical and nutraceutical compounds.

  8. Liver-targeting of interferon-alpha with tissue-specific domain antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulstock, Edward; Sosabowski, Jane; Ovečka, Milan; Prince, Rob; Goodall, Laura; Mudd, Clare; Sepp, Armin; Davies, Marie; Foster, Julie; Burnet, Jerome; Dunlevy, Gráinne; Walker, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNα) is used for the treatment of hepatitis C infection and whilst efficacious it is associated with multiple adverse events including reduced leukocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet counts, fatigue, and depression. These events are most likely caused by systemic exposure to interferon. We therefore hypothesise that targeting the therapeutic directly to the intended site of action in the liver would reduce exposure in blood and peripheral tissue and hence improve the safety and tolerability of IFNα therapy. We genetically fused IFN to a domain antibody (dAb) specific to a hepatocyte restricted antigen, asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). Our results show that the murine IFNα2 homolog (mIFNα2) fused to an ASGPR specific dAb, termed DOM26h-196-61, could be expressed in mammalian tissue culture systems and retains the desirable biophysical properties and activity of both fusion partners when measured in vitro. Furthermore a clear increase in in vivo targeting of the liver by mIFNα2-ASGPR dAb fusion protein, compared to that observed with either unfused mIFNα2 or mIFNα2 fused to an isotype control dAb VHD2 (which does not bind ASGPR) was demonstrated using microSPECT imaging. We suggest that these findings may be applicable in the development of a liver-targeted human IFN molecule with improved safety and patient compliance in comparison to the current standard of care, which could ultimately be used as a treatment for human hepatitis virus infections.

  9. A novel mouse monoclonal antibody targeting ErbB2 suppresses breast cancer growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawa, Seiji [Division of Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai 4-6-1, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Matsushita, Hirohisa; Ohbayashi, Hirokazu [Department of Research and Development, Nichirei Biosciences Inc., Tokyo 104-8402 (Japan); Semba, Kentaro [Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yamamoto, Tadashi, E-mail: tyamamot@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai 4-6-1, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)

    2009-07-03

    Overexpression of ErbB2 in breast cancer is associated with increased recurrence and worse prognosis. Accumulating evidences suggest that molecular targeted therapy is a promising anticancer strategy. In this study, we produced a novel anti-ErbB2 monoclonal antibody, 6G10, that recognized an epitope distinct from the trastuzumab binding site. 6G10 induced aggregation of BT474 breast cancer cells and inhibited proliferation of various breast cancer cell lines including BT474. A growth inhibition assay showed that 6G10 had EC{sub 50} values comparable to trastuzumab, indicating that the drugs have a similar level of potency. Furthermore, intraperitoneal administration of 6G10 completely inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors derived from BT474 and SK-BR-3 cells. These data suggested that 6G10 has great therapeutic potential and could be administered to patients alternatively, or synergistically, with trastuzumab.

  10. HER2-targeted therapy in breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Andersson, Michael; Kamby, Claus

    2008-01-01

    There is strong clinical evidence that trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) two tyrosine kinase receptor, is an important component of first-line treatment of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. In particular the combination...... with taxanes and vinorelbine has been established. In the preoperative setting inclusion of trastuzumab has significantly increased the pathological complete response rate. Results from large phase III trials evaluating adjuvant therapy in HER2-positive early breast cancer indicate that the addition...... of trastuzumab to chemotherapy improves disease-free and overall survival. The use of lapatinib, a dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both HER1 and HER2, in combination with capecitabine in the second-line treatment of HER2-positive patients with metastatic breast cancer previously treated with trastuzumab has...

  11. Targeting nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Joana A; Gomes, Bárbara; Coelho, Manuel A N; do Carmo Pereira, Maria; Rocha, Sandra

    2014-04-01

    Development of therapeutics for brain disorders is one of the more difficult challenges to be overcome by the scientific community due to the inability of most molecules to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Antibody-conjugated nanoparticles are drug carriers that can be used to target encapsulated drugs to the brain endothelial cells and have proven to be very promising. They significantly improve the accumulation of the drug in pathological sites and decrease the undesirable side effect of drugs in healthy tissues. We review the systems that have demonstrated promising results in crossing the BBB through receptor-mediated endocytic mechanisms for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

  12. Lethal iron deprivation induced by non-neutralizing antibodies targeting transferrin receptor 1 in malignant B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, José A; Luria-Pérez, Rosendo; López-Valdés, Héctor E; Casero, David; Daniels, Tracy R; Patel, Shabnum; Avila, David; Leuchter, Richard; So, Sokuntheavy; Ortiz-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Bonavida, Benjamin; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Charles, Andrew C; Pellegrini, Matteo; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L

    2011-11-01

    A number of antibodies have been developed that induce lethal iron deprivation (LID) by targeting the transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1/CD71) and either neutralizing transferrin (Tf) binding, blocking internalization of the receptor and/or inducing its degradation. We have developed recombinant antibodies targeting human TfR1 (ch128.1 and ch128.1Av), which induce receptor degradation and are cytotoxic to certain malignant B-cells. We now show that internalization of TfR1 bound to these antibodies can lead to its sequestration and degradation, as well as reduced Tf uptake, and the induction of a transcriptional response consistent with iron deprivation, which is mediated in part by downstream targets of p53. Cells resistant to these antibodies do not sequester and degrade TfR1 after internalization of the antibody/receptor complex, and accordingly maintain their ability to internalize Tf. These findings are expected to facilitate the rational design and clinical use of therapeutic agents targeting iron import via TfR1 in hematopoietic malignancies.

  13. HAI-178 antibody-conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and simultaneous therapy of gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Can; Bao, Chenchen; Liang, Shujing; Zhang, Lingxia; Fu, Hualin; Wang, Yutian; Wang, Kan; Li, Chao; Deng, Min; Liao, Qiande; Ni, Jian; Cui, Daxiang

    2014-05-01

    The successful development of safe and highly effective nanoprobes for targeted imaging and simultaneous therapy of in vivo gastric cancer is a great challenge. Herein we reported for the first time that anti-α-subunit of ATP synthase antibody, HAI-178 monoclonal antibody-conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles, was successfully used for targeted imaging and simultaneous therapy of in vivo gastric cancer. A total of 172 specimens of gastric cancer tissues were collected, and the expression of α-subunit of ATP synthase in gastric cancer tissues was investigated by immunohistochemistry method. Fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles were prepared and conjugated with HAI-178 monoclonal antibody, and the resultant HAI-178 antibody-conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (HAI-178-FMNPs) were co-incubated with gastric cancer MGC803 cells and gastric mucous GES-1 cells. Gastric cancer-bearing nude mice models were established, were injected with prepared HAI-178-FMNPs via tail vein, and were imaged by magnetic resonance imaging and small animal fluorescent imaging system. The results showed that the α-subunit of ATP synthase exhibited high expression in 94.7% of the gastric cancer tissues. The prepared HAI-178-FMNPs could target actively MGC803 cells, realized fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging of in vivo gastric cancer, and actively inhibited growth of gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, HAI-178 antibody-conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles have a great potential in applications such as targeted imaging and simultaneous therapy of in vivo early gastric cancer cells in the near future.

  14. Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus Neutralizing Antibody Escape Variants Contribute to Viral Persistence in Meat-Type Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously demonstrated a high incidence of chickens with persistent viremia even in the presence of neutralizing antibodies (NAb) against the inoculated parental virus (V+A+) in commercial meat-type chickens inoculated at hatch with Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV J) field isolates. I...

  15. Multiplexed, targeted gene editing in Nicotiana benthamiana for glyco-engineering and monoclonal antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Stoddard, Thomas J; Demorest, Zachary L; Lavoie, Pierre-Olivier; Luo, Song; Clasen, Benjamin M; Cedrone, Frederic; Ray, Erin E; Coffman, Andrew P; Daulhac, Aurelie; Yabandith, Ann; Retterath, Adam J; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Zhang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Biopharmaceutical glycoproteins produced in plants carry N-glycans with plant-specific residues core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose, which can significantly impact the activity, stability and immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals. In this study, we have employed sequence-specific transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to knock out two α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT) and the two β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase (XylT) genes within Nicotiana benthamiana to generate plants with improved capacity to produce glycoproteins devoid of plant-specific residues. Among plants regenerated from N. benthamiana protoplasts transformed with TALENs targeting either the FucT or XylT genes, 50% (80 of 160) and 73% (94 of 129) had mutations in at least one FucT or XylT allele, respectively. Among plants regenerated from protoplasts transformed with both TALEN pairs, 17% (18 of 105) had mutations in all four gene targets, and 3% (3 of 105) plants had mutations in all eight alleles comprising both gene families; these mutations were transmitted to the next generation. Endogenous proteins expressed in the complete knockout line had N-glycans that lacked β(1,2)-xylose and had a significant reduction in core α(1,3)-fucose levels (40% of wild type). A similar phenotype was observed in the N-glycans of a recombinant rituximab antibody transiently expressed in the homozygous mutant plants. More importantly, the most desirable glycoform, one lacking both core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose residues, increased in the antibody from 2% when produced in the wild-type line to 55% in the mutant line. These results demonstrate the power of TALENs for multiplexed gene editing. Furthermore, the mutant N. benthamiana lines provide a valuable platform for producing highly potent biopharmaceutical products.

  16. Proteasome activator complex PA28 identified as an accessible target in prostate cancer by in vivo selection of human antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, David; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Ximénez-Embún, Pilar; Fernández-Periáñez, Rodrigo; Martín, M. Teresa; Molina-Privado, Irene; Ruppen-Cañás, Isabel; Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Cañamero, Marta; Cuesta, Ángel M.; Compte, Marta; Kremer, Leonor; Bellas, Carmen; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Sanz, Laura; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Antibody cancer therapies rely on systemically accessible targets and suitable antibodies that exert a functional activity or deliver a payload to the tumor site. Here, we present proof-of-principle of in vivo selection of human antibodies in tumor-bearing mice that identified a tumor-specific antibody able to deliver a payload and unveils the target antigen. By using an ex vivo enrichment process against freshly disaggregated tumors to purge the repertoire, in combination with in vivo biopanning at optimized phage circulation time, we have identified a human domain antibody capable of mediating selective localization of phage to human prostate cancer xenografts. Affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry analysis showed that the antibody recognizes the proteasome activator complex PA28. The specificity of soluble antibody was confirmed by demonstrating its binding to the active human PA28αβ complex. Whereas systemically administered control phage was confined in the lumen of blood vessels of both normal tissues and tumors, the selected phage spread from tumor vessels into the perivascular tumor parenchyma. In these areas, the selected phage partially colocalized with PA28 complex. Furthermore, we found that the expression of the α subunit of PA28 [proteasome activator complex subunit 1 (PSME1)] is elevated in primary and metastatic human prostate cancer and used anti-PSME1 antibodies to show that PSME1 is an accessible marker in mouse xenograft tumors. These results support the use of PA28 as a tumor marker and a potential target for therapeutic intervention in prostate cancer. PMID:23918357

  17. The Presence, Persistence and Functional Properties of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein II Antibodies Are Influenced by HLA Class II Allelic Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Leticia M.; Lima, Barbara A. S.; Sousa, Taís N.; Alves, Jéssica R. S.; Rocha, Roberto S.; Fontes, Cor J. F.; Sanchez, Bruno A. M.; Adams, John H.; Brito, Cristiana F. A.; Pires, Douglas E. V.; Ascher, David B.; Sell, Ana Maria; Carvalho, Luzia H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax infects red blood cells through a key pathway that requires interaction between Duffy binding protein II (DBPII) and its receptor on reticulocytes, the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC). A high proportion of P. vivax-exposed individuals fail to develop antibodies that inhibit DBPII-DARC interaction, and genetic factors that modulate this humoral immune response are poorly characterized. Here, we investigate if DBPII responsiveness could be HLA class II-linked. Methodology/Principal Findings A community-based open cohort study was carried out in an agricultural settlement of the Brazilian Amazon, in which 336 unrelated volunteers were genotyped for HLA class II (DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 loci), and their DBPII immune responses were monitored over time (baseline, 6 and 12 months) by conventional serology (DBPII IgG ELISA-detected) and functional assays (inhibition of DBPII–erythrocyte binding). The results demonstrated an increased susceptibility of the DRB1*13:01 carriers to develop and sustain an anti-DBPII IgG response, while individuals with the haplotype DRB1*14:02-DQA1*05:03-DQB1*03:01 were persistent non-responders. HLA class II gene polymorphisms also influenced the functional properties of DBPII antibodies (BIAbs, binding inhibitory antibodies), with three alleles (DRB1*07:01, DQA1*02:01 and DQB1*02:02) comprising a single haplotype linked with the presence and persistence of the BIAbs response. Modelling the structural effects of the HLA-DRB1 variants revealed a number of differences in the peptide-binding groove, which is likely to lead to altered antigen binding and presentation profiles, and hence may explain the differences in subject responses. Conclusions/Significance The current study confirms the heritability of the DBPII antibody response, with genetic variation in HLA class II genes influencing both the development and persistence of IgG antibody responses. Cellular studies to increase

  18. The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte invasion ligand Pfrh4 as a target of functional and protective human antibodies against malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Reiling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquired antibodies are important in human immunity to malaria, but key targets remain largely unknown. Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding-homologue-4 (PfRh4 is important for invasion of human erythrocytes and may therefore be a target of protective immunity. METHODS: IgG and IgG subclass-specific responses against different regions of PfRh4 were determined in a longitudinal cohort of 206 children in Papua New Guinea (PNG. Human PfRh4 antibodies were tested for functional invasion-inhibitory activity, and expression of PfRh4 by P. falciparum isolates and sequence polymorphisms were determined. RESULTS: Antibodies to PfRh4 were acquired by children exposed to P. falciparum malaria, were predominantly comprised of IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses, and were associated with increasing age and active parasitemia. High levels of antibodies, particularly IgG3, were strongly predictive of protection against clinical malaria and high-density parasitemia. Human affinity-purified antibodies to the binding region of PfRh4 effectively inhibited erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum merozoites and antibody levels in protected children were at functionally-active concentrations. Although expression of PfRh4 can vary, PfRh4 protein was expressed by most isolates derived from the cohort and showed limited sequence polymorphism. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence suggests that PfRh4 is a target of antibodies that contribute to protective immunity to malaria by inhibiting erythrocyte invasion and preventing high density parasitemia. These findings advance our understanding of the targets and mechanisms of human immunity and evaluating the potential of PfRh4 as a component of candidate malaria vaccines.

  19. Coexistence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs Ag) and anti-HBs antibodies in chronic hepatitis B virus carriers: influence of "a" determinant variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lada, Olivier; Benhamou, Yves; Poynard, Thierry; Thibault, Vincent

    2006-03-01

    In chronic hepatitis B (CHB), the persistence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs Ag) is sometimes associated with antibodies (Ab) to HBs (anti-HBs). To assess the hypothesis of the selection of HBs Ag immune escape variants in CHB patients, the variability of the HBV S gene was determined for patients persistently carrying both HBs Ag and anti-HBs antibodies and patients solely positive for HBs Ag. We selected 14 patients who presented both markers (group I) in several consecutive samples and 12 patients positive for HBs Ag only (group II). The HBs Ag-encoding gene was amplified and cloned, and at least 15 clones per patient were sequenced and analyzed. The number of residue changes within the S protein was 2.7 times more frequent for group I than for group II patients and occurred mostly in the "a" determinant of the major hydrophilic region (MHR), with 9.52 versus 2.43 changes per 100 residues (P = 0.009), respectively. Ten patients (71%) from group I, but only three (25%) from group II, presented at least two residue changes in the MHR. The most frequent changes in group I patients were located at positions s145, s129, s126, s144, and s123, as described for immune escape variants. In CHB patients, the coexistence of HBs Ag and anti-HBs Ab is associated with an increase of "a" determinant variability, suggesting a selection of HBV immune escape mutants during chronic carriage. The consequences of this selection process with regard to vaccine efficacy, diagnosis, and clinical evolution remain partially unknown.

  20. Development of a human IgG4 bispecific antibody for dual targeting of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Christoph; Bevers, Jack; Jackman, Janet; Chiang, Nancy; Nakamura, Gerald; Dillon, Michael; Liu, Hongbin; Molina, Patricia; Elliott, J Michael; Shatz, Whitney; Scheer, Justin M; Giese, Glen; Persson, Josefine; Zhang, Yin; Dennis, Mark S; Giulianotti, James; Gupta, Prateek; Reilly, Dorothea; Palma, Enzo; Wang, Jianyong; Stefanich, Eric; Scheerens, Heleen; Fuh, Germaine; Wu, Lawren C

    2013-09-13

    Human bispecific antibodies have great potential for the treatment of human diseases. Although human IgG1 bispecific antibodies have been generated, few attempts have been reported in the scientific literature that extend bispecific antibodies to other human antibody isotypes. In this paper, we report our work expanding the knobs-into-holes bispecific antibody technology to the human IgG4 isotype. We apply this approach to generate a bispecific antibody that targets IL-4 and IL-13, two cytokines that play roles in type 2 inflammation. We show that IgG4 bispecific antibodies can be generated in large quantities with equivalent efficiency and quality and have comparable pharmacokinetic properties and lung partitioning, compared with the IgG1 isotype. This work broadens the range of published therapeutic bispecific antibodies with natural surface architecture and provides additional options for the generation of bispecific antibodies with differing effector functions through the use of different antibody isotypes.

  1. Multiproduct high-resolution monoclonal antibody charge variant separations by pH gradient ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnan, Dell; Moreno, G Tony

    2009-11-01

    In the biotechnology industry, ion-exchange chromatography is widely used for profiling the charge heterogeneity of proteins, including monoclonal antibodies. Ionic strength based ion exchange separations, while having excellent resolving power and robustness, are product specific and time-consuming to develop. In the present work, a pH gradient based separation using a cation exchange column is described and shown to be a multiproduct charge sensitive separation method for monoclonal antibodies. Simple mixtures of defined buffer components were used to generate the pH-gradients that separate closely related antibody species. The form of the pH gradient was controlled and optimized by the pump as well as the buffer composition if necessary. During this work, the buffer compositions for the separation were optimized in parallel for several MAbs. The data shows that the multiproduct method is optimal for all of the MAbs studied. Operational aspects of the separation such as column chemistry, column length, and sample matrix indicate a very robust method. The pH gradient ion-exchange method is demonstrated to have significant resolving power and peak capacities far in excess of what we would expect for ionic strength elution ion-exchange. Data obtained demonstrates that the separation is relatively insensitive to column length. Direct analysis (no buffer exchange) of samples in matrixes consistent with in-process manufacturing pools is demonstrated. Such a capability is extremely useful for the high throughput evaluation of in-process and final product samples.

  2. Triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI): phage display and antibodies as tools for finding target regions to inhibit catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Ayala, Víctor; Belmont, Iaraset; Abraham, Landa

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that antibodies against triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI) can alter its enzymatic catalysis. In the present study, we used antibodies produced against the NH2-terminal region of TTPI (1/3NH2TTPI) and the phage display technology to find target regions to inhibit TTPI activity. As a first step, we obtained polyclonal antibodies against non-conserved regions from the 1/3NH2TTPI, which had an inhibitory effect of about 74 % on catalytic activity. Afterward, they were used to screen a library of phage-displayed dodecapeptides; as a result, 41 phage mimotope clones were isolated and grouped according to their amino acid sequence, finding the consensus A1 (VPTXPI), A2 (VPTXXI), B (LTPGQ), and D (DPLPR). Antibodies against selected phage mimotope clones were obtained by rabbit's immunization; these ones clearly recognized TTPI by both Western blot and ELISA. However, only the mimotope PDTS16 (DSVTPTSVMAVA) clone, which belongs to the VPTXXI consensus, raised antibodies capable of inhibiting the TTPI catalytic activity in 45 %. Anti-PDTS16 antibodies were confronted to several synthetic peptides that encompass the 1/3NH2TTPI, and they only recognized three, which share the motif FDTLQK belonging to the helix-α1 in TTPI. This suggests that this motif is the main part of the epitope recognized by anti-PDTS16 antibodies and revealed its importance for TTPI catalysis.

  3. Analysis of Sera of Recipients with Allograft Rejection Indicates That Keratin 1 Is the Target of Anti-Endothelial Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuli; Hu, Juan; Luo, Weiguang; Luo, Qizhi; Guo, Jing; Tian, Fang; Ming, Yingzi

    2017-01-01

    Anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECAs) are usually directed against the surface antigens on the vascular endothelial cells. Clinical studies suggest a pathogenic role for nonhuman leukocyte antigen in antibody-mediated rejection; however, the antigens on the donor vascular endothelium that serve as the first-line targets for an immune response during allograft rejection have not been fully identified. Here, we used immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify antigens from the sera of kidney transplant recipients who were experiencing antibody-mediated rejection. Keratin 1 (KRT1) was identified as a novel antigenic target expressed on endothelial cells. To validate our finding, we produced recombinant proteins representing the three most common alleles of KRT1. The serum used for immunoprecipitation showed a strong reaction to KRT1 recombinants in western blot and ELISA. In the kidney transplant cohort, more AECA-positive recipients than AECA-negative recipients had KRT1 antibodies (32.2% versus 11.9%, p = 0.002). Sera from 255 renal recipients were tested by ELISA. Of the 77 recipients with deteriorating graft function (serum creatinine > 120 μmol/L), 23 had anti-KRT1 antibodies. KRT1-IgG positivity was, therefore, associated with a higher risk of kidney transplant rejection (29.9% (23/77) versus 16.9% (30/178), p = 0.0187). A better understanding of this antigenic target will improve long-term allograft survival.

  4. Targeting of influenza epitopes to murine CR1/CR2 using single-chain antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, J; Tchorbanov, A; Horváth, A; Baiu, D C; Hazenbos, W; Rajnavölgyi, E; Kurucz, I; Capel, P J; Erdei, A

    1999-05-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies are genetically engineered molecules comprising the variable regions responsible for specific binding. scFv that recognize certain surface molecules on professional antigen presenting cells could therefore be suitable for targeting Ag to these cells. We have produced an scFv that recognizes murine complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/CR2) and genetically fused it with different numbers of influenza hemagglutinin peptides which contain both B and T cell epitopes. The CR1/CR2 specific hybridoma 7G6 was used for RT-PCR to obtain the variable regions, which were then combined to create an scFv fragment. The influenza hemagglutinin intersubunit peptide HA317-41 (IP) was engineered to the N terminus of the scFv in one, two or three copies. The so obtained IP(1-3)7G6scFv still bound the complement receptors; the peptides in the construct were recognized by the peptide specific monoclonal IP2-11-1 on Western blots and ELISAs. The CR1/CR2 positive B lymphomas A20 and 2PK3 presented the peptide to an I-Ed restricted IP specific T cell hybridoma more efficiently when incubated with the IP(1)7G6 constructs as compared to the free peptide. The results suggest that scFv could work as targeting devices in subunit vaccines.

  5. Targeted cancer therapies based on antibodies directed against epidermal growth factor receptor: status and perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenping ZHU

    2007-01-01

    Compelling experimental and clinical evidence suggests that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of a variety of human cancers; thus, providing a strong rationale for the development of receptor antagonists as effective and specific therapeutic strategies for the treatment of EGFR-expressing cancers. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb), owing to their high specificity towards a given target, represent a unique class of novel cancer therapeutics. A number of anti-EGFR mAb are currently being developed in our clinic, including two that have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN). Cetuximab (Erbitux, IMC-C225), an IgG 1 mAb, has demonstrated significant antitumor activity,both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapeutics and radiation,in patients with refractory mCRC and SCCHN, respectively. Panitumumab(Vectibix), an IgG2 mAb, has been approved as a single agent for the treatment of patients with refractory mCRC. These mAb, via blocking ligand/receptor interactions, exert their biological activity via multiple mechanisms, includinginhibition of cell cycle progression, potentiation of cell apoptosis, inhibition of DNA repair, inhibition of angiogenesis, tumor cell invasion and metastasis and,potentially, induction of immunological effector mechanisms. Anti-EGFR anti-bodies have demonstrated good safety profiles and potent anticancer activity in our clinic and may prove to be efficacious agents in the treatment of a variety of human malignancies.

  6. Molecular characterization of monoclonal antibodies that inhibit acetylcholinesterase by targeting the peripheral site and backdoor region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Bourne

    Full Text Available The inhibition properties and target sites of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs Elec403, Elec408 and Elec410, generated against Electrophorus electricus acetylcholinesterase (AChE, have been defined previously using biochemical and mutagenesis approaches. Elec403 and Elec410, which bind competitively with each other and with the peptidic toxin inhibitor fasciculin, are directed toward distinctive albeit overlapping epitopes located at the AChE peripheral anionic site, which surrounds the entrance of the active site gorge. Elec408, which is not competitive with the other two mAbs nor fasciculin, targets a second epitope located in the backdoor region, distant from the gorge entrance. To characterize the molecular determinants dictating their binding site specificity, we cloned and sequenced the mAbs; generated antigen-binding fragments (Fab retaining the parental inhibition properties; and explored their structure-function relationships using complementary x-ray crystallography, homology modeling and flexible docking approaches. Hypermutation of one Elec403 complementarity-determining region suggests occurrence of antigen-driven selection towards recognition of the AChE peripheral site. Comparative analysis of the 1.9Å-resolution structure of Fab408 and of theoretical models of its Fab403 and Fab410 congeners evidences distinctive surface topographies and anisotropic repartitions of charges, consistent with their respective target sites and inhibition properties. Finally, a validated, data-driven docking model of the Fab403-AChE complex suggests a mode of binding at the PAS that fully correlates with the functional data. This comprehensive study documents the molecular peculiarities of Fab403 and Fab410, as the largest peptidic inhibitors directed towards the peripheral site, and those of Fab408, as the first inhibitor directed toward the backdoor region of an AChE and a unique template for the design of new, specific modulators of AChE catalysis.

  7. Liver-targeting of interferon-alpha with tissue-specific domain antibodies.

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    Edward Coulstock

    Full Text Available Interferon alpha (IFNα is used for the treatment of hepatitis C infection and whilst efficacious it is associated with multiple adverse events including reduced leukocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet counts, fatigue, and depression. These events are most likely caused by systemic exposure to interferon. We therefore hypothesise that targeting the therapeutic directly to the intended site of action in the liver would reduce exposure in blood and peripheral tissue and hence improve the safety and tolerability of IFNα therapy. We genetically fused IFN to a domain antibody (dAb specific to a hepatocyte restricted antigen, asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR. Our results show that the murine IFNα2 homolog (mIFNα2 fused to an ASGPR specific dAb, termed DOM26h-196-61, could be expressed in mammalian tissue culture systems and retains the desirable biophysical properties and activity of both fusion partners when measured in vitro. Furthermore a clear increase in in vivo targeting of the liver by mIFNα2-ASGPR dAb fusion protein, compared to that observed with either unfused mIFNα2 or mIFNα2 fused to an isotype control dAb VHD2 (which does not bind ASGPR was demonstrated using microSPECT imaging. We suggest that these findings may be applicable in the development of a liver-targeted human IFN molecule with improved safety and patient compliance in comparison to the current standard of care, which could ultimately be used as a treatment for human hepatitis virus infections.

  8. Distinct expression profiles of Notch-1 protein in human solid tumors: Implications for development of targeted therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yuan; Burns, Janine A.; Carol A Cheney; Zhang, Ningyan; Vitelli, Salvatore; Wang, Fubao; Bett, Andrew; Chastain, Michael; Audoly, Laurent P.; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Biological therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target tumor-associated antigens have been considered an effective therapeutic approach in oncology. In considering Notch-1 receptor as a potential target, we performed immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays to determine 1) whether the receptor is overexpressed in tumor cells as compared to their corresponding normal tissues and 2) the clinical significance of its expression levels in human breast, colorectal, lung and prosta...

  9. Affinity Maturation of Monoclonal Antibody 1E11 by Targeted Randomization in CDR3 Regions Optimizes Therapeutic Antibody Targeting of HER2-Positive Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Bong-Kook; Choi, Soyoung; Cui, Lei Guang; Lee, Young-Ha; Hwang, In-Sik; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Shim, Hyunbo; Lee, Jong-Seo

    2015-01-01

    Anti-HER2 murine monoclonal antibody 1E11 has strong and synergistic anti-tumor activity in HER2-overexpressing gastric cancer cells when used in combination with trastuzumab. We presently optimized this antibody for human therapeutics. First, the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the murine antibody were grafted onto human germline immunoglobulin variable genes. No difference in affinity and biological activity was observed between chimeric 1E11 (ch1E11) and humanized 1E11 (hz1E11). Next, affinity maturation of hz1E11 was performed by the randomization of CDR-L3 and H3 residues followed by stringent biopanning selection. Milder selection pressure favored the selection of more diverse clones, whereas higher selection stringency resulted in the convergence of the panning output to a smaller number of clones with improved affinity. Clone 1A12 had four amino acid substitutions in CDR-L3, and showed a 10-fold increase in affinity compared to the parental clone and increased potency in an in vitro anti-proliferative activity assay with HER2-overepxressing gastric cancer cells. Clone 1A12 inhibited tumor growth of NCI-N87 xenograft model with similar efficacy to trastuzumab alone, and the combination treatment of 1A12 and trastuzumab completely removed the established tumors. These results suggest that humanized and affinity matured monoclonal antibody 1A12 is a highly optimized molecule for future therapeutic development against HER2-positive tumors.

  10. Photothermal killing of Staphylococcus aureus using antibody-targeted gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millenbaugh NJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nancy J Millenbaugh,1 Jonathan B Baskin,1 Mauris N DeSilva,1 W Rowe Elliott,1 Randolph D Glickman2 1Maxillofacial Injury and Disease Department, Naval Medical Research Unit San Antonio, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USAPurpose: The continued emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial infections and the decline in discovery of new antibiotics are major challenges for health care throughout the world. This situation has heightened the need for novel antimicrobial therapies as alternatives to traditional antibiotics. The combination of metallic nanoparticles and laser exposure has been proposed as a strategy to induce physical damage to bacteria, regardless of antibiotic sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to test the antibacterial effect of antibody-targeted gold nanoparticles combined with pulsed laser irradiation.Methods: Gold nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specific to Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan were incubated with suspensions of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MRSA and MSSA. Bacterial suspensions were then exposed to 8 ns pulsed laser irradiation at a wavelength of 532 nm and fluences ranging from 1 to 5 J/cm2. Viability of the bacteria following laser exposure was determined using colony forming unit assays. Scanning electron microscopy was used to confirm the binding of nanoparticles to bacteria and the presence of cellular damage.Results: The laser-activated nanoparticle treatment reduced the surviving population to 31% of control in the MSSA population, while the survival in the MRSA population was reduced to 58% of control. Significant decreases in bacterial viability occurred when the laser fluence exceeded 1 J/cm2, and this effect was linear from 0 to 5 J/cm2 (r2=0.97. Significantly less bactericidal effect was observed for nonfunctionalized nanoparticles or

  11. Time-Evolution Contrast of Target MRI Using High-Stability Antibody Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles: An Animal Model

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    K. W. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, high-quality antibody functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles are synthesized. Such physical characterizations as particle morphology, particle size, stability, and relaxivity of magnetic particles are investigated. The immunoreactivity of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles is examined by utilizing immunomagnetic reduction. The results show that the mean diameter of antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles is around 50 nm, and the relaxivity of the magnetic particles is 145 (mM·s−1. In addition to characterizing the magnetic nanoparticles, the feasibility of using the antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for the contrast medium of target magnetic resonance imaging is investigated. These antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles are injected into mice bearing with tumor. The tumor magnetic-resonance image becomes darker after the injection and then recovers 50 hours after the injection. The tumor magnetic-resonance image becomes the darkest at around 20 hours after the injection. Thus, the observing time window for the specific labeling of tumors with antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles was found to be 20 hours after injecting biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles into mice. The biopsy of tumor is stained after the injection to prove that the long-term darkness of tumor magnetic-resonance image is due to the specific anchoring of antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles at tumor.

  12. Functional characterization of an scFv-Fc antibody that immunotherapeutically targets the common cancer cell surface proteoglycan CSPG4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhui; Katayama, Akihiro; Wang, Yangyang; Yu, Ling; Favoino, Elvira; Sakakura, Koichi; Favole, Alessandra; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Silver, Susan; Watkins, Simon C; Kageshita, Toshiro; Ferrone, Soldano

    2011-12-15

    Cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) is an attractive target for antibody-based cancer immunotherapy because of its role in tumor cell biology, its high expression on malignant cells including cancer-initiating cells, and its restricted distribution in normal tissues. The clinical use of CSPG4 has been hampered by the lack of a CSPG4-specific chimeric, humanized, or fully human monoclonal antibody. To overcome this limitation, we generated a CSPG4-specific fully human single-chain antibody termed scFv-FcC21 and characterized its specificity and antitumor activity. Viable CSPG4(+) melanoma cells were used in a screen of a human scFv phage display library that included CDR3 engineered to optimize antibody binding sites. The scFv antibody isolated was then recombinantly engineered with a human immunoglobulin G1 Fc region to construct the fully human antibody scFv-FcC21, which recognized tumors of neuroectodermal origin, various types of carcinomas, mesotheliomas, and sarcomas as well as myeloid leukemias. scFv-FcC21 inhibited in vitro growth and migration of tumor cells and in vivo growth of human tumor xenografts. These effects were mediated by inhibition of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and focal adhesion kinase signaling pathways that are critical for tumor cell growth and migration, respectively. Our findings define the CSPG4-specific fully human scFv-FcC21 antibody as a candidate therapeutic agent to target the many types of tumors that express CSPG4.

  13. Targeting Antibodies to Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors by Pyrene Hydrazide Modification of Heavy Chain Carbohydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steingrimur Stefansson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNT-FET studies have used immobilized antibodies as the ligand binding moiety. However, antibodies are not optimal for CNT-FET detection due to their large size and charge. Their size can prevent ligands from reaching within the Debye length of the CNTs and a layer of charged antibodies on the circuits can drown out any ligand signal. In an attempt to minimize the antibody footprint on CNT-FETs, we examined whether pyrene hydrazide modification of antibody carbohydrates could reduce the concentration required to functionalize CNT circuits. The carbohydrates are almost exclusively on the antibody Fc region and this site-specific modification could mediate uniform antibody orientation on the CNTs. We compared the hydrazide modification of anti-E. coli O157:H7 polyclonal antibodies to pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester-coated CNTs and carbodiimide-mediated antibody CNT attachment. Our results show that the pyrene hydrazide modification was superior to those methods with respect to bacteria detection and less than 1 nM labeled antibody was required to functionalize the circuits.

  14. Development of monoclonal antibodies and quantitative ELISAs targeting insulin-degrading enzyme

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    Dickson Dennis W

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is a widely studied zinc-metalloprotease implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer disease (AD and varicella zoster virus infection. Despite more than six decades of research on IDE, progress has been hampered by the lack of well-characterized reagents targeting this biomedically important protease. To address this important need, we generated and characterized new mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs targeting natively folded human and rodent IDE. Results Eight monoclonal hybridoma cell lines were derived in house from mice immunized with full-length, natively folded, recombinant human IDE. The mAbs derived from these lines were shown to detect IDE selectively and sensitively by a wide range of methods. Two mAbs in particular—designated 6A1 and 6H9—proved especially selective for IDE in immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical applications. Using a variety of methods, we show that 6A1 selectively detects both human and rodent IDE, while 6H9 selectively detects human, but not rodent, IDE, with both mAbs showing essentially no cross reactivity with other proteins in these applications. Using these novel anti-IDE mAbs, we also developed sensitive and quantitative sandwich ELISAs capable of quantifying IDE levels present in human brain extracts. Conclusion We succeeded in developing novel mAbs that selectively detect rodent and/or human IDE, which we have shown to be suitable for a wide range of applications, including western blotting, immunoprecipitation, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative sandwich ELISAs. These novel anti-IDE mAbs and the assays derived from them constitute important new tools for addressing many unresolved questions about the basic biology of IDE and its role in multiple highly prevalent human diseases.

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting the Alpha-Exosite of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/A Inhibit Catalytic Activity.

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    Yongfeng Fan

    Full Text Available The paralytic disease botulism is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT, multi-domain proteins containing a zinc endopeptidase that cleaves the cognate SNARE protein, thereby blocking acetylcholine neurotransmitter release. Antitoxins currently used to treat botulism neutralize circulating BoNT but cannot enter, bind to or neutralize BoNT that has already entered the neuron. The light chain endopeptidase domain (LC of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A was targeted for generation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that could reverse paralysis resulting from intoxication by BoNT/A. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv libraries from immunized humans and mice were displayed on the surface of yeast, and 19 BoNT/A LC-specific mAbs were isolated by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Affinities of the mAbs for BoNT/A LC ranged from a KD value of 9.0×10-11 M to 3.53×10-8 M (mean KD 5.38×10-9 M and median KD 1.53×10-9 M, as determined by flow cytometry analysis. Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/A LC catalytic activity with IC50 values ranging from 8.3 ~73×10-9 M. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were also mapped by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that the inhibitory mAbs bound the α-exosite region remote from the BoNT/A LC catalytic center. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis post-intoxication and further define epitopes that could be targeted by small molecule inhibitors.

  16. Anti-neuropilin 1 antibody Fab' fragment conjugated liposomal docetaxel for active targeting of tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjappa, Arehalli S; Goel, Peeyush N; Gude, Rajiv P; Ramachandra Murthy, Rayasa S

    2014-09-01

    Neuropilin-1, a transmembrane receptor entailed in wide range of human tumour cell lines and diverse neoplasms, mediates the effects of VEGF and Semaphorins during the processes of cellular proliferation, survival and migration. In view of this, we had developed and evaluated in vitro and in vivo efficacy of anti-neuropilin-1 immunoliposomes against neuropilin-1 receptor expressing tumours. The PEGylated liposomes loaded with docetaxel were prepared using thin film hydration method. Functionalised PEGylated liposomes were prepared using post-insertion technique. Anti-neuropilin-1 immunoliposomes were prepared by covalently conjugating Fab' fragments of neuropilin-1 antibody to functionalised PEGylated liposomes via thioether linkage. In vivo evaluation of Taxotere and liposomal formulations was performed using intradermal tumour model to demonstrate anti-angiogenic and tumour regression ability. The modified Fab' fragments and immunoliposomes were found to be immunoreactive against A549 cells. Further, docetaxel loaded PEGylated liposomes and PEGylated immunoliposomes demonstrated higher in vitro cytotoxicity than Taxotere formulation at the same drug concentration and exposure time. The live imaging showed distinctive cellular uptake of functional immunoliposomes. Further, significant decrease in micro-blood vessel density and tumour volumes was observed using bio-engineered liposomes. The results clearly highlight the need to seek neuropilin-1 as one of the prime targets in developing an anti-angiogenic therapy.

  17. Structural and Antigenic Definition of Hepatitis C Virus E2 Glycoprotein Epitopes Targeted by Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sautto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is the major cause of chronic liver disease as well as the major indication for liver transplantation worldwide. Current standard of care is not completely effective, not administrable in grafted patients, and burdened by several side effects. This incomplete effectiveness is mainly due to the high propensity of the virus to continually mutate under the selective pressure exerted by the host immune response as well as currently administered antiviral drugs. The E2 envelope surface glycoprotein of HCV (HCV/E2 is the main target of the host humoral immune response and for this reason one of the major variable viral proteins. However, broadly cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against HCV/E2 represent a promising tool for the study of virus-host interplay as well as for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. In the last few years many anti-HCV/E2 mAbs have been evaluated in preclinical and clinical trials as possible candidate antivirals, particularly for administration in pre- and post-transplant settings. In this review we summarize the antigenic and structural characteristics of HCV/E2 determined through the use of anti-HCV/E2 mAbs, which, given the absence of a crystal structure of this glycoprotein, represent currently the best tool available.

  18. Targeting FMS-related tyrosine kinase receptor 3 with the human immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody IMC-EB10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssoufian, Hagop; Rowinsky, Eric K; Tonra, James; Li, Yiwen

    2010-02-15

    FMS-related tyrosine kinase receptor 3 (FLT3) is a class III receptor tyrosine kinase that holds considerable promise as a therapeutic target in hematologic malignancies. Current efforts directed toward the development of small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors of FLT3 may be limited by off-target toxicities and the development of drug resistance. Target-specific antibodies could overcome these hurdles and provide additional mechanisms to enhance the antitumor efficacy of FLT3 inhibitors. IMC-EB10 is a novel antibody directed against FLT3. The binding of IMC-EB10 to FLT3 results in antiproliferative effects in vitro and in mouse models engrafted with human leukemia cells that harbor wild-type or constitutively activated FLT3. Future clinical trials will test these notions formally and will identify the most appropriate opportunities for this member of a new generation of antileukemic therapies.

  19. A transferrin variant as the targeting ligand for polymeric nanoparticles incorporated in 3-D PLGA porous scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, André M; Chen, Kevin Y; Kamei, Daniel T

    2017-04-01

    We have developed doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (DP) conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and transferrin (Tf) to form Tf-PEG-DPs (TPDPs), and incorporated these TPDPs into three-dimensional (3-D) PLGA porous scaffolds to form a controlled delivery system. To our knowledge, this represents the first use of a Tf variant (oxalate Tf) to improve the targeted delivery of drug-encapsulated nanoparticles (NPs) in PLGA scaffolds to PC3 prostate cancer cells. The PLGA scaffolds with TPDPs incorporated have been shown to release drugs for sustained delivery and provided a continuous release of DOX. The MTS assay was also performed to determine the potency of native and oxalate TPDPs, and a 3.0-fold decrease in IC50 values were observed between the native and oxalate TPDPs. The lower IC50 value for the oxalate version signifies greater potency compared to the native version, since a lower concentration of drug was required to achieve the same therapeutic effect. These results suggest that this technology has potential to become a new implantable polymeric device to improve the controlled and targeted drug delivery of Tf-conjugated NPs for cancer therapy.

  20. Expression, intracellular targeting and purification of HIV Nef variants in tobacco cells

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    Baschieri Selene

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants may represent excellent alternatives to classical heterologous protein expression systems, especially for the production of biopharmaceuticals and vaccine components. Modern vaccines are becoming increasingly complex, with the incorporation of multiple antigens. Approaches towards developing an HIV vaccine appear to confirm this, with a combination of candidate antigens. Among these, HIV-Nef is considered a promising target for vaccine development because immune responses directed against this viral protein could help to control the initial steps of viral infection and to reduce viral loads and spreading. Two isoforms of Nef protein can be found in cells: a full-length N-terminal myristoylated form (p27, 27 kDa and a truncated form (p25, 25 kDa. Here we report the expression and purification of HIV Nef from transgenic tobacco. Results We designed constructs to direct the expression of p25 and p27 Nef to either the cytosol or the secretory pathway. We tested these constructs by transient expression in tobacco protoplasts. Cytosolic Nef polypeptides are correctly synthesised and are stable. The same is not true for Nef polypeptides targeted to the secretory pathway by virtue of a signal peptide. We therefore generated transgenic plants expressing cytosolic, full length or truncated Nef. Expression levels were variable, but in some lines they averaged 0.7% of total soluble proteins. Hexahistidine-tagged Nef was easily purified from transgenic tissue in a one-step procedure. Conclusion We have shown that transient expression can help to rapidly determine the best cellular compartment for accumulation of a recombinant protein. We have successfully expressed HIV Nef polypeptides in the cytosol of transgenic tobacco plants. The proteins can easily be purified from transgenic tissue.

  1. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

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    Peter J Hart

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  2. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Peter J; O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Siggins, Matthew K; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A; Goulding, David A; Crump, John A; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F; MacLennan, Calman A

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  3. Accurate variant detection across non-amplified and whole genome amplified DNA using targeted next generation sequencing

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    ElSharawy Abdou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many hypothesis-driven genetic studies require the ability to comprehensively and efficiently target specific regions of the genome to detect sequence variations. Often, sample availability is limited requiring the use of whole genome amplification (WGA. We evaluated a high-throughput microdroplet-based PCR approach in combination with next generation sequencing (NGS to target 384 discrete exons from 373 genes involved in cancer. In our evaluation, we compared the performance of six non-amplified gDNA samples from two HapMap family trios. Three of these samples were also preamplified by WGA and evaluated. We tested sample pooling or multiplexing strategies at different stages of the tested targeted NGS (T-NGS workflow. Results The results demonstrated comparable sequence performance between non-amplified and preamplified samples and between different indexing strategies [sequence specificity of 66.0% ± 3.4%, uniformity (coverage at 0.2× of the mean of 85.6% ± 0.6%]. The average genotype concordance maintained across all the samples was 99.5% ± 0.4%, regardless of sample type or pooling strategy. We did not detect any errors in the Mendelian patterns of inheritance of genotypes between the parents and offspring within each trio. We also demonstrated the ability to detect minor allele frequencies within the pooled samples that conform to predicted models. Conclusion Our described PCR-based sample multiplex approach and the ability to use WGA material for NGS may enable researchers to perform deep resequencing studies and explore variants at very low frequencies and cost.

  4. Identification of Functional Variants for Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate in or near PAX7, FGFR2, and NOG by Targeted Sequencing of GWAS Loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Taub, Margaret A; Liu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for nonsyndromic orofacial clefts have identified multiple strongly associated regions, the causal variants are unknown. To address this, we selected 13 regions from GWASs and other studies, performed targeted sequencing in 1,409 Asian and European...... alleles for nonsyndromic clefting in humans....

  5. Development and Evaluation of a Fluorescent Antibody-Drug Conjugate for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer.

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    Steve Knutson

    Full Text Available Antibodies are widely available and cost-effective research tools in life science, and antibody conjugates are now extensively used for targeted therapy, immunohistochemical staining, or in vivo diagnostic imaging of cancer. Significant advances in site-specific antibody labeling technologies have enabled the production of highly characterized and homogenous conjugates for biomedical purposes, and some recent studies have utilized site-specific labeling to synthesize bifunctional antibody conjugates with both imaging and drug delivery properties. While these advances are important for the clinical safety and efficacy of such biologics, these techniques can also be difficult, expensive, and time-consuming. Furthermore, antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs used for tumor treatment generally remain distinct from conjugates used for diagnosis. Thus, there exists a need to develop simple dual-labeling methods for efficient therapeutic and diagnostic evaluation of antibody conjugates in pre-clinical model systems. Here, we present a rapid and simple method utilizing commercially available reagents for synthesizing a dual-labeled fluorescent ADC. Further, we demonstrate the fluorescent ADC's utility for simultaneous targeted therapy and molecular imaging of cancer both in vitro and in vivo. Employing non-site-specific, amine-reactive chemistry, our novel biopharmaceutical theranostic is a monoclonal antibody specific for a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA biomarker conjugated to both paclitaxel and a near-infrared (NIR, polyethylene glycol modified (PEGylated fluorophore (DyLight™ 680-4xPEG. Using in vitro systems, we demonstrate that this fluorescent ADC selectively binds a CEA-positive pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3 in immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry, exhibits efficient internalization kinetics, and is cytotoxic. Model studies using a xenograft of BxPC-3 cells in athymic mice also show the fluorescent ADC's efficacy in detecting tumors in

  6. Targeted in vivo inhibition of specific protein-protein interactions using recombinant antibodies.

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    Matej Zábrady

    Full Text Available With the growing availability of genomic sequence information, there is an increasing need for gene function analysis. Antibody-mediated "silencing" represents an intriguing alternative for the precise inhibition of a particular function of biomolecules. Here, we describe a method for selecting recombinant antibodies with a specific purpose in mind, which is to inhibit intrinsic protein-protein interactions in the cytosol of plant cells. Experimental procedures were designed for conveniently evaluating desired properties of recombinant antibodies in consecutive steps. Our selection method was successfully used to develop a recombinant antibody inhibiting the interaction of ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFER PROTEIN 3 with such of its upstream interaction partners as the receiver domain of CYTOKININ INDEPENDENT HISTIDINE KINASE 1. The specific down-regulation of the cytokinin signaling pathway in vivo demonstrates the validity of our approach. This selection method can serve as a prototype for developing unique recombinant antibodies able to interfere with virtually any biomolecule in the living cell.

  7. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  8. CA19-9 as a Potential Target for Radiolabeled Antibody-Based Positron Emission Tomography of Pancreas Cancer

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    Mark D. Girgis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sensitive and specific imaging of pancreas cancer are necessary for accurate diagnosis, staging, and treatment. The vast majority of pancreas cancers express the carbohydrate tumor antigen CA19-9. The goal of this study was to determine the potential to target CA19-9 with a radiolabeled anti-CA19-9 antibody for imaging pancreas cancer. Methods. CA19-9 was quantified using flow cytometry on human pancreas cancer cell lines. An intact murine anti-CA19-9 monoclonal antibody was labeled with a positron emitting radionuclide (Iodine-124 and injected into mice harboring antigen positive and negative xenografts. MicroPET/CT were performed at successive time intervals (72 hours, 96 hours, 120 hours after injection. Radioactivity was measured in blood and tumor to provide objective confirmation of the images. Results. Antigen expression by flow cytometry revealed approximately 1.3×106 CA19-9 antigens for the positive cell line and no expression in the negative cell line. Pancreas xenograft imaging with Iodine-124-labeled anti-CA19-9 mAb demonstrated an average tumor to blood ratio of 5 and positive to negative tumor ratio of 20. Conclusion. We show in vivo targeting of our antigen positive xenograft with a radiolabeled anti-CA19-9 antibody. These data demonstrate the potential to achieve anti-CA19-9 antibody based positron emission tomography of pancreas cancer.

  9. Mouse lymphatic endothelial cell targeted probes: anti-LYVE-1 antibody-based magnetic nanoparticles

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    Guo Q

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Qiu Guo,1,2,* Yi Liu,1,* Ke Xu,1 Ke Ren,1 WenGe Sun1 1Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, People's Republic of China; 2Key Laboratory of Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Radiology of Liaoning Province, Shenyang, Liaoning, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To investigate the specific targeting property of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 binding polyethylene glycol-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (LYVE-1-PEG-USPIO nanoparticles to mouse lymphatic endothelial cells (MLECs. Methods: A ligand specific target to lymphatic vessels was selected by immunohistochemical staining on the sections of a Lewis subcutaneous transplanted tumor. The z-average hydrodynamic diameter (HD, zeta potential, and the relaxivity of PEG-USPIO and LYVE-1-PEG-USPIO nanoparticles were determined with a laser particle analyzer and magnetic resonance T2 spin echo sequence, respectively. Prussian blue staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM of nanoparticle labeled cells were performed to determine the nanoparticles' binding form. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed in vitro to evaluate the signal enhancement on the T2 spin echo sequence of the nanoparticle labeled cells. The iron content of the labeled cells after the Prussian blue staining and MRI scanning was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS. Results: The anti-LYVE-1 antibody was used as the specific ligand to synthesize the target probe to the MLECs. The mean z-average HDs of the LYVE-1-PEG-USPIO and PEG-USPIO nanoparticles were 57.42 ± 0.31 nm and 47.91 ± 0.73 nm, respectively, and the mean zeta potentials of the LYVE-1-PEG-USPIO and PEG-USPIO nanoparticles were 12.38 ± 4.87 mV and 2.57 ± 0.83 mV, respectively. The relaxivities of the LYVE-1-PEG-USPIO and PEG-USPIO nanoparticles were 185.48 mM-1s-1 and 608.32 mM-1s-1. Cells binding

  10. Distinct expression profiles of Notch-1 protein in human solid tumors: Implications for development of targeted therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan Li; Burns, Janine A.; Carol A Cheney; et al

    2010-01-01

    Yuan Li1, Janine A Burns1, Carol A Cheney1, Ningyan Zhang1, Salvatore Vitelli1, Fubao Wang1, Andrew Bett2, Michael Chastain2, Laurent P Audoly1, Zhi-Qiang Zhang1,31Department of Biologics Research, 2Department of Vaccine Research, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA, USA; 3Clinical Development Laboratory, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ, USAAbstract: Biological therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target tumor-associated antigens have been considered an effecti...

  11. Dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in plasmacytoid variant of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda D; Chaux, Alcides; Al-Hussain, Turki; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Bezerra, Stephania Martins; Hicks, Jessica; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J

    2013-04-01

    Plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma is a rare but aggressive variant of bladder cancer with no clear therapeutic guidelines. Dysregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been linked to oncogenesis in conventional bladder cancer. Several antineoplastic agents targeting mTOR pathway are currently available. This study assesses mTOR pathway status as well as c-myc and p27 expression. We retrieved 19 archival cases of plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma from two institutions. Whole tissue sections were evaluated for immunoexpression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), phosphorylated mTOR, phosphorylated protein kinase B (AKT), phosphorylated S6, c-myc, and p27. We evaluated intensity (0 to 3+) and extent (0%-100%) of expression for all markers. An H score was calculated as the sum of products of intensity and extent for each marker and used during analysis. In addition, PTEN loss was defined as absence of expression in >10% of tumor cells. We encountered PTEN loss in 28%. Higher H score for nuclear phosphorylated AKT and a lower H score for phosphorylated S6 was encountered in muscle invasive tumors compared to non-muscle invasive tumors (P = .007 and P = .009, respectively). Although a trend for negative prognostic impact on overall survival for higher phosphorylated mTOR expression was noted (P = .051), markers expression levels failed to predict survival in our cohort. We found dysregulation of mTOR pathway members in urinary bladder plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma, suggesting that the use of mTOR pathway inhibitors might be beneficial for patients with this aggressive tumor.

  12. Tumor cell-selective apoptosis induction through targeting of KV10.1 via bifunctional TRAIL antibody

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    Pardo Luis A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search for strategies to target ion channels for therapeutic applications has become of increasing interest. Especially, the potassium channel KV10.1 (Ether-á-go-go is attractive as target since this surface protein is virtually not detected in normal tissue outside the central nervous system, but is expressed in approximately 70% of tumors from different origins. Methods We designed a single-chain antibody against an extracellular region of KV10.1 (scFv62 and fused it to the human soluble TRAIL. The KV10.1-specific scFv62 antibody -TRAIL fusion protein was expressed in CHO-K1 cells, purified by chromatography and tested for biological activity. Results Prostate cancer cells, either positive or negative for KV10.1 were treated with the purified construct. After sensitization with cytotoxic drugs, scFv62-TRAIL induced apoptosis only in KV10.1-positive cancer cells, but not in non-tumor cells, nor in tumor cells lacking KV10.1 expression. In co-cultures with KV10.1-positive cancer cells the fusion protein also induced apoptosis in bystander KV10.1-negative cancer cells, while normal prostate epithelial cells were not affected when present as bystander. Conclusions KV10.1 represents a novel therapeutic target for cancer. We could design a strategy that selectively kills tumor cells based on a KV10.1-specific antibody.

  13. Targeting vascular amyloid in arterioles of Alzheimer disease transgenic mice with amyloid β protein antibody-coated nanoparticles.

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    Poduslo, Joseph F; Hultman, Kristi L; Curran, Geoffry L; Preboske, Gregory M; Chamberlain, Ryan; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Garwood, Michael; Jack, Clifford R; Wengenack, Thomas M

    2011-08-01

    The relevance of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and dementia in general emphasizes the importance of developing novel targeting approaches for detecting and treating cerebrovascular amyloid (CVA) deposits. We developed a nanoparticle-based technology that uses a monoclonal antibody against fibrillar human amyloid-β42 that is surface coated onto a functionalized phospholipid monolayer. We demonstrate that this conjugated nanoparticle binds to CVA deposits in arterioles of AD transgenic mice (Tg2576) after infusion into the external carotid artery using 3 different approaches. The first 2 approaches use a blood vessel enrichment of homogenized brain and a leptomeningeal vessel preparation from thin tangential brain slices from the surface of the cerebral cortex. Targeting of CVA by the antibody-coated nanoparticle was visualized using fluorescent lissamine rhodamine-labeled phospholipids in the nanoparticles, which were compared with fluorescent staining of the endothelial cells and amyloid deposits using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The third approach used high-field strength magnetic resonance imaging of antibody-coated iron oxide nanoparticles after infusion into the external carotid artery. Dark foci of contrast enhancement in cortical arterioles were observed in T2*-weighted images of ex vivo AD mouse brains that correlated histologically with CVA deposits. The targeting ability of these nanoparticles to CVA provides opportunities for the prevention and treatment of CAA.

  14. New Strategies for the Next Generation of Matrix-Metalloproteinase Inhibitors: Selectively Targeting Membrane-Anchored MMPs with Therapeutic Antibodies

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    Laetitia Devy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available MMP intervention strategies have met with limited clinical success due to severe toxicities. In particular, treatment with broad-spectrum MMP-inhibitors (MMPIs caused musculoskeletal pain and inflammation. Selectivity may be essential for realizing the clinical potential of MMPIs. Here we review discoveries pinpointing membrane-bound MMPs as mediators of mechanisms underlying cancer and inflammation and as possible therapeutic targets for prevention/treatment of these diseases. We discuss strategies to target these therapeutic proteases using highly selective inhibitory agents (i.e., human blocking antibodies against individual membrane-bound MMPs.

  15. Improving the solubility of anti-LINGO-1 monoclonal antibody Li33 by isotype switching and targeted mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepinsky, R Blake; Silvian, Laura; Berkowitz, Steven A; Farrington, Graham; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Walus, Lee; Eldredge, John; Capili, Allan; Mi, Sha; Graff, Christilyn; Garber, Ellen

    2010-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) are a favorite drug platform of the biopharmaceutical industry. Currently, over 20 Mabs have been approved and several hundred others are in clinical trials. The anti-LINGO-1 Mab Li33 was selected from a large panel of antibodies by Fab phage display technology based on its extraordinary biological activity in promoting oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in vitro and in animal models of remyelination. However, the Li33 Fab had poor solubility when converted into a full antibody in an immunoglobulin G1 framework. A detailed analysis of the biochemical and structural features of the antibody revealed several possible reasons for its propensity to aggregate. Here, we successfully applied three molecular approaches (isotype switching, targeted mutagenesis of complementarity determining region residues, and glycosylation site insertion mutagenesis) to address the solubility problem. Through these efforts we were able to improve the solubility of the Li33 Mab from 0.3 mg/mL to >50 mg/mL and reduce aggregation to an acceptable level. These strategies can be readily applied to other proteins with solubility issues.

  16. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Block Chikungunya Virus Entry and Release by Targeting an Epitope Critical to Viral Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Liss, Nathan M; Chen, Dong-Hua; Liao, Maofu; Fox, Julie M; Shimak, Raeann M; Fong, Rachel H; Chafets, Daniel; Bakkour, Sonia; Keating, Sheila; Fomin, Marina E; Muench, Marcus O; Sherman, Michael B; Doranz, Benjamin J; Diamond, Michael S; Simmons, Graham

    2015-12-22

    We evaluated the mechanism by which neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies inhibit chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection. Potently neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) blocked infection at multiple steps of the virus life cycle, including entry and release. Cryo-electron microscopy structures of Fab fragments of two human NAbs and chikungunya virus-like particles showed a binding footprint that spanned independent domains on neighboring E2 subunits within one viral spike, suggesting a mechanism for inhibiting low-pH-dependent membrane fusion. Detailed epitope mapping identified amino acid E2-W64 as a critical interaction residue. An escape mutation (E2-W64G) at this residue rendered CHIKV attenuated in mice. Consistent with these data, CHIKV-E2-W64G failed to emerge in vivo under the selection pressure of one of the NAbs, IM-CKV063. As our study suggests that antibodies engaging the residue E2-W64 can potently inhibit CHIKV at multiple stages of infection, antibody-based therapies or immunogens that target this region might have protective value.

  17. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Block Chikungunya Virus Entry and Release by Targeting an Epitope Critical to Viral Pathogenesis

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    Jing Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the mechanism by which neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies inhibit chikungunya virus (CHIKV infection. Potently neutralizing antibodies (NAbs blocked infection at multiple steps of the virus life cycle, including entry and release. Cryo-electron microscopy structures of Fab fragments of two human NAbs and chikungunya virus-like particles showed a binding footprint that spanned independent domains on neighboring E2 subunits within one viral spike, suggesting a mechanism for inhibiting low-pH-dependent membrane fusion. Detailed epitope mapping identified amino acid E2-W64 as a critical interaction residue. An escape mutation (E2-W64G at this residue rendered CHIKV attenuated in mice. Consistent with these data, CHIKV-E2-W64G failed to emerge in vivo under the selection pressure of one of the NAbs, IM-CKV063. As our study suggests that antibodies engaging the residue E2-W64 can potently inhibit CHIKV at multiple stages of infection, antibody-based therapies or immunogens that target this region might have protective value.

  18. A novel universal neutralizing monoclonal antibody against enterovirus 71 that targets the highly conserved "knob" region of VP3 protein.

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    Tanja K Kiener

    Full Text Available Hand, foot and mouth disease caused by enterovirus 71(EV71 leads to the majority of neurological complications and death in young children. While putative inactivated vaccines are only now undergoing clinical trials, no specific treatment options exist yet. Ideally, EV71 specific intravenous immunoglobulins could be developed for targeted treatment of severe cases. To date, only a single universally neutralizing monoclonal antibody against a conserved linear epitope of VP1 has been identified. Other enteroviruses have been shown to possess major conformational neutralizing epitopes on both the VP2 and VP3 capsid proteins. Hence, we attempted to isolate such neutralizing antibodies against conformational epitopes for their potential in the treatment of infection as well as differential diagnosis and vaccine optimization. Here we describe a universal neutralizing monoclonal antibody that recognizes a conserved conformational epitope of EV71 which was mapped using escape mutants. Eight escape mutants from different subgenogroups (A, B2, B4, C2, C4 were rescued; they harbored three essential mutations either at amino acid positions 59, 62 or 67 of the VP3 protein which are all situated in the "knob" region. The escape mutant phenotype could be mimicked by incorporating these mutations into reverse genetically engineered viruses showing that P59L, A62D, A62P and E67D abolish both monoclonal antibody binding and neutralization activity. This is the first conformational neutralization epitope mapped on VP3 for EV71.

  19. Low frequency of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies during chronic infection even in quaternary epitope targeting antibodies containing large numbers of somatic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicar, Mark D; Chen, Xuemin; Kalams, Spyros A; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Spearman, Paul; Crowe, James E

    2016-02-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (Abs) are thought to be a critical component of an appropriate HIV vaccine response. It has been proposed that Abs recognizing conformationally dependent quaternary epitopes on the HIV envelope (Env) trimer may be necessary to neutralize diverse HIV strains. A number of recently described broadly neutralizing monoclonal Abs (mAbs) recognize complex and quaternary epitopes. Generally, many such Abs exhibit extensive numbers of somatic mutations and unique structural characteristics. We sought to characterize the native antibody (Ab) response against circulating HIV focusing on such conformational responses, without a prior selection based on neutralization. Using a capture system based on VLPs incorporating cleaved envelope protein, we identified a selection of B cells that produce quaternary epitope targeting Abs (QtAbs). Similar to a number of broadly neutralizing Abs, the Ab genes encoding these QtAbs showed extensive numbers of somatic mutations. However, when expressed as recombinant molecules, these Abs failed to neutralize virus or mediate ADCVI activity. Molecular analysis showed unusually high numbers of mutations in the Ab heavy chain framework 3 region of the variable genes. The analysis suggests that large numbers of somatic mutations occur in Ab genes encoding HIV Abs in chronically infected individuals in a non-directed, stochastic, manner.

  20. Targeting the replisome with transduced monoclonal antibodies triggers lethal DNA replication stress in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplancq, Dominique; Freund, Guillaume; Conic, Sascha; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Didier, Pascal; Stoessel, Audrey; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Vigneron, Marc; Wagner, Jérôme; Mély, Yves; Chatton, Bruno; Tora, Laszlo; Weiss, Etienne

    2016-03-15

    Although chemical inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) in cancer cells triggers cell death, it is not clear if the fork blockade achieved with inhibitors that neutralise proteins of the replisome is sufficient on its own to overcome the DDR. Monoclonal antibodies to PCNA, which block the DNA elongation process in vitro, have been developed. When these antibodies were transduced into cancer cells, they are able to inhibit the incorporation of nucleoside analogues. When co-delivered with anti-PCNA siRNA, the cells were flattened and the size of their nuclei increased by up to 3-fold, prior to cell death. Analysis of these nuclei by super-resolution microscopy revealed the presence of large numbers of phosphorylated histone H2AX foci. A senescence-like phenotype of the transduced cells was also observed upon delivery of the corresponding Fab molecules or following PCNA gene disruption or when the Fab fragment of an antibody that neutralises DNA polymerase alpha was used. Primary melanoma cells and leukaemia cells that are resistant to chemical inhibitors were similarly affected by these antibody treatments. These results demonstrate that transduced antibodies can trigger a lethal DNA replication stress, which kills cancer cells by abolishing the biological activity of several constituents of the replisome.

  1. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

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    Berger Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ. Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848, respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs.

  2. Target-selective homologous recombination cloning for high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies from single plasma cells

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    Isobe Masaharu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells is one of the most promising technologies for the rapid development of monoclonal antibody drugs. However, the proper insertion of PCR-amplified immunoglobulin genes into expression vectors remains an obstacle to the high-throughput production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Results We developed a single-step cloning method, target-selective homologous recombination (TS-HR, in which PCR-amplified immunoglobulin variable genes were selectively inserted into vectors, even in the presence of nonspecifically amplified DNA. TS-HR utilizes Red/ET-mediated homologous recombination with a target-selective vector (TS-vector with unique homology arms on its termini. Using TS-HR, immunoglobulin variable genes were cloned directly into expression vectors by co-transforming unpurified PCR products and the TS-vector into E. coli. Furthermore, the high cloning specificity of TS-HR allowed plasmids to be extracted from pools of transformed bacteria without screening single colonies for correct clones. We present a one-week protocol for the production of recombinant mouse monoclonal antibodies from large numbers of single plasma cells. Conclusion The time requirements and limitations of traditional cloning procedures for the production of recombinant immunoglobulins have been significantly reduced with the development of the TS-HR cloning technique.

  3. Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein A (SasA) Protect Against Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis and Peritonitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yilong; Qian, Mengying; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Shuling; Li, Bing; Yu, Rui; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yu, Changming; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) imposes an increasing impact on public health. Due to multi-antibiotics resistance in MRSA strains, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics such as effective monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against MRSA infections. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein A (SasA), a large surface-located protein (~240 kDa), is one of MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) and a potential target for immunotherapeutic approaches against S. aureus infections. In the present study, we analyzed the sequence of SasA with bioinformatics tools and generated a protective monoclonal antibody (2H7) targeting the conserved domain of SasA. 2H7 was shown to recognize wild-type S. aureus and promote opsonophagocytic killing of S. aureus. In both sepsis and peritoneal infection models, prophylactic administration of 2H7 improved the survival of BALB/c mice challenged by S. aureus strain USA300 and ST239 (prevalent MRSA clones in North America and Asian countries, respectively) and enhanced bacterial clearance in kidneys. Additionally, 2H7 prophylaxis prevented the formation of intraperitoneal abscess in a murine model of peritoneal infection and therapeutic administration of 2H7 showed protective efficacy in a murine sepsis model. Our results presented here provide supporting evidences that an anti-SasA mAb might be a potential component in an antibody-based immunotherapeutic treatment of MRSA infections.

  4. The effect of internalizing human single chain antibody fragment on liposome targeting to epithelioid and sarcomatoid mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Arun K; Su, Yang; Feng, Jinjin; Lan, Xiaoli; Zhu, Xiaodong; Liu, Yue; Gao, Dongwei; Seo, Youngho; Vanbrocklin, Henry F; Courtney Broaddus, V; Liu, Bin; He, Jiang

    2011-04-01

    Immunoliposomes (ILs) anchored with internalizing human antibodies capable of targeting all subtypes of mesothelioma can be useful for targeted imaging and therapy of this malignant disease. The objectives of this study were to evaluate both the in vitro and in vivo tumor targeted internalization of novel internalizing human single chain antibody (scFv) anchored ILs on both epithelioid (M28) and sarcomatoid (VAMT-1) subtypes of human mesothelioma. ILs were prepared by post-insertion of mesothelioma-targeting human scFv (M1) onto preformed liposomes and radiolabeled with (111)In ((111)In-IL-M1), along with control non-targeted liposomes ((111)In-CL). Incubation of (111)In-IL-M1 with M28, VAMT-1, and a control non-tumorigenic cell line (BPH-1) at 37 °C for 24 h revealed efficient binding and rapid internalization of ILs into both subtypes of tumor cells but not into the BPH-1 cells; internalization accounted for approximately 81-94% of total cell accumulation in mesothelioma cells compared to 37-55% in control cells. In tumor-bearing mice intravenous (i.v.) injection of (111)In-IL-M1 led to remarkable tumor accumulation: 4% and 4.7% injected dose per gram (% ID/g) for M28 and VAMT-1 tumors, respectively, 48 h after injection. Furthermore, tumor uptake of (111)In-IL-M1 in live xenograft animal models was verified by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT). In contrast, i.v. injection of (111)In-CL in tumor-bearing mice revealed very low uptake in both subtypes of mesothelioma, 48 h after injection. In conclusion, M1 scFv-anchored ILs showed selective tumor targeting and rapid internalization into both epithelioid and sarcomatoid subtypes of human mesothelioma, demonstrating its potential as a promising vector for enhanced tumor drug targeting.

  5. Plant pharming of a full-sized, tumour-targeting antibody using different expression strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Maria Elena; Morgun, Bogdan; Brunetti, Patrizia; Marusic, Carla; Lombardi, Raffaele; Pisoni, Ivan; Bacci, Camilla; Desiderio, Angiola; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this work were to obtain a human antibody against the tumour-associated antigen tenascin-C (TNC) and to compare the yield and quality of plant-produced antibody in either stable transgenics or using a transient expression system. To this end, the characterization of a full-sized human immunoglobulin G (IgG) [monoclonal antibody H10 (mAb H10)], derived from a selected single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and produced in plants, is presented. The human mAb gene was engineered for plant expression, and Nicotiana tabacum transgenic lines expressing both heavy (HC) and light (LC) chain were obtained and evaluated for antibody expression levels, in vivo assembly and functionality. Affinity-purified H10 from transgenics (yield, 0.6-1.1 mg/kg fresh weight) revealed that more than 90% of HC was specifically degraded, leading to the formation of functional antigen-binding fragments (Fab). Consequently, H10 was transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants through an Agrobacterium-mediated gene-transfer system. Moreover, the use of the p19 silencing suppressor gene from artichoke mottled crinkle virus raised antibody expression levels by an order of magnitude (yields of purified H10, 50-100 mg/kg fresh weight). Approximately 75% of purified protein consisted of full-sized antibody functionally binding to TNC (K(D) = 14 nm), and immunohistochemical analysis on tumour tissues revealed specific accumulation around tumour blood vessels. The data indicate that the purification yields of mAb H10, using a transient expression system boosted by the p19 silencing suppressor, are exceptionally high when compared with the results reported previously, providing a technique for the over-expression of anticancer mAbs by a rapid, cost-effective, molecular farming approach.

  6. Holes in the Glycan Shield of the Native HIV Envelope Are a Target of Trimer-Elicited Neutralizing Antibodies

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    Laura E. McCoy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A major advance in the search for an HIV vaccine has been the development of a near-native Envelope trimer (BG505 SOSIP.664 that can induce robust autologous Tier 2 neutralization. Here, potently neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs from rabbits immunized with BG505 SOSIP.664 are shown to recognize an immunodominant region of gp120 centered on residue 241. Residue 241 occupies a hole in the glycan defenses of the BG505 isolate, with fewer than 3% of global isolates lacking a glycan site at this position. However, at least one conserved glycan site is missing in 89% of viruses, suggesting the presence of glycan holes in most HIV isolates. Serum evidence is consistent with targeting of holes in natural infection. The immunogenic nature of breaches in the glycan shield has been under-appreciated in previous attempts to understand autologous neutralizing antibody responses and has important potential consequences for HIV vaccine design.

  7. A general strategy for antibody library screening via conversion of transient target binding into permanent reporter deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, Alexander; Heiseler, Tim; Maaß, Franziska; Fritz, Janine; Hofmeyer, Thomas; Glotzbach, Bernhard; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-02-01

    We report here a generally applicable method for the selective covalent attachment of a reporter molecule to a replicating entity that allows one to obtain specific binders from a single round of library screening. We show that selective biotinylation of phage particles displaying a binder to any given target can be achieved by application of a coupled enzyme reaction on the surface of the target-binding phage particles that includes a peroxidase, an oxidase and a catalase. Due to the covalent linkage of biotin together with the tight and stable interaction of biotin with streptavidin, very stringent wash conditions for removal of nonspecific binders can be applied. The method termed (3)CARD (triple catalytic reporter deposition) was successfully applied to single-round screening of a phage display library of camelid single-domain antibodies against three different target proteins.

  8. Targeted resequencing of regulatory regions at schizophrenia risk loci: Role of rare functional variants at chromatin repressive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Peñas, Javier; Amigo, Jorge; Santomé, Luis; Sobrino, Beatriz; Brenlla, Julio; Agra, Santiago; Paz, Eduardo; Páramo, Mario; Carracedo, Ángel; Arrojo, Manuel; Costas, Javier

    2016-07-01

    There is mounting evidence that regulatory variation plays an important role in genetic risk for schizophrenia. Here, we specifically search for regulatory variants at risk by sequencing promoter regions of twenty-three genes implied in schizophrenia by copy number variant or genome-wide association studies. After strict quality control, a total of 55,206bp per sample were analyzed in 526 schizophrenia cases and 516 controls from Galicia, NW Spain, using the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System. Variants were filtered based on frequency from public databases, chromatin states from the RoadMap Epigenomics Consortium at tissues relevant for schizophrenia, such as fetal brain, mid-frontal lobe, and angular gyrus, and prediction of functionality from RegulomeDB. The proportion of rare variants at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues was higher in cases than in controls. The proportion of rare variants with predicted regulatory role was significantly higher in cases than in controls (P=0.0028, OR=1.93, 95% C.I.=1.23-3.04). Combination of information from both sources led to the identification of an excess of carriers of rare variants with predicted regulatory role located at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues in cases versus controls (P=0.0016, OR=19.34, 95% C.I.=2.45-2495.26). The variants are located at two genes affected by the 17q12 copy number variant, LHX1 and HNF1B. These data strongly suggest that a specific epigenetic mechanism, chromatin remodeling by histone modification during early development, may be impaired in a subset of schizophrenia patients, in agreement with previous data.

  9. A single point in protein trafficking by Plasmodium falciparum determines the expression of major antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes targeted by human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jo-Anne; Howell, Katherine B; Langer, Christine; Maier, Alexander G; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Petter, Michaela; Chesson, Joanne; Stanisic, Danielle I; Duffy, Michael F; Cooke, Brian M; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Bull, Peter C; Marsh, Kevin; Fowkes, Freya J I; Beeson, James G

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies to blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum play a pivotal role in human immunity to malaria. During parasite development, multiple proteins are trafficked from the intracellular parasite to the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). However, the relative importance of different proteins as targets of acquired antibodies, and key pathways involved in trafficking major antigens remain to be clearly defined. We quantified antibodies to surface antigens among children, adults, and pregnant women from different malaria-exposed regions. We quantified the importance of antigens as antibody targets using genetically engineered P. falciparum with modified surface antigen expression. Genetic deletion of the trafficking protein skeleton-binding protein-1 (SBP1), which is involved in trafficking the surface antigen PfEMP1, led to a dramatic reduction in antibody recognition of IEs and the ability of human antibodies to promote opsonic phagocytosis of IEs, a key mechanism of parasite clearance. The great majority of antibody epitopes on the IE surface were SBP1-dependent. This was demonstrated using parasite isolates with different genetic or phenotypic backgrounds, and among antibodies from children, adults, and pregnant women in different populations. Comparisons of antibody reactivity to parasite isolates with SBP1 deletion or inhibited PfEMP1 expression suggest that PfEMP1 is the dominant target of acquired human antibodies, and that other P. falciparum IE surface proteins are minor targets. These results establish SBP1 as part of a critical pathway for the trafficking of major surface antigens targeted by human immunity, and have key implications for vaccine development, and quantifying immunity in populations.

  10. Production of a tumour-targeting antibody with a human-compatible glycosylation profile in N. benthamiana hairy root cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonoce, Chiara; Salem, Reda; Marusic, Carla; Jutras, Philippe V; Scaloni, Andrea; Salzano, Anna Maria; Lucretti, Sergio; Steinkellner, Herta; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello

    2016-09-01

    Hairy root (HR) cultures derived from Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformation of plant tissues are an advantageous biotechnological manufacturing platform due to the accumulation of recombinant proteins in an otherwise largely protein free culture medium. In this context, HRs descending from transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants were successfully used for the production of several functional mAbs with plant-type glycans. Here, we expressed the tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody mAb H10 in HRs obtained either by infecting a transgenic N. tabacum line expressing H10 with A. rhizogenes or a glyco-engineered N. benthamiana line (ΔXTFT) with recombinant A. rhizogenes carrying mAb H10 heavy and light chain cDNAs. Selected HR clones derived from both plants accumulated mAb H10 in the culture medium with similar yields (2-3 mg/L). N-glycosylation profiles of antibodies purified from HR supernatant revealed the presence of plant-typical complex structures for N. tabacum-derived mAb H10 and of GnGn structures lacking xylose and fucose for the ΔXTFT-derived counterpart. Both antibody glyco-formats exhibited comparable antigen binding activities. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the co-infection of ΔXTFT Nicotiana benthamiana with recombinant A. rhizogenes is an efficient procedure for the generation of stable HR cultures expressing the tumor-targeting mAb H10 with a human-compatible glycosylation profile, thus representing an important step towards the exploitation of root cultures for the production of 'next generation' human therapeutic antibodies.

  11. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  12. Cell-Penetrating Bispecific Antibodies for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    biochemical lesions produced by this antibody, while developing higher affinity analogs with improved production characteristics. 15. SUBJECT TERMS...observations with DHT-stimulated luciferase activity assays, enzalutamide had no effect on the constitutive induction of luciferase activity by the AR

  13. Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection may elicit neutralizing antibodies targeting epitopes conserved in all viral genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicasio Mancini

    Full Text Available Anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV cross-neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, directed against conserved epitopes on surface E2 glycoprotein, are central tools for understanding virus-host interplay, and for planning strategies for prevention and treatment of this infection. Recently, we developed a research aimed at identifying these antibody specificities. The characteristics of one of these antibodies (Fab e20 were addressed in this study. Firstly, using immunofluorescence and FACS analysis of cells expressing envelope HCV glycoproteins, Fab e20 was able to recognize all HCV genotypes. Secondly, competition assays with a panel of mouse and rat monoclonals, and alanine scanning mutagenesis analyses located the e20 epitope within the CD81 binding site, documenting that three highly conserved HCV/E2 residues (W529, G530 and D535 are critical for e20 binding. Finally, a strong neutralizing activity against HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp incorporating envelope glycoproteins of genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b and 4, and against the cell culture-grown (HCVcc JFH1 strain, was observed. The data highlight that neutralizing antibodies against HCV epitopes present in all HCV genotypes are elicited during natural infection. Their availability may open new avenues to the understanding of HCV persistence and to the development of strategies for the immune control of this infection.

  14. Clinical efficacy and management of monoclonal antibodies targeting CD38 and SLAMF7 in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Moreau, Philippe; Plesner, Torben;

    2016-01-01

    have demonstrated significantly improved progression-free survival when elotuzumab is added to lenalidomide-dexamethasone or bortezomib-dexamethasone. Importantly, there has been no significant additive toxicity when these monoclonal antibodies are combined with other anti-MM agents, other than...

  15. Targeting CD47-SIRPα interactions for potentiating therapeutic antibody-mediated tumor cell destruction by phagocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X.W.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the role of CD47-SIRPα interactions in therapeutic antibody-dependent tumor cell destruction by human phagocytes and also explore the killing mechanism(s) by which human phagocytes, and in particular human neutrophils, mediat

  16. Detection of Aichi virus with antibody targeting of conserved viral protein 1 epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Shen; Chen, Bao-Chen; Lin, You-Sheng; Chang, Jenn-Tzong; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Chen, Jih-Jung; Chang, Tsung-Hsien

    2013-10-01

    Aichi virus (AiV) is an emerging single-stranded, positive-sense, non-enveloped RNA virus in the Picornaviridae that causes acute gastroenteritis in humans. The first case of AiV infection in Taiwan was diagnosed in a human neonate with enterovirus-associated symptoms; the virus was successfully isolated and propagated. To establish a method to detect AiV, we analyzed the antigen epitope and generated a polyclonal antibody against AiV viral protein 1 (VP1). This peptide-purified anti-AiV VP1 antibody showed high specificity against AiV VP1 without cross-reaction to nine other tested strains of Picornaviruses. The anti-AiV VP1 antibody was used in immunofluorescence analysis, immunoblotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to elucidate the cell tropism and replication kinetics of AiV. Use of the anti-AiV VP1 antibody also revealed AiV infection restriction with interferon type I and polyI/C antiviral treatment. The AiV infection and detection system may provide an in vitro platform for AiV virology study.

  17. A novel dimeric inhibitor targeting Beta2GPI in Beta2GPI/antibody complexes implicated in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kolyada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: β2GPI is a major antigen for autoantibodies associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, an autoimmune disease characterized by thrombosis and recurrent pregnancy loss. Only the dimeric form of β2GPI generated by anti-β2GPI antibodies is pathologically important, in contrast to monomeric β2GPI which is abundant in plasma. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We created a dimeric inhibitor, A1-A1, to selectively target β2GPI in β2GPI/antibody complexes. To make this inhibitor, we isolated the first ligand-binding module from ApoER2 (A1 and connected two A1 modules with a flexible linker. A1-A1 interferes with two pathologically important interactions in APS, the binding of β2GPI/antibody complexes with anionic phospholipids and ApoER2. We compared the efficiency of A1-A1 to monomeric A1 for inhibition of the binding of β2GPI/antibody complexes to anionic phospholipids. We tested the inhibition of β2GPI present in human serum, β2GPI purified from human plasma and the individual domain V of β2GPI. We demonstrated that when β2GPI/antibody complexes are formed, A1-A1 is much more effective than A1 in inhibition of the binding of β2GPI to cardiolipin, regardless of the source of β2GPI. Similarly, A1-A1 strongly inhibits the binding of dimerized domain V of β2GPI to cardiolipin compared to the monomeric A1 inhibitor. In the absence of anti-β2GPI antibodies, both A1-A1 and A1 only weakly inhibit the binding of pathologically inactive monomeric β2GPI to cardiolipin. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the approach of using a dimeric inhibitor to block β2GPI in the pathological multivalent β2GPI/antibody complexes holds significant promise. The novel inhibitor A1-A1 may be a starting point in the development of an effective therapeutic for antiphospholipid syndrome.

  18. A Novel Dimeric Inhibitor Targeting Beta2GPI in Beta2GPI/Antibody Complexes Implicated in Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Kolyada; C Lee; A De Biasio; N Beglova

    2011-12-31

    {beta}2GPI is a major antigen for autoantibodies associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), an autoimmune disease characterized by thrombosis and recurrent pregnancy loss. Only the dimeric form of {beta}2GPI generated by anti-{beta}2GPI antibodies is pathologically important, in contrast to monomeric {beta}2GPI which is abundant in plasma. We created a dimeric inhibitor, A1-A1, to selectively target {beta}2GPI in {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes. To make this inhibitor, we isolated the first ligand-binding module from ApoER2 (A1) and connected two A1 modules with a flexible linker. A1-A1 interferes with two pathologically important interactions in APS, the binding of {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes with anionic phospholipids and ApoER2. We compared the efficiency of A1-A1 to monomeric A1 for inhibition of the binding of {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes to anionic phospholipids. We tested the inhibition of {beta}2GPI present in human serum, {beta}2GPI purified from human plasma and the individual domain V of {beta}2GPI. We demonstrated that when {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes are formed, A1-A1 is much more effective than A1 in inhibition of the binding of {beta}2GPI to cardiolipin, regardless of the source of {beta}2GPI. Similarly, A1-A1 strongly inhibits the binding of dimerized domain V of {beta}2GPI to cardiolipin compared to the monomeric A1 inhibitor. In the absence of anti-{beta}2GPI antibodies, both A1-A1 and A1 only weakly inhibit the binding of pathologically inactive monomeric {beta}2GPI to cardiolipin. Our results suggest that the approach of using a dimeric inhibitor to block {beta}2GPI in the pathological multivalent {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes holds significant promise. The novel inhibitor A1-A1 may be a starting point in the development of an effective therapeutic for antiphospholipid syndrome.

  19. Inhibiting angiogenesis with human single-chain variable fragment antibody targeting VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hossien; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Ebrahimizadeh, Walead; Dehbidi, Gholamreza Rafiei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific angiogenesis factor which has crucial roles in the angiogenesis of tumors. Anti-angiogenesis agents can inhibit growth and metastasis of tumor cells. Single-chain variable fragments (scFv) have the same affinity as whole antibodies and smaller size, thus result in more tissue permeability and higher production yield. In this research we aim to isolate a human scFv antibody against VEGF that inhibits angiogenesis. For that, we have used human scFv phage library to isolate a specific scFv antibody against binding site of VEGF. The human scFv phage library was amplified according to the manufacture protocol and panned against recombinant VEGF. ScFv antibody was isolated after five rounds of panning. Phage ELISA was used for detection of the highest affinity binder (HR6). Soluble HR6 scFv was expressed in non-suppressor strain of Escherichia coli HB2151 and purified using Ni-NTA chromatography. In vivo and in vitro function of the HR6 scFv was analyzed by chorioallantoic membrane assay and endothelial cell proliferation assay on VEGF stimulated HUVECs. Result of the cross reactivity showed that HR6 scFv specifically bounds to VEGF. The affinity was calculated to be 1.8×10(-7)M. HR6 could stop HUVEC proliferation in a dose dependent manner and anti-angiogenesis activity was observed using 10μg of HR6 in chorioallantoic membrane assay. In this work, we demonstrate that a HR6 scFv selected from human library phage display specifically blocks VEGF signaling, furthermore, this scFv has an anti-angiogenesis effect and because of its small size has more tissue diffusion. The HR6 antibody was isolated form a human library thus, it is not immunogenic for humans and could serve as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer.

  20. Comprehensive optimization of a single-chain variable domain antibody fragment as a targeting ligand for a cytotoxic nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kathy; Geddie, Melissa L; Kohli, Neeraj; Kornaga, Tad; Kirpotin, Dmitri B; Jiao, Yang; Rennard, Rachel; Drummond, Daryl C; Nielsen, Ulrik B; Xu, Lihui; Lugovskoy, Alexey A

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-targeted nanoparticles have the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of cytotoxic anti-cancer therapies by directing them to tumor cells. Using antibodies or their fragments requires careful engineering because multiple parameters, including affinity, internalization rate and stability, all need to be optimized. Here, we present a case study of the iterative engineering of a single chain variable fragment (scFv) for use as a targeting arm of a liposomal cytotoxic nanoparticle. We describe the effect of the orientation of variable domains, the length and composition of the interdomain protein linker that connects VH and VL, and stabilizing mutations in both the framework and complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) on the molecular properties of the scFv. We show that variable domain orientation can alter cross-reactivity to murine antigen while maintaining affinity to the human antigen. We demonstrate that tyrosine residues in the CDRs make diverse contributions to the binding affinity and biophysical properties, and that replacement of non-essential tyrosines can improve the stability and bioactivity of the scFv. Our studies demonstrate that a comprehensive engineering strategy may be required to identify a scFv with optimal characteristics for nanoparticle targeting.

  1. Half-Antibody Functionalized Lipid-Polymer Hybrid Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery to Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) Presenting Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Che-Ming Jack; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Tran Cao, Hop S.; Aryal, Santosh; Sartor, Marta; Esener, Sadik; Bouvet, Michael; Zhang, Liangfang

    2010-01-01

    Current chemotherapy regimens against pancreatic cancer are met with little success as poor tumor vascularization significantly limits the delivery of oncological drugs. High-dose targeted drug delivery, through which a drug delivery vehicle releases a large payload upon tumor localization, is thus a promising alternative strategy against this lethal disease. Herein, we synthesize anti-CEA half-antibody conjugated lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles and characterize their ligand conjugation yields, physicochemical properties, and targeting ability against pancreatic cancer cells. Under the same drug loading, the half-antibody targeted nanoparticles show enhanced cancer killing effect compared to the corresponding non-targeted nanoparticles. PMID:20394436

  2. Cationic liposomes enhance targeted delivery and expression of exogenous DNA mediated by N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine)-antibody conjugate in mouse lung endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P; Kennel, S; Huang, L

    1992-07-15

    A new and improved system for targeted gene delivery and expression is described. Transfection efficiency of N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine) (NPLL) conjugated with anti-thrombomodulin antibody 34A can be improved by adding to the system a lipophilic component, cationic liposomes. DNA, antibody conjugate and cationic liposomes form a ternary electrostatic complex which preserves the ability to bind specifically to the target cells. At the same time the addition of liposomes enhance the specific transfection efficiency of antibody-polylysine/DNA binary complex by 10 to 20-fold in mouse lung endothelial cells in culture.

  3. A cytotoxic anti-IL-3Rα antibody targets key cells and cytokines implicated in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oon, Shereen; Huynh, Huy; Tai, Tsin Yee; Ng, Milica; Monaghan, Katherine; Biondo, Mark; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Nash, Andrew D.; Wicks, Ian P.; Wilson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    To date, the major target of biologic therapeutics in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been the B cell, which produces pathogenic autoantibodies. Recently, targeting type I IFN, which is elaborated by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in response to endosomal TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation by SLE immune complexes, has shown promising results. pDCs express high levels of the IL-3Rα chain (CD123), suggesting an alternative potential targeting strategy. We have developed an anti-CD123 monoclonal antibody, CSL362, and show here that it affects key cell types and cytokines that contribute to SLE. CSL362 potently depletes pDCs via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, markedly reducing TLR7, TLR9, and SLE serum-induced IFN-α production and IFN-α-upregulated gene expression. The antibody also inhibits TLR7- and TLR9-induced plasmablast expansion by reducing IFN-α and IL-6 production. These effects are more pronounced than with IFN-α blockade alone, possibly because pDC depletion reduces production of other IFN subtypes, such as type III, as well as non-IFN proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6. In addition, CSL362 depletes basophils and inhibits IL-3 signaling. These effects were confirmed in cells derived from a heterogeneous population of SLE donors, various IFN-dependent autoimmune diseases, and healthy controls. We also demonstrate in vivo activity of CSL362 following its s.c. administration to cynomolgus monkeys. This spectrum of effects provides a preclinical rationale for the therapeutic evaluation of CSL362 in SLE. PMID:27699260

  4. Antibody Responses to NY-ESO-1 in Primary Breast Cancer Identify a Subtype Target for Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The highly immunogenic human tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 (ESO) is a target of choice for anti-cancer immune therapy. In this study, we assessed spontaneous antibody (Ab) responses to ESO in a large cohort of patients with primary breast cancer (BC) and addressed the correlation between the presence of anti-ESO Ab, the expression of ESO in the tumors and their characteristics. We found detectable Ab responses to ESO in 1% of the patients. Tumors from patients with circulating Ab to ESO exhibited co...

  5. Antibody-mediated targeting of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator proteolytic function neutralizes fibrinolysis in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K; Jögi, Annika; Rønø, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays a central role in tissue remodeling processes. Most of our understanding of the role of uPA in vivo is derived from studies using gene-targeted uPA-deficient mice. To enable in vivo studies on the specific interference with uPA functionality in mouse...... models, we have now developed murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against murine uPA by immunization of uPA-deficient mice with the recombinant protein. Guided by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting, surface plasmon resonance, and enzyme kinetic analyses, we have selected two...

  6. LGR5 expressing cells of hair follicle as potential targets for antibody mediated anti-cancer laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Boris V.

    2013-02-01

    Near infrared laser immunotherapy becomes now a new promising research field to cure the patients with cancers. One of the critical limitation in medical application of this treatment is availability of the specific markers for delivery of laser-sensitive nanoparticles. When coupled to antibodies to the cancer stem cells markers these nanoparticles may be delivered to the cancer tissue and mediate the laser induced thermolysis of the cancer stem cells that initiate and drive growth of cancer. This paper addresses the Lgr5 cell surface marker mediating the Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction as a potential target for anti-cancer laser immunotherapy of skin cancers.

  7. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  8. Immunotherapy of B-Cell Lymphoma with an Engineered Bispecific Antibody Targeting CD19 and CD5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Breitling

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Using genetic engineering a humanized Fab fragment with specificity for CD19 was fused to a disulfide-stabilized single-chain antibody (dsFv recognizing CD5. This format should show reduced immunogenicity and improved tissue penetration. The specificity of bsAb FabCD19xdsFvCD5 binding to target cells was verified by flow cytometry on B and T lymphoma cell lines. Binding affinities of both arms were compared with the bivalent parental antibodies against CD19 and CD5 by binding competition assay. Redirected lysis of B lymphoma cells by preactivated PBMC from healthy donors was demonstrated in a chromium-release assay. A clear dose-response relationship could be established in the range from 1 ng/mL to 10 mg/mL bsAb. To evaluate the in vivo efficacy of bsAb FabCD19xdsFvCD5, NOD/SCID mice were intravenously injected with luciferase transfected Raji lymphoma cells together with pre-activated PBMC. Mice received five injections of therapeutic bsAb or control antibodies. While in the control groups all mice died within 40 to 50 days, 40% of bsAb treated animals survived longer than 60 days.

  9. A neutralizing monoclonal antibody targeting the acid-sensitive region in chikungunya virus E2 protects from disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suganya Selvarajah

    Full Text Available The mosquito-borne alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV, has recently reemerged, producing the largest epidemic ever recorded for this virus, with up to 6.5 million cases of acute and chronic rheumatic disease. There are currently no licensed vaccines for CHIKV and current anti-inflammatory drug treatment is often inadequate. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of two human monoclonal antibodies, C9 and E8, from CHIKV infected and recovered individuals. C9 was determined to be a potent virus neutralizing antibody and a biosensor antibody binding study demonstrated it recognized residues on intact CHIKV VLPs. Shotgun mutagenesis alanine scanning of 98 percent of the residues in the E1 and E2 glycoproteins of CHIKV envelope showed that the epitope bound by C9 included amino-acid 162 in the acid-sensitive region (ASR of the CHIKV E2 glycoprotein. The ASR is critical for the rearrangement of CHIKV E2 during fusion and viral entry into host cells, and we predict that C9 prevents these events from occurring. When used prophylactically in a CHIKV mouse model, C9 completely protected against CHIKV viremia and arthritis. We also observed that when administered therapeutically at 8 or 18 hours post-CHIKV challenge, C9 gave 100% protection in a pathogenic mouse model. Given that targeting this novel neutralizing epitope in E2 can potently protect both in vitro and in vivo, it is likely to be an important region both for future antibody and vaccine-based interventions against CHIKV.

  10. [Construction and functional analysis of a bispecific antibody that targets TNF-α and ED-B].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu-Jun; Yang, Yan-Qun; Hu, Xue-Ping; Xie, Mian; Liu, Meng-Yuan

    2014-12-01

    In order to enhance the specificity of TNF-α monoclonal antibody to inflamed site, a bispecific antibody BsDb that targets TNF-α and the extra-domain B (ED-B) of fibronectin (FN) was constructed by covalently linking the anti-TNF-α single chain Fv antibody (TNF-scFv) and the anti-ED-B scFv L19 via a flexible peptide linker deriving from human serum albumin (HSA). ED-B is an antigen specifically expressed at the inflamed site. BsDb is expressed in E. coli, identified by immunoblot, and purified with affinity chromatography. This was followed by further examination of its bioactivities and pharmacokinetics. We demonstrated that BsDb retained the immunoreactivity of its original antibodies as it could simultaneously bind to TNF-α and ED-B and neutralize the biological action of TNF-α. In the collagen-induced arthritis mice model, BsDb selectively accumulate in the inflamed joint with a maximal uptake of (12.2 ± 1.50)% ID/g in a single inflamed paw and retain in the inflamed paw for at least 72 h. In contrast, BsDb showed a short serum half-life of (0.50 ± 0.05) h and a rapid clearance from normal tissues. The findings reported herein indicate that BsDb has good specificity to the inflamed site and low toxicity to normal tissues. BsDb is therefore likely to have greater clinical applications in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. This laid a stable basis for its preclinical study.

  11. Cergutuzumab amunaleukin (CEA-IL2v), a CEA-targeted IL-2 variant-based immunocytokine for combination cancer immunotherapy: Overcoming limitations of aldesleukin and conventional IL-2-based immunocytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Waldhauer, Inja; Nicolini, Valeria G.; Freimoser-Grundschober, Anne; Nayak, Tapan; Vugts, Danielle J.; Dunn, Claire; Bolijn, Marije; Benz, Jörg; Stihle, Martine; Lang, Sabine; Roemmele, Michaele; Hofer, Thomas; van Puijenbroek, Erwin; Moser, Samuel; Ast, Oliver; Brünker, Peter; Gorr, Ingo H.; Neumann, Sebastian; Hinton, Heather; Crameri, Flavio; Gerdes, Christian; Bacac, Marina; van Dongen, Guus; Moessner, Ekkehard; Umaña, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We developed cergutuzumab amunaleukin (CEA-IL2v, RG7813), a novel monomeric CEA-targeted immunocytokine, that comprises a single IL-2 variant (IL2v) moiety with abolished CD25 binding, fused to the C-terminus of a high affinity, bivalent carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific antibody devoid of Fc-mediated effector functions. Its molecular design aims to (i) avoid preferential activation of regulatory T-cells vs. immune effector cells by removing CD25 binding; (ii) increase the therapeutic index of IL-2 therapy by (a) preferential retention at the tumor by having a lower dissociation rate from CEA-expressing cancer cells vs. IL-2R-expressing cells, (b) avoiding any FcγR-binding and Fc effector functions and (c) reduced binding to endothelial cells expressing CD25; and (iii) improve the pharmacokinetics, and thus convenience of administration, of IL-2. The crystal structure of the IL2v-IL-2Rβγ complex was determined and CEA-IL2v activity was assessed using human immune effector cells. Tumor targeting was investigated in tumor-bearing mice using 89Zr-labeled CEA-IL2v. Efficacy studies were performed in (a) syngeneic mouse models as monotherapy and combined with anti-PD-L1, and in (b) xenograft mouse models in combination with ADCC-mediating antibodies. CEA-IL2v binds to CEA with pM avidity but not to CD25, and consequently did not preferentially activate Tregs. In vivo, CEA-IL2v demonstrated superior pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting compared with a wild-type IL-2-based CEA immunocytokine (CEA-IL2wt). CEA-IL2v strongly expanded NK and CD8+ T cells, skewing the CD8+:CD4+ ratio toward CD8+ T cells both in the periphery and in the tumor, and mediated single agent efficacy in syngeneic MC38-CEA and PancO2-CEA models. Combination with trastuzumab, cetuximab and imgatuzumab, all of human IgG1 isotype, resulted in superior efficacy compared with the monotherapies alone. Combined with anti-PD-L1, CEA-IL2v mediated superior efficacy over the respective

  12. Differences in human antibody reactivity to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens are dependent on age and malaria transmission intensity in northeastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Lasse S; Lusingu, John P; Nielsen, Morten A

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens (VSA) are involved in the pathogenesis of malaria. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) with specificity for VSA (anti-VSA IgG) is therefore considered important for acquired immunity. To better understand the nature and dynamics of variant-specific IgG responses ...

  13. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus-Like Particle Binding to Target Cells by Antiviral Antibodies in Acute and Chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Daniel; Barth, Heidi; Gissler, Bettina; Schürmann, Peter; Adah, Mohammed I.; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Pape, Gerd R.; Depla, Erik; Jacobs, Dirk; Maertens, Geert; Patel, Arvind H.; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Liang, T. Jake; Blum, Hubert E.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic viral hepatitis worldwide. The study of antibody-mediated virus neutralization has been hampered by the lack of an efficient and high-throughput cell culture system for the study of virus neutralization. The HCV structural proteins have been shown to assemble into noninfectious HCV-like particles (HCV-LPs). Similar to serum-derived virions, HCV-LPs bind and enter human hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines. In this study, we developed an HCV-LP-based model system for a systematic functional analysis of antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C. We demonstrate that cellular HCV-LP binding was specifically inhibited by antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C in a dose-dependent manner. Using a library of homologous overlapping envelope peptides covering the entire HCV envelope, we identified an epitope in the N-terminal E2 region (SQKIQLVNTNGSWHI; amino acid positions 408 to 422) as one target of human antiviral antibodies inhibiting cellular particle binding. Using a large panel of serum samples from patients with acute and chronic hepatitis C, we demonstrated that the presence of antibodies with inhibition of binding activity was not associated with viral clearance. In conclusion, antibody-mediated inhibition of cellular HCV-LP binding represents a convenient system for the functional characterization of human anti-HCV antibodies, allowing the mapping of envelope neutralization epitopes targeted by naturally occurring antiviral antibodies. PMID:15308699

  14. In Vivo Molecular Imaging to Diagnose and Subtype Tumors through Receptor-Targeted Optically Labeled Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Koyama

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging of cell surface receptors can potentially diagnose tumors based on their distinct expression profiles. Using multifilter spectrally resolved optical imaging with three fluorescently labeled antibodies, we simultaneously imaged three different cell surface receptors to distinguish tumor types noninvasively. We selected tumors overexpressing different subtypes of EGFR receptor: HER-1 (A431 and HER-2 (NIH3T3/HER2+, or interleukin-2 receptor α-subunit receptor (IL-2Rα; SP2/Tac. After tumor establishment, a cocktail of three fluorescently labeled monoclonal antibodies was injected: cetuximab-Cy5 (targeting HER-1, trastuzumab-Cy7 (HER-2, daclizumab-AIexaFluor700 (IL-2Ra. Optical fluorescence imaging was performed after 24 hours with both a red filter set and three successive filter sets (yellow, red, deep red. Spectrally resolved imaging of 10 mice clearly distinguished A431, NIH3T3/HER2+, SP2-Tac tumors based on their distinct optical spectra. Three-filter sets significantly increased the signal-to-background ratio compared to a single-filter set by reducing the background signal, thus significantly improving the differentiation of each of the receptors targeted (P < .022. In conclusion, following multifilter spectrally resolved imaging, different tumor types can be simultaneously distinguished and diagnosed in vivo. Multiple filter sets increase the signal-to-noise ratio by substantially reducing the background signal, may allow more optical dyes to be resolved within the narrow limits of the near-infrared spectrum.

  15. Optimization of an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody targeted delivery system using PEGylated human serum albumin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Tahmasebi, Fathollah; Shokri, Fazel

    2013-04-15

    Human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles represent an attractive strategy for active targeting of therapeutics into tumor cells due to the presence of superficial functional groups. HER2 is highly expressed in a significant proportion of cancers and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against HER2 hold great promise for effective therapy. Herein, covalent coupling of a novel mAb (1F2) directed against the extracellular domain of HER2 to the surface of HSA nanoparticles was evaluated to obtain nanoparticles with highest cellular uptake. HER2 reactivity of 1F2-conjugated nanoparticles produced under different conditions was screened by an indirect ELISA and flow cytometry techniques. Monoclonal antibody thiolation with 100-fold molar excess of 2-iminothiolane and the ratio of 10:1 for the thiolated 1F2 (μg) to PEGylated nanoparticles (mg), were optimum for the attachment process. Under this condition, 23±4% of 1F2 was conjugated to nanoparticles. The flow cytometry results show that 1F2-modified nanoparticles interact with nearly all HER2 receptors on the surface of BT474 cells. In addition, no cellular uptake was observed on MCF7 cells. In vitro analyses showed no significant cytotoxicity of produced system against BT474 cells. Therefore, 1F2-attached HSA nanoparticles represent a potential delivery system for targeted transport of therapeutic agents into HER2-positive tumor cells.

  16. Antibody Therapy Targeting CD47 and CD271 Effectively Suppresses Melanoma Metastasis in Patient-Derived Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Michael; Han, Arum; Lakatos, Anita; Sahoo, Debashis; Hachey, Stephanie J; Weiskopf, Kipp; Beck, Andrew H; Weissman, Irving L; Boiko, Alexander D

    2016-08-09

    The high rate of metastasis and recurrence among melanoma patients indicates the existence of cells within melanoma that have the ability to both initiate metastatic programs and bypass immune recognition. Here, we identify CD47 as a regulator of melanoma tumor metastasis and immune evasion. Protein and gene expression analysis of clinical melanoma samples reveals that CD47, an anti-phagocytic signal, correlates with melanoma metastasis. Antibody-mediated blockade of CD47 coupled with targeting of CD271(+) melanoma cells strongly inhibits tumor metastasis in patient-derived xenografts. This therapeutic effect is mediated by drastic changes in the tumor and metastatic site immune microenvironments, both of whichwhich exhibit greatly increased density of differentiated macrophages and significantly fewer inflammatory monocytes, pro-metastatic macrophages (CCR2(+)/VEGFR1(+)), and neutrophils, all of which are associated with disease progression. Thus, antibody therapy that activates the innate immune response in combination with selective targeting of CD271(+) melanoma cells represents a powerful therapeutic approach against metastatic melanoma.

  17. Antibody Therapy Targeting CD47 and CD271 Effectively Suppresses Melanoma Metastasis in Patient-Derived Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ngo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The high rate of metastasis and recurrence among melanoma patients indicates the existence of cells within melanoma that have the ability to both initiate metastatic programs and bypass immune recognition. Here, we identify CD47 as a regulator of melanoma tumor metastasis and immune evasion. Protein and gene expression analysis of clinical melanoma samples reveals that CD47, an anti-phagocytic signal, correlates with melanoma metastasis. Antibody-mediated blockade of CD47 coupled with targeting of CD271+ melanoma cells strongly inhibits tumor metastasis in patient-derived xenografts. This therapeutic effect is mediated by drastic changes in the tumor and metastatic site immune microenvironments, both of whichwhich exhibit greatly increased density of differentiated macrophages and significantly fewer inflammatory monocytes, pro-metastatic macrophages (CCR2+/VEGFR1+, and neutrophils, all of which are associated with disease progression. Thus, antibody therapy that activates the innate immune response in combination with selective targeting of CD271+ melanoma cells represents a powerful therapeutic approach against metastatic melanoma.

  18. Bispecific antibodies and trispecific immunocytokines for targeting the immune system against cancer: preparing for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Philippe; Schirrmacher, Volker

    2013-02-01

    Monoclonal anti-tumor antibodies (mAbs) that are clinically effective usually recruit, via their constant fragment (Fc) domain, Fc receptor (FcR)-positive accessory cells of the immune system and engage these additionally against the tumor. Since T cells are FcR negative, these important cells are not getting involved. In contrast to mAbs, bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) can be designed in such a way that they involve T cells. bsAbs are artificially designed molecules that bind simultaneously to two different antigens, one on the tumor cell, the other one on an immune effector cell such as CD3 on T cells. Such dual antibody constructs can cross-link tumor cells and T cells. Many such bsAb molecules at the surface of tumor cells can thus build a bridge to T cells and aggregate their CD3 molecules, thereby activating them for cytotoxic activity. BsAbs can also contain a third binding site, for instance a Fc domain or a cytokine that would bind to its respective cytokine receptor. The present review discusses the pros and cons for the use of the Fc fragment during the development of bsAbs using either cell-fusion or recombinant DNA technologies. The recombinant antibody technology allows the generation of very efficient bsAbs containing no Fc domain such as the bi-specific T-cell engager (BiTE). The strong antitumor activity of these molecules makes them very interesting new cancer therapeutics. Over the last decade, we have developed another concept, namely to combine bsAbs and multivalent immunocytokines with a tumor cell vaccine. The latter are patient-derived tumor cells modified by infection with a virus. The virus-Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV)-introduces, at the surface of the tumor cells, viral molecules that can serve as general anchors for the bsAbs. Our strategy aims at redirecting, in an Fc-independent fashion, activities of T cells and accessory cells against autologous tumor antigens. It creates very promising perspectives for a new generation of efficient

  19. Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeted to mucin-type carbohydrate epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1991-01-01

    The cancer-related mucin-type carbohydrate neoantigen Tn was found on gp160 and gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Tn neutralized infection with cell-free virus and blocked fusion between HIV-infected and uninfected cells......; this binding was inhibitable by pure Tn antigen, and indications were found that this inhibition occurred at a pre-entry step. Boosting the naturally occurring low-titer anti-Tn activity may be of prophylactic value, as suggested by the in vitro neutralization found in this study....

  20. Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeted to mucin-type carbohydrate epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M;

    1991-01-01

    . This inhibition was found in infection of both lymphocytic cells and monocytoid cells. Viruses tested included six HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates propagated in different cells, as well as infectious plasma from AIDS patients. The antiviral effect of anti-Tn MAbs occurred by specific binding of the MAb to the virus......The cancer-related mucin-type carbohydrate neoantigen Tn was found on gp160 and gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Tn neutralized infection with cell-free virus and blocked fusion between HIV-infected and uninfected cells...

  1. Use of N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine)-antibody conjugate as a carrier for targeted gene delivery in mouse lung endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P; Kennel, S J; Huang, L

    1992-01-01

    A DNA targeted delivery and expression system has been designed based on an N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine) (NPLL)-antibody conjugate, which readily forms a complex with plasmid DNA. Monoclonal antibodies against the cell-surface thrombomodulin conjugated with NPLL were used for targeted delivery of foreign plasmid DNA to an antigen-expressing mouse lung endothelial cell line in vitro and to mouse lungs in vivo. In both cases significant amounts of DNA can be specifically bound to the target cells or tissues. Specific gene expression was observed in the treated mouse lung endothelial cells.

  2. Isolation of recombinant phage antibodies targeting the hemagglutinin cleavage site of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Dong

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses, which have emerged in poultry and other wildlife worldwide, contain a characteristic multi-basic cleavage site (CS in the hemagglutinin protein (HA. Because this arginine-rich CS is unique among influenza virus subtypes, antibodies against this site have the potential to specifically diagnose pathogenic H5N1. By immunizing mice with the CS peptide and screening a phage display library, we isolated four antibody Fab fragment clones that specifically bind the antigen peptide and several HPAI H5N1 HA proteins in different clades. The soluble Fab fragments expressed in Escherichia coli bound the CS peptide and the H5N1 HA protein with nanomolar affinity. In an immunofluorescence assay, these Fab fragments stained cells infected with HPAI H5N1 but not those infected with a less virulent strain. Lastly, all the Fab clones could detect the CS peptide and H5N1 HA protein by open sandwich ELISA. Thus, these recombinant Fab fragments will be useful novel reagents for the rapid and specific detection of HPAI H5N1 virus.

  3. Targeting natural killer cell reactivity by employing antibody to NKp46: implications for type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Yossef

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells belong to the innate lymphoid cells. Their cytotoxic activity is regulated by the delicate balance between activating and inhibitory signals. NKp46 is a member of the primary activating receptors of NK cells. We previously reported that the NKp46 receptor is involved in the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D. Subsequently, we hypothesized that blocking this receptor could prevent or hinder disease development. To address this goal, we developed monoclonal antibodies for murine NKp46. One mAb, named NCR1.15, recognizes the mouse homologue protein of NKp46, named Ncr1, and was able to down-regulate the surface expression of NKp46 on primary murine NK cells following antibody injection in vivo. Additionally, NCR1.15 treatments were able to down-regulate cytotoxic activity mediated by NKp46, but not by other NK receptors. To test our primary assumption, we examined T1D development in two models, non-obese diabetic mice and low-dose streptozotocin. Our results show a significantly lower incidence of diabetic mice in the NCR1.15-treated group compared to control groups. This study directly demonstrates the involvement of NKp46 in T1D development and suggests a novel treatment strategy for early insulitis.

  4. BRCAA1 monoclonal antibody conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for in vivo targeted magnetofluorescent imaging of gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Jian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric cancer is 2th most common cancer in China, and is still the second most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. How to recognize early gastric cancer cells is still a great challenge for early diagnosis and therapy of patients with gastric cancer. This study is aimed to develop one kind of multifunctional nanoprobes for in vivo targeted magnetofluorescent imaging of gastric cancer. Methods BRCAA1 monoclonal antibody was prepared, was used as first antibody to stain 50 pairs of specimens of gastric cancer and control normal gastric mucous tissues, and conjugated with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles with 50 nm in diameter, the resultant BRCAA1-conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoprobes were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectrometry, as-prepared nanoprobes were incubated with gastric cancer MGC803 cells, and were injected into mice model loaded with gastric cancer of 5 mm in diameter via tail vein, and then were imaged by fluorescence optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging, their biodistribution was investigated. The tissue slices were observed by fluorescent microscopy, and the important organs such as heart, lung, kidney, brain and liver were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE stain method. Results BRCAA1 monoclonal antibody was successfully prepared, BRCAA1 protein exhibited over-expression in 64% gastric cancer tissues, no expression in control normal gastric mucous tissues, there exists statistical difference between two groups (P in vivo gastric cancer tissues loaded by mice, and could be used to image gastric cancer tissues by fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging, and mainly distributed in local gastric cancer tissues within 12 h post-injection. HE stain analysis showed that no obvious damages were observed in important organs. Conclusions The high-performance BRCAA1 monoclonal antibody-conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles

  5. Construction and Characterization of Novel Staphylokinase Variants with Antiplatelet Aggregation Activity and Reduced Immunogenecity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Bo SU; Yu-Gao ZHANG; Jin-Tian HE; Wei MO; Yan-Ling ZHANG; Xian-Mei TAO; Hou-Yan SONG

    2004-01-01

    To develop target thrombolytic agents with fibrinolytic activity, antiplatelet aggregation activity and reduced immunogenicity, two staphylokinase variants containing Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif were constructed. Gene expression was induced in E. coli JF1125 and the variants, designated DGR and RL1, were purified with gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography and the purity was over 95%. The fibrinolytic activity and kinetic constants of the two variants were comparable to those of recombinant wild-type staphylokinase. Both the variants can inhibit the platelet aggregation at a final concentration of 2 μM. Thetiters of antibodies against variants were much lower than those against recombinant staphylokinase in guineapigs, which indicated that the immunogenicity of the variants was greatly reduced. These results confirm thatit is possible to design and produce a bifunctional protein that possesses fibrinolytic and antiplatelet aggregation activities.

  6. Aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrsen, Kirstine; Madsen, Caroline B; Rasch, Morten G

    2013-01-01

    not covered by immunological tolerance in MUC1 humanized mice and man. The objective of this study was to determine if mouse antibodies to this Tn-MUC1 epitope induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) pivotal for their potential use in cancer immunotherapy. Binding affinity of mAb 5E5 directed...... is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity suggesting that antibodies targeting glycopeptide epitopes on mucins are strong candidates for cancer-specific immunotherapies.......Protein glycosylation often changes during cancer development, resulting in the expression of cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens. In particular mucins such as MUC1 are subject to these changes. We previously identified an immunodominant Tn-MUC1 (GalNAc-α-MUC1) cancer-specific epitope...

  7. Intracellular delivery and trafficking dynamics of a lymphoma-targeting antibody-polymer conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berguig, Geoffrey Y; Convertine, Anthony J; Shi, Julie; Palanca-Wessels, Maria Corinna; Duvall, Craig L; Pun, Suzie H; Press, Oliver W; Stayton, Patrick S

    2012-12-03

    Ratiometric fluorescence and cellular fractionation studies were employed to characterize the intracellular trafficking dynamics of antibody-poly(propylacrylic acid) (PPAA) conjugates in CD22+ RAMOS-AW cells. The HD39 monoclonal antibody (mAb) directs CD22-dependent, receptor-mediated uptake in human B-cell lymphoma cells, where it is rapidly trafficked to the lysosomal compartment. To characterize the intracellular-release dynamics of the polymer-mAb conjugates, HD39-streptavidin (HD39/SA) was dual-labeled with pH-insensitive Alexa Fluor 488 and pH-sensitive pHrodo fluorophores. The subcellular pH distribution of the HD39/SA-polymer conjugates was quantified as a function of time by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, and the average intracellular pH value experienced by the conjugates was also characterized as a function of time by flow cytometry. PPAA was shown to alter the intracellular trafficking kinetics strongly relative to HD39/SA alone or HD39/SA conjugates with a control polymer, poly(methacryclic acid) (PMAA). Subcellular trafficking studies revealed that after 6 h, only 11% of the HD39/SA-PPAA conjugates had been trafficked to acidic lysosomal compartments with values at or below pH 5.6. In contrast, the average intracellular pH of HD39/SA alone dropped from 6.7 ± 0.2 at 1 h to 5.6 ± 0.5 after 3 h and 4.7 ± 0.6 after 6 h. Conjugation of the control polymer PMAA to HD39/SA showed an average pH drop similar to that of HD39/SA. Subcellular fractionation studies with tritium-labeled HD39/SA demonstrated that after 6 h, 89% of HD39/SA was associated with endosomes (Rab5+) and lysosomes (Lamp2+), while 45% of HD39/SA-PPAA was translocated to the cytosol (lactate dehydrogenase+). These results demonstrate the endosomal-releasing properties of PPAA with antibody-polymer conjugates and detail their intracellular trafficking dynamics and subcellular compartmental distributions over time.

  8. Monoclonal antibody targeting chikungunya virus envelope 1 protein inhibits virus release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masrinoul, Promsin; Puiprom, Orapim; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Miwa; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Okabayashi, Tamaki

    2014-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes an acute clinical illness characterized by sudden high fever, intense joint pain, and skin rash. Recent outbreaks of chikungunya disease in Africa and Asia are a major public health concern; however, there is currently no effective licensed vaccine or specific treatment. This study reported the development of a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb), CK47, which recognizes domain III within the viral envelope 1 protein and inhibited the viral release process, thereby preventing the production of progeny virus. The MAb had no effect on virus entry and replication processes. Thus, CK47 may be a useful tool for studying the mechanisms underlying CHIKV release and may show potential as a therapeutic agent.

  9. Antibody-independent Targeted Quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Protein Products in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jintang; Sun, Xuefei; Shi, Tujin; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Xie, Fang; Zhao, Rui; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Yang, Feng; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Chae, Sung Suk; Rubin, Mark; Siddiqui, Javed; Wei, John; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.

    2014-10-01

    Fusions between the transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and ETS related gene (ERG) represent one of the most specific biomarkers that define a distinct molecular subtype of prostate cancer. The studies on TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions have seldom been performed at the protein level, primarily due to the lack of high-quality antibodies or an antibody-independent method that is sufficiently sensitive for detecting the truncated ERG protein products resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions and alternative splicing. Herein, we applied a recently developed PRISM (high-pressure high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) strategy for quantifying ERG protein in prostate cancer cell lines and tumors. The highly sensitive PRISM-SRM assays led to confident detection of 6 unique ERG peptides in either the TMPRSS2-ERG positive cell lines or tissues but not in the negative controls, indicating that ERG protein expression is highly correlated with TMPRSS2-ERG gene rearrangements. Significantly, our results demonstrated for the first time that at least two groups of ERG protein isoforms were simultaneously expressed at variable levels in TMPRSS2-ERG positive samples as evidenced by concomitant detection of two mutually exclusive peptides. Three peptides shared across almost all fusion protein products were determined to be the most abundant peptides, and hence can be used as “signature” peptides for detecting ERG overexpression resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. These PRISM-SRM assays provide valuable tools for studying TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion protein products, thus improving our understanding of the role of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in the biology of prostate cancer.

  10. Determinants of variant surface antigen antibody response in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria in an area of low and unstable malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A-Elgadir, T M E; Theander, T G; Elghazali, G

    2006-01-01

    The variant surface antigens (VSA) of infected erythrocytes are important pathogenic markers, a set of variants (VSA(SM)), were assumed to be associated with severe malaria (SM), while SM constitutes clinically diverse forms, such as, severe malarial anemia (SMA) and cerebral malaria (CM). This s......The variant surface antigens (VSA) of infected erythrocytes are important pathogenic markers, a set of variants (VSA(SM)), were assumed to be associated with severe malaria (SM), while SM constitutes clinically diverse forms, such as, severe malarial anemia (SMA) and cerebral malaria (CM.......001). Parasites obtained from patients with SMA or from children were better recognized than isolates obtained from patients with uncomplicated malaria or from adults, P

  11. Antibody directed enzyme prodrug therapy: Discovery of novel genes, isolation of novel gene variants and production of long acting drugs for efficient cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goda, S.K.; AlQahtani, A.; Rashidi, F.A.; Dömling, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer accounts for 13% of the mortality rate worldwide. Antibody-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (ADEPT) is a novel strategy to improve the selectivity of cancer treatment. The ADEPT uses the bacterial enzyme, glucarpidase to produce the antibody-enzyme complex. Also the glucarpidase is

  12. DNA-templated antibody conjugation for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tianqiang

    2016-01-01

    -templated organic synthesis due to the wide existence of the 3-histidine cluster in most wild-type proteins. In this thesis, three projects that relate to targeted drug delivery to cancer cells based on the DTPC method is described. The first project was a delivery system which uses transferrin as the targeting...... ligand and saporin (ribosome inactivating protein) as the warhead to achieve enhanced cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of saporin to transferrin receptor overexpressed cancer cell line. The transferrin-saporin conjugate complex are formed by linking the site-selective DNA-transferrin conjugates with mono...... to cancer cells. The DNA duplex in the conjugates could be used for doxorubicin intercalation since it contains CGA repeats. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry results showed a receptor-mediated targeting manner to EGFR+ cancer cell lines (KB and MDA-MB-231), and resulted in enhanced cell killing...

  13. Disease-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting glutamate decarboxylase impair GABAergic neurotransmission and affect motor learning and behavioral functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario U Manto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies to the smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase can be found in patients with type 1 diabetes and a number of neurological disorders, including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and limbic encephalitis. The detection of disease-specific autoantibody epitopes led to the hypothesis that distinct glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies may elicit specific neurological phenotypes. We explored the in vitro/in vivo effects of well-characterized monoclonal glutamate decarboxylase antibodies. We found that glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies present in patients with stiff person syndrome (n = 7 and cerebellar ataxia (n = 15 recognized an epitope distinct from that recognized by glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies present in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 10 or limbic encephalitis (n = 4. We demonstrated that the administration of a monoclonal glutamate decarboxylase antibody representing this epitope specificity (1 disrupted in vitro the association of glutamate decarboxylase with γ-Aminobutyric acid containing synaptic vesicles, (2 depressed the inhibitory synaptic transmission in cerebellar slices with a gradual time course and a lasting suppressive effect, (3 significantly decreased conditioned eyelid responses evoked in mice, with no modification of learning curves in the classical eyeblink-conditioning task, (4 markedly impaired the facilitatory effect exerted by the premotor cortex over the motor cortex in a paired-pulse stimulation paradigm, and (5 induced decreased exploratory behavior and impaired locomotor function in rats. These findings support the specific targeting of glutamate decarboxylase by its autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of stiff-person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia. Therapies of these disorders based on selective removal of such glutamate decarboxylase antibodies could be envisioned.

  14. Truncated G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1 splice variants are targets for highly potent opioid analgesics lacking side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Susruta; Grinnell, Steven; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Burgman, Maxim; Polikar, Lisa; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2011-12-06

    Pain remains a pervasive problem throughout medicine, transcending all specialty boundaries. Despite the extraordinary insights into pain and its mechanisms over the past few decades, few advances have been made with analgesics. Most pain remains treated by opiates, which have significant side effects that limit their utility. We now describe a potent opiate analgesic lacking the traditional side effects associated with classical opiates, including respiratory depression, significant constipation, physical dependence, and, perhaps most important, reinforcing behavior, demonstrating that it is possible to dissociate side effects from analgesia. Evidence indicates that this agent acts through a truncated, six-transmembrane variant of the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1. Although truncated splice variants have been reported for a number of G protein-coupled receptors, their functional relevance has been unclear. Our evidence now suggests that truncated variants can be physiologically important through heterodimerization, even when inactive alone, and can comprise new therapeutic targets, as illustrated by our unique opioid analgesics with a vastly improved pharmacological profile.

  15. Single-domain antibody-based and linker-free bispecific antibodies targeting FcγRIII induce potent antitumor activity without recruiting regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozan, Caroline; Cornillon, Amélie; Pétiard, Corinne; Chartier, Martine; Behar, Ghislaine; Boix, Charlotte; Kerfelec, Brigitte; Robert, Bruno; Pèlegrin, André; Chames, Patrick; Teillaud, Jean-Luc; Baty, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, one of the most prominent modes of action of antitumor antibodies, suffers from important limitations due to the need for optimal interactions with Fcγ receptors. In this work, we report the design of a new bispecific antibody format, compact and linker-free, based on the use of llama single-domain antibodies that are capable of circumventing most of these limitations. This bispecific antibody format was created by fusing single-domain antibodies directed against the carcinoembryonic antigen and the activating FcγRIIIa receptor to human Cκ and CH1 immunoglobulin G1 domains, acting as a natural dimerization motif. In vitro and in vivo characterization of these Fab-like bispecific molecules revealed favorable features for further development as a therapeutic molecule. They are easy to produce in Escherichia coli, very stable, and elicit potent lysis of tumor cells by human natural killer cells at picomolar concentrations. Unlike conventional antibodies, they do not engage inhibitory FcγRIIb receptor, do not compete with serum immunoglobulins G for receptor binding, and their cytotoxic activity is independent of Fc glycosylation and FcγRIIIa polymorphism. As opposed to anti-CD3 bispecific antitumor antibodies, they do not engage regulatory T cells as these latter cells do not express FcγRIII. Studies in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient gamma mice xenografted with carcinoembryonic antigen-positive tumor cells showed that Fab-like bispecific molecules in the presence of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells significantly slow down tumor growth. This new compact, linker-free bispecific antibody format offers a promising approach for optimizing antibody-based therapies.

  16. Targeting the autolysis loop of urokinase-type plasminogen activator with conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø; Fogh, Sarah; Bekes, Erin C;

    2011-01-01

    , with high levels correlating with a poor prognosis. This observation has stimulated efforts into finding new principles for intervening with uPA's activity. In the present study we characterize the so-called autolysis loop in the catalytic domain of uPA as a potential inhibitory target. This loop was found...

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted antibody therapy - Mechanisms of action and modulators of therapeutic efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen Jilles

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is an increasing disease in the world population, and in recent years there has been substantial interest in the development of novel therapeutic agents specifically targeting growth factor receptors on tumor cells. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) represents a tyrosine kinase cell

  18. CD9 monoclonal antibody-conjugated PEGylated liposomes for targeted delivery of rapamycin in the treatment of cellular senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuy Nguyen, Hanh; Thapa, Raj Kumar; Shin, Beom Soo; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2017-03-01

    Premature cellular senescence refers to the state of irreversible cell cycle arrest due to DNA damage or other stresses. In this study, CD9 monoclonal antibody (CD9mAb) was successfully conjugated to the surface of PEGylated liposomes for targeted delivery of rapamycin (LR-CD9mAb) to overcome senescence of CD9 receptor-overexpressing cells. LR-CD9mAb has a small particle size (143.3 ± 2.4 nm), narrow size distribution (polydispersity index: 0.220 ± 0.036), and negative zeta potential (‑14.6 ± 1.2 mV). The uptake of CD9-targeted liposomes by premature senescent human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) was higher than that by young HDFs, as displayed by confocal microscopic images. The senescence might not be reversed by treatment with rapamycin; however, the drug promoted cell proliferation and reduced the number of cells that expressed the senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal). These effects were further confirmed by cell viability, cell cycle, and Western blotting analyses. Moreover, CD9-targeted liposomes showed better anti-senescence activity, in comparison with free rapamycin or the conventional liposomal formulation, suggesting the potential application of this system in further in vivo studies.

  19. Prostate stem cell antigen antibody-conjugated multiwalled carbon nanotubes for targeted ultrasound imaging and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huixia; Shi, Haili; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Xue; Yang, Yan; Yu, Chao; Hao, Caiqin; Du, Jing; Hu, He; Yang, Shiping

    2014-07-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are cut short and grafted with polyethylenimine (PEI) for further covalent conjugation to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) monoclonal antibody (mAb). The in vitro and in vivo toxicity data reveal that the as-prepared CNT-PEI(FITC)-mAb has good biocompatibility. Combined flow cytometry and confocal luminescence imaging experiments confirm that the CNT-PEI(FITC)-mAb can specifically target the cancer cells which overexpress PSCA. The results of in vitro and in vivo ultrasound (US) imaging indicate that CNT-PEI(FITC)-mAb has great potential to be used as a targeted US contrast agent. The in vivo anti-cancer efficacy testing using PC-3 tumor-bearing mice as animal models demonstrates that CNT-PEI(FITC)-mAb can targetedly deliver drug to the tumors and suppress tumor growth. Findings from this study suggest that the CNT-PEI(FITC)-mAb could be used as a multifunctional platform for simultaneous US imaging and drug delivery applications.

  20. Epidermal Langerhans cells rapidly capture and present antigens from C-type lectin-targeting antibodies deposited in the dermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flacher, Vincent; Tripp, Christoph H; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Haid, Bernhard; Ebner, Susanne; Del Frari, Barbara; Koch, Franz; Park, Chae Gyu; Steinman, Ralph M; Idoyaga, Juliana; Romani, Nikolaus

    2010-03-01

    Antigen-presenting cells can capture antigens that are deposited in the skin, including vaccines given subcutaneously. These include different dendritic cells (DCs) such as epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), dermal DCs, and dermal langerin+ DCs. To evaluate access of dermal antigens to skin DCs, we used mAb to two C-type lectin endocytic receptors, DEC-205/CD205 and langerin/CD207. When applied to murine and human skin explant cultures, these mAbs were efficiently taken up by epidermal LCs. In addition, anti-DEC-205 targeted langerin+ CD103+ and langerin- CD103- mouse dermal DCs. Unexpectedly, intradermal injection of either mAb, but not isotype control, resulted in strong and rapid labeling of LCs in situ, implying that large molecules can diffuse through the basement membrane into the epidermis. Epidermal LCs targeted in vivo by ovalbumin-coupled anti-DEC-205 potently presented antigen to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro. However, to our surprise, LCs targeted through langerin were unable to trigger T-cell proliferation. Thus, epidermal LCs have a major function in uptake of lectin-binding antibodies under standard vaccination conditions.

  1. Functional characterization of antibodies against Neisseria gonorrhoeae opacity protein loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica G Cole

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of a gonorrhea vaccine is challenged by the lack of correlates of protection. The antigenically variable neisserial opacity (Opa proteins are expressed during infection and have a semivariable (SV and highly conserved (4L loop that could be targeted in a vaccine. Here we compared antibodies to linear (Ab(linear and cyclic (Ab(cyclic peptides that correspond to the SV and 4L loops and selected hypervariable (HV(2 loops for surface-binding and protective activity in vitro and in vivo. METHODS/FINDINGS: Ab(SV cyclic bound a greater number of different Opa variants than Ab(SV linear, including variants that differed by seven amino acids. Antibodies to the 4L peptide did not bind Opa-expressing bacteria. Ab(SV (cyclic and Ab(HV2 (cyclic, but not Ab(SV (linear or Ab(HV2 linear agglutinated homologous Opa variants, and Ab(HV2BD (cyclic but not Ab(HV2BD (linear blocked the association of OpaB variants with human endocervical cells. Only Ab(HV2BD (linear were bactericidal against the serum resistant parent strain. Consistent with host restrictions in the complement cascade, the bactericidal activity of Ab(HV2BD (linear was increased 8-fold when rabbit complement was used. None of the antibodies was protective when administered vaginally to mice. Antibody duration in the vagina was short-lived, however, with <50% of the antibodies recovered 3 hrs post-administration. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that an SV loop-specific cyclic peptide can be used to induce antibodies that recognize a broad spectrum of antigenically distinct Opa variants and have agglutination abilities. HV(2 loop-specific cyclic peptides elicited antibodies with agglutination and adherence blocking abilities. The use of human complement when testing the bactericidal activity of vaccine-induced antibodies against serum resistant gonococci is also important.

  2. Tumor-Selective Response to Antibody-Mediated Targeting of αvβ3 Integrin in Ovarian Cancer

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    Charles N. Landen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The αvβ3 integrin is expressed on proliferating endothelial cells and some cancer cells, but its expression on ovarian cancer cells and its potential as a therapeutic target are unknown. In this study, expression of the αvβ3 integrin on ovarian cancer cell lines and murine endothelial cells was tested, and the effect of a fully humanized monoclonal antibody against αvβ3, Abegrin (etaracizumab, on cell invasion, viability, tumor growth, and the Akt pathway were examined in vitro and in vivo. We found that etaracizumab recognizes αvβ3 on the ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3ip1, HeyA8, and A2780ip2 (at low levels but not on murine endothelial cells. Etaracizumab treatment decreased ovarian cancer proliferation and invasion. In vivo, tumor-bearing mice treated with etaracizumab alone gave variable results. There was no effect on A2780ip2 growth, but a 36% to 49% tumor weight reduction in the SKOV3ip1 and HeyA8 models was found (P < .05. However, combined etaracizumab and paclitaxel was superior to paclitaxel in the SKOV3ip1 and A2780ip2 models (by 51–73%, P < .001 but not in the HeyA8 model. Treatment with etaracizumab was then noted to decrease p-Akt and p-mTOR in SKOV3ip1, but not in HeyA8, which is Akt-independent. Tumors resected after therapy showed that etaracizumab treatment reduced the proliferating cell nuclear antigen index but not microvessel density. This study identifies tumor cell αvβ3 integrin as an attractive target and defines the Akt pathway as a predictor of response to function-blocking antibody.

  3. CD20 monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system for doxorubicin chemotherapy: an in vitro study of cell lysis of CD20-positive Raji cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuang; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhiran; Sun, Lan; Pu, Yunzhu; Yao, Hongjuan; Li, Jingcao; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yingge; Zhang, Weijing

    A monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system (NDDS) for chemotherapy was evaluated in CD20-positive Raji cells in vitro. Nanoparticles were formed by the assembly of an amphiphilic polymer consisting of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-methoxypolyethyleneglycol-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Active carbon nanoparticles (ACNP) were conjugated to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX), and the nanoliposome carrier, DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG2000-NH2 conjugated to the human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocytes. This monoclonal antibody targeted nanoparticle delivery system for chemotherapy formed the active NDDS complex, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20. This active NDDS was spherical in morphology and had good dispersion in the culture medium. When compared with the effects on CD20-negative YTS cells derived from natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, the active NDDS, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20, demonstrated DOX delivery to CD20-positive Raji cells derived from Burkitt's lymphoma (B cell lymphoma), resulting in increased cell killing in vitro. The intracellular targeting efficiency of the ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20 complex was assessed by confocal laser microscopy and flow cytometry. The findings of this in vitro study have shown that the DSPE-PEG2000 polymeric liposome is an effective nanocarrier of both a monoclonal antibody and a chemotherapy agent and can be used to target chemotherapy to specific cells, in this case to CD20-positive B-cells. Future developments in this form of targeted therapy will depend on the development of monoclonal antibodies that are specific for malignant cells, including antibodies that can distinguish between lymphoma cells and normal lymphocyte subsets.

  4. Most neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies target novel epitopes requiring both Lassa virus glycoprotein subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James E.; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Cross, Robert W.; Yenni, Rachael E.; Elliott, Deborah H.; Rouelle, Julie A.; Kannadka, Chandrika B.; Smira, Ashley A.; Garry, Courtney E.; Bradley, Benjamin T.; Yu, Haini; Shaffer, Jeffrey G.; Boisen, Matt L.; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Zandonatti, Michelle A.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson; de la Torre, Juan C.; Andersen, Kristian G.; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohamed; Gbakie, Michael; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J.; Fonnie, Richard; Jalloh, Simbirie C.; Kargbo, Brima; Vandi, Mohamed A.; Gbetuwa, Momoh; Ikponmwosa, Odia; Asogun, Danny A.; Okokhere, Peter O.; Follarin, Onikepe A.; Schieffelin, John S.; Pitts, Kelly R.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Kulakoski, Peter C.; Wilson, Russell B.; Happi, Christian T.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Gevao, Sahr M.; Khan, S. Humarr; Grant, Donald S.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever is a severe multisystem disease that often has haemorrhagic manifestations. The epitopes of the Lassa virus (LASV) surface glycoproteins recognized by naturally infected human hosts have not been identified or characterized. Here we have cloned 113 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for LASV glycoproteins from memory B cells of Lassa fever survivors from West Africa. One-half bind the GP2 fusion subunit, one-fourth recognize the GP1 receptor-binding subunit and the remaining fourth are specific for the assembled glycoprotein complex, requiring both GP1 and GP2 subunits for recognition. Notably, of the 16 mAbs that neutralize LASV, 13 require the assembled glycoprotein complex for binding, while the remaining 3 require GP1 only. Compared with non-neutralizing mAbs, neutralizing mAbs have higher binding affinities and greater divergence from germline progenitors. Some mAbs potently neutralize all four LASV lineages. These insights from LASV human mAb characterization will guide strategies for immunotherapeutic development and vaccine design. PMID:27161536

  5. Preclinical evaluation of MORAb-009, a chimeric antibody targeting tumor-associated mesothelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Raffit; Ebel, Wolfgang; Routhier, Eric L.; Patel, Rina; Kline, J. Bradford; Zhang, Jingli; Chao, Qimin; Jacob, Sara; Turchin, Howard; Gibbs, Lester; Phillips, Martin D.; Mudali, Shiyama; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Moreno, Maria; Pastan, Ira; Sass, Philip M.; Nicolaides, Nicholas C.

    2007-01-01

    Novel therapeutic agents that are safe and effective are needed for the treatment of pancreatic, ovarian, lung adenocarcinomas and mesotheliomas. Mesothelin is a glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol (GPI)-linked membrane protein of 40 kDa over-expressed in all pancreatic adenocarcinoma and mesothelioma, in >70% of ovarian adenocarcinoma, and in non-small cell lung and colorectal cancers. The biological functions of mesothelin are not known, although it appears to be involved in cell adhesion via its interaction with MUC16. We have recently developed MORAb-009, a mouse-human chimeric IgG1κ monoclonal antibody with an affinity of 1.5 nM for human mesothelin. Here we provide evidence that MORAb-009 prevents adhesion of mesothelin-bearing tumor cells to MUC16 positive cells and can elicit cell-mediated cytotoxicity on mesothelin-bearing tumor cells. Treatment that included MORAb-009 in combination with chemotherapy led to a marked reduction in tumor growth of mesothelin-expressing tumors in nude mice compared to chemotherapy or MORAb-009 treatment alone. No adverse effects of MORAb-009 were noted during toxicology studies conducted in non-human primates. The preclinical data obtained from our studies warrants pursuing clinical testing of MORAb-009. We have in fact initiated a Phase I clinical study enrolling patients with mesothelin-positive pancreatic, mesothelioma, non-small cell lung and ovarian cancers. PMID:18088084

  6. Antibody-independent targeted quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion protein products in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jintang; Sun, Xuefei; Shi, Tujin; Schepmoes, Athena A; Fillmore, Thomas L; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Xie, Fang; Zhao, Rui; Gritsenko, Marina A; Yang, Feng; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Chae, Sung-Suk; Rubin, Mark A; Siddiqui, Javed; Wei, John T; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G

    2014-10-01

    Fusions between the transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and ETS related gene (ERG) represent one of the most specific biomarkers that define a distinct molecular subtype of prostate cancer. Studies of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions have seldom been performed at the protein level, primarily due to the lack of high-quality antibodies suitable for quantitative studies. Herein, we applied a recently developed PRISM (high-pressure high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) strategy for quantifying ERG protein in prostate cancer cell lines and tumors. The highly sensitive PRISM-SRM assays provided confident detection of 6 unique ERG peptides in both TMPRSS2-ERG positive cell lines and tissues, but not in cell lines or tissues lacking the TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangement, clearly indicating that ERG protein expression is significantly increased in the presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. Significantly, our results provide evidence that two distinct ERG protein isoforms are simultaneously expressed in TMPRSS2-ERG positive samples as evidenced by the concomitant detection of two mutually exclusive peptides in two patient tumors and in the VCaP prostate cancer cell line. Three peptides, shared across almost all fusion protein products, were determined to be the most abundant peptides, providing "signature" peptides for detection of ERG over-expression resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. The PRISM-SRM assays provide valuable tools for studying TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion protein products in prostate cancer.

  7. HIV-1 resistance to neutralizing antibodies: Determination of antibody concentrations leading to escape mutant evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Carsten; Reh, Lucia; Trkola, Alexandra

    2016-06-15

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considered vital components of novel therapeutics and blueprints for vaccine research. Yet escape to even the most potent of these antibodies is imminent in natural infection. Measures to define antibody efficacy and prevent mutant selection are thus urgently needed. Here, we derive a mathematical framework to predict the concentration ranges for which antibody escape variants can outcompete their viral ancestors, referred to as mutant selection window (MSW). When determining the MSW, we focus on the differential efficacy of neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in two canonical infection routes, free-virus infection and cell-cell transmission. The latter has proven highly effective in vitro suggesting its importance for both in vivo spread as well as for escaping targeted intervention strategies. We observed a range of MSW patterns that highlight the potential of mutants to arise in both transmission pathways and over wide concentration ranges. Most importantly, we found that only when the arising mutant has both, residual sensitivity to the neutralizing antibody and reduced infectivity compared to the parental virus, antibody dosing outside of the MSW to restrict mutant selection is possible. Emergence of mutants that provide complete escape and have no considerable fitness loss cannot be prevented by adjusting antibody doses. The latter may in part explain the ubiquitous resistance to neutralizing antibodies observed in natural infection and antibody treatment. Based on our findings, combinations of antibodies targeting different epitopes should be favored for antibody-based interventions as this may render complete resistance less likely to occur and also increase chances that multiple escapes result in severe fitness loss of the virus making longer-term antibody treatment more feasible.

  8. Antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates enable co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant to dendritic cells in cis but only have partial targeting specificity.

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    Martin Kreutz

    Full Text Available Antibody-antigen conjugates, which promote antigen-presentation by dendritic cells (DC by means of targeted delivery of antigen to particular DC subsets, represent a powerful vaccination approach. To ensure immunity rather than tolerance induction the co-administration of a suitable adjuvant is paramount. However, co-administration of unlinked adjuvant cannot ensure that all cells targeted by the antibody conjugates are appropriately activated. Furthermore, antigen-presenting cells (APC that do not present the desired antigen are equally strongly activated and could prime undesired responses against self-antigens. We, therefore, were interested in exploring targeted co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant in cis in form of antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates for the induction of anti-tumour immunity. In this study, we report on the assembly and characterization of conjugates consisting of DEC205-specific antibody, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN. We show that such conjugates are more potent at inducing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses than control conjugates mixed with soluble CpG. However, our study also reveals that the nucleic acid moiety of such antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates alters their binding and uptake and allows delivery of the antigen and the adjuvant to cells partially independently of DEC205. Nevertheless, antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates are superior to antibody-free antigen-adjuvant conjugates in priming CTL responses and efficiently induce anti-tumour immunity in the murine B16 pseudo-metastasis model. A better understanding of the role of the antibody moiety is required to inform future conjugate vaccination strategies for efficient induction of anti-tumour responses.

  9. Glutamine repeat variants in human RUNX2 associated with decreased femoral neck BMD, broadband ultrasound attenuation and target gene transactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel A Morrison

    Full Text Available RUNX2 is an essential transcription factor required for skeletal development and cartilage formation. Haploinsufficiency of RUNX2 leads to cleidocranial displaysia (CCD a skeletal disorder characterised by gross dysgenesis of bones particularly those derived from intramembranous bone formation. A notable feature of the RUNX2 protein is the polyglutamine and polyalanine (23Q/17A domain coded by a repeat sequence. Since none of the known mutations causing CCD characterised to date map in the glutamine repeat region, we hypothesised that Q-repeat mutations may be related to a more subtle bone phenotype. We screened subjects derived from four normal populations for Q-repeat variants. A total of 22 subjects were identified who were heterozygous for a wild type allele and a Q-repeat variant allele: (15Q, 16Q, 18Q and 30Q. Although not every subject had data for all measures, Q-repeat variants had a significant deficit in BMD with an average decrease of 0.7SD measured over 12 BMD-related parameters (p = 0.005. Femoral neck BMD was measured in all subjects (-0.6SD, p = 0.0007. The transactivation function of RUNX2 was determined for 16Q and 30Q alleles using a reporter gene assay. 16Q and 30Q alleles displayed significantly lower transactivation function compared to wild type (23Q. Our analysis has identified novel Q-repeat mutations that occur at a collective frequency of about 0.4%. These mutations significantly alter BMD and display impaired transactivation function, introducing a new class of functionally relevant RUNX2 mutants.

  10. Antibody Targeting the Ferritin-Like Protein Controls Listeria Infection ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Walid; Sethi, Shneh; Darji, Ayub; Mraheil, Mobarak A.; Hain, Torsten; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of iron during the infection process is essential for the growth of pathogenic microorganisms (S. C. Andrews, Adv. Microb. Physiol. 40:281-351, 1998; H. M. Baker, B. F. Anderson, and E. N. Baker, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 100:3579-3583, 2003). Since the solubility of iron is low and it is toxic at low concentrations, following uptake, iron is stored in subcellular microenvironments in the iron storage protein ferritin (C. Cheers and M. Ho, J. Reticuloendothel. Soc. 34:299-309, 1983). Here, we show that ferritin-like proteins (Frl) are highly conserved in the genus Listeria and demonstrate that these proteins are present in both the cytoplasm and cell wall fractions of these bacteria. Even though Frl is expressed under different growth conditions, transcriptional mapping revealed that its regulation is complex. When bacteria are grown in brain heart infusion medium, extracellular expression involves both sigma A (SigA)- and sigma B (SigB)-dependent promoters; however, during intracellular growth, initiation of transcription is additionally SigB dependent. The expression of Frl is greatly enhanced in bacteria grown in the presence of blood, and a mutant strain lacking the frl gene was defective for growth in this medium. Using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for Frl, we demonstrate that administration of anti-Frl MAb prior to infection confers antilisterial resistance in vivo, evidenced in reduced bacterial load and increased survival rates, thereby demonstrating the in vivo significance of upregulated cell surface-associated Frl expression. In vitro studies revealed that the antilisterial resistance is due to increased listerial phagocytosis. PMID:20439472

  11. CD33 monoclonal antibody conjugated Au cluster nano-bioprobe for targeted flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Jayasimhan, Jasusri; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Mony, Ullas; Koyakutty, Manzoor, E-mail: manzoork@aims.amrita.edu, E-mail: ullasmony@aims.amrita.edu [Amrita Centre for Nanoscience and Molecular Medicine, Amrita Institute of Medical Science, Cochin 682 041 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Protein stabilized gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) are biocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) emitting nanosystems having a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report the development of a Au-NC based targeted fluorescent nano-bioprobe for the flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. Au-NCs with {approx} 25-28 atoms showing bright red-NIR fluorescence (600-750 nm) and average size of {approx} 0.8 nm were prepared by bovine serum albumin assisted reduction-cum-stabilization in aqueous phase. The protein protected clusters were conjugated with monoclonal antibody against CD33 myeloid antigen, which is overexpressed in {approx} 99.2% of the primitive population of AML cells, as confirmed by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Au-NC-CD33 conjugates having average size of {approx} 12 nm retained bright fluorescence over an extended duration of {approx} a year, as the albumin protein protects Au-NCs against degradation. Nanotoxicity studies revealed excellent biocompatibility of Au-NC conjugates, as they showed no adverse effect on the cell viability and inflammatory response. Target specificity of the conjugates for detecting CD33 expressing AML cells (KG1a) in flow cytometry showed specific staining of {approx} 95.4% of leukaemia cells within 1-2 h compared to a non-specific uptake of {approx} 8.2% in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) which are CD33{sup low}. The confocal imaging also demonstrated the targeted uptake of CD33 conjugated Au-NCs by leukaemia cells, thus confirming the flow cytometry results. This study demonstrates that novel nano-bioprobes can be developed using protein protected fluorescent nanoclusters of Au for the molecular receptor targeted flow cytometry based detection and imaging of cancer cells.

  12. Heterologous expressed toxic and non-toxic peptide variants of toxin CssII are capable to produce neutralizing antibodies against the venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Salgado, Kenya; Estrada, Georgina; Olvera, Alejandro; Coronas, Fredy I; Possani, Lourival D; Corzo, Gerardo

    2009-08-15

    Two toxic and one non-toxic recombinant peptide variants of the mammalian neurotoxin CssII was cloned into the expression vector pQE30 containing a 6His-tag and a Factor Xa proteolytic cleavage site. The toxic recombinant peptides rCssII, HisrCssII and the non-toxic rCssIIE15R were expressed under induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG), isolated using chromatographic techniques and folded correctly in vitro. The three recombinant variants showed similar secondary structures as the native CssII, but only the rCssIIE15R was not toxic to mice at concentrations up to 30microg/20g mouse body weight when injected intraperitoneally. All three recombinant peptides were capable of displacing the native CssII from their receptor sites in rat brain synaptosomes, suggesting that they had similar structural and functional characteristics of the native peptides. The three recombinant variants of CssII and the native one were used as antigens for immunization of New Zealand rabbits. The antibodies present in the rabbit antisera were able to recognize the native CssII. Additionally and more importantly, the sera of the immunized rabbits were able to neutralize both the native toxin CssII and the whole soluble venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus. These results indicate that the recombinant peptides can be used to produce antidotes against the venom of this species of scorpion.

  13. Combined Linkage and Association Studies Show that HLA Class II Variants Control Levels of Antibodies against Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Pedergnana; Laurène Syx; Aurélie Cobat; Julien Guergnon; Pauline Brice; Christophe Fermé; Patrice Carde; Olivier Hermine; Catherine Le-Pendeven; Corinne Amiel; Yassine Taoufik; Alexandre Alcaïs; Ioannis Theodorou; Caroline Besson; Laurent Abel

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid an...

  14. An antibody to the lutheran glycoprotein (Lu recognizing the LU4 blood type variant inhibits cell adhesion to laminin α5.

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    Yamato Kikkawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Lutheran blood group glycoprotein (Lu, an Ig superfamily (IgSF transmembrane receptor, is also known as basal cell adhesion molecule (B-CAM. Lu/B-CAM is a specific receptor for laminin α5, a major component of basement membranes in various tissues. Previous reports have shown that Lu/B-CAM binding to laminin α5 contributes to sickle cell vaso-occlusion. However, as there are no useful tools such as function-blocking antibodies or drugs, it is unclear how epithelial and sickled red blood cells adhere to laminin α5 via Lu/B-CAM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we discovered a function-blocking antibody that inhibits Lu binding to laminin α5 using a unique binding assay on tissue sections. To characterize the function-blocking antibody, we identified the site on Lu/B-CAM recognized by this antibody. The extracellular domain of Lu/B-CAM contains five IgSF domains, D1-D2-D3-D4-D5. The antibody epitope was localized to D2, but not to the D3 domain containing the major part of the laminin α5 binding site. Furthermore, mutagenesis studies showed that Arg(175, the LU4 blood group antigenic site, was crucial for forming the epitope and the antibody bound sufficiently close to sterically hinder the interaction with α5. Cell adhesion assay using the antibody also showed that Lu/B-CAM serves as a secondary receptor for the adhesion of carcinoma cells to laminin α5. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This function-blocking antibody against Lu/B-CAM should be useful for not only investigating cell adhesion to laminin α5 but also for developing drugs to inhibit sickle cell vaso-occlusion.

  15. Antibodies targeting dengue virus envelope domain III are not required for serotype-specific protection or prevention of enhancement in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Katherine L; Wahala, Wahala M P B; Orozco, Susana; de Silva, Aravinda M; Harris, Eva

    2012-07-20

    The envelope (E) protein of dengue virus (DENV) is composed of three domains (EDI, EDII, EDIII) and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. Many monoclonal antibodies that bind EDIII strongly neutralize DENV. However in vitro studies indicate that anti-EDIII antibodies contribute little to the neutralizing potency of human DENV-immune serum. In this study, we assess the role of anti-EDIII antibodies in mouse and human DENV-immune serum in neutralizing or enhancing DENV infection in mice. We demonstrate that EDIII-depleted human DENV-immune serum was protective against homologous DENV infection in vivo. Although EDIII-depleted DENV-immune mouse serum demonstrated decreased neutralization potency in vitro, reduced protection in some organs, and enhanced disease in vivo, administration of increased volumes of EDIII-depleted serum abrogated these effects. These data indicate that anti-EDIII antibodies contribute to protection and minimize enhancement when present, but can be replaced by neutralizing antibodies targeting other epitopes on the dengue virion.

  16. Bispecific antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens and neutralizing complement regulators increase the efficacy of antibody-based immunotherapy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macor, P; Secco, E; Mezzaroba, N; Zorzet, S; Durigutto, P; Gaiotto, T; De Maso, L; Biffi, S; Garrovo, C; Capolla, S; Tripodo, C; Gattei, V; Marzari, R; Tedesco, F; Sblattero, D

    2015-02-01

    The efficacy of antibody-based immunotherapy is due to the activation of apoptosis, the engagement of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). We developed a novel strategy to enhance CDC using bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) that neutralize the C-regulators CD55 and CD59 to enhance C-mediated functions. Two bsAbs (MB20/55 and MB20/59) were designed to recognize CD20 on one side. The other side neutralizes CD55 or CD59. Analysis of CDC revealed that bsAbs could kill 4-25 times more cells than anti-CD20 recombinant antibody in cell lines or cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacokinetics of the bsAbs was evaluated in a human-SCID model of Burkitt lymphoma. The distribution profile of bsAbs mimics the data obtained by studying the pharmacokinetics of anti-CD20 antibodies, showing a peak in the tumor mass 3-4 days after injection. The treatment with bsAbs completely prevented the development of human/SCID lymphoma. The tumor growth was blocked by the activation of the C cascade and by the recruitment of macrophages, polymorphonuclear and natural killer cells. This strategy can easily be applied to the other anti-tumor C-fixing antibodies currently used in the clinic or tested in preclinical studies using the same vector with the appropriate modifications.

  17. Antiviral antibodies target adenovirus to phagolysosomes and amplify the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaiss, Anne K; Vilaysane, Akosua; Cotter, Matthew J; Clark, Sharon A; Meijndert, H Christopher; Colarusso, Pina; Yates, Robin M; Petrilli, Virginie; Tschopp, Jurg; Muruve, Daniel A

    2009-06-01

    Adenovirus is a nonenveloped dsDNA virus that activates intracellular innate immune pathways. In vivo, adenovirus-immunized mice displayed an enhanced innate immune response and diminished virus-mediated gene delivery following challenge with the adenovirus vector AdLacZ suggesting that antiviral Abs modulate viral interactions with innate immune cells. Under naive serum conditions in vitro, adenovirus binding and internalization in macrophages and the subsequent activation of innate immune mechanisms were inefficient. In contrast to the neutralizing effect observed in nonhematopoietic cells, adenovirus infection in the presence of antiviral Abs significantly increased FcR-dependent viral internalization in macrophages. In direct correlation with the increased viral internalization, antiviral Abs amplified the innate immune response to adenovirus as determined by the expression of NF-kappaB-dependent genes, type I IFNs, and caspase-dependent IL-1beta maturation. Immune serum amplified TLR9-independent type I IFN expression and enhanced NLRP3-dependent IL-1beta maturation in response to adenovirus, confirming that antiviral Abs specifically amplify intracellular innate pathways. In the presence of Abs, confocal microscopy demonstrated increased targeting of adenovirus to LAMP1-positive phagolysosomes in macrophages but not epithelial cells. These data show that antiviral Abs subvert natural viral tropism and target the adenovirus to phagolysosomes and the intracellular innate immune system in macrophages. Furthermore, these results illustrate a cross-talk where the adaptive immune system positively regulates the innate immune system and the antiviral state.

  18. Antibodies targeted to the brain with image-guided focused ultrasound reduces amyloid-beta plaque load in the TgCRND8 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica F Jordão

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD relies on antibodies directed against toxic amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta, which circulate in the bloodstream and remove Abeta from the brain. In mouse models of AD, the administration of anti-Abeta antibodies directly into the brain, in comparison to the bloodstream, was shown to be more efficient at reducing Abeta plaque pathology. Therefore, delivering anti-Abeta antibodies to the brain of AD patients may also improve treatment efficiency. Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS is known to transiently-enhance the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, allowing intravenously administered therapeutics to enter the brain. Our goal was to establish that anti-Abeta antibodies delivered to the brain using magnetic resonance imaging-guided FUS (MRIgFUS can reduce plaque pathology. To test this, TgCRND8 mice received intravenous injections of MRI and FUS contrast agents, as well as anti-Abeta antibody, BAM-10. MRIgFUS was then applied transcranially. Within minutes, the MRI contrast agent entered the brain, and BAM-10 was later found bound to Abeta plaques in targeted cortical areas. Four days post-treatment, Abeta pathology was significantly reduced in TgCRND8 mice. In conclusion, this is the first report to demonstrate that MRIgFUS delivery of anti-Abeta antibodies provides the combined advantages of using a low dose of antibody and rapidly reducing plaque pathology.

  19. Breadth of humoral response and antigenic targets of sporozoite-inhibitory antibodies associated with sterile protection induced by controlled human malaria infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kaitian; Goh, Yun Shan; Siau, Anthony; Franetich, Jean-François; Chia, Wan Ni; Ong, Alice Soh Meoy; Malleret, Benoit; Wu, Ying Ying; Snounou, Georges; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Adams, John H.; Mazier, Dominique; Preiser, Peter R.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Rénia, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    The development of an effective malaria vaccine has remained elusive even until today. This is due to our incomplete understanding of the immune mechanisms that confer and/or correlate with protection. Human volunteers have been protected experimentally from a subsequent challenge by immunization with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites under drug cover. Here, we demonstrate that sera from the protected individuals contain neutralizing antibodies against the pre erythrocytic stage. To identify the antigen(s) recognized by these antibodies, a newly developed library of P. falciparum antigens was screened with the neutralizing sera. Antibodies from protected individuals recognized a broad antigenic repertoire of which three antigens, PfMAEBL, PfTRAP and PfSEA1 were recognized by most protected individuals. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated that anti-PfMAEBL antibodies block liver stage development in human hepatocytes. Thus, these antigens identified are promising targets for vaccine development against malaria. PMID:27130708

  20. Disulfide-stabilized single-chain antibody-targeted superantigen: Construction of a prokaryotic expression system and its functional analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Li Wang; Yu-Ling Zheng; Ru Ma; Bao-Li Wang; Ai-Guang Guo; Yong-Qiang Jiang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To construct the expression vector of B3 (scdsFv)-SEA (D227A) and to identify its binding and cytotoxic ability to B3 antigen positive carcinoma cell lines.METHODS: This fusion protein was produced by a bacterial expression system in this study. It was expressed mainly in the inclusion body. The gene product was solubilized by guanidine hydrochloride, refolded by conventional dilution method, and purified using SP-sepharose cation chromatography.RESULTS: The expression vector B3 (scdsFv)-SEA-PETwas constructed, the expression product existed mainly in the inclusion body, the refolding product retained the binding ability of the single-chain antibody and had cytotoxic effect on HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. The stability assay showed that the resulting protein was stable at 37 ℃.CONCLUSION: This genetically engineered B3 (scdsFv)-SEA fusion protein has bifunction of tumor targeting and tumor cell killing and shows its promises as an effective reagent for tumor-targeted immunotherapy.

  1. Targeted suppression of autoreactive CD8+ T-cell activation using blocking anti-CD8 antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Mathew; Pearson, James A.; Gras, Stephanie; van den Berg, Hugo A.; Lissina, Anya; Llewellyn-Lacey, Sian; Willis, Mark D.; Dockree, Tamsin; McLaren, James E.; Ekeruche-Makinde, Julia; Gostick, Emma; Robertson, Neil P.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Burrows, Scott R.; Price, David A.; Wong, F. Susan; Peakman, Mark; Skowera, Ania; Wooldridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T-cells play a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes. However, drugs that target the entire CD8+ T-cell population are not desirable because the associated lack of specificity can lead to unwanted consequences, most notably an enhanced susceptibility to infection. Here, we show that autoreactive CD8+ T-cells are highly dependent on CD8 for ligand-induced activation via the T-cell receptor (TCR). In contrast, pathogen-specific CD8+ T-cells are relatively CD8-independent. These generic differences relate to an intrinsic dichotomy that segregates self-derived and exogenous antigen-specific TCRs according to the monomeric interaction affinity with cognate peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I (pMHCI). As a consequence, “blocking” anti-CD8 antibodies can suppress autoreactive CD8+ T-cell activation in a relatively selective manner. These findings provide a rational basis for the development and in vivo assessment of novel therapeutic strategies that preferentially target disease-relevant autoimmune responses within the CD8+ T-cell compartment. PMID:27748447

  2. IL-6 Antibody and RGD Peptide Conjugated Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimer for Targeted Drug Delivery of HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekuria, Shewaye Lakew; Debele, Tilahun Ayane; Chou, Hsiao-Ying; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih

    2016-01-14

    In this study, PAMAM dendrimer (G4.5) was conjugated with two targeting moieties, IL-6 antibody and RGD peptide (G4.5-IL6 and G4.5-RGD conjugates). Doxorubicin anticancer drug was physically loaded onto G4.5-IL6 and G4.5-RGD with the encapsulation efficiency of 51.3 and 30.1% respectively. The cellular internalization and uptake efficiency of G4.5-IL6/DOX and G4.5-RGD/DOX complexes was observed and compared by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry using HeLa cells, respectively. The lower IC50 value of G4.5-IL6/DOX in comparison to G4.5-RGD/DOX is indication that higher drug loading and faster drug release rate corresponded with greater cytotoxicity. The cytotoxic effect was further verified by increment in late apoptotic/necrotic cells due to delivery of drug through receptor-mediated endocytosis. On the basis of these results, G4.5-IL6 is a better suited carrier for targeted drug delivery of DOX to cervical cancer cells.

  3. Targeting Epstein-Barr virus–transformed B lymphoblastoid cells using antibodies with T-cell receptor–like specificities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Junyun; Tan, Wei Jian; Too, Chien Tei; Choo, Joanna Ai Ling; Wong, Lan Hiong; Mustafa, Fatimah Bte; Srinivasan, Nalini; Lim, Angeline Pei Chiew; Zhong, Youjia; Gascoigne, Nicholas R. J.; Hanson, Brendon J.; Chan, Soh Ha; Chen, Jianzhu

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncovirus associated with several human malignancies including posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in immunosuppressed patients. We show here that anti-EBV T-cell receptor–like monoclonal antibodies (TCR-like mAbs) E1, L1, and L2 bound to their respective HLA-A*0201-restricted EBV peptides EBNA1562-570, LMP1125-133, and LMP2A426-434 with high affinities and specificities. These mAbs recognized endogenously presented targets on EBV B lymphoblastoid cell lines (BLCLs), but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells, from which they were derived. Furthermore, these mAbs displayed similar binding activities on several BLCLs, despite inherent heterogeneity between different donor samples. A single weekly administration of the naked mAbs reduced splenomegaly, liver tumor spots, and tumor burden in BLCL-engrafted immunodeficient NOD-SCID/Il2rg−/− mice. In particular, mice that were treated with the E1 mAb displayed a delayed weight loss and significantly prolonged survival. In vitro, these TCR-like mAbs induced early apoptosis of BLCLs, thereby enhancing their Fc-dependent phagocytic uptake by macrophages. These data provide evidence for TCR-like mAbs as potential therapeutic modalities to target EBV-associated diseases. PMID:27338099

  4. Nef decreases HIV-1 sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies that target the membrane-proximal external region of TMgp41.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel P J Lai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Primate lentivirus nef is required for sustained virus replication in vivo and accelerated progression to AIDS. While exploring the mechanism by which Nef increases the infectivity of cell-free virions, we investigated a functional link between Nef and Env. Since we failed to detect an effect of Nef on the quantity of virion-associated Env, we searched for qualitative changes by examining whether Nef alters HIV-1 sensitivity to agents that target distinct features of Env. Nef conferred as much as 50-fold resistance to 2F5 and 4E10, two potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs that target the membrane proximal external region (MPER of TMgp41. In contrast, Nef had no effect on HIV-1 neutralization by MPER-specific nAb Z13e1, by the peptide inhibitor T20, nor by a panel of nAbs and other reagents targeting gp120. Resistance to neutralization by 2F5 and 4E10 was observed with Nef from a diverse range of HIV-1 and SIV isolates, as well as with HIV-1 virions bearing Env from CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic viruses, clade B and C viruses, or primary isolates. Functional analysis of a panel of Nef mutants revealed that this activity requires Nef myristoylation but that it is genetically separable from other Nef functions such as the ability to enhance virus infectivity and to downregulate CD4. Glycosylated-Gag from MoMLV substituted for Nef in conferring resistance to 2F5 and 4E10, indicating that this activity is conserved in a retrovirus that does not encode Nef. Given the reported membrane-dependence of MPER-recognition by 2F5 and 4E10, in contrast to the membrane-independence of Z13e1, the data here is consistent with a model in which Nef alters MPER recognition in the context of the virion membrane. Indeed, Nef and Glycosylated-Gag decreased the efficiency of virion capture by 2F5 and 4E10, but not by other nAbs. These studies demonstrate that Nef protects lentiviruses from one of the most broadly-acting classes of neutralizing antibodies. This newly

  5. Antibody-targeting of steady state dendritic cells induces tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten eMahnke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are often defined as pivotal inducers of immunity, but these proinflammatory properties only develop after stimulation or ex vivo manipulation of DCs. Under non-inflammatory conditions in vivo, DCs are embedded into a tissue environment and encounter a plethora of self-antigens derived from apoptotic material. This material is transported to secondary lymphoid organs. As DCs maintain their non-activated phenotype in a sterile tissue environment, interaction with T cells will induce rather regulatory T cells (Treg than effector T cells. Thus, DCs are not only inducers of immunity but are also critical for maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutical intervention for the induction of long lasting tolerance in several autoimmune conditions may therefore be possible by manipulating DC activation and/or targeting of DCs in their natural tissue environment.

  6. Polymorphisms in the F8 gene and MHC-II variants as risk factors for the development of inhibitory anti-factor VIII antibodies during the treatment of hemophilia a: a computational assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Shankar Pandey

    Full Text Available The development of neutralizing anti-drug-antibodies to the Factor VIII protein-therapeutic is currently the most significant impediment to the effective management of hemophilia A. Common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs in the F8 gene occur as six haplotypes in the human population (denoted H1 to H6 of which H3 and H4 have been associated with an increased risk of developing anti-drug antibodies. There is evidence that CD4+ T-cell response is essential for the development of anti-drug antibodies and such a response requires the presentation of the peptides by the MHC-class-II (MHC-II molecules of the patient. We measured the binding and half-life of peptide-MHC-II complexes using synthetic peptides from regions of the Factor VIII protein where ns-SNPs occur and showed that these wild type peptides form stable complexes with six common MHC-II alleles, representing 46.5% of the North American population. Next, we compared the affinities computed by NetMHCIIpan, a neural network-based algorithm for MHC-II peptide binding prediction, to the experimentally measured values and concluded that these are in good agreement (area under the ROC-curve of 0.778 to 0.972 for the six MHC-II variants. Using a computational binding predictor, we were able to expand our analysis to (a include all wild type peptides spanning each polymorphic position; and (b consider more MHC-II variants, thus allowing for a better estimation of the risk for clinical manifestation of anti-drug antibodies in the entire population (or a specific sub-population. Analysis of these computational data confirmed that peptides which have the wild type sequence at positions where the polymorphisms associated with haplotypes H3, H4 and H5 occur bind MHC-II proteins significantly more than a negative control. Taken together, the experimental and computational results suggest that wild type peptides from polymorphic regions of FVIII constitute potential T-cell epitopes

  7. Intranuclear Delivery of a Novel Antibody-Derived Radiosensitizer Targeting the DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong Hairong [Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA (Georgia); State Key Laboratory of Virology, Institute of Medical Virology, Wuhan University School of Medicine, Wuhan (China); Lee, Robert J. [Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Haura, Eric B. [Thoracic Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics Programs, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Edwards, John G. [Apeliotus Technologies, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Dynan, William S. [Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Li Shuyi, E-mail: sli@georgiahealth.edu [Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Apeliotus Technologies, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To inhibit DNA double-strand break repair in tumor cells by delivery of a single-chain antibody variable region fragment (ScFv 18-2) to the cell nucleus. ScFv 18-2 binds to a regulatory region of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), an essential enzyme in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway, and inhibits DNA end-joining in a cell-free system and when microinjected into single cells. Development as a radiosensitizer has been limited by the lack of a method for intranuclear delivery to target cells. We investigated a delivery method based on folate receptor-mediated endocytosis. Methods and Materials: A recombinant ScFv 18-2 derivative was conjugated to folate via a scissile disulfide linker. Folate-ScFv 18-2 was characterized for its ability to be internalized by tumor cells and to influence the behavior of ionizing radiation-induced repair foci. Radiosensitization was measured in a clonogenic survival assay. Survival curves were fitted to a linear-quadratic model, and between-group differences were evaluated by an F test. Sensitization ratios were determined based on mean inhibitory dose. Results: Human KB and NCI-H292 lung cancer cells treated with folate-conjugated ScFv 18-2 showed significant radiosensitization (p < 0.001). Sensitization enhancement ratios were 1.92 {+-} 0.42 for KB cells and 1.63 {+-} 0.13 for NCI-H292 cells. Studies suggest that treatment inhibits repair of radiation-induced DSBs, as evidenced by the persistence of {gamma}-H2AX-stained foci and by inhibition of staining with anti-DNA-PKcs phosphoserine 2056. Conclusions: Folate-mediated endocytosis is an effective method for intranuclear delivery of an antibody-derived DNA repair inhibitor.

  8. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Jain

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2 that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7 isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a

  9. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  10. Distinct expression profiles of Notch-1 protein in human solid tumors: Implications for development of targeted therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Yuan Li1, Janine A Burns1, Carol A Cheney1, Ningyan Zhang1, Salvatore Vitelli1, Fubao Wang1, Andrew Bett2, Michael Chastain2, Laurent P Audoly1, Zhi-Qiang Zhang1,31Department of Biologics Research, 2Department of Vaccine Research, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA, USA; 3Clinical Development Laboratory, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ, USAAbstract: Biological therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that target tumor-associated antigens have been considered an effective therapeutic approach in oncology. In considering Notch-1 receptor as a potential target, we performed immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays to determine 1 whether the receptor is overexpressed in tumor cells as compared to their corresponding normal tissues and 2 the clinical significance of its expression levels in human breast, colorectal, lung and prostate cancers. We found that the expression of Notch-1 protein was overexpressed in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma and nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, but not in primary ductal breast carcinoma or prostate adenocarcinoma. Further analysis revealed that higher levels of Notch-1 protein expression were significantly associated with poorer differentiation of breast and prostate tumors. Strikingly, for NSCLC, the expression levels of Notch-1 protein were found to be inversely correlated with tumor differentiation and progression. For colorectal tumors, however, no correlation of Notch-1 protein expression was found with any tumor clinicopathological parameters, in spite of its overexpression in tumor cells. Our data demonstrated the complexity of Notch-1 protein expression in human solid tumors and further supported the notion that the roles of Notch-1 expression in tumorigenesis are highly context-dependent. The findings could provide the basis for development of distinct therapeutic strategies of Notch-1 mAbs for its applications in the treatment of suitable types of human cancers.Keywords: Notch

  11. C-kit-targeted imaging of gastrointestinal stromal tumor using radiolabeled anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody in a mouse tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogawa, Chizuru [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tsuji, Atsushi B. [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: a_tsuji@nirs.go.jp; Sudo, Hitomi [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Pathology and Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Sugyo, Aya [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Chisato [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Molecular Imaging and Radiotherapy, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Odaka, Kenichi [Molecular Probe Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Uehara, Tomoya; Arano, Yasushi [Department of Molecular Imaging and Radiotherapy, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Koizumi, Mitsuru; Saga, Tsuneo [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor arising from the gastrointestinal tract and highly expresses mutated c-kit. We aimed to develop a specific and sensitive method for detecting GISTs using radiolabeled anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody. Methods: A mutated c-kit-expressing cell clone was established by transfecting an expressing vector of mutated c-kit gene into HEK293 human embryonic kidney cells. The tumors were developed by inoculating c-kit-expressing cells into nude mice. {sup 125}I- and {sup 111}In-labeled anti-c-kit antibodies (12A8 and 41A11) were evaluated in vitro by cell binding, competitive inhibition and cellular internalization assays, and in vivo by biodistribution and imaging studies in tumor-bearing mice. Results: Both {sup 125}I- and {sup 111}In-labeled antibodies showed specific binding with c-kit-expressing cells with high affinity (dissociation constants = 2.2-7.1x10{sup 9} M{sup -1}). Internalization assay showed that {sup 125}I-labeled antibodies were rapidly internalized and dehalogenated, with the release of {sup 125}I from the cells, resulting in reduction of cell-associated radioactivity with time. In contrast, {sup 111}In-labeled antibody was internalized but did not result in the reduced radioactivity associated with tumor cells. Reflecting this phenomenon, the in vivo tumor uptake of {sup 125}I-labeled antibody was low on Day 1, further decreasing with time, while tumor uptake of {sup 111}In-labeled antibody was high on Day 1, further increasing with time. The xenografted tumor was clearly visualized by scintigraphy after injection of {sup 111}In-labeled antibody. Conclusion: The anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody labeled with a metal radionuclide would be promising for c-kit-targeted imaging of GISTs.

  12. Gold Nanorods, DNA Origami, and Porous Silicon Nanoparticle-functionalized Biocompatible Double Emulsion for Versatile Targeted Therapeutics and Antibody Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Feng; Zhang, Hongbo; Qu, Xiangmeng; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Dong; Ding, Ruihua; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Santos, Hélder A; Hai, Mingtan

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanorods, DNA origami, and porous silicon nanoparticle-functionalized biocompatible double emulsion are developed for versatile molecular targeted therapeutics and antibody combination therapy. This advanced photothermal responsive all-in-one biocompatible platform can be easily formed with great therapeutics loading capacity for different cancer treatments with synergism and multidrug resistance inhibition, which has great potential in advancing biomedical applications.

  13. Antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates enable co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant to dendritic cells in cis but only have partial targeting specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreutz, M.; Giquel, B.; Hu, Q.; Abuknesha, R.; Uematsu, S.; Akira, S.; Nestle, F.O.; Diebold, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-antigen conjugates, which promote antigen-presentation by dendritic cells (DC) by means of targeted delivery of antigen to particular DC subsets, represent a powerful vaccination approach. To ensure immunity rather than tolerance induction the co-administration of a suitable adjuvant is par

  14. Oxidation-specific epitopes are dominant targets of innate natural antibodies in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Meng-Yun; Fogelstrand, Linda; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Hansen, Lotte F; Woelkers, Douglas; Shaw, Peter X; Choi, Jeomil; Perkmann, Thomas; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Miller, Yury I; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Corr, Maripat; Witztum, Joseph L; Binder, Christoph J

    2009-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of oxidized lipoproteins and apoptotic cells. Adaptive immune responses to various oxidation-specific epitopes play an important role in atherogenesis. However, accumulating evidence suggests that these epitopes are also recognized by innate receptors, such as scavenger receptors on macrophages, and plasma proteins, such as C-reactive protein (CRP). Here, we provide multiple lines of evidence that oxidation-specific epitopes constitute a dominant, previously unrecognized target of natural Abs (NAbs) in both mice and humans. Using reconstituted mice expressing solely IgM NAbs, we have shown that approximately 30% of all NAbs bound to model oxidation-specific epitopes, as well as to atherosclerotic lesions and apoptotic cells. Because oxidative processes are ubiquitous, we hypothesized that these epitopes exert selective pressure to expand NAbs, which in turn play an important role in mediating homeostatic functions consequent to inflammation and cell death, as demonstrated by their ability to facilitate apoptotic cell clearance. These findings provide novel insights into the functions of NAbs in mediating host homeostasis and into their roles in health and diseases, such as chronic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis.

  15. Quantifying the importance of MSP1-19 as a target of growth-inhibitory and protective antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny W Wilson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies targeting blood stage antigens are important in protection against malaria, but the key targets and mechanisms of immunity are not well understood. Merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1 is an abundant and essential protein. The C-terminal 19 kDa region (MSP1-19 is regarded as a promising vaccine candidate and may also be an important target of immunity. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Growth inhibitory antibodies against asexual-stage parasites and IgG to recombinant MSP1-19 were measured in plasma samples from a longitudinal cohort of 206 children in Papua New Guinea. Differential inhibition by samples of mutant P. falciparum lines that expressed either the P. falciparum or P. chabaudi form of MSP1-19 were used to quantify MSP1-19 specific growth-inhibitory antibodies. The great majority of children had detectable IgG to MSP1-19, and high levels of IgG were significantly associated with a reduced risk of symptomatic P. falciparum malaria during the 6-month follow-up period. However, there was little evidence of PfMSP1-19 specific growth inhibition by plasma samples from children. Similar results were found when testing non-dialysed or dialysed plasma, or purified antibodies, or when measuring growth inhibition in flow cytometry or microscopy-based assays. Rabbit antisera generated by immunization with recombinant MSP1-19 demonstrated strong MSP1-19 specific growth-inhibitory activity, which appeared to be due to much higher antibody levels than human samples; antibody avidity was similar between rabbit antisera and human plasma. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that MSP1-19 is not a major target of growth inhibitory antibodies and that the protective effects of antibodies to MSP1-19 are not due to growth inhibitory activity, but may instead be mediated by other mechanisms. Alternatively, antibodies to MSP1-19 may act as a marker of protective immunity.

  16. Activated platelets in carotid artery thrombosis in mice can be selectively targeted with a radiolabeled single-chain antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Heidt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activated platelets can be found on the surface of inflamed, rupture-prone and ruptured plaques as well as in intravascular thrombosis. They are key players in thrombosis and atherosclerosis. In this study we describe the construction of a radiolabeled single-chain antibody targeting the LIBS-epitope of activated platelets to selectively depict platelet activation and wall-adherent non-occlusive thrombosis in a mouse model with nuclear imaging using in vitro and ex vivo autoradiography as well as small animal SPECT-CT for in vivo analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: LIBS as well as an unspecific control single-chain antibody were labeled with (111Indium ((111In via bifunctional DTPA ( = (111In-LIBS/(111In-control. Autoradiography after incubation with (111In-LIBS on activated platelets in vitro (mean 3866 ± 28 DLU/mm(2, 4010 ± 630 DLU/mm(2 and 4520 ± 293 DLU/mm(2 produced a significantly higher ligand uptake compared to (111In-control (2101 ± 76 DLU/mm(2, 1181 ± 96 DLU/mm(2 and 1866 ± 246 DLU/mm(2 indicating a specific binding to activated platelets; P<0.05. Applying these findings to an ex vivo mouse model of carotid artery thrombosis revealed a significant increase in ligand uptake after injection of (111In-LIBS in the presence of small thrombi compared to the non-injured side, as confirmed by histology (49630 ± 10650 DLU/mm(2 vs. 17390 ± 7470 DLU/mm(2; P<0.05. These findings could also be reproduced in vivo. SPECT-CT analysis of the injured carotid artery with (111In-LIBS resulted in a significant increase of the target-to-background ratio compared to (111In-control (1.99 ± 0.36 vs. 1.1 ± 0.24; P < 0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nuclear imaging with (111In-LIBS allows the detection of platelet activation in vitro and ex vivo with high sensitivity. Using SPECT-CT, wall-adherent activated platelets in carotid arteries could be depicted in vivo. These results encourage further studies elucidating the role of

  17. The microRNAs in an ancient protist repress the variant-specific surface protein expression by targeting the entire coding sequence.

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    Ashesh A Saraiya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNA have been detected in the deeply branched protist, Giardia lamblia, and shown to repress expression of the family of variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs, only one of which is expressed in Giardia trophozoite at a given time. Three next-generation sequencing libraries of Giardia Argonaute-associated small RNAs were constructed and analyzed. Analysis of the libraries identified a total of 99 new putative miRNAs with a size primarily in the 26 nt range similar to the size previously predicted by the Giardia Dicer crystal structure and identified by our own studies. Bioinformatic analysis identified multiple putative miRNA target sites in the mRNAs of all 73 VSPs. The effect of miRNA target sites within a defined 3'-region were tested on two vsp mRNAs. All the miRNAs showed partial repression of the corresponding vsp expression and were additive when the targeting sites were separately located. But the combined repression still falls short of 100%. Two other relatively short vsp mRNAs with 15 and 11 putative miRNA target sites identified throughout their ORFs were tested with their corresponding miRNAs. The results indicate that; (1 near 100% repression of vsp mRNA expression can be achieved through the combined action of multiple miRNAs on target sites located throughout the ORF; (2 the miRNA machinery could be instrumental in repressing the expression of vsp genes in Giardia; (3 this is the first time that all the miRNA target sites in the entire ORF of a mRNA have been tested and shown to be functional.

  18. Overlapping antigenic repertoires of variant antigens expressed on the surface of erythrocytes infected by Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, H A; Staalsoe, T; Dodoo, D;

    1999-01-01

    Antibodies against variable antigens expressed on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes are believed to be important for protection against malaria. A target for these antibodies is the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1, PfEMP1, which is encoded by around 50 var...... genes and undergoes clonal variation. Using agglutination and mixed agglutination tests and flow cytometry to analyse the recognition of variant antigens on parasitized erythrocytes by plasma antibodies from individuals living in Daraweesh in eastern Sudan, an area of seasonal and unstable malaria...

  19. Identification of MCAM/CD146 as the target antigen of a human monoclonal antibody that recognizes both epithelioid and sarcomatoid types of mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; He, Jiang; Wang, Yong; An, Feng; Feng, Jinjin; Barbone, Dario; Gao, Dongwei; Franc, Ben; Broaddus, V Courtney; Liu, Bin

    2009-02-15

    The prognosis for patients diagnosed with mesothelioma is generally poor, and currently available treatments are usually ineffective. Therapies that specifically target tumor cells hold much promise for the treatment of cancers that are resistant to current approaches. We have previously selected phage antibody display libraries on mesothelioma cell lines to identify a panel of internalizing human single chain (scFv) antibodies that target mesothelioma-associated, clinically represented cell surface antigens and further exploited the internalizing function of these scFvs to specifically deliver lethal doses of liposome-encapsulated small molecule drugs to both epithelioid and sarcomatous subtypes of mesothelioma cells. Here, we report the identification of MCAM/MUC18/CD146 as the surface antigen bound by one of the mesothelioma-targeting scFvs using a novel cloning strategy based on yeast surface human proteome display. Immunohistochemical analysis of mesothelioma tissue microarrays confirmed that MCAM is widely expressed by both epithelioid and sarcomatous types of mesothelioma tumor cells in situ but not by normal mesothelial cells. In addition, quantum dot-labeled anti-MCAM scFv targets primary meosthelioma cells in tumor fragment spheroids cultured ex vivo. As the first step in evaluating the therapeutic potential of MCAM-targeting antibodies, we performed single-photon emission computed tomography studies using the anti-MCAM scFv and found that it recognizes mesothelioma organotypic xenografts in vivo. The combination of phage antibody library selection on tumor cells and rapid target antigen identification by screening the yeast surface-displayed human proteome could be a powerful method for mapping the targetable tumor cell surface epitope space.

  20. Validation of a pH gradient-based ion-exchange chromatography method for high-resolution monoclonal antibody charge variant separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Jennifer C; Moreno, G Tony; Lou, Yun; Farnan, Dell

    2011-01-25

    Ion-exchange chromatography is widely used for profiling the charge heterogeneity of proteins, including monoclonal antibodies. Despite good resolving power and robustness, ionic strength-based ion-exchange separations are product-specific and time-consuming to develop. We have previously reported a novel pH-based separation of proteins by cation exchange chromatography that was multi-product, high-resolution, and robust against variations in sample matrix salt concentration and pH. In this study, a pH gradient-based separation method using cation exchange chromatography was evaluated in a mock validation. This method was shown to be robust for monoclonal antibodies and suitable for its intended purpose of charge heterogeneity analysis. Simple mixtures of defined buffer components were used to generate the pH gradients that separated closely related antibody species. Validation characteristics, such as precision and linearity, were evaluated. Robustness to changes in protein load, buffer pH and column oven temperature was demonstrated. The stability-indicating capability of this method was determined using thermally stressed antibody samples. In addition, intermediate precision was demonstrated using multiple instruments, multiple analysts, multiple column lots, and different column manufacturers. Finally, the precision for this method was compared to conventional ion-exchange chromatography and imaged capillary isoelectric focusing. These results demonstrate the superior precision and robustness of this multi-product method, which can be used for the high-throughput evaluation of in-process and final product samples.

  1. Interaction between PLA2R1 and HLA-DQA1 variants associates with anti-PLA2R antibodies and membranous nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jicheng; Hou, Wanyin; Zhou, Xujie; Liu, Gang; Zhou, Fude; Zhao, Na; Hou, Ping; Zhao, Minghui; Zhang, Hong

    2013-07-01

    Risk alleles at genome loci containing phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R1) and HLA-DQA1 closely associate with idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN) in the European population, but it is unknown whether a similar association exists in the Chinese population and whether high-risk alleles promote the development of anti-PLA2R antibodies. Here, we genotyped 2132 Chinese individuals, including 1112 patients with IMN and 1020 healthy controls, for three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within PLA2R1 and three SNPs within HLA genes. We also selected 71 patients, with varying genotypes, to assess for circulating anti-PLA2R antibody and for PLA2R expression in glomeruli. Three SNPs within PLA2R1 and one SNP within HLA-DQA1 strongly associated with IMN, and we noted gene-gene interactions involving these SNPs. Furthermore, these risk alleles strongly associated with the presence of anti-PLA2R antibodies and glomerular PLA2R expression. Among individuals who carried risk alleles for both genes, 73% had anti-PLA2R antibodies and 75% expressed PLA2R in glomeruli. In contrast, among individuals who carried protective genotypes of both genes, none had anti-PLA2R antibodies and glomerular expression of PLA2R was weak or absent. In conclusion, the interaction between PLA2R1 and HLA-DQA1 risk alleles associates with the development of IMN in the Chinese population. Individuals carrying risk alleles are predisposed to the generation of circulating anti-PLA2R autoantibodies, which may contribute to the development of IMN.

  2. Assessment of the Fusion Tags on Increasing Soluble Production of the Active TEV Protease Variant and Other Target Proteins in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuelian; Sun, Jiaqi; Wang, Weiyu; Jiang, Li; Cheng, Beijiu; Fan, Jun

    2016-12-17

    In this study, five fusion tags affecting soluble production and cleavage activity of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease (TEVp) variant in Escherichia coli strains BL21 (DE3) and Rosetta™ (DE3) are investigated. Combination of the augmenting rare transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and the fused expressivity tag (N-terminal seven amino acid residues of E. coli translation initiation factor II) promotes the soluble TEVp partner expressed at relatively high level. Attachment of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) tag increases soluble expression of the protease released from the fusion protein in E. coli cells, but the incorporated TEVp recognition sequence slightly decreases expressivity of the fusion construct. Except for the green fluorescent protein, the attached expressivity tag shows less efficiency than the MBP tag in enhancing expression levels of the selected five target proteins in the Rosetta™ (DE3) cells under different induction conditions. Our results identified that high-level production of the functional target protein as the fusion partner in E. coli is combined with the intrinsic property of fusion tag, fusion protein stability, inherent folding of target protein, rare tRNA abundance, and the incorporated linker. Purified TEVp fusion constructs with the N-terminal expressivity tag, as well as the MBP partner, are the ideal alternatives for removing fusion tag.

  3. Targeted cancer immunotherapy with oncolytic adenovirus coding for a fully human monoclonal antibody specific for CTLA-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, J D; Hemminki, O; Diaconu, I; Hirvinen, M; Bonetti, A; Guse, K; Escutenaire, S; Kanerva, A; Pesonen, S; Löskog, A; Cerullo, V; Hemminki, A

    2012-10-01

    Promising clinical results have been achieved with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as ipilimumab and tremelimumab that block cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4, CD152). However, systemic administration of these agents also has the potential for severe immune-related adverse events. Thus, local production might allow higher concentrations at the target while reducing systemic side effects. We generated a transductionally and transcriptionally targeted oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 expressing complete human mAb specific for CTLA-4 and tested it in vitro, in vivo and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal donors and patients with advanced solid tumors. mAb expression was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Biological functionality was determined in a T-cell line and in PBMCs from cancer patients. T cells of patients, but not those of healthy donors, were activated by an anti-CTLA4mAb produced by Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4. In addition to immunological effects, a direct anti-CTLA-4-mediated pro-apoptotic effect was observed in vitro and in vivo. Local production resulted in 43-fold higher (P<0.05) tumor versus plasma anti-CTLA4mAb concentration. Plasma levels in mice remained below what has been reported safe in humans. Replication-competent Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 resulted in 81-fold higher (P<0.05) tumor mAb levels as compared with a replication-deficient control. This is the first report of an oncolytic adenovirus producing a full-length human mAb. High mAb concentrations were seen at tumors with lower systemic levels. Stimulation of T cells of cancer patients by Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 suggests feasibility of testing the approach in clinical trials.

  4. New Anti-Nodal Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting the Nodal Pre-Helix Loop Involved in Cripto-1 Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalia Focà

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nodal is a potent embryonic morphogen belonging to the TGF-β superfamily. Typically, it also binds to the ALK4/ActRIIB receptor complex in the presence of the co-receptor Cripto-1. Nodal expression is physiologically restricted to embryonic tissues and human embryonic stem cells, is absent in normal cells but re-emerges in several human cancers, including melanoma, breast, and colon cancer. Our aim was to obtain mAbs able to recognize Nodal on a major CBR (Cripto-Binding-Region site and to block the Cripto-1-mediated signalling. To achieve this, antibodies were raised against hNodal(44–67 and mAbs generated by the hybridoma technology. We have selected one mAb, named 3D1, which strongly associates with full-length rhNodal (KD 1.4 nM and recognizes the endogenous protein in a panel of human melanoma cell lines by western blot and FACS analyses. 3D1 inhibits the Nodal-Cripto-1 binding and blocks Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Data suggest that inhibition of the Nodal-Cripto-1 axis is a valid therapeutic approach against melanoma and 3D1 is a promising and interesting agent for blocking Nodal-Cripto mediated tumor development. These findings increase the interest for Nodal as both a diagnostic and prognostic marker and as a potential new target for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Antibody responses to NY-ESO-1 in primary breast cancer identify a subtype target for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaï, Ahmed; Duperrier-Amouriaux, Karine; Pignon, Pascale; Raimbaud, Isabelle; Memeo, Lorenzo; Colarossi, Cristina; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Perin, Tiziana; Classe, Jean-Marc; Campone, Mario; Jézéquel, Pascal; Campion, Loïc; Ayyoub, Maha; Valmori, Danila

    2011-01-01

    The highly immunogenic human tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 (ESO) is a target of choice for anti-cancer immune therapy. In this study, we assessed spontaneous antibody (Ab) responses to ESO in a large cohort of patients with primary breast cancer (BC) and addressed the correlation between the presence of anti-ESO Ab, the expression of ESO in the tumors and their characteristics. We found detectable Ab responses to ESO in 1% of the patients. Tumors from patients with circulating Ab to ESO exhibited common characteristics, being mainly hormone receptor (HR)⁻ invasive ductal carcinomas of high grade, including both HER2⁻ and HER2⁺ tumors. In line with these results, we detected ESO expression in 20% of primary HR⁻ BC, including both ESO Ab⁺ and Ab⁻ patients, but not in HR⁺ BC. Interestingly, whereas expression levels in ESO⁺ BC were not significantly different between ESO Ab⁺ and Ab⁻ patients, the former had, in average, significantly higher numbers of tumor-infiltrated lymph nodes, indicating that lymph node invasion may be required for the development of spontaneous anti-tumor immune responses. Thus, the presence of ESO Ab identifies a tumor subtype of HR⁻ (HER2⁻ or HER2⁺) primary BC with frequent ESO expression and, together with the assessment of antigen expression in the tumor, may be instrumental for the selection of patients for whom ESO-based immunotherapy may complement standard therapy.

  6. In vivo imaging of chromogranin A-positive endocrine tumours by three-step monoclonal antibody targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siccardi, A.G. [Dipartimento di Ricerca Biologica e Tecnologica, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Paganelli, G. [Dipartimento di Medicina Nucleare, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Pontiroli, A.E. [Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Pelagi, M. [Dipartimento di Ricerca Biologica e Tecnologica, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Magnani, P. [Dipartimento di Medicina Nucleare, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Viale, G. [Dipartimento di Ricerca Biologica e Tecnologica, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Faglia, G. [Istituto di Scienze Endocrine, Universita di Milano (Italy); Fazio, F. [Dipartimento di Medicina Nucleare, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano (Italy)

    1996-11-01

    The detection of chromogranins (Cg) by immunohistochemistry and serology represents a new in vitro diagnostic tool for endocrine tumours. We have recently reported on the feasibility of targeting chromogranin A (CgA) for in vivo detection of pituitary adenomas by immunoscintigraphy (ISG). The scintigraphic procedure, based on an anti-CgA monoclonal antibody and on the avidin-biotin three-step method (Cg-3S-ISG), was evaluated on a group of 29 consecutive patients with known or suspected endocrine tumours other than pituitary adenomas, i.e. medullary thyroid carcinoma, carcinoid, insulinoma and parathormone- or ACTH-producing tumours. Primary tumours (10) and recurrences (16) were visualised in 26 patients, whereas conventional imaging techniques (planar radiography, computerised tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography) failed to detect the tumour sites in ten of the same (Cg-3S-ISG-positive) patients. Therefore, these preliminary results indicate that Cg-3S-ISG, the first immunological method able to detect endocrine tumours in vivo, has a higher diagnostic accuracy than conventional imaging techniques (93.1% compared with 65.5%). (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. TriFabs—Trivalent IgG-Shaped Bispecific Antibody Derivatives: Design, Generation, Characterization and Application for Targeted Payload Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Mayer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available TriFabs are IgG-shaped bispecific antibodies (bsAbs composed of two regular Fab arms fused via flexible linker peptides to one asymmetric third Fab-sized binding module. This third module replaces the IgG Fc region and is composed of the variable region of the heavy chain (VH fused to CH3 with “knob”-mutations, and the variable region of the light chain (VL fused to CH3 with matching “holes”. The hinge region does not contain disulfides to facilitate antigen access to the third binding site. To compensate for the loss of hinge-disulfides between heavy chains, CH3 knob-hole heterodimers are linked by S354C-Y349C disulphides, and VH and VL of the stem region may be linked via VH44C-VL100C disulphides. TriFabs which bind one antigen bivalent in the same manner as IgGs and the second antigen monovalent “in between” these Fabs can be applied to simultaneously engage two antigens, or for targeted delivery of small and large (fluorescent or cytotoxic payloads.

  8. Peptide Targeted by Human Antibodies Associated with HIV Vaccine-Associated Protection Assumes a Dynamic α-Helical Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Lorenzo; Goger, Michael; Battacharya, Shibani; deCamp, Allan C.; Gilbert, Peter B.; Berman, Phillip W.; Cardozo, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    The only evidence of vaccine-induced protection from HIV acquisition in humans was obtained in the RV144 HIV vaccine clinical trial. One immune correlate of risk in RV144 was observed to be higher titers of vaccine-induced antibodies (Abs) reacting with a 23-mer non-glycosylated peptide with the same amino acid sequence as a segment in the second variable (V2) loop of the MN strain of HIV. We used NMR to analyze the dynamic 3D structure of this peptide. Distance restraints between spatially proximate inter-residue protons were calculated from NOE cross peak intensities and used to constrain a thorough search of all possible conformations of the peptide. α–helical folding was strongly preferred by part of the peptide. A high-throughput structure prediction of this segment in all circulating HIV strains demonstrated that α–helical conformations are preferred by this segment almost universally across all subtypes. Notably, α–helical conformations of this segment of the V2 loop cluster cross-subtype-conserved amino acids on one face of the helix and the variable amino acid positions on the other in a semblance of an amphipathic α–helix. Accordingly, some Abs that protected against HIV in RV144 may have targeted a specific, conserved α–helical peptide epitope in the V2 loop of HIV’s surface envelope glycoprotein. PMID:28107435

  9. Monoclonal antibody targeting of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1c ameliorates obesity and glucose intolerance via central mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Lelliott

    Full Text Available We have generated a novel monoclonal antibody targeting human FGFR1c (R1c mAb that caused profound body weight and body fat loss in diet-induced obese mice due to decreased food intake (with energy expenditure unaltered, in turn improving glucose control. R1c mAb also caused weight loss in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, leptin receptor-mutant db/db mice, and in mice lacking either the melanocortin 4 receptor or the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1. In addition, R1c mAb did not change hypothalamic mRNA expression levels of Agrp, Cart, Pomc, Npy, Crh, Mch, or Orexin, suggesting that R1c mAb could cause food intake inhibition and body weight loss via other mechanisms in the brain. Interestingly, peripherally administered R1c mAb accumulated in the median eminence, adjacent arcuate nucleus and in the circumventricular organs where it activated the early response gene c-Fos. As a plausible mechanism and coinciding with the initiation of food intake suppression, R1c mAb induced hypothalamic expression levels of the cytokines Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and 3 and ERK1/2 and p70 S6 kinase 1 activation.

  10. Catheterized guinea pigs infected with Ebola Zaire virus allows safer sequential sampling to determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowall, Stuart; Taylor, Irene; Yeates, Paul; Smith, Leonie; Rule, Antony; Easterbrook, Linda; Bruce, Christine; Cook, Nicola; Corbin-Lickfett, Kara; Empig, Cyril; Schlunegger, Kyle; Graham, Victoria; Dennis, Mike; Hewson, Roger

    2013-02-01

    Sequential sampling from animals challenged with highly pathogenic organisms, such as haemorrhagic fever viruses, is required for many pharmaceutical studies. Using the guinea pig model of Ebola virus infection, a catheterized system was used which had the benefits of allowing repeated sampling of the same cohort of animals, and also a reduction in the use of sharps at high biological containment. Levels of a PS-targeting antibody (Bavituximab) were measured in Ebola-infected animals and uninfected controls. Data showed that the pharmacokinetics were similar in both groups, therefore Ebola virus infection did not have an observable effect on the half-life of the antibody.

  11. Combinational Targeting of Prostate Carcinoma Cells and Tumors Associated Pericytes with Antibody Based Immunotherapy and Metronomic Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    been purified from ascitis by sequential precipitation with caprilyc acid and with ammonium sulphate . The purity of the antibody preparation has been...monoclonal antibody have been purified by sequential precipitation with ammonium sulphate and caprylic acid (Fig. 2). To test the efficacy of...conditions of monoclonal antibodies 225.28 and F3C25 purified from ascitis by sequential precipitation with ammonium sulphate and caprylic acid

  12. Technical note: Protozoa-specific antibodies raised in sheep plasma bind to their target protozoa in the rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Y J; Rea, S M; Popovski, S; Skillman, L C; Wright, A-D G

    2014-12-01

    Binding of IgG antibodies to Entodinium spp. in the rumen of sheep (Ovis aries) was investigated by adding IgG, purified from plasma, directly into the rumen. Plasma IgG was sourced from sheep that had or had not been immunized with a vaccine containing whole fixed Entodinium spp. cells. Ruminal fluid was sampled approximately 2 h after each antibody dosing. Binding of protozoa by a specific antibody was detected using an indirect fluorescent antibody test. An antibody titer in the ruminal fluid was determined by ELISA, and the concentration of ruminal fluid ammonia-N and ruminal pH were also determined. Entodinium spp. and total protozoa from IgG-infused sheep were enumerated by microscopic counts. Two-hourly additions of IgG maintained a low antibody titer in the rumen for 12 h and the binding of the antibody to the rumen protozoa was demonstrated. Increased ammonia-N concentrations and altered ruminal fluid pH patterns indicated that additional fermentation of protein was occurring in the rumen after addition of IgG. No reduction in numbers of Entodinium spp. was observed (P>0.05). Although binding of antibodies to protozoa has been demonstrated in the rumen, it is unclear how much cell death occurred. On the balance of probability, it would appear that the antibody was degraded or partially degraded, and the impact of this on protozoal populations and the measurement of a specific titer is also unclear.

  13. Genetic variants in microRNAs and microRNA target sites predict biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Pin; Lévesque, Eric; Guillemette, Chantal; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Lin, Victor C; Chung, I-Che; Chen, Lih-Chyang; Laverdière, Isabelle; Lacombe, Louis; Fradet, Yves; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Lee, Hong-Zin; Juang, Shin-Hun; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that microRNAs might participate in prostate cancer initiation, progression and treatment response. Germline variations in microRNAs might alter target gene expression and modify the efficacy of prostate cancer therapy. To determine whether genetic variants in microRNAs and microRNA target sites are associated with the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). We retrospectively studied two independent cohorts composed of 320 Asian and 526 Caucasian men with pathologically organ-confined prostate cancer who had a median follow-up of 54.7 and 88.8 months after RP, respectively. Patients were systematically genotyped for 64 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNAs and microRNA target sites, and their prognostic significance on BCR was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression model. After adjusting for known clinicopathologic risk factors, two SNPs (MIR605 rs2043556 and CDON rs3737336) remained associated with BCR. The numbers of risk alleles showed a cumulative effect on BCR [perallele hazard ratio (HR) 1.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-2.21, p for trend = 0.005] in Asian cohort, and the risk was replicated in Caucasian cohort (HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.15-2.08, p for trend = 0.004) and in combined analysis (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.26-1.96, p for trend microRNAs and microRNA target sites can be predictive biomarkers for BCR after RP.

  14. Site-specific antibody-liposome conjugation through copper-free click chemistry: a molecular biology approach for targeted photodynamic therapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Girgis; Wang, Yucheng; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Broekgaarden, Mans; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Hui, James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Nanocarriers, such as liposomes, have the ability to potentiate photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment regimens by the encapsulation of high payloads of photosensitizers and enhance their passive delivery to tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. By conjugating targeting moieties to the surface of the liposomal nanoconstructs, cellular selectivity is imparted on them and PDT-based therapies can be performed with significantly higher dose tolerances, as off-target toxicity is simultaneously reduced.1 However, the maximal benefits of conventional targeted nanocarriers, including liposomes, are hindered by practical limitations including chemical instability, non-selective conjugation chemistry, poor control over ligand orientation, and loss of ligand functionality following conjugation, amongst others.2 We have developed a robust, physically and chemically stable liposomal nanoplatform containing benzoporphyrin derivative photosensitizer molecules within the phospholipid bilayer and an optimized surface density of strained cyclooctyne moieties for `click' conjugation to azido-functionalized antibodies.3 The clinical chimeric anti-EGFR antibody Cetuximab is site-specifically photocrosslinked to a recombinant bioengineered that recognizes the antibody's Fc region, containing a terminal azide.4 The copper-free click conjugation of the bioengineered Cetuximab derivative to the optimized photosensitizing liposome provides exceptional control over the antibody's optimal orientation for cellular antigen binding. Importantly, the reaction occurs rapidly under physiological conditions, bioorthogonally (selectively in the presence of other biomolecules) and without the need for toxic copper catalysis.3 Such state-of-the-art conjugation strategies push the boundaries of targeted photodynamic therapy beyond the limitations of traditional chemical coupling techniques to produce more robust and effective targeted therapeutics with applications beyond

  15. Contactin-1 and Neurofascin-155/-186 Are Not Targets of Auto-Antibodies in Multifocal Motor Neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Doppler

    Full Text Available Multifocal motor neuropathy is an immune mediated disease presenting with multifocal muscle weakness and conduction block. IgM auto-antibodies against the ganglioside GM1 are detectable in about 50% of the patients. Auto-antibodies against the paranodal proteins contactin-1 and neurofascin-155 and the nodal protein neurofascin-186 have been detected in subgroups of patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Recently, auto-antibodies against neurofascin-186 and gliomedin were described in more than 60% of patients with multifocal motor neuropathy. In the current study, we aimed to validate this finding, using a combination of different assays for auto-antibody detection. In addition we intended to detect further auto-antibodies against paranodal proteins, specifically contactin-1 and neurofascin-155 in multifocal motor neuropathy patients' sera. We analyzed sera of 33 patients with well-characterized multifocal motor neuropathy for IgM or IgG anti-contactin-1, anti-neurofascin-155 or -186 antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, binding assays with transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells and murine teased fibers. We did not detect any IgM or IgG auto-antibodies against contactin-1, neurofascin-155 or -186 in any of our multifocal motor neuropathy patients. We conclude that auto-antibodies against contactin-1, neurofascin-155 and -186 do not play a relevant role in the pathogenesis in this cohort with multifocal motor neuropathy.

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of aryl-naloxamide opiate analgesics targeting truncated exon 11-associated μ opioid receptor (MOR-1) splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Susruta; Subrath, Joan; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Polikar, Lisa; Burgman, Maxim; Nagakura, Kuni; Ocampo, Julie; Haselton, Nathan; Pasternak, Anna R; Grinnell, Steven; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2012-07-26

    3-Iodobenzoylnaltrexamide 1 (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic acting through a novel receptor target that lack many side-effects of traditional opiates composed, in part, of exon 11-associated truncated six transmembrane domain MOR-1 (6TM/E11) splice variants. To better understand the SAR of this drug target, a number of 4,5-epoxymorphinan analogues were synthesized. Results show the importance of a free 3-phenolic group, a phenyl ring at the 6 position, an iodine at the 3'or 4' position of the phenyl ring, and an N-allyl or c-propylmethyl group to maintain high 6TM/E11 affinity and activity. 3-Iodobenzoylnaloxamide 15 (IBNalA) with a N-allyl group displayed lower δ opioid receptor affinity than its naltrexamine analogue, was 10-fold more potent an analgesic than morphine, elicited no respiratory depression or physical dependence, and only limited inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. Thus, the aryl-naloxamide scaffold can generate a potent analgesic acting through the 6TM/E11 sites with advantageous side-effect profile and greater selectivity.

  17. Physical exercise and antidepressants enhance BDNF targeting in hippocampal CA3 dendrites: further evidence of a spatial code for BDNF splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baj, Gabriele; D'Alessandro, Valentina; Musazzi, Laura; Mallei, Alessandra; Sartori, Cesar R; Sciancalepore, Marina; Tardito, Daniela; Langone, Francesco; Popoli, Maurizio; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2012-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is encoded by multiple BDNF transcripts, whose function is unclear. We recently showed that a subset of BDNF transcripts can traffic into distal dendrites in response to electrical activity, while others are segregated into the somatoproximal domains. Physical exercise and antidepressant treatments exert their beneficial effects through upregulation of BDNF, which is required to support survival and differentiation of newborn dentate gyrus (DG) neurons. While these DG processes are required for the antidepressant effect, a role for CA1 in antidepressant action has been excluded, and the effect on CA3 neurons remains unclear. Here, we show for the first time that physical exercise and antidepressants induce local increase of BDNF in CA3. Voluntary physical exercise for 28 consecutive days, or 2-week treatment with 10 mg/kg per day fluoxetine or reboxetine, produced a global increase of BDNF mRNA and protein in the neuronal somata of the whole hippocampus and a specific increase of BDNF in dendrites of CA3 neurons. This increase was accounted for by BDNF exon 6 variant. In cultured hippocampal neurons, application of serotonin or norepinephrine (10-50 μM) induced increase in synaptic transmission and targeting of BDNF mRNA in dendrites. The increased expression of BDNF in CA3 dendrites following antidepressants or exercise further supports the neurotrophin hypothesis of antidepressants action and confirms that the differential subcellular localization of BDNF mRNA splice variants provides a spatial code for a selective expression of BDNF in specific subcellular districts. This selective expression may be exploited to design more specific antidepressants.

  18. The membrane-proximal external region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope: dominant site of antibody neutralization and target for vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Marinieve; van Houten, Nienke E; Wang, Xin; Scott, Jamie K

    2008-03-01

    Enormous efforts have been made to produce a protective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1; there has been little success. However, the identification of broadly neutralizing antibodies against epitopes on the highly conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the gp41 envelope protein has delineated this region as an attractive vaccine target. Furthermore, emerging structural information on the MPER has provided vaccine designers with new insights for building relevant immunogens. This review describes the current state of the field regarding (i) the structure and function of the gp41 MPER; (ii) the structure and binding mechanisms of the broadly neutralizing antibodies 2F5, 4E10, and Z13; and (iii) the development of an MPER-targeting vaccine. In addition, emerging approaches to vaccine design are presented.

  19. Cellulase variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazej, Robert; Toriello, Nicholas; Emrich, Charles; Cohen, Richard N.; Koppel, Nitzan

    2015-07-14

    This invention provides novel variant cellulolytic enzymes having improved activity and/or stability. In certain embodiments the variant cellulotyic enzymes comprise a glycoside hydrolase with or comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to one or more of residues F64, A226, and/or E246 in Thermobifida fusca Cel9A enzyme. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a theme B family 9 glycoside hydrolase.

  20. Elimination of Tumor Cells Using Folate Receptor Targeting by Antibody-Conjugated, Gold-Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles in a Murine Breast Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan S. Krystofiak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The chemotherapeutic treatment of cancer suffers from poor specificity for targeting the tumor cells and often results in adverse effects such as systemic toxicity, damage to nontarget tissues, and development of drug-resistant tumors in patients. Increasingly, drug nanocarriers have been explored as a way of lessening or overcoming these problems. In this study, antibody-conjugated Au-coated magnetite nanoparticles, in conjunction with inductive heating produced by exposure to an oscillating magnetic field (OMF, were evaluated for their effects on the viability of tumor cells in a murine model of breast cancer. Treatment effects were evaluated by light microscopy and SEM. Results. 4T1 mammary epithelial carcinoma cells overexpressing the folate receptor were targeted with an anti-folate receptor primary antibody, followed by labeling with secondary antibody-conjugated Au-coated magnetite nanoparticles. In the absence of OMF exposure, nanoparticle labeling had no effect on 4T1 cell viability. However, following OMF treatment, many of the labeled 4T1 cells showed extensive membrane damage by SEM analysis, and dramatically reduced viability as assessed using a live/dead staining assay. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that Au-coated magnetite targeted to tumor cells through binding to an overexpressed surface receptor, in the presence of an OMF, can lead to tumor cell death.

  1. Pan-HER-An antibody mixture targeting EGFR, HER2 and HER3 abrogates preformed and ligand-induced EGFR homo- and heterodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellebaek, Sofie; Brix, Susanne; Grandal, Michael; Lantto, Johan; Horak, Ivan D; Kragh, Michael; Poulsen, Thomas Tuxen

    2016-11-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-family is involved in development of many epithelial cancers. Therefore, HER-family members constitute important targets for anti-cancer therapeutics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). A limitation to the success of single HER-targeting mAbs is development of acquired resistance through mechanisms such as alterted receptor dimerization patterns and dependencies. Pan-HER is a mixture of six mAbs simultaneously targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), HER2 and HER3 with two mAbs against each receptor. Pan-HER has previously demonstrated broader efficacy than targeting single or dual receptor combinations also in resistant settings. In light of this broad efficacy, we decided to investigate the effect of Pan-HER compared with single HER-targeting with single and dual mAbs on HER-family cross-talk and dimerization focusing on EGFR. The effect of Pan-HER on cell proliferation and HER-family receptor degradation was superior to treatment with single mAbs targeting either single receptor, and similar to targeting a single receptor with two non-overlapping antibodies. Furthermore, changes in EGFR-dimerization patterns after treatment with Pan-HER were investigated by in situ proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation, demonstrating that Pan-HER and the EGFR-targeting mAb mixture efficiently down-regulate basal EGFR homo- and heterodimerization in two tested cell lines, whereas single mAbs had limited effects. Pan-HER and the EGFR-targeting mAb mixture also blocked EGF-binding and thereby ligand-induced changes in EGFR-dimerization levels. These results suggest that Pan-HER reduces the cellular capability to switch HER-dependency and dimerization pattern in response to treatment and thus hold promise for future clinical development of Pan-HER in resistant settings.

  2. Neutralization of Diverse Human Cytomegalovirus Strains Conferred by Antibodies Targeting Viral gH/gL/pUL128-131 Pentameric Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sha; Li, Fengsheng; Troutman, Matthew C.; Freed, Daniel C.; Tang, Aimin; Loughney, John W.; Wang, I-Ming; Vlasak, Josef; Nickle, David C.; Rustandi, Richard R.; Hamm, Melissa; DePhillips, Pete A.; Zhang, Ningyan; McLellan, Jason S.; Zhu, Hua; Adler, Stuart P.; McVoy, Michael A.; An, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    -defective virus with the restored pentameric complex, rhesus macaques can develop broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting multiple immunogenic sites of the pentameric complex. Such analyses of site-specific antibody responses are imperative to our assessment of the quality of vaccine-induced immunity in clinical studies. PMID:28077654

  3. Bispecific antibody complex pre-targeting and targeted delivery of polymer drug conjugates for imaging and therapy in dual human mammary cancer xenografts. Targeted polymer drug conjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaw, Ban-An; Gada, Keyur S.; Patil, Vishwesh; Panwar, Rajiv; Mandapati, Savitri [Northeastern University, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Bouve College of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Boston, MA (United States); Hatefi, Arash [Rutgers University, Department of Pharmaceutics, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Majewski, Stan [West Virginia University, Department of Radiology, Morgantown, WV (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Doxorubicin, a frontline chemotherapeutic agent, limited by its cardiotoxicity and other tissue toxicities, was conjugated to N-terminal DTPA-modified polyglutamic acid (D-Dox-PGA) to produce polymer pro-drug conjugates. D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m labeled DTPA-succinyl-polylysine polymers (DSPL) were targeted to HER2-positive human mammary carcinoma (BT-474) in a double xenografted SCID mouse model also hosting HER2-negative human mammary carcinoma (BT-20). After pretargeting with bispecific anti-HER2-affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab complexes (BAAC), anti-DTPA-Fab or only phosphate buffered saline, D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m DSPL were administered. Positive therapeutic control mice were injected with Dox alone at maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Only BT-474 lesions were visualized by gamma imaging with Tc-99 m-DSPL; BT-20 lesions were not. Therapeutic efficacy was equivalent in mice pretargeted with BAAC/targeted with D-Dox-PGA to mice treated only with doxorubicin. There was no total body weight (TBW) loss at three times the doxorubicin equivalent MTD with D-Dox-PGA, whereas mice treated with doxorubicin lost 10 % of TBW at 2 weeks and 16 % after the second MTD injection leading to death of all mice. Our cancer imaging and pretargeted therapeutic approaches are highly target specific, delivering very high specific activity reagents that may result in the development of a novel theranostic application. HER/2 neu specific affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab bispecific antibody pretargeting of HER2 positive human mammary xenografts enabled exquisite targeting of polymers loaded with radioisotopes for molecular imaging and doxorubicin for effective therapy without the associating non-tumor normal tissue toxicities. (orig.)

  4. Targeting of a CCK{sub 2} receptor splice variant with {sup 111}In-labelled cholecystokinin-8 (CCK8) and {sup 111}In-labelled minigastrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Gotthardt, Martin; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PO Box 9101, HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Roosenburg, Susan [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PO Box 9101, HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Park, Jeseong; Hellmich, Mark R. [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Surgery and the Sealy Center for Cancer Cell Biology, Galveston, TX (United States); Jong, Marion de [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rutjes, Floris P.J.T.; Delft, Floris L. van [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2008-02-15

    Radiolabelled cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin-derived peptides potentially can be used for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Recently, a splice variant version of the CCK2R has been identified, designated CCK2i4svR. Constitutive expression of this receptor has been demonstrated in human colorectal cancer and in pancreatic cancer, but not in normal tissue. So far, it has never been shown whether radiolabelled peptides can target the CCK2i4svR in vivo. In this paper, we investigated the potential of sulfated {sup 111}In-labelled DOTA-CCK8 (sCCK8), a pan-CCKR-binding peptide, and [{sup 111}In]DOTA-minigastrin (MG0), a CCK2R selective peptide, for the targeting of the CCK2i4svR. The receptor binding affinity of [{sup 111}In]DOTA-sCCK8 and [{sup 111}In]DOTA-MG0 for the CCK2R and CCK2i4svR was determined using stably transfected HEK293 cell lines, expressing either CCK2R or CCK2i4svR. Tumour targeting was studied in HEK293-CCK2i4svR tumour-bearing athymic mice. [{sup 111}In]DOTA-sCCK8 as well as [{sup 111}In]DOTA-MG0 specifically bound both CCK2R and CCK2i4svR with affinities in the low nanomolar range. In vivo experiments revealed that accumulation of both peptides in CCK2i4svR-positive tumours was similar (3.21 {+-} 0.77 and 3.01 {+-} 0.67%ID/g, sCCK8 and MG0, respectively, 24 h p.i.). Kidney retention of [{sup 111}In]DOTA-MG0 (32.4 {+-} 7.5%ID/g, 24 h p.i.) was markedly higher than that of [{sup 111}In]DOTA-sCCK8 (2.75 {+-} 0.31%ID/g, 24 h p.i.). We demonstrated that the CCK2i4svR is a potential target for PRRT using a radiolabelled sulfated CCK8 peptide. As this receptor is expressed on colorectal and pancreatic tumours, but not in normal tissue, these tumours are potentially new targets for PRRT with CCK8 and gastrin analogs. (orig.)

  5. PET-based compartmental modeling of {sup 124}I-A33 antibody: quantitative characterization of patient-specific tumor targeting in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzonico, Pat; O' Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Ruan, Shutian; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Stony Brook School of Medicine, Departments of Psychiatry and Radiology, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Divgi, Chaitanya [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Scott, Andrew M. [La Trobe University, Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Kemeny, Nancy E.; Wong, Douglas; Scheinberg, David [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Fong, Yuman [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); City of Hope, Department of Surgery, Duarte, CA (United States); Ritter, Gerd; Jungbluth, Achem; Old, Lloyd J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The molecular specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against tumor antigens has proven effective for targeted therapy of human cancers, as shown by a growing list of successful antibody-based drug products. We describe a novel, nonlinear compartmental model using PET-derived data to determine the ''best-fit'' parameters and model-derived quantities for optimizing biodistribution of intravenously injected {sup 124}I-labeled antitumor antibodies. As an example of this paradigm, quantitative image and kinetic analyses of anti-A33 humanized mAb (also known as ''A33'') were performed in 11 colorectal cancer patients. Serial whole-body PET scans of {sup 124}I-labeled A33 and blood samples were acquired and the resulting tissue time-activity data for each patient were fit to a nonlinear compartmental model using the SAAM II computer code. Excellent agreement was observed between fitted and measured parameters of tumor uptake, ''off-target'' uptake in bowel mucosa, blood clearance, tumor antigen levels, and percent antigen occupancy. This approach should be generally applicable to antibody-antigen systems in human tumors for which the masses of antigen-expressing tumor and of normal tissues can be estimated and for which antibody kinetics can be measured with PET. Ultimately, based on each patient's resulting ''best-fit'' nonlinear model, a patient-specific optimum mAb dose (in micromoles, for example) may be derived. (orig.)

  6. Sequence and functional analysis of the envelope glycoproteins of hepatitis C virus variants selectively transmitted to a new host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arienzo, Valentina; Moreau, Alain; D'Alteroche, Louis; Gissot, Valérie; Blanchard, Emmanuelle; Gaudy-Graffin, Catherine; Roch, Emmanuelle; Dubois, Frédéric; Giraudeau, Bruno; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Goudeau, Alain; Roingeard, Philippe; Brand, Denys

    2013-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a challenging public health problem worldwide. The identification of viral variants establishing de novo infections and definition of the phenotypic requirements for transmission would facilitate the design of preventive strategies. We explored the transmission of HCV variants in three cases of acute hepatitis following needlestick accidents. We used single-genome amplification of glycoprotein E1E2 gene sequences to map the genetic bottleneck upon transmission accurately. We found that infection was likely established by a single variant in two cases and six variants in the third case. Studies of donor samples showed that the transmitted variant E1E2 amino acid sequences were identical or closely related to those of variants from the donor virus populations. The transmitted variants harbored a common signature site at position 394, within hypervariable region 1 of E2, together with additional signature amino acids specific to each transmission pair. Surprisingly, these E1E2 variants conferred no greater capacity for entry than the E1E2 derived from nontransmitted variants in lentiviral pseudoparticle assays. Mutants escaping the antibodies of donor sera did not predominate among the transmitted variants either. The fitness parameters affecting the selective outgrowth of HCV variants after transmission in an immunocompetent host may thus be more complex than those suggested by mouse models. Human antibodies directed against HCV envelope effectively cross-neutralized the lentiviral particles bearing E1E2 derived from transmitted variants. These findings provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying HCV transmission and suggest that viral entry is a potential target for the prevention of HCV infection.

  7. Large-Scale Purification of r28M: A Bispecific scFv Antibody Targeting Human Melanoma Produced in Transgenic Cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Spiesberger

    Full Text Available 30 years ago, the potential of bispecific antibodies to engage cytotoxic T cells for the lysis of cancer cells was discovered. Today a variety of bispecific antibodies against diverse cell surface structures have been developed, the majority of them produced in mammalian cell culture systems. Beside the r28M, described here, no such bispecific antibody is known to be expressed by transgenic livestock, although various biologicals for medical needs are already harvested-mostly from the milk-of these transgenics. In this study we investigated the large-scale purification and biological activity of the bispecific antibody r28M, expressed in the blood of transgenic cattle. This tandem single-chain variable fragment antibody is designed to target human CD28 and the melanoma/glioblastoma-associated cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4.With the described optimized purification protocol an average yield of 30 mg enriched r28M fraction out of 2 liters bovine plasma could be obtained. Separation of this enriched fraction by size exclusion chromatography into monomers, dimers and aggregates and further testing regarding the biological activity revealed the monomer fraction as being the most appropriate one to continue working with. The detailed characterization of the antibody's activity confirmed its high specificity to induce the killing of CSPG4 positive cells. In addition, first insights into tumor cell death pathways mediated by r28M-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were gained. In consideration of possible applications in vivo we also tested the effect of the addition of different excipients to r28M.Summing up, we managed to purify monomeric r28M from bovine plasma in a large-scale preparation and could prove that its biological activity is unaffected and still highly specific and thus, might be applicable for the treatment of melanoma.

  8. Pan-HER - an antibody mixture targeting EGFR, HER2, and HER3 abrogates preformed and ligand-induced EGFR homo- and heterodimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Sofie; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Grandal, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abs is development of acquired resistance through mechanisms such as alterated receptor dimerization patterns and dependencies. Pan-HER is a mixture of six mAbs simultaneously targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), HER2, and HER3 with two mAbs against each receptor. Pan-HER has previously demonstrated....... The effect of Pan-HER on cell proliferation and HER-family receptor degradation was superior to treatment with single mAbs targeting either single receptor, and similar to targeting a single receptor with two non-overlapping antibodies. Furthermore, changes in EGFR-dimerization patterns after treatment......-HER and the EGFR-targeting mAb mixture also blocked EGF-binding and thereby ligand-induced changes in EGFR-dimerization levels. These results suggest that Pan-HER reduces the cellular capability to switch HER-dependency and dimerization pattern in response to treatment and thus hold promise for future clinical...

  9. Anti-HER2 antibody and ScFvEGFR-conjugated antifouling magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting and magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen H

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hongwei Chen,1,* Liya Wang,1,2,* Qiqi Yu,1,2 Weiping Qian,3 Diana Tiwari,1 Hong Yi,4 Andrew Y Wang,5 Jing Huang,1,2 Lily Yang,3 Hui Mao1,2 1Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, 2Center for Systems Imaging, 3Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, 4Robert Apkarian Electron Microscopy Core, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 5Ocean NanoTech LLC, Springdale, AK, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Antifouling magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs coated with block copolymer poly(ethylene oxide-block-poly(γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (PEO-b-PγMPS were investigated for improving cell targeting by reducing nonspecific uptake. Conjugation of a HER2 antibody, Herceptin®, or a single chain fragment (ScFv of antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (ScFvEGFR to PEO-b-PγMPS-coated IONPs resulted in HER2-targeted or EGFR-targeted IONPs (anti-HER2-IONPs or ScFvEGFR-IONPs. The anti-HER2-IONPs bound specifically to SK-BR-3, a HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cell line, but not to MDA-MB-231, a HER2-underexpressing cell line. On the other hand, the ScFvEGFR-IONPs showed strong reactivity with MDA-MB-231, an EGFR-positive human breast cancer cell line, but not with MDA-MB-453, an EGFR-negative human breast cancer cell line. Transmission electron microscopy revealed internalization of the receptor-targeted nanoparticles by the targeted cancer cells. In addition, both antibody-conjugated and non-antibody-conjugated IONPs showed reduced nonspecific uptake by RAW264.7 mouse macrophages in vitro. The developed IONPs showed a long blood circulation time (serum half-life 11.6 hours in mice and low accumulation in both the liver and spleen. At 24 hours after systemic administration of ScFvEGFR-IONPs into mice bearing EGFR-positive breast cancer 4T1 mouse mammary tumors, magnetic resonance imaging revealed signal reduction in the tumor as a result of the accumulation of the targeted IONPs

  10. Humoral Immune Pressure Selects for HIV-1 CXC-chemokine Receptor 4-using Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although both C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5- and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4-using HIV-1 strains cause AIDS, the emergence of CXCR4-utilizing variants is associated with an accelerated decline in CD4+ T cells. It remains uncertain if CXCR4-using viruses hasten disease or if these variants only emerge after profound immunological damage. We show that exclusively CXCR4- as compared to cocirculating CCR5-utilizing variants are less sensitive to neutralization by both contemporaneous autologous plasma and plasma pools from individuals that harbor only CCR5-using HIV-1. The CXCR4-utilizing variants, however, do not have a global antigenic change because they remain equivalently susceptible to antibodies that do not target coreceptor binding domains. Studies with envelope V3 loop directed antibodies and chimeric envelopes suggest that the neutralization susceptibility differences are potentially influenced by the V3 loop. In vitro passage of a neutralization sensitive CCR5-using virus in the presence of autologous plasma and activated CD4+ T cells led to the emergence of a CXCR4-utilizing virus in 1 of 3 cases. These results suggest that in some but not necessarily all HIV-1 infected individuals humoral immune pressure against the autologous virus selects for CXCR4-using variants, which potentially accelerates disease progression. Our observations have implications for using antibodies for HIV-1 immune therapy.

  11. Humoral Immune Pressure Selects for HIV-1 CXC-chemokine Receptor 4-using Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nina; Gonzalez, Oscar A; Registre, Ludy; Becerril, Carlos; Etemad, Behzad; Lu, Hong; Wu, Xueling; Lockman, Shahin; Essex, Myron; Moyo, Sikhulile; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Sagar, Manish

    2016-06-01

    Although both C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)- and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4)-using HIV-1 strains cause AIDS, the emergence of CXCR4-utilizing variants is associated with an accelerated decline in CD4+ T cells. It remains uncertain if CXCR4-using viruses hasten disease or if these variants only emerge after profound immunological damage. We show that exclusively CXCR4- as compared to cocirculating CCR5-utilizing variants are less sensitive to neutralization by both contemporaneous autologous plasma and plasma pools from individuals that harbor only CCR5-using HIV-1. The CXCR4-utilizing variants, however, do not have a global antigenic change because they remain equivalently susceptible to antibodies that do not target coreceptor binding domains. Studies with envelope V3 loop directed antibodies and chimeric envelopes suggest that the neutralization susceptibility differences are potentially influenced by the V3 loop. In vitro passage of a neutralization sensitive CCR5-using virus in the presence of autologous plasma and activated CD4+ T cells led to the emergence of a CXCR4-utilizing virus in 1 of 3 cases. These results suggest that in some but not necessarily all HIV-1 infected individuals humoral immune pressure against the autologous virus selects for CXCR4-using variants, which potentially accelerates disease progression. Our observations have implications for using antibodies for HIV-1 immune therapy.

  12. Antibody-Based Strategies to Prevent and Treat Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram eSasisekharan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Passive immunization using antibodies has been suggested to offer several benefits in comparison to other antiviral treatment options. The potential for seasonal protection arising from a single injection of antibodies is appealing and has been pursued for a number of infectious agents. However, until recently, antibody-based strategies to combat infectious agents has been hampered due to the fact that typical antibodies have been found to be strain-specific, with the virus evolving resistance in many cases. The discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs in, for example, influenza, dengue virus, and HIV, which bind to multiple, structurally-diverse strains has provided renewed interest in this area. This review will focus on new technologies that enable the discovery of bNAbs, the challenges and opportunities of immunotherapies as an important addition to existing antiviral therapy, and the role of antibody discovery in informing rational vaccine discovery – with agents targeting influenza specifically addressed. Multiple agents have entered the clinic and raise the possibility that a single antibody or small combination of antibodies can effectively neutralize a wide variety of strains. However, challenges remain - including combating escape variants, pharmacodynamics of antibody distribution, and development of efficacy biomarkers beyond virologic endpoints.

  13. Double-peak elution profile of a monoclonal antibody in cation exchange chromatography is caused by histidine-protonation-based charge variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haibin; Cao, Mingyan; Newell, Kelcy; Afdahl, Christopher; Wang, Jihong; Wang, William K; Li, Yuling

    2015-12-11

    We have systemically investigated unusual elution behaviors of an IgG4 (mAb A) in cation exchange chromatography (CEX). This mAb A exhibited two elution peaks under certain conditions when being purified by several strong CEX columns. When either of the two peaks was isolated and re-injected on the same column, the similar pattern was observed again during elution. The protein distribution between the two peaks could be altered by NaCl concentration in the feed, or NaCl concentration in wash buffer, or elution pH, suggesting two pH-associated strong-and-weak binding configurations. The protein distributions under different pH values showed good correlation with protonated/un-protonated fractions of a histidine residue. These results suggest that the double-peak elution profile associates with histidine-protonation-based charge variants. By conducting pepsin digestion, amino-acid specific chemical modifications, peptide mapping, and measuring the effects of elution residence time, a histidine in the variable fragment (Fab) was identified to be the root cause. Besides double-peak pattern, mAb A can also exhibit peak-shouldering or single elution peak on different CEX resins, reflecting different resins' resolving capability on protonated/un-protonated forms. This work characterizes a novel cause for unusual elution behaviors in CEX and also provides alternative avenues of purification development for mAbs with similar behaviors.

  14. Targeted therapy with bispecific single chain antibodies for acute leukemia%双特异单链抗体靶向治疗急性白血病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔鹤; 张王刚

    2015-01-01

    目前除急性早幼粒细胞白血病(acute promyelocytic leukemia,APL)以外的急性白血病( acute leukemia,AL)疗效堪忧,急需研发新的治疗药物。采用基因工程抗体技术制备的双特异性单链抗体能同时结合两个特异性抗原,与其他抗体药物相比有明显的优越性,是一种有很好临床应用前景的免疫治疗药物,本文对双特异性单链抗体靶向治疗急性白血病的最新进展做一综述。%At present,there is a urgent need to develop new drugs for acute leukemia patients because of their poor effect except for acute promyelocytic leukemia. The bispecific single chain antibodies can combine with two specific antigens using gene engineering antibody technology,show more obvious advantage than other antibody drugs,and po-tential prospect in clinical application. We described the current new targeted therapy with bispecific single chain anti-bodies for acute leukemia in this article.

  15. Acquisition and decay of antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that protect against placental parasitemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, T; Megnekou, R; Fievét, N

    2001-01-01

    Otherwise clinically immune women in areas endemic for malaria are highly susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria during their first pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is characterized by placental accumulation of infected erythrocytes that adhere to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). S...... adhesion to CSA. Data suggest that VSA(CSA) is a target for vaccination against PAM....

  16. Restoring apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by targeting the nuclear factor-kappaB signaling pathway with the anti-epidermal growth factor antibody IMC-C225.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclabas, Guido M; Fujioka, Shuichi; Schmidt, Christian; Fan, Zhen; Evans, Douglas B; Chiao, Paul J

    2003-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that RelA is constitutively activated in the majority of human pancreatic cancers and plays an important role in tumorigenesis and metastasis. The antiapoptotic gene bcl-xl is a downstream target of RelA, and regulation of bcl-xl transcription is mediated directly by the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) binding sites present in the upstream promoter element of the bcl-xl gene. In this study we investigated the effects of inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway with the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody IMC-C225 on constitutive NF-kappaB activation and regulation of apoptosis-related genes in human pancreatic cancer cells. We found that activation of EGFR can be blocked with the anti-EGFR antibody IMC-C225 in the human pancreatic cancer cell line MDA Panc-28, leading to a marked decrease in constitutive NF-kappaB DNA binding activity. Our data also suggest that downregulation of NF-kappaB DNA binding activity by IMC-C225 leads to a decrease in bcl-xl and bfl-1 expression. Therefore, targeting the NF-kappaB signaling pathway with an anti-EGFR antibody may be one strategy to restore apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells, thereby enhancing the effect of chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  17. SGN-CD33A: a novel CD33-targeting antibody-drug conjugate using a pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer is active in models of drug-resistant AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung Sutherland, May S; Walter, Roland B; Jeffrey, Scott C; Burke, Patrick J; Yu, Changpu; Kostner, Heather; Stone, Ivan; Ryan, Maureen C; Sussman, Django; Lyon, Robert P; Zeng, Weiping; Harrington, Kimberly H; Klussman, Kerry; Westendorf, Lori; Meyer, David; Bernstein, Irwin D; Senter, Peter D; Benjamin, Dennis R; Drachman, Jonathan G; McEarchern, Julie A

    2013-08-22

    Outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain unsatisfactory, and novel treatments are urgently needed. One strategy explores antibodies and their drug conjugates, particularly those targeting CD33. Emerging data with gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) demonstrate target validity and activity in some patients with AML, but efficacy is limited by heterogeneous drug conjugation, linker instability, and a high incidence of multidrug resistance. We describe here the development of SGN-CD33A, a humanized anti-CD33 antibody with engineered cysteines conjugated to a highly potent, synthetic DNA cross-linking pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer via a protease-cleavable linker. The use of engineered cysteine residues at the sites of drug linker attachment results in a drug loading of approximately 2 pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimers per antibody. In preclinical testing, SGN-CD33A is more potent than GO against a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML cells in vitro and in xenotransplantation studies in mice. Unlike GO, antileukemic activity is observed with SGN-CD33A in AML models with the multidrug-resistant phenotype. Mechanistic studies indicate that the cytotoxic effects of SGN-CD33A involve DNA damage with ensuing cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. Together, these data suggest that SGN-CD33A has CD33-directed antitumor activity and support clinical testing of this novel therapeutic in patients with AML.

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Brazilian subtype B variant showed an increasing avidity of the anti-V3 antibodies over time compared to the subtype B US/European strain in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casseb Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian variant of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 subtype B, (serotype B"-GWGR, has a tryptophan replacing the proline in position 328 the HIV-1 envelope. A longer median time period from infection to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS for serotype B (B"-GWGR infected subjects compared to the B-GPGR US/European strain was reported. In a cohort study, in São Paulo city, 10 B"-GWGR patients had a statistically significant increased avidity of the anti-V3 antibodies, from 79% ± 33% to 85% ± 75%, versus from 48% ± 59% to 32% ± 17% for the 10 B-GPGR subjects (p = 0.02. The T CD4+ cells showed a mean increase of + 0.45 cells/month for the B-GPGR subjects and for B"-GWGR the slope was + 1.24 cells/month (p = 0.06, for 62 and 55 months of follow up, respectively. RNA plasma viral load decreased from 3.98 ± 1.75 to 2.16 ± 1.54 log10 in the B"-GWGR group while B-GPGR patients showed one log10 reduction in viral load from 4.09 ± 0.38 to 3.17 ± 1.47 log10 over time (p = 0.23, with a decreasing slope of 0.0042 ± log10,/month and 0.0080 ± log10/month, for B-GPGR and B"-GWGR patients, respectively (p = 0.53. Neither group presented any AIDS defining events during the study, according to Center for Diseases Control criteria. Although the sample size is small, these results may indicate that differences in the pathogenicity of the 2 HIV-1 B serotypes which co-circulate in Brazil may be correlated to the avidity of anti-V3 antibodies.

  19. Antibody-mediated targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles to the folate receptor alpha increases tumor cell association in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndong C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Christian Ndong,1 Seiko Toraya-Brown,2 Katsiaryna Kekalo,1 Ian Baker,1 Tillman U Gerngross,1,3,4 Steven N Fiering,2,5,6 Karl E Griswold1,3,6 1Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; 3Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; 4Department of Chemistry, Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; 5Department of Genetics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; 6Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, NH, USA Abstract: Active molecular targeting has become an important aspect of nanoparticle development for oncology indications. Here, we describe molecular targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs to the folate receptor alpha (FOLRα using an engineered antibody fragment (Ffab. Compared to control nanoparticles targeting the non-relevant botulinum toxin, the Ffab-IONP constructs selectively accumulated on FOLRα-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro, where they exhibited the capacity to internalize into intracellular vesicles. Similarly, Ffab-IONPs homed to FOLRα-positive tumors upon intraperitoneal administration in an orthotopic murine xenograft model of ovarian cancer, whereas negative control particles showed no detectable tumor accumulation. Interestingly, Ffab-IONPs built with custom 120 nm nanoparticles exhibited lower in vitro targeting efficiency when compared to those built with commercially sourced 180 nm nanoparticles. In vivo, however, the two Ffab-IONP platforms achieved equivalent tumor homing, although the smaller 120 nm IONPs were more prone to liver sequestration. Overall, the results show that Ffab-mediated targeting of IONPs yields specific, high-level accumulation within cancer cells, and this fact suggests that Ffab-IONPs could have future utility in ovarian cancer diagnostics and therapy. Keywords: nanoparticle targeting, antibody fragment, biodistribution, ovarian cancer

  20. The antibody mining toolbox

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew RM; Kiss, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput ...

  1. Anti-Yo antibody uptake and interaction with its intracellular target antigen causes Purkinje cell death in rat cerebellar slice cultures: a possible mechanism for paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in humans with gynecological or breast cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E Greenlee

    Full Text Available Anti-Yo antibodies are immunoglobulin G (IgG autoantibodies reactive with a 62 kDa Purkinje cell cytoplasmic protein. These antibodies are closely associated with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in the setting of gynecological and breast malignancies. We have previously demonstrated that incubation of rat cerebellar slice cultures with patient sera and cerebrospinal fluid containing anti-Yo antibodies resulted in Purkinje cell death. The present study addressed three fundamental questions regarding the role of anti-Yo antibodies in disease pathogenesis: 1 Whether the Purkinje cell cytotoxicity required binding of anti-Yo antibody to its intraneuronal 62 kDa target antigen; 2 whether Purkinje cell death might be initiated by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity rather than intracellular antibody binding; and 3 whether Purkinje cell death might simply be a more general result of intracellular antibody accumulation, rather than of specific antibody-antigen interaction. In our study, incubation of rat cerebellar slice cultures with anti-Yo IgG resulted in intracellular antibody binding, and cell death. Infiltration of the Purkinje cell layer by cells of macrophage/microglia lineage was not observed until extensive cell death was already present. Adsorption of anti-Yo IgG with its 62 kDa target antigen abolished both antibody accumulation and cytotoxicity. Antibodies to other intracellular Purkinje cell proteins were also taken up by Purkinje cells and accumulated intracellularly; these included calbindin, calmodulin, PCP-2, and patient anti-Purkinje cell antibodies not reactive with the 62 kDa Yo antigen. However, intracellular accumulation of these antibodies did not affect Purkinje cell viability. The present study is the first to demonstrate that anti-Yo antibodies cause Purkinje cell death by binding to the intracellular 62 kDa Yo antigen. Anti-Yo antibody cytotoxicity did not involve other antibodies or factors present in patient

  2. A comparison of the performance of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for small molecule targets and antibodies in the ELISA format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinska-Kempisty, Katarzyna; Guerreiro, Antonio; Canfarotta, Francesco; Cáceres, César; Whitcombe, Michael J.; Piletsky, Sergey

    2016-11-01

    Here we show that molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles, prepared in aqueous media by solid phase synthesis with immobilised L-thyroxine, glucosamine, fumonisin B2 or biotin as template, can demonstrate comparable or better performance to commercially produced antibodies in enzyme-linked competitive assays. Imprinted nanoparticles-based assays showed detection limits in the pM range and polymer-coated microplates are stable to storage at room temperature for at least 1 month. No response to analyte was detected in control experiments with nanoparticles imprinted with an unrelated template (trypsin) but prepared with the same polymer composition. The ease of preparation, high affinity of solid-phase synthesised imprinted nanoparticles and the lack of requirement for cold chain logistics make them an attractive alternative to traditional antibodies for use in immunoassays.

  3. Multiple antibody targets on herpes B glycoproteins B and D identified by screening sera of infected rhesus macaques with peptide microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Kevin Hotop

    Full Text Available Herpes B virus (or Herpesvirus simiae or Macacine herpesvirus 1 is endemic in many populations of macaques, both in the wild and in captivity. The virus elicits only mild clinical symptoms (if any in monkeys, but can be transmitted by various routes, most commonly via bites, to humans where it causes viral encephalitis with a high mortality rate. Hence, herpes B constitutes a considerable occupational hazard for animal caretakers, veterinarians and laboratory personnel. Efforts are therefore being made to reduce the risk of zoonotic infection and to improve prognosis after accidental exposure. Among the measures envisaged are serological surveillance of monkey colonies and specific diagnosis of herpes B zoonosis against a background of antibodies recognizing the closely related human herpes simplex virus (HSV. 422 pentadecapeptides covering, in an overlapping fashion, the entire amino acid sequences of herpes B proteins gB and gD were synthesized and immobilized on glass slides. Antibodies present in monkey sera that bind to subsets of the peptide collection were detected by microserological techniques. With 42 different rhesus macaque sera, 114 individual responses to 18 different antibody target regions (ATRs were recorded, 17 of which had not been described earlier. This finding may pave the way for a peptide-based, herpes B specific serological diagnostic test.

  4. Intracellular Targeting of CEA Results in Th1-Type Antibody Responses Following Intradermal Genetic Vaccination by a Needle-Free Jet Injection Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Johansson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The route and method of immunization, as well as the cellular localization of the antigen, can influence the generation of an immune response. In general, intramuscular immunization results in Th1 responses, whereas intradermal delivery of DNA by gene gun immunization often results in more Th2 responses. Here we investigate how altering the cellular localization of the tumor antigen CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen affects the quality and amplitude of DNA vaccine-induced antibody responses in mice following intradermal delivery of DNA by a needle-free jet injection device (Biojector. CEA was expressed either in a membrane-bound form (wild-type CEA or in two truncated forms (CEA6 and CEA66 with cytoplasmic localization, where CEA66 was fused to a promiscuous T-helper epitope from tetanus toxin. Repeated intradermal immunization of BALB/c mice with DNA encoding wild-type CEA produced high antibody titers of a mixed IgG1/IgG2a ratio. In contrast, utilizing the DNA construct that resulted in intracellular targeting of CEA led to a reduced capacity to induce CEA-specific antibodies, but instead induced a Th1-biased immune response.

  5. Targeted sequencing identifies a novel SH2D1A pathogenic variant in a Chinese family: Carrier screening and prenatal genetic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Yao; Li, Shu-Yuan; Zhang, Lan-Lan; Shen, Ying-Hua; Chang, Chun-Xin; Xiang, Yu-Qian; Huang, He-Feng; Xu, Chen-Ming

    2017-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease type 1 (XLP1) is a rare primary immunodeficiency characterized by a clinical triad consisting of severe EBV-induced hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, B-cell lymphoma, and dysgammaglobulinemia. Mutations in SH2D1A gene have been revealed as the cause of XLP1. In this study, a pregnant woman with recurrence history of birthing immunodeficiency was screened for pathogenic variant because the proband sample was unavailable. We aimed to clarify the genetic diagnosis and provide prenatal testing for the family. Next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based multigene panel was used in carrier screening of the pregnant woman. Variants of immunodeficiency related genes were analyzed and prioritized. Candidate variant was verified by using Sanger sequencing. The possible influence of the identified variant was evaluated through RNA assay. Amniocentesis, karyotyping, and Sanger sequencing were performed for prenatal testing. We identified a novel de novo frameshift SH2D1A pathogenic variant (c.251_255delTTTCA) in the pregnant carrier. Peripheral blood RNA assay indicated that the mutant transcript could escape nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and might encode a C-terminal truncated protein. Information of the variant led to success prenatal diagnosis of the fetus. In conclusion, our study clarified the genetic diagnosis and altered disease prevention for a pregnant carrier of XLP1. PMID:28231257

  6. Plasmodium vivax VIR Proteins Are Targets of Naturally-Acquired Antibody and T Cell Immune Responses to Malaria in Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Pilar; Rui, Edmilson; Padilla, Norma; Martínez-Espinosa, Flor E.; Castellanos, Maria Eugenia; Bôtto-Menezes, Camila; Malheiro, Adriana; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Kochar, Swati; Kochar, Sanjay K.; Kochar, Dhanpat K.; Umbers, Alexandra J.; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Wangnapi, Regina; Hans, Dhiraj; Menegon, Michela; Mateo, Francesca; Sanz, Sergi; Desai, Meghna; Mayor, Alfredo; Chitnis, Chetan C.; Bardají, Azucena; Mueller, Ivo; Rogerson, Stephen; Severini, Carlo; Fernández-Becerra, Carmen; Menéndez, Clara

    2016-01-01

    P. vivax infection during pregnancy has been associated with poor outcomes such as anemia, low birth weight and congenital malaria, thus representing an important global health problem. However, no vaccine is currently available for its prevention. Vir genes were the first putative virulent factors associated with P. vivax infections, yet very few studies have examined their potential role as targets of immunity. We investigated the immunogenic properties of five VIR proteins and two long synthetic peptides containing conserved VIR sequences (PvLP1 and PvLP2) in the context of the PregVax cohort study including women from five malaria endemic countries: Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, India and Papua New Guinea (PNG) at different timepoints during and after pregnancy. Antibody responses against all antigens were detected in all populations, with PNG women presenting the highest levels overall. P. vivax infection at sample collection time was positively associated with antibody levels against PvLP1 (fold-increase: 1.60 at recruitment -first antenatal visit-) and PvLP2 (fold-increase: 1.63 at delivery), and P. falciparum co-infection was found to increase those responses (for PvLP1 at recruitment, fold-increase: 2.25). Levels of IgG against two VIR proteins at delivery were associated with higher birth weight (27 g increase per duplicating antibody levels, p<0.05). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from PNG uninfected pregnant women had significantly higher antigen-specific IFN-γ TH1 responses (p=0.006) and secreted less pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-6 after PvLP2 stimulation than P. vivax-infected women (p<0.05). These data demonstrate that VIR antigens induce the natural acquisition of antibody and T cell memory responses that might be important in immunity to P. vivax during pregnancy in very diverse geographical settings. PMID:27711158

  7. Impact of Cell-surface Antigen Expression on Target Engagement and Function of an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor × c-MET Bispecific Antibody*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarantow, Stephen W.; Bushey, Barbara S.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Boakye, Ken; Lacy, Eilyn R.; Sanders, Renouard; Sepulveda, Manuel A.; Moores, Sheri L.; Chiu, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of engaging multiple drug targets using bispecific antibodies (BsAbs) is affected by the relative cell-surface protein levels of the respective targets. In this work, the receptor density values were correlated to the in vitro activity of a BsAb (JNJ-61186372) targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-MET). Simultaneous binding of the BsAb to both receptors was confirmed in vitro. By using controlled Fab-arm exchange, a set of BsAbs targeting EGFR and c-MET was generated to establish an accurate receptor quantitation of a panel of lung and gastric cancer cell lines expressing heterogeneous levels of EGFR and c-MET. EGFR and c-MET receptor density levels were correlated to the respective gene expression levels as well as to the respective receptor phosphorylation inhibition values. We observed a bias in BsAb binding toward the more highly expressed of the two receptors, EGFR or c-MET, which resulted in the enhanced in vitro potency of JNJ-61186372 against the less highly expressed target. On the basis of these observations, we propose an avidity model of how JNJ-61186372 engages EGFR and c-MET with potentially broad implications for bispecific drug efficacy and design. PMID:26260789

  8. Impact of Cell-surface Antigen Expression on Target Engagement and Function of an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor × c-MET Bispecific Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarantow, Stephen W; Bushey, Barbara S; Pardinas, Jose R; Boakye, Ken; Lacy, Eilyn R; Sanders, Renouard; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Moores, Sheri L; Chiu, Mark L

    2015-10-09

    The efficacy of engaging multiple drug targets using bispecific antibodies (BsAbs) is affected by the relative cell-surface protein levels of the respective targets. In this work, the receptor density values were correlated to the in vitro activity of a BsAb (JNJ-61186372) targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-MET). Simultaneous binding of the BsAb to both receptors was confirmed in vitro. By using controlled Fab-arm exchange, a set of BsAbs targeting EGFR and c-MET was generated to establish an accurate receptor quantitation of a panel of lung and gastric cancer cell lines expressing heterogeneous levels of EGFR and c-MET. EGFR and c-MET receptor density levels were correlated to the respective gene expression levels as well as to the respective receptor phosphorylation inhibition values. We observed a bias in BsAb binding toward the more highly expressed of the two receptors, EGFR or c-MET, which resulted in the enhanced in vitro potency of JNJ-61186372 against the less highly expressed target. On the basis of these observations, we propose an avidity model of how JNJ-61186372 engages EGFR and c-MET with potentially broad implications for bispecific drug efficacy and design.

  9. Secretory expression of a bispecific antibody targeting tumor necrosis factor and ED-B fibronectin in Pichia pastoris and its functional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-yuan; Hu, Xue-ping; Xie, Mian; Jiang, Si-jing; Li, Lu-jun; Liu, Dong-xu; Yang, Xiao-song

    2014-12-01

    Specific targeting of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonist to the inflamed site could increase its efficacy and reduce side-effects. Here, we constructed a bispecific diabody (BsDb) that targets TNF-α and ED-B-containing fibronectin, a fibronectin isoform specifically expressed in the pannus of the inflamed synovium in rheumatoid arthritis. BsDb was secreted from Pichia pastoris as functional protein and was purified to homogeneity. BsDb could simultaneously bind to human TNF-α and B-FN and neutralize TNF-α action. Additionally, BsDb showed a significant gain both in the antigen-binding affinity and in TNF-α-neutralizing ability as compared to its original antibodies, L19 and anti-TNF-α scFv, which were produced in E. coli. BsDb was constructed and was endowed with enhanced bioactivities and improved production processing. Therefore, it holds great potential for in vivo applications.

  10. Affinity Maturation of an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeting Human Monoclonal Antibody ER414 by CDR Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Min-Soo; Hong, Gwang-Won; Seo, Mi-Sun; Shin, Yong-Nam; Kim, Se-Ho

    2012-08-01

    It is well established that blocking the interaction of EGFR with growth factors leads to the arrest of tumor growth, resulting in tumor cell death. ER414 is a human monoclonal antibody (mAb) derived by guided selection of the mouse mAb A13. The ER414 exhibited a ~17-fold lower affinity and, as a result, lower efficacy of inhibition of the EGF-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR when compared with mAb A13 and cetuximab. We performed a stepwise in vitro affinity maturation to improve the affinity of ER414. We obtained a 3D model of ER414 to identify the amino acids in the CDRs that needed to be mutated. Clones were selected from the phage library with randomized amino acids in the CDRs and substitution of amino acids in the HCDR3 and LCDR1 of ER414 led to improved affinity. A clone, H3-14, with a ~20-fold increased affinity, was selected from the HCDR3 randomized library. Then three clones, ER2, ER78 and ER79, were selected from the LCDR1 randomized library based on the H3-14 but did not show further increased affinities compared to that of H3-14. Of the three, ER2 was chosen for further characterization due to its better expression than others. We successfully performed affinity maturation of ER414 and obtained antibodies with a similar affinity as cetuximab. And antibody from an affinity maturation inhibits the EGF-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR in a manner similar to cetuximab.

  11. Affinity Maturation of an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeting Human Monoclonal Antibody ER414 by CDR Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that blocking the interaction of EGFR with growth factors leads to the arrest of tumor growth, resulting in tumor cell death. ER414 is a human monoclonal antibody (mAb) derived by guided selection of the mouse mAb A13. The ER414 exhibited a ~17-fold lower affinity and, as a result, lower efficacy of inhibition of the EGF-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR when compared with mAb A13 and cetuximab. We performed a stepwise in vitro affinity maturation to improve the...

  12. Efficient method to optimize antibodies using avian leukosis virus display and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changming; Pike, Gennett M; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Correia, Cristina; Kaufmann, Scott H; Federspiel, Mark J

    2015-08-11

    Antibody-based therapeutics have now had success in the clinic. The affinity and specificity of the antibody for the target ligand determines the specificity of therapeutic delivery and off-target side effects. The discovery and optimization of high-affinity antibodies to important therapeutic targets could be significantly improved by the availability of a robust, eukaryotic display technology comparable to phage display that would overcome the protein translation limitations of microorganisms. The use of eukaryotic cells would improve the diversity of the displayed antibodies that can be screened and optimized as well as more seamlessly transition into a large-scale mammalian expression system for clinical production. In this study, we demonstrate that the replication and polypeptide display characteristics of a eukaryotic retrovirus, avian leukosis virus (ALV), offers a robust, eukaryotic version of bacteriophage display. The binding affinity of a model single-chain Fv antibody was optimized by using ALV display, improving affinity >2,000-fold, from micromolar to picomolar levels. We believe ALV display provides an extension to antibody display on microorganisms and offers virus and cell display platforms in a eukaryotic expression system. ALV display should enable an improvement in the diversity of properly processed and functional antibody variants that can be screened and affinity-optimized to improve promising antibody candidates.

  13. Comparative targeting of human colon-carcinoma multicell spheroids using one- and two-step (bispecific antibody) techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devys, A; Thedrez, P; Gautherot, E; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Saï-Maurel, C; Rouvier, E; Auget, J L; Barbet, J; Chatal, J F

    1996-09-17

    In the perspective of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of micrometastases, we compared, in multicell spheroids (MS), the uptake and retention kinetics of 125I-F(ab)'2 F6 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody (MAb), and the affinity enhancement system (AES) using an anti-CEA/anti-DTPA-indium bispecific antibody (BsMAb) and a 125I-labeled di-DTPA-In-tyrosine-lysine bivalent hapten. We used MS of colorectal tumor cell lines expressing CEA strongly (LS 174T), weakly (HT-29) or not at all (HRT-18). Uptake and retention kinetics of 125I-F(ab)'2 F6 and 125I-BsMAb used alone gave similar results. The highest uptake values, obtained with LS 174T MS, were slightly lower with AES than with 125I-F(ab)'2 F6. However, effective retention half-lives were longer for AES than for 125I-F(ab)'2 F6 or for 111In-labeled monovalent hapten after pre-incubation of spheroids with BsMAb. Autoradiography showed the same slow and heterogeneous distribution of 125I-F(ab)'2 F6 and 125I-BsMAb. These results indicate that the 2-step technique is more favorable for RIT: uptake values were approximately the same but uptake kinetics were more rapid, and retention half-life was longer than with the one-step technique.

  14. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Jin [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); New Drug Development Center, Osong Medical Innovation Foundation, Cheongwon, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Suhwan [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa [BK21-plus, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok, E-mail: sskoh@dau.ac.kr [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  15. Therapeutic targeting of tumor growth and angiogenesis with a novel anti-S100A4 monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Hernández

    Full Text Available S100A4, a member of the S100 calcium-binding protein family secreted by tumor and stromal cells, supports tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis. We demonstrated that S100A4 synergizes with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, via the RAGE receptor, in promoting endothelial cell migration by increasing KDR expression and MMP-9 activity. In vivo overexpression of S100A4 led to a significant increase in tumor growth and vascularization in a human melanoma xenograft M21 model. Conversely, when silencing S100A4 by shRNA technology, a dramatic decrease in tumor development of the pancreatic MiaPACA-2 cell line was observed. Based on these results we developed 5C3, a neutralizing monoclonal antibody against S100A4. This antibody abolished endothelial cell migration, tumor growth and angiogenesis in immunodeficient mouse xenograft models of MiaPACA-2 and M21-S100A4 cells. It is concluded that extracellular S100A4 inhibition is an attractive approach for the treatment of human cancer.

  16. The antibody targeting the E314 peptide of human Kv1.3 pore region serves as a novel, potent and specific channel blocker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Fang Yang

    Full Text Available Selective blockade of Kv1.3 channels in effector memory T (T(EM cells was validated to ameliorate autoimmune or autoimmune-associated diseases. We generated the antibody directed against one peptide of human Kv1.3 (hKv1.3 extracellular loop as a novel and possible Kv1.3 blocker. One peptide of hKv1.3 extracellular loop E3 containing 14 amino acids (E314 was chosen as an antigenic determinant to generate the E314 antibody. The E314 antibody specifically recognized 63.8KD protein stably expressed in hKv1.3-HEK 293 cell lines, whereas it did not recognize or cross-react to human Kv1.1(hKv1.1, Kv1.2(hKv1.2, Kv1.4(hKv1.4, Kv1.5(hKv1.5, KCa3.1(hKCa3.1, HERG, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1, Nav1.5 and Cav1.2 proteins stably expressed in HEK 293 cell lines or in human atrial or ventricular myocytes by Western blotting analysis and immunostaining detection. By the technique of whole-cell patch clamp, the E314 antibody was shown to have a directly inhibitory effect on hKv1.3 currents expressed in HEK 293 or Jurkat T cells and the inhibition showed a concentration-dependence. However, it exerted no significant difference on hKv1.1, hKv1.2, hKv1.4, hKv1.5, hKCa3.1, HERG, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1, L-type Ca(2+ or voltage-gated Na(+ currents. The present study demonstrates that the antibody targeting the E314 peptide of hKv1.3 pore region could be a novel, potent and specific hKv1.3 blocker without affecting a variety of closely related K(v1 channels, KCa3.1 channels and functional cardiac ion channels underlying central nervous system (CNS disorders or drug-acquired arrhythmias, which is required as a safe clinic-promising channel blocker.

  17. The spike protein of the emerging betacoronavirus EMC uses a novel coronavirus receptor for entry, can be activated by TMPRSS2, and is targeted by neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierer, Stefanie; Bertram, Stephanie; Kaup, Franziska; Wrensch, Florian; Heurich, Adeline; Krämer-Kühl, Annika; Welsch, Kathrin; Winkler, Michael; Meyer, Benjamin; Drosten, Christian; Dittmer, Ulf; von Hahn, Thomas; Simmons, Graham; Hofmann, Heike; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    The novel human coronavirus EMC (hCoV-EMC), which recently emerged in Saudi Arabia, is highly pathogenic and could pose a significant threat to public health. The elucidation of hCoV-EMC interactions with host cells is critical to our understanding of the pathogenesis of this virus and to the identification of targets for antiviral intervention. Here we investigated the viral and cellular determinants governing hCoV-EMC entry into host cells. We found that the spike protein of hCoV-EMC (EMC-S) is incorporated into lentiviral particles and mediates transduction of human cell lines derived from different organs, including the lungs, kidneys, and colon, as well as primary human macrophages. Expression of the known coronavirus receptors ACE2, CD13, and CEACAM1 did not facilitate EMC-S-driven transduction, suggesting that hCoV-EMC uses a novel receptor for entry. Directed protease expression and inhibition analyses revealed that TMPRSS2 and endosomal cathepsins activate EMC-S for virus-cell fusion and constitute potential targets for antiviral intervention. Finally, EMC-S-driven transduction was abrogated by serum from an hCoV-EMC-infected patient, indicating that EMC-S-specific neutralizing antibodies can be generated in patients. Collectively, our results indicate that hCoV-EMC uses a novel receptor for protease-activated entry into human cells and might be capable of extrapulmonary spread. In addition, they define TMPRSS2 and cathepsins B and L as potential targets for intervention and suggest that neutralizing antibodies contribute to the control of hCoV-EMC infection.

  18. Antibody-drug conjugates: targeting melanoma with cisplatin encapsulated in protein-cage nanoparticles based on human ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falvo, Elisabetta; Tremante, Elisa; Fraioli, Rocco; Leonetti, Carlo; Zamparelli, Carlotta; Boffi, Alberto; Morea, Veronica; Ceci, Pierpaolo; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2013-11-01

    A novel antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) was synthesized incorporating ferritin-based nanoparticles. An average of three molecules of monoclonal antibody (mAb) Ep1 to the human melanoma-specific antigen CSPG4 were conjugated to a single ferritin cage encapsulating about 50 cisplatin molecules (HFt-Pt-Ep1). The HFt-Pt-Ep1 nanoparticle had an estimated molecular size of about 900 kD and 33 nm, and flow cytometry demonstrated specific binding to a CSPG4+ melanoma cell line, but not to a CSPG4- breast carcinoma cell line. As compared to the cisplatin-containing ferritin nanoparticle alone (HFt-Pt), which inhibited thymidine incorporation more efficiently in breast carcinoma than melanoma cells, the mAb-derivatized HFt-Pt-Ep1 nanoparticle had a 25-fold preference for the latter. A similar preference for melanoma was observed upon systemic intravenous administration of HFt-Pt-Ep1 to nude mice xenotransplanted with pre-established, palpable melanoma and breast carcinoma tumors. Thus, we have been able to determine precise combinations and stoichiometric relationships between mAbs and nanoparticle protein cages, whereby the latter lose their tropism for ubiquitously distributed cellular receptors, and acquire instead remarkably lineage-selective binding. HFt-Pt-Ep1 is therefore an interesting model to improve the therapeutic index of antiblastic therapy in a tumor such as melanoma, which at its advanced stages is totally refractory to mono- and combination-chemotherapy.A novel antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) was synthesized incorporating ferritin-based nanoparticles. An average of three molecules of monoclonal antibody (mAb) Ep1 to the human melanoma-specific antigen CSPG4 were conjugated to a single ferritin cage encapsulating about 50 cisplatin molecules (HFt-Pt-Ep1). The HFt-Pt-Ep1 nanoparticle had an estimated molecular size of about 900 kD and 33 nm, and flow cytometry demonstrated specific binding to a CSPG4+ melanoma cell line, but not to a CSPG4- breast carcinoma cell

  19. Novel camelid antibody fragments targeting recombinant nucleoprotein of Araucaria hantavirus: a prototype for an early diagnosis of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya S Pereira

    Full Text Available In addition to conventional antibodies, camelids produce immunoglobulins G composed exclusively of heavy chains in which the antigen binding site is formed only by single domains called VHH. Their particular characteristics make VHHs interesting tools for drug-delivery, passive immunotherapy and high-throughput diagnosis. Hantaviruses are rodent-borne viruses of the Bunyaviridae family. Two clinical forms of the infection are known. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS is present in the Old World, while Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS is found on the American continent. There is no specific treatment for HPS and its diagnosis is carried out by molecular or serological techniques, using mainly monoclonal antibodies or hantavirus nucleoprotein (N to detect IgM and IgG in patient serum. This study proposes the use of camelid VHHs to develop alternative methods for diagnosing and confirming HPS. Phage display technology was employed to obtain VHHs. After immunizing one Lama glama against the recombinant N protein (prNΔ₈₅ of a Brazilian hantavirus strain, VHH regions were isolated to construct an immune library. VHHs were displayed fused to the M13KO7 phage coat protein III and the selection steps were performed on immobilized prNΔ₈₅. After selection, eighty clones recognized specifically the N protein. These were sequenced, grouped based mainly on the CDRs, and five clones were analyzed by western blot (WB, surface plasmon resonance (SPR device, and ELISA. Besides the ability to recognize prNΔ85 by WB, all selected clones showed affinity constants in the nanomolar range. Additionaly, the clone KC329705 is able to detect prNΔ₈₅ in solution, as well as the native viral antigen. Findings support the hypothesis that selected VHHs could be a powerful tool in the development of rapid and accurate HPS diagnostic assays, which are essential to provide supportive care to patients and reduce the high mortality rate associated with

  20. Novel camelid antibody fragments targeting recombinant nucleoprotein of Araucaria hantavirus: a prototype for an early diagnosis of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Soraya S; Moreira-Dill, Leandro S; Morais, Michelle S S; Prado, Nidiane D R; Barros, Marcos L; Koishi, Andrea C; Mazarrotto, Giovanny A C A; Gonçalves, Giselle M; Zuliani, Juliana P; Calderon, Leonardo A; Soares, Andreimar M; Pereira da Silva, Luiz H; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Fernandes, Carla F C; Stabeli, Rodrigo G

    2014-01-01

    In addition to conventional antibodies, camelids produce immunoglobulins G composed exclusively of heavy chains in which the antigen binding site is formed only by single domains called VHH. Their particular characteristics make VHHs interesting tools for drug-delivery, passive immunotherapy and high-throughput diagnosis. Hantaviruses are rodent-borne viruses of the Bunyaviridae family. Two clinical forms of the infection are known. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS) is present in the Old World, while Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is found on the American continent. There is no specific treatment for HPS and its diagnosis is carried out by molecular or serological techniques, using mainly monoclonal antibodies or hantavirus nucleoprotein (N) to detect IgM and IgG in patient serum. This study proposes the use of camelid VHHs to develop alternative methods for diagnosing and confirming HPS. Phage display technology was employed to obtain VHHs. After immunizing one Lama glama against the recombinant N protein (prNΔ₈₅) of a Brazilian hantavirus strain, VHH regions were isolated to construct an immune library. VHHs were displayed fused to the M13KO7 phage coat protein III and the selection steps were performed on immobilized prNΔ₈₅. After selection, eighty clones recognized specifically the N protein. These were sequenced, grouped based mainly on the CDRs, and five clones were analyzed by western blot (WB), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) device, and ELISA. Besides the ability to recognize prNΔ85 by WB, all selected clones showed affinity constants in the nanomolar range. Additionaly, the clone KC329705 is able to detect prNΔ₈₅ in solution, as well as the native viral antigen. Findings support the hypothesis that selected VHHs could be a powerful tool in the development of rapid and accurate HPS diagnostic assays, which are essential to provide supportive care to patients and reduce the high mortality rate associated with hantavirus

  1. Sub-domains of ricin's B subunit as targets of toxin neutralizing and non-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Yermakova

    Full Text Available The B subunit (RTB of ricin toxin is a galactose (Gal-/N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNac-specific lectin that mediates attachment, entry, and intracellular trafficking of ricin in host cells. Structurally, RTB consists of two globular domains with identical folding topologies. Domains 1 and 2 are each comprised of three homologous sub-domains (α, β, γ that likely arose by gene duplication from a primordial carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD, although only sub-domains 1α and 2γ retain functional lectin activity. As part of our ongoing effort to generate a comprehensive B cell epitope map of ricin, we report the characterization of three new RTB-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. All three mAbs, JB4, B/J F9 and C/M A2, were initially identified based on their abilities to neutralize ricin in a Vero cell cytotoxicity assay and to partially (or completely block ricin attachment to cell surfaces. However, only JB4 proved capable of neutralizing ricin in a macrophage apoptosis assay and in imparting passive immunity to mice in a model of systemic intoxication. Using a combination of techniques, including competitive ELISAs, pepscan analysis, differential reactivity by Western blot, as well as affinity enrichment of phage displayed peptides, we tentatively localized the epitopes recognized by the non-neutralizing mAbs B/J F9 and C/M A2 to sub-domains 2α and 2β, respectively. Furthermore, we propose that the epitope recognized by JB4 is within sub-domain 2γ, adjacent to RTB's high affinity Gal/GalNAc CRD. These data suggest that recognition of RTB's sub-domains 1α and 2γ are critical determinants of antibody neutralizing activity and protective immunity to ricin.

  2. Epitope distance to the target cell membrane and antigen size determine the potency of T cell-mediated lysis by BiTE antibodies specific for a large melanoma surface antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluemel, Claudia; Hausmann, Susanne; Fluhr, Petra; Sriskandarajah, Mirnalini; Stallcup, William B; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Kufer, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP; also called CSPG4, NG2, HMW-MAA, MSK16, MCSPG, MEL-CSPG, or gp240) is a surface antigen frequently expressed on human melanoma cells, which is involved in cell adhesion, invasion and spreading, angiogenesis, complement inhibition, and signaling. MCSP has therefore been frequently selected as target antigen for development of antibody- and vaccine-based therapeutic approaches. We have here used a large panel of monoclonal antibodies against human MCSP for generation of single-chain MCSP/CD3-bispecific antibodies of the BiTE (for bispecific T cell engager) class. Despite similar binding affinity to MCSP, respective BiTE antibodies greatly differed in their potency of redirected lysis of CHO cells stably transfected with full-length human MCSP, or with various MCSP deletion mutants and fusion proteins. BiTE antibodies binding to the membrane proximal domain D3 of MCSP were more potent than those binding to more distal domains. This epitope distance effect was corroborated with EpCAM/CD3-bispecific BiTE antibody MT110 by testing various fusion proteins between MCSP and EpCAM as surface antigens. CHO cells expressing small surface target antigens were generally better lysed than those expressing larger target antigens, indicating that antigen size was also an important determinant for the potency of BiTE antibody. The present study for the first time relates the positioning of binding domains and size of surface antigens to the potency of target cell lysis by BiTE-redirected cytotoxic T cells. In case of the MCSP antigen, this provides the basis for selection of a maximally potent BiTE antibody candidate for development of a novel melanoma therapy.

  3. Fully human antagonistic antibodies against CCR4 potently inhibit cell signaling and chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs B Hagemann

    Full Text Available CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4 represents a potentially important target for cancer immunotherapy due to its expression on tumor infiltrating immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs and on tumor cells in several cancer types and its role in metastasis.Using phage display, human antibody library, affinity maturation and a cell-based antibody selection strategy, the antibody variants against human CCR4 were generated. These antibodies effectively competed with ligand binding, were able to block ligand-induced signaling and cell migration, and demonstrated efficient killing of CCR4-positive tumor cells via ADCC and phagocytosis. In a mouse model of human T-cell lymphoma, significant survival benefit was demonstrated for animals treated with the newly selected anti-CCR4 antibodies.For the first time, successful generation of anti- G-protein coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR antibodies using human non-immune library and phage display on GPCR-expressing cells was demonstrated. The generated anti-CCR4 antibodies possess a dual mode of action (inhibition of ligand-induced signaling and antibody-directed tumor cell killing. The data demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity in vivo is mediated, at least in part, through Fc-receptor dependent effector mechanisms, such as ADCC and phagocytosis. Anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibodies inhibiting receptor signaling have potential as immunomodulatory antibodies for cancer.

  4. The effectiveness of an anti-human IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody combined with chemotherapy to target colon cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jin; Tsujii, Masahiko; Kondo, Jumpei; Hayashi, Yoshito; Kato, Motohiko; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Inoue, Takuta; Shiraishi, Eri; Inoue, Tahahiro; Hiyama, Satoshi; Tsujii, Yoshiki; Maekawa, Akira; Kawai, Shoichiro; Fujinaga, Tetsuji; Araki, Maekawa; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Watabe, Kenji; Nishida, Tsutomu; Iijima, Hideki; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) can initiate and sustain tumor growth and exhibit resistance to clinical cytotoxic therapies. Therefore, CSCs represent the main target of anticancer therapy. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) promotes cellular proliferation and drug resistance in colorectal cancer, and its serum levels correlate with patient survival. Therefore, IL-6 and its downstream signaling molecule the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) represent potential molecular targets. In the present study, we investigated the effects of IL-6 and its downstream signaling components on stem cell biology, particularly the chemoresistance of CSCs, to explore potential molecular targets for cancer therapy. The colon cancer cell line WiDr was cultured in serum-free, non-adherent, and three-dimensional spheroid-forming conditions to enrich the stem cell-like population. Spheroid-forming cells slowly proliferated and expressed high levels of Oct-4, Klf4, Bmi-1, Lgr5, IL-6, and Notch 3 compared with adherent cells. Treatment with an anti-human IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody reduced spheroid formation, stem cell-related gene expression, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance. In addition, IL-6 treatment enhanced the levels of p-STAT3 (Tyr705), the expression of Oct-4, Klf4, Lgr5, and Notch 3, and chemoresistance to 5-FU. siRNA targeting Notch 3 suppressed spheroid formation, Oct-4 and Lgr5 expression, and 5-FU chemoresistance, whereas STAT3 inhibition enhanced Oct-4, Klf4, Lgr5, and Notch 3 expression and 5-FU chemoresistance along with reduced spheroid growth. Taken together, these results indicate that IL-6 functions in dichotomous pathways involving Notch 3 induction and STAT3 activation. The former pathway is involved in cancer stem-like cell biology and enhanced chemoresistance, and the latter pathway leads to accelerated proliferation and reduced chemoresistance. Thus, an anti-human IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody or Notch 3

  5. A simplified procedure for antibody engineering by yeast surface display: Coupling display levels and target binding by ribosomal skipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzeschik, Julius; Hinz, Steffen C; Könning, Doreen; Pirzer, Thomas; Becker, Stefan; Zielonka, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald

    2017-02-01

    Yeast surface display is a valuable, widely used method for protein engineering. However, current yeast display applications rely on the staining of epitope tags in order to verify full-length presentation of the protein of interest on the cell surface. We aimed at developing a modified yeast display approach that relies on ribosomal skipping, thereby enabling the translation of two proteins from one open reading frame and, in that manner, generating an intracellular fluorescence signal. This improved setup is based on a 2A sequence that is encoded between the protein to be displayed and a gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP). The intracellular GFP fluorescence signal of yeast cells correlates with full-length protein presentation and omits the need for the immunofluorescence detection of epitope tags. For method validation, shark-derived IgNAR variable domains (vNAR) were subjected to affinity maturation using the 2A-GFP system. Yeast library screening of full-length vNAR variants which were detected via GFP expression yielded the same high-affinity binder that had previously been isolated by our group using the conventional epitope tag-based display format. The presented method obviates the need for additional immunofluorescence cell staining, offering an easy and cost-friendly alternative to conventional epitope tag detections.

  6. Experimental on Antibody Targeting Liver Cancer Stem Cell Treatment%肝癌干细胞抗体靶向治疗的实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙力超; 赵璇; 孙立新; 遇珑; 杨治华; 冉宇靓

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the biological characteristics and function of the anti- hepatocellular carcinoma cancer stem cells (HCC-CSC) monoclonal antibody 15B7 in vivo and in vitro, and to investigate whether the targeting liver stem cells can inhibit recurrence, spontaneous lung metastasis and prolong the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Methods Monoclonal antibody 15B7 which could recognize HCC-CSC was identified by two-color immunofluorescence, two-color flow cytometry and subcutaneous tumor formation assay. CD133+ phenotype cells were sorted from BEL7402 cell lines by the flow cytometry and cultured in serum free medium. The function of 15B7 was identified by CCK8 cell proliferation, invasion assay, migration assay and flow cytometry. The inhibition of implanted tumor growth and spontaneous lung metastasis of monoclonal antibody 15B7 were studied by tumor treatment experiments and the survival of mice was also observed. The antigen of 15B7 was identified by western blotting. Results The results of two-color immunofluorescence and two-color flow cytometry showed that monoclonal antibody 15B7 could recognized cells which also were partly co-stained with ESA or CD133. 15B7+ or ESA+ cells or CD133+ cells sorted by flow cytometry could form mammospheres after serum-free suspension culture. 1 × 104 15B7+ cells were inoculated into the nude mice and developed visible tumors in 2 months. In vitro functional experiments showed that monoclonal antibody 15B7 could inhibit the proliferation, migration and invasion of CD133+ cells, and the inhibition rates was 13. 8%, 15. 7% and 30. 9%, respectively. Furthermore, CD133+ cells incubated with monoclonal antibody 15B7 were induced G1 phase arrest.Animal experiment revealed that monoclonal antibody 15B7 significantly inhibited tumor growth by 60. 5%. Conclusion 15B7 not only inhibited tumor growth. The results indicated that targeting cancer stem cell antibody therapy had significant advantages and monoclonal antibody 15B7

  7. Development of an enhanced bovine viral diarrhea virus subunit vaccine based on E2 glycoprotein fused to a single chain antibody which targets to antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecora, Andrea; Malacari, Darío A; Pérez Aguirreburualde, María S; Bellido, Demian; Escribano, José M; Dus Santos, María J; Wigdorovitz, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important cause of economic losses worldwide. E2 is an immunodominant protein and a promising candidate to develop subunit vaccines. To improve its immunogenicity, a truncated E2 (tE2) was fused to a single chain antibody named APCH, which targets to antigen-presenting cells. APCH-tE2 and tE2 proteins were expressed in the baculovirus system and their immunogenicity was firstly compared in guinea pigs. APCH-tE2 vaccine was the best one to evoke a humoral response, and for this reason, it was selected for a cattle vaccination experiment. All the bovines immunized with 1.5 μg of APCH-tE2 developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies against BVDV up to a year post-immunization, demonstrating its significant potential as a subunit vaccine. This novel vaccine is undergoing scale-up and was transferred to the private sector. Nowadays, it is being evaluated for registration as the first Argentinean subunit vaccine for cattle.

  8. Kinetic Characterization of a Panel of High-Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Ricin and Recombinant Re-Formatting for Biosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Cummins

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ricin is a potent glycoprotein toxin that is structurally composed of two subunits joined via a disulfide bond: a ~30 kDa subunit A (RTA and a ~32 kDa subunit B (RTB. There are fears of ricin being used as a weapon for warfare and terrorism and, as such, there is an increasing need for the development of immunodiagnostic reagents targeted towards this toxin. This article describes the production and characterization of a panel of six ricin-specific monoclonal IgG antibodies (mAbs, previously selected based upon their ability to inhibit ricin-mediated killing of cultured cells. Subsequent epitope binding analysis using the surface plasmon resonance (SPR array biosensor (ProteOn XPR36 indicated three distinct, non-competitive binding epitopes (“bins”. The association (ka and dissociation (kd rate constants and binding affinities (KD of each of the mAbs to ricin were also determined by SPR using Biacore T100 instrument. Affinities (KD ranged from 0.1 nM to 9 nM. We present the coding sequences of the variable domains of the six mAbs, the expression, kinetic and cytotoxicity assays for two recombinant Fab (rFab fragments and demonstrate a rFab affinity improvement by chain-shuffling. Together, these antibodies and constituent rFabs represent a panel of reagents for high-affinity recognition of ricin with potential national security biosensor applications.

  9. Therapeutic Targeting of CD6 in Autoimmune Diseases: A Review of Cuban Clinical Studies with the Antibodies IOR-T1 and Itolizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Patricia; Moreno, Ernesto; Aira, Lazaro E; Rodríguez, Pedro C

    2016-01-01

    The CD6 molecule is a pan T cell marker involved in T cell regulation. Although CD6 expression has been correlated with human autoimmune diseases, only a few therapeutic approaches are exploring this molecule as target in the clinic. The biological functions and mechanisms of actions of CD6 have not been definitively established. It is probable that this molecule plays a dual role as a modulator of intracellular signaling. Itolizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody specific for human CD6, developed at the Center of Molecular Immunology in Havana, Cuba. Its parent murine antibody, the IOR-T1 mAb, had been obtained in the 80's at the Institute of Oncology and Radiology, also in Havana. This article provides an overview of the clinical data obtained in Cuban patients with autoimmune diseases who have been treated with IOR-T1 mAb or itolizumab. Furthermore, we discuss the possible mechanism of action of itolizumab basing the analysis on recent site mutagenesis and structural data, which, contrary to previous interpretations, points to a steric blocking of the CD6-CD166 interaction in the cellular context. Overall, the conducted clinical studies have demonstrated that itolizumab has favorable clinical effects and a safety profile when used as monotherapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis. So far, in vitro and in vivo evidences indicate that itolizumab has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Hence, itolizumab represents a new therapeutic option for autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis.

  10. Improved Binding Activity of Antibodies against Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related Gene A by Phage Display Technology for Cancer-Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achara Phumyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA is an NKG2D ligand that is over-expressed under cellular stress including cancer transformation and viral infection. High expression of MICA in cancer tissues or patients' sera is useful for prognostic or follow-up markers in cancer patients. In this study, phage display technology was employed to improve antigen-binding activities of anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (WW2G8, WW6B7, and WW9B8. The 12 amino acid residues in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs on the V domain of the heavy chain CDR3 (HCDR3 of these anti-MICA antibodies were modified by PCR-random mutagenesis, and phages displaying mutated anti-MICA Fab were constructed. After seven rounds of panning, five clones of phages displaying mutant anti-MICA Fab which exhibited 3–7-folds higher antigen-binding activities were isolated. Two clones of the mutants (phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.1 and phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.21 were confirmed to have antigen-binding specificity for cell surface MICA proteins by flow cytometry. These phage clones are able to recognize MICA in a native form according to positive results obtained by indirect ELISA and flow cytometry. Thus, these phage particles could be potentially used for further development of nanomedicine specifically targeting cancer cells expressing MICA proteins.

  11. Straightforward selection of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies targeting the conserved CD4 and coreceptor binding sites of HIV-1 gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Julie; Kessler, Pascal; Bouchet, Jérôme; Combes, Olivier; Ramos, Oscar Henrique Pereira; Barin, Francis; Baty, Daniel; Martin, Loïc; Benichou, Serge; Chames, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Few broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting determinants of the HIV-1 surface envelope glycoprotein (gp120) involved in sequential binding to host CD4 and chemokine receptors have been characterized. While these epitopes show low diversity among various isolates, HIV-1 employs many strategies to evade humoral immune response toward these sensitive sites, including a carbohydrate shield, low accessibility to these buried cavities, and conformational masking. Using trimeric gp140, free or bound to a CD4 mimic, as immunogens in llamas, we selected a panel of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) that bind to either the CD4 or the coreceptor binding site (CD4BS and CoRBS, respectively). When analyzed as monomers or as homo- or heteromultimers, the best sdAb candidates could not only neutralize viruses carrying subtype B envelopes, corresponding to the Env molecule used for immunization and selection, but were also efficient in neutralizing a broad panel of envelopes from subtypes A, C, G, CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG, including tier 3 viruses. Interestingly, sdAb multimers exhibited a broader neutralizing activity spectrum than the parental sdAb monomers. The extreme stability and high recombinant production yield combined with their broad neutralization capacity make these sdAbs new potential microbicide candidates for HIV-1 transmission prevention.

  12. TARGETING OF DRUGS TO VARIOUS BLOOD-CELL TYPES USING (NEO-)GLYCOPROTEINS, ANTIBODIES AND OTHER PROTEIN CARRIERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLEMA, G; MEIJER, DKF

    1994-01-01

    The current problems in controlling severe viral infections of blood cells such as in AIDS as well as the lack of effective and safe pharmacotherapeutic measures for such diseases have renewed interest in the options of targeting of drugs and genes to various blood cell types. The design and develop

  13. Rationale for the development of IMC-3G3, a fully human immunoglobulin G subclass 1 monoclonal antibody targeting the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gaurav D; Loizos, Nick; Youssoufian, Hagop; Schwartz, Jonathan D; Rowinsky, Eric K

    2010-02-15

    A large body of evidence suggests that the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) family and associated receptors are potential targets in oncology therapeutic development because of their critical roles in the proliferation and survival of various cancers and in the regulation and growth of the tumor stroma and blood vessels. Several small molecules that nonspecifically target the PDGF signaling axis are in current use or development as anticancer therapies. However, for the majority of these agents, PDGF and its receptors are neither the primary targets nor the principal mediators of anticancer activity. IMC-3G3, a fully human monoclonal antibody of the immunoglobulin G subclass 1, specifically binds to the human PDGF receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha) with high affinity and blocks PDGF ligand binding and PDGFRalpha activation. The results of preclinical studies and the frequent expression of PDGFRalpha in many types of cancer and in cancer-associated stroma support a rationale for the clinical development of IMC-3G3. Currently, IMC-3G3 is being evaluated in early clinical development for patients with several types of solid malignancies.

  14. A simplified method to attach antibodies on liposomes by biotin-streptavidin affinity for rapid and economical screening of targeted liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadia, Konstantina; Markoutsa, Eleni; Antimisiaris, Sophia G

    2014-05-01

    The biotin-Streptavidin (STREP) technique for attachment of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (or other ligand types) on liposome surface offers high attachment yield, however it is time consuming and expensive due to the number of steps used and the consumption of large quantities of STREP. Herein, a simplified, fast and economic technique, by incubating pre-mixed biotin-mAb/STREP with biotin-liposomes, at a 3:1:1 biotin-mAb/STREP/biotin-LIP ratio (mol/mol/mol) was evaluated. The physichochemical properties, final mAb attachment yield and targeting potential of liposomes decorated with an anti-transferrin receptor mAb (TfR-mAb), prepared by the simple method (SM) and the conventional method (CM), were compared. The vesicle uptake by hCMEC/D3 cells (known to overexpress TfR) were considered as a measure of liposome targeting capability. Results show that both targeted liposome types (SM and CM) have small size (mean diameters around 150 nm), low poly-dispersity (approx. 0.20) and similar mAb attachment yield (between 64-88%). However, the uptake of the SM-liposomes is slightly lower compared to CM-LIP (24-30% decrease), suggesting that the modulated conformation of mAbs on the liposome surface (triplets attached to one single STREP molecule) results in decreased targeting capability. Nevertheless, the simpler and faster one-step preparation procedure which has very high lipid recovery (> 95%) compared to the CM (50-60%) and 15-30 times lower consumption of STREP, may be a good alternative for initial screening of various mAbs as ligands for targeted liposomal or other nanotechnologies, during pre-clinical development.

  15. uPAR as anti-cancer target: evaluation of biomarker potential, histological localization, and antibody-based therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K; Illemann, Martin; Sørensen, Tine Thurison

    2011-01-01

    , and a potential diagnostic and predictive impact of the different uPAR forms has been reported. Hence, pericellular proteolysis seems to be a suitable target for anti-cancer therapy and numerous approaches have been pursued. Targeting of this process may be achieved by preventing the binding of uPA to u......Degradation of proteins in the extracellular matrix is crucial for the multistep process of cancer invasion and metastasis. Compelling evidence has demonstrated the urokinase receptor (uPAR) and its cognate ligand, the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), to play critical roles in the concerted...... up-regulated during cancer progression and is primarily confined to the tumor-associated stromal compartment. Furthermore, both uPAR and uPA have proven to be prognostic markers in several types of cancer; high levels indicating poor survival. The cleaved forms of uPAR are also prognostic markers...

  16. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  17. Antibody 10-1074 suppresses viremia in HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Marina; Schoofs, Till; Gruell, Henning; Settler, Allison; Karagounis, Theodora; Kreider, Edward F; Murrell, Ben; Pfeifer, Nico; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago Y; Learn, Gerald H; Cohen, Yehuda Z; Lehmann, Clara; Gillor, Daniel; Shimeliovich, Irina; Unson-O'Brien, Cecilia; Weiland, Daniela; Robles, Alexander; Kümmerle, Tim; Wyen, Christoph; Levin, Rebeka; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; Eren, Kemal; Ignacio, Caroline; Kiss, Szilard; West, Anthony P; Mouquet, Hugo; Zingman, Barry S; Gulick, Roy M; Keler, Tibor; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Seaman, Michael S; Hahn, Beatrice H; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Schlesinger, Sarah J; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Klein, Florian

    2017-02-01

    Monoclonal antibody 10-1074 targets the V3 glycan supersite on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) protein. It is among the most potent anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies isolated so far. Here we report on its safety and activity in 33 individuals who received a single intravenous infusion of the antibody. 10-1074 was well tolerated and had a half-life of 24.0 d in participants without HIV-1 infection and 12.8 d in individuals with HIV-1 infection. Thirteen individuals with viremia received the highest dose of 30 mg/kg 10-1074. Eleven of these participants were 10-1074-sensitive and showed a rapid decline in viremia by a mean of 1.52 log10 copies/ml. Virologic analysis revealed the emergence of multiple independent 10-1074-resistant viruses in the first weeks after infusion. Emerging escape variants were generally resistant to the related V3-specific antibody PGT121, but remained sensitive to antibodies targeting nonoverlapping epitopes, such as the anti-CD4-binding-site antibodies 3BNC117 and VRC01. The results demonstrate the safety and activity of 10-1074 in humans and support the idea that antibodies targeting the V3 glycan supersite might be useful for the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

  18. Preparation and identification of polyclonal antibody against protein H1b: the variant of major subunit of human ASGPR%抗人ASGPR大亚基异构体蛋白H1b多克隆抗体的制备和鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘嘉; 丁红晖; 杨燕; 胡斌; 余源; 黄红平; 陆蒙吉; 杨东亮

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To prepare and identify mouse polyclonal antibody against protein Hlb, which is the variant of major subunit of human ASGPR. METHODS: Hlb specific peptide was synthesized and coupled with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) for immunization. Then H1b-KLH conjugation was injected into mouse subcutaneously to produce polyclonal antibody. ELISA assay was used to detect the titer of the antibody. Antibody was also identified by Western blot and immunohistochemistry assays. RESULTS: Mouse antibody against Hlb was prepared after injection of H1bKLH conjugation. The titer of H1b antibody was about 1:10~5.Western blot confirmed its high specificity. This antibody could also be used for immunohistochemistry analysis. CONCLUSION: The successful preparation of the polyclonal antibody against protein H1b, which can discriminate the two variants of the major subunit of ASGPR with high specificity, will provide an efficient reagent for further study of the physiologic functions of H1b and its role in the pathogenesis of human disease.%目的:制备小鼠抗人ASGPR大亚基异构体蛋白H1b的多克隆抗体,并鉴定其特异性.方法:合成H1b特异性多肽,以匙孔血蓝蛋白(KLH)作为载体构建多肽免疫原,通过致敏小鼠,制备小鼠抗人H1b蛋白的多克隆抗体;ELISA法检测抗体效价,通过Western blot和免疫组织化学检测,鉴定抗体的特异性与适用范围.结果:得到小鼠抗人H1b蛋白的多克隆抗体,效价达1:10~5.纯化后的抗体用于Western blot可高特异性识别真核表达的H1b蛋白,并可用于免疫组织化学实验.结论:成功制备小鼠抗人H1b蛋白的多克隆抗体,该抗体具有较高的效价以及特异性,能区分ASG-PR大亚基的两种剪接异构体,从而为进一步研究H1b蛋白的生理功能及其在人类疾病中的意义提供了有利工具.

  19. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies That Target 1-Cys Peroxiredoxin and Differentiate Plasmodium falciparum from P. vivax and P. knowlesi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Hassan; Nguyen, Thu-Thuy; Suganuma, Keisuke; Masuda-Suganuma, Hirono; Angeles, Jose Ma M; Inoue, Noboru; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro

    2013-06-01

    Prompt and accurate diagnosis of malarial patients is a crucial factor in controlling the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Effective treatment decisions require a correct diagnosis among mixed-species malarial patients. Differential diagnosis is particularly important in cases of Plasmodium vivax, a species that shares endemicity with P. falciparum in most endemic areas. Moreover, it is difficult to identify P. knowlesi on the basis of morphology alone, and rapid diagnostic tests are still not available for this malaria species. Therefore, the development of diagnostic tests applicable to the field is urgently needed. 1-Cys peroxiredoxin (1-Cys-Prx) in P. falciparum is abundantly expressed in the mature asexual stages, making it a promising candidate as a diagnostic antigen. In this study, we produced five monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against P. falciparum 1-Cys-Prx (Pf1-Cys-Prx) by immunizing BALB/c mice with recombinant Pf1-Cys-Prx and subsequent hybridoma production. Cross reactivity of established mAbs with the orthologous molecule of Pf1-Cys-Prx in P. vivax (Pv1-Cys-Prx) and P. knowlesi (Pk1-Cys-Prx) was examined. Western blot analyses showed that three mAbs reacted with Pv1-Cys-Prx and Pk1-Cys-Prx but two mAbs did not. These results indicate that the two mAbs were effective in differentiating P. falciparum from P. vivax and P. knowlesi and could be used in differential diagnosis as well as comparative molecular studies of human Plasmodium species.

  20. Attachment of an anti-receptor antibody to non-target cells renders them susceptible to lysis by a clone of cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, D M; Tonegawa, S; Eisen, H N

    1984-12-01

    The molecular basis for the dependence of antigen recognition by T cells on products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is unknown, and the antigenic structures that are actually bound by T-cell receptors are ill-defined. In this study, we asked whether a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that reacts with the T-cell receptor of a clone of murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and not with the receptors of other CTL clones can substitute for that clone's natural ligand in specific cytolytic reactions. To answer the question, a mAb (1B2) to the receptor of a CTL clone (2C) was attached covalently to 51Cr-labeled cells that were not otherwise susceptible to lysis by clone 2C, and the cells thus modified were then tested as targets for clone 2C and other CTL clones of similar specificity. All labeled cells modified in this way, including a murine cell line that expresses no cell-surface MHC class I molecules and a human cell line, were lysed by clone 2C but not by other CTL clones. If, however, instead of attaching the mAb to the receptor of clone 2C, the cells were modified by attaching to them mAbs to other surface antigens on CTL [lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1), Thy-1.2], they were not lysed. In cytolytic titrations, the cells that had been converted by attachment of mAb 1B2 into specific targets for clone 2C were just as susceptible to lysis by that clone as the clone's natural H-2d targets (e.g., P815 cells). However, some accessory surface molecules (LFA-1, Lyt-2) that are required for clone 2C to lyse its natural H-2d targets seemed not to be required for this clone to lyse the mAb-converted target cells. By demonstrating that a variety of different cell types can be thus converted into target cells for CTL, the approach described in this study may provide opportunities to analyze further the mechanisms by which CTL destroy target cells.

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy of EGFR or EGFRvIII positive gliomas using either boronated monoclonal antibodies or epidermal growth factor as molecular targeting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, W. [Department of Pathology, Ohio State University, 165 Hamilton Hall, 1645 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Barth, R.F. [Department of Pathology, Ohio State University, 165 Hamilton Hall, 1645 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)], E-mail: rolf.barth@osumc.edu; Wu, G. [Department of Pathology, Ohio State University, 165 Hamilton Hall, 1645 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Tjarks, W. [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Binns, P.; Riley, K. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory and Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02215 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    In the present report we have summarized studies carried out over the past five years on molecular targeting of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its mutant isoform, EFGRvIII, for BNCT of genetically engineered F98 rat gliomas, expressing either wildtype (F98{sub EGFR}) or mutant receptors (F98{sub npEGFRvIII}). EGF or the monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), cetuximab (IMC-C225) and L8A4, which recognize wildtype EGFR and EGFRvIII, respectively, were heavily boronated using polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (BD) linked to the targeting vehicles by means of heterobifunctional reagents. Boronated EGF or mAbs, alone or in combination with i.v. boronophenylalanine (BPA), were administered intracerebrally (i.c.) by either intratumoral (i.t.) injection or convection enhanced delivery (CED) to rats bearing F98 gliomas following which BNCT was initiated. The best survival data were obtained in rats bearing F98{sub npEGFRvIII} gliomas that had received CED of BD-L8A4 either alone or in combination with i.v. boronophenylalanine (BPA). Studies carried out in rats bearing composite tumors (F98{sub EGFR}/F98{sub npEGFRvIII}) demonstrated that it was essential to target both tumor cell populations in order to obtain an optimal therapeutic effect. Based on these observations, we have concluded that EGFR targeting vehicles are useful, but not stand-alone boron delivery agents due to the heterogeneity of receptor expression in brain tumors. They could, however, be quite useful in combination with the two drugs that currently are being used clinically, BPA and sodium borocaptate (BSH) for BNCT of either brain tumors or head and neck cancers.

  2. S-layer fusion protein as a tool functionalizing emulsomes and CurcuEmulsomes for antibody binding and targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucisik, Mehmet H; Küpcü, Seta; Breitwieser, Andreas; Gelbmann, Nicola; Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2015-04-01

    Selective targeting of tumor cells by nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems is highly desirable because it maximizes the drug concentration at the desired target while simultaneously protecting the surrounding healthy tissues. Here, we show a design for smart nanocarriers based on a biomimetic approach that utilizes the building principle of virus envelope structures. Emulsomes and CurcuEmulsomes comprising a tripalmitin solid core surrounded by phospholipid layers are modified by S-layer proteins that self-assemble into a two-dimensional array to form a surface layer. One significant advantage of this nanoformulation is that it increases the solubility of the lipophilic anti-cancer agent curcumin in the CurcuEmulsomes by a factor of 2700. In order to make the emulsomes specific for IgG, the S-layer protein is fused with two protein G domains. This S-layer fusion protein preserves its recrystallization characteristics, forming an ordered surface layer (square lattice with 13 nm unit-by-unit distance). The GG domains are presented in a predicted orientation and exhibit a selective binding affinity for IgG.

  3. A fusogenic dengue virus-derived peptide enhances antitumor efficacy of an antibody-ribonuclease fusion protein targeting the EGF receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesgen, Stefan; Liebers, Nora; Cremer, Martin; Arnold, Ulrich; Weber, Tobias; Keller, Armin; Herold-Mende, Christel; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Jäger, Dirk; Kontermann, Roland E; Arndt, Michaela A E; Krauss, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    Due to its frequent overexpression in a variety of solid tumors the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a well-established target for therapeutic interventions in epithelial cancers. In order to target EGFR in head and neck cancer, we have generated a ribonuclease (RNase) fusion protein comprising a humanized anti-EGFR antibody single-chain Fv fragment (scFv) and Ranpirnase, an RNase from Rana pipiens. Fusion of Ranpirnase to the N-terminus of the scFv via a flexible glycine-serine linker (G4S)3 resulted in very poor cytotoxicity of the fusion protein. As endosomal accumulation and lysosomal degradation have been reported to diminish the antitumor efficacy of ribonuclease or toxin-based immunoagents, we explored a fusion peptide from dengue virus that has been reported to be involved in the endosomal escape of the virus. This peptide was introduced as a linker between Ranpirnase and the scFv moiety. The modified immunoRNase exhibited exceptionally high cytotoxicity toward EGFR-expressing head and neck cell lines without affecting specificity. These results indicate that endosomal entrapment needs to be considered for Ranpirnase-based immunoagents and might be overcome by the use of tailored transduction domains from viral proteins.

  4. Host-Primed Ebola Virus GP Exposes a Hydrophobic NPC1 Receptor-Binding Pocket, Revealing a Target for Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary A. Bornholdt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP mediates viral entry into host cells. Following viral internalization into endosomes, GP is cleaved by host cysteine proteases to expose a receptor-binding site (RBS that is otherwise hidden from immune surveillance. Here, we present the crystal structure of proteolytically cleaved Ebola virus GP to a resolution of 3.3 Å. We use this structure in conjunction with functional analysis of a large panel of pseudotyped viruses bearing mutant GP proteins to map the Ebola virus GP endosomal RBS at molecular resolution. Our studies indicate that binding of GP to its endosomal receptor Niemann-Pick C1 occurs in two distinct stages: the initial electrostatic interactions are followed by specific interactions with a hydrophobic trough that is exposed on the endosomally cleaved GP1 subunit. Finally, we demonstrate that monoclonal antibodies targeting the filovirus RBS neutralize all known filovirus GPs, making this conserved pocket a promising target for the development of panfilovirus therapeutics.

  5. Diverse antigenic site targeting of influenza hemagglutinin in the murine antibody recall response to A(H1N1)pdm09 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jason R; Guo, Zhu; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Garten, Rebecca J; Xiyan, Xu; Blanchard, Elisabeth G; Blanchfield, Kristy; Stevens, James; Katz, Jacqueline M; York, Ian A

    2015-11-01

    Here we define the epitopes on HA that are targeted by a group of 9 recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rmAbs) isolated from memory B cells of mice, immunized by infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 virus followed by a seasonal TIV boost. These rmAbs were all reactive against the HA1 region of HA, but display 7 distinct binding footprints, targeting each of the 4 known antigenic sites. Although the rmAbs were not broadly cross-reactive, a group showed subtype-specific cross-reactivity with the HA of A/South Carolina/1/18. Screening these rmAbs with a panel of human A(H1N1)pdm09 virus isolates indicated that naturally-occurring changes in HA could reduce rmAb binding, HI activity, and/or virus neutralization activity by rmAb, without showing changes in recognition by polyclonal antiserum. In some instances, virus neutralization was lost while both ELISA binding and HI activity were retained, demonstrating a discordance between the two serological assays traditionally used to detect antigenic drift.

  6. Development of an EGFRvIII specific recombinant antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gordon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EGF receptor variant III (EGFRvIII is the most common variant of the EGF receptor observed in human tumors. It results from the in frame deletion of exons 2-7 and the generation of a novel glycine residue at the junction of exons 1 and 8. This novel juxtaposition of amino acids within the extra-cellular domain of the EGF receptor creates a tumor specific and immunogenic epitope. EGFRvIII expression has been seen in many tumor types including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, breast adenocarcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer, but has been rarely observed in normal tissue. Because this variant is tumor specific and highly immunogenic, it can be used for both a diagnostic marker as well as a target for immunotherapy. Unfortunately many of the monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against EGFRvIII have cross reactivity to wild type EGFR or other non-specific proteins. Furthermore, a monoclonal antibody to EGFRvIII is not readily available to the scientific community. Results In this study, we have developed a recombinant antibody that is specific for EGFRvIII, has little cross reactivity for the wild type receptor, and which can be easily produced. We initially designed a recombinant antibody with two anti-EGFRvIII single chain Fv's linked together and a human IgG1 Fc component. To enhance the specificity of this antibody for EGFRvIII, we mutated tyrosine H59 of the CDRH2 domain and tyrosine H105 of the CDRH3 domain to phenylalanine for both the anti-EGFRvIII sequence inserts. This mutated recombinant antibody, called RAbDMvIII, specifically detects EGFRvIII expression in EGFRvIII expressing cell lines as well as in EGFRvIII expressing GBM primary tissue by western blot, immunohistochemistry (IHC and immunofluorescence (IF and FACS analysis. It does not recognize wild type EGFR in any of these assays. The affinity of this antibody for EGFRvIII peptide is 1.7 × 107 M-1 as

  7. Combining in vitro protein detection and in vivo antibody detection identifies potential vaccine targets against Staphylococcus aureus during osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Reijer, P Martijn; Sandker, Marjan; Snijders, Susan V; Tavakol, Mehri; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; van Wamel, Willem J B

    2017-02-01

    Currently, little is known about the in vivo human immune response against Staphylococcus aureus during a biofilm-associated infection, such as osteomyelitis, and how this relates to protein production in biofilms in vitro. Therefore, we characterized IgG responses in 10 patients with chronic osteomyelitis against 50 proteins of S. aureus, analyzed the presence of these proteins in biofilms of the infecting isolates on polystyrene (PS) and human bone in vitro, and explored the relation between in vivo and in vitro data. IgG levels against 15 different proteins were significantly increased in patients compared to healthy controls. Using a novel competitive Luminex-based assay, eight of these proteins [alpha toxin, Staphylococcus aureus formyl peptide receptor-like 1 inhibitor (FlipR), glucosaminidase, iron-responsive surface determinants A and H, the putative ABC transporter SACOL0688, staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), and serine-aspartate repeat-containing protein E (SdrE)] were also detected in a majority of the infecting isolates during biofilm formation in vitro. However, 4 other proteins were detected in only a minority of isolates in vitro while, vice versa, 7 proteins were detected in multiple isolates in vitro but not associated with significantly increased IgG levels in patients. Detection of proteins was largely confirmed using a transcriptomic approach. Our data provide further insights into potential therapeutic targets, such as for vaccination, to reduce S. aureus virulence and biofilm formation. At the same time, our data suggest that either in vitro or immunological in vivo data alone should be interpreted cautiously and that combined studies are necessary to identify potential targets.

  8. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment-apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Natasha M; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. Ribosomal protein P2 localizes to the parasite zoite-surface and is a target for invasion inhibitory antibodies in Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsan, Rajagopal; Chopra, Reshma Korde; Khan, Mudassar Ali; Sharma, Shobhona

    2015-02-01

    In the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the conserved ribosomal stalk protein P2 (PfP2) exhibits extra-ribosomal stage-specific oligomerization and trafficking to the host red cell membrane. Antibodies directed against PfP2 arrested cell division. We sought to examine whether P2 from a closely related Apicomplexan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, exhibits similar properties in terms of its oligomeric status as well as such unique host-cell localization. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of recombinant P2 from T. gondii (TgP2) showed a structure similar to that of PfP2, but unlike PfP2, which forms SDS- and DTT-resistant oligomers, TgP2 exhibited only a weak SDS-resistant dimerization. Also, unlike PfP2 localization to the infected erythrocyte surface, TgP2 did not localize to the host membrane in T. gondii infected human foreskin fibroblast cells. However, P2 protein was detected on the free tachyzoite surface, corroborated by localization of epitope-tagged P2 transfected in T. gondii. The presence of P2 on the surface of P. falciparum merozoites was also observed, and specific antibodies raised against the P2 protein blocked both T. gondii and P. falciparum zoite invasion of the host cells. Thus, although certain moonlighting functions of the acidic ribosomal protein P2 are different amongst P. falciparum and T. gondii, the P2 protein localizes to the surface of the invasive zoite form, and appears to constitute a potential target for host cell invasion inhibition in both the Apicomplexan infections.

  10. Single cell cloning and recombinant monoclonal antibodies generation from RA synovial B cells reveal frequent targeting of citrullinated histones of NETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsiero, Elisa; Bombardieri, Michele; Carlotti, Emanuela; Pratesi, Federico; Robinson, William; Migliorini, Paola; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by breach of self-tolerance towards citrullinated antigens with generation of anti-citrullinated peptide/proteins antibodies (ACPA). Currently, the nature and source of citrullinated antigens driving the humoral autoimmune response within synovial ectopic lymphoid structures (ELS) is a crucial unknown aspect of RA pathogenesis. Here we characterised the autoreactive B-cell response of lesional B cells isolated from ELS+RA synovium. Methods Single synovial tissue CD19+cells were Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted and VH/VL Ig genes cloned to generate recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rmAbs) from patients with ELS+/ACPA+RA. Results RA-rmAbs immunoreactivity analysis provided the following key findings: (1) in a chIP-based array containing 300 autoantigens and in a ‘citrullinome’ multiplex assay, a strong reactivity against citrullinated histones H2A/H2B (citH2A/H2B) was observed in ∼40% of RA-rmAbs, followed by cit-fibrinogen and cit-vimentin; (2) anti-citH2A/H2B-reactive RA-rmAbs (but not anti-citH2A/H2B negative) selectively recognised neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) from peripheral blood and/or RA joint neutrophils; (3) anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET immunobinding was dependent on affinity maturation and was completely abrogated following reversion of hypermutated IgVH/VL genes to germline sequences; (4) ELS+ (not ELS−) RA synovial tissues engrafted into Severe Combined ImmunoDeficiency (SCID) mice released human anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET antibodies in association with the intra-graft expression of CXCL13 and lymphotoxin (LT)-β, two master regulators of ELS. Conclusion We provided novel evidence that B cells differentiated within synovial ELS in the RA joints frequent target deiminated proteins which could be generated during NETosis of RA synovial neutrophils including histones. Thus, NETs could represent a source of citrullinated antigens fuelling the ACPA autoimmune

  11. Antimitochondrial antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  12. Evaluation of the immunological profile of antibody-functionalized metal-filled single-walled carbon nanocapsules for targeted radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Ruiz de Garibay, Aritz; Spinato, Cinzia; Klippstein, Rebecca; Bourgognon, Maxime; Martincic, Markus; Pach, Elzbieta; Ballesteros, Belén; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.; Tobias, Gerard; Bianco, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the immune responses induced by metal-filled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo settings. Either empty amino-functionalized CNTs [SWCNT-NH2 (1)] or samarium chloride-filled amino-functionalized CNTs with [SmCl3@SWCNT-mAb (3)] or without [SmCl3@SWCNT-NH2 (2)] Cetuximab functionalization were tested. Conjugates were added to RAW 264.7 or PBMC cells in a range of 1 μg/ml to 100 μg/ml for 24 h. Cell viability and IL-6/TNFα production were determined by flow cytometry and ELISA. Additionally, the effect of SWCNTs on the number of T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes and monocytes within the PBMC subpopulations was evaluated by immunostaining and flow cytometry. The effect on monocyte number in living mice was assessed after tail vein injection (150 μg of each conjugate per mouse) at 1, 7 and 13 days post-injection. Overall, our study showed that all the conjugates had no significant effect on cell viability of RAW 264.7 but conjugates 1 and 3 led to a slight increase in IL-6/TNFα. All the conjugates resulted in significant reduction in monocyte/macrophage cell numbers within PBMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, monocyte depletion was not observed in vivo, suggesting their suitability for future testing in the field of targeted radiotherapy in mice.

  13. Multi-determinants analysis of molecular alterations for predicting clinical benefit to EGFR-targeted monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sartore-Bianchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: KRAS mutations occur in 35-45% of metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC and preclude responsiveness to EGFR-targeted therapy with cetuximab or panitumumab. However, less than 20% patients displaying wild-type KRAS tumors achieve objective response. Alterations in other effectors downstream of the EGFR, such as BRAF, and deregulation of the PIK3CA/PTEN pathway have independently been found to give rise to resistance. We present a comprehensive analysis of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA mutations, and PTEN expression in mCRC patients treated with cetuximab or panitumumab, with the aim of clarifying the relative contribution of these molecular alterations to resistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrospectively analyzed objective tumor response, progression-free (PFS and overall survival (OS together with the mutational status of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and expression of PTEN in 132 tumors from cetuximab or panitumumab treated mCRC patients. Among the 106 non-responsive patients, 74 (70% had tumors with at least one molecular alteration in the four markers. The probability of response was 51% (22/43 among patients with no alterations, 4% (2/47 among patients with 1 alteration, and 0% (0/24 for patients with > or =2 alterations (p or =2 molecular alteration(s (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: When expression of PTEN and mutations of KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA are concomitantly ascertained, up to 70% of mCRC patients unlikely to respond to anti-EGFR therapies can be identified. We propose to define as 'quadruple negative', the CRCs lacking alterations in KRAS, BRAF, PTEN and PIK3CA. Comprehensive molecular dissection of the EGFR signaling pathways should be considered to select mCRC patients for cetuximab- or panitumumab-based therapies.

  14. Targeting of Ly9 (CD229) Disrupts Marginal Zone and B1 B Cell Homeostasis and Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Marta; Romero, Xavier; Sintes, Jordi; Terhorst, Cox; Engel, Pablo

    2016-01-15

    Marginal zone (MZ) and B1 B cells have the capacity to respond to foreign Ags more rapidly than conventional B cells, providing early immune responses to blood-borne pathogens. Ly9 (CD229, SLAMF3), a member of the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family receptors, has been implicated in the development and function of innate T lymphocytes. In this article, we provide evidence that in Ly9-deficient mice splenic transitional 1, MZ, and B1a B cells are markedly expanded, whereas development of B lymphocytes in bone marrow is unaltered. Consistent with an increased number of these B cell subsets, we detected elevated levels of IgG3 natural Abs and a striking increase of T-independent type II Abs after immunization with 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl-Ficoll in the serum of Ly9-deficient mice. The notion that Ly9 could be a negative regulator of innate-like B cell responses was supported by the observation that administering an mAb directed against Ly9 to wild-type mice selectively eliminated splenic MZ B cells and significantly reduced the numbers of B1 and transitional 1 B cells. In addition, Ly9 mAb dramatically diminished in vivo humoral responses and caused a selective downregulation of the CD19/CD21/CD81 complex on B cells and concomitantly an impaired B cell survival and activation in an Fc-independent manner. We conclude that altered signaling caused by the absence of Ly9 or induced by anti-Ly9 may negatively regulate development and function of innate-like B cells by modulating B cell activation thresholds. The results suggest that Ly9 could serve as a novel target for the treatment of B cell-related diseases.

  15. Inhibition of SCF ubiquitin ligases by engineered ubiquitin variants that target the Cul1 binding site on the Skp1–F-box interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelik, Maryna; Orlicky, Stephen; Sartori, Maria A.; Tang, Xiaojing; Marcon, Edyta; Kurinov, Igor; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Tyers, Mike; Moffat, Jason; Sicheri, Frank; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-03-14

    The ubiquitin proteasome components are often misregulated in numerous diseases, encouraging the search for drug targets and inhibitors. E3 ligases that specify ubiquitination targets are of particular interest. Multimeric Skp1–Cul1–F-box (SCF) E3 ligases constitute one of the largest E3 families connected to every cellular process and multiple diseases; however, their characterization as therapeutic targets is impeded by functional diversity and poor characterization of its members. Herein we describe a strategy to inhibit SCF E3 ligases using engineered ubiquitin-based binders. We identify a previously uncharacterized inhibitory site and design ubiquitin-based libraries targeting this site. Our strategy to target SCF E3 ligases with small-molecule–like agents will have broad applications for basic research and drug development relating to SCF E3 ligase function.

  16. Natural and Man-made Antibody Repertories for Antibody Discovery

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    Juan C eAlmagro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of human, mice and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process.

  17. Viral escape from HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies drives increased plasma neutralization breadth through sequential recognition of multiple epitopes and immunotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Kurt Wibmer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the targets of broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 and understanding how these antibodies develop remain important goals in the quest to rationally develop an HIV-1 vaccine. We previously identified a participant in the CAPRISA Acute Infection Cohort (CAP257 whose plasma neutralized 84% of heterologous viruses. In this study we showed that breadth in CAP257 was largely due to the sequential, transient appearance of three distinct broadly neutralizing antibody specificities spanning the first 4.5 years of infection. The first specificity targeted an epitope in the V2 region of gp120 that was also recognized by strain-specific antibodies 7 weeks earlier. Specificity for the autologous virus was determined largely by a rare N167 antigenic variant of V2, with viral escape to the more common D167 immunotype coinciding with the development of the first wave of broadly neutralizing antibodies. Escape from these broadly neutralizing V2 antibodies through deletion of the glycan at N160 was associated with exposure of an epitope in the CD4 binding site that became the target for a second wave of broadly neutralizing antibodies. Neutralization by these CD4 binding site antibodies was almost entirely dependent on the glycan at position N276. Early viral escape mutations in the CD4 binding site drove an increase in wave two neutralization breadth, as this second wave of heterologous neutralization matured to recognize multiple immunotypes within this site. The third wave targeted a quaternary epitope that did not overlap any of the four known sites of vulnerability on the HIV-1 envelope and remains undefined. Altogether this study showed that the human immune system is capable of generating multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies in response to a constantly evolving viral population that exposes new targets as a consequence of escape from earlier neutralizing antibodies.

  18. In vivo tumor targeting and imaging with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody-conjugated dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh WJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Wan-Ju Hsieh,1 Chan-Jung Liang,1 Jen-Jie Chieh,4 Shu-Huei Wang,1 I-Rue Lai,1 Jyh-Horng Chen,2 Fu-Hsiung Chang,3 Wei-Kung Tseng,4–6 Shieh-Yueh Yang,4 Chau-Chung Wu,7 Yuh-Lien Chen11Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, 2Department of Electrical Engineering, 3Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, E-Da Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Taipei, Taiwan; 7Department of Internal Medicine and Primary Care Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Active targeting by specific antibodies combined with nanoparticles is a promising technology for cancer imaging and detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether the systemic delivery of antivascular endothelial growth factor antibodies conjugating to the surface of functionalized supermagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (anti-VEGF-NPs led to target-specific accumulation in the tumor.Methods: The VEGF expression in human colon cancer and in Balb/c mice bearing colon cancers was examined by immunohistochemistry. The distribution of these anti-VEGF-NPs particles or NPs particles were evaluated by MRI at days 1, 2, or 9 after the injection into the jugular vein of Balb/c mice bearing colon cancers. Tumor and normal tissues (liver, spleen, lung, and kidney were collected and were examined by Prussian blue staining to determine the presence and distribution of NPs in the tissue sections.Results: VEGF is highly expressed in human and mouse colon cancer tissues. MRI showed significant changes in the T*2 signal and T2 relaxation in the anti-VEGF-NP- injected-mice, but not in mice injected with NP alone. Examination of paraffin

  19. Cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldenberg, D.M. (Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology, Newark, NJ (US))

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a perspective of the use of antibodies to target diagnostic isotopes to tumors. Antibodies with reasonable specificity can be developed against almost any substance. If selective targeting to cancer cells can be achieved, the prospects for a selective therapy are equally intriguing. But the development of cancer detection, or imaging, with radiolabeled antibodies has depended upon advances in a number of different areas, including cancer immunology and immunochemistry for identifying suitable antigen targets and antibodies to these targets, tumor biology for model systems, radiochemistry for he attachment of radionuclides to antibodies, molecular biology for reengineering the antibodies for safer and more effective use in humans, and nuclear medicine for providing the best imaging protocols and instrumentation to detect minute amounts of elevated radioactivity against a background of considerable noise. Accordingly, this book has been organized to address the advances that are being made in many of these areas.

  20. Moving target tracking based on image cutting under illumination-variant condition%光照变动条件下基于图切割算法的运动目标跟踪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯明正; 冯子亮; 刘艳丽; 王棣

    2012-01-01

    为解决光照大范围变动条件下跟踪运动目标丢失问题,本文基于光照估计的算法建立光照模型,对跟踪视频中的光照进行估计,然后结合图切割算法计算出运动目标的光流向量,利用光流向量进行目标跟踪。实验表明,本文算法对光照的改变具有一定的适应性,可以准确地跟踪目标,提高了跟踪算法的鲁棒性。%Tracking moving targets under variant illumination in a large range is still a hard problem in computer vision.In order to solve it,the illumination model is established based on the outdoor light source estimation,which is used to estimate the illumiation in tracking vision.Then the optical flow vector of the moving target is computed combining the image cutting algorithm,so the moving target is tracked.Experimental results indicate that the proposed scheme is adaptive to illumination changes,can track the moving target accurately,and improves the algorithm′s robustness.

  1. Improved renal clearance and tumor targeting of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled anti-Tac monoclonal antibody Fab by chemical modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Meyoung-kon; Jeong, Hyeh-Jean; Kao, Chih-Hao K.; Yao, Zhengsheng; Paik, David S.; Pie, Jae Eun; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Paik, Chang H. E-mail: cpaik@mail.cc.nih.gov

    2002-02-01

    This study was undertaken to improve the renal clearance and tumor targeting properties of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled humanized anti-Tac (HuTac) monoclonal antibody Fab fragments using two chemical approaches: 1) labeling with a renal secretion agent {sup 99m}Tc-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) and 2) lowering its isoelectric point (pI) by acylation. HuTac Fab (3.3 mg/mL) was reacted with a trifluorophenyl ester (TFP) of {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3 alone or was additionally reacted with TFP-glycolate to reduce the pI. In Balb/c mice, {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3-Fab (pI>9.3) rapidly accumulated in the kidneys (177% injected dose [ID]/g at 15 min) and then gradually cleared out of the kidneys. In contrast, the glycolation (pI 4.6{approx}6.6) drastically reduced the renal uptake (31% ID/g) and also the whole-body retention (82% ID vs 101% for the nonglycolated) at 15 min, indicating that the glycolated {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3-Fab (pI 4.6{approx}6.6) was rapidly excreted. The glycolated remained in the blood longer than the nonglycolated (1.2% vs 0.3% ID/g at 360 min), but this effect was less drastic than the effect shown on the renal uptake. In nude mice bearing receptor-positive (ATAC4) tumors, the glycolated {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3-Fab increased the peak tumor uptake to 14.8% ID/g from 8.3% ID/g for {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3-Fab, whereas the glycolation resulted in a drastic reduction of the renal uptake at 15 min. We demonstrated that the renal clearance and the tumor targeting of Fab could be optimized by chemical modifications.

  2. Phase I pharmacologic and biologic study of ramucirumab (IMC-1121B), a fully human immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratlin, Jennifer L; Cohen, Roger B; Eadens, Matthew; Gore, Lia; Camidge, D Ross; Diab, Sami; Leong, Stephen; O'Bryant, Cindy; Chow, Laura Q M; Serkova, Natalie J; Meropol, Neal J; Lewis, Nancy L; Chiorean, E Gabriela; Fox, Floyd; Youssoufian, Hagop; Rowinsky, Eric K; Eckhardt, S Gail

    2010-02-10

    PURPOSE To evaluate the safety, maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics (PKs), pharmacodynamics, and preliminary anticancer activity of ramucirumab (IMC-1121B), a fully human immunoglobulin G(1) monoclonal antibody targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients with advanced solid malignancies were treated once weekly with escalating doses of ramucirumab. Blood was sampled for PK studies throughout treatment. The effects of ramucirumab on circulating vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), soluble VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, tumor perfusion, and vascularity using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were assessed. Results Thirty-seven patients were treated with 2 to 16 mg/kg of ramucirumab. After one patient each developed dose-limiting hypertension and deep venous thrombosis at 16 mg/kg, the next lower dose (13 mg/kg) was considered the MTD. Nausea, vomiting, headache, fatigue, and proteinuria were also noted. Four (15%) of 27 patients with measurable disease had a partial response (PR), and 11 (30%) of 37 patients had either a PR or stable disease lasting at least 6 months. PKs were characterized by dose-dependent elimination and nonlinear exposure consistent with saturable clearance. Mean trough concentrations exceeded biologically relevant target levels throughout treatment at all dose levels. Serum VEGF-A increased 1.5 to 3.5 times above pretreatment values and remained in this range throughout treatment at all dose levels. Tumor perfusion and vascularity decreased in 69% of evaluable patients. CONCLUSION Objective antitumor activity and antiangiogenic effects were observed over a wide range of dose levels, suggesting that ramucirumab may have a favorable therapeutic index in treating malignancies amenable to VEGFR-2 inhibition.

  3. Insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by saporin delivered into cancer cells by an antibody fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R.; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A.; Leoh, Lai Sum; Erb, Michael A.; Diamante, Graciel; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) that targets the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and exhibits direct cytotoxicity against malignant B cells in an iron-dependent manner. ch128.1Av is also a delivery system and its conjugation with biotinylated saporin (b-SO6), a plant ribosome-inactivating toxin, results in a dramatic iron-independent cytotoxicity, both in malignant cells that are sensitive or resistant to ch128.1Av alone, in which the toxin effectively inhibits protein synthesis and triggers caspase activation. We have now found that the ch128.1Av/b-SO6 complex induces a transcriptional response consistent with oxidative stress and DNA damage, a response that is not observed with ch128.1Av alone. Furthermore, we show that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially blocks saporin-induced apoptosis suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to DNA damage and ultimately saporin-induced cell death. Interestingly, the toxin was detected in nuclear extracts by immunoblotting, suggesting the possibility that saporin might induce direct DNA damage. However, confocal microscopy did not show a clear and consistent pattern of intranuclear localization. Finally, using the long-term culture-initiating cell assay we found that ch128.1Av/b-SO6 is not toxic to normal human hematopoietic stem cells suggesting that this critical cell population would be preserved in therapeutic interventions using this immunotoxin. PMID:23085102

  4. Insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by saporin delivered into cancer cells by an antibody fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A; Leoh, Lai Sum; Erb, Michael A; Diamante, Graciel; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L

    2013-02-01

    We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) that targets the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and exhibits direct cytotoxicity against malignant B cells in an iron-dependent manner. ch128.1Av is also a delivery system and its conjugation with biotinylated saporin (b-SO6), a plant ribosome-inactivating toxin, results in a dramatic iron-independent cytotoxicity, both in malignant cells that are sensitive or resistant to ch128.1Av alone, in which the toxin effectively inhibits protein synthesis and triggers caspase activation. We have now found that the ch128.1Av/b-SO6 complex induces a transcriptional response consistent with oxidative stress and DNA damage, a response that is not observed with ch128.1Av alone. Furthermore, we show that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially blocks saporin-induced apoptosis suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to DNA damage and ultimately saporin-induced cell death. Interestingly, the toxin was detected in nuclear extracts by immunoblotting, suggesting the possibility that saporin might induce direct DNA damage. However, confocal microscopy did not show a clear and consistent pattern of intranuclear localization. Finally, using the long-term culture-initiating cell assay we found that ch128.1Av/b-SO6 is not toxic to normal human hematopoietic stem cells suggesting that this critical cell population would be preserved in therapeutic interventions using this immunotoxin.

  5. Preparation and Evaluation of 99mTc-labeled anti-CD11b Antibody Targeting Inflammatory Microenvironment for Colon Cancer Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dengfeng; Zou, Weihong; Li, Xiao; Xiu, Yan; Tan, Hui; Shi, Hongcheng; Yang, Xiangdong

    2015-06-01

    CD11b, an active constituent of innate immune response highly expressed in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), can be used as a marker of inflammatory microenvironment, particularly in tumor tissues. In this research, we aimed to fabricate a (99m)Tc-labeled anti-CD11b antibody as a probe for CD11b(+) myeloid cells in colon cancer imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In situ murine colon tumor model was established in histidine decarboxylase knockout (Hdc(-/-)) mice by chemicals induction. (99m)Tc-labeled anti-CD11b was obtained with labeling yields of over 30% and radiochemical purity of over 95%. Micro-SPECT/CT scans were performed at 6 h post injection to investigate biodistributions and targeting of the probe. In situ colonic neoplasma as small as 3 mm diameters was clearly identified by imaging; after dissection of the animal, anti-CD11b immunofluorescence staining was performed to identify infiltration of CD11b+ MDSCs in microenvironment of colonic neoplasms. In addition, the images displayed intense signal from bone marrow and spleen, which indicated the origin and migration of CD11b(+) MDSCs in vivo, and these results were further proved by flow cytometry analysis. Therefore, (99m)Tc-labeled anti-CD11b SPECT displayed the potential to facilitate the diagnosis of colon tumor in very early stage via detection of inflammatory microenvironment.

  6. Attachment of an anti-MUC1 monoclonal antibody to 5-FU loaded BSA nanoparticles for active targeting of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Mohammadnejad, Javad; Paknejad, Malihe; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad

    2012-01-01

    With PR81 as a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) that was prepared against the human breast cancer, the MUC1 receptor specific targeting is possible. In this study, PR81-conjugated bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles loaded with anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) were developed. Enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) results showed high immunoreactivity of PR81 mAb conjugated to nanoparticles towards MUC1 related peptide or native cancerous MUC1 and almost no cross-reaction to non-specific proteins. In vitro experiments were performed to determine the ability of this new drug delivery system on overcoming MCF-7 breast cancer cells in comparison with four other systems. The results revealed that these cell-type specific drug loaded nanoparticles could achieve more cell death as compared to when the 5-FU was used with no carriers. Stability studies of produced drug delivery system proved high immunoreactivity of conjugated PR81 even after 11 days of storage in room temperature.

  7. Treating IgE-mediated diseases via targeting IgE-expressing B cells using an anti-CεmX antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liour, Sean S; Tom, Andrew; Chan, Yueh-Hsuan; Chang, Tse Wen

    2016-08-01

    Targeting the IgE pathway is a clinically validated strategy for treating IgE-mediated diseases. Omalizumab, an anti-IgE antibody, which binds to free IgE and prevents the binding of IgE to FcεRI on mast cells and basophils has been approved for severe persistent allergic asthma and chronic spontaneous (idiopathic) urticaria. The therapeutic efficacy of anti-IgE has also been reported in allergic rhinitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, latex allergy, atopic dermatitis, allergic urticaria, anaphylaxis, and others. Anti-CεmX, which binds to membrane-bound IgE (mIgE) on IgE-switched B cells, lyses mIgE-expressing B lymphoblasts and prevents the allergen-induced generation of IgE-producing plasma cells, offers an alternative mechanism of intervening with the IgE inflammatory pathway. Because anti-CεmX does not bind to free IgE, it can modulate the IgE pathway regardless of the serum IgE levels in treated patients. These unique pharmacologic mechanisms potentially enable anti-CεmX to provide different clinical utilities from anti-IgE and serve as a therapeutic and a prophylactic in some IgE-mediated diseases, which are not adequately treated with current medicine.

  8. [Progress of research on genetic engineering antibody and its application in prevention and control of parasitic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Yu, Chuan-xin

    2013-08-01

    Antibody has extensive application prospects in the biomedical field. The inherent disadvantages of traditional polyclonal antibody and monoclonal antibody limit their application values. The humanized and fragmented antibody remodeling has given a rise to a series of genetic engineered antibody variant. This paper reviews the progress of research on genetic engineering antibody and its application in prevention and control of parasitic diseases.

  9. Postnatally-transmitted HIV-1 Envelope variants have similar neutralization-sensitivity and function to that of nontransmitted breast milk variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouda Genevieve G

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breastfeeding is a leading cause of infant HIV-1 infection in the developing world, yet only a minority of infants exposed to HIV-1 via breastfeeding become infected. As a genetic bottleneck severely restricts the number of postnatally-transmitted variants, genetic or phenotypic properties of the virus Envelope (Env could be important for the establishment of infant infection. We examined the efficiency of virologic functions required for initiation of infection in the gastrointestinal tract and the neutralization sensitivity of HIV-1 Env variants isolated from milk of three postnatally-transmitting mothers (n=13 viruses, five clinically-matched nontransmitting mothers (n=16 viruses, and seven postnatally-infected infants (n = 7 postnatally-transmitted/founder (T/F viruses. Results There was no difference in the efficiency of epithelial cell interactions between Env virus variants from the breast milk of transmitting and nontransmitting mothers. Moreover, there was similar efficiency of DC-mediated trans-infection, CCR5-usage, target cell fusion, and infectivity between HIV-1 Env-pseudoviruses from nontransmitting mothers and postnatal T/F viruses. Milk Env-pseudoviruses were generally sensitive to neutralization by autologous maternal plasma and resistant to breast milk neutralization. Infant T/F Env-pseudoviruses were equally sensitive to neutralization by broadly-neutralizing monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies as compared to nontransmitted breast milk Env variants. Conclusion Postnatally-T/F Env variants do not appear to possess a superior ability to interact with and cross a mucosal barrier or an exceptional resistance to neutralization that define their capability to initiate infection across the infant gastrointestinal tract in the setting of preexisting maternal antibodies.

  10. Targeting the active site of the placental isozyme of alkaline phosphatase by phage-displayed scFv antibodies selected by a specific uncompetitive inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kala Mrinalini

    2005-12-01

    . Conclusion The results demonstrate the biochemical modulation of scFv binding. Also, the scFvs bound to the active site and denied the access to the substrate. The selection strategy could generate specific anti-enzyme antibodies to PLAP that can potentially be used for targeting, for modulating enzyme activity in in vitro and in vivo and as probes for the active site. This strategy also has a general application in selecting antibodies from combinatorial libraries to closely related molecules and conformations.

  11. Substitution at Aspartic Acid 1128 in the SARS Coronavirus Spike Glycoprotein Mediates Escape from a S2 Domain-Targeting Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Keng, Choong-Tat; Leung, Cynthia Sau-Wai; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Poon, Leo Lit Man; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs), are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S) protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2): 941–50). In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111–1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A) exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus. PMID:25019613

  12. Substitution at aspartic acid 1128 in the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein mediates escape from a S2 domain-targeting neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oi-Wing Ng

    Full Text Available The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs, are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2: 941-50. In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111-1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus.

  13. Designing a HER2/neu promoter to drive α1,3galactosyltransferase expression for targeted anti-αGal antibody-mediated tumor cell killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanteri, Marion; Ollier, Laurence; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Our goal was to specifically render tumor cells susceptible to natural cytolytic anti-αGal antibodies by using a murine α1,3galactosyltransferase (mαGalT) transgene driven by a designed form of HER2/neu promoter (pNeu), the transcription of which is frequently observed to be above basal in breast tumors. Indeed, the αGalT activity that promotes Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R (αGal) epitope expression has been mutationally disrupted during the course of evolution, starting from Old World primates, and this has led to the counter-production of large amounts of cytotoxic anti-αGal antibodies in recent primates, including man. Method Expression of the endogenous c-erbB-2 gene was investigated in various cell lines by northern blotting. A mαGalT cDNA was constructed into pcDNA3 vector downstream of the original CMV promoter (pCMV/mαGalT) and various forms of pNeu were prepared by PCR amplification and inserted in the pCMV/mαGalT construct upstream of the mαGalT cDNA, in the place of the CMV promoter. These constructs were transferred into HEK-293 control and breast tumor cell lines. Stably transfected cells were analyzed by northern blotting for their expression of αGalT and c-erbB-2, and by flow cytometry for their binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Griffonia simplicifolia/isolectin B4. Results We show that expression of the mαGalT was up- or down-modulated according to the level of endogenous pNeu activity and the particular form of constructed pNeu. Among several constructs, two particular forms of the promoter, pNeu250 containing the CCAAT box and the PEA3 motif adjacent to the TATAA box, and pNeu664, which has three additional PEA3 motifs upstream of the CCAAT box, were found to promote differential αGalT expression. Conclusion Our results strengthen current concepts about the crucial role played by the proximal PEA3 motif of pNeu, and may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the development of targeted transgene expression

  14. Antiphospholipid Antibody and Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴竞生

    2008-01-01

    @@ Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) APA is a big category for all kinds of negative charge phospholipid or lecithin - a protein complex autoantibodies or the same antibody, through its recognition of antigen (target protein) different, and phospholipids or lecithin - protein complex combination of various rely on the interference Phospholipid clotting and anti-coagulation factor, and promote endothelial cells, platelets, complement activation and play a role. APA including lupus anticoagulant(LA) and anticardiolipin antibody (ACA), In addition, there are anti-β2 glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI) antibody, anti-prothrombin (a- PT) antibody, anti-lysophosphatidic acid antibody and anti-phosphatidylserine antibody, and so on. APA as the main target of phospholipid-binding protein, including β2-GPI, prothrombin, annexin, protein C (PC) and protein S (PS), plasminogen, and so on.

  15. Honing a harder-hitting hammerhead improves broadly neutralizing antibody breadth and potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, George K

    2015-06-01

    While current HIV-1 therapies have greatly improved the quality and duration of life for infected individuals, a vaccine to prevent transmission of the virus is lacking. Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnmAbs) with the capacity to neutralize multiple HIV-1 variants have been isolated from HIV-1-infected individuals, and there has been a great effort to investigate how these bnmAbs arise, due their potential for HIV-1 vaccination. In this issue of the JCI, Willis and colleagues apply a computational approach to design variants of the bnmAb PG9 in an attempt to enhance potency and neutralization breadth. One of these variants was able to target multiple PG9-resistant strains, as the result of stabilization of the long heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (HCDR3). The results of this study provide important insight and a unique approach to optimizing HIV-1 bnmABs.

  16. Docetaxel-loaded single-wall carbon nanohorns using anti-VEGF antibody as a targeting agent: characterization, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qian; Li, Nannan; Shu, Chang; Li, Ruixin; Ma, Xiaona; Li, Xuequan; Wang, Ran; Zhong, Wenying, E-mail: wyzhong@cpu.edu.cn [China Pharmaceutical University, Department of Analytical Chemistry (China)

    2015-05-15

    A novel antitumor drug delivery system, docetaxel (DTX)-loaded oxidized single-wall carbon nanohorns (oxSWNHs) with anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (mAb) as a target agent was constructed. DTX was absorbed onto the oxSWNHs via the physical adsorption or π–π interaction. DSPE–PEG–COOH was non-covalently wrapped to the hydrophobic surface of oxSWNHs to improve its water solubility and biocompatibility. The mAb was bonded to the PEG through amide bond. The DTX@oxSWNHs-PEG-mAb (DDS) exhibited suitable particle size (191.2 ± 2.1 nm), good particle size distribution (PDI: 0.196), and negative zeta potential (−24.3 ± 0.85 mV). These features enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and reduced the drug molecule uptake by the reticuloendothelial system. The in vitro drug release followed non-Fickian diffusion (n = 0.6857, R = 0.9924) with the cumulative release of DTX 59 ± 1.35 % at 72 h. Compared with free DTX, the DDS enhanced the cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cell lines in vitro efficiently (IC{sub 50}: 2.96 ± 0.6 μg/ml), and provided higher antitumor efficacy (TGI: 69.88 %) in vivo. The histological analysis indicated that the DDS had no significant side effect. Therefore, the new DDS is promising to attain higher pharmaceutical efficacy and lower side effects than free DTX for cancer therapy. The research demonstrated that DTX@oxSWNHs-PEG-mAb might have promising biomedical applications for future cancer therapy.

  17. A Variant in the Precursor of MicroRNA-146a is Responsible for Development of Erectile Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Prostatitis via Targeting NOS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jian; Tang, Yuxin; Tang, Zhengyan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Wang, Guilin

    2017-02-20

    BACKGROUND The morbidity of erectile dysfunction (ED) has been found to be substantially increased in patients with chronic prostatitis (CP). Accumulating evidence shows that single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located in pre-miRNA or mature microRNA may affect the processing of microRNA (miRNA) and alter the expression of the miRNA, as well as its target gene. In this study we investigated the association between rs2910164 G/C polymorphism and risk of ED in patients with CP, as well as the underlying molecular mechanism. MATERIAL AND METHODS Computational analysis was used to search for the target of miR-146a, and the luciferase reporter assay system was used to validate NOS1 to be the target gene of miR-146a. We also treated PC-3 cells with miR-146a mimics/inhibitors to verify the negative regulatory relationship between miR-146a and NOS1, and real-time PCR and Western blot analysis were used to estimate the expression of the NOS1 mRNA and miR-146a. RESULTS The binding site of miR-146a was found to be located within the 3'-UTR of the NOS1 by searching an online miRNA database (www.mirdb.org), and luciferase reporter assay was done to confirm that NOS1 is a direct target gene of miR-146a. We also found that mRNA and protein expression level of NOS1 in PC-3 cells treated with miR-146a mimics and NOS1 siRNA was substantially down-regulated compared with scramble control, while cells treated with miR-146a inhibitors showed increased expression of NOS1. In addition, 705 people were recruited for our research - 342 CP patients with ED and 363 CP patients without ED - and we found that the presence of minor allele of rs2910164 polymorphism is significantly associated with reduced risk of ED in patients with CP. CONCLUSIONS The findings indicate a decreased risk of ED in patients with CP who are carriers of miR-146a rs2910164 C allele, and this association might be due to its ability to compromise the expression of miR-146a, and thereby increase the expression of its

  18. A novel trifunctional IgG-like bispecific antibody to inhibit HIV-1 infection and enhance lysis of HIV by targeting activation of complement

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    Tomlinson Stephen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complement system is not only a key component of innate immunity but also provides a first line of defense against invading pathogens, especially for viral pathogens. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, however, possesses several mechanisms to evade complement-mediated lysis (CoML and exploit the complement system to enhance viral infectivity. Responsible for this intrinsic resistance against complement-mediated virolysis are complement regulatory membrane proteins derived from the host cell that inherently downregulates complement activation at several stages of the cascade. In addition, HIV is protected from complement-mediated lysis by binding soluble factor H (fH through the viral envelope proteins, gp120 and gp41. Whereas inhibition of complement activity is the desired outcome in the vast majority of therapeutic approaches, there is a broader potential for complement-mediated inhibition of HIV by complement local stimulation. Presentation of the hypothesis Our previous studies have proven that the complement-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infection is mediated by the association of complement receptor type 2 bound to the C3 fragment and deposited on the surface of HIV virions. Thus, we hypothesize that another new activator of complement, consisting of two dsFv (against gp120 and against C3d respectively linked to a complement-activating human IgG1 Fc domain ((anti-gp120 × anti-C3d-Fc, can not only target and amplify complement activation on HIV virions for enhancing the efficiency of HIV lysis, but also reduce the infectivity of HIV through blocking the gp120 and C3d on the surface of HIV. Testing the hypothesis Our hypothesis was tested using cell-free HIV-1 virions cultivated in vitro and assessment of virus opsonization was performed by incubating appropriate dilutions of virus with medium containing normal human serum and purified (anti-gp120 × anti-C3d-Fc proteins. As a control group, viruses

  19. De novo expression of fetal ED-A(+) fibronectin and B (+) tenascin-C splicing variants in human cardiac allografts: potential impact for targeted therapy of rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Marcus; Matusiak-Brückner, Monika; Richter, Petra; Grün, Katja; Ziffels, Barbara; Neri, Dario; Maschek, Hansjörg; Schulz, Uwe; Pfeil, Alexander; Jung, Christian; Figulla, Hans R; Gummert, Jan; Berndt, Alexander; Renner, André

    2014-10-01

    Management of acute and especially chronic rejection after human cardiac transplantation is still challenging. Chronic rejection, represented by allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and cardiac interstitial fibrosis (CIF) is known to cause severe long-term complications. Rejection associated tissue-remodelling entails the reoccurrence of fetal variants of Fibronectin (Fn) and Tenascin-C (Tn-C), which are virtually absent in adult human organs. In a rat model, an extensive re-expression could be demonstrated for ED-A(+) Fn with spatial association to CAV and CIF. Thus, it is of great interest to investigate the cardiac tissue expression and distribution in human samples. From 48 heart transplanted patients, 64 tissue specimens derived from right ventricular biopsies were available. Histopathological analysis was performed according to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) guidelines for the detection of acute rejection. By immunohistochemistry, protein expression of ED-A(+) Fn, B(+) Tn-C, alpha-smooth muscle actin, CD31 and CD45 was assessed and analysed semiquantitatively. Co-localisation studies were performed by means of immunofluorescence double labelling. Histopathological analysis of the 64 samples revealed different ISHLT grades (0R in 36 cases, 1R in 20 cases and 2R in 8 cases). There was a distinct and quantitatively relevant re-occurrence of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C in most samples. Semi-quantitative evaluation did not show any correlation to the acute rejection grade for all markers. Interestingly, significant correlations to the extent of inflammation could be shown for ED-A(+) Fn (r = 0.442, p = 0.000) and B(+) Tn-C (r = 0.408, p = 0.001) as well as between both proteins (r = 0.663, p = 0.000). A spatial association of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C to CAV and CIF could be demonstrated. A relevant re-occurrence of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C following human heart transplantation could be demonstrated with spatial association to

  20. Intracytoplasmic stable expression of IgG1 antibody targeting NS3 helicase inhibits replication of highly efficient hepatitis C Virus 2a clone

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    Clementi Massimo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major public health problem with more than 170 million cases of chronic infections worldwide. There is no protective vaccine currently available for HCV, therefore the development of novel strategy to prevent chronic infection is important. We reported earlier that a recombinant human antibody clone blocks viral NS3 helicase activity and inhibits replication of HCV 1b virus. This study was performed further to explore the mechanism of action of this recombinant antibody and to determine whether or not this antibody inhibits replication and infectivity of a highly efficient JFH1 HCV 2a virus clone. Results The antiviral effect of intracellular expressed antibody against the HCV 2a virus strain was examined using a full-length green fluorescence protein (GFP labeled infectious cell culture system. For this purpose, a Huh-7.5 cell line stably expressing the NS3 helicase gene specific IgG1 antibody was prepared. Replication of full-length HCV-GFP chimera RNA and negative-strand RNA was strongly inhibited in Huh-7.5 cells stably expressing NS3 antibody but not in the cells expressing an unrelated control antibody. Huh-7.5 cells stably expressing NS3 helicase antibody effectively suppressed infectious virus production after natural infection and the level of HCV in the cell free supernatant remained undetectable after first passage. In contrast, Huh-7.5 cells stably expressing an control antibody against influenza virus had no effect on virus production and high-levels of infectious HCV were detected in culture supernatants over four rounds of infectivity assay. A recombinant adenovirus based expression system was used to demonstrate that Huh-7.5 replicon cell line expressing the intracellular antibody strongly inhibited the replication of HCV-GFP RNA. Conclusion Recombinant human anti-HCV NS3 antibody clone inhibits replication of HCV 2a virus and infectious virus production. Intracellular

  1. Characterization of alpha-toxin hla gene variants, alpha-toxin expression levels, and levels of antibody to alpha-toxin in hemodialysis and postsurgical patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu K; Wu, Yuling; Tabor, David E; Mok, Hoyin; Sellman, Bret R; Jenkins, Amy; Yu, Li; Jafri, Hasan S; Rude, Thomas H; Ruffin, Felicia; Schell, Wiley A; Park, Lawrence P; Yan, Qin; Thaden, Joshua T; Messina, Julia A; Fowler, Vance G; Esser, Mark T

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-toxin is a major Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor. This study evaluated potential relationships between in vitro alpha-toxin expression of S. aureus bloodstream isolates, anti-alpha-toxin antibody in serum of patients with S. aureus bacteremia (SAB), and clinical outcomes in 100 hemodialysis and 100 postsurgical SAB patients. Isolates underwent spa typing and hla sequencing. Serum anti-alpha-toxin IgG and neutralizing antibody levels were measured by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a red blood cell (RBC)-based hemolysis neutralization assay. Neutralization of alpha-toxin by an anti-alpha-toxin monoclonal antibody (MAb MEDI4893) was tested in an RBC-based lysis assay. Most isolates encoded hla (197/200; 98.5%) and expressed alpha-toxin (173/200; 86.5%). In vitro alpha-toxin levels were inversely associated with survival (cure, 2.19 μg/ml, versus failure, 1.09 μg/ml; P toxin-expressing S. aureus isolates (P toxin is highly conserved in clinical S. aureus isolates. Higher in vitro alpha-toxin levels were associated with a positive clinical outcome. Although patients infected with alpha-toxin-producing S. aureus exhibited higher anti-alpha-toxin antibody levels, these levels were not associated with a better clinical outcome in this study.

  2. Immunogenic variants obtained by mutagenesis of mouse mastocytoma P815. V. H-2 associativity of variant-specific antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Snick, J; Maryanski, J; Van Pel, A; Parmiani, G; Boon, T

    1982-11-01

    By in vitro mutagenesis of mastocytoma P815, it is possible to obtain tumor cell variants that are rejected by syngeneic mice (tum-). Most of these variants carry new individual antigens and stimulate a specific cytolytic T cell (CTL) response in mixed leukocyte tumor cell culture (MLTC). The H-2 associativity of this response was examined for six different variants by measuring the inhibition of cell-mediated cytolysis by antibodies directed against products of the K or the D end of the H-2d complex. The lysis was either not inhibited (variants P91 and P116) or inhibited selectively by anti-Kd (variants P21, P32 and P198) or anti-Dd antibodies (variant P35). All these tum- variants expressed Kd and Dd antigens as measured by absorption of H-2 alloantisera. Long-term CTL clones can be obtained that are specific for individual tum- antigens. The pattern of H-2 associativity obtained with MLTC-derived CTL against four tum- variants was verified with CTL clones directed against the specific antigens of these variants. Concordant results were observed in all cases. In addition to CTL clones specific for tum- antigens, it is possible to isolate clones against a P815 tumor-associated antigen found on all P815 tum- variants. For these clones no clear associativity with either Kd or Dd products was found.

  3. Targeted exome sequencing for the identification of a protective variant against Internet gaming disorder at rs2229910 of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 3 (NTRK3): A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Yu; Jeong, Jo-Eun; Rhee, Je-Keun; Cho, Hyun; Chun, Ji-Won; Kim, Tae-Min; Choi, Sam-Wook; Choi, Jung-Seok; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2016-12-01

    Background and aims Internet gaming disorder (IGD) has gained recognition as a potential new diagnosis in the fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, but genetic evidence supporting this disorder remains scarce. Methods In this study, targeted exome sequencing was conducted in 30 IGD patients and 30 control subjects with a focus on genes linked to various neurotransmitters associated with substance and non-substance addictions, depression, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Results rs2229910 of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 3 (NTRK3) was the only single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that exhibited a significantly different minor allele frequency in IGD subjects compared to controls (p = .01932), suggesting that this SNP has a protective effect against IGD (odds ratio = 0.1541). The presence of this potentially protective allele was also associated with less time spent on Internet gaming and lower scores on the Young's Internet Addiction Test and Korean Internet Addiction Proneness Scale for Adults. Conclusions The results of this first targeted exome sequencing study of IGD subjects indicate that rs2229910 of NTRK3 is a genetic variant that is significantly related to IGD. These findings may have significant implications for future research investigating the genetics of IGD and other behavioral addictions.

  4. Production and Purification of Polyclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masami; Mukumoto, Mari; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies consist of a mixture of antibodies produced by multiple B-cell clones that have differentiated into antibody-producing plasma cells in response to an immunogen. Polyclonal antibodies raised against an antigen recognize multiple epitopes on a target molecule, which results in a signal amplification in indirect immunoassays including immune-electron microscopy. In this chapter, we present a basic procedure to generate polyclonal antibodies in rabbits.

  5. Drift of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 toward increased neutralization resistance over the course of the epidemic: a comprehensive study using the most potent and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvin-Pley, M; Morgand, M; Meyer, L; Goujard, C; Moreau, A; Mouquet, H; Nussenzweig, M; Pace, C; Ho, D; Bjorkman, P J; Baty, D; Chames, P; Pancera, M; Kwong, P D; Poignard, P; Barin, F; Braibant, M

    2014-12-01

    Extending our previous analyses to the most recently described monoclonal broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), we confirmed a drift of HIV-1 clade B variants over 2 decades toward higher resistance to bNAbs targeting almost all the identified gp120-neutralizing epitopes. In contrast, the sensitivity to bNAbs targeting the gp41 membrane-proximal external region remained stable, suggesting a selective pressure on gp120 preferentially. Despite this evolution, selected combinations of bNAbs remain capable of neutralizing efficiently most of the circulating variants.

  6. Characterization of C69R variant HBsAg: effect on binding to anti-HBs and the structure of virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadiji-Abbes, Nadia; Mihoubi, Wafa; Martin, Marta; Karakasyan-Dia, Carole; Frikha, Fakher; Gergely, Csilla; Jouenne, Thierry; Gargouri, Ali; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2015-10-01

    Several variants of the major "a" determinant of the HBsAg, the main target of HBV neutralization by antibodies, have been described. However, mutations outside this region have not been as thoroughly investigated. During the genotyping of HBV from Tunisian patients with chronic hepatitis B, we identified a variant with a C69R substitution in the cytosolic loop of the S protein, resulting in a change in the hydrophobicity profile compared to the wild-type HBsAg. Wild-type and mutant HBsAgs were produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and recombinant proteins were tested for their ability to correctly self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs), and their ability to bind to HBs antibodies. The C69R substitution resulted in a decrease in binding to commercial anti-HBs antibodies, and although the variant appeared to assemble properly into VLPs, the average size of the particles was larger than that of the wild-type HBsAg. Prediction of the tertiary structure of the C69R mutant revealed a change in the first (aa 60-70) and the second loop (aa 110 to 120) compared to the wild-type protein. Furthermore, we showed by an isothermal titration calorimetry assay that the interaction between the wild-type HBsAg and the anti-HBs antibody was exothermic, whereas that with the mutant C69R was endothermic, indicating an effect on the binding affinity.

  7. Monoclonal antibody-based targeted therapy for ovarian cancer%单克隆抗体靶向治疗卵巢癌研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹王丽; 宋佳希

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer, one of the lethal malignancies of the female reproductive system , has the highest rate of mortality among all gynecological malignancies, which can be attributed to the lack of effective means of early diagnosis and treatment, its resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics and its extraperitoneal metastasis. The identification of a series of ovarian cancer associated antigens has promoted the development of monoclonal antibodies and their conjugates and provided options for the treatment of ovarian cancer through such target antigens as CA125, MUC1, HER2, VEGF and EFGR. Some of them have exhibited clinical effects and application value. At present, abagovomab, oregovomab, human milk fat globule 1, trastuzumab, etc. are already on stage—Ⅲ clinical trial.%卵巢癌(ovarian cancer,OC)是妇科生殖器官恶性肿瘤之一,死亡率占妇科肿瘤首位,主要原因在于其缺乏有效的早期诊断治疗措施、对常规化疗药物的耐药性和腹膜外转移.随着卵巢癌相关抗原被陆续发现,其特异性单克隆抗体以及抗体-抗肿瘤药物偶联物已成为卵巢癌治疗的新手段.通过靶向肿瘤抗原(cancer antigen 125,CA125)、黏蛋白1(mucin 1,MUC1)、人类表皮生长因子受体2(human epidermal factor receptor-2,HER2)、血管内皮生长因子(vascular endothelial growth factor,VEGF)和表皮生长因子受体(epidermal growth factor receptor,EGFR)等目标抗原,针对性地治疗卵巢癌,有些已经显示出一定的临床疗效,具有很好的应用前景.阿巴伏单抗、Oregovomab、人乳脂肪球1(human milk fat globule 1,HMFG1)和曲妥珠单抗等已进入Ⅲ期临床试验中.

  8. Targeting oxidative injury and cytokines' activity in the treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor-α antibody for complex regional pain syndrome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclescu, Adriana A; Nordquist, Lena; Hysing, Eva-Britt; Butler, Stephen; Basu, Samar; Lind, Anne-Li; Gordh, Torsten

    2013-11-01

    Cytokines and oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the potential pathogenic development of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). We aimed to analyze the relationship between clinical status, circulating levels of cytokines, and markers of oxidative damage during the treatment with anti-TNFα antibodies. The patient chosen for treatment had not had improvement through a number of conventional therapies and fulfilled the current diagnostic criteria for CRPS-1. We investigated the clinical variables before and after systemic administration of 1.4 mg/kg anti-TNFα antibody (infliximab), repeated after 1 month in a dose of 3 mg/kg. Blood samples were collected before and after anti-TNFα antibodies administration, and plasma was analyzed for 8-isoprostane-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α, a marker of oxidative injury) and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17A). Plasma concentrations of 8-iso-PGF2α were measured with radioimmunoassay (RIA), and the kinetics of cytokines were detected in plasma by antibody-based proximity ligation (PLA). Pathologically high levels of 8-iso-PGF2α were found in the patient. Immediately after each administration of infliximab, the levels of 8-iso-PGF2α decreased. Although the patient showed an improvement of the cutaneous dystrophic symptoms and diminished pain associated with these lesions, the levels of circulating TNFα increased after the administration of anti-TNFα antibodies. In a patient with CRPS-1 treated with anti-TNFα antibodies, we report increased levels of circulating TNFα and a temporary mitigation of oxidative stress as measured by plasma F2 -isoprostane. This case report provides evidence 2 supporting the indication of monitoring the oxidative stress biomarkers during treatment with anti-TNFα antibodies in CRPS 1.

  9. Phenotypic screening: the future of antibody discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Munoz, Andrea L; Minter, Ralph R; Rust, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Most antibody therapeutics have been isolated from high throughput target-based screening. However, as the number of validated targets diminishes and the target space becomes increasingly competitive, alternative strategies, such as phenotypic screening, are gaining momentum. Here, we review successful phenotypic screens, including those used to isolate antibodies against cancer and infectious agents. We also consider exciting advances in the expression and phenotypic screening of antibody repertoires in single cell autocrine systems. As technologies continue to develop, we believe that antibody phenotypic screening will increase further in popularity and has the potential to provide the next generation of therapeutic antibodies.

  10. Phage display selection of tight specific binding variants from a hyperthermostable Sso7d scaffold protein library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies, the quintessential biological recognition molecules, are not ideal for many applications because of their large size, complex modifications, and thermal and chemical instability. Identifying alternative scaffolds that may be evolved into tight, specific binding molecules with improved physical properties is of increasing interest, particularly for biomedical applications in resource-limited environments. Hyperthermophilic organisms, such as Sulfolobus solfataricus, are an attractive source of highly stable proteins that may serve as starting points for alternative molecular recognition scaffolds. We describe the first application of phage display to identify binding proteins based on the S. solfataricus protein Sso7d scaffold. Sso7d is a small cysteine-free DNA-binding protein (approximately 7 kDa, 63 amino acids), with a melting temperature of nearly 100 °C. Tight-binding Sso7d variants were selected for a diverse set of protein targets from a 10(10) member library, demonstrating the versatility of the scaffold. These Sso7d variants are able to discriminate among closely related human, bovine and rabbit serum albumins. Equilibrium dissociation constants in the nanomolar to low micromolar range were measured via competitive ELISA. Importantly, the Sso7d variants continue to bind their targets in the absence of the phage context. Furthermore, phage-displayed Sso7d variants retain their binding affinity after exposure to temperatures up to 70 °C. Taken together, our results suggest that the Sso7d scaffold will be a complementary addition to the range of non-antibody scaffold proteins that may be utilized in phage display. Variants of hyperthermostable binding proteins have potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics for environments with extreme conditions of storage and deployment.

  11. Allelic diversity of the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 entails variant-specific red cell surface epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inès Vigan-Womas

    Full Text Available The clonally variant Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 adhesin is a virulence factor and a prime target of humoral immunity. It is encoded by a repertoire of functionally differentiated var genes, which display architectural diversity and allelic polymorphism. Their serological relationship is key to understanding the evolutionary constraints on this gene family and rational vaccine design. Here, we investigated the Palo Alto/VarO and IT4/R29 and 3D7/PF13_003 parasites lines. VarO and R29 form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes, a phenotype associated with severe malaria. They express an allelic Cys2/group A NTS-DBL1α(1 PfEMP1 domain implicated in rosetting, whose 3D7 ortholog is encoded by PF13_0003. Using these three recombinant NTS-DBL1α(1 domains, we elicited antibodies in mice that were used to develop monovariant cultures by panning selection. The 3D7/PF13_0003 parasites formed rosettes, revealing a correlation between sequence identity and virulence phenotype. The antibodies cross-reacted with the allelic domains in ELISA but only minimally with the Cys4/group B/C PFL1955w NTS-DBL1α. By contrast, they were variant-specific in surface seroreactivity of the monovariant-infected red cells by FACS analysis and in rosette-disruption assays. Thus, while ELISA can differentiate serogroups, surface reactivity assays define the more restrictive serotypes. Irrespective of cumulated exposure to infection, antibodies acquired by humans living in a malaria-endemic area also displayed a variant-specific surface reactivity. Although seroprevalence exceeded 90% for each rosetting line, the kinetics of acquisition of surface-reactive antibodies differed in the younger age groups. These data indicate that humans acquire an antibody repertoire to non-overlapping serotypes within a serogroup, consistent with an antibody-driven diversification pressure at the population level. In addition, the data provide important information for vaccine design, as

  12. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  13. Suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses in mice exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid: Role of PPARalpha and T- and B-cell targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    T-cell-dependent antibody responses (TDAR) are suppressed in female C57BL/6N mice exposed to ≥3.75 mg/kg of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) for 15 days. To determine if suppression of humoral immunity by PFOA is peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARa)-dependent and...

  14. Murine anti-vaccinia virus D8 antibodies target different epitopes and differ in their ability to block D8 binding to CS-E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Matho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The IMV envelope protein D8 is an adhesion molecule and a major immunodominant antigen of vaccinia virus (VACV. Here we identified the optimal D8 ligand to be chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E. CS-E is characterized by a disaccharide moiety with two sulfated hydroxyl groups at positions 4' and 6' of GalNAc. To study the role of antibodies in preventing D8 adhesion to CS-E, we have used a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies, and tested their ability to compete with CS-E for D8 binding. Among four antibody specificity groups, MAbs of one group (group IV fully abrogated CS-E binding, while MAbs of a second group (group III displayed widely varying levels of CS-E blocking. Using EM, we identified the binding site for each antibody specificity group on D8. Recombinant D8 forms a hexameric arrangement, mediated by self-association of a small C-terminal domain of D8. We propose a model in which D8 oligomerization on the IMV would allow VACV to adhere to heterogeneous population of CS, including CS-C and potentially CS-A, while overall increasing binding efficiency to CS-E.

  15. Increased Fab thermoresistance via VH-targeted directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entzminger, Kevin C; Johnson, Jennifer L; Hyun, Jeongmin; Lieberman, Raquel L; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2015-10-01

    Antibody aggregation is frequently mediated by the complementarity determining regions within the variable domains and can significantly decrease purification yields, shorten shelf-life and increase the risk of anti-drug immune responses. Aggregation-resistant antibodies could offset these risks; accordingly, we have developed a directed evolution strategy to improve Fab stability. A Fab-phage display vector was constructed and the VH domain targeted for mutagenesis by error-prone PCR. To enrich for thermoresistant clones, the resulting phage library was transiently heated, followed by selection for binding to an anti-light chain constant domain antibody. Five unique variants were identified, each possessing one to three amino acid substitutions. Each engineered Fab possessed higher, Escherichia coli expression yield, a 2-3°C increase in apparent melting temperature and improved aggregation resistance upon heating at high concentration. Select mutations were combined and shown to confer additive improvements to these biophysical characteristics. Finally, the wild-type and most stable triple variant Fab variant were converted into a human IgG1 and expressed in mammalian cells. Both expression level and aggregation resistance were similarly improved in the engineered IgG1. Analysis of the wild-type Fab crystal structure provided a structural rationale for the selected residues changes. This approach can help guide future Fab stabilization efforts.

  16. Prospective Preliminary In Vitro Investigation of a Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Conjugated with Ligand CD80 and VEGF Antibody As a Targeted Drug Delivery System for the Induction of Cell Death in Rodent Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Kay Kovach

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Target drug deliveries using nanotechnology are a novel consideration in the treatment of cancer. We present herein an in vitro mouse model for the preliminary investigation of the efficacy of an iron oxide nanoparticle complex conjugated to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF antibody and ligand cluster of differentiation 80 (CD80 for the purpose of eventual translational applications in the treatment of human osteosarcoma (OSA. The 35 nm diameter iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are functionalized with an n-hydroxysuccinimide biocompatible coating and are conjugated on the surface to proteins VEGF antibody and ligand CD80. Combined, these proteins have the ability to target OSA cells and induce apoptosis. The proposed system was tested on a cancerous rodent osteoblast cell line (ATCCTMNPO CRL-2836 at four different concentrations (0.1, 1.0, 10.0, and 100.0 μg/mL of ligand CD80 alone, VEGF antibody alone, and a combination thereof (CD80+VEGF. Systems were implemented every 24 h over different sequential treatment timelines: 24, 48, and 72 h, to find the optimal protein concentration required for a reduction in cell proliferation. Results demonstrated that a combination of ligand CD80 and VEGF antibody was consistently most effective at reducing aberrant osteoblastic proliferation for both the 24- and 72-h timelines. At 48 h, however, an increase in cell proliferation was documented for the 0.1 and 1 μg/mL groups. For the 24- and 72-h tests, concentrations of 1.0 μg/mL of CD80+VEGF and 0.1 μg/mL of VEGF antibody were most effective. Concentrations of 10.0 and 100.0 μg/mL of CD80+VEGF reduced cell proliferation, but not as remarkably as the 1.0 μg/mL concentration. In addition, cell proliferation data showed that multiple treatments (72-h test induced cell death in the osteoblasts better than a single treatment. Future targeted drug delivery system research includes trials in OSA cell lines from greater phylum

  17. Ontogeny-based immunogens for the induction of V2-directed HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Penny L; Gorman, Jason; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Morris, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    The development of a preventative HIV vaccine able to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) remains a major challenge. Antibodies that recognize the V2 region at the apex of the HIV envelope trimer are among the most common bNAb specificities during chronic infection and many exhibit remarkable breadth and potency. Understanding the developmental pathway of these antibodies has provided insights into their precursors, and the viral strains that engage them, as well as defined how such antibodies mature to acquire breadth. V2-apex bNAbs are derived from rare precursors with long anionic CDR H3s that are often deleted in the B cell repertoire. However, longitudinal studies suggest that once engaged, these precursors contain many of the structural elements required for neutralization, and can rapidly acquire breadth through moderate levels of somatic hypermutation in response to emerging viral variants. These commonalities in the precursors and mechanism of neutralization have enabled the identification of viral strains that show enhanced reactivity for V2 precursors from multiple donors, and may form the basis of germline targeting approaches. In parallel, new structural insights into the HIV trimer, the target of these quaternary antibodies, has created invaluable new opportunities for ontogeny-based immunogens designed to select for rare V2-bNAb precursors, and drive them toward breadth.

  18. Structure-guided alterations of the gp41-directed HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5 reveal new properties regarding its neutralizing function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Guenaga

    Full Text Available The broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody 2F5 recognizes an epitope in the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER. The MPER adopts a helical conformation as free peptide, as post-fusogenic forms of gp41, and when bound to the 4E10 monoclonal antibody (Mab. However, when bound to 2F5, the epitope is an extended-loop. The antibody-peptide structure reveals binding between the heavy and light chains with most the long, hydrophobic CDRH3 not contacting peptide. However, mutagenesis identifies this loop as critical for binding, neutralization and for putative hydrophobic membrane interactions. Here, we examined length requirements of the 2F5 CDRH3 and plasticity regarding binding and neutralization. We generated 2F5 variants possessing either longer or shorter CDRH3s and assessed function. The CDRH3 tolerated elongations and reductions up to four residues, displaying a range of binding affinities and retaining some neutralizing capacity. 2F5 antibody variants selective recognition of conformationally distinctive MPER probes suggests a new role for the CDRH3 loop in destabilizing the helical MPER. Binding and neutralization were enhanced by targeted tryptophan substitutions recapitulating fully the activities of the wild-type 2F5 antibody in a shorter CDRH3 variant. MPER alanine scanning revealed binding contacts of this variant downstream of the 2F5 core epitope, into the 4E10 epitope region. This variant displayed increased reactivity to cardiolipin-beta-2-glycoprotein. Tyrosine replacements maintained neutralization while eliminating cardiolipin-beta-2-glycoprotein interaction. The data suggest a new mechanism of action, important for vaccine design, in which the 2F5 CDRH3 contacts and destabilizes the MPER helix downstream of its core epitope to allow induction of the extended-loop conformation.

  19. Variant RH alleles and Rh immunisation in patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippert, Emilia; Fujita, Claudia R.; Machado, Debora; Guelsin, Glaucia; Gaspardi, Ane C.; Pellegrino, Jordão; Gilli, Simone; Saad, Sara S.T.O.; Castilho, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Background Alloimmunisation is a major complication in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) receiving red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and despite provision of Rh phenotyped RBC units, Rh antibodies still occur. These antibodies in patients positive for the corresponding Rh antigen are considered autoantibodies in many cases but variant RH alleles found in SCD patients can also contribute to Rh alloimmunisation. In this study, we characterised variant RH alleles in 31 SCD patients who made antibodies to Rh antigens despite antigen-positive status and evaluated the clinical significance of the antibodies produced. Materials and methods RHD and RHCE BeadChip™ from BioArray Solutions and/or amplification and sequencing of exons were used to identify the RH variants. The serological features of all Rh antibodies in antigen-positive patients were analysed and the clinical significance of the antibodies was evaluated by retrospective analysis of the haemoglobin (Hb) levels before and after transfusion; the change from baseline pre-transfusion Hb and the percentage of HbS were also determined. Results We identified variant RH alleles in 31/48 (65%) of SCD patients with Rh antibodies. Molecular analyses revealed the presence of partial RHD alleles and variant RHCE alleles associated with altered C and e antigens. Five patients were compound heterozygotes for RHD and RHCE variants. Retrospective analysis showed that 42% of antibodies produced by the patients with RH variants were involved in delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions or decreased survival of transfused RBC. Discussion In this study, we found that Rh antibodies in SCD patients with RH variants can be clinically significant and, therefore, matching patients based on RH variants should be considered. PMID:24960646

  20. The Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-1 19 KD antibody response in the Peruvian Amazon predominantly targets the non-allele specific, shared sites of this antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum re-emerged in Iquitos, Peru in 1994 and is now hypoendemic (P. falciparum infections can be followed using this population dynamic. Previous work demonstrated a strong association between this population's antibody response to PfMSP1-19KD and protection against febrile illness and parasitaemia. Therefore, some selection for PfMSP1-19KD allelic diversity would be expected if the protection is to allele-specific sites of PfMSP1-19KD. Here, the potential for allele-specific polymorphisms in this population is investigated, and the allele-specificity of antibody responses to PfMSP1-19KD are determined. Methods The 42KD region in PfMSP1 was genotyped from 160 individual infections collected between 2003 and 2007. Additionally, the polymorphic block 2 region of Pfmsp1 (Pfmsp1-B2 was genotyped in 781 infection-months to provide a baseline for population-level diversity. To test whether PfMSP1-19KD genetic diversity had any impact on antibody responses, ELISAs testing IgG antibody response were performed on individuals using all four allele-types of PfMSP1-19KD. An antibody depletion ELISA was used to test the ability of antibodies to cross-react between allele-types. Results Despite increased diversity in Pfmsp1-B2, limited diversity within Pfmsp1-42KD was observed. All 160 infections genotyped were Mad20-like at the Pfmsp1-33KD locus. In the Pfmsp1-19KD locus, 159 (99.4% were the Q-KSNG-F haplotype and 1 (0.6% was the E-KSNG-L haplotype. Antibody responses in 105 individuals showed that Q-KNG and Q-TSR alleles generated the strongest immune responses, while Q-KNG and E-KNG responses were more concordant with each other than with those from Q-TSR and E-TSR, and vice versa. The immuno-depletion ELISAs showed all samples responded to the antigenic sites shared amongst all allelic forms of PfMSP1-19KD. Conclusions A non-allele specific antibody response in PfMSP1-19KD may explain why other allelic forms have not

  1. Isolation and characterization of human rhinovirus antigenic variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Isolation of antigenic variants of human rhinovirus types 2, 14, and 17 was attempted by plaquing untreated virus (P-isolates), selecting variants in the presence of homologous antiserum (C-isolates), and by selecting variants in the presence of antibody following 5-fluorouracil mutagenesis (M-isolates). All viruses were triple-plaque purified and purity neutralization tested prior to isolate selection. Based on a fourfold reduction in neutralizing antibody titer to homologous antiserum, no antigenic variation was found in P-isolates from the three serotypes examined. Antigenic variants of all three serotypes could be isolated by the antiserum selection method (C-isolates). However, antigenic variants of RV17 were isolated at a much higher frequency and showed a larger degree of variation than those of RV2 and RV14. At least two of the variants selected, RV17 (C301) and RV2 (M803), failed to be neutralized by the known 89 rhinovirus antiserum. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of (/sup 35/S) methionine-labelled virion polypeptides revealed that each serotype had a characteristic pattern and that selected RV2 and RV17 isolates had patterns identical to those of the prototype strains. By isoelectric focusing an antigenic variant of RV2 was shown to contain altered virion polypeptides VP1 and VP2 whereas two RV17 antigenic variants demonstrated alterations only in the VP1 polypeptide.

  2. New strategies in colorectal cancer: biomarkers of response to epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies and potential therapeutic targets in phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Arvind; Messersmith, Wells A

    2010-08-01

    Initial experience with the epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies (EGFR MoAb) in unselected patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) showed that most of the treated patients did not derive therapeutic benefit. This outcome has driven the search for biomarkers for this population. Recent advances have further shown the heterogeneous nature of this disease with multiple interlinked pathways being implicated. Two such pathways downstream to the EGFR, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) PI3K, have gained increasing attention and become targets for development of novel biomarkers and therapeutic agents. Here, we highlight recent progress.

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of targeted gold nanoshelled poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles carrying anti p53 antibody as a theranostic agent for ultrasound contrast imaging and photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Wan, Caifeng; Du, Jing; Li, Hongli; Liu, Xuesong; Yang, Hong; Li, Fenghua

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women and earlier detection can substantially reduce deaths from breast cancer. Polymers with targeted ligands are widely used in the field of molecular ultrasound imaging and targeted tumor therapy. In our study, the nanotheranostic agent was fabricated through filling perfluoropropane (C3F8) into poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs), followed by the formation of gold nanoshell on the surface, then conjugated with anti p53 antibody which has high specificity with the p53 protein overexpressing in breast cancer. The average diameter of the gold nanoshelled PLGA NPs carrying anti p53 antibody (p53-PLGA@Au NPs) was 247 ± 108.2 nm. The p53-PLGA@Au NPs had well-defined spherical morphology and hollow interiors observed by electron microscope, and had a good photothermal effect under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser. The results of laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) and flow cytometer (FCM) indicated the specific targeting of p53-PLGA@Au NPs conjugating with breast cancer MCF-7 cells overexpressing p53 protein in vitro. Also the ultrasound imaging experiments in vitro showed that p53-PLGA@Au NPs were suitable for ultrasound contrast imaging. In conclusion, the p53-PLGA@Au NPs are demonstrated to be novel targeted UCAs and may have potential applications in the early diagnosis and targeted near-infrared (NIR) photothermal therapy of breast cancer in the future.

  4. Rational design, biophysical and biological characterization of site-specific antibody-tubulysin conjugates with improved stability, efficacy and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Pamela; Fleming, Ryan; Bezabeh, Binyam; Huang, Fengying; Mao, Shenlan; Chen, Cui; Harper, Jay; Zhong, Haihong; Gao, Xizhe; Yu, Xiang-Qing; Hinrichs, Mary Jane; Reed, Molly; Kamal, Adeela; Strout, Patrick; Cho, Song; Woods, Rob; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Dixit, Rakesh; Wu, Herren; Gao, Changshou; Dimasi, Nazzareno

    2016-08-28

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are among the most promising empowered biologics for cancer treatment. ADCs are commonly prepared by chemical conjugation of small molecule cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs to antibodies through either lysine side chains or cysteine thiols generated by the reduction of interchain disulfide bonds. Both methods yield heterogeneous conjugates with complex biophysical properties and suboptimal serum stability, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics. To limit the complexity of cysteine-based ADCs, we have engineered and characterized in vitro and in vivo antibody cysteine variants that allow precise control of both site of conjugation and drug load per antibody molecule. We demonstrate that the chemically-defined cysteine-engineered antibody-tubulysin conjugates have improved ex vivo and in vivo stability, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics when compared to conventional cysteine-based ADCs with similar drug-to-antibody ratios. In addition, to limit the non-target FcγRs mediated uptake of the ADCs by cells of the innate immune system, which may result in off-target toxicities, the ADCs have been engineered to lack Fc-receptor binding. The strategies described herein are broadly applicable to any full-length IgG or Fc-based ADC and have been incorporated into an ADC that is in phase I clinical development.

  5. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies recognize their cognate antigens in a precise and effective way. In order to do so, they target regions of the antigenic molecules that have specific features such as large exposed areas, presence of charged or polar atoms, specific secondary structure elements, and lack of similarity...... to self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin.Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody...