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Sample records for antibody syndrome coexistence

  1. Pulmonary renal syndrome in a child with coexistence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease: case report and literature review.

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    Bogdanović, Radovan; Minić, Predrag; Marković-Lipkovski, Jasmina; Stajić, Nataša; Savić, Nataša; Rodić, Milan

    2013-03-22

    Pulmonary renal syndrome (PRS), denoting the presence of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and glomerulonephritis as manifestations of systemic autoimmune disease, is very rare in childhood. The coexistence of circulating anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease in children affected by this syndrome is exceptional, with unfavorable outcome in five out of seven patients reported to date. We describe a child with PRS associated with both circulating anti-myeloperoxidase (anti-MPO) ANCA and anti-GBM disease on renal biopsy who was successfully treated with immunosuppressive therapy. A 10-year old girl presented with fever, fatigue, malaise, and pallor followed by hemoptysis and severe anemia. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage was revealed on fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Renal findings consisted of microscopic hematuria, moderate proteinuria, and anti-GBM disease on renal biopsy. ANCA with anti-MPO specificity were present whereas anti-GBM antibodies were on borderline for positivity. Methyl-prednisolone pulses followed by prednisone led to cessation of hemoptysis, marked improvement of lung fuction, and normal finding on chest x-ray within 10 days. An immunosuppressive regimen was then given consisting of prednisone daily for 4 weeks with subsequent taper on alternate day, i.v. cyclophosphamide pulses monthly for 6 doses, followed by mycophenolate mofetil that resulted in normal lung function tests, hemoglobin concentration, and anti-MPO level within four subsequent weeks. During 10-months of follow-up she remained well, her blood pressure and renal function tests were normal, and proteinuria and hematuria gradually resolved. We report a child with an exceptionally rare coexistence of circulating ANCA and anti-GBM disease manifesting as PRS in whom renal disease was not the prominent part of clinical presentation, contrary to other reported pediatric patients. A review of literature on disease with double positive antibodies is

  2. Coexistence of Reverse Capgras Syndrome, Subjective Double and Cotard Syndrome

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    Azadeh Mashayekhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Misidentification syndrome is a condition in which the person thinks that familiar persons have been replaced with other one. Coexistence of some types of this syndrome has been reported with other psychiatric syndromes. In this report, we present a 47-year-old married man with coexistence of reverse Capgras and subjective double syndromes with Cotard syndrome. There is no previous report of coexistence of these three forms of delusions in a single case.

  3. Clinical outcome of patients with coexistent antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and antibodies against glomerular basement membrane.

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    Lindic, Jelka; Vizjak, Alenka; Ferluga, Dusan; Kovac, Damjan; Ales, Andreja; Kveder, Radoslav; Ponikvar, Rafael; Bren, Andrej

    2009-08-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and antibodies against glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) rarely coexist. Both antibodies may be associated with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and pulmonary hemorrhage. We describe the clinical, serological and histological features of our patients with dual antibodies. From 1977 to 2008, 48 patients with anti-GBM antibody-associated renal disease were observed. Eight out of the 30 tested patients (26.7%), all females, had positive myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA coexistent with anti-GBM antibodies. The patients' mean age was 63.4 +/- 7.8 years. Five presented with pulmonary-renal syndrome, all but one were dialysis-dependent on admission. They had constitutional symptoms and different organ involvement. The kidney biopsies revealed intense linear staining for immunoglobulin G and C3 along the glomerular and distal tubular basement membrane associated with irregular diffuse or focal extracapillary crescentic glomerulonephritis with necrosis of varying extent. Lesions of varying ages were characteristically expressed. Seven patients were treated with methylprednisolone and plasma exchange, four with cyclophosphamide, and one with intravenous immunoglobulin. After 28-74 months, there were three dialysis-dependent survivors and one patient with stable chronic renal disease. Two clinical relapses with pulmonary involvement and MPO-ANCA positivity without anti-GBM antibodies occurred in two dialysis-dependent patients. In summary, screening for ANCA and anti-GBM antibodies should be undertaken in patients with clinical signs of systemic vasculitis. In dialysis-dependent patients, the goal of treatment is to limit the damage of other involved organs and not to preserve renal function. Careful follow-up is necessary due to the relapsing nature of the ANCA component of the disease.

  4. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and coexisting hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

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    Young Min Hong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS is an acute viral disease with fever, hemorrhage and renal failure caused by hantavirus infection. Hantavirus induces HFRS or hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS. HPS progression to a life-threatening pulmonary disease is found primarily in the USA and very rarely in South Korea. Here, we report a case of HFRS and coexisting HPS.

  5. Coexistence of Antiphospholipid Syndrome and Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia in a Patient with Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism

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    Samuel Adediran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT is a prothrombotic adverse drug reaction in which heparin forms complexes with platelet factor 4 forming neoantigens that are recognized by autoantibodies. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is similar to HIT in that it is mediated by autoantibodies that are also prothrombotic. We present a case of rare coexistence of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

  6. Coexistence of Metabolic Syndrome and Psoriasis Vulgaris

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    Reyhan Çelik

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is one of the chronic inflammatory systemic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Crohn's disease, in which the inflammation is responsible for the pathogenesis. Recently, some studies reported the importance of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and an association of chronic inflammatory systemic diseases with atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine coexistence of psoriasis vulgaris with various severity and metabolic syndrome.Material and Method: One hundred psoriasis vulgaris patients and one hundred sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included in this study. The Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI was used for evaluating the disease severity in psoriasis patients. A PASI score below 7 was accepted as mild, between 7-12 as moderate, and above 12 as severe. We evaluated metabolic syndrome in both patient and control groups by using the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III metabolic syndrome criteria. SPSS 10.0 for Windows was used in analyzing data. For comparison, the student’s-t test, the Mann-Whitney U test and the chi-square test were used. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Metabolic syndrome, hypertension, elevated fasting plasma glucose and triglyceride levels, high waist circumference and lower high-density lipoprotein levels were more common in patients with psoriasis than in controls. However, there was no statistically significant difference in these parameters between these two groups (p>0.05. We found that the mean value of triglyceride levels was statistically higher in the psoriasis group (p0.05.Conclusion: No significant difference was observed between patients with mild, moderate, severe psoriasis and controls for the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. However, the mean value of triglyceride levels in psoriasis patients was higher and the mean value

  7. Syringomyelia coexisting with guillain-barre syndrome.

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    Kim, Hee-Sang; Yun, Dong Hwan; Chon, Jinmann; Lee, Jong Eon; Park, Min Ho; Han, Yoo Jin

    2013-10-01

    Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and syringomyelia are diseases of different entities. GBS is an acute post-infectious autoimmune disease which is mediated by autoantibodies against the myelin of peripheral nerves. Syringomyelia is a chronic disease characterized by a cavity extending longitudinally inside the spinal cord. A 67-year-old man is being hospitalized due to severe numbness and ascending weakness in all limbs. On neurological examination, the motor power of all limbs are decreased and show absence of deep tendon reflexes (DTRs). The patient is being diagnosed with GBS on the basis of the acute clinical course, nerve conduction studies of segmental demyelinating polyneuropathy, and a finding of albuminocytologic dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient is presented with a new set of symptoms thereafter, which composes of sensory changes in the upper extremities, the urinary dysfunction including frequency and residual urine, spastic bilateral lower extremities, and increased reflexes of the knee and the biceps at follow-up examinations. The spinal magnetic resonance imaging in the sagittal section revealed a syrinx cavity between the fifth cervical and the first thoracic vertebral segment in the cord. The somatosensory evoked potential show sensory pathway defects between both the brachial plexus and the brain stem. Thus, this patient is being diagnosed with both GBS and syringomyelia. We report a case of symptomatic syringomyelia coexisting with GBS. Since the GBS is presented with a progressive muscle weakness and reduced DTRs, the muscle weakness and stiffness in the extremities suggests a concurrent syringomyelia might be easily overlooked.

  8. Coexistence of pyoderma gangrenosum and sweet's syndrome in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coexistence of pyoderma gangrenosum and sweet's syndrome in a patient with ulcerative colitis. F Ajili, A Souissi, F Bougrine, N Boussetta, N.B. Abdelhafidh, S Sayhi, B Louzir, N Doss, J Laabidi, S Othmani ...

  9. The coexistence of antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus in Colombians.

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    Juan-Sebastian Franco

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence and associated factors related to the coexistence of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in a cohort of Colombian patients with SLE, and to discuss the coexistence of APS with other autoimmune diseases (ADs. METHOD: A total of 376 patients with SLE were assessed for the presence of the following: 1 confirmed APS; 2 positivity for antiphospholipid (aPL antibodies without a prior thromboembolic nor obstetric event; and 3 SLE patients without APS nor positivity for aPL antibodies. Comparisons between groups 1 and 3 were evaluated by bivariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Although the prevalence of aPL antibodies was 54%, APS was present in just 9.3% of SLE patients. In our series, besides cardiovascular disease (AOR 3.38, 95% CI 1.11-10.96, p = 0.035, pulmonary involvement (AOR 5.06, 95% CI 1.56-16.74, p = 0.007 and positivity for rheumatoid factor (AOR 4.68, 95%IC 1.63-14.98, p = 0.006 were factors significantly associated with APS-SLE. APS also may coexist with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, autoimmune thyroid diseases, systemic sclerosis, systemic vasculitis, dermatopolymyositis, primary biliary cirrhosis and autoimmune hepatitis. CONCLUSIONS: APS is a systemic AD that may coexist with other ADs, the most common being SLE. Awareness of this polyautoimmunity should be addressed promptly to establish strategies for controlling modifiable risk factors in those patients.

  10. Coexistence of Celiac Disease and Down Syndrome.

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    Simila, Seppo; Kokkonen, Jourma

    1990-01-01

    Three Finnish patients with Down syndrome and celiac disease are described. The incidence of celiac disease among patients with Down syndrome was calculated to be 20 times greater than in children without Down syndrome, indicating that it should be kept in mind when patients suffer from recurrent diarrhea and/or delayed puberty. (Author/JDD)

  11. Coexistence of Ankylosing Spondylitis and Klinefelter's Syndrome.

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    Kobak, Senol; Yalçin, Murat; Karadeniz, Muamer; Oncel, Guray

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammatory lower back pain and morning stiffness and accompanied by spine and sacroiliac joint involvement. Klinefelter's syndrome is a genetic condition that only affects males. Affected males have an extra X chromosome. This paper reports a 30-years-old male on followup with the diagnosis of Klinefelters syndrome. The patient admitted with complaints of inflammatory lower back, and neck pain and morning stiffness and was diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and salazopyrine treatment resulted in significant regression in his complaints.

  12. Coexistence of Ankylosing Spondylitis and Klinefelter's Syndrome

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    Şenol Kobak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammatory lower back pain and morning stiffness and accompanied by spine and sacroiliac joint involvement. Klinefelter's syndrome is a genetic condition that only affects males. Affected males have an extra X chromosome. This paper reports a 30-years-old male on followup with the diagnosis of Klinefelters syndrome. The patient admitted with complaints of inflammatory lower back, and neck pain and morning stiffness and was diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and salazopyrine treatment resulted in significant regression in his complaints.

  13. Coexistence of asthma and polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierau, Louise; Gade, Elisabeth Juul; Lindenberg, Svend

    2016-01-01

    Asthma may be associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and possibly patients with PCOS have a more severe type of asthma. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to summarize evidence of a coexistense of PCOS and asthma using the available literature. The search was completed...

  14. Update on antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

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    Lopes, Michelle Remião Ugolini; Danowski, Adriana; Funke, Andreas; Rêgo, Jozelia; Levy, Roger; Andrade, Danieli Castro Oliveira de

    2017-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. Most APS events are directly related to thrombotic events, which may affect small, medium or large vessels. Other clinical features like thrombocytopenia, nephropathy, cardiac valve disease, cognitive dysfunction and skin ulcers (called non-criteria manifestations) add significant morbidity to this syndrome and represent clinical situations that are challenging. APS was initially described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but it can occur in patients without any other autoimmune disease. Despite the autoimmune nature of this syndrome, APS treatment is still based on anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy.

  15. Update on antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

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    Michelle Remião Ugolini Lopes

    Full Text Available Summary Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease characterized by antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. Most APS events are directly related to thrombotic events, which may affect small, medium or large vessels. Other clinical features like thrombocytopenia, nephropathy, cardiac valve disease, cognitive dysfunction and skin ulcers (called non-criteria manifestations add significant morbidity to this syndrome and represent clinical situations that are challenging. APS was initially described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE but it can occur in patients without any other autoimmune disease. Despite the autoimmune nature of this syndrome, APS treatment is still based on anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy.

  16. [Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with diabetes insipidus].

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    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are conditions characterized by the combination of two or more organ-specific disorders. The underestimation oftheir real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical presentation. Because they comprise a wide spectrum of autoimmune disorders, autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are divided into four types, among which type-3 is the most common one. In this article, we report the case of a young female, initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus who several years later developed full-blown autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 consisting of autoimmune thyroid disorder and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.The discussed case suggests that in selected patients diabetes insipidus may coexist with autoimmune endocrinopathies and nonendocrine autoimmunopathies, as well as that in some patients idiopathic diabetes insipidus may be secondary to lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and/or the supraoptic-hypophyseal tract

  17. Coexistence of Cushing syndrome from functional adrenal adenoma and Addison disease from immune-mediated adrenalitis.

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    Colucci, Randall; Jimenez, Rafael E; Farrar, William; Malgor, Ramiro; Kohn, Leonard; Schwartz, Frank L

    2012-06-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an incidental adrenal adenoma and physical examination findings that included moderate obesity, a slight cervicothoracic fat pad ("buffalo hump"), increased supraclavicular fat pads, and white abdominal striae. Biochemical workup revealed elevated levels of 24-hour urinary free cortisol but normal serum morning cortisol and suppressed levels of corticotropin, suggestive of adrenal-dependent Cushing syndrome. The resected adrenal gland revealed macronodular cortical hyperplasia with a dominant nodule. Other findings included an absent cortisol response to corticotropin stimulation, presence of serum anti-21-hydroxylase antibodies, and mononuclear cell infiltration--consistent with adrenalitis. The findings represent, to the authors' knowledge, the first known case of a patient with coexistent functional cortisol-secreting macronodular adrenal tumor resulting in Cushing syndrome and immune-mediated adrenalitis resulting in Addison disease.

  18. [A patient with coexistence of primary hyperparathyroidism, Marfan's syndrome and von Willebrand's disease].

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    Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grazyna; Rakowska-Chort, Anna; Adamarczuk-Janczyszyn, Maria

    2008-01-01

    We presented a case of a 58 year old women suffering from three diseases: primary hyperparathyroidism, Marfan's syndrome and von Willebrand's disease. The coexistence of these diseases is not mentioned in medical literature. Because of the coexistence of Marfan's syndrome with primary hyperparathyroidism, the examinations of other endocrinopathy including multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN). Their coexistence was not confirmed at the present time. In this paper the new views on both patogenesis and treatment of the mentioned diseases were included.

  19. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

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    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Won, Jong Jin [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Jeong Gon; Ki, Won Woo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Won, Jong Jin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Jeong Gon; Ki, Won Woo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho

    1998-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs

  1. Coexistence of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome and Turner Syndrome: A Case Report.

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    Białka, Agnieszka; Gawlik, Aneta; Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka; Wilk, Krzysztof; Małecka-Tendera, Ewa; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2016-04-01

    Turner syndrome is a common chromosomal disorder, with an incidence of 1 in 2000 live-born female infants. Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKH) affects 1 in 4500 female births and, rarely, it might be associated with gonadal dysgenesis. A 17-year-old girl was referred to our clinic with short stature and primary amenorrhea. The patient was diagnosed with Turner syndrome and underwent estrogen therapy. At the age of 24 years, just after the patient's sexual initiation, the first complete gynecological examination was performed. A blind-ending vagina was revealed and the patient was diagnosed with MRKH. Early diagnosis of coexistence of MRKH and Turner syndrome, although very difficult, might prevent patients from developing serious complications. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Coexistence of potent HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies and antibody-sensitive viruses in a viremic controller.

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    Freund, Natalia T; Wang, Haoqing; Scharf, Louise; Nogueira, Lilian; Horwitz, Joshua A; Bar-On, Yotam; Golijanin, Jovana; Sievers, Stuart A; Sok, Devin; Cai, Hui; Cesar Lorenzi, Julio C; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Gristick, Harry B; van Gils, Marit J; Sanders, Rogier W; Wang, Lai-Xi; Seaman, Michael S; Burton, Dennis R; Gazumyan, Anna; Walker, Bruce D; West, Anthony P; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2017-01-18

    Some HIV-1-infected patients develop broad and potent HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that when passively transferred to mice or macaques can treat or prevent infection. However, bNAbs typically fail to neutralize coexisting autologous viruses due to antibody-mediated selection against sensitive viral strains. We describe an HIV-1 controller expressing HLA-B57*01 and HLA-B27*05 who maintained low viral loads for 30 years after infection and developed broad and potent serologic activity against HIV-1. Neutralization was attributed to three different bNAbs targeting nonoverlapping sites on the HIV-1 envelope trimer (Env). One of the three, BG18, an antibody directed against the glycan-V3 portion of Env, is the most potent member of this class reported to date and, as revealed by crystallography and electron microscopy, recognizes HIV-1 Env in a manner that is distinct from other bNAbs in this class. Single-genome sequencing of HIV-1 from serum samples obtained over a period of 9 years showed a diverse group of circulating viruses, 88.5% (31 of 35) of which remained sensitive to at least one of the temporally coincident autologous bNAbs and the individual's serum. Thus, bNAb-sensitive strains of HIV-1 coexist with potent neutralizing antibodies that target the virus and may contribute to control in this individual. When administered as a mix, the three bNAbs controlled viremia in HIV-1 YU2 -infected humanized mice. Our finding suggests that combinations of bNAbs may contribute to control of HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Severe jaundice due to coexistence of Dubin-Johnson syndrome and hereditary spherocytosis: a case report.

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    Korkmaz, Uğur; Duman, Ali Erkan; Oğütmen Koç, Deniz; Gürbüz, Yeşim; Dındar, Gökhan; Ensaroğlu, Fatih; Sener, Selçuk Yusuf; Sentürk, Omer; Hülagü, Sadettin

    2011-08-01

    Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a chronic, benign, intermittent jaundice, mostly of conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The level of bilirubin is not expected to be more than 20 mg/dl in this syndrome. In this article, we report a patient who was evaluated for hyperbilirubinemia and liver function test abnormalities and diagnosed with Dubin-Johnson syndrome coexisting with hereditary spherocytosis. We suggest that other diseases should be investigated if patients with Dubin-Johnson syndrome present with severe hyperbilirubinemia. Dubin-Johnson syndrome accompanied by hemolytic diseases might also have high coproporphyrin levels (as in Rotor's syndrome) than expected in pure Dubin-Johnson syndrome.

  4. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

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    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  5. Co-existence of syndrome X and hypertension among Ghanaians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, diabetes and dyslipidaemia have been commonly associated with hypertension. The clustering of such risk factors is termed the metabolic syndrome (i.e. Syndrome X). The syndrome has been associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease especially in the ...

  6. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome presenting as transverse myelitis

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    Javvid M Dandroo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies and/or lupus anticoagulant. APS can occur either as a primary disorder or secondary to a connective tissue disease, most frequently systemic lupus erythematosus. Central nervous system involvement is one of the most prominent clinical manifestations of APS, and includes arterial and venous thrombotic events, psychiatric features, and a variety of other nonthrombotic neurological syndromes. Although the mechanism of neurological involvement in patients with APS is thought to be thrombotic in origin and endothelial dysfunction associated with antiphospholipid antibodies. APS presenting as acute transverse myelitis is very rarely seen with a prevalence rate of 1%. We are describing a foreigner female presenting as acute transverse myelitis which on evaluation proved to be APS induced. So far, very few cases have been reported in literature with APS as etiology.

  7. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome presenting as transverse myelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Javvid M Dandroo; Naveed Mohsin; Firdousa Nabi

    2015-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies and/or lupus anticoagulant. APS can occur either as a primary disorder or secondary to a connective tissue disease, most frequently systemic lupus erythematosus. Central nervous system involvement is one of the most prominent clinical manifestations of APS, and includes arterial and venous thrombotic events, psychiatric features, and a...

  8. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Presenting with Hemichorea

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    Yezenash Ayalew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old Bangladeshi lady presented to neurology with a three-month history of involuntary movements of her right arm, associated with loss of power. There was progression to the right leg, and she subsequently developed episodes of slurred speech and blurred vision. At the time of presentation, she was 12 weeks pregnant and the symptoms were reported to have started at conception. Past medical history was unremarkable apart from one first trimester miscarriage and there was no significant family history suggestive of a hereditary neurological condition. MRI of the head revealed no abnormalities but serology showed positive antinuclear antibodies (ANAs at a titre of 1/400. Further investigations revealed strongly positive anticardiolipin antibodies (>120 and positive lupus anticoagulant antibodies. The patient had a second miscarriage at 19 weeks gestation strengthening the possibility that the chorea was related to antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and she was started on a reducing dose of Prednisolone 40 mg daily and aspirin 300 mg daily. Six months later, she had complete resolution of neurological symptoms. There are several reports of chorea as a feature of antiphospholipid syndrome, but no clear consensus on underlying pathophysiology.

  9. The geoepidemiology of the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggioggero, Martina; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2010-03-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) can be detected by functional (lupus anticoagulant) and/or by solid phase assays (anti-cardiolipin and anti-beta2 glycoprotein I). Although detectable in 1-5% of asymptomatic apparently healthy subjects, persistent aPL are significantly associated with recurrent arterial/venous thrombosis and with pregnancy morbidity. Such an association is the formal classification tool for the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The prevalence of the syndrome with no associated systemic connective tissue diseases (primary APS) in the general population is still a matter of debate since there are no sound epidemiological studies in the literature so far. aPL display higher prevalence in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis than in other systemic autoimmune diseases. However not all the aPL positive lupus patients display the clinical manifestations. Comparable findings may be found in the paediatric population, although anti-beta2 glycoprotein I antibodies are detected in healthy children more frequently than in adults. High prevalence of aPL has been also reported in clinical manifestations that are not formal APS classification criteria: heart valve disease, livedo reticular, nephropathy, neurological manifestations, and thrombocytopenia. Antiphospholipid antibodies can be associated with infectious processes, active vaccination, drug administration and malignancies. Their prevalence and titres are lower and the relationship with the APS clinical manifestations are less strong than in the previously mentioned conditions. Ethnicity was also reported to influence the prevalence of aPL. 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Rapidly progressive antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies associated with pulmonary-renal syndrome in a 10-year-old girl

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco Filho,Fermin; Ernesto,Luci Carla; Rosa,Mônica Assis; Stuginski,Luis Antônio; Zlochevsky,Eliana Regina; Blanco,Fernando

    2001-01-01

    CONTEXT: The term pulmonary-renal syndrome has been used frequently to describe the clinical manifestations of a great number of diseases in which pulmonary hemorrhage and glomerulonephritis coexist. The classic example of this type of vasculitis is Goodpasture´s syndrome, a term used to describe the association of pulmonary hemorrhage, glomerulonephritis and the presence of circulating antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies (anti-GBM). Among the several types of systemic vasculitides th...

  11. Coexistence of 9p Deletion Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günes, Serkan; Ekinci, Özalp; Ekinci, Nuran; Toros, Fevziye

    2017-01-01

    Deletion or duplication of the short arm of chromosome 9 may lead to a variety of clinical conditions including craniofacial and limb abnormalities, skeletal malformations, mental retardation, and autism spectrum disorder. Here, we present a case report of 5-year-old boy with 9p deletion syndrome and autism spectrum disorder.

  12. Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome coexisted with intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome (BRBNS) is an uncommon congenital disorder characterized by sporadic venous malformation which mainly occurs in skin and alimentary canal. Here, we report a BRBNS patient with concomitant intestinal intussusception who diagnosed by intraoperative endoscopy and ultimately ...

  13. Sheehan fs syndrome co.existing with Graves' disease | Arpaci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sheehanfs syndrome (SS), which is an important cause of hypopituitarism, is common in developing countries. The most common presentation is the absence of lactation and amenorrhea. Hypothyroidism rather than hyperthyroidism is the usual expected phenomenon in SS. Postpartum hyperthyroidism is also common and ...

  14. Sawyer Syndrome Coexisting with Gonadoblastoma and Dysgerminoma, Delayed Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zohreh yousefiu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sawyer   syndrome characterized by the presence   sexual abnormality , gonadal disgenesis. The current practice is to proceed to a gonadectomy once the diagnosis due to due to the fact that the  risk   malignant transformation entirely in dysgenetic gonad.  Case   report: We present a case of Sawyer   syndrome  who  referred to the department of gynecology   oncology at Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad University, Iran in 2015 for evaluation of abdomino- pelvic distention.  She was a 18-year-old female with 46, XY karyotype and   poor secondary sexual characters  ,she suffered of abdominal  pain , multiple abdomino- pelvic  mass. Surgical excision of the mass along with bilateral salpingophorectomy  revealed   gonadoblastoma  in one gonad and dysgerminoma in the second one.  After combination chemotherapy she was under fallow-up. Conclusion: This case is presented because of its  could excellent prognosis if   not  missed opportunities in early recognizing  and  furthermore  adequate  treated with gonadectomy.

  15. Paraneoplastic cerebellar syndromes associated with antibodies against Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenkenbecher, Philipp; Chacko, Lisa; Pul, Refik; Sühs, Kurt-Wolfram; Wegner, Florian; Wurster, Ulrich; Stangel, Martin; Skripuletz, Thomas

    2017-12-18

    The paraneoplastic cerebellar syndrome presents as severe neuroimmunological disease associated with malignancies. Antibodies against antigens expressed by tumor cells cross-react with proteins of cerebellar Purkinje cells leading to neuroinflammation and neuronal loss. These antineuronal antibodies are preferentially investigated by serological analyses while examination of the cerebrospinal fluid is only performed infrequently. We retrospectively investigated 12 patients with antineuronal antibodies against Purkinje cells with a special focus on cerebrospinal fluid. Our results confirm a subacute disease with a severe cerebellar syndrome in 10 female patients due to anti-Yo antibodies associated mostly with gynecological malignancies. While standard cerebrospinal fluid parameters infrequently revealed pathological results, all patients presented oligoclonal bands indicating intrathecal IgG synthesis. Analyses of anti-Yo antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid by calculating the antibody specific index revealed intrathecal synthesis of anti-Yo antibodies in these patients. In analogy to anti-Yo syndrome, an intrathecal production of anti-Tr antibodies in one patient who presented with a paraneoplastic cerebellar syndrome was detected. In an additional patient, anti-Purkinje cell antibodies of unknown origin in the cerebrospinal fluid but not in serum were determined suggesting an isolated immune reaction within the central nervous system (CNS) and underlining the importance of investigating the cerebrospinal fluid. In conclusion, patients with a cerebellar syndrome display a distinct immune reaction within the cerebrospinal fluid including intrathecal synthesis of disease-specific antibodies. We emphasize the importance of a thorough immunological work up including investigations of both serum and cerebrospinal fluid.

  16. Role of Scleral Contact Lenses in Management of Coexisting Keratoconus and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Varsha M; Taneja, Mukesh; Dumpati, Srikanth; Mandathara, Preeji S; Sangwan, Virender S

    2017-10-01

    To report the rare coexistence of keratoconus and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) managed with scleral contact lenses (ScCLs). This is a retrospective case series. Five patients (9 eyes) who had coexisting SJS and corneal ectasia were identified from the database during the 2-year period. Diagnosis of SJS was based on a positive history of drug reactions, signs of ocular surface disease, and the presence of keratinization of lid margins. Keratoconus was diagnosed by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Five eyes of 3 patients had coexisting SJS and keratoconus and were dispensed with ScCLs (PROSE, prosthetic replacement of the ocular surface ecosystem; Boston Foundation for Sight, Needham Heights, MA). All these patients had photophobia. Visual acuity improved in all these patients with ScCL wear. Two patients (4 eyes) were excluded from this study because they had SJS with generalized corneal thinning from limbus to limbus, corneal opacification, and pannus. One patient developed deep vessels in the cornea on prolonged ScCL wear. Reduction in the ScCL wear schedule and change of material with a higher Dk resulted in regression of vascularization. Case 3 developed conjunctival congestion and was uncomfortable wearing ScCLs, although visual acuity was 20/40. He discontinued using ScCL wear. Keratoconus, a noninflammatory condition of the cornea coexisted with inflammatory SJS. Managing such patients with ScCLs may improve vision and comfort.

  17. Coexistence of spondyloarthritis and joint hypermobility syndrome: rare or unknown association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Pinto Carneiro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of siblings presenting coexisting non-radiographic axial spondyloartrhritis and joint hypermobility syndrome, complaining of back pain with morning stiffness, enthesitis, peripheral arthralgia, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level and positive HLA-B27. The association of these two conditions is rare, but especially interesting in view of their contrasting features, one causing axial skeleton stiffness, the other a wider range of peripheral joint movements. Coexistence of these two opposite disorders causes confusion in diagnosis and management, resulting in lower quality of life for patients, as they are in pain from the early stages. Therefore, this association is suspected in young individuals with back pain and physical exam findings of peripheral joint hypermobility and axial skeleton loss of mobility.

  18. Co-Existence of Tuberous Sclerosis and the Fanconi Syndrome in Two Saudi Male Siblings: Report on Two Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hwiesh, Abdulla K.; Al-Mueilo, Samir H.; Saeed, Ibrahim; Barak, Infal H.; Al-Muhanna, Fahd A.

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we present two cases of familial tuberous sclerosis co-existing with the Fanconi Syndrome. Both cases presented with history of failure to thrive and mental retardation associated with hypokalemic metabolic acidosis. To our knowledge, the association between tuberous sclerosis and the Fanconi Syndrome has not been reported previously. (author)

  19. A case of right alien hand syndrome coexisting with right-sided tactile extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSchaefer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The alien hand syndrome is a fascinating movement disorder. Patients with alien hand syndrome experience one of their limbs as alien, which acts autonomously and performs meaningful movements without being guided by the intention of the patient. Here we report a case of a 74-years old lady diagnosed with an atypical Parkinson syndrome by possible corticobasal degeneration. The patient stated that she could not control her right hand and that she felt like this hand had her own life. We tested the patient for ownership illusions of the hands and general tactile processing. Results revealed that when blindfolded, the patient recognized touch to her alien hand only if it was presented separated from touch to the other hand (bilateral asynchronous touch. Delivering touch synchronously to both the alien and the healthy hand resulted in failure of recognizing touch to the alien hand (bilateral synchronous touch. Thus, the alien hand syndrome here co-existed with right-sided tactile extinction and is one of only very few cases in which the alien hand was felt on the right side. We discuss the results in the light of recent research on the alien hand syndrome.

  20. Antiphospholipid syndrome, antiphospholipid antibodies and solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Moreno, J; Callejas-Rubio, J L; Ríos-Fernández, R; Ortego-Centeno, N

    2015-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is considered a high risk factor for any kind of surgery. Considering that all solid organ transplants are critically dependent on the patency of vascular anastomosis, there is much concern about the consequences this pro-thrombotic condition may have on transplantation. Relatively little information is available in the literature assessing the real risk that antiphospholipid syndrome or the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies represent in solid organ transplantation. The aim of this article is to review the literature related to transplantation of solid organs in patients diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome or patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Microangiopathic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex IgM antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Yumi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Shimizu, Masaki; Furuichi, Kengo; Wada, Takashi; Yachie, Akihiro

    2017-03-01

    Herein we describe a case of microangiopathic antiphospholipid syndrome (MAPS) due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex (aPS/PT) IgM antibody successfully treated with rituximab. A significant correlation was observed between the clinical course and the aPS/PT IgM antibody titer, which can rise earlier before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Rituximab can be safely and effectively used for MAPS. Although detection of only aPS/PT IgM antibody is rare, aPS/PT IgM antibody might be associated with the pathogenesis of MAPS and might be a useful marker of disease activity. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Subpleural lung cysts in Down syndrome: prevalence and association with coexisting diagnoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biko, David M. [Pennsylvania Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Schwartz, Michael; Anupindi, Sudha A. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Altes, Talissa A. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Although subpleural cysts are known to be associated with Down syndrome, their etiology and prevalence remains unknown. To determine the prevalence of subpleural cysts in children with Down syndrome and the association with prematurity, congenital heart disease (CHD), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and chronic ventilator support. A review of the CT examinations of 25 children with Down syndrome was performed to determine the presence, location, and distribution of cysts along with associated abnormalities. Charts were reviewed and coexistent diagnoses and past treatments were recorded. The prevalence of subpleural cysts was 36% with no significant association with CHD, ECMO, or chronic ventilator support. An association was found in the two children with a history of prematurity. The cysts were most commonly found in the anteromedial portion of the lung. Subpleural cysts are common in Down syndrome and should not be confused with another pathological process. An association with prematurity was found, but the low number of children in this study makes the connection uncertain. The etiology remains unclear, but it has been hypothesized that the cysts are associated with lung hypoplasia. (orig.)

  3. Subpleural lung cysts in Down syndrome: prevalence and association with coexisting diagnoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biko, David M.; Schwartz, Michael; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Altes, Talissa A.

    2008-01-01

    Although subpleural cysts are known to be associated with Down syndrome, their etiology and prevalence remains unknown. To determine the prevalence of subpleural cysts in children with Down syndrome and the association with prematurity, congenital heart disease (CHD), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and chronic ventilator support. A review of the CT examinations of 25 children with Down syndrome was performed to determine the presence, location, and distribution of cysts along with associated abnormalities. Charts were reviewed and coexistent diagnoses and past treatments were recorded. The prevalence of subpleural cysts was 36% with no significant association with CHD, ECMO, or chronic ventilator support. An association was found in the two children with a history of prematurity. The cysts were most commonly found in the anteromedial portion of the lung. Subpleural cysts are common in Down syndrome and should not be confused with another pathological process. An association with prematurity was found, but the low number of children in this study makes the connection uncertain. The etiology remains unclear, but it has been hypothesized that the cysts are associated with lung hypoplasia. (orig.)

  4. Periodontal status and Prevotella intermedia antibody in acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Hirofumi; Oe, Yoko; Nakayama, Hideki; Matsuo, Katsuhiko; Fukunaga, Takashi; Sugamura, Koichi; Kawano, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Seigo; Shinohara, Masanori; Izumi, Yuichi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2009-11-12

    We performed periodontal examination and measured serum antibody levels against Prevotella intermedia in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Composite periodontal risk scores were significantly higher in the ACS group than in the coronary artery disease (CAD) group. Serum antibody levels were higher in the ACS group than in the CAD group and those were significantly correlated with the composite periodontal risk scores. These results provided important information about the status of P. intermedia infection in patients with ACS.

  5. Coexistence of two neurocutaneous syndromes: Tuberous sclerosis and hypomelanosis of Ito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC and hypomelanosis of Ito (HI are two uncommon neurocutaneous syndromes and their coexistence is extremely rare. An epileptic child presented with progressively increasing multiple hypopigmented macules arranged in a linear and whorled pattern along the lines of Blaschko over the trunk and limbs, characteristic of HI. He also had facial angiofibromas, ash-leaf and confetti macules and shagreen patches. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed cortical tubers and subependymal nodules; which are diagnostic of TSC. The TSC defining loci have been mapped to Chromosome 9q34 (TSC1 and 16 pl3.3 (TSC2. There is no common genetic background for HI, but mosaicism of 9q33 locus has been documented. As per our knowledge, this is the second case of association of TSC with HI in a four-year-old child.

  6. CNS syndromes associated with antibodies against metabotropic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Autoantibodies to Central nervous system (CNS) metabotropic receptors are associated with a growing family of autoimmune brain diseases, including encephalitis, basal ganglia encephalitis, Ophelia syndrome, and cerebellitis. The purpose of this review is to summarize the state of knowledge regarding the target receptors, the neurological autoimmune disorders, and the pathogenic mechanisms. Antibodies to the γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor are associate with limbic encephalitis and severe seizures, often with small cell lung cancers. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) antibodies associate with Ophelia syndrome, a relatively mild form of encephalitis linked to Hodgkin lymphoma. mGluR1 antibodies associate with a form of cerebellar degeneration, and also Hodgkin lymphoma. Antibodies to Homer 3, a protein associated with mGluR1, have also been reported in two patients with cerebellar syndromes. Dopamine-2 receptor antibodies have been reported by one group in children with basal ganglia encephalitis and other disorders. CNS metabotropic receptor antibodies may exert direct inhibitory effects on their target receptors, but the evidence is more limited than with autoantibodies to ionotropic glutamate receptors. In the future, improved recognition of these patients may lead to better outcomes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of the diseases may uncover novel treatment strategies.

  7. A Novel SCN5A Mutation in a Patient with Coexistence of Brugada Syndrome Traits and Ischaemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders G; Calloe, Kirstine; Jespersen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a primary electrical heart disease, which can lead to sudden cardiac death. In older patients with BrS, the disease may coexist with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and recent studies support a synergistic proarrhythmic effect of the two disease entities. We report a case...

  8. Evolution of full-length genomes of HBV quasispecies in sera of patients with a coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tai-Cheng; Li, Xiao; Li, Long; Li, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Liang; Wei, Jia

    2017-04-06

    Although the evolutionary changes of viral quasispecies are correlated to the pathological status of a disease, little is known in the coexistence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibodies to these antigens (anti-HBs). To examine evolutionary changes in hepatitis B virus (HBV) and their relationship to the coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs antibodies, HBV genomes in patients with a coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs antibodies (experimental group) and HBsAg positive without anti-HBs (control group) were assessed. Our results showed that quasispecies diversity was significantly higher in the experimental group for large HBsAg (LHBsAg), middle HBsAg (MHBsAg), and HBsAg genes. LHBsAg harbored dN/dS values eight times higher in the experimental group; however, the mean dN/dS ratios in genes HbxAg, Pol and PreC/C of the experimental patients had an opposite trend. Phylogenetic trees in the experimental group were more complex than the control group. More positive selection sites, mutations and deletions were observed in the experimental group in specific regions. Furthermore, several amino acid variants in epitopes were potentially associated with the immune evasion. In conclusion, cumulative evolutionary changes in HBV genome that facilitate immune evasion provide insights into the genetic mechanism of a coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs antibodies.

  9. Onconeuronal and antineuronal antibodies in patients with neoplastic and non-neoplastic pulmonary pathologies and suspected for paraneoplastic neurological syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalak S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Onconeuronal antibodies are important diagnostic tool in patients with suspicion of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS. However, their role in PNS pathophysiology and specificity for particular neurological manifestation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate onconeuronal and antineuronal antibodies in patients with pulmonary pathologies and suspected for PNS. Materials and methods Twenty one patients with pulmonary pathologies were selected from the database of 525 consecutive patients with suspicion of PNS. Patients' sera were screened for the presence of onconeuronal and antineuronal antibodies by means of indirect immunofluorescence; the presence was confirmed by Western blotting. Clinical data were obtained from medical records, hospital data base, and questionnaire-based direct telephone contact with patients. Results Among 21 patients, aged 54 ± 11, with pulmonary pathologies, the most frequent neurological manifestations were neuropathies. Typical PNS included paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD and limbic encephalitis (LE. We found cases with multiple onconeuronal antibodies (anti-Ri and anti-Yo and coexisting PNS (PCD/LE. Well-defined onconeuronal antibodies were identified in 23.8% of patients. Among antineuronal antibodies, the most frequent were anti-MAG (23.8%. ROC curves analysis revealed high sensitivity of onconeuronal and antineuronal antibodies for typical PNS and lower for pulmonary malignancies. Conclusions Tests for antibodies are highly sensitive for the diagnosis of typical paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. Anti-myelin and anti-MAG antibodies are associated with non-neoplastic pulmonary diseases. Patients with well-defined onconeuronal antibodies require careful screening and follow-up, because the PNS diagnosis indicates a high probability of an underlying malignancy.

  10. Severe antiphospholipid antibody syndrome - response to plasmapheresis and rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkogkolou, Paraskevi; Ehrchen, Jan; Goerge, Tobias

    2017-09-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis, recurrent abortions and detection of antiphospholipid antibodies. In fulminant cases, involvement of multiple organs can lead to significant morbidity and even fatal outcomes, so that a rapid, interdisciplinary treatment is needed. Here, we describe the case of a 39-year-old woman with a severe hard-to-treat APS with arterial occlusion and progressive skin necrosis, who was successfully treated with a combination therapy with plasmapheresis and rituximab. The treatment led to complete remission of the skin lesions for over a year. Clinical response correlated with a long-lasting reduction of antiphospholipid antibodies and B-cell depletion. This case demonstrates the use of antiphospholipid antibodies for monitoring APS-activity and shows that this severe vascular disease requires rigorous therapeutic approaches.

  11. Sleep structure and sleepiness in chronic fatigue syndrome with or without coexisting fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, Fumiharu; Natelson, Benjamin H; Cherniack, Neil S; FitzGibbons, Jennifer; Garcon, Carmen; Rapoport, David M

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated polysomnograms of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients with and without fibromyalgia to determine whether patients in either group had elevated rates of sleep-disturbed breathing (obstructive sleep apnea or upper airway resistance syndrome) or periodic leg movement disorder. We also determined whether feelings of unrefreshing sleep were associated with differences in sleep architecture from normal. We compared sleep structures and subjective scores on visual analog scales for sleepiness and fatigue in CFS patients with or without coexisting fibromyalgia (n = 12 and 14, respectively) with 26 healthy subjects. None had current major depressive disorder, and all were studied at the same menstrual phase. CFS patients had significant differences in polysomnograpic findings from healthy controls and felt sleepier and more fatigued than controls after a night's sleep. CFS patients as a group had less total sleep time, lower sleep efficiency, and less rapid eye movement sleep than controls. A possible explanation for the unrefreshing quality of sleep in CFS patients was revealed by stratification of patients into those who reported more or less sleepiness after a night's sleep (a.m. sleepier or a.m. less sleepy, respectively). Those in the sleepier group reported that sleep did not improve their symptoms and had poorer sleep efficiencies and shorter runs of sleep than both controls and patients in the less sleepy group; patients in the less sleepy group reported reduced fatigue and pain after sleep and had relatively normal sleep structures. This difference in sleep effects was due primarily to a decrease in the length of periods of uninterrupted sleep in the a.m. sleepier group. CFS patients had significant differences in polysomnographic findings from healthy controls and felt sleepier and more fatigued than controls after a night's sleep. This difference was due neither to diagnosable sleep disorders nor to coexisting fibromyalgia but primarily to a

  12. Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Antiβ2glicoprotein-1 Antibodies as the Cause of Recurrent Tibial Vein Thrombosis in SAPHO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przepiera-Będzak, Hanna; Brzosko, Marek

    2016-12-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is defined by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with recurrent venous or arterial thromboembolism (1). SAPHO syndrome is a rare disease, characterized by specific clinical manifestations of synovitis, acne pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis. It is a disease that manifests with a combination of osseous and articular manifestations associated with skin lesions (2). Venous thrombosis complicating SAPHO syndrome seems to be uncommon with an unclear pathogenesis (3-9). Coexistence of antiphospholipid syndrome and SAPHO syndrome was not previously mentioned in literature. A 33-year-old white woman was diagnosed with SAPHO syndrome at the age of 31. The patient was previously diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome and depressive syndrome. She was treated with sulfasalazin (2 g daily) and methotrexate (20 mg weekly). Seven months before admission to our department she experienced an episode of deep vein thrombosis of the left leg, successfully treated with subcutaneous enoxaparin sodium (40 mg daily) that was continued for the following 6 months as secondary prophylaxis. Pustular skin changes on palmar surface of the hands and plantar surface of the feet (characteristic for palmo-plantar pustulosis), tenderness of sterno-clavicular joints, swelling and restricted motion of both wrists, and pain on motion in both elbows, shoulders, knees, and ankles were found on physical examination. There was also a moderate amount of effusion in her left knee. There was a 3-centimeter difference between the circumferences of the shins. The level of C reactive protein was increased (6.21 mg/L). The patient was positive for antiβ2glicoprotein-1 (anti-β2G-1) antibodies. Tests for anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), antiannexin V antibodies, antiphosphatidylserine antibodies (aPS), and antiprothrombin antibodies (aPT) were negative. Prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and D-dimer level were normal, and

  13. Premenstrual syndrome and fibromyalgia: the frequency of the coexistence and their effects on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyupek, Feray; Aydogan, Cigdem; Guney, Mehmet; Kose, Seyit Ali

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), to assess common symptoms and quality of life (QOL) of them. Patients with PMS formed the PMS group and age-matched healthy normal controls were included in the control group. The diagnosis of the FMS and PMS were based on new American College of Rheumatology FMS criteria and DSM-IV PMS criteria. FMS-related symptoms assessed by visual analog scale and number of tender points (TePs) were analyzed. QOL, PMS severity and FMS severity were assessed with SF-36, fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ) and premenstrual assessment form (PAF), respectively. Patients with PMS were divided into two subgroups according to coexistence of FMS or not. The frequency of FMS in PMS and control group were 20 and 0%, respectively (p = 0.002). FMS-related symptoms, number of TePs in the PMS group were higher than those in the control group. The mean mental component summary (MCS) score of SF-36 was low in the PMS group. The mean PAF score in PMS with FMS subgroup was higher than those in without FMS subgroup. The mean physical component summary of SF-36 was low in the PMS patient with FMS. There was correlation between PAF score and FIQ score (r = 0.476, p < 0.001). FMS was common among the patients with PMS and frequently seen in the PMS patients having severe premenstrual complaints. Mental QOL was distressed in the patients with PMS but while FMS accompanied to PMS, the physical QOL was decreased.

  14. A girl of Klippel-Trenaunay Weber syndrome coexistence of recurrent bloody vaginal discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Mehmet; Kavukçu, Salih; Çakmakci, Handan; Soylu, Alper; Aktan, Sebnem; Çağan, Yeliz

    2010-09-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay Weber syndrome (KTWS) is the coexistence of capillary vascular malformations, varicose veins, dilated arteries and arteriovenous fistulas, soft tissue and/or bone hypertrophy. We present a girl of KTWS associated with hypertrophied left kidney, enlargement in venous structures of the left kidney, recurrent bloody vaginal discharge and angiokeratomas. A 6-year-old girl was admitted to our department with complaints of recurrent bloody vaginal discharge and swelling in the left inguinal region. Physical examination revealed hypertrophy of the left lower extremity. Vaginoscopy and cystoscopy revealed normal findings. Abdominal ultrasound revealed an enlarged left kidney. Enlargement in the venous structures of the hypertrophied left kidney was detected by abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, and arteriovenous fistulas were revealed by conventional angiography. The patient was diagnosed KTWS. Ophthalmic examination was normal. Galactosidase A (GLA) level was found to be at the lower limit of the normal range, and mutation was not detected in the GLA gene. In conclusion, we have emphasized that the girls with recurrent vaginal discharge might be KTWS. Angiokeratoma may be considered as a dermatological finding of KTWS. KTWS may also have enlarged kidney and enlargement in venous structures of the kidney in hypertrophied side.

  15. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage and primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Iturrospe, C.; Quilez, I.J.; Echevarria, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is an uncommon entity that is difficult to diagnose given the ambiquity of the clinical signs. Computerized tomography plays a major role in the diagnosis, disclosing enlarged adrenal glands presenting the hyperdense aspect that characterizes this disorders. We present a case of bilateral adrenal hemoorrhage in a patient diagnosed as having primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, which is a less common cause of adrenal hemorrhage than those classically reported, such as anticoagulant therapy, sepsis, shock and abdominal injury. (Author) 8 refs

  16. Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome in a patient with antidomain I antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Joris; Mohamed, Shirine; Revuz, Sabine; de Maistre, Emmanuel; de Laat, Bas; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Zuily, Stéphane; Lévy, Bruno; Regnault, Véronique; Wahl, Denis

    2016-07-01

    Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by the association of acquired factor II deficiency and lupus anticoagulant. Contrary to classical antiphospholipid syndrome, it may cause severe life-threatening bleeding (89% of published cases). We report a patient, positive for antidomain I antibodies, with initially primary lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome without previous clinical manifestation or underlying systemic disease. Five years later, he experienced the first systemic lupus erythematous flare. Within a few days, catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome was diagnosed with heart, liver and kidney involvement. The patient recovered under pulse steroids, intravenous heparin and intravenous immunoglobulins.

  17. Thrombosis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome during acute Q fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Bardin, Nathalie; Bessis, Simon; Nouiakh, Nadia; Douliery, Charlaine; Edouard, Sophie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bosseray, Annick; Epaulard, Olivier; Branger, Stéphanie; Chaudier, Bernard; Blanc-Laserre, Karine; Ferreira-Maldent, Nicole; Demonchy, Elisa; Roblot, France; Reynes, Jacques; Djossou, Felix; Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Patrizia; Camoin-Jau, Laurence; Mege, Jean-Louis; Raoult, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Q fever is a neglected and potentially fatal disease. During acute Q fever, antiphospholipid antibodies are very prevalent and have been associated with fever, thrombocytopenia, acquired heart valve disease, and progression to chronic endocarditis. However, thrombosis, the main clinical criterion of the 2006 updated classification of the antiphospholipid syndrome, has not been assessed in this context. To test whether thrombosis is associated with antiphospholipid antibodies and whether the criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome can be met in patients with acute Q fever, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the French National Referral Center for Q fever. Patients included were diagnosed with acute Q fever in our Center between January 2007 and December 2015. Each patient's history and clinical characteristics were recorded with a standardized questionnaire. Predictive factors associated with thrombosis were assessed using a rare events logistic regression model. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG aCL) assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were tested on the Q fever diagnostic serum. A dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and thrombosis was tested using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Of the 664 patients identified for inclusion in the study, 313 (47.1%) had positive IgG aCL and 13 (1.9%) were diagnosed with thrombosis. Three patients fulfilled the antiphospholipid syndrome criteria. After multiple adjustments, only positive IgG aCL (relative risk, 14.46 [1.85–113.14], P = .011) were independently associated with thrombosis. ROC analysis identified a dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and occurrence of thrombosis (area under curve, 0.83, 95%CI [0.73–0.93], P antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and acquired valvular heart disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies should be systematically assessed in acute Q fever patients. Hydroxychloroquine

  18. COEXISTENCE OF ADDISON'S DISEASE AND PERNICIOUS ANEMIA: IS THE NEW CLASSIFICATION OF AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME APPROPRIATE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrkljan, Ana Marija; Pašalić, Ante; Strinović, Mateja; Perić, Božidar; Kruljac, Ivan; Miroševć, Gorana

    2015-06-01

    A case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is presented. A 45-year-old man was admitted due to fatigue, malaise and inappetence. He had a history of primary hypothyroidism and was on levothyroxine substitution therapy. One year before, he was diagnosed with normocytic anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency, which was treated with vitamin B12 substitution therapy. Physical examination revealed hypotension and marked hyperpigmentation. Laboratory testing showed hyponatremia, hyperkaliemia and severe normocytic anemia. Endocrinological evaluation disclosed low morning cortisol and increased adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. Hence, the diagnosis of Addison's disease was established. Additional laboratory workup showed positive parietal cell antibodies. However, his vitamin B12 levels were increased due to vitamin B12 supplementation therapy, which was initiated earlier. Gastroscopy and histopathology of gastric mucosa confirmed atrophic gastritis. Based on prior low serum vitamin B12 levels, positive parietal cell antibodies and atrophic gastritis, the patient was diagnosed with pernicious anemia. Hydrocortisone supplementation therapy was administered and titrated according to urinary-free cortisol levels. Electrolyte disbalance and red blood cell count were normalized. This case report demonstrates rather unique features of pernicious anemia in a patient with Addison's disease. It also highlights the link between type II and type III APS. Not only do they share the same etiological factors, but also overlap in pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. This case report favors older classification of APS, which consolidates all endocrine and other organ-specific autoimmune diseases into one category. This is important since it might help avoid pitfalls in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with APS.

  19. Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with adrenal hemorrhage in a child : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Hyun Joo; Yoo, Han Wook; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    1999-01-01

    Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a disease that is clinically diagnosed if a patient suffers recurrent thromboses, stroke, recurrent fetal loss, livedo reticularis, and thrombocytopenia, without evidence of systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective diseases. Adrenal hemorrhage in a patient with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a rarely recognized, but potentially catastrophic disorder. We recently encountered bilateral adrenal hemorrhaging in a child with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and casem as well as reviewing the literature

  20. Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with adrenal hemorrhage in a child : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Hyun Joo; Yoo, Han Wook; Yoon, Chong Hyun [Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a disease that is clinically diagnosed if a patient suffers recurrent thromboses, stroke, recurrent fetal loss, livedo reticularis, and thrombocytopenia, without evidence of systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective diseases. Adrenal hemorrhage in a patient with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a rarely recognized, but potentially catastrophic disorder. We recently encountered bilateral adrenal hemorrhaging in a child with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and casem as well as reviewing the literature.

  1. Too little or too much corticosteroid? Coexisting adrenal insufficiency and Cushing's syndrome from chronic, intermittent use of intranasal betamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Adrienne; Yu, Run; Carmichael, John

    2013-01-01

    To report the puzzling, rare occurrence of coexisting adrenal insufficiency and Cushing's syndrome from chronic, intermittent use of intranasal betamethasone spray. A 62-year-old male was referred to our endocrinology clinic for management of adrenal insufficiency. This previously healthy individual began to experience chronic sinus symptoms in 2007, was treated with multiple ensuing sinus surgeries, and received oral glucocorticoid for 6 months. In the following 5 years, he suffered severe fatigue and was diagnosed with secondary adrenal insufficiency. He could not be weaned from corticosteroid and developed clear cushingoid features. In our clinic, careful inquiry on medications revealed chronic, intermittent use of high-dose intranasal betamethasone since 2008, which was not apparent to his other treating physicians. His cushingoid features significantly improved after holding intranasal betamethasone. Chronic, intermittent intranasal betamethasone can cause secondary adrenal insufficiency and iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome when used in excess.Topical corticosteroid use should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency or Cushing's syndrome.

  2. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome With Valvular Vegetations in Acute Q Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Thuny, Franck; Bardin, Nathalie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Edouard, Sophie; Bessis, Simon; Guimard, Thomas; Weitten, Thierry; Martin-Barbaz, François; Texereau, Michèle; Ayouz, Khelifa; Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Patrizia; Habib, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier

    2016-03-01

    Coxiella burnetii endocarditis is considered to be a late complication of Q fever in patients with preexisting valvular heart disease (VHD). We observed a large transient aortic vegetation in a patient with acute Q fever and high levels of IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG aCL). Therefore, we sought to determine how commonly acute Q fever could cause valvular vegetations associated with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, which would be a new clinical entity. We performed a consecutive case series between January 2007 and April 2014 at the French National Referral Center for Q fever. Age, sex, history of VHD, immunosuppression, and IgG aCL assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were tested as potential predictors. Of the 759 patients with acute Q fever and available echocardiographic results, 9 (1.2%) were considered to have acute Q fever endocarditis, none of whom had a previously known VHD. After multiple adjustment, very high IgG aCL levels (>100 immunoglobulin G-type phospholipid units; relative risk [RR], 24.9 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 4.5-140.2]; P = .002) and immunosuppression (RR, 10.1 [95% CI, 3.0-32.4]; P = .002) were independently associated with acute Q fever endocarditis. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with valvular vegetations in acute Q fever is a new clinical entity. This would suggest the value of systematically testing for C. burnetii in antiphospholipid-associated cardiac valve disease, and performing early echocardiography and antiphospholipid dosages in patients with acute Q fever. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Rapidly progressive antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies associated with pulmonary-renal syndrome in a 10-year-old girl

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    Fermin Blanco Filho

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The term pulmonary-renal syndrome has been used frequently to describe the clinical manifestations of a great number of diseases in which pulmonary hemorrhage and glomerulonephritis coexist. The classic example of this type of vasculitis is Goodpasture´s syndrome, a term used to describe the association of pulmonary hemorrhage, glomerulonephritis and the presence of circulating antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies (anti-GBM. Among the several types of systemic vasculitides that can present clinical manifestations of the pulmonary-renal syndrome, we focus the discussion on two types more frequently associated with antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA, microscopic polyangiitis and Wegener´s granulomatosis, concerning a 10 year old girl with clinical signs and symptoms of pulmonary-renal syndrome, with positive ANCA and rapidly progressive evolution. CASE REPORT: We describe the case of a 10-year-old girl referred to our hospital for evaluation of profound anemia detected in a primary health center. Five days before entry she had experienced malaise, pallor and began to cough up blood-tinged sputum that was at first attributed to dental bleeding. She was admitted to the infirmary with hemoglobin = 4 mg/dL, hematocrit = 14%, platelets = 260,000, white blood cells = 8300, 74% segmented, 4% eosinophils, 19% lymphocytes and 3% monocytes. Radiographs of the chest revealed bilateral diffuse interstitial alveolar infiltrates. There was progressive worsening of cough and respiratory distress during the admission day, when she began to cough up large quantities of blood and hematuria was noted. There was rapid and progressive loss of renal function and massive lung hemorrhage. The antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA test with antigen specificity for myeloperoxidase (anti-MPO was positive and the circulating anti-GBM showed an indeterminate result.

  4. Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome presenting with encephalopathy, psychosis and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipa, R; Santos, E

    2011-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by recurrent thrombotic events, miscarriages and thrombocytopenia with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies.( 1,2 ) APS may be isolated (primary APS) or associated to a connective tissue disease, most often systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).( 1,2 ) APS usually affects young patients before the fifth decade( 3 ) with stroke being the commonest neurological manifestation.( 4 ) Various other neurological manifestations are being recognized in patients with APS including migraine, epilepsy, multi-infarct dementia and chorea.( 2 ) The pathological process underlying the neurological manifestations remains obscure.( 1,2 ) Herein we report a case of primary APS presenting with a group of unusual neurological manifestations in a 68-year-old woman.

  5. Tourette syndrome in a longitudinal perspective. Clinical course of tics and comorbidities, coexisting psychopathologies, phenotypes and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Camilla

    2018-04-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by motor and vocal tics and frequent associated comorbidities. The developmental trajectory of tic shows tic-onset in the age of 4-6, peak in the age of 10-12 and decline during adolescence, although only few and small longitudinal studies form the basis of this evidence. Recent studies suggest that comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and coexisting psychopathologies tend to persist and become more dominant in adolescence. This large prospective follow-up study want to examine the clinical course of TS: tic and comorbidities during adolescence, the prevalence of coexisting psychopathologies, the tic-related impairment, development in phenotype expression and find predictors for the expected course of TS. 
Method: This study is examining a large clinical cohort recruited at the Danish National Tourette Clinic during the period 2005-2007 and 2011-2013. At baseline, 314 participants aged 5-19 years were included and at follow-up 6 years later 227 participated, aged 11-26. All participants were uniformly clinically examined at basis and follow-up with a clinical interview and validated measurements to assess comorbidities. The Yale Global Tic Severity Scale was used to asses tic severity and tic-related impairment. At follow-up a cross-sectional diagnostic evaluation was made with the Development and Well-Being Assessment to assess coexisting psychopathologies.
 Results: A significant decline in tic and the most frequent comorbidities OCD and ADHD was found although some variation existed and some subclinical and partial remissions persisted. Tic-related impairment was not reflected in the tic-decline as expected but influenced by several parameters. The phenotype expression was found to be dynamic but overall changed toward TS without comorbidities. Several predictors were found to predict the clinical course of TS in

  6. A new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome? Coexistence of vitiligo, autoimmune thyroid disease and ulcerative colitis

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    Firdevs Topal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of three or more autoimmune disorders in one patient defines multiple autoimmune syndrome. The pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune syndrome is not known yet and environmental triggers and genetic susceptibility have been suggested to be involved. Herein, we report a 47-year-old woman who had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, vitiligo and newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis was confirmed with histopathologic examination. This case presents a new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome.

  7. Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: neuroradiologic findings in 11 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Choi, Soo Jung; Lee, Ho Kyu; Suh, Dae Chul

    2000-01-01

    To describe the neuroradiologic findings of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). During a recent two-year period, abnormally elevated antiphospholipid antibodies were detected in a total of 751 patients. In any cases in which risk factors for stroke were detected - hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and the presence of SLE or other connective tissue diseases - PAPS was not diagnosed. Neuroradiologic studies were performed in 11 of 32 patients with PAPS. We retrospectively reviewed brain CT (n = 7), MR (n = 8), and cerebral angiography (n = 8) in 11 patients with special attention to the presence of brain parenchymal lesions and cerebral arterial or venous abnormalities. CT or MR findings of PAPS included nonspecific multiple hyper-intensity foci in deep white matter on T2-weighted images (5/11), a large infarct in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (4/11), diffuse cortical atrophy (2/11), focal hemorrhage (2/11), and dural sinus thrombosis (1/11). Angiographic findings were normal (5/8) or reflected either occlusion of a large cerebral artery (2/8) or dural sinus thrombosis (1/8). Neuroradiologic findings of PAPS are nonspecific but in young or middle- aged adults who show the above mentioned CT or MR findings, and in whom risk factors for stroke are not present, the condition should be suspected

  8. Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: neuroradiologic findings in 11 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Choi, Soo Jung; Lee, Ho Kyu; Suh, Dae Chul [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    To describe the neuroradiologic findings of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). During a recent two-year period, abnormally elevated antiphospholipid antibodies were detected in a total of 751 patients. In any cases in which risk factors for stroke were detected - hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and the presence of SLE or other connective tissue diseases - PAPS was not diagnosed. Neuroradiologic studies were performed in 11 of 32 patients with PAPS. We retrospectively reviewed brain CT (n = 7), MR (n = 8), and cerebral angiography (n = 8) in 11 patients with special attention to the presence of brain parenchymal lesions and cerebral arterial or venous abnormalities. CT or MR findings of PAPS included nonspecific multiple hyper-intensity foci in deep white matter on T2-weighted images (5/11), a large infarct in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (4/11), diffuse cortical atrophy (2/11), focal hemorrhage (2/11), and dural sinus thrombosis (1/11). Angiographic findings were normal (5/8) or reflected either occlusion of a large cerebral artery (2/8) or dural sinus thrombosis (1/8). Neuroradiologic findings of PAPS are nonspecific but in young or middle- aged adults who show the above mentioned CT or MR findings, and in whom risk factors for stroke are not present, the condition should be suspected.

  9. Co-existence of exfoliation syndrome, previous iris surgery, and heterochromia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstas, A G; Williamson, T H

    1993-12-01

    A case is described where exfoliation syndrome developed in a relatively young patient with heterochromia. The patient had previously undergone large radial iridotomies as part of penetrating keratoplasty procedures. This case illustrates an association between iris surgery and early manifestation of exfoliation syndrome.

  10. A Novel SCN5A Mutation in a Patient with Coexistence of Brugada Syndrome Traits and Ischaemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders G. Holst

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome (BrS is a primary electrical heart disease, which can lead to sudden cardiac death. In older patients with BrS, the disease may coexist with ischaemic heart disease (IHD and recent studies support a synergistic proarrhythmic effect of the two disease entities. We report a case that illustrates this. The index patient was a middle-aged patient with BrS traits, IHD, and aborted sudden cardiac death. Mutation analysis discovered a novel mutation P468L in the NaV1.5 sodium channel. Surprisingly, voltage-clamp experiments on the wild-type and mutant NaV1.5 channels expressed in HEK cells revealed no functional effect of the mutation. In a patient like ours, the distinction between IHD and BrS as the cause of an aborted sudden cardiac death is hard to establish and mounting evidence shows that coexistence of the two may have a synergistic proarrhythmic effect.

  11. [An evaluation of HLA class 2 alleles and anti-islet antibodies as evidence for non-autoimmune diabetes in Wolfram syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmysłowska, Agnieszka; Borowiec, Maciej; Antosik, Karolina; Wyka, Krystyna; Cieślik-Heinrich, Agnieszka; Klich, Izabela; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    A clinical criterion of the Wolfram syndrome is the coexistence of diabetes and optic atrophy recognized before the age of 15. Diabetes present in Wolfram syndrome is a result of the selective β cell loss and failed insulin secretion which is probably associated with non-autoimmune pathogenesis. The aim of the study was an evaluation of HLA subtypes and presence of β-cell autoantibodies in patients with molecularly confirmed Wolfram syndrome. 9 patients with Wolfram syndrome aged 10-24 years were examined. We also studied 218 patients with type 1 diabetes as a reference group. A control group of 176 healthy individuals was included in the study. Besides the clinical assessment the HLA typing by PCR-SSO was performed. Islet cell antibodies (ICA), antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), thyrosine phosphatase antibodies (IA2A) and insulin antibodies (IAA) were also detected. In all nine patients the coexistence of diabetes with optic atrophy was observed and in 8/9 individuals additional symptoms were recognized. In patients with Wolfram syndrome a significantly lower age of diagnosis of diabetes (Me=5.0 years) than in type 1 diabetic children (Me=10.4; p=0.002) was observed. Studies of HLA subtypes demonstrated an increased prevalence of HLA-DQw1, DRB1⋅03 and/or 04 and DR2. A comparison of the frequency of the HLA alleles in patients with Wolfram syndrome with type 1 diabetic children showed a more frequent presence of the DRB1⋅1501 (p=0.03; OR=13.28 (2.44-72.12)) and DQB1⋅06 (p=0.016; OR=10.15 (2.49-41.35)) alleles in patients with Wolfram syndrome. Polish patients with Wolfram syndrome have a different profile of the HLA antigens with the presence of DR2, DQw1 and DRB3/4 allele and are negative for diabetes-related autoantibodies, which may confirm non-autoimmune β-cell destruction in this syndrome.

  12. A Rare Case of Necrotizing Myopathy and Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia with Anti-EJ Antisynthetase Syndrome and Sjögren’s Syndrome (SSA) Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, Muhammad; Arya, Divya; Niazi, Masooma; Khaja, Misbahuddin

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 34 Final Diagnosis: Necrotizing myopathy • fibrinous • organizing pneumonia Symptoms: Short of breath • weakness in limbs Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Rheumatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are autoimmune disorders that can involve the skin, joints, muscles, and lungs. The most common of these disorders are dermatomyositis, polymyositis, overlap syndrome, and inclusion body myositis. Necrotizing autoimmune myopathy is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy that is rarely associated with Sjögren’s syndrome. The most common lung findings associated with anti-EJ antisynthetase syndrome are nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and usual interstitial pneumonia; this condition is rarely associated with fibrinous and organizing pneumonia. Case Report: Here, we present a rare case of necrotizing myopathy and fibrinous and organizing pneumonia in a 34-year-old African American man with Sjögren’s syndrome and anti-EJ antibodies. The patient’s presenting symptoms were cough and proximal muscle weakness of the extremities. He had elevated serum creatine kinase level, aldolase level, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Myositis panel was positive for anti-EJ antibodies. Chest radiography was consistent with bilateral interstitial infiltrates. CT chest showed patchy bilateral infiltrates. Quadriceps muscle biopsy revealed widespread necrotic fibers and lung biopsy showed fibrinous and organizing pneumonia. The patient responded well to immunoglobulin therapy, mycophenolate, and prednisone, which resulted in complete resolution of bilateral infiltrates and improved muscle pain and weakness. Conclusions: Myopathies are characterized by myalgia and muscle weakness due to muscle fiber dysfunction and are associated with autoimmune diseases. Histopathological features may differ in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. It is important to recognize the rare association

  13. Coexistence of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D Syndrome in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resul Yilmaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available     Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are Mendelian inherited single gene diseases which are also known as hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and inflammation. Familial Mediterranean Fever and Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome are prototypes and are inherited autosomal recessively. The diagnosis is based on clinical course, family history and is confirmed with genetic mutation analysis. We describe a 5- year-old boy who had recurrent attacks of fever, skin rash, and cervical lymphadenopathy since he was 2 years old. His genetic analysis revealed homozygous M694V and V377I for MEFV and MVK gene respectively. Due to our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient who has both HIDS and FMF clinical and genetic features.

  14. An Approach to Differential Diagnosis of Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Related Conditions

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    Giacomo Emmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a systemic, acquired, immune-mediated disorder characterized by episodes of venous, arterial, or microcirculation thrombosis and/or pregnancy abnormalities, associated with the persistent presence of autoantibodies, confirmed at least in two occasions 12 weeks apart, directed to molecular complexes consisting of phospholipids and proteins. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome should always be considered as a potential diagnosis especially for young patients presenting with a history of thrombotic events, in particular when they occur without any obvious external trigger or any inherited thrombophilic mutation (even if 2006 criteria do not exclude antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in patients with other inherited or acquired prothrombotic conditions, or for women with recurrent pregnancy losses or later fetal deaths. Many other disorders are able to mimic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, so a broad range of alternative diagnoses should be investigated and ruled out during clinical workup.

  15. Antiphospholipid antibody profile based obstetric outcomes of primary antiphospholipid syndrome : The PREGNANTS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo; Maruotti, Giuseppe Maria; Ghi, Tullio; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Simonazzi, Giuliana; Rizzo, Nicola; Facchinetti, Fabio; Dall'Asta, Andrea; Visentin, Silvia; Sarno, Laura; Xodo, Serena; Bernabini, Dalila; Monari, Francesca; Roman, Amanda; Eke, Ahizechukwu Chigoziem; Hoxha, Ariela; Ruffatti, Amelia; Schuit, Ewoud; Martinelli, Pasquale

    BACKGROUND: Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune, hypercoagulable state caused by antiphospholipid antibodies. Anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), anti-β2 glycoprotein-I (ab2GPI) and lupus anticoagulant (LA) are the main autoantibodies found in APS. Despite the amassed body of clinical

  16. Coexistence of cellulitis and primary peritonitis in a pediatric patient with nephrotic syndrome: A case report

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    Luisa Lagos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotic syndrome is a chronic disease that increases the risk of skin, respiratory and urinary tract infection, while also increasing the chance for other diseases, like peritonitis and meningitis. A four year old patient with a history of nephrotic syndrome was admitted to emergency room (ER with the following symptoms: abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea and vomiting, associated to abdominal wall erythema, abdominal distension and peritoneal signs. In order to make a differential diagnosis of the infection, peritoneal fluid was extracted and, according to the characteristics found, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was started. Cases in which different infections like pneumonia, abdominal wall peritonitis and cellulitis occur simultaneously have been reported rarely. Early diagnosis and dismissal of other causes of acute abdominal pain, as well as early introduction of antibiotics are fundamental in the treatment of these kind of infections.

  17. Coexistence of RS3PE Syndrome and Ankylosing Spondylitis in a Young Male

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    Erdem İlgün

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The RS3PE syndrome is the inflammatory rheumatisms of old age, being related to rheumatoid arthritis. Etiology and pathogenesis of this disease is not fully understood and usually seen over 50 years of age and characterized by recurrent symmetrical pitting type edema. We present a case whose clinical symptoms and laboratory findings are compatible with the RS3PE in young male with ankylosing spondylitis. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7(4: 290-293

  18. Glycine receptor antibodies in PERM and related syndromes: characteristics, clinical features and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-González, Alexander; Leite, M. Isabel; Waters, Patrick; Woodhall, Mark; Coutinho, Ester; Balint, Bettina; Lang, Bethan; Pettingill, Philippa; Carr, Aisling; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Press, Raomand; Lunn, Michael P.; Lim, Ming; Maddison, Paul; Meinck, H.-M.; Vandenberghe, Wim

    2014-01-01

    The clinical associations of glycine receptor antibodies have not yet been described fully. We identified prospectively 52 antibody-positive patients and collated their clinical features, investigations and immunotherapy responses. Serum glycine receptor antibody endpoint titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:60 000. In 11 paired samples, serum levels were higher than (n = 10) or equal to (n = 1) cerebrospinal fluid levels; there was intrathecal synthesis of glycine receptor antibodies in each of the six pairs available for detailed study. Four patients also had high glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (>1000 U/ml), and one had high voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibody (2442 pM). Seven patients with very low titres (antibodies activated complement on glycine receptor-transfected human embryonic kidney cells at room temperature, and caused internalization and lysosomal degradation of the glycine receptors at 37°C. Immunoglobulin G antibodies bound to rodent spinal cord and brainstem co-localizing with monoclonal antibodies to glycine receptor-α1. Ten glycine receptor antibody positive samples were also identified in a retrospective cohort of 56 patients with stiff person syndrome and related syndromes. Glycine receptor antibodies are strongly associated with spinal and brainstem disorders, and the majority of patients have progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. The antibodies demonstrate in vitro evidence of pathogenicity and the patients respond well to immunotherapies, contrasting with earlier studies of this syndrome, which indicated a poor prognosis. The presence of glycine receptor antibodies should help to identify a disease that responds to immunotherapies, but these treatments may need to be sustained, relapses can occur and maintenance immunosuppression may be required. PMID:24951641

  19. Multiple syncope mechanisms coexisting in a Brugada syndrome patient requiring a single therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouliotis, A I; Gatzoulis, K A; Dilaveris, P; Stefanadis, C

    2013-05-01

    We report the case of a Brugada syndrome patient with a history of syncopal and presyncopal episodes and evidence of sinus node and atrioventricular (AV) conduction abnormalities. The patient developed sinus bradycardia, sinoatrial conduction abnormalities, prolonged HV interval, early appearance of AV block, AV nodal reentrant tachycardia and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in the electrophysiological study. He was treated with a dual-chamber pacemaker defibrillator. At the 9-year follow-up, the patient remained asymptomatic with several episodes of 1:1 AV-relationship tachycardia, interrupted with antitachycardia pacing, while the predominant pacing states of the device were AP-VS and AS-VP for most of the time.

  20. Miller-Fisher Syndrome: Are Anti-GAD Antibodies Implicated in Its Pathophysiology?

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    Ioannis E. Dagklis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS is considered as a variant of the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS and its characteristic clinical features are ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Typically, it is associated with anti-GQ1b antibodies; however, a significant percentage (>10% of these patients are seronegative. Here, we report a 67-year-old female patient who presented with the typical clinical features of MFS. Workup revealed antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD in relatively high titers while GQ1b antibodies were negative. Neurological improvement was observed after intravenous gamma globulin and follow-up examinations showed a continuous clinical amelioration with simultaneous decline of anti-GAD levels which finally returned to normal values. This case indicates that anti-GAD antibodies may be associated with a broader clinical spectrum and future studies in GQ1b-seronegative patients could determine ultimately their clinical and pathogenetic significance in this syndrome.

  1. Post-streptococcal antibodies are associated with metabolic syndrome in a population-based cohort.

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    Adi Aran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcal infections are known to trigger autoimmune disorders, affecting millions worldwide. Recently, we found an association between post-streptococcal autoantibodies against Protein Disulphide Isomerase (PDI, an enzyme involved in insulin degradation and insulin resistance. This led us to evaluate associations between post-streptococcal antibodies and metabolic syndrome, as defined by the updated National Cholesterol Education Program definition, 2005. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Metabolic data (HDL, triglycerides, fasting glucose, blood pressure, waist circumference, BMI, smoking, post-streptococcal antibodies (anti-Streptolysin O (ASO and anti-PDI, and C-reactive protein (CRP, as a general inflammatory marker, were assessed in 1156 participants of the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study. Anti-PDI antibodies were found in 308 participants (26.6%, ASO≥100 in 258 (22.3%, and 482 (41.7% met diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome. Anti-PDI antibodies but not ASO were significantly associated with metabolic syndrome [n = 1156, OR 1.463 (95% CI 1.114, 1.920, p = 0.0062; adjusted for age, gender, education, smoking]. Importantly, the anti-PDI-metabolic syndrome association remained significant after adjusting for CRP and fasting insulin. CONCLUSIONS: Post-streptococcal anti-PDI antibodies are associated with metabolic syndrome regardless of fasting insulin and CRP levels. Whereas these data are in line with a growing body of evidence linking infections, immunity and metabolism, additional studies are necessary to establish the post-streptococcal-metabolic syndrome association.

  2. [Capgras syndrome and possible worlds or places where the real person and its imposter coexist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiyama, Yoshitsugu

    2004-01-01

    In a previous paper, the author has argued that what actually changes in the person whom the Capgras patient has chosen as his/her target of delusion is non-attribute such as having only "haecceity." At the same time, the author has pointed out that such ever-identical is also the target of the indication for the rigid designator as proposed by S. Kripke. Such problems with indication and identity, however, are closely associated with ontology presented by possible worlds semantics, an analytic philosophy that was much debated during the latter half of the 20th century. The purpose of this paper is to try to define the essence of Capgras syndrome from the viewpoint of possible worlds semantics. If Capgras syndrome is taken as suggested by the patient's statement that "a real person has been replaced by an imposter," it is though that this statement refers to metaphysics with regard to the number of individuals who exist in the world. This is because the appearance of the imposter means the generation of a new individual who had not been in existence until that time. The creation of the new individual not only demands the existence of plural worlds as addressed by possible worlds semantics, but also provides a clue to solving problems with places where the real person and its imposter exist. If the number of individuals existing in the world is taken into account, it is difficult to spatio-temporally comprehend the places in which the real person and its imposter exist. Inevitably, the real person and its imposter have to be in mutually different possible worlds as defined by possible worlds semantics. This leads into the conclusion that after the onset of Capgras syndrome, the patient and the imposter are in a possible world that is different from the possible world to which the real person belongs. In the case presented herein, the patient repeatedly talked about how difficult it was to get access to the real person. If the patient was separated by space and time

  3. Guillain-Barré syndrome- and Miller Fisher syndrome-associated Campylobacter jejuni lipopolysaccharides induce anti-GM1 and anti-GQ1b Antibodies in rabbits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. de Klerk; H.P. Endtz (Hubert); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); J.D. Laman (Jon); F.G.A. van der Meché (Frans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); C.W. Ang (Wim)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractCampylobacter jejuni infections are thought to induce antiganglioside antibodies in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) by molecular mimicry between C. jejuni lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and gangliosides. We used

  4. Diagnostic Challenge of Hepatopulmonary Syndrome in a Patient with Coexisting Structural Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge M. Hurtado-Cordovi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS is a severe complication seen in advance liver disease. Its prevalence among cirrhotic patients varies from 4–47 percent. HPS exact pathogenesis remains unknown. Patient presents with signs/symptoms of chronic liver disease, and dypsnea of variable severity. Our patient is a 62 years old white male with a known history of chronic hepatitis C, cirrhosis, ascites, and hypothyroidism who presented to GI/liver clinic complaining of 1 episode BRBPR, and exacerbating dypsnea associated with nausea and few episodes of non-bloody vomit. Physical exam showed, icterus, jaundice, few small spider angiomas on the chest, decrease breath sounds bilateral right more than left, and mild tachycardic. Abdominal exam revealed mid-line scar, moderated size ventral hernia, distention, diffused tenderness, and dullness to percussion. Laboratory result: CBC 5.2/13.2/37.6/83, LFTs 83/217/125/5.2/4.7/7.4, Pt 22.6 INR 1.9 PTT35.4. CT scan showed liver cirrhosis, abdominal varices, and moderated ascites collection around ventral hernia. Calculated A-a gradient was 49.5. Echocardiography revealed patent foramen ovale (PFO with predominant left to right shunt. In our case, existence of paten foramen ovale (PFO and atelectasis precludes definitive diagnosis of HPS. Presence of cardiopulmonary shunt could be partially responsible for the patient’s dypsnea exacerbation.

  5. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies as biomarkers to identify severe primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Ariela; Mattia, Elena; Tonello, Marta; Grava, Chiara; Pengo, Vittorio; Ruffatti, Amelia

    2017-05-01

    Anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) antibodies have begun to be considered potentional biomarkers for antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). This cohort study investigate the role of aPS/PT antibodies as a risk factor for severe APS by evaluating the association between those antibodies and clinical/laboratory profiles of APS. Plasma/serum samples from 197 APS patients, 100 healthy subjects and 106 patients with autoimmune diseases were collected. IgG/IgM aPS/PT antibodies were assayed using commercial ELISA kit. Prevalences of IgG and IgM aPS/PT (pantiphospholipid antibody patients than in double and single positivity ones (p<0.0001 for all). APS/PT antibodies were associated to severe thrombosis, severe pregnancy complications inducing prematurity, and vascular microangiopathy, all generally associated to high risk APS forms requiring strong therapy.

  6. Hughes syndrome and epilepsy: when to test for antiphospholipid antibodies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldine, M H A; Harifi, G; Berjawi, A; Haydar, A A; Nader, M; Elnawar, R; Sweid, A; Al Saleh, J; Khamashta, M A; Uthman, I

    2016-11-01

    Epilepsy and seizures are reported among the neurological manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) at a prevalence rate of approximately 8%, which is nearly 10 times the prevalence of epilepsy in the general population. The association of seizures with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) is even more significant in the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this review, we discuss the epidemiological, pathophysiological, laboratory, clinical, and radiological aspects of this association, and derive suggestions on when to consider testing for aPL in epileptic patients and how to manage seizures secondary to APS based on literature data. Epilepsy due to APS should be considered in young patients presenting with seizures of unknown origin. Temporal lobe epilepsy seems to be particularly prevalent in APS patients. The pathogenesis is complex and may not only involve micro-thrombosis, but also a possible immune-mediated neuronal damage. Patients with seizures and positive aPL tend to develop thrombocytopenia and livedo racemosa more frequently compared with those without aPL. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the imaging modality of choice in these patients. The presence of SLE and the presence of neurological symptoms significantly correlate with the presence of white matter changes on MRI. In contrast, the correlation between aPL positivity and the presence of white matter changes is very weak. Furthermore, MRI can be normal in more than 30-40% of neuropsychiatric lupus patients with or without aPL. aPL testing is recommended in young patients presenting with atypical seizures and multiple hyper-intensity lesions on brain MRI in the absence of other possible conditions. New MRI techniques can better understand the pathology of brain damage in neuro-APS. The therapeutic management of epileptic APS patients relies on anti-epileptic treatment and anticoagulant agents when there is evidence of a thrombotic event. In the absence of consensual

  7. Interactions between rivaroxaban and antiphospholipid antibodies in thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchillage, D R J; Mackie, I J; Efthymiou, M; Isenberg, D A; Machin, S J; Cohen, H

    2015-07-01

    Rivaroxaban can affect lupus anticoagulant (LA) testing and antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) may interfere with the anticoagulant action of rivaroxaban. To establish the influence of rivaroxaban on LA detection and of aPL on the anticoagulant action of rivaroxaban. Rivaroxaban and 52 IgG preparations (20 LA+ve, 12 LA-ve thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome [APS] patients, and 20 normal controls [NC]) were spiked into pooled normal plasma (PNP) for relevant studies. LA detection was also studied in APS patients receiving rivaroxaban 20 mg once daily. In vitro spiking of samples with rivaroxaban showed no false positive LA with Textarin time, Taipan venom time/Ecarin clotting time (TVT/ECT), dilute prothrombin time (dPT) and in-house dilute Russell's viper venom time (DRVVT), but false positives in the majority of NC and LA negative IgG with two commercial DRVVT reagents at 250 ng/mL but not 50 ng/mL rivaroxaban. Ex vivo studies: six LA+ve patients on rivaroxaban remained LA positive with TVT/ECT and DRVVT at peak (162-278 ng/mL) and trough (30-85 ng/mL) rivaroxaban levels. Six LA-ve patients became (apparently) LA+ve with two DRVVT reagents (test/confirm ratio median [confidence interval], 1.6 [1.3-1.8], 1.6 [1.4-1.9]) but not with TVT/ECT at peak rivaroxaban levels, and remained LA-ve with both DRVVT reagents and TVT/ECT at trough levels. aPL positive IgG spiking of PNP had no effect on rivaroxaban's anticoagulant action on thrombin generation or rivaroxaban anti-Xa levels. The TVT/ECT ratio and Textarin time were not affected even at peak rivaroxaban levels, enabling detection of LA ex vivo. aPL had no effects on rivaroxaban's anticoagulant action in vitro. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  8. Coexistence of urethritis with genital ulcer disease in South Africa: influence on provision of syndromic management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, R; Fehler, H; Htun, Y; Radebe, F; Jensen, J; Taylor-Robinson, D

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether syndromic management of genital ulcer disease was sound, if based on the premise that men with genital ulcers rarely have a concomitant urethral infection. Methods: Specimens were taken in 1998 from 186 mine workers in Carletonville, South Africa, who were seen consecutively with genital ulcers. The specimens comprised a swab from the ulcer, a urethral swab for a Gram stained smear, and 10–15 ml of a first catch urine sample. The latter was tested by ligase chain reaction assays for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis specific DNA sequences and by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for Mycoplasma genitalium. Ulcer inducing micro-organisms were detected either by a multiplex PCR assay, or in the case of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) serologically, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was detected by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. Results: Most (54%) of the ulcers were chancroidal, 18% were herpetic (HSV type 2), 6.5% primary syphilitic, and 3.2% due to LGV. More than one micro-organism was detected in 9.1% of the ulcers and less than 10% were undiagnosed. Microscopic examination of the urethral smears showed that 99 (53%) of the men had urethritis, of whom 45 (45%) were infected with N gonorrhoeae. Of the 54 men (55%) who had non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU), 11 (19.6%) harboured C trachomatis or M genitalium. Almost two thirds (64.5%) of the men had HIV infection, but this did not seem to have influenced the aetiology of the ulcers. Nor was a particular ulcer associated with one type of urethritis more than the other. Neither C trachomatis nor M genitalium was associated significantly with non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) in either HIV positive or HIV negative men. Conclusion: The combination of antibiotics used for the management of genital ulcer disease in men in this South African mining population needs to be widened to encompass frequently occurring concomitant gonococcal urethritis

  9. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in rheumatoid arthritis: antibody response to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Tabarya, D; Hoffman, W L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage and to compare antibody responses to two superantigens, staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), in rheumatoid arthritis patients and normal subjects. METHODS: 88 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 110 control subjects were cultured for nasal carriage of S aureus; 62 isolates were bacteriophage typed. Twenty five patients and 11 spouses were tested for antibodies t...

  10. Movement disorders with neuronal antibodies: syndromic approach, genetic parallels and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Bettina; Vincent, Angela; Meinck, Hans-Michael; Irani, Sarosh R; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2018-01-01

    Movement disorders are a prominent and common feature in many autoantibody-associated neurological diseases, a group of potentially treatable conditions that can mimic infectious, metabolic or neurodegenerative disease. Certain movement disorders are likely to associate with certain autoantibodies; for example, the characteristic dyskinesias, chorea and dystonia associated with NMDAR antibodies, stiff person spectrum disorders with GAD, glycine receptor, amphiphysin or DPPX antibodies, specific paroxysmal dystonias with LGI1 antibodies, and cerebellar ataxia with various anti-neuronal antibodies. There are also less-recognized movement disorder presentations of antibody-related disease, and a considerable overlap between the clinical phenotypes and the associated antibody spectra. In this review, we first describe the antibodies associated with each syndrome, highlight distinctive clinical or radiological 'red flags', and suggest a syndromic approach based on the predominant movement disorder presentation, age, and associated features. We then examine the underlying immunopathophysiology, which may guide treatment decisions in these neuroimmunological disorders, and highlight the exceptional interface between neuronal antibodies and neurodegeneration, such as the tauopathy associated with IgLON5 antibodies. Moreover, we elaborate the emerging pathophysiological parallels between genetic movement disorders and immunological conditions, with proteins being either affected by mutations or targeted by autoantibodies. Hereditary hyperekplexia, for example, is caused by mutations of the alpha subunit of the glycine receptor leading to an infantile-onset disorder with exaggerated startle and stiffness, whereas antibodies targeting glycine receptors can induce acquired hyperekplexia. The spectrum of such immunological and genetic analogies also includes cerebellar ataxias and some encephalopathies. Lastly, we discuss how these pathophysiological considerations could

  11. Differences in functional activity of anticardiolipin antibodies from patients with syphilis and those with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierangeli, S S; Goldsmith, G H; Krnic, S; Harris, E N

    1994-01-01

    Anticardiolipin antibodies are produced both in patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and in patients with syphilis, but lupus anticoagulant activity has been reported only for the former group. To understand these differences, affinity-purified immunoglobulin G anticardiolipin antibodies from APS (n = 11) and syphilis (n = 5) patients were compared. Only the antibodies from the APS group inhibited prothrombin conversion to thrombin and cross-reacted with phosphatidylserine. These findings may enable better definition of the phospholipid epitopes involved in the hemostatic abnormalities of APS. PMID:8063429

  12. Bilateral Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion Associated with the Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pria Anand

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old woman presented with a right-hemispheric stroke 1 year after she had suffered a left-hemispheric stroke. Her diagnostic workup was notable for bilateral occlusions of the internal carotid arteries at their origins and a positive lupus anticoagulant antibody test. There was no evidence of carotid dissection or another identifiable cause for her carotid occlusions. These findings suggest that the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome may be implicated in the pathological changes that resulted in occlusions of the extracranial internal carotid arteries. Young stroke patients who present with unexplained internal carotid artery occlusions may benefit from testing for the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies.

  13. Churg-Strauss syndrome associated with antiphospholipid antibodies in a patient with retinal vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Vicente, J L; Gálvez-Carvajal, S; Medina-Tapia, A; Rueda, T; González-García, L; Szewc, M; Muñoz-Morales, A

    2016-11-01

    We present the case of a 69-year-old woman with unilateral retinal vasculitis. Investigations showed asthma, rhinosinusitis, nasal polyposis, peripheral blood eosinophilia, increased sedimentation rate, proteinuria, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) were negative. Although her anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibody (ANCA) status was negative, taking into account the other clinical and laboratory features, retinal vasculitis was thought to be an ocular manifestation of Churg-Strauss syndrome. Treatment was started with high-dose corticosteroids and anticoagulant therapy. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Antiphospholipid Antibody Titers and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Recurrent Miscarriage and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Wang, Hai-Yan; Qiao, Jie; Liu, Ping; Chi, Hong-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Background: The management of patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM) and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) includes prolonged treatment with heparin and aspirin, starting from the confirmation of pregnancy and continuing until 6 weeks after birth. This study was conducted to determine the relationship between changes in antiphospholipid antibody titers and clinical outcomes. The effect of a shortened treatment regimen was also evaluated. Methods: A prospective study of 123 patients with RM and APS between March 2012 and May 2014 was conducted. Patients were pretreated with a low dose of prednisone plus aspirin before pregnancy, and heparin was added after conception. The levels of antiphospholipid antibodies and pregnancy outcomes were evaluated. Results: All patients were positive for anti-β2-glycoprotein 1 (anti-β2-GP1) IgM. After prepregnancy treatment with low-dose prednisone plus aspirin, 99 of 123 patients became pregnant, and 87 of those pregnancies resulted in successful live births, while 12 resulted in miscarriage, showing a success rate of 87.9%. In the live birth group, levels of anti-β2-GP1 were 56.8 ± 49.0 RU/ml before the pretreatment regimen, 32.1 ± 26.0 RU/ml after 2 months of pretreatment, and 24.1 ± 23.1 RU/ml during early pregnancy (P antiphospholipid antibody titers were 52.8 ± 30.7 RU/ml before pretreatment, 38.5 ± 34.2 RU/ml after pretreatment, and 33.9 ± 24.7 RU/ml during early pregnancy; the decrease in antiphospholipid antibodies was lower in the miscarriage group than in the live birth group (P antiphospholipid antibody titers correlated with better pregnancy outcomes. The shorter treatment regimen was effective and economical. PMID:28139508

  15. Coexistence of benign struma ovarii, pseudo-Meigs' syndrome and elevated serum CA 125: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chengjuan; Dong, Ruiying; Bu, Hualei; Yuan, Mingyuan; Zhang, Youzhong; Kong, Beihua

    2015-04-01

    Struma ovarii is an uncommon ovarian teratoma comprised predominantly of mature thyroid tissue. The combination of pseudo-Meigs' syndrome, and elevation of CA 125 to the struma ovarii is a rare condition that can mimic ovarian malignancy. We reported a case of benign struma ovarii, presenting with the clinical features of advanced ovarian carcinoma: complex pelvic mass, gross ascites, bilateral pleural effusion and markedly elevated serum CA 125 levels. The patient underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Ascites and pleural effusion were not evident and the CA 125 levels returned to normal following surgical excision. A systematic review of reported cases of coexistent benign struma ovarii, pseudo-Meigs' syndrome and elevated serum CA 125 was performed. Struma ovarii accompanied by pseudo-Meigs' syndrome and elevated serum CA 125 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ovarian epithelial cancer.

  16. Rare Association of Anti-Hu Antibody Positive Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome and Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lukacs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis (PEM and subacute sensory neuronopathy (SSN are remote effects of cancer, usually associated with small-cell lung carcinoma and positive anti-Hu antibody. We describe the rare association of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC with anti-Hu antibody positivity resulting in this paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Patient. A 76-year-old female presented with bilateral muscle weakness and paraesthesia of the upper and lower limbs in a length-dependent “glove and stocking” distribution. Central nervous system symptoms included cognitive problems, personality change, and truncal ataxia. Case notes and the literature were reviewed. Result. Autoantibody screening was positive for anti-Hu antibody (recently renamed antineuronal nuclear antibody 1, ANNA-1. The diagnosis of PEM and SSN was supported by MRI and lumbar puncture results. A superficial bladder TCC was demonstrated on CT and subsequently confirmed on histology. No other primary neoplasm was found on full-body imaging. The neurological symptoms were considered to be an antibody-mediated paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and improved after resection of the tumour. Discussion. The association of anti-Hu positive paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and TCC has not been described in the literature previously. We emphasize the need for detailed clinical examination and the importance of a multidisciplinary thought process and encourage further awareness of this rare association.

  17. Thrombotic risk assessment in antiphospholipid syndrome the role of new antibody specificities and thrombin generation assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciascia, Savino; Baldovino, Simone; Schreiber, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune condition characterized by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in subjects presenting with thrombosis and/or pregnancy loss. The currently used classification criteria were updated in the international consensus held in Sidney in 2005...

  18. Clinical significance of anti-domain 1 β2-glycoprotein I antibodies in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaniec, Teresa; Kaczor, Marcin P; Celińska-Löwenhoff, Magdalena; Polański, Stanisław; Musiał, Jacek

    2017-05-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in patients with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. In APS patients anti-domain 1 β2-glycoprotein I (anti-D1 β2GPI) IgG antibodies correlate strongly with thrombosis and to the lesser extent, with pregnancy complications. The aim of this study was to assess clinical utility of the anti-D1 β2GPI antibodies in the diagnosis and risk stratification of antiphospholipid syndrome. In this retrospective study 202 autoimmune patients were studied (primary APS - 58, secondary - 45 SLE - 99). Anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-β 2 GPI (aβ 2 GPI antibodies) (IgG and IgM class) together with anti-D1 IgG were tested with QUANTA Flash chemiluminescent immunoassay and lupus anticoagulant (LA) with coagulometric methods. The highest anti-D1 values were observed in triple positive patients as compared to patients with other antiphospholipid antibody profiles. A strong correlation was found between levels of anti-D1 IgG and a β2GPI IgG antibodies for all patients analyzed (Spearman's ρ=0.87; p<0.0001). Anti-D1 IgG antibodies increase specificity resulting from classic aPL positivity but at the expense of sensitivity. Anti-D1 test does not add accuracy in predicting APS thrombotic complications on the top of accuracy offered by classic aPL tests and their profiles. Anti-D1 IgG antibodies did not add diagnostic power to the standard laboratory aPL tests as assessed by this retrospective study. A true clinical significance of anti-D1 antibodies in thrombotic risk stratification of aPL positive patients will require a properly designed clinical prospective trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-Ganglioside antibodies in Guillain-Barre Syndrome : Do They indicate Prognosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Ashok

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to detect anti-ganglioside antibodies in the sera of patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome and correlate their presence with clinical features, electrophysiological studies and outcome. Twenty patients with GBS were evaluated clinically and electrophysiologically. Serological assays for antibodies against GM1, GD1a and GD1b gangliosides were carried out by ELISA, Twelve patients tested positive; two had antibodies against all three gangliosides, one against both GM1 and GD1a, one against GM1, GD1a or GD1b alone were seen in two, five and one patient respectively. No significant correlation was noted between the presence or type of antibody with clinical features, electrophysiological findings and outcome.

  20. Antibodies Against Complement Components: Relevance for the Antiphospholipid Syndrome-Biomarkers of the Disease and Biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bećarević, Mirjana

    2017-07-01

    Laboratory criterion for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL Abs). Complement system has a role in mediating aPL Abs-induced thrombosis in animal models. The importance of antibodies against complement components (potential biomarkers of APS) and the importance of antibodies with beneficial anti-complement effects in APS (as biopharmaceuticals) are reviewed. Antibodies against complement components described in APS patients, so far, are anti-C1q and anti-factor H Abs, although anti-factor B Abs and anti-C5a Abs were described in animal models of APS. Clinical studies in APS patients are limited to a small number of case reports. Studies that would confirm potential role of Abs against complement components (as potential biomarkers of APS) are lacking. Lack of randomized clinical trials (that would provide complete data for confirmation of beneficial effects of biopharmaceuticals in complement inhibition) in APS is alarming.

  1. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor(NMDAR) antibody encephalitis presents in atypical types and coexists with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder or neurosyphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kaiyu; Wu, Wenqing; Huang, Yuming; Xu, Dongmei; Zhang, Lei; Zheng, Bowen; Jiang, Meijuan; Kou, Cheng; Gao, Junhua; Li, Wurong; Zhang, Jinglin; Wang, Sumei; Luan, Yanfei; Yan, Chaoling; Xu, Dan; Zheng, Xinmei

    2017-01-05

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by epileptic seizures, psychosis, dyskinesia, consciousness impairments, and autonomic instability. Symptoms are always various. Sometimes it presents in milder or incomplete forms. We report 4 cases of anti-NMDAR encephalitis with incomplete forms, 3 cases of which were accompanied by neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder or neurosyphilis respectively. A 33-year-old man presented with dysarthria, movement disorder and occasional seizures. He had 6 relapses in 28 years. When suffered from upper respiratory tract syndrome, he developed behavioral and consciousness impairment. Cranial MRI was normal. Viral PCR studies and oncologic work-up were negative. Anti-NMDAR antibody was detected in CSF and serum. A 21-year-old female manifested dizziness and diplopia ten months and six months before, respectively. Both responded to steroid therapy and improved completely. This time she presented with progressive left limb and facial anesthesia, walking and holding unsteadily. Spinal cord MRI follow-up showed abnormality of medulla oblongata and cervical cord(C1). Anti-AQP4 and anti-NMDAR were positive in CSF. Steroid-pulse therapy ameliorated her symptoms. A 37-year-old male experienced worsening vision. He was confirmed neurosyphilis since the CSF tests for syphilis were positive. Protein was elevated and the oligoclonal IgG bands(OB) and anti-NMDAR was positive in CSF. Anti-aquaporin 4(AQP4) antibodies and NMO-IgG were negative. Cranial MRI showed high FLAIR signal on frontal lobe and low T2 signal adjacent to the right cornu posterious ventriculi lateralis. Treatment for neurosyphlis was commenced with gradual improvement. A 39-year-old male, developed serious behavioral and psychiatric symptoms. Examination showed abnormal pupils and unsteady gait. He was confirmed neurosyphilis according to the CSF tests for syphilis. Anti-NMDAR was positive in CSF and serum

  2. Thrombotic Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome: the profile of antibody positivity in patients from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Jasmina; Sreedharanunni, Sreejesh; Kumar, Narender; Masih, Joseph; Bose, Sunil Kumar; Varma, Neelam; Varma, Subhash; Singh, Surjit

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the frequency of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) in patients presenting with thrombosis of various vascular beds from North India and report the antibody profiles encountered. A retrospective analysis was performed on the laboratory results of aCL (anticardiolipin), aβ2 Gp1 (anti-βeta-2 glycoprotein 1) antibody and LAC (lupus anticoagulant) of 1222 consecutive patients referred to the coagulation laboratory work-up for a hypercoagulable/thrombophilic state over a period of 4 years between 2009 and 2013. LAC was screened with dRVVT (diluted Russel Viper Venom Test) and KCT (Kaolin clotting time), and aCL and aβ2 Gp1 antibodies with commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assy kits. The current APS criteria was satisfied in 3.85% of all patients and 4.2% of pediatric patients with thrombosis. The venous circulation was more frequently affected (59.6%). Cerebral arterial and intra-abdominal vein involvement was common. Transient antibody positivity was seen in 44 (3.6%) cases. aβ2 Gp1, aCL and LAC were positive in 95%, 54.5% and 23% of patients with APS, respectively, during the initial visit and 93.6%, 23% and 17%, respectively, during the follow-up visit. Persistent triple positivity was seen in only three cases. At initial testing, positivity for both aCL and aβ2 Gp1 was the most frequent pattern (38% of cases). aβ2 Gp1 antibody was the commonest antibody that was persistently positive in patients with thrombosis. Triple positivity for all antibodies had the highest specificity and positive predictive value to diagnose APS in the first visit, whereas aβ2 Gp1 antibody had the highest sensitivity and negative predictive value. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Accuracy of FDG-PET/CT and paraneoplastic antibodies in diagnosing cancer in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatankulu, B; Yilmaz Aksoy, S; Asa, S; Sager, S; Sayman, H B; Halac, M; Sonmezoglu, K

    2016-01-01

    There is still no consensus about whether to perform PET/CT to detect carcinoma in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) in patients with or without antibodies. The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT and antibodies in patients with PNS. A retrospective study was conducted on patients with clinically suspected PNS between 2008 and 2013. The association between histopathological findings, paraneoplastic antibodies, and PET/CT findings were evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of underlying malignancy were calculated for PET/CT and paraneoplastic antibodies. A total of 42 patients were analyzed. Of these 42 patients, 32 (75%) had a classical PNS, 6 (14%) had positive PET/CT findings, and 34 were tested for the presence of antibodies (anti-Hu Ab, anti-Yo Ab, and anti-Ri Ab). Twenty one of 34 patients had positive antibodies. Of the 6 patients with positive PET/CT findings, 6 had positive histopathological results. Among 21 patients with positive biomarkers, carcinoma was confirmed only in 5 patients. One patient with negative antibodies, but positive PET/CT findings, was diagnosed with a tumor. Gastric carcinoma was detected in 1 patient with negative PET/CT findings and antibodies during follow-up. Based on the results, PET/CT was found to have 85.71% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive and 97.22% negative predictive values in the detection of tumors. PET/CT has a certain diagnostic accuracy for detecting underlying malignancy in patients with PNS, regardless of the presence of paraneoplastic antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibodies to Pseudogymnoascus destructans are not sufficient for protection against white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph S; Reeder, DeeAnn M; Lilley, Thomas M; Czirják, Gábor Á; Voigt, Christian C; McMichael, James W; Meierhofer, Melissa B; Seery, Christopher W; Lumadue, Shayne S; Altmann, Alexander J; Toro, Michael O; Field, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fungal disease caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) that affects bats during hibernation. Although millions of bats have died from WNS in North America, mass mortality has not been observed among European bats infected by the fungus, leading to the suggestion that bats in Europe are immune. We tested the hypothesis that an antibody-mediated immune response can provide protection against WNS by quantifying antibodies reactive to Pd in blood samples from seven species of free-ranging bats in North America and two free-ranging species in Europe. We also quantified antibodies in blood samples from little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) that were part of a captive colony that we injected with live Pd spores mixed with adjuvant, as well as individuals surviving a captive Pd infection trial. Seroprevalence of antibodies against Pd, as well as antibody titers, was greater among little brown myotis than among four other species of cave-hibernating bats in North America, including species with markedly lower WNS mortality rates. Among little brown myotis, the greatest titers occurred in populations occupying regions with longer histories of WNS, where bats lacked secondary symptoms of WNS. We detected antibodies cross-reactive with Pd among little brown myotis naïve to the fungus. We observed high titers among captive little brown myotis injected with Pd. We did not detect antibodies against Pd in Pd-infected European bats during winter, and titers during the active season were lower than among little brown myotis. These results show that antibody-mediated immunity cannot explain survival of European bats infected with Pd and that little brown myotis respond differently to Pd than species with higher WNS survival rates. Although it appears that some species of bats in North America may be developing resistance to WNS, an antibody-mediated immune response does not provide an explanation for these remnant populations. PMID:26078857

  5. The prevalence of ANA antibodies, anticentromere antibodies, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome compared to patients with dryness symptoms without primary Sjögren's syndrome confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślińska, Maria; Mańczak, Małgorzata; Wojciechowska, Bożena; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2017-01-01

    Our study analyses the prevalence of ANA, anti-SS-A, anti-SS-B, and ACA and ACPA antibodies in patients with pSS and with dryness symptoms without pSS confirmation, and the association of ACPA and ACA antibodies with specific clinical symptoms. 113 patients were divided into two groups: I - with diagnosed pSS ( N = 75); and II - with dryness without pSS evidence ( N = 38). Diagnostics: indirect immunofluorescence (IF; Hep-2 cell line) of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-SS-A anti-SS-B antibodies determined with semi-quantitative method, autoantibody profile (14 antigens, ANA Profil 3 EUROLINE); basic laboratory, ophthalmic examination tests, minor salivary gland biopsy with focus score (FS), joint and lung evaluation, and ESSDAI questionnaire (pSS activity). 88% of group I had ANA antibodies (1 : 320 titre), 5.3% at 1 : 160. Anti-SS-A antibodies were present in 88% of group I, including all ANA 1 : 160. Anti-SS-A antibodies positively correlated with greater and moderate activity of ESSDAI 5 ( p = 0.046) and FS. The presence of SS-B antibodies significantly affected disease activity. ACPA present: group I - 13% (associated with higher arthritis incidence; p = 0.003); group II - 8%. ACA antibodies present in 4% of group I, but not in group II. No ACA association with interstitial lung changes (small ACA + group excludes full conclusions). ANA antibodies should also be considered in a titre of less than 1 : 320, but the presence of anti-SS-A antibodies is still the most important immunological marker for pSS. Anti-SS-A antibodies correlate with higher disease activity (ESSDAI ≥ 5) and higher FS. The presence of the anti-SS-B antibody was significantly affected by higher activity of the disease. The incidence of arthritis was higher in patients with ACPA+ pSS compared to ACPA- ( p = 0.003). There was no relationship between ACPA and arthritis in patients with dry-type syndrome without diagnosis of pSS.

  6. Increased prevalence of antibodies to thyroid peroxidase in dry eyes and mouth syndrome or sicca asthenia polyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavragani, Clio P; Skopouli, Fotini N; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M

    2009-08-01

    A subset of patients presenting with sicca features suggestive of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) do not fulfill diagnostic or histopathological criteria. This presentation was previously designated as dry eyes and mouth syndrome (DEMS) or sicca asthenia polyalgia syndrome (SAPS). We sought to define the underlying clinical, laboratory, and histological features of these patients. The study population consisted of 27 consecutive patients with DEMS/SAPS; 54 patients with pSS served as controls. Medical charts were retrospectively evaluated for clinical and serological data and frozen sera were tested for the presence of antibodies against HIV, hepatitis C virus, and thyroid antigens. Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin embedded tissues was also performed. Sicca symptoms and nonspecific musculoskeletal pain were the commonest clinical features of patients with DEMS/SAPS; positive titers of antibodies against thyroid peroxidase was the main underlying abnormality found in 16 out of 27 (59.2%) of patients with DEMS/SAPS compared to 11 out of 54 (20.4%) of pSS controls (p = 0.0009). Histological analysis of the minor salivary gland (MSG) biopsies of patients with DEMS/SAPS disclosed a mild inflammatory infiltration of the interstitial tissue with a predominantly perivascular distribution. Patients with DEMS/SAPS present with sicca features and nonspecific musculoskeletal complaints, have high prevalence of antithyroid antibodies, and their MSG biopsies demonstrate a mild interstitial lymphocytic infiltration with a predominantly perivascular distribution. In the setting of clinical practice, we propose that in the presence of DEMS/SAPS testing for antithyroid antibody should be performed.

  7. Co-existence of Blau syndrome and NAID? Diagnostic challenges associated with presence of multiple pathogenic variants in NOD2 gene: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Magdalena; Marjańska, Agata; Bąbol-Pokora, Katarzyna; Urbańczyk, Anna; Grześk, Elżbieta; Młynarski, Wojciech; Kołtan, Sylwia

    2017-07-27

    Pediatric autoinflammatory diseases are rare and still poorly understood conditions resulting from defective genetic control of innate immune system, inter alia from anomalies of NOD2 gene. The product of this gene is Nod2 protein, taking part in maintenance of immune homeostasis. Clinical form of resultant autoinflammatory condition depends on NOD2 genotype; usually patients with NOD2 defects present with Blau syndrome, NOD2-associated autoinflammatory disease (NAID) or Crohn's disease. We present the case of a 7-year-old girl with co-existing symptoms of two rare diseases, Blau syndrome and NAID. Overlapping manifestations of two syndromes raised a significant diagnostic challenge, until next-generation molecular test (NGS) identified presence of three pathogenic variants of NOD2 gene: P268S, IVS8 +158 , 1007 fs, and established the ultimate diagnosis. Presence of multiple genetical abnormalities resulted in an ambiguous clinical presentation with overlapping symptoms of Blau syndrome and NAID. Final diagnosis of autoinflammatory disease opened new therapeutic possibilities, including the use of biological treatments.

  8. Acquired Resistance to Corticotropin Therapy in Nephrotic Syndrome: Role of De Novo Neutralizing Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yu; Brem, Andrew S; Liu, Zhangsuo; Gong, Rujun

    2017-07-01

    There is increasing evidence supporting the use of corticotropin as an alternative treatment of refractory proteinuric glomerulopathies. The efficacy of short-acting corticotropin, however, remains unknown and was tested here in an adolescent with steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome caused by minimal change disease. After developing Cushing syndrome and recently being afflicted with severe cellulitis, the patient was weaned off all immunosuppressants, including corticosteroids. This resulted in a relapse of generalized anasarca, associated with massive proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia. Subsequently, mono-therapy with short-acting animal-derived natural corticotropin was initiated and resulted in a rapid response, marked by substantial diuresis, reduction in body weight, and partial remission of proteinuria. Ten days later, the patient developed mild skin rash and subcutaneous nodules at injection sites. A relapse followed despite doubling the dose of corticotropin, consistent with delayed-onset resistance to treatment. Immunoblot-based antibody assay revealed de novo formation of antibodies in the patient's serum that were reactive to the natural corticotropin. In cultured melanoma cells known to express abundant melanocortin receptors, addition of the patient's serum strikingly mitigated dendritogenesis and cell signaling triggered by natural corticotropin, denoting neutralizing properties of the newly formed antibodies. Collectively, short-acting natural corticotropin seems effective in steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome. De novo formation of neutralizing antibodies is likely responsible for acquired resistance to corticotropin therapy. The proof of concept protocols established in this study to examine the anticorticotropin neutralizing antibodies may aid in determining the cause of resistance to corticotropin therapy in future studies. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus: a syndrome with diverse clinical features and antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugaiv, Erkingül; Leite, Maria Isabel; Şehitoğlu, Elçin; Woodhall, Mark; Çavuş, Filiz; Waters, Patrick; İçöz, Sema; Birişik, Ömer; Uğurel, Elif; Ulusoy, Canan; Kürtüncü, Murat; Vural, Burçak; Vincent, Angela; Akman-Demir, Gulsen; Tüzün, Erdem

    2013-01-01

    To better characterize progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM) syndrome and identify novel PERM phenotypes. The clinical features and antibody status of PERM patients were investigated using immunoblots, cell-based assays, RIA, protein macroarray and ELISA. Two patients with supratentorial involvement showed abnormal PET or EEG findings. One patient was discovered to have renal cell carcinoma, and protein macroarray revealed Ma3-antibodies. Another patient with leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies showed a good response to immunotherapy. The heterogeneity of the immunological features suggests that PERM is caused by diverse pathogenic mechanisms. Seropositivity to well-characterized neuronal cell surface antigens might indicate a good treatment response. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. [A double antibody sandwich ELISA based assay for titration of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Zhang, Quan-Fu; Li, Chuan; Li, Jian-Dong; Jiang, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Fu-Shun; Wu, Wei; Liang, Mi-Fang; Li, De-Xin

    2013-06-01

    To develop an assay for titration of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) based on double antibody sandwich ELISA. A double antibody sandwich ELISA was developed for detection of SFTSV based on SFTSV nucleocapsid (N) protein specific poly- and monoclonal antibodies, procedures were optimized and evaluated. This ELISA based titration assay was compared with fluorescence assasy and plaque assay based titration method. The results suggested that the titers obtained by ELISA based method are consistent with those obtained by IFA based method (R = 0.999) and the plaque assay titration method (R = 0.949). The novel ELISA based titration method with high sensitivity and specificity is easy to manage and perform, and can overcome the subjectivity associated with result determination of the fluorescence assay and plaque assay based methods. The novel ELISA based titration method can also be applied to high throughput detection.

  11. Human Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody Inhibition of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication in the Common Marmoset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Chen, Cong; Zou, Tingting; Xue, Ying; Li, Fengdi; Lv, Qi; Gu, Songzhi; Gao, Xiaopan; Cui, Sheng; Wang, Jianmin; Qin, Chuan; Jin, Qi

    2017-06-15

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in humans is highly lethal, with a fatality rate of 35%. New prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to combat human infections are urgently needed. We isolated a fully human neutralizing antibody, MCA1, from a human survivor. The antibody recognizes the receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV S glycoprotein and interferes with the interaction between viral S and the human cellular receptor human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). To our knowledge, this study is the first to report a human neutralizing monoclonal antibody that completely inhibits MERS-CoV replication in common marmosets. Monotherapy with MCA1 represents a potential alternative treatment for human infections with MERS-CoV worthy of evaluation in clinical settings. © Crown copyright 2017.

  12. Thrombosis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome during acute Q fever: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Bardin, Nathalie; Bessis, Simon; Nouiakh, Nadia; Douliery, Charlaine; Edouard, Sophie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bosseray, Annick; Epaulard, Olivier; Branger, Stéphanie; Chaudier, Bernard; Blanc-Laserre, Karine; Ferreira-Maldent, Nicole; Demonchy, Elisa; Roblot, France; Reynes, Jacques; Djossou, Felix; Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Patrizia; Camoin-Jau, Laurence; Mege, Jean-Louis; Raoult, Didier

    2017-07-01

    Q fever is a neglected and potentially fatal disease. During acute Q fever, antiphospholipid antibodies are very prevalent and have been associated with fever, thrombocytopenia, acquired heart valve disease, and progression to chronic endocarditis. However, thrombosis, the main clinical criterion of the 2006 updated classification of the antiphospholipid syndrome, has not been assessed in this context. To test whether thrombosis is associated with antiphospholipid antibodies and whether the criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome can be met in patients with acute Q fever, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the French National Referral Center for Q fever.Patients included were diagnosed with acute Q fever in our Center between January 2007 and December 2015. Each patient's history and clinical characteristics were recorded with a standardized questionnaire. Predictive factors associated with thrombosis were assessed using a rare events logistic regression model. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG aCL) assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were tested on the Q fever diagnostic serum. A dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and thrombosis was tested using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.Of the 664 patients identified for inclusion in the study, 313 (47.1%) had positive IgG aCL and 13 (1.9%) were diagnosed with thrombosis. Three patients fulfilled the antiphospholipid syndrome criteria. After multiple adjustments, only positive IgG aCL (relative risk, 14.46 [1.85-113.14], P = .011) were independently associated with thrombosis. ROC analysis identified a dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and occurrence of thrombosis (area under curve, 0.83, 95%CI [0.73-0.93], P antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and acquired valvular heart disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies should be systematically assessed in acute Q fever patients. Hydroxychloroquine, which has been

  13. The prevalence of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome among systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, M A; Keogan, M; O'Connell, P; Kearns, G

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterised by excess autoantibody production. It typically affects women of childbearing age. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APLAs) is associated with serious co-morbidity to mother and child characterized by recurrent vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy associated morbidity. We reviewed SLE patients attending a specialist connective tissue disease clinic both to assess the occurrence of APLAs and its clinical presentations and to audit the effectiveness of screening for APL antibodies in a specialist clinic. 204 patients attended the newly established connective tissue disease outpatient clinic over a twenty-seven month period; 42 (34 female, 8 male) with a diagnosis of SLE. Ten patients (24%), eight female and 2 male with a median age of 38.5 years (range 20 to 64 years) fulfilled the ACR criteria for secondary APLAs (Table 2). The commonest clinical presentation was pulmonary embolus (five patients). Overall 37 patients (88%) with SLE were screened for APLAs during the study period: 94% of females and 62.5% of males were screened (for anticardiolipin antibodies, lupus anticoagulant or both), 27% had evidence of APLAs, 24% had positive antibodies but were asymptomatic. There is a significant occurrence of APLAs among SLE patients. Given the important clinical implications of this disorder including substantial risk of fetal loss and patient morbidity or mortality, routine screening of all SLE patients for APL antibodies is recommended.

  14. Antiganglioside antibodies in Guillain-Barré syndrome after a recent cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili-Shirazi, A; Gregson, N; Gray, I; Rees, J; Winer, J; Hughes, R

    1999-03-01

    To study the association between anti-ganglioside antibody responses and Guillan-Barré syndrome (GBS) after a recent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) was undertaken on serum samples from 14 patients with GBS with recent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection (CMV+GBS) and 12 without (CMV-GBS), 17 patients with other neurological diseases (OND), 11 patients with a recent CMV infection but without neurological involvement, 11 patients with recent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection but without neurological involvement, and 20 normal control (NC) subjects. IgM antibodies were found at 1:100 serum dilution to gangliosides GM2 (six of 14 patients), GM1 (four of 14), GD1a (three of 14) and GD1b (two of 14) in the serum samples of the CMV+GBS patients, but not in those of any of the CMV-GBS patients. IgM antibodies were also found to gangliosides GM1, GD1a, and GD1b in one of 11 OND patients, to ganglioside GM1 in one of 11 non- neurological CMV patients, and to ganglioside GD1b in one of 20 NC subjects. Some patients with EBV infection had IgM antibodies to gangliosides GM1 (five of 11), GM2 (three of 11), and GD1a (two of 11). However, the antibodies to ganglioside GM2 had a low titre, none being positive at 1:200 dilution, whereas five of the CMV+GBS serum samples remained positive at this dilution. Antibodies to ganglioside GM2 are often associated with GBS after CMV infection, but their relevance is not known. It is unlikely that CMV infection and anti-ganglioside GM2 antibodies are solely responsible and an additional factor is required to elicit GBS.

  15. A complex case of fatal calciphylaxis in a female patient with hyperparathyroidism secondary to end stage renal disease of graft and coexistence of haemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio; Bellavia, Maurizio; Damiano, Giuseppe; Gioviale, Maria Concetta; Maione, Carolina; Palumbo, Vincenzo Davide; Spinelli, Gabriele; Tripodo, Claudio; Cacciabaudo, Francesco; Sammartano, Antonino; Buscemi, Salvatore; De Luca, Salvatore; Di Ganci, Simona; Buscemi, Giuseppe

    2012-09-01

    Calciphylaxis is a potentially fatal complication of persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism; its cause is still not clear. Unfortunately there is no close relation in severity of clinical picture, serological and pathological alteration. For this reason the prognosis is difficult to establish. Administration of sodium thiosulphate may reduce the precipitation of calcium crystals and improve the general clinical conditions before surgical parathyroidectomy, which seems the only therapeutic approach able to reduce the mortality risk in these patients. A 60 year old female patient suffering from End Renal Stage Disease, on haemodialysis from 2001 due to the onset of haemolytic uremic syndrome, underwent a kidney transplant in April 2008. After transplantation there was a recurrence of the haemolytic uremic syndrome, with temporary worsening of the graft. Six months later there was a definite loss of graft and return to dialysis treatment. On April 2010 a severe systemic calciphylaxis related to secondary hyperparathyroidism was diagnosed. The patient underwent parathyroidectomy but, because of the unimproved clinical picture, treatment with sodium thiosulphate was initiated. There was only improvement in cutaneous lesions. The worsening general clinical condition of the patient caused death due to general septic complications. The coexistence of haemolytic uremic syndrome and secondary hyperpathyroidism makes the prognosis poor and, in this case, therapy, which counteracts calcium crystals precipitation, has no effect. Preventive parathyroidectomy can be considered as the only possible treatment.

  16. Glycine receptor antibody mediated Progressive Encephalomyelitis with Rigidity and Myoclonus (PERM): a rare but treatable neurological syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, W M; Howard, R; Chalmers, R M; Woodhall, M R; Waters, P; Vincent, A; Wickremaratchi, M M

    2014-04-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with respiratory compromise and was intubated. After tracheostomy, he was found to have ophthalmoplegia, severe limb rigidity, stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and autonomic dysfunction. For 1 week before admission, there had been a prodromal illness with low mood, hallucinations and limb myoclonus. Serum glycine receptor antibodies were strongly positive: we diagnosed progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. Despite a relapse, he has done well following immunotherapies. The clinical syndrome of encephalomyelitis with rigidity, described in 1976, often has a severe progressive course. A minority of patients have glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. The association with glycine receptor antibody was first reported in 2008, and we briefly review subsequent case reports to illustrate the range of clinical features. The antibody is likely to be disease mediating, although this remains unproven. The spectrum of diagnosable and treatable antibody mediated neurological syndromes is expanding. It is vital to recognise these conditions early to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  17. Coexistence of hepatitis B surface antigen and antibody to hepatitis B surface may increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic hepatitis B virus infection: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung In; Choi, Hyeok Soo; Choi, Bo Youn; Kim, Hyoung Su; Kim, Hak Yang; Jang, Myoung Kuk

    2014-01-01

    The simultaneous detection of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B surface (anti-HBs) is unusual in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, but may be related with more advanced liver diseases. This retrospective long-term cohort study was aimed to investigate whether coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs may increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic HBV infection. A total of 1,042 non-HCC patients were recruited and followed up for a median 4.3 years (range 1.0-22 years). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the risk factors for HCC development. The prevalence of coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs was 7.0% (73/1,042). In univariate analysis, the 5-, 10-, and 15-year cumulative incidences of HCC were significantly higher in coexistence group than in HBsAg only group (12.7%, 23.4%, 69.4% vs. 4.9%, 13%, 20.6%, respectively; P = 0.008). In multivariate analysis, coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs [Hazard ratio (HR), 2.001; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.023-3.912; P = 0.043] as well as male gender [HR, 1.898; 95% CI, 0.31-0.896; P = 0.018], age over 40 years [HR, 14.56; 95% CI, 4.499-47.08; P = 0.0001], and cirrhosis [HR, 7.995; 95% CI, 4.756-13.439; P = 0.0001] was identified as the independent factor for HCC development. Also, the cumulative incidence of HCC increased in proportion to the number of the risk factors. In conclusion, coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs may increase independently the risk of HCC development in chronic HBV infection. Therefore, consideration of HCC development is required in patients with coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Anesthetic management of right atrial mass removal and pulmonary artery thrombectomy in a patient with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawat SKS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APLAS characterises a clinical condition of arterial and venous thrombosis associated with phospholipids directed antibodies. APLAS occurs in 2% of the general population. However, one study demonstrated that 7.1% of hospitalised patients were tested positive for at least one of the three anticardiolipin antibody idiotype. Antiphospholipid antibodies often inhibit phospholipids dependent coagulation in vitro and interfere with laboratory testing of hemostasis. Therefore, the management of anticoagulation during cardiopulmonary bypass can be quite challenging in these patients. Here, we present a case of right atrial mass removal and pulmonary thrombectomy in a patient of APLAS.

  19. Smith-Magenis Syndrome Patients Often Display Antibody Deficiency but Not Other Immune Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Tiffany; Rosenberg, Jacob M; Le Coz, Carole; Alaimo, Joseph T; Trofa, Melissa; Mullegama, Sureni V; Antaya, Richard J; Jyonouchi, Soma; Elsea, Sarah H; Utz, Paul J; Meffre, Eric; Romberg, Neil

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex neurobehavioral disorder associated with recurrent otitis. Most SMS cases result from heterozygous interstitial chromosome 17p11.2 deletions that encompass not only the intellectual disability gene retinoic acid-induced 1 but also other genes associated with immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, and/or malignancy. The goals of this study were to describe the immunological consequence of 17p11.2 deletions by determining the prevalence of immunological diseases in subjects with SMS and by assessing their immune systems via laboratory methods. We assessed clinical histories of 76 subjects with SMS with heterozygous 17p11.2 deletions and performed in-depth immunological testing on 25 representative cohort members. Laboratory testing included determination of serum antibody concentrations, vaccine titers, and lymphocyte subset frequencies. Detailed reactivity profiles of SMS serum antibodies were performed using custom-made antigen microarrays. Of 76 subjects with SMS, 74 reported recurrent infections including otitis (88%), pneumonia (47%), sinusitis (42%), and gastroenteritis (34%). Infections were associated with worsening SMS-related neurobehavioral symptoms. The prevalence of autoimmune and atopic diseases was not increased. Malignancy was not reported. Laboratory evaluation revealed most subjects with SMS to be deficient of isotype-switched memory B cells and many to lack protective antipneumococcal antibodies. SMS antibodies were not more reactive than control antibodies to self-antigens. Patients with SMS with heterozygous 17p.11.2 deletions display an increased susceptibility to sinopulmonary infections, but not to autoimmune, allergic, or malignant diseases. SMS sera display an antibody reactivity profile favoring neither recognition of pathogen-associated antigens nor self-antigens. Prophylactic strategies to prevent infections may also provide neurobehavioral benefits to selected patients with SMS. Copyright © 2017

  20. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein and aquaporin-4 antibodies are highly specific in children with acquired demyelinating syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duignan, Sophie; Wright, Sukhvir; Rossor, Tom; Cazabon, John; Gilmour, Kimberly; Ciccarelli, Olga; Wassmer, Evangeline; Lim, Ming; Hemingway, Cheryl; Hacohen, Yael

    2018-02-22

    Our objectives were to evaluate the utility of measuring myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibodies (Ab) in clinical practice and describe their associated neurological phenotypes in children. Between 2012 and 2017, 371 children with suspected acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) seen in three tertiary centres were tested for MOG-Ab and AQP4-Ab. Medical notes were retrospectively reviewed, and clinical and demographic data compiled. Clinical phenotyping was performed blinded to the antibody results. After review, 237 of the 371 were diagnosed with ADS. Of these, 76 out of 237 (32.1%) were MOG-Ab positive and 14 out of 237 (5.9%) were AQP4-Ab positive. None were positive for both autoantibodies. All 134 patients with non-ADS were negative for MOG-Ab. MOG-Ab were identified in 45 out of 70 (64.3%) patients presenting with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and in 24 out of 25 patients with relapsing ADEM. Thirty-six out of 75 (48%) MOG-Ab positive patients relapsed. Of the 33 children with neuromyelitis optic spectrum disorder, 14 were AQP4-Ab positive, 13 were MOG-Ab positive, and 6 were seronegative. Of the children with longitudinal samples, 8 out of 13 AQP4-Ab remained positive during the disease course compared to 35 out of 43 MOG-Ab (13/16 monophasic and 22/27 relapsing). Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies were identified in a third of children with ADS. Almost half of the MOG-Ab positive children relapsed and the majority of them remained antibody positive over 4-years follow-up. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies (MOG-Ab) are highly specific for acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS). Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies are not identified in children with peripheral demyelination or genetic leukodystrophies/hypomyelination. Up to 48% of MOG-Ab ADS paediatric patients relapse, higher than previously thought. Seroconversion to MOG-Ab negative status is infrequent; patients may test

  1. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome showing elevated levels of antinuclear and anticentromere antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Seisuke; Kasahara, Akinori; Tada, Shoko; Tanaka, Takehiro; Umena, Sachio; Fukatsu, Haruka; Noguchi, Toshio; Matsumura, Tadashi

    2015-02-01

    A 56-year-old female initially visited an otorhinolaryngologist because of an impaired sense of taste in September, 2010 and was referred to our facility in October, 2010. She was diagnosed with Basedow's disease for which she underwent subtotal thyroidectomy in 1984 and arthritis involving multiple joints, primarily affecting her hands. In addition, the anticentromere antibody (ACA) level was markedly high. On physical examination, alopecia as well as hyperpigmentation of the dorsum of the hands and back was observed. Dystrophic changes of the fingernails and a bilateral thumb abduction deformity were observed. Antinuclear antibodies were elevated. Gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy revealed the mucosa carpeted with strawberry-like polypoid lesions. Histopathological examination of the biopsied specimen of the stomach revealed a corkscrew-like appearance. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS). She admitted to our hospital in November, 2010. Oral prednisolone was administered with success. In July, 2012, her antimitochondrial M2 antibody level was elevated. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first patient with CCS, a history of Basedow's disease, and elevated levels of ACA and antimitochondrial M2 antibody. We consider the present case suggests CCS could be caused by immunological abnormality.

  2. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as potential markers of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlagea, Alexandru; Gil, Antonio; Cuesta, Maria V; Arribas, Florencia; Diez, Jesús; Lavilla, Paz; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora

    2013-06-01

    The antiphospholipid antibodies present in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are directed at a number of phospholipid-binding proteins: β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI), prothrombin, and so on. Antibodies directed at β2GPI are accepted as a classification criterion for APS, while the presence of antiprothrombin antibodies is not. In the present article, we investigated the possible role of antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as marker of APS on a cohort of 295 individuals with APS (95 primary APS and 45 secondary APS) and APS-related diseases. We found aPS/PT to be highly associated with venous thrombosis (immunoglobulin G [IgG] aPS/PT odds ratio [OR], 7.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.97-13.92 and IgM aPS/PT OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.35-4.77) and obstetric abnormalities (IgG aPS/PT OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.04-5.43), but not with arterial thrombosis. A very high degree of concordance between the concentration of aPS/PT and lupus anticoagulant activity was demonstrated. Therefore, we support the inclusion of aPS/PT determination as second-level assay to confirm APS classification.

  3. Bickerstaff’s brainstem encephalitis, Miller Fisher syndrome and Guillain-Barré syndrome overlap in an asthma patient with negative anti-ganglioside antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chongyu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bickerstaff’s brainstem encephalitis (BBE, together with Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS were considered to form a continuous clinical spectrum. An anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome has been proposed to underlie the common pathophysiology for the three disorders; however, other studies have found a positive anti-GM1 instead of anti-GQ1b antibody. Case presentation Here we report a 20-year-old male patient with overlapping BBE, MFS and GBS. The patient had a positive family history of bronchial asthma and had suffered from the condition for over 15 years. He developed BBE symptoms nine days after an asthma exacerbation. During the course of illness, he had significantly elevated IgE levels in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Serologic analysis of antibodies against ganglioside complexes (anti-GDIa, anti-GDIb, anti-GM1, anti-GM2, anti-GM3, anti-GQIb and anti-GTIb antibodies showed negative results. Conclusions Since asthma has recently been related to autoimmune disease, our case supports an autoimmune mechanism underlying the clinical spectrum composed of BBE, MFS and GBS. However, contrary to a proposed anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome, we would suggest that pathogenesis of this clinical spectrum is not limited to anti-ganglioside antibodies.

  4. Diagnostic value of anti-annexin A5 antibodies in seropositive versus seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gihan Omar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current laboratory criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome (APS classification recommend testing positive for antiphospholipid (aPL antibodies. However, there appears to be a subset of patients with classical APS manifestations who test negative. Aim of the work: To analyze the potential clinical usefulness of testing for anti-annexin A5 antibodies in patients with APS and to study the effectiveness of testing for non-criteria aPLs in an attempt to increase the diagnostic yield, particularly in seronegative APS. Patients and methods: 60 APS patients were divided into two groups; 30 seropositive (SP-APS (group I and 30 age and sex matched seronegative (sN-APS testing negative for aPL antibodies. Serum assay for detection of isotypes of anti-annexin A5 antibodies (IgG and IgM were conducted. Results: The mean age of the patients was 32.9 ± 5.8 years, female:male 57:3 and disease duration in SP-APS versus sN-APS (10.17 ± 4.9 years versus 9.6 ± 5.5 years respectively. Secondary APS was present in 16(53.3% patients in group I compared to 3(10% in group II (p < 0.0001. The mean anti-AnxA5 IgG level was 10.7 ± 5.6 U/ml and IgM was 11.2 ± 7.1 U/ml and were comparable between the 2 groups. The obstetric and thrombotic morbidity had no significant differences between SP and sN-APS. The IgG and IgM levels significantly correlated with the pregnancy morbidity, venous and arterial thrombosis events and showed reasonable sensitivities in their prediction (IgG:71.2%,72.8% and 75.8%; IgM: 68%,67.8% and 71.4% respectively and specificities (IgG:75.9%,77.8% and 81.5%; IgM: 70.9%,73.1% and 73.7% respectively. Conclusion: anti-annexinA5 antibodies are promising for detecting obstetric and thrombotic morbidity in both SP- and sN-APS patients. Keywords: Antiphospholipid syndrome, Seropositive APS (SP-APS, Seronegative APS (sN-APS, Anti-annexin A5 antibodies

  5. Modulating thrombotic diathesis in hereditary thrombophilia and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: a role for circulating microparticles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campello, Elena; Radu, Claudia M; Spiezia, Luca; Simioni, Paolo

    2017-06-27

    Over the past decades, there have been great advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with inherited and acquired thrombophilia [mainly antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS)]. However, a number of questions remain unanswered. Prognostic markers capable of estimating the individual VTE risk would be of great use. Microparticles (MPs) are sub-micron membrane vesicles constitutively released from the surface of cells after cellular activation and apoptosis. The effects of MPs on thrombogenesis include the exposure of phopshatidylserine and the expression of tissue factor and MPs have been described in clinical studies as possible diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for VTE. This review will provide a novel perspective on the current knowledge and research trends on the possible role of MPs in hereditary thrombophilia and APS. Basically, the published data show that circulating MPs may contribute to the development of VTE in thrombophilic carriers, both in mild and severe states. Moreover, the presence of endothelial-MPs and platelet-MPs has been described in antiphospholipid syndrome and seems to be directly linked to antiphospholipid antibodies and not to other underlying autoimmune disorders or the thrombotic event itself. In conclusion, circulating MPs may constitute an epiphenomenon of thrombophilia itself and could be up-regulated in acute particular conditions, promoting a global prothrombotic state up to the threshold of the clinical relevant thrombotic event.

  6. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in Santa Cruz, Bolivia: Outbreak Investigation and Antibody Prevalence Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Joel M.; Blair, Patrick J.; Carroll, Darin S.; Mills, James N.; Gianella, Alberto; Iihoshi, Naomi; Briggiler, Ana M.; Felices, Vidal; Salazar, Milagros; Olson, James G.; Glabman, Raisa A.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation of a small outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in 2002 in the Department of Santa Cruz, Bolivia, where the disease had not previously been reported. Two cases were initially reported. The first case was a physician infected with Laguna Negra virus during a weekend visit to his ranch. Four other persons living on the ranch were IgM antibody-positive, two of whom were symptomatic for mild hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. The second case was a migrant sugarcane worker. Although no sample remained to determine the specific infecting hantavirus, a virus 90% homologous with Río Mamoré virus was previously found in small-eared pygmy rice rats (Oligoryzomys microtis) trapped in the area. An antibody prevalence study conducted in the region as part of the outbreak investigation showed 45 (9.1%) of 494 persons to be IgG positive, illustrating that hantavirus infection is common in Santa Cruz Department. Precipitation in the months preceding the outbreak was particularly heavy in comparison to other years, suggesting a possible climatic or ecological influence on rodent populations and risk of hantavirus transmission to humans. Hantavirus infection appears to be common in the Santa Cruz Department, but more comprehensive surveillance and field studies are needed to fully understand the epidemiology and risk to humans. PMID:23094116

  7. Coexistence of antibodies to tick-borne agents of babesiosis and Lyme borreliosis in patients from Cotia county, State of São Paulo, Brazil

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    Natalino Hajime Yoshinari

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case of coinfection caused by pathogens of Lyme disease and babesiosis in brothers. This was the first case of borreliosis in Brazil, acquired in Cotia County, State of São Paulo, Brazil. Both children had tick bite history, presented erythema migrans, fever, arthralgia, mialgia, and developed positive serology (ELISA and Western-blotting directed to Borrelia burgdorferi G 39/40 and Babesia bovis antigens, mainly of IgM class antibodies, suggestive of acute disease. Also, high frequencies of antibodies to B. bovis was observed in a group of 59 Brazilian patients with Lyme borreliosis (25.4%, when compared with that obtained in a normal control group (10.2% (chi-square = 5.6; p < 0.05. Interestingly, both children presented the highest titers for IgM antibodies directed to both infective diseases, among all patients with Lyme borreliosis.

  8. The chest X-ray in antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease (Goodpasture's syndrome)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowley, N.B.; Steiner, R.E.; Chin, W.S.

    1979-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 25 patients with proven antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease (Goodpasture's syndrome) were analysed. All except two of the patients had pulmonary haemorrhage at some stage of their disease. Altogether there were 39 episodes of pulmonary haemorrhage, 25 being relapses. During seven episodes the chest radiograph was normal. Relapses of pulmonary haemorrhage never occurred in isolation but were usually associated with infection (not necessarily a chest infection) or occasionally fluid overload. Conversely fluid overload or infection were always associated with pulmonary haemorrhage provided there were high or rising titres of circulating antibodies at the time. Therefore in a patient with antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease, the presence of shadowing in the lung fields on the chest radiograph almost invariably means the patient has pulmonary haemorrhage whether or not pulmonary oedema or a chest infection are present. Limitation of shadowing by a fissure, loss of major portions of the diaphragmatic or cardiac silhouette, involvement of the lung apex or costophrenic angles suggest an underlying chest infection. Septal lines suggest fluid overload. Pleural effusions are seen with chest infections and fluid overload. The carbon monoxide uptake (KCO) was invariably high in the presence of pulmonary haemorrhage even if the chest radiograph was normal. A combined use of KCO and chest radiographs is the best method of monitoring lung disease in these patients. (author)

  9. Should we systematically test patients with clinically isolated syndrome for auto-antibodies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrotto, Laura; Tur, Carmen; Tintoré, Mar; Arrambide, Georgina; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Río, Jordi; Comabella, Manuel; Nos, Carlos; Galán, Ingrid; Vidal-Jordana, Angela; Simon, Eva; Castilló, Joaquín; Palavra, Filipe; Mitjana, Raquel; Auger, Cristina; Rovira, Àlex; Montalban, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Several autoimmune diseases (ADs) can mimic multiple sclerosis (MS). For this reason, testing for auto-antibodies (auto-Abs) is often included in the diagnostic work-up of patients with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). The purpose was to study how useful it was to systematically determine antinuclear-antibodies, anti-SSA and anti-SSB in a non-selected cohort of CIS patients, regarding the identification of other ADs that could represent an alternative diagnosis. From a prospective CIS cohort, we selected 772 patients in which auto-Ab levels were tested within the first year from CIS. Baseline characteristics of auto-Ab positive and negative patients were compared. A retrospective revision of clinical records was then performed in the auto-Ab positive patients to identify those who developed ADs during follow-up. One or more auto-Ab were present in 29.4% of patients. Only 1.8% of patients developed other ADs during a mean follow-up of 6.6 years. In none of these cases the concurrent AD was considered the cause of the CIS. In all cases the diagnosis of the AD resulted from the development of signs and/or symptoms suggestive of each disease. Antinuclear-antibodies, anti-SSA and anti-SSB should not be routinely determined in CIS patients but only in those presenting symptoms suggestive of other ADs. © The Author(s), 2015.

  10. Identification of a Monoclonal Antibody That Attenuates Antiphospholipid Syndrome-Related Pregnancy Complications and Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineo, Chieko; Lanier, Lane; Jung, Eunjeong; Sengupta, Samarpita; Ulrich, Victoria; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Tarango, Cristina; Osunbunmi, Olutoye; Shen, Yu-Min; Salmon, Jane E.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Huang, Xianming; Shaul, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    In the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), patients produce antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) that promote thrombosis and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Current therapy with anticoagulation is only partially effective and associated with multiple complications. We previously discovered that aPL recognition of cell surface β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) initiates apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2)-dependent signaling in endothelial cells and in placental trophoblasts that ultimately promotes thrombosis and fetal loss, respectively. Here we sought to identify a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to β2-GPI that negates aPL-induced processes in cell culture and APS disease endpoints in mice. In a screen measuring endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity in cultured endothelial cells, we found that whereas aPL inhibit eNOS, the mAb 1N11 does not, and instead 1N11 prevents aPL action. Coimmunoprecipitation studies revealed that 1N11 decreases pathogenic antibody binding to β2-GPI, and it blocks aPL-induced complex formation between β2-GPI and apoER2. 1N11 also prevents aPL antagonism of endothelial cell migration, and in mice it reverses the impairment in reendothelialization caused by aPL, which underlies the non-thrombotic vascular occlusion provoked by disease-causing antibodies. In addition, aPL inhibition of trophoblast proliferation and migration is negated by 1N11, and the more than 6-fold increase in fetal resorption caused by aPL in pregnant mice is prevented by 1N11. Furthermore, the promotion of thrombosis by aPL is negated by 1N11. Thus, 1N11 has been identified as an mAb that attenuates APS-related pregnancy complications and thrombosis in mice. 1N11 may provide an efficacious, mechanism-based therapy to combat the often devastating conditions suffered by APS patients. PMID:27463336

  11. Association between polycystic ovary syndrome, oral microbiota and systemic antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcalı, Aliye; Bostanci, Nagihan; Özçaka, Özgün; Öztürk-Ceyhan, Banu; Gümüş, Pınar; Buduneli, Nurcan; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder of women that not only is the leading cause of infertility but also shows a reciprocal link with oral health. This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that the levels of putative periodontal pathogens in saliva and their antibody response in serum are elevated in PCOS, compared to systemic health. A total of 125 women were included in four groups; 45 women with PCOS and healthy periodontium, 35 women with PCOS and gingivitis, 25 systemically and periodontally healthy women, 20 systemically healthy women with gingivitis. Salivary levels of seven putative periodontal pathogens were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and serum antibody levels were analyzed by ELISA. In women with PCOS, salivary Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis and Tannerella forsythia levels were higher than matched systemically healthy women, particularly in the case of gingivitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola levels were similar among study groups. The presence of PCOS also enhanced P. gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and S. oralis serum antibody levels, when gingivitis was also present. Gingival inflammation correlated positively with levels of the studied taxa in saliva, particularly in PCOS. The presence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum in saliva also exhibited a strong positive correlation with the corresponding serum antibody levels. In conclusion, as an underlying systemic endocrine condition, PCOS may quantitatively affect the composition of oral microbiota and the raised systemic response to selective members of this microbial community, exerting a confounding role in resultant gingival inflammation and periodontal health. The most consistent effect appeared to be exerted on P. gingivalis.

  12. Association between polycystic ovary syndrome, oral microbiota and systemic antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Akcalı

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a hormonal disorder of women that not only is the leading cause of infertility but also shows a reciprocal link with oral health. This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that the levels of putative periodontal pathogens in saliva and their antibody response in serum are elevated in PCOS, compared to systemic health. A total of 125 women were included in four groups; 45 women with PCOS and healthy periodontium, 35 women with PCOS and gingivitis, 25 systemically and periodontally healthy women, 20 systemically healthy women with gingivitis. Salivary levels of seven putative periodontal pathogens were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and serum antibody levels were analyzed by ELISA. In women with PCOS, salivary Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis and Tannerella forsythia levels were higher than matched systemically healthy women, particularly in the case of gingivitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola levels were similar among study groups. The presence of PCOS also enhanced P. gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and S. oralis serum antibody levels, when gingivitis was also present. Gingival inflammation correlated positively with levels of the studied taxa in saliva, particularly in PCOS. The presence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum in saliva also exhibited a strong positive correlation with the corresponding serum antibody levels. In conclusion, as an underlying systemic endocrine condition, PCOS may quantitatively affect the composition of oral microbiota and the raised systemic response to selective members of this microbial community, exerting a confounding role in resultant gingival inflammation and periodontal health. The most consistent effect appeared to be exerted on P. gingivalis.

  13. Antibody-dependent infection of human macrophages by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ming Shum; Leung, Nancy Hiu Lan; Cheung, Chung Yan; Li, Ping Hung; Lee, Horace Hok Yeung; Daëron, Marc; Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik; Bruzzone, Roberto; Jaume, Martial

    2014-05-06

    Public health risks associated to infection by human coronaviruses remain considerable and vaccination is a key option for preventing the resurgence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We have previously reported that antibodies elicited by a SARS-CoV vaccine candidate based on recombinant, full-length SARS-CoV Spike-protein trimers, trigger infection of immune cell lines. These observations prompted us to investigate the molecular mechanisms and responses to antibody-mediated infection in human macrophages. We have used primary human immune cells to evaluate their susceptibility to infection by SARS-CoV in the presence of anti-Spike antibodies. Fluorescence microscopy and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were utilized to assess occurrence and consequences of infection. To gain insight into the underlying molecular mechanism, we performed mutational analysis with a series of truncated and chimeric constructs of fragment crystallizable γ receptors (FcγR), which bind antibody-coated pathogens. We show here that anti-Spike immune serum increased infection of human monocyte-derived macrophages by replication-competent SARS-CoV as well as Spike-pseudotyped lentiviral particles (SARS-CoVpp). Macrophages infected with SARS-CoV, however, did not support productive replication of the virus. Purified anti-viral IgGs, but not other soluble factor(s) from heat-inactivated mouse immune serum, were sufficient to enhance infection. Antibody-mediated infection was dependent on signaling-competent members of the human FcγRII family, which were shown to confer susceptibility to otherwise naïve ST486 cells, as binding of immune complexes to cell surface FcγRII was necessary but not sufficient to trigger antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection. Furthermore, only FcγRII with intact cytoplasmic signaling domains were competent to sustain ADE of SARS-CoVpp infection, thus providing additional

  14. An incidental coexistence of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome with pelvic ectopic kidney and perirenal endometrioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balci, O.; Karatayli, R.; Capar, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this case report, Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome with pelvic ectopic kidney and a perirenal cyst with endometrial tissue inside is demonstrated. A 17 year old patient admitted with primary amenorrhea. Pubertal stages were completed. In pelvic ultrasonography; uterus could not be detected, a 6x11 cm sized cystic lesion was seen on the right adnexal area. A centrally located 5.5x9 cm sized ectopic pelvic kidney was detected. Hormones and tumor markers were normal. Laparoscopy was planned. In the laparoscopic observation, uterus and both tubes could not be detected, ovaries were normal. There was a 6x7 cm sized cyst located in the retroperitoneal area, the origin of cyst could not be identified. Laparatomy was considered, retroperitoneal space was entered, an 8x11 sized smooth contoured perirenal cyst adjacent to the pelvic kidney was detected. Cyst was extirpated. The pathology result was reported to include endometrial tissue and hemorrhage inside. (author)

  15. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis Overlap Syndrome in Patients With Biopsy-Proven Glomerulonephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrot, Pierre-Andre; Chiche, Laurent; Hervier, Baptiste; Daniel, Laurent; Vuiblet, Vincent; Bardin, Nathalie; Bertin, Daniel; Terrier, Benjamin; Amoura, Zahir; Andrés, Emmanuel; Rondeau, Eric; Hamidou, Mohamed; Pennaforte, Jean-Loup; Halfon, Philippe; Daugas, Eric; Dussol, Bertrand; Puéchal, Xavier; Kaplanski, Gilles; Jourde-Chiche, Noemie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to report the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of patients with glomerulonephritis (GN) secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)/antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) overlap syndrome. A nationwide survey was conducted to identify cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. Data were collected from SLE and AAV French research groups. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of both SLE and AAV according to international classification criteria and biopsy-proven GN between 1995 and 2014. Additional cases were identified through a systematic literature review. A cohort of consecutive biopsy-proven GN was used to study the prevalence of overlapping antibodies and/or overlap syndrome. The national survey identified 8 cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. All patients were female; median age was 40 years. AAV occurred before SLE (n = 3), after (n = 3), or concomitantly (n = 2). Six patients had rapidly progressive GN and 3/8 had alveolar hemorrhage. All patients had antinuclear antibodies (ANA); 7/8 had p-ANCA antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies. Renal biopsies showed lupus nephritis (LN) or pauci-immune GN. Remission was obtained in 4/8 patients. A literature review identified 31 additional cases with a similarly severe presentation. In the GN cohort, ANCA positivity was found in 30% of LN, ANA positivity in 52% of pauci-immune GN, with no correlation with pathological findings. The estimated prevalence for SLE/AAV overlap syndrome was 2/101 (2%). In patients with GN, SLE/AAV overlap syndrome may occur but with a low prevalence. Most patients have an aggressive renal presentation, with usually both ANA and anti-MPO antibodies. Further studies are needed to assess shared pathogenesis and therapeutic options. PMID:27258503

  16. Antiphospholipid Antibody Titers and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Recurrent Miscarriage and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Song

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Anti-β2-GP1 IgM was the predominant form of antibody in patients with RM and APS. The decreases in antiphospholipid antibody titers correlated with better pregnancy outcomes. The shorter treatment regimen was effective and economical.

  17. The crucial role of Campylobacter jejuni genes in anti-ganglioside antibody induction in Guillain-Barré syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Jacobs (Bart); H.P. Endtz (Hubert); A.P. Heikema (Astrid); M. Gilbert (Michel); T. Komagamine (Tomoko); C.W. Ang (Wim); J. Glerum (Jobine); D. Brochu (Denis); J. Li (Jianjun); N. Yuki (Nobuhiro); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); P.C.R. Godschalk (Peggy)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractMolecular mimicry of Campylobacter jejuni lipo-oligosaccharides (LOS) with gangliosides in nervous tissue is considered to induce cross-reactive antibodies that lead to Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), an acute polyneuropathy. To determine whether specific bacterial genes

  18. Recombinant protein-based assays for detection of antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike and nucleocapsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Lia M; Miao, Congrong; Harcourt, Jennifer L; Montgomery, Joel M; Le, Mai Quynh; Dryga, Sergey A; Kamrud, Kurt I; Rivers, Bryan; Babcock, Gregory J; Oliver, Jennifer Betts; Comer, James A; Reynolds, Mary; Uyeki, Timothy M; Bausch, Daniel; Ksiazek, Thomas; Thomas, William; Alterson, Harold; Smith, Jonathan; Ambrosino, Donna M; Anderson, Larry J

    2007-03-01

    Recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) nucleocapsid and spike protein-based immunoglobulin G immunoassays were developed and evaluated. Our assays demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to the SARS coronavirus in sera collected from patients as late as 2 years postonset of symptoms. These assays will be useful not only for routine SARS coronavirus diagnostics but also for epidemiological and antibody kinetic studies.

  19. Marfan syndrome with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated systemic vasculitis presenting as severe anaemia and haematuria after the Bentall procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijia, Li; Shuangxin, Liu; Wei, Shi; Yanhai, Cui

    2013-08-01

    One month previously, a 28-year old male underwent an emergency modified Bentall procedure because of Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection Stanford Class A. Computed tomography of the chest did not reveal severe graft stenosis of the anastomosis. To explore the cause of anaemia, renal dysfunction and macroscopic haematuria, the patient was tested for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV). Antimyeloperoxidase antibodies (MPO)-ANCA and antiproteinase 3 antibodies (PR3)-ANCA were strongly positive. Corticosteroid therapy was applied, followed by cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. In response to treatment, the MPO-ANCA and PR3-ANCA levels gradually decreased, proteinuria was alleviated and haemoglobin levels returned to normal after 6 months. This is the first report to highlight haemolytic anaemia and AASV with Marfan syndrome after surgery for aortic dissection.

  20. Systemic lupus erythematosis with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: A mimic of Buerger′s disease

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    Vasugi Zoya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report is about a past smoker who presented with history of recurrent ulcers and digital gangrene with claudication pain of the left foot for the past fifteen years. Clinical examination and angiogram showed disease involving the peripheral vessels of lowervlimb. This patient had been labeled as Buerger′s disease 15 years ago based on clinical and demographic profile of the illness. We felt that the progression of the disease despite the patient having stopped smoking 15 years ago along with the presence of elevated inflammatory markers in the blood with proteinuria was not in keeping with the nature of the disease. Furthur evaluation revealed that the patient had systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. This case highlights the need for a careful search for diseases, which can mimic Buerger′s disease in young smokers who present with peripheral vascular disease and who have an atypical clinical presentation or progression.

  1. Chest radiographs in acquired antibody deficiency syndrome with chronic granulomatous inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qaiyumi, S.A.A.; Peest, D.; Galanski, M.; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

    1990-01-01

    Ten cases of acquired antibody deficiency syndrome with chronic granulomatous infection were diagnosed in our hospital during the past 10 years. We were able to perform a retrospective analysis of the initial and follow-up chest radiographs in 8 of these patients. The following pathological findings could be demonstrated: 1. increased bronchovascular markings in the basal lung fields, 2. reticular densities in the middle and basal lung fields, 3. confluent nodular densities of varying size in the periphery of the basal and middle fields, 4. pulmonary infiltrates in the middle and lower lobes, 5. hilar node enlargement of moderate extent. Findings 2, 3 and 5 completely disappeared under steroid therapy whereas 1 showed only partial recovery. If both the radiologic and serologic findings are considered, it is possible to differentiate this disease from sarcoidosis. (orig.) [de

  2. Characterization of polyclonal antibodies against nonstructural protein 9 from the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng ZHAO,Juanjuan QIAN,Jiexiong XIE,Tiantian CUI,Songling FENG,Guoqiang WANG,Ruining WANG,Guihong ZHANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS is considered to be one of the most important infectious diseases impacting the swine industry and is characterized by reproductive failure in late term gestation in sows and respiratory disease in pigs of all ages. The nonstructural protein 9 gene, Nsp9, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, is generally regarded as fairly conserved when compared to other viral proteins. Antibodies against Nsp9 will be of great importance for the diagnosis and treatment of the causal agent, PRRS virus. A study was undertaken to generate polyclonal antibodies against the immunodominant Nsp9. For this purpose, the Nsp9 was expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently used as an antigen to immunize New Zealand rabbits. Antiserum was identified via an indirect ELISA, and then verified based on the ability to react with both naturally and artificially expressed Nsp9. Results of virus neutralization test showed that this antiserum could not neutralize the PRRSV. Nevertheless, this antiserum as a diagnostic core reagent should prove invaluable for further investigations into the mechanism of PRRS pathogenesis.

  3. Cerebral thrombosis in systemic lupus erythematosus with the antibody antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniadhi, Didi; Pujiwati; Wijaya, Linda K; Setiyohadi, Bambang; Atmakusuma, Djumhana

    2007-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has numerous manifestations. Haematology is the common system influenced by the disease. The antibody antiphospholipid syndrome, secondary hematology disorder in SLE, is related to high incidence of thrombosis. The thrombosis events like myocardial infarction and stroke are high in mortality. We reported a-36-year old woman treated for lung tuberculosis (TB) with secondary infection, nephritis lupus, and pancytopenia. The general condition has improved and the patient was planned to discharge while she suddenly fell down, unconscious and had seizure. The CT-scan showed an area of hypodensity on the left thalamus. Haematology results showed high level of fibrinogen and D-dimer as the signs of thrombosis. The anticardiolipin antibody was intermediately positive for IgG and IgM, but lupus anticoagulan was weakly positive. The serial test within 2 months still showed positive IgG. The patient received supportive treatment, heparinization, neurotropic drugs and anticonvulsant. She was discharged in good condition while continuing oral anticoagulant to prevent recurrent seizure.

  4. Anticardiolipine antibodies in skin and muscle eluates of patients with primary and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z S Alekberova

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To detect anticardiolipin antibodies (АСА, anti-p2-GPl antibodies, C3 and C4 complement components in immune complexes including those containing АСА in skin and muscle eluates of pts with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS. Material and methods . In 7 pts (6 female and I male, 2 with primary APS, 3 with SLE+APS and 2 with SLE skin and muscle biopsies were taken. 6 from 7 pts had thrombotic complications. Eluates were obtained from frozen skin and skeletal muscle biopsies (size was 1,5x0,5 and 0,5x0,5 respectively. Because of small size of biopsies it was not possible to use traditional methods of tissue pounding such as sharp homogenization of tissues in homogenizers with pulverizing and subsequent process of freezing-unfreezing which lead to large protein loss and make impossible serological tissue analysis. Application of acid eluates method by T.E.W. Feltkamp and J,H. Boode of own modification allowed to minimize tissue protein loss and perform serological tissue analysis. Results. Serum of all 7 pts contained antiphospholipid antibodies - IgG-ACA in 3, combination of IgG- und IgM-ACA in 5. In 5 from 7 eluates lgG АСА exceeded 0,109 OO units were revealed. They contained СЗ, C4 and different protein products mostly immunoglobulines. Anti-(I2GP1 antiboddie;. were absent. Conclusion. For the first time presence of АСА in tissues of APS pts was showed which may be of particular interest in studying morphogenesis of local tissue disturbances with participation of immune complexes containing АСА.

  5. Novel enzyme immunoassay system for simultaneous detection of six subclasses of antiphospholipid antibodies for differential diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Junzo; Motoki, Yukari; Hara, Kazusa; Sakata, Toshiyuki; Ichihara, Kiyoshi

    2017-06-01

    : Antiphospholipid syndrome, which often complicates systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), features high occurrence of arterial and/or venous thrombosis and recurrent fetal loss. However, which antibody subclass contributes to which clinical event remains uncertain. We newly developed an up-to-date enzyme immunoassay system using the AcuStar automated analyzer (Instrumentation Laboratory, Bedford, Massachusetts, USA) for parallel detection of six subclasses of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs): anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) of IgG, IgM, and IgA and anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies (aβ2GPI) of IgG, IgM, and IgA. They were measured in 276 healthy volunteers and 138 patients with SLE: 45 with thromboembolic complications (29 arterial; 16 venous) and 93 without. Lupus anticoagulant activity in their plasma was measured according to the guidelines recommended by the Subcommittee on Lupus Anticoagulant/Phospholipid-Dependent Antibodies. aCL/β2GPI was measured with a standard ELISA kit commonly used in Japan. The positive results of IgG aCL, IgA aCL, and IgG aβ2GPI were closely associated with thromboembolic complications, whereas IgM aCL and IgM aβ2GPI were not. receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that the accuracy of predicting thromboembolic complications based on the composite test results of the former three antibodies were obviously higher than by each alone. Regarding agreement with the test results of lupus anticoagulant activity, IgG aβ2GPI showed the closest match. Patients with SLE frequently possess various combinations of the six aPL subclasses, and this antibody spectrum is closely associated with thromboembolic events in these patients. This new automated enzyme immunoassay system allows simultaneous analysis of the profile of aPL subclasses for the differential diagnosis of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in its early stage.

  6. Sin nombre virus (SNV) Ig isotype antibody response during acute and convalescent phases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostik, P; Winter, J; Ksiazek, T G; Rollin, P E; Villinger, F; Zaki, S R; Peters, C J; Ansari, A A

    2000-01-01

    Serum samples from 22 hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) patients were tested for Sin Nombre virus (SNV)-reactive antibodies. In the acute phase of HPS, 100% and 67% of the samples tested positive for SNV-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgA, respectively. Among the virus-specific IgG antibodies, the most prevalent were IgG3 (in 97% of samples), followed by IgG1 (70%), IgG2 (30%), and IgG4 (3%).

  7. β2GP1, Anti-β2GP1 Antibodies and Platelets: Key Players in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yik C. Ho

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Anti-beta 2 glycoprotein 1 (anti-β2GP1 antibodies are commonly found in patients with autoimmune diseases such as the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Their presence is highly associated with increased risk of vascular thrombosis and/or recurrent pregnancy-related complications. Although they are a subtype of anti-phospholipid (APL antibody, anti-β2GP1 antibodies form complexes with β2GP1 before binding to different receptors associated with anionic phospholipids on structures such as platelets and endothelial cells. β2GP1 consists of five short consensus repeat termed “sushi” domains. It has three interchangeable conformations with a cryptic epitope at domain 1 within the molecule. Anti-β2GP1 antibodies against this cryptic epitope are referred to as ‘type A’ antibodies, and have been suggested to be more strongly associated with both vascular and obstetric complications. In contrast, ‘type B’ antibodies, directed against other domains of β2GP1, are more likely to be benign antibodies found in asymptomatic patients and healthy individuals. Although the interactions between anti-β2GP1 antibodies, β2GP1, and platelets have been investigated, the actual targeted metabolic pathway(s and/or receptor(s involved remain to be clearly elucidated. This review will discuss the current understanding of the interaction between anti-β2GP1 antibodies and β2GP1, with platelet receptors and associated signalling pathways.

  8. Antiphospholipid antibody profile based obstetric outcomes of primary antiphospholipid syndrome: the PREGNANTS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo; Maruotti, Giuseppe Maria; Ghi, Tullio; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Simonazzi, Giuliana; Rizzo, Nicola; Facchinetti, Fabio; Dall'Asta, Andrea; Visentin, Silvia; Sarno, Laura; Xodo, Serena; Bernabini, Dalila; Monari, Francesca; Roman, Amanda; Eke, Ahizechukwu Chigoziem; Hoxha, Ariela; Ruffatti, Amelia; Schuit, Ewoud; Martinelli, Pasquale

    2017-05-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune, hypercoagulable state that is caused by antiphospholipid antibodies. Anticardiolipin antibodies, anti-β2 glycoprotein-I, and lupus anticoagulant are the main autoantibodies found in antiphospholipid syndrome. Despite the amassed body of clinical knowledge, the risk of obstetric complications that are associated with specific antibody profile has not been well-established. The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of obstetric complications in women with primary antiphospholipid syndrome that is associated with specific antibody profile. The Pregnancy In Women With Antiphospholipid Syndrome study is a multicenter, retrospective, cohort study. Diagnosis and classification of antiphospholipid syndrome were based on the 2006 International revised criteria. All women included in the study had at least 1 clinical criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome, were positive for at least 1 antiphospholipid antibody (anticardiolipin antibodies, anti-β2 glycoprotein-I, and/or lupus anticoagulant), and were treated with low-dose aspirin and prophylactic low molecular weight heparin from the first trimester. Only singleton pregnancies with primary antiphospholipid syndrome were included. The primary outcome was live birth, defined as any delivery of a live infant after 22 weeks gestation. The secondary outcomes were preeclampsia with and without severe features, intrauterine growth restriction, and stillbirth. We planned to assess the outcomes that are associated with the various antibody profile (test result for lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, and anti-β2 glycoprotein-I). There were 750 singleton pregnancies with primary antiphospholipid syndrome in the study cohort: 54 (7.2%) were positive for lupus anticoagulant only; 458 (61.0%) were positive for anticardiolipin antibodies only; 128 (17.1%) were positive for anti-β2 glycoprotein-I only; 90 (12.0%) were double positive and lupus anticoagulant negative, and 20

  9. Long-term use of hydroxychloroquine reduces antiphospholipid antibodies levels in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuri, Entela; Taraborelli, Mara; Andreoli, Laura; Tonello, Marta; Gerosa, Maria; Calligaro, Antonia; Argolini, Lorenza Maria; Kumar, Rajesh; Pengo, Vittorio; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Ruffatti, Amelia; Tincani, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) was suggested to play a role in lowering antiphospholipid antibody titers and preventing thrombotic recurrences in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, but few data are available in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS). In this retrospective, propensity score-matched cohort study, we evaluated the impact of HCQ on aPL titers and the incidence of thrombotic events in 57 exposed patients compared to 57 not exposed patients. These were matched for sex/type of disease onset/follow-up duration, age at the beginning of the follow-up ±10 years and initial date of the follow-up ±5 years. At baseline, no significant differences in demographical, clinical and serological features were observed between the two groups except for positive anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibodies (21 % in HCQ exposed vs 0 % in HCQ not exposed, P = 0.001). Both the levels of IgG anti-cardiolipin and IgG/IgM anti-β2-glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) were significantly reduced at end of follow-up compared to the baseline in HCQ-exposed patients, while there were no differences in the other group. Moreover, anti-β2GPI IgG titers were significantly decreased when the end of follow-up was compared between the two groups (P < 0.002). Among patients with a history of thrombosis, the annual incidence of recurrence was 1.16 % in HCQ exposed and 1.71 % in not exposed patients, with a significant reduction in the incidence of arterial events (0 vs 1.14 %). This study shows a strong reduction in aPL titers together with an apparent decrease in the incidence of arterial thrombosis recurrence in PAPS patients treated with HCQ.

  10. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) antibodies are associated with Raynaud phenomenon and migraine in primary thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytek, M; Natorska, J; Undas, A

    2018-04-01

    Objectives Antibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex (aPS/PT) detectable in sera of some patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) have been shown to correlate with thrombosis. However, associations of aPS/PT antibodies with APS related disorders remain unclear. Aim To evaluate whether there are any associations between aPS/PT antibodies and Raynaud phenomenon, migraine and/or valvular lesions in primary thrombotic APS (PAPS). Methods We enrolled 67 consecutive patients (56 women) with thrombotic PAPS (VTE in 80.6%), aged 46.2 ± 13.5 years. The exclusion criteria were: acute coronary syndromes or stroke within preceding 6 months, cancer, severe comorbidities and pregnancy. The IgG and IgM aPS/PT antibodies were determined by ELISA with the cut-off of 30 units. We recorded Raynaud phenomenon, migraine and valvular lesions. Results Positive IgM or/and IgG aPS/PT antibodies were observed in 29 patients (43.3%), with a higher prevalence of IgM antibodies ( n = 27, 40.3%) compared with IgG isotype ( n = 12, 17.9%, p = 0.014). aPS/PT antibodies were observed most commonly in patients with triple aPL ( n = 12, 85.7%) compared with those with double ( n = 5, 35.7%) or single aPL antibodies (n = 12, 30.8%, p = 0.03), with no association with demographics, the ANA titre, the type of thrombotic events or medications. Raynaud phenomenon, migraine and valvular lesions were observed in 15% ( n = 10), 30% ( n = 20) and 18% ( n = 12) of the patients, respectively. Raynaud phenomenon and migraine, but not valvular lesions, were markedly more frequent in PAPS patients presenting with positive aPS/PT antibodies ( n = 10, 34.5% vs. n = 0, 0%; p = 0.0001). Conclusions In PAPS patients aPS/PT antibodies are related to the occurrence of both Raynaud phenomenon and migraine.

  11. Double-Blind, Randomized Study of the Effects of Influenza Vaccination on the Specific Antibody Response and Clinical Course of Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

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    Kenna M Sleigh

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether influenza immunization is associated with early side effects, a deleterious impact on the illness course and depressed antibody response in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS.

  12. Recombinant Protein-Based Assays for Detection of Antibodies to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike and Nucleocapsid Proteins▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Lia M.; Miao, Congrong; Harcourt, Jennifer L.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Le, Mai Quynh; Dryga, Sergey A.; Kamrud, Kurt I.; Rivers, Bryan; Babcock, Gregory J.; Oliver, Jennifer Betts; Comer, James A.; Reynolds, Mary; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Bausch, Daniel; Ksiazek, Thomas; Thomas, William; Alterson, Harold; Smith, Jonathan; Ambrosino, Donna M.; Anderson, Larry J.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) nucleocapsid and spike protein-based immunoglobulin G immunoassays were developed and evaluated. Our assays demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to the SARS coronavirus in sera collected from patients as late as 2 years postonset of symptoms. These assays will be useful not only for routine SARS coronavirus diagnostics but also for epidemiological and antibody kinetic studies. PMID:17229882

  13. Fatal adult-onset antibody deficiency syndrome in a patient with cartilage hair hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Julia; Schlesier, Michael; Warnatz, Klaus; Prasse, Antje; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Peter, Hans-Hartmut; Salzer, Ulrich

    2010-09-01

    Cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA-processing (RMRP) gene. Although its most constant feature is metaphyseal dysplasia with short stature, CHH is associated with extraskeletal defects such as thin hair, anemia, immunodeficiency, and increased incidence of lymphomas. The spectrum of immunologic phenotypes in CHH translates into clinical severity. Whereas T-cell deficiency may remain subclinical or may result in severe combined immunodeficiency or Omenn syndrome, humoral immunodeficiency has only rarely been noted in these patients. Here we report the diagnosis of CHH in a woman who presented with severe short stature and a full-blown antibody deficiency, clinically resembling common variable immunodeficiency. Sequencing of the RMRP gene revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel mutations (g.68_69delinsTT and g.76C>T). Despite the late onset of immunodeficiency in the patient, its clinical course was severe, and the patient died 3 years after the first diagnosis. Copyright 2010 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Elevated levels of antibodies against phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex and/or cardiolipin associated with infection and recurrent purpura in a child: a forme fruste of antiphospholipid syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yuri; Mayumi, Nobuko; Inaba, Motoyuki; Igarashi, Touru; Katagiri, Ichigen; Kawana, Seiji

    2015-07-15

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the occurrence of venous and arterial thrombosis, as well as morbidity in pregnancy, in the presence of anti-phospholipid antibodies. The diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome is usually established based on clinical and laboratory findings by strictly following the 2006 Sapporo classification. However, the diagnosis remains challenging owing to the ongoing debates on the serological criteria. We report a case we describe as forme fruste antiphospholipid syndrome in which these criteria were not fulfilled. Purpura appeared repeatedly in a female infant starting from the age of 6 months and following episodes of upper respiratory infections and vaccinations. The levels of anti-cardiolipin IgG antibodies and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex antibodies were elevated in accordance with these events. Histopathological evaluation revealed multiple small vessel thrombi in the dermis and adipose tissue. After 2 weeks of treatment with aspirin and heparin, the cutaneous symptoms subsided. Infection has long been associated with antiphospholipid syndrome, and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies are considered a new marker for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome. Forme fruste antiphospholipid syndrome should be considered even if the antiphospholipid syndrome diagnostic criteria are not completely fulfilled, especially in the presence of elevated levels of anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies and known preceding infections.

  15. Management of phenytoin-induced gingival enlargement in a patient with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: A rare case report

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    Shilpa Sarvesh Urolagin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibody (APLA syndrome is a noninflammatory autoimmune disease, with innumerable clinical manifestations ranging from recurrent thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity to valvular lesions, transverse myelitis, thrombocytopenia, and hemolytic anemia. APLAs in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS are well-known risk factors for cerebrovascular accidents. Stroke is the most common manifestation of APS in the central nervous system. Gingival enlargement is a known side effect of phenytoin which is an antiepileptic drug. This can have a significant effect on the quality of life as well as increasing the oral bacterial load by generating plaque retention sites. The management of gingival overgrowth seems to be directed at controlling gingival inflammation through a good oral hygiene regimen. Thus, this case report aims to describe the conservative management of phenytoin-induced gingival enlargement combined with inflammatory enlargement in a patient with APLA syndrome.

  16. Unique DNA repair gene variations and potential associations with the primary antibody deficiency syndromes IgAD and CVID.

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    Steven M Offer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite considerable effort, the genetic factors responsible for >90% of the antibody deficiency syndromes IgAD and CVID remain elusive. To produce a functionally diverse antibody repertoire B lymphocytes undergo class switch recombination. This process is initiated by AID-catalyzed deamination of cytidine to uridine in switch region DNA. Subsequently, these residues are recognized by the uracil excision enzyme UNG2 or the mismatch repair proteins MutSalpha (MSH2/MSH6 and MutLalpha (PMS2/MLH1. Further processing by ubiquitous DNA repair factors is thought to introduce DNA breaks, ultimately leading to class switch recombination and expression of a different antibody isotype. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Defects in AID and UNG2 have been shown to result in the primary immunodeficiency hyper-IgM syndrome, leading us to hypothesize that additional, potentially more subtle, DNA repair gene variations may underlie the clinically related antibody deficiencies syndromes IgAD and CVID. In a survey of twenty-seven candidate DNA metabolism genes, markers in MSH2, RAD50, and RAD52 were associated with IgAD/CVID, prompting further investigation into these pathways. Resequencing identified four rare, non-synonymous alleles associated with IgAD/CVID, two in MLH1, one in RAD50, and one in NBS1. One IgAD patient carried heterozygous non-synonymous mutations in MLH1, MSH2, and NBS1. Functional studies revealed that one of the identified mutations, a premature RAD50 stop codon (Q372X, confers increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with a class switch recombination model in which AID-catalyzed uridines are processed by multiple DNA repair pathways. Genetic defects in these DNA repair pathways may contribute to IgAD and CVID.

  17. Comparative study between obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome and obstetric morbidity related with antiphospholipid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Esteve-Valverde, Enrique; Ferrer-Oliveras, Raquel; LLurba, Elisa; Ruffatti, Amelia; Tincani, Angela; Lefkou, Elmina; Bertero, Mª Tiziana; Espinosa, Gerard; de Carolis, Sara; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Lundelin, Krista; Picardo, Elisa; Mekinian, Arsene

    2017-12-20

    To compare clinical, laboratory, treatment and live birth rate data between women with aPL-related obstetric complications (OMAPS) not fulfilling the Sydney criteria and women fulfilling them (OAPS). Retrospective and prospective multicentre study. Data comparison between groups from The European Registry on Antiphospholipid Syndrome included within the framework of the European Forum on Antiphospholipid Antibody projects. 338 women were analysed: 247 fulfilled the Sydney criteria (OAPS group) and 91 did not (OMAPS group). In the OMAPS group, 24/91 (26.37%) fulfilled laboratory Sydney criteria (subgroup A) and 67/91 (74.63%) had a low titre and/or non-persistent aPL-positivity (subgroup B). Overall, aPL laboratory categories in OAPS vs. OMAPS showed significant differences: 34% vs. 11% (p<0.0001) for category I, 66% vs. 89% (p<0.0001) for category II. No differences were observed when current obstetric complications were compared (p=0.481). 86.20% of OAPS women were treated vs. 75.82% of OMAPS (p=0.0224), particularly regarding the LDA+LMWH schedule (p=0.006). No differences between groups were observed in live births, gestational, puerperal arterial and/or venous thrombosis. Significant differences were found among aPL categories between groups. Treatment rates were higher in OAPS. Both OAPS and OMAPS groups had similarly good foetal-maternal outcomes when treated. The proposal to modify OAPS classification criteria, mostly laboratory requirements, is reinforced by these results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Usefulness of antibodies and minor salivary gland biopsy in the study of sicca syndrome in daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Maria Lida; Seisdedos, Maria Renata; Garcia Salinas, Rodrigo Nicolás; Catalán Pellet, Antonio; Villalón, Liliana; Secco, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    To assess the association between histologic findings in the minor salivary gland biopsy (MSGB) and anti La (La/SS-B)y antiRo antibodies (Ro/SS-A), antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and Rheumatoid Factor (RF),and compare the value of the latter as diagnostic tests with MSGB, considered as the gold standard. Patients with suspected Primary Sjögren Syndrome (PSS) referred for MSGB were included. Antibody measurements were performed. Grade III and IV biopsy results were considered positive. Two hundred and eighteen (218) patients were included, 95% females, with a median age of 54 years and 12 months median duration of sicca symptoms. 36 of the biopsies were positive. 33% of patients had positive anti Ro/SS-A anti La/SS-B antibodies, 62% had positive ANA, and 31% positive RF. A statistically significant association was found between MSGB and anti Ro/SS-A anti La/SS-B, ANA and RF. ANA were the most sensitive antibodies (84%. 95% CI: 75- 92), and the most specific were: Anti Ro/ SS-A and/or anti La/ SS-B (78%. 95% CI: 71-85) and RF (78%. 95% CI: 69-87). On PSS clinical suspicion, anti Ro/ SS-A y anti La/ SS-B antibodies have a great value to achieve the diagnosis, with MSGB useful for diagnosis of seronegative patients. The results also suggest the importance of ANA and RF for PSS classification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel dimeric inhibitor targeting Beta2GPI in Beta2GPI/antibody complexes implicated in antiphospholipid syndrome.

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    Alexey Kolyada

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available β2GPI is a major antigen for autoantibodies associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, an autoimmune disease characterized by thrombosis and recurrent pregnancy loss. Only the dimeric form of β2GPI generated by anti-β2GPI antibodies is pathologically important, in contrast to monomeric β2GPI which is abundant in plasma.We created a dimeric inhibitor, A1-A1, to selectively target β2GPI in β2GPI/antibody complexes. To make this inhibitor, we isolated the first ligand-binding module from ApoER2 (A1 and connected two A1 modules with a flexible linker. A1-A1 interferes with two pathologically important interactions in APS, the binding of β2GPI/antibody complexes with anionic phospholipids and ApoER2. We compared the efficiency of A1-A1 to monomeric A1 for inhibition of the binding of β2GPI/antibody complexes to anionic phospholipids. We tested the inhibition of β2GPI present in human serum, β2GPI purified from human plasma and the individual domain V of β2GPI. We demonstrated that when β2GPI/antibody complexes are formed, A1-A1 is much more effective than A1 in inhibition of the binding of β2GPI to cardiolipin, regardless of the source of β2GPI. Similarly, A1-A1 strongly inhibits the binding of dimerized domain V of β2GPI to cardiolipin compared to the monomeric A1 inhibitor. In the absence of anti-β2GPI antibodies, both A1-A1 and A1 only weakly inhibit the binding of pathologically inactive monomeric β2GPI to cardiolipin.Our results suggest that the approach of using a dimeric inhibitor to block β2GPI in the pathological multivalent β2GPI/antibody complexes holds significant promise. The novel inhibitor A1-A1 may be a starting point in the development of an effective therapeutic for antiphospholipid syndrome.

  20. A Novel Dimeric Inhibitor Targeting Beta2GPI in Beta2GPI/Antibody Complexes Implicated in Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Kolyada; C Lee; A De Biasio; N Beglova

    2011-12-31

    {beta}2GPI is a major antigen for autoantibodies associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), an autoimmune disease characterized by thrombosis and recurrent pregnancy loss. Only the dimeric form of {beta}2GPI generated by anti-{beta}2GPI antibodies is pathologically important, in contrast to monomeric {beta}2GPI which is abundant in plasma. We created a dimeric inhibitor, A1-A1, to selectively target {beta}2GPI in {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes. To make this inhibitor, we isolated the first ligand-binding module from ApoER2 (A1) and connected two A1 modules with a flexible linker. A1-A1 interferes with two pathologically important interactions in APS, the binding of {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes with anionic phospholipids and ApoER2. We compared the efficiency of A1-A1 to monomeric A1 for inhibition of the binding of {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes to anionic phospholipids. We tested the inhibition of {beta}2GPI present in human serum, {beta}2GPI purified from human plasma and the individual domain V of {beta}2GPI. We demonstrated that when {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes are formed, A1-A1 is much more effective than A1 in inhibition of the binding of {beta}2GPI to cardiolipin, regardless of the source of {beta}2GPI. Similarly, A1-A1 strongly inhibits the binding of dimerized domain V of {beta}2GPI to cardiolipin compared to the monomeric A1 inhibitor. In the absence of anti-{beta}2GPI antibodies, both A1-A1 and A1 only weakly inhibit the binding of pathologically inactive monomeric {beta}2GPI to cardiolipin. Our results suggest that the approach of using a dimeric inhibitor to block {beta}2GPI in the pathological multivalent {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes holds significant promise. The novel inhibitor A1-A1 may be a starting point in the development of an effective therapeutic for antiphospholipid syndrome.

  1. Periodontitis prevalence and serum antibody reactivity to periodontal bacteria in primary Sjögren's syndrome: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugonja, Bozo; Yeo, Lorraine; Milward, Michael R; Smith, Diana; Dietrich, Thomas; Chapple, Iain L C; Rauz, Saaeha; Williams, Geraint P; Barone, Francesca; de Pablo, Paola; Buckley, Chris; Hamburger, John; Richards, Andrea; Poveda-Gallego, Ana; Scheel-Toellner, Dagmar; Bowman, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were as follows: (i) To assess the prevalence of periodontitis among patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) and comparator groups of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). (ii) To perform a pilot study to compare serum antibody responses to 10 oral/periodontal bacteria in these patient groups and a historical comparator group of patients with periodontitis. Standard clinical periodontal assessments were performed on 39 pSS, 36 RA and 23 OA patients and "In-house" antibody ELISAs for serum antibodies against 10 oral/periodontal bacteria were performed in these groups. Forty-six percent of the pSS group, 64% of the RA group and 48% of the OA group had moderate/severe periodontitis. These frequencies did not reach statistical significance between groups. Raised antibody levels to Prevotella denticola were found in the pSS, RA and periodontitis groups compared to the OA group. Significant between group differences were seen for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia and Campylobacter showae. None of these differences were specifically associated with pSS. This study showed no increase in periodontitis in pSS patients. Although the P. denticola data are of interest, identifying bacterial triggering factors for pSS will likely require alternative strategies including modern techniques such as microbiome analysis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Prevalence of antibodies to beta2-glycoprotein I in systemic lupus erythematosus and their association with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome criteria: a single center study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, I N; Clark-Soloninka, C A; Spitzer, K A; Gladman, D D; Urowitz, M B; Laskin, C A

    2000-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-beta2-GPI) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and to assess their association with and predictive value for the clinical classification criteria of the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). One hundred thirty-three consecutive patients with SLE were recruited from 2 lupus clinics in the University of Toronto. Serum and plasma samples were tested for IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), prolonged partial thromboplastin time (PTT), a panel of lupus anticoagulant (LAC) assays, and anti-beta2-GPI (IgG, IgM, IgA). Normal ranges for the assays were established using 129 healthy controls. A literature review from 1992 to 2000 was performed using beta2-GPI, SLE, APS, thrombosis, and recurrent pregnancy loss as key search words. The distribution of anti-beta2-GPI antibodies (of any isotype) in each group were as follows: all patients with SLE, 36.8%; SLE with clinical features of APS, 40.4%; SLE without clinical features of APS, 34.9%; and healthy controls, 3%. The positive predictive values of prolonged PTT, IgG aCL, and anti-beta2-GPI for at least one clinical feature of APS in SLE were 59.3, 50.0, and 38.8%, respectively. There were 27 patients with SLE who had antibodies to beta2-GPI but a normal PTT and negative aCL and LAC. Six (20.7%) of these had a history of thrombosis and/or recurrent pregnancy loss. Twelve studies (including ours) were identified in which patient groups were similar and the same antibody isotype was measured. No agreement was apparent after reviewing the literature regarding an association of anti-beta2-GPI IgG and clinical features of APS in patients with SLE. Antibodies to beta2-GPI were frequently seen (35%) in our SLE population. The prevalence of anti-beta2-GPI was similar in those with (19/47) and without (39/86) APS. Anti-beta2-GPI did, however, identify 6 patients with clinical features of APS who were negative for aCL and prolonged PTT. Our

  3. No evidence for XMRV nucleic acids, infectious virus or anti-XMRV antibodies in Canadian patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Steffen

    Full Text Available The gammaretroviruses xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV and MLV have been reported to be more prevalent in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS patients than in healthy controls. Here, we report the complex analysis of whole blood and plasma samples from 58 CFS patients and 57 controls from Canada for the presence of XMRV/MLV nucleic acids, infectious virus, and XMRV/MLV-specific antibodies. Multiple techniques were employed, including nested and qRT-PCR, cell culture, and immunoblotting. We found no evidence of XMRV or MLV in humans and conclude that CFS is not associated with these gammaretroviruses.

  4. Immunoblot for the detection of Ascaris suum-specific antibodies in patients with visceral larva migrans (VLM) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Renate; Obwaller, Andreas; Auer, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Visceral larva migrans (VLM) syndrome caused by Toxocara canis larvae was first described in the 1950s. The role of other nematode larvae, i.e. the pig roundworm Ascaris suum as a causative agent of visceral larva migrans-associated symptoms like general malaise, cough, liver dysfunction, hypereosinophilia with hepatomegaly and/or pneumonia, was discussed controversially during the last decades. Recent serological screening studies for specific A. suum antibodies carried out in the Netherlands and Sweden yielded remarkable high seroprevalences, while a number of case reports from Japan report pulmonal, hepatic and cerebral symptoms caused by A. suum larvae after ingestion of infected raw meat (liver) or contaminated vegetables. We present here a sensitive and specific larval excretory-secretory (E/S) antigen-based immunoblot (As-IB) for the serodiagnosis of A. suum-infected patients suffering from symptoms associated to the VLM syndrome. In total, 34 sera from patients with hypereosinophilia and other clinical symptoms associated to the VLM syndrome tested negative for Toxocara sp. antibodies but positive in our newly established As-IB, 30 sera from healthy volunteers, 53 sera from patients with clinically and serologically confirmed toxocarosis and other helminthoses as well as 3 sera from patients with intestinal ascariosis due to Ascaris lumbricoides were included in the study. When evaluated with 30 sera from healthy volunteers and 53 sera from patients suffering from different helminthoses, the calculated specificity of our new As-IB is 95%. Problems hampering the establishment of simple serological screening tests for specific A. suum antibodies, like extensive antigenic similarities between the nematodes Ascaris and Toxocara or the absence of suitable experimental animals, are discussed. We assume that specific serological testing for antibodies of A. suum is very important for the treatment of individual patients on one hand and seroepidemiological

  5. The impact of antibody profile in thrombosis associated with primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Saraiva, Sabrina; de Moraes Mazetto, Bruna; Quinteiro Tobaldine, Lais; Pereira Colella, Marina; Vinícius De Paula, Erich; Annichinno-Bizzachi, Joyce; Andrade Orsi, Fernanda

    2017-11-01

    Triple positivity (TP) for antiphospholipid antibodies(aPL) may identify aPL carriers with poorer prognosis. The clinical impact of TP in primary antiphospholipid syndrome(PAPS) remains unclear and further clinical evidences are needed to validate TP as a marker of severity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of TP on the clinical course of PAPS with thrombosis(t-PAPS). We performed a retrospective analysis of a cohort of t-PAPS patients, comparing groups of patients with TP and non-TP profiles according to their demographic, clinical and laboratory features. We included 105 patients with t-PAPS, the median follow-up time of 3.7 years. Twenty-two patients(21%) had TP; the demographic distribution, the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and the site of thrombosis were similar between TP and non-TP patients. The frequency of thrombotic events did not differ between TP and non-TP patients during the study period. Pregnancy morbidities were more frequent in women with t-PAPS and TP than in those with non-TP profile (80% vs. 52.8%, P = 0.05). Patients with t-PAPS and TP presented, at diagnosis, higher dRVVT ratio (median R = 2.44 vs. 1.57, P < 0.0001), higher aCL titer (median = 50UI vs. 35 UI, P < 0.0001), lower C3 levels (median = 1.08 vs. 1.30 mg dL -1 , P = 0.001), lower C4 levels (median = 0.22 vs. 0.25 mg dL -1 , P = 0.05) and higher frequency of positive ANA test (50% vs. 20%, P = 0.008) than patients with t-PAPS and non-TP. Lower-than-normal levels of C3 was independently associated with TP (OR = 5.1, P = 0.02). The presence of TP in patients with t-PAPS was associated with immune derangement, with no effect on the clinical course of the disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effect of genetic and coexisting polymorphisms on platelet response ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of genetic and coexisting polymorphisms on platelet response to clopidogrel in Chinese Han patients with acute coronary syndrome. Xu Liu, Yu Luo, Yan Lai, Yian Yao, Jimin Li, Yunkai Wang, S. Lilly Zheng, Jianfeng Xu and Xuebo Liu. J. Genet. 95, 231–237. Table 1. Association for coexisting SNPs and PRU/HPR.

  7. HYdroxychloroquine to Improve Pregnancy Outcome in Women with AnTIphospholipid Antibodies (HYPATIA) Protocol: A Multinational Randomized Controlled Trial of Hydroxychloroquine versus Placebo in Addition to Standard Treatment in Pregnant Women with Antiphospholipid Syndrome or Antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreiber, Karen; Breen, Karen; Cohen, Hannah; Jacobsen, Soren; Middeldorp, Saskia; Pavord, Sue; Regan, Lesley; Roccatello, Dario; Robinson, Susan E.; Sciascia, Savino; Seed, Paul T.; Watkins, Linda; Hunt, Beverley J.

    2017-01-01

    Women with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are at risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including recurrent first-trimester pregnancy loss and late pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzyme levels, and low platelet levels) syndrome, premature delivery,

  8. Successful management of aortic thrombi resulting in spinal cord infarction in a patient with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and acute cholecystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Manabu Izumi, Shoko Teraoka, Keisuke Yamashita, Kenji Matsumoto, Tomohiro Muronoi, Yoshimitsu Izawa, Chikara Yonekawa, Masaki Ano, Masayuki SuzukawaDepartment of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, JapanAbstract: A 74-year-old man with coronary artery disease was suffering from acute nonobstructive cholecystitis and was admitted to a nearby hospital. Dual antiplatelet (aspirin and ticlopidine therapy was discontinued before preparation for surgical resection of the gall bladder. During his time in hospital he was aware of lumbar pain and weakness in both legs. He was transferred to our hospital for further evaluation and therapy. Diffuse intra-aortic thrombi were revealed by computed tomography with contrast media, and magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal cord infarction. However, computed tomography scans of the descending aorta obtained 4 months before admission exhibited no signs of atherosclerotic plaques or intra-aortic thrombi. Laboratory data suggest that antiphospholipid antibody syndrome might have caused these acute multiple intra-arterial thrombi. By restarting dual antiplatelet therapy and increasing the dose of heparin (from 10,000 IU/day to 15,000 IU/day we successfully managed the patient's clinical condition and symptoms. It is important to understand that stopping antiplatelet therapy may rapidly grow thrombi in patients with a hypercoagulative state.Keywords: intra-aortic thrombus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, spinal cord infarction

  9. Onconeural antibodies in sera from patients with various types of tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monstad, Sissel Evy; Knudsen, Anette; Salvesen, Helga B; Aarseth, Jan H; Vedeler, Christian A

    2009-11-01

    We assessed the frequency and levels of onconeural antibodies in 974 patients with various types of tumours, but without apparent paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). We included patients with the following tumours: 200 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients, 253 breast cancer patients, 182 ovarian cancer patients, 266 uterine cancer patients and 73 thymoma patients, as well as 52 patients with PNS and cancer and 300 healthy blood donors. Sera were screened for amphiphysin, CRMP5, Hu, Ma2, Ri and Yo antibodies using a multi-well immunoprecipitation technique. The most frequently detected antibodies were Hu followed by CRMP5. Ma2, Yo, amphiphysin and Ri antibodies were less common, but each was found at similar frequencies. Onconeural antibodies were present at similar levels in sera from the PNS control group and from cancer patients. Hu antibodies were rare in cancers other than SCLC. CRMP5 was the only antibody found in patients with thymoma and this antibody was more common among patients with thymoma than in other tumour patients. With one exception, coexisting antibodies were only found in patients with SCLC. The presence of onconeural antibodies in SCLC patients was not associated with prolonged survival. Onconeural antibodies are associated with various types of tumours suggesting that all antibodies should be included in the serological screening for possible PNS. The levels of onconeural antibody are not sufficiently sensitive to discriminate between cancer patients with PNS and those without.

  10. New tests to detect antiphospholipid antibodies: antiprothrombin (aPT) and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciascia, Savino; Khamashta, Munther A; Bertolaccini, Maria Laura

    2014-05-01

    Antiprothrombin antibodies have been proposed as potential new biomarkers for thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity in the setting of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Antiprothrombin antibodies are commonly detected by ELISA, using prothrombin coated onto irradiated plates (aPT), or prothrombin in complex with phosphatidylserine (aPS/PT), as antigen. Although these antibodies can co-exist in the same patient, aPT and aPS/PT seem to belong to different populations of autoantibodies. Early research explored the role of antibodies to prothrombin as potential antigenic targets for the lupus anticoagulant (LA). To date their clinical significance is being investigated and their potential role in identifying patients at higher risk of developing thrombotic events or pregnancy morbidity is being probed.

  11. Anti-hLAMP2-antibodies and dual positivity for anti-GBM and MPO-ANCA in a patient with relapsing pulmonary-renal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kistler Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary-renal syndrome associated with anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM antibodies, also known as Goodpasture's syndrome, is a rare but acute and life-threatening condition. One third of patients presenting as anti-GBM antibody positive pulmonary-renal syndrome or rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis are also tested positive for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA. Whilst anti-GBM disease is considered a non-relapsing condition, the long-term course of double-positive patients is less predictable. Case Presentation We report a patient with such dual positivity, who presented with pulmonary hemorrhage, crescentic glomerulonephritis and membranous nephropathy. Plasmapheresis in combination with immunosuppresive therapy led to a rapid remission but the disease relapsed after two years. The serum of the patient was tested positive for antibodies to human lysosomal membrane protein 2 (hLAMP2, a novel autoantigen in patients with active small-vessel vasculitis (SVV. The anti-hLAMP2 antibody levels correlated positively with clinical disease activity in this patient. Conclusion We hypothesize that this antibody may indicate a clinical course similar to ANCA-associated vasculitis in double-positive patients. However, this needs to be confirmed on comprehensive patient cohorts.

  12. Impact of coexisting irritable bowel syndrome and non-erosive reflux disease on postprandial abdominal fullness and sleep disorders in functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futagami, Seiji; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Shimpuku, Mayumi; Izumi, Nikki; Wakabayashi, Taiga; Kodaka, Yasuhiro; Nagoya, Hiroyuki; Shindo, Tomotaka; Kawagoe, Tetsuro; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2013-01-01

    The association between clinical symptoms and sleep disorders in functional dyspepsia (FD)-overlap syndrome has not been studied in detail. The subjects were 139 patients with FD, 14 with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 12 with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD), and 41 healthy volunteers. Gastric motility was evaluated with the (13)C-acetate breath test. We used Rome III criteria to evaluate upper abdominal symptoms, and Self-Rating Questionnaire for Depression (SRQ-D) scores to determine depression status. Sleep disorders were evaluated with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores. There were no significant differences in age, body-mass index, alcohol intake, and smoking rate between patients with FD alone and those with FD-overlap syndrome. The postprandial abdominal fullness score in patients with FD-NERD-IBS was significantly greater than that in patients with FD-NERD overlap syndrome (pSleep Quality Index score in subjects with FD-NERD-IBS overlap syndrome was significantly greater than that in subjects with FD alone. Symptom scores, such as those for postprandial abdominal fullness, heartburn, and the feeling of hunger, in patients with FD-overlap syndromes are significantly greater than those in patients with FD alone. Further studies are necessary to clarify whether various symptoms are related to sleep disorders in patients with FD-NERD-IBS overlap syndrome.

  13. Glycine receptor antibodies are detected in progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM) but not in saccadic oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Takahiro; Leite, Maria I; Lang, Bethan; Waters, Patrick; Urano, Yoshiaki; Miyakawa, Saori; Hamada, Junichi; Sakai, Fumihiko; Mochizuki, Hideki; Vincent, Angela

    2012-08-01

    Glycine receptor (GlyR) antibodies were recently identified in a few patients with progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM); none of these patients had antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). An inhibitory glycinergic transmission defect has also been implicated in the mechanism underlying saccadic oscillations, including ocular flutter or opsoclonus; GlyR antibodies have not been reported in these patients. The purpose was to determine whether GlyR antibodies are found in patients with PERM, ocular flutter syndrome (OFS), and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS). GlyR antibodies were first measured in archived sera and CSF from five patients, including one patient with GAD antibody-positive PERM, two patients with OFS, and two patients with OMS. GlyR antibodies were also measured in archived sera from nine other adult patients with OMS. GlyR antibodies and GAD antibodies were both found at high titers in the serum and CSF of the patient with PERM, and their levels paralleled disease activity over time. GlyR antibodies were not found at significant levels in 13 patients with saccadic oscillations. GlyR and GAD antibodies can co-exist in PERM and follow the clinical course. Although saccadic oscillations are a feature of this condition, GlyR antibodies are not commonly found in patients with isolated saccadic oscillations.

  14. Pregnancy failure in patients with obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome with conventional treatment: the influence of a triple positive antibody profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latino, J O; Udry, S; Aranda, F M; Perés Wingeyer, S D A; Fernández Romero, D S; de Larrañaga, G F

    2017-08-01

    Conventional treatment of obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome fails in approximately 20-30% of pregnant women without any clearly identified risk factor. It is important to identify risk factors that are associated with these treatment failures. This study aimed to assess the impact of risk factors on pregnancy outcomes in women with obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome treated with conventional treatment. We carefully retrospectively selected 106 pregnancies in women with obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome treated with heparin + aspirin. Pregnancy outcomes were evaluated according to the following associated risk factors: triple positivity profile, double positivity profile, single positivity profile, history of thrombosis, autoimmune disease, more than four pregnancy losses, and high titers of anticardiolipin antibodies and/or anti-βeta-2-glycoprotein-I (aβ2GPI) antibodies. To establish the association between pregnancy outcomes and risk factors, a single binary logistic regressions analysis was performed. Risk factors associated with pregnancy loss with conventional treatment were: the presence of triple positivity (OR = 5.0, CI = 1.4-16.9, p = 0.01), high titers of aβ2GPI (OR = 4.4, CI = 1.2-16.1, p = 0.023) and a history of more than four pregnancy losses (OR = 3.5, CI = 1.2-10.0, p = 0.018). The presence of triple positivity was an independent risk factor associated with gestational complications (OR = 4.1, CI = 1.2-13.9, p = 0.02). Our findings reinforce the idea that triple positivity is a categorical risk factor for poor response to conventional treatment.

  15. Evans syndrome and antibody deficiency: an atypical presentation of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Colarusso

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with Evans syndrome and severe hypogammaglobulinemia, subsequently in whom the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS was diagnosed. No other clinical sign of 22q11.2 DS was present with the exception of slight facial dysmorphism. The case is of particular interest because it suggests the need to research chromosome 22q11.2 deletion in patients who present with autoimmune cytopenia and peculiar facial abnormalities, which could be an atypical presentation of an incomplete form of 22q11.2 DS.

  16. Clinical implications of the detection of antibodies directed against domain 1 of β2-glycoprotein 1 in thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvão, Silmara; Elídio, Priscila Soares; da Silva Saraiva, Sabrina; de Moraes Mazetto, Bruna; Colella, Marina Pereira; de Paula, Erich Vinícius; Appenzeller, Simone; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce; Orsi, Fernanda Andrade

    2016-12-01

    Antibodies directed against domain 1 of β2 glycoprotein 1 (aβ2GP1-Dm1) have been involved in the immunopathogenesis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). However, the clinical relevance of aβ2GP1-Dm1 in thrombotic APS has not yet been fully explored. To determine the frequency of aβ2GP1-Dm1 in a cohort of patients with thrombotic APS, and to evaluate whether testing for aβ2GP1-Dm1 could have a clinical impact upon the risk assessment of the disease. Patients were tested for aβ2GP1-Dm1 antibodies by chemiluminescence (BioFlash/AcuStar®, ES). The presence of aβ2GP1-Dm1 was evaluated in different clinical presentations of the disease. Eight-four patients with a history of venous or arterial thrombosis were included. Forty-five (54%) patients had aβ2GP1 antibodies and 40% of them were positive for aβ2GP1-Dm1. Levels of aβ2GP1-Dm1 were higher in patients with systemic autoimmune disease (AUC=0.665; 95% CI=0.544-0.786; P=0.01), positive antinuclear antibody (AUC=0.654; 95% CI=0.535-0.772; P=0.01), triple antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) positivity (AUC=0.680; 95% CI=0.534-0.825; P=0.02) and positive lupus anticoagulant (AUC=0.639; 95% CI=0.502-0.776; P=0.07). In this cohort, aβ2GP1-Dm1 antibodies were not associated with the site of the first thrombosis (OR=0,62, 95% CI=0.20-1.94, P=0.42), thrombosis recurrence (OR=1.0, 95% CI=0.37-2.71, P=1.0) or pregnancy morbidity (OR=1.5, 95% CI=0.33-7.34, P=0.58). In multivariate analysis, positivity for aβ2GP1-Dm1 antibodies was associated with the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune disease (OR=4.01, 95% CI=1.14-14.2; P=0.03) and triple aPL positivity (OR=3.59, 95% CI=0.87-14.85; P=0.07). In the present cohort of thrombotic-APS patients, aβ2GP1-Dm1 antibodies were related to the diagnosis of systemic autoimmunity and complex serological profile of the disease, as triple aPL positivity and positive antinuclear antibody. Thus, our results suggest that testing for aβ2GP1-Dm1 antibodies may be useful for improving APS risk

  17. Prevalence and pattern of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in a hospital based longitudinal study of 193 patients of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N K; Agrawal, A; Singh, M N; Kumar, V; Godhra, M; Gupta, A; Yadav, D P; Usha; Singh, R G; Singh, T B

    2013-09-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterised by thrombophilic state and obstetrical complications. Prevalence of APS varies in different parts of the world. So this study was conducted to find out the prevalence and pattern of APS in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in this region. In this hospital based longitudinal study from 2004 to 2011, we studied 193 patients of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) for prevalence of APS and its different characteristics. The diagnosis of SLE was made according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and diagnosis of APS was made according to Sapporo criteria. Prevalence of APS in SLE was 25.38%. Mean age at study entry was 25.5 +/- 6.9 years and majority of APS patients were in the age group 21-30 yrs (44.89%). The most common clinical manifestation in both SLE with APS and SLE without APS was musuloskeletal involvement (79.59% and 84.72% respectively). Among 49 patients of SLE having APS, multisystem involvement was present in 16 patients and life threatening complications were present in 12 patients. Late foetal loss was the most common obstetrical manifestation of APS (26.53%) and deep vein thrombosis was most common thrombotic manifestation (16.32%). Anticardiolipin antibodies(IgG aCL) were the most common antibody (85.71%) detected. Lupus anticoagulant was present in 71.42% cases of SLE having APS. ANA and anti-dsDNA antibodies were present in 97.95% and 77.55% cases of SLE having APS. APS is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients of SLE. The incidence of secondary APS in SLE varies in different geographical regions and it was 25.38% in our study. Pregnancy morbidity and deep vein thrombosis were the most common complications of APS. IgG aCL was the most common antibody in APS patients. Screening for the presence of aPL antibodies in SLE patients and timely initiation of prophylactic treatment can prevent many of the complications.

  18. Clinical and Immunological Features of Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome in the Era of Neuronal Cell Surface Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armangué, Thaís; Sabater, Lidia; Torres-Vega, Estefanía; Martínez-Hernández, Eugenia; Ariño, Helena; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Planagumà, Jesús; Bataller, Luis; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Most studies on opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) in adults are based on small case series before the era of neuronal cell surface antibody discovery. To report the clinical and immunological features of idiopathic OMS (I-OMS) and paraneoplastic OMS (P-OMS), the occurrence of antibodies to cell surface antigens, and the discovery of a novel cell surface epitope. Retrospective cohort study and laboratory investigations of 114 adult patients with OMS at a center for autoimmune neurological disorders done between January 2013 and September 2015. Review of clinical records. Immunohistochemistry on rat brain and cultured neurons as well as cell-based assays were used to identify known autoantibodies. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry were used to characterize novel antigens. Of the 114 patients (62 [54%] female; median age, 45 years; interquartile range, 32-60 years), 45 (39%) had P-OMS and 69 (61%) had I-OMS. In patients with P-OMS, the associated tumors included lung cancer (n = 19), breast cancer (n = 10), other cancers (n = 5), and ovarian teratoma (n = 8); 3 additional patients without detectable cancer were considered to have P-OMS because they had positive results for onconeuronal antibodies. Patients with I-OMS, compared with those who had P-OMS, were younger (median age, 38 [interquartile range, 31-50] vs 54 [interquartile range, 45-65] years; P OMS with lung cancer (21% vs 5% in patients with OMS without lung cancer; P = .02); however, a similar frequency of glycine receptor antibodies was found in patients with lung cancer without OMS (13 of 65 patients [20%]). A novel cell surface epitope, human natural killer 1 (HNK-1), was the target of the antibodies in 3 patients with lung cancer and P-OMS. Patients with I-OMS responded better to treatment and had fewer relapses than those with P-OMS. Older age and encephalopathy, significantly associated with P-OMS, are clinical clues suggesting an underlying tumor. Glycine receptor antibodies occur

  19. Incidence of Ascaris suum-specific antibodies in Austrian patients with suspected larva migrans visceralis (VLM) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Renate; Auer, Herbert

    2016-03-01

    The pig roundworm, Ascaris suum, is commonly found in domestic pigs all over the world. The transmission to humans takes place by ingestion of infective A. suum eggs present in soil because pig manure is widely used as fertilizer. The possible role of A. suum in the human visceral larva migrans (VLM) syndrome has been discussed controversially during past decades, even though various case reports, particularly from Japan document pulmonal, hepatic and even cerebral symptoms caused by migrating A. suum larvae after ingestion of infected row meat (liver) or contaminated vegetables. We examined 4481 sera by A. suum immunoblot (As-IB) and 5301 sera by Toxocara-ELISA from patients with symptoms associated with the VLM syndrome during three consecutive years (2012-2014). The incidence of A. suum-specific antibodies was 13.2 %, the incidence of T. canis specific antibodies 12.9 % and from a part of the As-IB positive sera (n = 417) additional Toxocara serology was performed to demonstrate the specificity of our tests. Only 56 out of the 417 (13.4 %) sera showed antibodies to both helminth species demonstrating that double infections exist. Interestingly the age distribution of the patients showed that 2.8 % of the Ascaris-positive patients were younger than 21 years, while in the Toxocara-positive group 13.4 % were <21 years. These results are in accordance with a Dutch study suspecting different ways of transmission as cause for this interesting age distribution. Due to the fact that large amounts of untreated pig manure are used as fertilizer and that the expulsion of adult A. suum worms causing intestinal ascariosis is extremely rare in Central European countries, the zoonotic potential of A. suum is considerably underestimated. We suggest that the performance of reliable immunoserological tests, in all industrialized countries where pigs are raised and their manure is used as fertilizer, could help to assess the actual potential of A. suum as causative agent of

  20. Interferon beta-1b-neutralizing antibodies 5 years after clinically isolated syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartung, H.P.; Freedman, M.S.; Polman, C.H.; Edan, G.; Kappos, L.; Miller, D. H.; Montalban, X.; Barkhof, F.; Petkau, J.; White, R.; Sahajpal, V.; Knappertz, V.; Beckmann, K.; Lanius, V.; Sandbrink, R.; Pohl, C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and consequences of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) in patients with a first event suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with interferon β-1b (IFNβ-1b). Methods: In the Betaseron/Betaferon in Newly Emerging MS For Initial Treatment (BENEFIT) study,

  1. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) RNA and neutralising antibodies in milk collected according to local customs from dromedary camels, Qatar, April 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reusken, C B; Farag, E A; Jonges, M; Godeke, G J; El-Sayed, A M; Pas, S D; Raj, V S; Mohran, K A; Moussa, H A; Ghobashy, H; Alhajri, F; Ibrahim, A K; Bosch, B J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/273306049; Pasha, S K; Al-Romaihi, H E; Al-Thani, M; Al-Marri, S A; AlHajri, M M; Haagmans, B L; Koopmans, M P

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) were detected in serum and milk collected according to local customs from 33 camels in Qatar, April 2014. At one location, evidence for active virus shedding in nasal secretions and/or faeces was observed for 7/12 camels; viral

  2. No evidence for circulating HuD-specific CD8+ T cells in patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and Hu antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.K. de Beukelaar (Janet); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); Y. van Norden (Yvette); J.C. Milikan (Johannes); J. Kraan (Jaco); H. Hooijkaas (Herbert); K. Sintnicolaas (Krijn); J.W. Gratama (Jan-Willem); P.A. Smitt (Peter)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAim: In paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) associated with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and Hu antibodies (Hu-PNS), Hu antigens expressed by the tumour hypothetically trigger an immune response that also reacts with Hu antigens in the nervous system, resulting in tumour

  3. Hydralazine-induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive renal vasculitis presenting with a vasculitic syndrome, acute nephritis and a puzzling skin rash: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keasberry Justin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis has been associated with many drugs and it is a relatively rare side effect of the antihypertensive drug hydralazine. The diagnosis and management of patients who have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis may be challenging because of its relative infrequency, variability of clinical expression and changing nomenclature. The spectrum of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is wide and can be fatal. This case documents a 62-year-old woman who presented with hydralazine-induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive renal vasculitis with a puzzling cutaneous rash. Case presentation We report a rare case of hydralazine-induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis in a 62-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with a vasculitic syndrome with a sore throat, mouth ulcers and otalgia after several months of constitutional symptoms. She then proceeded to develop a rash over her right lower limb. Clinically, the rash had features to suggest Sweet’s syndrome, but also had some appearances consistent with embolic phenomena and did not have the appearance of palpable purpure usually associated with cutaneous vasculitis. Differential diagnoses were hydralazine-associated Sweet’s syndrome, streptococcal-induced cutaneous eruption or an unrelated contact dermatitis. A midstream urine sample detected glomerular blood cells in the setting of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive renal vasculitis and Streptococcus pyogenes bacteremia. A renal biopsy revealed a pauci-immune, focally necrotizing glomerulonephritis with small crescents. Her skin biopsy revealed a heavy neutrophil infiltrate involving the full thickness of the dermis with no evidence of a leucocytoclastic vasculitis, but was non-specific. She was initially commenced on intravenous lincomycin for her bloodstream infection and subsequently

  4. Hydralazine-induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive renal vasculitis presenting with a vasculitic syndrome, acute nephritis and a puzzling skin rash: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keasberry, Justin; Frazier, Jeremy; Isbel, Nicole M; Van Eps, Carolyn L; Oliver, Kimberley; Mudge, David W

    2013-01-14

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis has been associated with many drugs and it is a relatively rare side effect of the antihypertensive drug hydralazine. The diagnosis and management of patients who have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis may be challenging because of its relative infrequency, variability of clinical expression and changing nomenclature. The spectrum of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is wide and can be fatal. This case documents a 62-year-old woman who presented with hydralazine-induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive renal vasculitis with a puzzling cutaneous rash. We report a rare case of hydralazine-induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis in a 62-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with a vasculitic syndrome with a sore throat, mouth ulcers and otalgia after several months of constitutional symptoms. She then proceeded to develop a rash over her right lower limb. Clinically, the rash had features to suggest Sweet's syndrome, but also had some appearances consistent with embolic phenomena and did not have the appearance of palpable purpure usually associated with cutaneous vasculitis. Differential diagnoses were hydralazine-associated Sweet's syndrome, streptococcal-induced cutaneous eruption or an unrelated contact dermatitis. A midstream urine sample detected glomerular blood cells in the setting of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive renal vasculitis and Streptococcus pyogenes bacteremia. A renal biopsy revealed a pauci-immune, focally necrotizing glomerulonephritis with small crescents. Her skin biopsy revealed a heavy neutrophil infiltrate involving the full thickness of the dermis with no evidence of a leucocytoclastic vasculitis, but was non-specific. She was initially commenced on intravenous lincomycin for her bloodstream infection and subsequently commenced on immunosuppression after cessation of hydralazine

  5. Role of anti-domain 1-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies in the diagnosis and risk stratification of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Craemer, A-S; Musial, J; Devreese, K M J

    2016-09-01

    Essentials Antibodies to domain 1 of β2 glycoprotein I (aD1) are a subset of antiphospholipid antibodies. We evaluated the added diagnostic value of an automated aD1 assay in antiphospholipid syndrome. AD1 IgG correctly classifies patients at risk for thrombosis. Agreement between aD1 and aβ2GPI IgG is high, limiting the added value of aD1 in our setting. Click to hear Professor de Groot's perspective on new mechanistic understanding in antiphospholipid syndrome Background Laboratory diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) includes lupus anticoagulant (LAC), anticardiolipin (aCL) or anti-β2 glycoprotein I (aβ2 GPI) antibodies. Antibodies targeting domain 1 of β2 GPI (aD1) constitute a pathogenic subset of autoantibodies. Objectives In this cohort study, we determined the clinical performance characteristics, additional diagnostic value and the contribution to APS risk stratification of an automated aD1 assay. Patients/Methods LAC, aCL, aβ2 GPI and aD1 IgG were measured in 101 APS patients, 123 patients with autoimmune disorders, 82 diseased controls and 120 healthy controls. aD1 antibodies were detected by QUANTA Flash(®) Beta2GPI-Domain 1 chemiluminescence immunoassay. Results With a cut-off value of 20.0 CU, the aD1 IgG assay identifies APS patients in a clinically affected patient cohort with a sensitivity of 53.5% and specificity of 98.8%. It implied a high odds ratio (OR) for clinical events (OR, 17.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.1-40.5). aD1 IgG did not add diagnostic value to the formal aPL panel because aβ2 GPI IgG was nearly as specific but more sensitive for APS (sensitivity 56.4%) with a higher OR for clinical events (36.2; 95% CI, 11.1-117.9). High aD1 titers identify triple-positive patients and patients with thrombosis in a β2 GPI-dependent LAC-positive population. Agreement between aD1 IgG and aβ2 GPI IgG was high (positive and negative agreement 91.7% and 98.4%, respectively). Conclusion Detection of aD1 IgG correctly classifies

  6. The presentation and evaluation of a case of systemic Lupus erythematosus and anthiphospholipid antibody syndrome with primary clinical manifestation of chorea

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    Asgary S

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Manifestation of chorea in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APA synd. is not common. Moreover, primary presentation of the disease with chorea is rare and only few such cases are reported in literature in recent years. We report here the case of a 28 year old woman who was first seen at the age of 10 with clinical manifestations of chorea. Later she developed deep vein thrombosis, thrombocytpenia, stroke, cardiac valve involvement and recurrent abortions. Laboratory investigations confirmed the diagnosis of SLE and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. We present this patient as a case of SLE and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with chorea being her primary clinical presentation

  7. Elevated homocysteine andN-methyl-d-aspartate-receptor antibodies as a cause of behavioural and cognitive decline in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann Jones, Simon; Banerjee, Subimal; Smith, A David; Refsum, Helga; Lennox, Belinda

    2017-12-01

    A 19-year-old male with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome presented with a 4-year history of cognitive decline and symptoms suggestive of atypical psychosis. Potential for elevated homocysteine and NMDA-receptor antibodies in the pathogenesis of his symptoms was investigated. He had elevated blood homocysteine level (18.7 μmol/l), low-normal vitamin B12 and folate levels and was positive for NMDA-receptor antibodies. Treatment with daily folinic acid (0.8 mg) and vitamin B12 (1 mg) led to dramatic improvement in his cognitive and behavioural presentation. Subsequent plasma exchange resulted in a further, significant clinical improvement. Homocysteine levels and NMDA-R antibodies should be investigated as potential causes of behavioural and cognitive symptoms in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

  8. Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: a drastic improvement in brain perfusion by antiplatelet therapy

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    Tokumaru, Sunao; Yoshikai, Tomonori; Uchino, Akira; Kudo, Sho [Dept. of Radiology, Saga Medical School (Japan); Matsui, Makoto; Kuroda, Yasuo [Dept. of Neurology, Saga Medical School (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    We present a case of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) with repeated transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple cerebral infarcts and ischemic changes in the cerebral white matter. Cerebral angiographies showed no abnormalities. Technetium-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer (Tc-99m-ECD) brain SPECT showed multiple decreased perfusion areas, which were more extensive than the lesions demonstrated on MRI. After treatment with an antiplatelet agent, the patient subsequently recovered from the TIAs. Although no interval changes were observed by MRI after therapy, follow-up Tc-99m-ECD SPECT revealed a marked improvement in brain perfusion. This is the first imaging report of remarkable post-therapy improvement in brain perfusion in APS cases. (orig.)

  9. Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: a drastic improvement in brain perfusion by antiplatelet therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokumaru, Sunao; Yoshikai, Tomonori; Uchino, Akira; Kudo, Sho; Matsui, Makoto; Kuroda, Yasuo

    2001-01-01

    We present a case of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) with repeated transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple cerebral infarcts and ischemic changes in the cerebral white matter. Cerebral angiographies showed no abnormalities. Technetium-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer (Tc-99m-ECD) brain SPECT showed multiple decreased perfusion areas, which were more extensive than the lesions demonstrated on MRI. After treatment with an antiplatelet agent, the patient subsequently recovered from the TIAs. Although no interval changes were observed by MRI after therapy, follow-up Tc-99m-ECD SPECT revealed a marked improvement in brain perfusion. This is the first imaging report of remarkable post-therapy improvement in brain perfusion in APS cases. (orig.)

  10. Gemcitabine-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome mimicking scleroderma renal crisis presenting with Raynaud's phenomenon, positive antinuclear antibodies and hypertensive emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Keisuke; Nobata, Hironobu; Kawai, Hirohisa; Wakamatsu, Ryo; Miura, Naoto; Banno, Shogo; Imai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman who received gemcitabine for advanced gallbladder cancer developed an impaired renal function, thrombocytopenia, Raynaud's phenomenon, digital ischemic changes, a high antinuclear antibody titer and hypertensive emergency that mimicked a scleroderma renal crisis. A kidney biopsy specimen demonstrated onion-skin lesions in the arterioles and small arteries along with ischemic changes in the glomeruli, compatible with a diagnosis of hypertensive emergency (malignant hypertension). The intravenous administration of a calcium channel blocker, the oral administration of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin II receptor blocker and the transfusion of fresh frozen plasma were effective for treating the thrombocytopenia and progressive kidney dysfunction. Gemcitabine induces hemolytic uremic syndrome with accelerated hypertension and Raynaud's phenomenon, mimicking scleroderma renal crisis.

  11. Coexisting diseases modifying each other’s presentation - lack of growth failure in Turner syndrome due to the associated pituitary gigantism

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    Dragović Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Turner syndrome presents with one of the most frequent chromosomal aberrations in female, typically presented with growth retardation, ovarian insufficiency, facial dysmorphism, and numerous other somatic stigmata. Gigantism is an extremely rare condition resulting from an excessive growth hormone (GH secretion that occurs during childhood before the fusion of epiphyseal growth plates. The major clinical feature of gigantism is growth acceleration, although these patients also suffer from hypogonadism and soft tissue hypertrophy. Case report. We presented a girl with mosaic Turner syndrome, delayed puberty and normal linear growth for the sex and age, due to the simultaneous GH hypersecretion by pituitary tumor. In the presented case all the typical phenotypic stigmata related to Turner syndrome were missing. Due to excessive pituitary GH secretion during the period while the epiphyseal growth plates of the long bones are still open, characteristic stagnation in longitudinal growth has not been demonstrated. The patient presented with delayed puberty and primary amenorrhea along with a sudden appearance of clinical signs of hypersomatotropinism, which were the reasons for seeking medical help at the age of 16. Conclusion. Physical examination of children presenting with delayed puberty but without growth arrest must include an overall hormonal and genetic testing even in the cases when typical clinical presentations of genetic disorder are absent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of simultaneous presence of Turner syndrome and gigantism in the literature.

  12. Coexisting diseases modifying each other’s presentation - lack of growth failure in Turner syndrome due to the associated pituitary gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragović, Tamara; Đuran, Zorana; Jelić, Svetlana; Marinković, Dejan; Kiković, Saša; Kuzmić-Janković, Snežana; Hajduković, Zoran

    2016-10-01

    Turner syndrome presents with one of the most frequent chromosomal aberrations in female, typically presented with growth retardation, ovarian insufficiency, facial dysmorphism, and numerous other somatic stigmata. Gigantism is an extremely rare condition resulting from an excessive growth hormone (GH) secretion that occurs during childhood before the fusion of epiphyseal growth plates. The major clinical feature of gigantism is growth acceleration, although these patients also suffer from hypogonadism and soft tissue hypertrophy. We presented a girl with mosaic Turner syndrome, delayed puberty and normal linear growth for the sex and age, due to the simultaneous GH hypersecretion by pituitary tumor. In the presented case all the typical phenotypic stigmata related to Turner syndrome were missing. Due to excessive pituitary GH secretion during the period while the epiphyseal growth plates of the long bones are still open, characteristic stagnation in longitudinal growth has not been demonstrated. The patient presented with delayed puberty and primary amenorrhea along with a sudden appearance of clinical signs of hypersomatotropinism, which were the reasons for seeking medical help at the age of 16. Physical examination of children presenting with delayed puberty but without growth arrest must include an overall hormonal and genetic testing even in the cases when typical clinical presentations of genetic disorder are absent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of simultaneous presence of Turner syndrome and gigantism in the literature.

  13. Novel camelid antibody fragments targeting recombinant nucleoprotein of Araucaria hantavirus: a prototype for an early diagnosis of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya S Pereira

    Full Text Available In addition to conventional antibodies, camelids produce immunoglobulins G composed exclusively of heavy chains in which the antigen binding site is formed only by single domains called VHH. Their particular characteristics make VHHs interesting tools for drug-delivery, passive immunotherapy and high-throughput diagnosis. Hantaviruses are rodent-borne viruses of the Bunyaviridae family. Two clinical forms of the infection are known. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS is present in the Old World, while Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS is found on the American continent. There is no specific treatment for HPS and its diagnosis is carried out by molecular or serological techniques, using mainly monoclonal antibodies or hantavirus nucleoprotein (N to detect IgM and IgG in patient serum. This study proposes the use of camelid VHHs to develop alternative methods for diagnosing and confirming HPS. Phage display technology was employed to obtain VHHs. After immunizing one Lama glama against the recombinant N protein (prNΔ₈₅ of a Brazilian hantavirus strain, VHH regions were isolated to construct an immune library. VHHs were displayed fused to the M13KO7 phage coat protein III and the selection steps were performed on immobilized prNΔ₈₅. After selection, eighty clones recognized specifically the N protein. These were sequenced, grouped based mainly on the CDRs, and five clones were analyzed by western blot (WB, surface plasmon resonance (SPR device, and ELISA. Besides the ability to recognize prNΔ85 by WB, all selected clones showed affinity constants in the nanomolar range. Additionaly, the clone KC329705 is able to detect prNΔ₈₅ in solution, as well as the native viral antigen. Findings support the hypothesis that selected VHHs could be a powerful tool in the development of rapid and accurate HPS diagnostic assays, which are essential to provide supportive care to patients and reduce the high mortality rate associated with

  14. Presence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus antibodies in Saudi Arabia: a nationwide, cross-sectional, serological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Marcel A; Meyer, Benjamin; Corman, Victor M; Al-Masri, Malak; Turkestani, Abdulhafeez; Ritz, Daniel; Sieberg, Andrea; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Bosch, Berend-J; Lattwein, Erik; Alhakeem, Raafat F; Assiri, Abdullah M; Albarrak, Ali M; Al-Shangiti, Ali M; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Wikramaratna, Paul; Alrabeeah, Abdullah A; Drosten, Christian; Memish, Ziad A

    2015-05-01

    Scientific evidence suggests that dromedary camels are the intermediary host for the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). However, the actual number of infections in people who have had contact with camels is unknown and most index patients cannot recall any such contact. We aimed to do a nationwide serosurvey in Saudi Arabia to establish the prevalence of MERS-CoV antibodies, both in the general population and in populations of individuals who have maximum exposure to camels. In the cross-sectional serosurvey, we tested human serum samples obtained from healthy individuals older than 15 years who attended primary health-care centres or participated in a national burden-of-disease study in all 13 provinces of Saudi Arabia. Additionally, we tested serum samples from shepherds and abattoir workers with occupational exposure to camels. Samples were screened by recombinant ELISA and MERS-CoV seropositivity was confirmed by recombinant immunofluorescence and plaque reduction neutralisation tests. We used two-tailed Mann Whitney U exact tests, χ(2), and Fisher's exact tests to analyse the data. Between Dec 1, 2012, and Dec 1, 2013, we obtained individual serum samples from 10,009 individuals. Anti-MERS-CoV antibodies were confirmed in 15 (0·15%; 95% CI 0·09-0·24) of 10,009 people in six of the 13 provinces. The mean age of seropositive individuals was significantly younger than that of patients with reported, laboratory-confirmed, primary Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome (43·5 years [SD 17·3] vs 53·8 years [17·5]; p=0·008). Men had a higher antibody prevalence than did women (11 [0·25%] of 4341 vs two [0·05%] of 4378; p=0·028) and antibody prevalence was significantly higher in central versus coastal provinces (14 [0·26%] of 5479 vs one [0·02%] of 4529; p=0·003). Compared with the general population, seroprevalence of MERS-CoV antibodies was significantly increased by 15 times in shepherds (two [2·3%] of 87, p=0·0004) and by 23

  15. Inverse Association of Plasma IgG Antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and High C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontitis.

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    Supanee Thanakun

    Full Text Available The association between clinically diagnosed periodontitis, a common chronic oral infection, and metabolic syndrome has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasma IgG levels against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, C-reactive protein, and periodontal status with metabolic syndrome. Plasma IgG levels and C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and salivary levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 127 individuals aged 35-76 years, 57 participants had metabolic syndrome and severe periodontitis, 25 had metabolic syndrome and an absence of severe periodontitis, 17 healthy individuals had severe periodontitis, and 28 healthy individuals were without severe periodontitis. Patients with metabolic syndrome had reduced humoral immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.008, regardless of their salivary levels or periodontitis status compared with healthy participants. The IgG antibody response to P. gingivalis, regardless of their salivary levels or participants' health condition, was significantly higher in severe periodontitis patients (p<0.001. Plasma IgG titers for P. intermedia were inconsistent among metabolic syndrome or periodontal participants. Our results indicate that the presence of lower levels of IgG antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans (OR = 0.1; 95%CI 0.0-0.7, but not P. gingivalis, a severe periodontitis status (OR = 7.8; 95%CI 1.1-57.0, high C-reactive protein levels (OR = 9.4; 95%CI 1.0-88.2 and body mass index (OR = 3.0; 95%CI 1.7-5.2, are associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The role of the decreased IgG antibody response to A. actinomycetemcomitans, increased C-reactive protein levels on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome in a group of Thai patients is

  16. Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome-one further aspect of thrombophilia in overweight and obese patients with venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Thomas; Belaj, Klara; Bruckenberger, Rosa; Hackl, Gerald; Hafner, Franz; Froehlich, Harald; Zebisch, Armin; Pilger, Ernst; Brodmann, Marianne

    2013-09-01

    Overweight and obesity are established risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE). We examined the difference in the frequency of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS) in VTE patients according to their BMI. We included 998 VTE patients treated at our institution between 2009 and 2011 in a retrospective data analysis. Thrombophilia screening including evaluation for APS (lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin, and anti-B2-glycoprotein-I IgG and IgM antibodies) was performed in all patients. PAPS was diagnosed in 6.8% (24/355) of normal weight (BMI 31 kg/m2) VTE patients. The difference of PAPS occurrence between these groups was statistically significant (P = 0.001). PAPS patients demonstrated higher fibrinogen levels as compared to non-PAPS patients (median 416.0 md/dl vs. 352.0 mg/dl, P = 0.001). Furthermore, fibrinogen levels increased significantly according to the body weight of patients (median normal weight patients 330.0 mg/dl vs. overweight patients 359.0 mg/dl vs. obese patients 415.0 mg/dl, P = 0.001). PAPS seems to be more frequent in overweight and obese patients. As PAPS patients showed significantly higher fibrinogen levels and as fibrinogen levels increased significantly according to the body weight of patients, an elevated inflammatory state in overweight and obese patients as a reason for the increased PAPS occurrence can be assumed. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  17. A dermatomyositis and scleroderma overlap syndrome with a remarkable high titer of anti-exosome antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Avalos-Díaz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1972, Sharp et al described the mixed connective tissue disease; such a description corresponded to an apparently distinct rheumatic disease syndrome associated to U1RNP, which is an extractable nuclear antigen or ENA (1. After this clever description, different overlap syndromes that did not meet the EMTC criteria were described. Conceptually Alarcón-Segovia coined the term of “shared autoimmunity”, which was defined by the presence of two or more data compatible with autoimmune disease; such category of disease describes signs or symptoms of certain autoimmune connective diseases, for instance Rupus corresponds to lupus erythematosus associated...

  18. China and Coexistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Liselotte

    and influence without requiring widespread exercise of military or economic pressure. Odgaard examines the origins of peaceful coexistence in early Soviet doctrine, its midcentury development by China and India, and its ongoing appeal to developing countries. She reveals what this foreign policy offers China......“Peaceful coexistence,” long a key phrase in China’s strategic thinking, is a constructive doctrine that offers China a path for influencing the international system. So argues Liselotte Odgaard in this timely analysis of China's national security strategy in the context of its foreign policy...... practice. China’s program of peaceful coexistence emphasizes absolute sovereignty and non-interference in the internal affairs of other states. Odgaard suggests that China’s policy of working within the international community and with non-state actors such as the UN aims to win for China greater power...

  19. China and Coexistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Liselotte

    “Peaceful coexistence,” long a key phrase in China’s strategic thinking, is a constructive doctrine that offers China a path for influencing the international system. So argues Liselotte Odgaard in this timely analysis of China's national security strategy in the context of its foreign policy...... practice. China’s program of peaceful coexistence emphasizes absolute sovereignty and non-interference in the internal affairs of other states. Odgaard suggests that China’s policy of working within the international community and with non-state actors such as the UN aims to win for China greater power...... and influence without requiring widespread exercise of military or economic pressure. Odgaard examines the origins of peaceful coexistence in early Soviet doctrine, its midcentury development by China and India, and its ongoing appeal to developing countries. She reveals what this foreign policy offers China...

  20. Eculizumab in anti-factor h antibodies associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diamante Chiodini, Benedetta; Davin, Jean-Claude; Corazza, Francis; Khaldi, Karim; Dahan, Karin; Ismaili, Khalid; Adams, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a life-threatening multisystemic condition often leading to end-stage renal failure. It results from an increased activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system due to mutations of genes coding for inhibitors of this pathway or from

  1. Immune modulation with a staphylococcal preparation in fibromyalgia/chronic fatigue syndrome: relation between antibody levels and clinical improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachrisson, O; Colque-Navarro, P; Gottfries, C G; Regland, B; Möllby, R

    2004-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the serological response to treatment with staphylococcal vaccine in fibromyalgia/chronic fatigue syndrome patients and to explore the relationship between serological response and clinical effect. Twenty-eight patients, half of whom served as controls, were recruited from a 6-month randomised trial in which repeated administration of the staphylococcal toxoid vaccine Staphypan Berna (Berna Biotech, Switzerland) was tested against placebo. Antibody status against extracellular toxins/enzymes, cell-wall components, and enterotoxins was evaluated at baseline and at endpoint. The clinical response to treatment was recorded in rating scales. In the group receiving active treatment, significant serological changes were recorded, whereas no significant changes were found in controls. Treatment led to a significantly increased capacity of serum to neutralise alpha-toxin and a significant increase in serum IgG to alpha-toxin and lipase. Furthermore, the increase in these parameters combined paralleled the improvement in clinical outcome. Thus, the greater the serological response, the greater was the clinical effect. In conclusion, this explorative study has shown that repeated administration of the Staphypan Berna vaccine in patients with fibromyalgia/chronic fatigue syndrome causes a serological response to several staphylococcal antigens, particularly to certain extracellular toxins and enzymes. The results further show that this response is related to the clinical outcome of treatment.

  2. Paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome: A practical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheeran Kannoth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS are rare disorders associated with cancer, not caused by direct invasion, metastasis or consequences of treatment. They are usually autoimmune in nature. Often, PNS precedes the manifestations of cancer. Onconeural antibodies are important in the diagnosis and management of these disorders. These antibodies are specific for the malignancy rather than for a particular neurological syndrome. Often, there are different antibodies associated with the same syndrome. Multiple antibodies are also known to coexist in a given patient with malignancy. While investigating a patient for suspected PNS, the entire gamut of onconeural antibodies should be investigated so as not to miss the diagnosis. In 30-40% of the cases, PNS can occur without antibodies. Investigations for identifying the underlying cancer can be directed by the antibody panel. If conventional screening for cancer is negative, a positron emission scanning/computed tomography scan can be useful. Patients need follow-up surveillance for cancer if not detected in the first instance. Cancer detection and treatment, immunotherapy and supportive care are important components of treatment of PNS. Immunotherapy is very effective in PNS associated with cell membrane-associated antibodies like voltage-gated potassium channel complex, NMDA receptor antibodies and voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies. Immunotherapy includes steroids, IVIgG, plasmaphereis, cytotoxic medications and rituximab. Supportive therapy includes symptomatic treatment with antiepileptic and analgesic medications, physiotherapy, speech therapy and occupational therapy. PNS can mimic any neurologic syndrome. A high index of clinical suspicion is important for early diagnosis and prompt management and better outcome.

  3. Disease-modifying influences of coexistent G6PD-deficiency, Gilbert syndrome and deletional alpha thalassemia in hereditary spherocytosis: A report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamwal, Manu; Aggarwal, Anu; Kumar, Verinder; Sharma, Prashant; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Bansal, Deepak; Malhotra, Pankaj; Das, Reena

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a common inherited hemolytic anemia characterized by heterogeneous clinical presentations with variable degrees of anemia, jaundice, splenomegaly and gallstones. Although the underlying genetic defects in red cell membrane proteins may explain many phenotypic variations, a proportion of variability may be due to other co-inherited factors like enzymopathies, thalassemias and Gilbert syndrome. Associations of HS with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and Gilbert syndrome in isolation have been reported previously. We describe 3 adult cases of HS with concomitant Gilbert syndrome and G6PD-Mediterranean mutations (2 hemizygous males, aged 15 and 35y and 1 heterozygous 25-y female). Two patients required multiple transfusions that required splenectomy for management. One patient (15y male) also carried the single gene alpha 4.2 deletion and was less symptomatic. These cases illustrate the importance of clinico-pathological correlation and judicious extended testing for various contributing factors that may modify the clinical course of HS patients. G6PD deficiency is also a common enzymopathy in India and can contribute to the phenotypic heterogeneity. Its recognition is important for advising avoidance of oxidizing drug exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Does insulin resistance co-exist with glucocorticoid resistance in the metabolic syndrome? Studies comparing skin sensitivity to glucocorticoids in individuals with and without acanthosis nigricans

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    Teelucksingh Surujpal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for both diabetes and coronary artery disease, which insulin resistance alone does not satisfactorily explain. We propose an additional and complementary underlying mechanism of glucocorticoid resistance. Results Using acanthosis nigricans (AN and skin vasoconstrictor (SVC response to topically applied beclomethasone dipropionate as markers of insulin and glucocorticoid resistance, respectively, we compared anthropometric, biochemical, pro-inflammatory markers and the SVC response in subjects with AN in two studies: STUDY 1 was used to compare subjects with AN (Grade 4, n = 32, with those without AN (n = 68 while STUDY 2 compared these responses among a cross-section of diabetic patients (n = 109 with varying grades of AN (grade 0, n = 30; grade 1, n = 24; grade 2, n = 18; grade 3, n = 25; grade 4, n = 12. Findings In both studies there was an inverse relationship between AN Grade 4 and the SVC response, (P Conclusion An absent SVC response represents a new biomarker for the metabolic syndrome and the exaggerated inflammatory response, which characterizes the metabolic syndrome, may be an outcome of deficient glucocorticoid action in vascular tissue.

  5. Antiprothrombin Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Žigon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, the presence of a group of pathogenic autoantibodies called antiphospholipid antibodies causes thrombosis and pregnancy complications. The most frequent antigenic target of antiphospholipid antibodies are phospholipid bound β2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GPI and prothrombin. The international classification criteria for APS connect the occurrence of thrombosis and/or obstetric complications together with the persistence of lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL and antibodies against β2GPI (anti-β2GPI into APS. Current trends for the diagnostic evaluation of APS patients propose determination of multiple antiphospholipid antibodies, among them also anti-prothrombin antibodies, to gain a common score which estimates the risk for thrombosis in APS patients. Antiprothrombin antibodies are common in APS patients and are sometimes the only antiphospholipid antibodies being elevated. Methods for their determination differ and have not yet been standardized. Many novel studies confirmed method using phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT ELISA as an antigen on solid phase encompass higher diagnostic accuracy compared to method using prothrombin alone (aPT ELISA. Our research group developed an in-house aPS/PT ELISA with increased analytical sensitivity which enables the determination of all clinically relevant antiprothrombin antibodies. aPS/PT exhibited the highest percentage of lupus anticoagulant activity compared to aCL and anti-β2GPI. aPS/PT antibodies measured with the in-house method associated with venous thrombosis and presented the strongest independent risk factor for the presence of obstetric complications among all tested antiphospholipid antibodies

  6. Coexistence between neighbours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shenge, K.C.; Mabagala, R.B.; Mortensen, C A Nieves Paulino

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were conducted under laboratory and screenhouse conditions to study the coexistence between Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, incitants of bacterial speck and bacterial spot diseases of tomato. Results of in vitro studies showed that when mixe...

  7. Coexistence between neighbours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shenge, K.C.; Mabagala, R.B.; Mortensen, C A Nieves Paulino

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were conducted under laboratory and screenhouse conditions to study the coexistence between Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, incitants of bacterial speck and bacterial spot diseases of tomato. Results of in vitro studies showed that when mixed...

  8. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in Santa Cruz, Bolivia: Outbreak Investigation and Antibody Prevalence Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    Ecology and epidemiology of an emerging virus in Latin America]. Medicina (B Aires) 66: 343–356. 22. Weissenbacher MC, Cura E, Segura EL, Hortal M, Baek LJ...et al. (1996) Serological evidence of human Hantavirus infection in Argentina, Bolivia and Uruguay. Medicina (B Aires) 56: 17–22. 23. Pini N (2004...Hantavirus in human and rodent population in an endemic area for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in Argentina]. Medicina (B Aires) 62: 1–8. 26. Simonsen L

  9. Declining antibody levels after hepatitis B vaccination in Down syndrome : A need for booster vaccination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvoogel, N.B.; Hollegien, M.I.; Bok, L.A.; Derksen-Lubsen, A.; Dikken, F.; Leenders, A.C.A.P.; Pijning, A.; Post, E.; Wojciechowski, M.; Hilbink, M.; de Vries, E.

    2017-01-01

    We determined the anti-HBs titer in 227 children of all ages with Down syndrome (DS). Only 48.1% (95%CI: 35.1-61.3) of the DS children aged 7-10 years and 31.9% (95%CI: 22.1-43.6) of the DS children aged >10 years had a protective anti-HBs titer (≥10 IU/L). The geometric mean anti-HBs titer was

  10. Systematic review of case reports of antiphospholipid syndrome following infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahab, N; Lopez-Olivo, M A; Pinto-Patarroyo, G P; Suarez-Almazor, M E

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review of case reports documenting the development of antiphospholipid syndrome or antiphospholipid syndrome-related features after an infection. We searched Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, PubMed ePubs, and The Cochrane Library - CENTRAL through March 2015 without restrictions. Studies reporting cases of antiphospholipid syndrome or antiphospholipid syndrome-related features following an infection were included. Two hundred and fifty-nine publications met inclusion criteria, reporting on 293 cases. Three different groups of patients were identified; group 1 included patients who fulfilled the criteria for definitive antiphospholipid syndrome (24.6%), group 2 included patients who developed transient antiphospholipid antibodies with thromboembolic phenomena (43.7%), and group 3 included patients who developed transient antiphospholipid antibodies without thromboembolic events (31.7%). The most common preceding infection was viral (55.6%). In cases that developed thromboembolic events Human immunodeficiency and Hepatitis C viruses were the most frequently reported. Parvovirus B19 was the most common in cases that developed antibodies without thromboembolic events. Hematological manifestations and peripheral thrombosis were the most common clinical manifestations. Positive anticardiolipin antibodies were the most frequent antibodies reported, primarily coexisting IgG and IgM isotypes. Few patients in groups 1 and 2 had persistent antiphospholipid antibodies for more than 6 months. Outcome was variable with some cases reporting persistent antiphospholipid syndrome features and others achieving complete resolution of clinical events. Development of antiphospholipid antibodies with all traditional manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome were observed after variety of infections, most frequently after chronic viral infections with Human immunodeficiency and Hepatitis C. The causal relationship between infection

  11. [Following 90 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome with antibody titers and correlations with clinical manifestations: symptoms of the disease, a new antibody and correlations with clinical manifestations in the Israeli population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marai, I; Levi, Y; Godard, G; Shoenfeld, Y

    2001-06-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) with venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent pregnancy loss or thrombocytopenia. The syndrome can be either primary or secondary to an underlying condition, most commonly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The purpose of the study was to review the manifestations of the APS in Israeli patients and to investigate the difference between patients with primary or secondary syndrome. Analysis of the correlation between the manifestations of the disease and the antibody titers [LA (lupus anticoagulant), IgG aCL (anticardiolipin), IgM aCL] was also performed. In the study there were 90 patients with APS in the Sheba Medical Center. The clinical findings for all patients were recorded according to established protocol. Arterial thrombotic events were present in 51.1% of the patients; cerebral ischemic attacks were the most frequent arterial events. Venous thrombotic events were present in 45.6% patients; deep venous thrombosis was the most frequent venous event. Obstetric complications were found in 37.3% of patients; the most frequent complication was abortions. The clinical findings of patients with primary or secondary syndrome were similar. Patients with APS associated with lupus had a high prevalence of hemolytic anemia (28.6% v 3.3%; P = 0.001), and ANA (antinuclear antibody) (75% v 12.9%; P = 0.0001). There was no correlation between the antibody titers (LA, IgG aCL, IgM aCL) and clinical manifestations. The patients received anticoagulant treatment and antiaggregant drugs to prevent recurrence of symptoms. Clinical manifestations in Israeli patients did not differ from those in non-Israeli patients. Venous or arterial thrombosis and obstetric complications are the most frequent clinical findings in APS. There was no different in clinical manifestations between primary and secondary syndrome. The findings of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and ANA were more frequent in

  12. Coexistência de transtornos respiratórios do sono e síndrome fibromiálgica Sleep disordered breathing concomitant with fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dienaro Germanowicz

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar síndrome fibromiálgica em pacientes com transtornos respiratórios do sono. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 50 pacientes que compareceram à Clínica do Sono com queixas de roncar no sono, apnéias e sonolência diurna. Confirmou-se o diagnóstico de transtornos respiratórios do sono através de polissonografia. Para se estabelecer o diagnóstico de síndrome fibromiálgica, submeteram-se os pacientes a avaliação de acordo com os critérios estabelecidos pelo American College of Rheumatology. RESULTADOS: Estudaram-se 50 pacientes, 32 do sexo masculino. A média (± desvio-padrão de idade do grupo foi de 50 ± 12 anos. A média do índice de massa corporal do grupo foi de 29,7 ± 5,6 kg/m². A média do índice de apnéias e hipopnéias do grupo foi de 36 ± 29 apnéias e hipopnéias /hora. Nove das 18 mulheres e 2 homens preencheram os critérios estabelecidos pelo American College of Rheumatology para o diagnóstico de síndrome fibromiálgica. CONCLUSÃO: Considerando-se que a prevalência de síndrome fibromiálgica na população geral é de 0,5% para homens e de 3,4% para mulheres, a fração de casos de fibromialgia mais de dez vezes maior nesta amostra reforça a hipótese de associação entre transtornos respiratórios do sono e síndrome fibromiálgica.OBJECTIVE: To identify fibromyalgia syndrome in patients with sleep disordered breathing. METHOD: We studied 50 patients seeking treatment at a sleep disorder clinic for snoring, apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness. Sleep disordered breathing was diagnosed through the use of polysomnography. To diagnose fibromyalgia syndrome, patients were evaluated in accordance with the criteria established by the American College of Rheumatology. RESULTS: Of the 50 patients, 32 were male. The mean (± standard deviation age of the group was 50 ± 12 years. The mean body mass index was 29.7 ± 5.6 kg/m². The mean apnea-hypopnea index was 36 ± 29 attacks of apnea or hypopnea

  13. [Analysis of epitopes and function of anti-M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antibodies in patients with Sjögren's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Hiroto; Matsuo, Naomi; Iizuka, Mana; Nakamura, Yumi; Matsumoto, Isao; Sumida, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease that affects exocrine glands including salivary and lacrimal glands. It is characterized by lymphocytic infiltration into exocrine glands, leading to dry mouth and eyes. A number of auto-antibodies, such as anti-SS-A and SS-B antibodies, are detected in patients with SS. However, no SS-specific pathologic auto-antibodies have yet been found in this condition. M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) plays a crucial role in the secretion of saliva from salivary glands. It is reported that some patients with SS carried inhibitory auto-antibodies against M3R. To clarify the epitopes and function of anti-M3R antibodies in SS, we examined antibodies to the extracellular domains (N terminal region, the first, second, and third extracellular loop) of M3R by ELISA using synthesized peptide antigens encoding these domains in 42 SS and 42 healthy controls (HC). Titers and positivity of anti-M3R antibodies to every extracellular domain of M3R were significantly higher in SS than in HC. For functional analysis, human salivary gland (HSG) cells were pre-cultured with IgG from anti-M3R antibodies positive SS, negative SS, and HC. HSG cells were stimulated with cevimeline hydrochloride and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) was measured. IgG from anti-M3R antibodies to the second loop positive SS inhibited the increase of [Ca(2+)](i), but IgG from antibodies to the N terminal or the first loop positive SS enhanced it, while IgG from antibodies to the third loop positive SS showed no effect on [Ca(2+)](i) as well as IgG from anti-M3R antibodies negative SS and HC. These findings indicated the presence of several B cell epitopes on M3R in SS and effect of anti-M3R antibodies on the salivary secretion might differ with these epitopes.

  14. Anti-centromere antibody-seropositive Sjögren's syndrome differs from conventional subgroup in clinical and pathological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Hiroaki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To clarify the clinicopathological characteristics of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS with anti-centromere antibody (ACA. Methods Characteristics of 14 patients of pSS with ACA were evaluated. All patients were anti-SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La antibodies negative (ACA+ group without sclerodactyly. The prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP, titer of IgG and focus score (FS in the minor salivary glands (MSGs were determined. Quantification analysis of Azan Mallory staining was performed to detect collagenous fiber. Forty eight patients in whom ACA was absent were chosen as the conventional (ACA- pSS group. Results Prevalence of ACA+ SS patients was 14 out of 129 (10.85% pSS patients. RP was observed in 61.5% of the patients with ACA. The level of IgG in the ACA+ group was significantly lower than that of the ACA- group (p = 0.018. Statistical difference was also found in the FS of MSGs from the ACA+ group (1.4 ± 1.0 as compared with the ACA- group (2.3 ± 1.6 (p = 0.035. In contrast, the amount of fibrous tissue was much higher in the ACA+ group (65052.2 ± 14520.6 μm2 versus 26251.3 ± 14249.8 μm2 (p = 1.3 × 10-12. Conclusions Low cellular infiltration but with an increase in fibrous tissues may explain the clinical feature of a high prevalence of RP and normal IgG concentration in ACA+ pSS.

  15. Evaluation of the clinical relevance of anti-annexin-A5 antibodies in Chinese patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shulan; Wu, Ziyan; Li, Jing; Wen, Xiaoting; Li, Liubing; Zhang, Wen; Zhao, Jiuliang; Zhang, Fengchun; Li, Yongzhe

    2017-02-01

    A hallmark feature of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs). Few studies have addressed the clinical relevance of anti-annexin A5 antibodies (aANXA5) in Chinese patients with APS. In this study, we evaluated the clinical performance of aANXA5 in the diagnosis of APS. Sera from 313 subjects were tested, including 170 samples from patients with APS, 104 samples from patients with non-APS diseases as disease controls (DC), and 39 healthy controls (HC). Serum IgG and IgM aANXA5 were determined by ELISA. Overall, the levels of both IgG and IgM aANXA5 were significantly increased in patients with primary APS (PAPS) and APS associated to other diseases (APSAOD) compared with DC and HC. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for IgG and IgM aANXA5 in the diagnosis of APS were 33.5 and 15.3, 99.0 and 99.0, 98.3 and 96.3, and 47.7 and 41.7%, respectively. Significant associations between IgG aANXA5 and arterial thrombotic events (OR, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.44-4.71) and between IgG aANXA5 and venous thrombotic events (OR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.55-5.06) were identified. No correlations were identified between IgG or IgM aANXA5 and obstetric complications. Our data suggest that aANXA5 could serve as a diagnosis biomarker for patients with APS. More importantly, our data highlighted a potential role of IgG aANXA5 in identifying APS patients with high risk of thrombosis.

  16. Does insulin resistance co-exist with glucocorticoid resistance in the metabolic syndrome? Studies comparing skin sensitivity to glucocorticoids in individuals with and without acanthosis nigricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teelucksingh, Surujpal; Jaimungal, Sarada; Pinto Pereira, Lexley; Seemungal, Terence; Nayak, Shivananda

    2012-03-30

    The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for both diabetes and coronary artery disease, which insulin resistance alone does not satisfactorily explain. We propose an additional and complementary underlying mechanism of glucocorticoid resistance. Using acanthosis nigricans (AN) and skin vasoconstrictor (SVC) response to topically applied beclomethasone dipropionate as markers of insulin and glucocorticoid resistance, respectively, we compared anthropometric, biochemical, pro-inflammatory markers and the SVC response in subjects with AN in two studies: STUDY 1 was used to compare subjects with AN (Grade 4, n = 32), with those without AN (n = 68) while STUDY 2 compared these responses among a cross-section of diabetic patients (n = 109) with varying grades of AN (grade 0, n = 30; grade 1, n = 24; grade 2, n = 18; grade 3, n = 25; grade 4, n = 12). In both studies there was an inverse relationship between AN Grade 4 and the SVC response, (P glucocorticoid action in vascular tissue.

  17. Clinical utility of circulating anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunits NR2A/B antibody for the diagnosis of neuropsychiatric syndromes in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome: An updated meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Sen Hee; Fairhurst, Anna-Marie; Mak, Anselm

    2017-02-01

    Neuropsychiatric (NP) events are found in patients with rheumatic diseases, commonly in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). The standard nomenclature and case definitions for 19 NPSLE syndromes by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Committee on Research cover a wide range of NP events seen in both SLE and SS. Despite advances in the understanding of SLE and SS, NP syndromes continue to pose diagnostic challenges. Correct attribution of NP events is critical in determining the correct treatment and prognosis. Anti-N-methyl- d -aspartate receptor subunits NR2A/B (anti-NR2A/B) antibodies have been demonstrated in the sera of SLE and SS patients and have been associated with collective or specific NP syndromes, though not consistently. Interpretation of anti-NR2A/B antibody data in the medical literature is rendered difficult by small sample size of patient groups. By combining different studies to generate a pooled effect size, a meta-analysis can increase the power to detect differences in the presence or absence of NP syndromes. Hence, we set out to perform a meta-analysis to assess the association between anti-NR2A/B antibodies and NP syndromes in SLE and SS. A literature search was conducted using PubMed and other databases from inception to June 2016. We abstracted data relating to anti-NR2A/B antibodies from the identified studies. The random effects model was used to calculate overall combined odds ratio (OD) with its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) to evaluate the relationship between anti-NR2A/B antibodies and NP syndromes in SLE and SS patients with and without NP events. We also included our own cohort of 57 SLE patients fulfilling the ACR 1997 revised classification criteria and 58 healthy controls (HCs). In total, 17 studies with data on anti-NR2A/B antibodies in 2212 SLE patients, 66 SS patients, 99 disease controls (DCs) (e.g. antiphospholipid syndrome, myasthenia gravis and autoimmune polyendocrine

  18. Indications for the presence of antibodies cross-reactive with HTLV-I/II, but not HIV, in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möstl, M; Mucke, H; Schinkinger, M; Haushofer, A; Krieger, O; Lutz, D

    1992-10-01

    Serological evidence is presented for the fact that patients with the myelodysplastic syndrome exhibit a statistically significant reactivity in confirmatory assays for antibodies to human T-lymphotropic viruses types I and II (HTLV-I/II). This antibody reactivity, evident by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot, was not confined to HTLV core antigens but extended to native and recombinant envelope glycoproteins. The effect was also observed in cases of acute myeloic leukemia, albeit to a lesser degree. It was essentially absent from patients with chronic myeloic leukemia or lymphocytic leukemias and healthy or multitransfused controls. No antibodies to human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 or 2 were detected in any of the specimens. The investigated clinical population had no known risk factor for retroviral infection other than a history of multiple platelet transfusions, and none of the specimens was seropositive for HTLV-I or HTLV-II according to recommended criteria. The cause of this cross-reactivity remains to be determined.

  19. Co-existence of other copy number variations with 22q11.2 deletion or duplication: a modifier for variable phenotypes of the syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Deling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phenotype in patients with a 22q11.2 deletion or duplication can be extremely variable, and the causes of such as variations are not well known. Results We observed additional copy number variations (CNVs in 2 of 15 cases with a 22q11.2 deletion or duplication. Both cases were newborn babies referred for severe congenital heart defects. The first case had a deletion with a size of approximately 1.56 Mb involving multiple genes including STS in the Xp22.31 region along with a 22q11.2 deletion. The second case had a duplication of 605 kb in the 15q13.3 region encompassing CHRNA7 and a deletion of 209 kb involving the RBFOX1 gene in the 16p13.2 region, in addition to 22q11.2 duplication. Discussion Our observations have shown that additional CNVs are not rare (2/15, 13% in patients with a 22q11.2 deletion or duplication. We speculate that these CNVs may contribute to phenotype variations of 22q11.2 microdeletion/duplication syndromes as genomic modifiers.

  20. Antiphospholipid Antibodies Promote the Release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps: A New Mechanism of Thrombosis in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Gould, Travis J.; Rao, Ashish N.; Mazza, Levi F.; Morris, Alexandra E.; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos; Hernández-Ramírez, Diego; Bockenstedt, Paula L.; Liaw, Patricia C.; Cabral, Antonio R.; Knight, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), especially those targeting beta-2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), are well known to activate endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets, with prothrombotic implications. In contrast, the interaction of aPL with neutrophils has not been extensively studied. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been recognized as an important activator of the coagulation cascade, as well as an integral component of arterial and venous thrombi. Here, we hypothesized that aPL might activate neutrophils to release NETs, thereby predisposing to the arterial and venous thrombosis inherent to the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Methods Neutrophils, sera, and plasma were prepared and characterized from patients with primary APS (n=52), or from healthy volunteers. No patient carried a concomitant diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Results Sera and plasma from patients with primary APS have elevated levels of both cell-free DNA and NETs, as compared to healthy volunteers. Freshly-isolated APS neutrophils are predisposed to high levels of spontaneous NET release. Further, APS-patient sera, as well as IgG purified from APS patients, stimulate NET release from control neutrophils. Human aPL monoclonals, especially those targeting β2GPI, also enhance NET release. The induction of APS NETs can be abrogated with inhibitors of reactive oxygen species formation and toll-like receptor 4 signaling. Highlighting the potential clinical relevance of these findings, APS NETs promote thrombin generation. Conclusion Neutrophil NET release warrants further investigation as a novel therapeutic target in APS. PMID:26097119

  1. Clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) with and without antiphospholipid antibodies (the so-called 'seronegative APS').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Jose Luis; Bertolaccini, Maria Laura; Cuadrado, Maria Jose; Sanna, Giovanni; Ateka-Barrutia, Oier; Khamashta, Munther A

    2012-02-01

    Although the medical literature currently provides a growing number of isolated case reports of patients with clinically well-defined antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and persistently negative antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), there are no studies including a series of patients addressing the clinical features of this condition. The authors assessed clinical manifestations of APS in 154 patients: 87 patients with seropositive APS and 67 patients with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity persistently negative for aPL and presenting with at least two additional non-criteria manifestations of APS (the so-called 'seronegative APS', SN-APS). Patients were interviewed at the time of recruitment, and a retrospective file review was carried out. There were no significant differences in the frequency of thrombotic events or obstetric morbidity in patients with SN-APS versus patients with seropositive APS: deep vein thrombosis (31.4% vs 31.0%), pulmonary embolism (23.8% vs 28.7%), stroke (14.9% vs 17.2%), transient ischaemic attack (11.9% vs 10.3%), early spontaneous abortions (67.1% vs 52.1%), stillbirths (62.5% vs 59.4%), prematurity (28.1% vs 21.7%) or pre-eclampsia (28.1% vs 23.1%). Classic and SN-APS patients show similar clinical profiles. The results suggest that clinical management in patients with APS should not be based only on the presence of conventional aPL.

  2. Antiphospholipid antibodies detected by line immunoassay differentiate among patients with antiphospholipid syndrome, with infections and asymptomatic carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggenbuck, Dirk; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Somma, Valentina; Büttner, Thomas; Schierack, Peter; Hanack, Katja; Grossi, Claudia; Bodio, Caterina; Macor, Paolo; von Landenberg, Philipp; Boccellato, Francesco; Mahler, Michael; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2016-05-21

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) can be detected in asymptomatic carriers and infectious patients. The aim was to investigate whether a novel line immunoassay (LIA) differentiates between antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and asymptomatic aPL+ carriers or patients with infectious diseases (infectious diseases controls (IDC)). Sixty-one patients with APS (56 primary, 22/56 with obstetric events only, and 5 secondary), 146 controls including 24 aPL+ asymptomatic carriers and 73 IDC were tested on a novel hydrophobic solid phase coated with cardiolipin (CL), phosphatic acid, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, beta2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), prothrombin, and annexin V. Samples were also tested by anti-CL and anti-β2GPI ELISAs and for lupus anticoagulant activity. Human monoclonal antibodies (humoAbs) against human β2GPI or PL alone were tested on the same LIA substrates in the absence or presence of human serum, purified human β2GPI or after CL-micelle absorption. Comparison of LIA with the aPL-classification assays revealed good agreement for IgG/IgM aß2GPI and aCL. Anti-CL and anti-ß2GPI IgG/IgM reactivity assessed by LIA was significantly higher in patients with APS versus healthy controls and IDCs, as detected by ELISA. IgG binding to CL and ß2GPI in the LIA was significantly lower in aPL+ carriers and Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test (VDRL) + samples than in patients with APS. HumoAb against domain 1 recognized β2GPI bound to the LIA-matrix and in anionic phospholipid (PL) complexes. Absorption with CL micelles abolished the reactivity of a PL-specific humoAb but did not affect the binding of anti-β2GPI humoAbs. The LIA and ELISA have good agreement in detecting aPL in APS, but the LIA differentiates patients with APS from infectious patients and asymptomatic carriers, likely through the exposure of domain 1.

  3. Antibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) enhanced the diagnostic performance in Chinese patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shulan; Wu, Ziyan; Zhang, Wen; Zhao, Jiuliang; Norman, Gary L; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun; Li, Yongzhe

    2018-03-21

    Increasing evidence has highlighted the role of non-criteria antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) as important supplements to the current criteria aPLs for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). In this retrospective study, we evaluated the clinical relevance of antibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) in Chinese patients with APS. A total of 441 subjects were tested, including 101 patients with primary APS (PAPS), 140 patients with secondary APS (SAPS), 161 disease controls (DCs) and 39 healthy controls (HCs). Serum IgG/IgM aPS/PT was determined by ELISA. The levels of IgG/IgM aPS/PT were significantly increased in patients with APS compared with DCs and HCs. IgG and IgM aPS/PT were present in 29.7% and 54.5% of PAPS, and 42.1% and 53.6% of SAPS, respectively. For diagnosis of APS, IgG aCL exhibited the highest positive likelihood ratio (LR+) of 21.60, followed by LA (13.84), IgG aβ2GP1 (9.19) and IgG aPS/PT (8.49). aPS/PT was detected in 13.3% of seronegative PAPS patients and 31.3% of seronegative SAPS patients. LA exhibited the highest OR of 3.64 in identifying patients with thrombosis, followed by IgG aCL (OR, 2.63), IgG aPS/PT (OR, 2.55) and IgG aβ2GP1 (OR, 2.33). LA and IgG aCL were correlated with both arterial and venous thrombosis, whereas IgG aPS/PT and IgG aβ2GP1 correlated with venous or arterial thrombosis, respectively. Our findings suggest that the inclusion of IgG/IgM aPS/PT may enhance the diagnostic performance for APS, especially in those in whom APS is highly suspected, but conventional aPLs are repeatedly negative. In addition, IgG aPS/PT may contribute to identify patients at risk of thrombosis.

  4. Genetic and genomic basis of antibody response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in gilts and sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serão, Nick V L; Kemp, Robert A; Mote, Benny E; Willson, Philip; Harding, John C S; Bishop, Stephen C; Plastow, Graham S; Dekkers, Jack C M

    2016-07-14

    Our recent research showed that antibody response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), measured as sample-to-positive (S/P) ratio, is highly heritable and has a high genetic correlation with reproductive performance during a PRRS outbreak. Two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) on Sus scrofa chromosome 7 (SSC7; QTLMHC and QTL130) accounted for ~40 % of the genetic variance for S/P. Objectives of this study were to estimate genetic parameters for PRRS S/P in gilts during acclimation, identify regions associated with S/P, and evaluate the accuracy of genomic prediction of S/P across populations with different prevalences of PRRS and using different single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sets. Phenotypes and high-density SNP genotypes of female pigs from two datasets were used. The outbreak dataset included 607 animals from one multiplier herd, whereas the gilt acclimation (GA) dataset included data on 2364 replacement gilts from seven breeding companies placed on health-challenged farms. Genomic prediction was evaluated using GA for training and validation, and using GA for training and outbreak for validation. Predictions were based on SNPs across the genome (SNPAll), SNPs in one (SNPMHC and SNP130) or both (SNPSSC7) QTL, or SNPs outside the QTL (SNPRest). Heritability of S/P in the GA dataset increased with the proportion of PRRS-positive animals in the herd (from 0.28 to 0.47). Genomic prediction accuracies ranged from low to moderate. Average accuracies were highest when using only the 269 SNPs in both QTL regions (SNPSSC7, with accuracies of 0.39 and 0.31 for outbreak and GA validation datasets, respectively. Average accuracies for SNPALL, SNPMHC, SNP130, and SNPRest were, respectively, 0.26, 0.39, 0.21, and 0.05 for the outbreak, and 0.28, 0.25, 0.22, and 0.12, for the GA validation datasets. Moderate genomic prediction accuracies can be obtained for PRRS antibody response using SNPs located within two major QTL on SSC7, while the rest of

  5. Genetics Home Reference: antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Antiphospholipid syndrome Antiphospholipid syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... area? Other Names for This Condition anti-phospholipid syndrome antiphospholipid antibody syndrome Hughes syndrome Related Information How are ...

  6. New epitopes and function of anti-M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antibodies in patients with Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, H; Matsumoto, I; Wakamatsu, E; Nakamura, Y; Iizuka, M; Hayashi, T; Goto, D; Ito, S; Sumida, T

    2010-10-01

    M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) plays a crucial role in the secretion of saliva from salivary glands. It is reported that some patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS) carried inhibitory autoantibodies against M3R. The purpose of this study is to clarify the epitopes and function of anti-M3R antibodies in SS. We synthesized peptides encoding the extracellular domains of human-M3R including the N-terminal region and the first, second and third extracellular loops. Antibodies against these regions were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in sera from 42 SS and 42 healthy controls. For functional analysis, human salivary gland (HSG) cells were preincubated with immunoglobulin G (IgG) separated from sera of anti-M3R antibody-positive SS, -negative SS and controls for 12 h. After loading with Fluo-3, HSG cells were stimulated with cevimeline hydrochloride, and intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations [(Ca(2+) )i] were measured. Antibodies to the N-terminal, first, second and third loops were detected in 42·9% (18 of 42), 47·6% (20 of 42), 54·8% (23 of 42) and 45·2% (19 of 42) of SS, while in 4·8% (two of 42), 7·1% (three of 42), 2·4% (one of 42) and 2·4% (one of 42) of controls, respectively. Antibodies to the second loop positive SS-IgG inhibited the increase of (Ca(2+) )i induced by cevimeline hydrochloride. Antibodies to the N-terminal positive SS-IgG and antibodies to the first loop positive SS-IgG enhanced it, while antibodies to the third loop positive SS-IgG showed no effect on (Ca(2+) )i as well as anti-M3R antibody-negative SS-IgG. Our results indicated the presence of several B cell epitopes on M3R in SS. The influence of anti-M3R antibodies on salivary secretion might differ based on these epitopes. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2010 British Society for Immunology.

  7. The effects of wet cupping on serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and heat shock protein 27 antibody titers in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Seyed Kazem; Gang, Li Zhi; Saghebi, Seyed Ahmad; Mohammadi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Shabnam; Mohammadi, Ghazaleh; Ferns, Gordan A; Ghanbarzadeh, Majid; Razmgah, Gholamreza Ghayour; Ramazani, Zahra; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Esmaily, Habibollah; Bahrami Taghanaki, Hamidreza; Azizi, Hoda

    2014-08-01

    It has previously been reported that increased level of serum heat shock proteins (Hsps) antibody in patients with metabolic syndrome. It is possible that the expression of Hsp and inflammatory markers can be affected by cupping and traditional Chinese medicine. There is a little data investigating the effects of cupping on markers of inflammation and Hsp proteins, hence, the objective of this study was evaluation of the effects of wet cupping on serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and Hsp27 antibody titers in patients with metabolic syndrome. Serum Hs-CRP and Hsp27 antibody titers were assessed in samples from 126 patients with metabolic syndrome (18-65 years of age) at baseline, and after 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. One hundred and twenty-six patients were randomly divided into the experimental group treated with wet cupping combined with dietary advice, and the control group treated with dietary advice alone using a random number table. Eight patients in case group and five subjects in control groups were excluded from the study. Data were analyzed using SPSS 15.0 software and a repeated measure ANCOVA. Serum hs-CRP titers did not change significantly between groups (p>0.05) and times (p=0.27). The same result was found for Hsp27 titers (p>0.05). Wet-cupping on the interscapular region has no effect on serum hs-CRP and Hsp27 patients with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgical Interventions for Organ and Limb Ischemia Associated With Primary and Secondary Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome With Arterial Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Carlos A; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Bermudez-Serrato, Karla; García-Alva, Ramón; Laparra-Escareno, Hugo; Torres-Machorro, Adriana; Lizola, Rene

    2017-11-01

    The association of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) and hypercoagulability is well known. Arterial compromise leading to ischemia of organs and/or limbs in patients with APS is uncommon, frequently unrecognized, and rarely described. We evaluated our institutional experience. Retrospective review was conducted. From August 2007 to September 2016, 807 patients with diagnosis of APS were managed in our Institution. Patients with primary and secondary APS who required interventions were examined. Demographics, comorbidities, manifestations, procedures, complications, and other factors affecting outcomes were recorded. Fourteen patients (mean age 35 years old, standard deviation ±14) were evaluated and treated by our service. Six (43%) of them had primary APS and 8 (57%) had secondary APS; 11 (79%) were female. Two (14%) experienced distal aorta and iliac arteries involvement, 3 (21%) visceral vessels disease, 2 (14%) in upper and 7 (50%) in the lower extremity vasculatures. Thirteen (93%) patients underwent direct open revascularization and 1 with hand ischemia (Raynaud disease) underwent sympathectomy. During the mean follow-up period of 48 months, reinterventions included a revision of the proximal anastomosis of an aortobifemoral bypass graft, 1 (7%) abdominal exploration for bleeding, 1 (7%) graft thrombectomy, and 4 (29%) amputations (2 below the knee, 1 above the knee, and 1 transmetatarsal). One (7%) death occurred secondary to sepsis in a patient who had acute mesenteric ischemia. Significant differences in clinical manifestations and outcomes were not observed among patients with primary and secondary APS. All patients remained on systemic anticoagulation. APS is a prothrombotic disorder that may lead to arterial involvement with less frequency than the venous circulation but has significant morbidity and limb loss rate. Arterial reconstruction seems feasible in an attempt to salvage organs and limbs; however, research is necessary to establish the

  9. The obstetric outcome following treatment in a cohort of patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Dadhwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APAS is regarded as the most frequently acquired risk factor for thrombophilia. The obstetric manifestations of APAS include early or late pregnancy losses and complications like preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction. Its timely diagnosis and treatment can improve maternal and neonatal outcome. Aims: To study the pregnancy outcome of patients with APAS treated with heparin and aspirin. Settings and Design: This was a retrospective study of pregnancy outcome in 42 consecutive women with APAS, treated with heparin and aspirin. Materials and Methods: The case records of 42 diagnosed cases of APAS with pregnancy, over a 3-year period, were studied. The pregnancy outcome in this group was compared before and after treatment with heparin and low-dose aspirin in terms of abortions, intrauterine deaths and live birth rate. The outcome of the present pregnancy in terms of fetal and maternal complications was analyzed. Results: The mean age and average parity of women with APAS were 30.1±4.1 years and 3.2±1.2, respectively. Among the treated patients of APAS, 13 (30.9% had preeclampsia and 9 (21.4% had intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR. There were 2 (4.7% intrauterine deaths, 4 (9.5% missed abortions and 3 (7.1% abruptio placentae. Women with APAS had a live birth rate of 4.6% before treatment and 85.7% in the index pregnancy after treatment. Conclusion: Treatment of pregnant women with APAS results in marked improvement in the live birth rate (4.6-85.7%. However, complications like preeclampsia and IUGR occur even after treatment, requiring strict monitoring and timely delivery.

  10. IgG/IgM antiphospholipid antibodies present in the classification criteria for the antiphospholipid syndrome: a critical review of their association with thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelchtermans, H; Pelkmans, L; de Laat, B; Devreese, K M

    2016-08-01

    Essentials The clinical value of IgM antibodies in thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is debated. By review of literature, we reconsidered the clinical value of IgM antibodies in thrombotic APS. More significant correlations with thrombosis were found for the IgG compared to IgM isotype. Unavailability of paired IgG/IgM results hampers evaluating the added value of IgM positivity. Click to hear Dr de Groot's perspective on antiphospholipid syndrome Background Despite the update of the classification criteria for the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), difficulties persist in the identification of patients at risk for thrombosis. Current guidelines include assays detecting IgG/IgM anti-β2 -glycoprotein I and anti-cardiolipin antibodies, although the relevance of IgM antibodies has been debated. Objectives Through a review of the literature from 2001 to 2014, we aimed to formally establish the thrombotic risk stratification potential of IgM as compared with IgG anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPLs). Patients/methods One thousand two hundred and twenty-eight articles were selected by a computer-assisted search of the literature. Of the 177 studies that met our inclusion criteria, the clinical value of IgG/IgM aPLs was established through analysis of odds ratios for thrombosis or percentage of positives in the thrombotic population. Results/conclusions We clearly found more significant correlations with thrombosis for the IgG than for the IgM isotype. Nonetheless, in a minority of studies, significant associations with thrombosis were found for IgM but not IgG antibodies. The unavailability of paired results of IgG and IgM for each separate patient hampers evaluation of the added value of isolated IgM positivity. To fully take advantage of results obtained by future studies, we strongly encourage scientists to provide all studied information per patient. We planned a large multicenter study to investigate clinical associations of isolated/combined positivity for

  11. Coexistence of neuropeptides in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1983-01-01

    Using a technique for simultaneous visualisation of two antigens in one section, oxytocin-like immunoreactivity has been found to coexist with bombesin-like immunoreactivity in neurons of the basal disk, gastric region and tentacles of hydra. Neurons with oxytocin-like immunoreactivity in peduncle...... and hypostome, on the other hand, have little or no bombesin-like material. Oxytocin-like immunoreactivity never coexists with FMRFamide-immunoreactivity. The neurons with oxytocin- and FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity, however, are often found to be closely intermingled. The results show that coexistence......, as well as non-coexistence, of neuropeptides is a phylogenetically old principle....

  12. Memory, Conviviality and Coexistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duru, Deniz Neriman

    2016-01-01

    that postulates cohesion and conflict as rooted in ethnic and religious differences. It suggests ‘conviviality’ as the production of space, by arguing that hard times, tensions as well as sensorial pleasures produce a sense of belonging in a place, through shared ways of living. While memories of ‘coexistence......The article explores the narratives and memories of past diversity and current practices of conviviality to investigate how class, lifestyle and tastes affect the daily interactions between people belonging to different ethno-religious backgrounds. This chapter critiques ‘coexistence’ as a concept......’ emphasize the fragmentation of people into ethnic and religious groups as a consequence of the homogenization process in the post-Ottoman Turkish context, bitter sweet memories of conviviality create a sense of belonging to Burgaz....

  13. Estimating Parameters Related to the Lifespan of Passively Transferred and Vaccine-Induced Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Type I Antibodies by Modeling Field Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Andraud

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The outputs of epidemiological models are strongly related to the structure of the model and input parameters. The latter are defined by fitting theoretical concepts to actual data derived from field or experimental studies. However, some parameters may remain difficult to estimate and are subject to uncertainty or sensitivity analyses to determine their variation range and their global impact on model outcomes. As such, the evaluation of immunity duration is often a puzzling issue requiring long-term follow-up data that are, most of time, not available. The present analysis aims at characterizing the kinetics of antibodies against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv from longitudinal data sets. The first data set consisted in the serological follow-up of 22 vaccinated gilts during 21 weeks post-vaccination (PV. The second one gathered the maternally derived antibodies (MDAs kinetics in piglets from three different farms up to 14 weeks of age. The peak of the PV serological response against PRRSv was reached 6.9 weeks PV on average with an average duration of antibodies persistence of 26.5 weeks. In the monitored cohort of piglets, the duration of passive immunity was found relatively short, with an average duration of 4.8 weeks. The level of PRRSv-MDAs was found correlated with the dams’ antibody titer at birth, and the antibody persistence was strongly related to the initial MDAs titers in piglets. These results evidenced the importance of PRRSv vaccination schedule in sows, to optimize the delivery of antibodies to suckling piglets. These estimates of the duration of active and passive immunity could be further used as input parameters of epidemiological models to analyze their impact on the persistence of PRRSv within farms.

  14. Estimating Parameters Related to the Lifespan of Passively Transferred and Vaccine-Induced Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Type I Antibodies by Modeling Field Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraud, Mathieu; Fablet, Christelle; Renson, Patricia; Eono, Florent; Mahé, Sophie; Bourry, Olivier; Rose, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    The outputs of epidemiological models are strongly related to the structure of the model and input parameters. The latter are defined by fitting theoretical concepts to actual data derived from field or experimental studies. However, some parameters may remain difficult to estimate and are subject to uncertainty or sensitivity analyses to determine their variation range and their global impact on model outcomes. As such, the evaluation of immunity duration is often a puzzling issue requiring long-term follow-up data that are, most of time, not available. The present analysis aims at characterizing the kinetics of antibodies against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) from longitudinal data sets. The first data set consisted in the serological follow-up of 22 vaccinated gilts during 21 weeks post-vaccination (PV). The second one gathered the maternally derived antibodies (MDAs) kinetics in piglets from three different farms up to 14 weeks of age. The peak of the PV serological response against PRRSv was reached 6.9 weeks PV on average with an average duration of antibodies persistence of 26.5 weeks. In the monitored cohort of piglets, the duration of passive immunity was found relatively short, with an average duration of 4.8 weeks. The level of PRRSv-MDAs was found correlated with the dams' antibody titer at birth, and the antibody persistence was strongly related to the initial MDAs titers in piglets. These results evidenced the importance of PRRSv vaccination schedule in sows, to optimize the delivery of antibodies to suckling piglets. These estimates of the duration of active and passive immunity could be further used as input parameters of epidemiological models to analyze their impact on the persistence of PRRSv within farms.

  15. Estimating Parameters Related to the Lifespan of Passively Transferred and Vaccine-Induced Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Type I Antibodies by Modeling Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraud, Mathieu; Fablet, Christelle; Renson, Patricia; Eono, Florent; Mahé, Sophie; Bourry, Olivier; Rose, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    The outputs of epidemiological models are strongly related to the structure of the model and input parameters. The latter are defined by fitting theoretical concepts to actual data derived from field or experimental studies. However, some parameters may remain difficult to estimate and are subject to uncertainty or sensitivity analyses to determine their variation range and their global impact on model outcomes. As such, the evaluation of immunity duration is often a puzzling issue requiring long-term follow-up data that are, most of time, not available. The present analysis aims at characterizing the kinetics of antibodies against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) from longitudinal data sets. The first data set consisted in the serological follow-up of 22 vaccinated gilts during 21 weeks post-vaccination (PV). The second one gathered the maternally derived antibodies (MDAs) kinetics in piglets from three different farms up to 14 weeks of age. The peak of the PV serological response against PRRSv was reached 6.9 weeks PV on average with an average duration of antibodies persistence of 26.5 weeks. In the monitored cohort of piglets, the duration of passive immunity was found relatively short, with an average duration of 4.8 weeks. The level of PRRSv-MDAs was found correlated with the dams’ antibody titer at birth, and the antibody persistence was strongly related to the initial MDAs titers in piglets. These results evidenced the importance of PRRSv vaccination schedule in sows, to optimize the delivery of antibodies to suckling piglets. These estimates of the duration of active and passive immunity could be further used as input parameters of epidemiological models to analyze their impact on the persistence of PRRSv within farms. PMID:29435455

  16. Seroprevalance Anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in children and adolescents with tourette syndrome/chronic motor or vocal tic disorder: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaltun, İsmail; Kara, Tayfun; Sertan Kara, Soner; Ayaydın, Hamza

    2018-05-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection may be associated with psychiatric disorders due to its neurological effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between tic disorders in children and adolescents and Anti-Toxoplasma IgG. 43 children diagnosed with Tourette's syndrome(TS) and 87 with chronic motor or vocal tic disorder(CMVTD), and 130 healthy volunteers, all aged 7-18, were enrolled. Anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody levels obtained from blood specimens were investigated. Toxoplasma IgG positivity was determined in 16(37.2%) of the patients with TS, in 27(31%) of those with CMVTD and in 12(9.2%) members of the control group. Anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibody positivity was 5.827-fold higher in subjects with TS and 4.425-fold higher in subjects with CMVTD compared to the control group. Correlation was determined between a diagnosis of TS or CMVTD and Anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies. We think that it will be useful for the neuropsychiatric process associated with Anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies to be clarified. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of TLR4 on B Cell Activation and Anti-β2GPI Antibody Production in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High titer of anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-β2GPI Ab plays a pathogenic role in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS. Numerous studies have focused on the pathological mechanism in APS; however, little attention is paid to the immune mechanism of production of anti-β2GPI antibodies in APS. Our previous study demonstrated that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 plays a vital role in the maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs from the mice immunized with human β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI. TLR4 is required for the activation of B cells and the production of autoantibody in mice treated with β2GPI. However, TLR4 provides a third signal for B cell activation and then promotes B cells better receiving signals from both B cell antigen receptor (BCR and CD40, thus promoting B cell activation, surface molecules expression, anti-β2GPI Ab production, and cytokines secretion and making B cell functioning like an antigen presenting cell (APC. At the same time, TLR4 also promotes B cells producing antibodies by upregulating the expression of B-cell activating factor (BAFF. In this paper, we aim to review the functions of TLR4 in B cell immune response and antibody production in autoimmune disease APS and try to find a new way for the prevention and treatment of APS.

  18. Guillain-Barré Syndrome: A Variant Consisting of Facial Diplegia and Paresthesia with Left Facial Hemiplegia Associated with Antibodies to Galactocerebroside and Phosphatidic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Sho; Branch, Joel; Tsuchiya, Tsubasa; Ito, Ryoji; Kawada, Junya

    2017-10-02

    BACKGROUND A rare variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) consists of facial diplegia and paresthesia, but an even more rare association is with facial hemiplegia, similar to Bell's palsy. This case report is of this rare variant of GBS that was associated with IgG antibodies to galactocerebroside and phosphatidic acid. CASE REPORT A 54-year-old man presented with lower left facial palsy and paresthesia of his extremities, following an upper respiratory tract infection. Physical examination confirmed lower left facial palsy and paresthesia of his extremities with hyporeflexia of his lower limbs and sensory loss of all four extremities. The differential diagnosis was between a variant of GBS and Bell's palsy. Following initial treatment with glucocorticoids followed by intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), his sensory abnormalities resolved. Serum IgG antibodies to galactocerebroside and phosphatidic acid were positive in this patient, but not other antibodies to glycolipids or phospholipids were found. Five months following discharge from hospital, his left facial palsy had improved. CONCLUSIONS A case of a rare variant of GBS is presented with facial diplegia and paresthesia and with unilateral facial palsy. This rare variant of GBS may which may mimic Bell's palsy. In this case, IgG antibodies to galactocerebroside and phosphatidic acid were detected.

  19. Lack of IgG antibody seropositivity to Borrelia burgdorferi in patients with Parry-Romberg syndrome and linear morphea en coup de sabre in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gómez, Claudia; Godínez-Hana, Ana L; García-Hernández, Marisela; Suárez-Roa, María de Lourdes; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia; Vega-Memije, Elisa; Gutiérrez-Mendoza, Daniela; Pérez-Dosal, Marcia; Medina-De la Garza, Carlos E

    2014-08-01

    Progressive hemifacial atrophy or Parry-Romberg Syndrome (PRS) is a rare, acquired, progressive dysplasia of subcutaneous tissue and bone characterized by unilateral facial involvement. Its etiology is unknown, but theories about its pathogenesis include infectious, degenerative, autoimmune, and traumatic causes among others. The causal relationship of PRS and linear morphea en coup de sabre (LMCS) with Borrelia burgdorferi infection remains controversial. Our goal was to serologically determine anti-B. burgdorferi antibodies in patients diagnosed with PRS and LMCS to establish a possible association as a causative agent. We conducted a serology study with patients belonging to a group of 21 individuals diagnosed with PRS, six with LMCS, and 21 matched controls. Anti-Borrelia IgG antibodies were determined by ELISA. A descriptive statistical analysis and Fischer's exact test were done. In serological tests, only two cases had borderline values and were further analyzed by Western blot with non-confirmatory results. For both the PRS and LMCS group, the association test was not significant, suggesting a lack of association between PRS or LMCS and the presence of anti-Borrelia antibodies. In Mexico there are no previous studies on Borrelia infection and its relationship between PRS or LMCS. Our result showed a lack of association of either clinical entities with anti-Borrelia-antibodies. Former reports of this association may suggest coincidental findings without causal relationship. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  20. Antecedent infections and anti-ganglioside antibodies in Guillain-Barré syndrome : their role in pathogenesis and heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Jacobs (Bart)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is the most common form of acute neuromuscular paralysis in developed countries, but the pathogenesis is still largely unknown. The major clinical features of the syndrome were first united by J-B.O. Landry in 1859 (1). The syndrome was named after G.

  1. Paraneoplastic chronic demyelinating neuropathy and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome associated with multiple anti-neural antibodies and small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozsa, Csilla; Vincent, Angela; Aranyi, Zsuzsanna; Kovacs, Gabor G; Komoly, Samuel; Illes, Zsolt

    2008-09-30

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) developed in a patient with presumed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and negative chest CT. Since antibodies against both Hu and voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) were detected, repeated chest CT was performed, which eventually showed a pulmonary mass lesion. Biopsy revealed small cell lung cancer (SCLC) indicating the importance of repeated chest CT in LEMS even when an existing autoimmune-like disease and negative CT may suggest an autoimmune origin. This is the first report of paraneoplastic CIDP and LEMS associated with anti-Hu, anti-VGCC and SCLC.

  2. Guillain-Barré syndrome variant with facial diplegia and paresthesias associated with IgM anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ryuichiro; Yamaguchi, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 19-year-old woman with facial diplegia and paresthesias (FDP) preceded by flu-like symptoms. We diagnosed the patient with a regional variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome due to decreased tendon reflexes, albuminocytological dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid and demyelinating features on nerve conduction studies. The patient also had IgM anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies, and treatment with glucocorticoids was effective for treating the facial diplegia, but not paresthesia. Therefore, facial palsy may have a different pathophysiology from paresthesia or other symptoms of FDP, which responds to glucocorticoid therapy.

  3. Anti-protein C antibodies are associated with resistance to endogenous protein C activation and a severe thrombotic phenotype in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchillage, D R J; Efthymiou, M; Mackie, I J; Lawrie, A S; Machin, S J; Cohen, H

    2014-11-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies may interfere with the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C (APC) to induce acquired APC resistance (APCr). To investigate the frequency and characteristics of APCr by using recombinant human APC (rhAPC) and endogenous protein C activation in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). APCr was assessed in APS and non-APS venous thromboembolism (VTE) patients on warfarin and normal controls with rhAPC or Protac by thrombin generation. IgG anti-protein C and anti-protein S antibodies and avidity were assessed by ELISA. APS patients showed greater resistance to both rhAPC and Protac than non-APS patients and normal controls (median normalized endogenous thrombin potential inhibition): APS patients with rhAPC, 81.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 75.2-88.3%; non-APS patients with rhAPC, 97.7% (95% CI 93.6-101.8%; APS patients with Protac, 66.0% (95% CI 59.5-72.6%); and non-APS patients with Protac, 80.7 (95% CI 74.2-87.2%). APS patients also had a higher frequency and higher levels of anti-protein C antibodies, with 60% (15/25) high-avidity antibodies. High-avidity anti-protein C antibodies were associated with greater APCr and with a severe thrombotic phenotype (defined as the development of recurrent VTE while patients were receiving therapeutic anticoagulation or both venous and arterial thrombosis). Twelve of 15 (80%) patients with high-avidity anti-protein C antibodies were classified as APS category I. Thrombotic APS patients showed greater APCr to both rhAPC and activation of endogenous protein C by Protac. High-avidity anti-protein C antibodies, associated with greater APCr, may provide a marker for a severe thrombotic phenotype in APS. However, in patients with category I APS, it remains to be established whether anti-protein C or anti-β2 -glycoprotein I antibodies are responsible for APCr. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. Anti-prothrombin (aPT) and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) antibodies and the risk of thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciascia, Savino; Sanna, Giovanni; Murru, Veronica; Roccatello, Dario; Khamashta, Munther A; Bertolaccini, Maria Laura

    2014-02-01

    Antibodies to prothrombin are detected by directly coating prothrombin on irradiated ELISA plates (aPT) or by using the phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex as antigen (aPS/PT). Although these antibodies have both been associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and a correlation between the two assays have been reported, it seems that aPT and aPS/PT belong to different populations of autoantibodies. It was our objective to systematically review the available evidence on aPT and aPS/PT antibodies and the risk of thrombosis in APS. Medline-reports published between 1988 and 2013 investigating aPT and aPS/PT as a risk factor for thrombosis were included. Whenever possible, antibody isotype(s) and site of thrombosis were analysed. This systematic review is based on available data from more than 7,000 patients and controls from 38 studies analysing aPT and 10 aPS/PT. Antibodies to prothrombin (both aPT and aPS/PT) increased the risk of thrombosis (odds ratio [OR] 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.72-3.5). aPS/PT seemed to represent a stronger risk factor for thrombosis, both arterial and/or venous than aPT (OR 5.11; 95%CI 4.2-6.3 and OR 1.82; 95%CI 1.44-2.75, respectively). In conclusion, routine measurement of aPS/PT (but not aPT) might be useful in establishing the thrombotic risk of patients with previous thrombosis and/or systemic lupus erythematosus. Their inclusion as laboratory criteria for the APS should be indisputably further explored.

  5. Sero-prevalence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) specific antibodies in Dromedary Camels in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrath, Rafik; Duhier, Faisel M Abu

    2018-04-16

    The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel Coronavirus which was responsible of the first case of human acute respiratory syndrome in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), 2012. Dromedary camels are considered as potential reservoirs for the virus and seem to be the only animal host which may transmit the infection to human. Further studies are required to better understand the animal sources of zoonotic transmission route and the risks of this infection. A primary sero-prevalence study of MERS-CoV preexisting neutralizing antibodies in Dromedary camel serum was conducted in Tabuk, western north region of KSA, in order to assess the seopositivity of these animals and to explain their possible role in the transmission of the infection to Human. One hundred seventy one (171) serum samples were collected from healthy dromedary camels with different ages and genders in Tabuk city and tested for specific serum IgG by ELISA using the receptor-binding S1 subunits of spike proteins of MERS-CoV. 144 (84,21%) of the total camel sera shown the presence of protein-specific antibodies against MERS-CoV. These results may provide evidence that MERS-CoV has previously infected dromedary camels in Tabuk and may support the possible role of camels in the human infection. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. The relative abundance of deer mice with antibody to Sin Nombre virus corresponds to the occurrence of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in nearby humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisher, Charles H; Mills, James N; Root, Jon Jeffrey; Doty, Jeffrey B; Beaty, Barry J

    2011-05-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV) is the principal cause of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the United States and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are its principal rodent host, and thus the natural cycle of the virus is related to the occurrence of HPS. Prevalence of rodent infection appears to be associated with fluctuations in deer mouse populations and, indirectly, with timing and amount of precipitation, a complex of biologic events. Given that rodent population abundances fluctuate, often acutely, it is not unreasonable to assume a direct correlation between the numbers of infected rodents and the number of human infections, unless confounding factors are involved. During a 13-year longitudinal study at a site in southwestern Colorado, we accumulated data regarding deer mice and antibody to SNV and therefore had the opportunity to compare dynamics of deer mouse populations, seroprevalence of antibody to SNV in the rodents, and numbers of HPS cases in Durango and in the State of Colorado as a whole. If abundances of deer mouse populations are directly correlated with occurrence of HPS, it is reasonable to assume that low densities of deer mice and low prevalences of antibody to SNV would lead to fewer human cases than would high densities and high prevalences. Our results substantiate such an assumption and suggest that the risk of acquisition of HPS is likely related to both high numbers of infected deer mice and human activities, rather than being strictly related to prevalence of SNV in the host rodent.

  7. Association of Anti-GT1a Antibodies with an Outbreak of Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Analysis of Ganglioside Mimicry in an Associated Campylobacter jejuni Strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maojun Zhang

    Full Text Available An outbreak of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, subsequent to Campylobacter jejuni enteritis, occurred in China in 2007. Serum anti-ganglioside antibodies were measured in GBS patients and controls. Genome sequencing was used to determine the phylogenetic relationship among three C. jejuni strains from a patient with GBS (ICDCCJ07001, a patient with gastroenteritis (ICDCCJ07002 and a healthy carrier (ICDCCJ07004, which were all associated with the outbreak. The ganglioside-like structures of the lipo-oligosaccharides of these strains were determined by mass spectrometry. Seventeen (53% of the GBS patients had anti-GT1a IgG antibodies. GT1a mimicry was found in the lipo-oligosaccharides of strain ICDCCJ07002 and ICDCCJ07004; but a combination of GM3/GD3 mimics was observed in ICDCCJ07001, although this patient had anti-GT1a IgG antibodies. A single-base deletion in a glycosyltransferase gene caused the absence of GT1a mimicry in ICDCCJ07001. The phylogenetic tree showed that ICDCCJ07002 and ICDCCJ07004 were genetically closer to each other than to ICDCCJ07001. C. jejuni, bearing a GT1a-like lipo-oligosaccharide, might have caused the GBS outbreak and the loss of GT1a mimicry may have helped ICDCCJ07001 to survive in the host.

  8. Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1-Mediated Toxicity Inhibited by Neutralizing Antibodies Late in the Course of Continual in Vivo and in Vitro Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Stich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxic shock syndrome (TSS results from the host’s overwhelming inflammatory response and cytokine storm mainly due to superantigens (SAgs. There is no effective specific therapy. Application of immunoglobulins has been shown to improve the outcome of the disease and to neutralize SAgs both in vivo and in vitro. However, in most experiments that have been performed, antiserum was either pre-incubated with SAg, or both were applied simultaneously. To mirror more closely the clinical situation, we applied a multiple dose (over five days lethal challenge in a rabbit model. Treatment with toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1 neutralizing antibody was fully protective, even when administered late in the course of the challenge. Kinetic studies on the effect of superantigen toxins are scarce. We performed in vitro kinetic studies by neutralizing the toxin with antibodies at well-defined time points. T-cell activation was determined by assessing T-cell proliferation (3H-thymidine incorporation, determination of IL-2 release in the cell supernatant (ELISA, and IL-2 gene activation (real-time PCR (RT-PCR. Here we show that T-cell activation occurs continuously. The application of TSST-1 neutralizing antiserum reduced IL-2 and TNFα release into the cell supernatant, even if added at later time points. Interference with the prolonged stimulation of proinflammatory cytokines is likely to be in vivo relevant, as postexposure treatment protected rabbits against the multiple dose lethal SAg challenge. Our results shed new light on the treatment of TSS by specific antibodies even at late stages of exposure.

  9. Phenotypic Plasticity and Species Coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Martin M; Levine, Jonathan M

    2016-10-01

    Ecologists are increasingly interested in predicting how intraspecific variation and changing trait values impact species interactions and community composition. For many traits, much of this variation is caused by phenotypic plasticity, and thus the impact of plasticity on species coexistence deserves robust quantification. Partly due to a lack of sound theoretical expectations, empirical studies make contradictory claims regarding plasticity effects on coexistence. Our critical review of this literature, framed in modern coexistence theory, reveals that plasticity affects species interactions in ways that could impact stabilizing niche differences and competitive asymmetries. However, almost no study integrates these measures to quantify the net effect of plasticity on species coexistence. To address this challenge, we outline novel empirical approaches grounded in modern theory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Netrin-1 receptor antibodies in thymoma-associated neuromyotonia with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Vega, Estefanía; Mancheño, Nuria; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Chumillas, María J; Moris, Germán; Joubert, Bastien; Honnorat, Jérôme; Sevilla, Teresa; Vílchez, Juan J; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Bataller, Luis

    2017-03-28

    To identify cell-surface antibodies in patients with neuromyotonia and to describe the main clinical implications. Sera of 3 patients with thymoma-associated neuromyotonia and myasthenia gravis were used to immunoprecipitate and characterize neuronal cell-surface antigens using reported techniques. The clinical significance of antibodies against precipitated proteins was assessed with sera of 98 patients (neuromyotonia 46, myasthenia gravis 52, thymoma 42; 33 of them with overlapping syndromes) and 219 controls (other neurologic diseases, cancer, and healthy volunteers). Immunoprecipitation studies identified 3 targets, including the Netrin-1 receptors DCC (deleted in colorectal carcinoma) and UNC5A (uncoordinated-5A) as well as Caspr2 (contactin-associated protein-like 2). Cell-based assays with these antigens showed that among the indicated patients, 9 had antibodies against Netrin-1 receptors (7 with additional Caspr2 antibodies) and 5 had isolated Caspr2 antibodies. Only one of the 219 controls had isolated Caspr2 antibodies with relapsing myelitis episodes. Among patients with neuromyotonia and/or myasthenia gravis, the presence of Netrin-1 receptor or Caspr2 antibodies predicted thymoma ( p thymoma, myasthenia gravis, and neuromyotonia, often with Morvan syndrome ( p = 0.009). Expression of DCC, UNC5A, and Caspr2 proteins was demonstrated in paraffin-embedded thymoma samples (3) and normal thymus. Antibodies against Netrin-1 receptors (DCC and UNC5a) and Caspr2 often coexist and associate with thymoma in patients with neuromyotonia and myasthenia gravis. This study provides Class III evidence that antibodies against Netrin-1 receptors can identify patients with thymoma (sensitivity 21.4%, specificity 100%). © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Clinical Application of Revised Laboratory Classification Criteria for Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: Is the Follow-Up Interval of 12 Weeks Instead of 6 Weeks Significantly Useful?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hyuk Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. According to revised classification criteria of true antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, at least one of three antiphospholipid antibodies should be present on two or more occasions at least 12 weeks apart. However, it can be inconvenient to perform follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. We investigated clinical application of follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. Method. Totals of 67, 199, and 332 patients tested positive initially for the lupus anticoagulants confirm, the anti-β2 glycoprotein-I antibody, and the anti-cardiolipin antibody test, respectively, from Jan 2007 to Jul 2009. We investigated clinical symptoms of patients, follow-up interval, and results of each test. Results. Among patients with initial test positive, 1.5%–8.5% were subjected to follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks. Among 25 patients with negative conversion in tests, patients with interval of more than 12 weeks showed clinical symptom positivity of 33.3%, which was higher than that of 12.5% with 6–12 weeks. Among 34 patients with persistent test positive, clinical symptoms positivity trended to be more evident in patients at interval of 6–12 weeks (47.4% versus 26.7%, P=0.191 than more than 12 weeks. Conclusion. Less than 10% of patients with initial test positive had follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks and the patients with persistent test positive at interval of more than 12 weeks showed trends toward having lower clinical symptoms than 6–12 weeks. More research is needed focused on the evidence that follow-up test at interval of more than 12 weeks should be performed instead of 6 weeks.

  12. Comparison of serum and oral fluid antibody responses after vaccination with a modified live (MLV) porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PPRSV) vaccine in PRRS endemic farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiek, Ah Meng; Ooi, Peck Toung; Yong, Chiun Khang; Ng, Chi Foon

    2015-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a disease that is both highly contagious and of great economic importance in Malaysia. Therefore, reliable and improved diagnostic methods are needed to facilitate disease surveillance. This study compared PRRSV antibody responses in oral fluid versus serum samples following PRRS modified live (MLV) vaccination using commercial antibody ELISA kits (IDEXX Laboratories, Inc.). The study involved two pig farms located in Perak and Selangor, Malaysia. Both farms were vaccinated with PRRS MLV 1 month prior to sample collection. Thirty-five animals were used as subjects in each farm. These 35 animals were divided into 7 different categories: gilts, young sows, old sows, and four weaner groups. Oral fluid and serum samples were collected from these animals individually. In addition, pen oral fluid samples were collected from weaner groups. The oral fluid and serum samples were tested with IDEXX PRRS Oral Fluid Antibody Test Kit and IDEXX PRRS X3 Antibody Test Kit, respectively. The results were based on sample to positive ratio (S/P ratio of the samples). Results revealed a significant and positive correlation between serum and oral fluid samples for both farm A (p = 0.0001, r = 0.681) and farm B (p = 0.0001, r = 0.601). In general, oral fluids provided higher S/P results than serum, but the patterns of response were highly similar, especially for the sow groups. Thus, the use of oral fluids in endemic farms is effective and economical, particularly for large herds. In conclusion, the authors strongly recommend the use of oral fluids for PRRS monitoring in endemic farms.

  13. Coexisting diseases of moyamoya vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yi-Chia; Liu, Chi-Hung; Chang, Ting-Yu; Chin, Shy-Chyi; Chang, Chien-Hung; Huang, Kuo-Lun; Chang, Yeu-Jhy; Peng, Tsung-I; Lee, Tsong-Hai

    2014-07-01

    Several coexisting diseases have been reported in patients with moyamoya vasculopathy (MMV), but studies of quasi-moyamoya disease (quasi-MMD) are rare. This study aims to investigate the frequency of known coexisting diseases in patients with quasi-MMD and to compare quasi-MMD with moyamoya disease (MMD). Between 2000 and 2011, we retrospectively screened patients with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code of 4375 (MMD) in the Health Information System of our hospital. The vascular images of each patient were confirmed by 2 neurologists and 1 neuroradiologist based on the diagnostic criteria of Japan Ministry of Health and Welfare. We excluded the patients with missing images and erroneous diagnosis. Demographics, coexisting diseases, laboratory data, treatment, and recurrent strokes were recorded. The eligible patients were divided into quasi-MMD and MMD groups according to the presence or absence of coexisting diseases. MMV was found in 90 patients including 37 (41.1%) quasi-MMD and 53 (58.9%) MMD. Atherosclerosis (32.4%) and thyroid disease (29.7%) were the leading coexisting diseases in quasi-MMD. Patients with MMD became symptomatic in a bimodal age distribution, whereas patients with quasi-MMD became symptomatic in a single-peak distribution. The prognosis of recurrent strokes was similar between quasi-MMD and MMD based on Kaplan-Meier analysis. A bimodal distribution of onset age was noted in MMD, whereas a single-peak distribution was found in quasi-MMD. Coexisting diseases were usually underevaluated but were more common than expected in patients with MMV. Atherosclerosis and thyroid diseases were the leading coexisting diseases in different preferential age. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of a blocking ELISA for screening of antibodies against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.J.; Bøtner, Anette; Madsen, E.S.

    1997-01-01

    A blocking Elisa was developed for the detection of antibodies against PRRS virus with a view to satisfying the need for examination of blood samples on a large scale. The test was evaluated in comparison with an indirect Elisa and the immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. The blocking Elisa was sens......A blocking Elisa was developed for the detection of antibodies against PRRS virus with a view to satisfying the need for examination of blood samples on a large scale. The test was evaluated in comparison with an indirect Elisa and the immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. The blocking Elisa...

  15. Anti-basal ganglia antibodies and Tourette's syndrome: a voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging study in an adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, D; Draganski, B; Cavanna, A; Church, A; Defazio, G; Robertson, M M; Frackowiak, R S J; Giovannoni, G; Critchley, H D

    2008-07-01

    Anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGAs) have been suggested to be a hallmark of autoimmunity in Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (GTS), possibly related to prior exposure to streptococcal infection. In order to detect whether the presence of ABGAs was associated with subtle structural changes in GTS, whole-brain analysis using independent sets of T(1) and diffusion tensor imaging MRI-based methods were performed on 22 adults with GTS with (n = 9) and without (n = 13) detectable ABGAs in the serum. Voxel-based morphometry analysis failed to detect any significant difference in grey matter density between ABGA-positive and ABGA-negative groups in caudate nuclei, putamina, thalami and frontal lobes. These results suggest that ABGA synthesis is not related to structural changes in grey and white matter (detectable with these methods) within frontostriatal circuits.

  16. [Head drop syndrome in a patient with immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy with anti-signal recognition particle antibody: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushimura, Yukie; Shiga, Kensuke; Mukai, Mao; Yoshida, Masakatu; Mizuno, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    We report an 87-year-old female patient who presented a dropped head and progressive weakness in proximal muscles over five months. The value of serum creatine kinase was 2,708 IU/l and the antibody against signal recognition particle (SRP) was detected by means of immunoprecipitation. The computed tomography of skeletal muscles revealed atrophy and fatty degeneration preferentially in the neck extensors and paraspinal muscles. The biopsied specimen of the deltoid muscle showed necrotic fibers scattered in fascicles with marked myophagia. The mononuclear cells in necrotic fibers were positive against CD68, leading to the diagnosis of immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. We hypothesize that a group of patients with necrotizing myopathy can present a preferential involvement in neck extensors resulting in dropped head syndrome.

  17. Optimisation of sandwich ELISA based on monoclonal antibodies for the specific measurement of pregnancy-associated plasma protein (PAPP-A) in acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossen, Marie; Iversen, Kasper; Teisner, Ane

    2007-01-01

    with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aims of the present study were to demonstrate (i) the importance of antibody specificity, (ii) the potential pitfalls in changing assay technology, (iii) the importance of strict definition of technology, and (iv) the application of a well-defined assay technology......-A RIA and the WHO reference preparation (WHO 78/610). Results different from those obtained by the original RIA led to ELISA modifications with respect to dilution buffer and enzymatic digestion of the Mab. RESULTS: The first generation ELISA revealed serum measurements from a pool of non-pregnant (n......=103) individuals which, compared to the RIA, seemed to be false positive. The false positive reaction was abolished by addition of bovine serum (BS) to the dilution buffer. Subsequent analysis of individual sera (n=103) indicated that 7/103 were still false positive. This reaction was eliminated...

  18. Secondary infection as a risk factor for dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome: an historical perspective and role of antibody-dependent enhancement of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Maria G; Alvarez, Mayling; Halstead, Scott B

    2013-07-01

    Today, dengue viruses are the most prevalent arthropod-borne viruses in the world. Since the 1960s, numerous reports have identified a second heterologous dengue virus (DENV) infection as a principal risk factor for severe dengue disease (dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, DHF/DSS). Modifiers of dengue disease response include the specific sequence of two DENV infections, the interval between infections, and contributions from the human host, such as age, ethnicity, chronic illnesses and genetic background. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection has been proposed as the early mechanism underlying DHF/DSS. Dengue cross-reactive antibodies raised following a first dengue infection combine with a second infecting virus to form infectious immune complexes that enter Fc-receptor-bearing cells. This results in an increased number of infected cells and increased viral output per cell. At the late illness stage, high levels of cytokines, possibly the result of T cell elimination of infected cells, result in vascular permeability, leading to shock and death. This review is focused on the etiological role of secondary infections (SI) and mechanisms of ADE.

  19. Coexistence of diabetes mellitus type 1 with diffuse systemic sclerosis - case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielosz, Ewa; Kurowska, Maria; Suszek, Dorota; Majdan, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic sclerodactyly is a frequently recognized skin finding that may occur in patients with diabetes mellitus but coexistence of diabetes and systemic sclerosis is rare. We describe a case of coexistence of type 1 diabetes mellitus and systemic sclerosis in 42-year-old man with the history of Raynaud's phenomenon, progressive diffuse hardening of the skin and sclerodactyly, slowly worsening with time. The medical history included type 1 diabetes since childhood with microvascular complications. The patient presented a typical capillaroscopic scleroderma-like pattern, antinuclear antibodies and sclerotic lesions in gastrointestinal system. Summing up, our case represents the rare coexistence of autoimmune diseases like diabetes mellitus type 1 and systemic sclerosis.

  20. Antibodies Against β2-Glycoprotein I Complexed With an Oxidised Lipoprotein Relate to Intima Thickening of Carotid Arteries in Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. J. Ames

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore whether antibodies against β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI complexed to 7-ketocholesteryl-9-carboxynonanoate (oxLig-1 and to oxidised low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL relate to paraoxonase activity (PONa and/or intima media thickness (IMT of carotid arteries in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS. As many as 29 thrombotic patients with PAPS, 10 subjects with idiopathic antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL without thrombosis, 17 thrombotic patients with inherited thrombophilia and 23 healthy controls were investigated. The following were measured in all participants: β2GPI−oxLDL complexes, IgG anti-β2GPI−oxLig-1, IgG anti-β2GPI−oxLDL antibodies (ELISA, PONa, (para-nitrophenol method, IMT of common carotid (CC artery, carotid bifurcation (B, internal carotid (IC by high resolution sonography. β2GPI−oxLDL complex was highest in the control group (p < 0.01, whereas, IgG anti-β2GPI−oxLig1 and IgG anti-β2GPI−oxLDL were highest in PAPS (p < 0.0001. In healthy controls, β2GPI−oxLDL complexes positively correlated to IMT of the IC (p = 0.007 and negatively to PONa after correction for age (p < 0.03. PONa inversely correlated with age (p = 0.008. In PAPS, IgG anti-2GPI−oxLig-1 independently predicted PONa (p = 0.02 and IMT of B (p = 0.003, CC, (p = 0.03 and of IC (p = 0.04. In PAPS, PONa inversely correlated to the IMT of B, CC and IC (p = 0.01, 0.02 and 0.003, respectively. IgG anti-2GPI−oxLig-1 may be involved in PAPS related atherogenesis via decreased PON activity.

  1. Antibody Response to Shiga Toxins in Argentinean Children with Enteropathic Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome at Acute and Long-Term Follow-Up Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Brando, Romina J.; Bentancor, Leticia V.; Mejías, María Pilar; Ramos, María Victoria; Exeni, Andrea; Exeni, Claudia; Laso, María del Carmen; Exeni, Ramón; Isturiz, Martín A.; Palermo, Marina S.

    2011-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection is associated with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations that include diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Systemic Stx toxemia is considered to be central to the genesis of HUS. Distinct methods have been used to evaluate anti-Stx response for immunodiagnostic or epidemiological analysis of HUS cases. The development of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot (WB) assay to detect the presence of specific antibodies to Stx has introduced important advantages for serodiagnosis of HUS. However, application of these methods for seroepidemiological studies in Argentina has been limited. The aim of this work was to develop an ELISA to detect antibodies against the B subunit of Stx2, and a WB to evaluate antibodies against both subunits of Stx2 and Stx1, in order to analyze the pertinence and effectiveness of these techniques in the Argentinean population. We studied 72 normal healthy children (NHC) and 105 HUS patients of the urban pediatric population from the surrounding area of Buenos Aires city. Using the WB method we detected 67% of plasma from NHC reactive for Stx2, but only 8% for Stx1. These results are in agreement with the broad circulation of Stx2-expressing STEC in Argentina and the endemic behavior of HUS in this country. Moreover, the simultaneous evaluation by the two methods allowed us to differentiate acute HUS patients from NHC with a great specificity and accuracy, in order to confirm the HUS etiology when pathogenic bacteria were not isolated from stools. PMID:21559455

  2. Presence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus antibodies in Saudi Arabia : a nationwide, cross-sectional, serological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Marcel A; Meyer, Benjamin; Corman, Victor M; Al-Masri, Malak; Turkestani, Abdulhafeez; Ritz, Daniel; Sieberg, Andrea; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Bosch, Berend-J; Lattwein, Erik; Alhakeem, Raafat F; Assiri, Abdullah M; Albarrak, Ali M; Al-Shangiti, Ali M; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Wikramaratna, Paul; Alrabeeah, Abdullah A; Drosten, Christian; Memish, Ziad A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scientific evidence suggests that dromedary camels are the intermediary host for the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). However, the actual number of infections in people who have had contact with camels is unknown and most index patients cannot recall any such

  3. Anti-Aquaporin-4 Antibody-Positive Neuromyelitis Optica Presenting with Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion as an Initial Manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nakajima

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of neuromyelitis optica (NMO-characteristic brain lesions corresponds to sites of high aquaporin-4 (AQP4 expression, and the brainstem and hypothalamus lesions that express high levels of AQP4 protein are relatively characteristic of NMO. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH is one of the important causes of hyponatremia and results from an abnormal production or sustained secretion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH. SIADH has been associated with many clinical states or syndromes, and the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal system regulates the feedback control system for ADH secretion. We report the case of a 63-year-old man with NMO, whose initial manifestation was hyponatremia caused by SIADH. Retrospective analysis revealed that the serum anti-AQP4 antibody was positive, and an MRI scan showed a unilateral lesion in the hypothalamus. SIADH recovered completely with regression of the hypothalamic lesion. As such, NMO should even be considered in patients who develop SIADH and have no optic nerve or spinal cord lesions but have MRI-documented hypothalamic lesions.

  4. Prevalence of anti- beta2GPI antibodies and their isotypes in patients with renal diseases and clinical suspicion of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Sabiha; Ahmed, Ejaz; Muzaffar, Rana

    2013-07-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are autoantibodies that are associated with a clinical state of hypercoagulability and diverse clinical manifestations collectively known as antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). To investigate the prevalence of anti-beta2glycoproteinI-antibodies (anti-β2GPI) and their isotypes in patients with renal diseases and clinical suspicion of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). This is a retrospective study in which we have analyzed the prevalence of anti-β2GPI and its isotypes in 170 patients on initial testing and in 29 patients repeated after 12 weeks for confirmation of APS.  The clinical information was provided by the treating physicians or retrieved from the clinical records. The tests for anti-β2GPI screening and its isotypes (IgG, IgM and IgA) detection were assessed. On initial samples, anti-β2GPI was positive in 118patients.  IgA-β2GPI positivity (93; 79%) was significantly higher than IgM and IgG isotypes.  Out of anti-β2GPI positive patients, clinical features in 95 patients were suggestive of APS or had SLE.  Of these, IgA isotypes was found in 66% (P = 0.010), IgM in 31% (P = 0.033), and IgG in 11% (P = 0.033). On repeat testing, anti-β2GPI was persistently found In 22 patients with a continual predominance of IgA-anti-β2GPI over IgM and IgG isotypes (91% vs. 45.5% and 18% respectively).   Our results show that IgA-anti-β2GPI antibodies are the most prevalent isotypes in patients with renal disease or on renal replacement therapy in our population.  Thus inclusion of IgA-anti-β2GPI in the testing repertoire may increase the diagnostic sensitivity for APS in patients with renal diseases.

  5. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as potential diagnostic markers and risk predictors of venous thrombosis and obstetric complications in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hui; Zheng, Hui; Yin, Yu-Feng; Hu, Qiong-Yi; Teng, Jia-Lin; Sun, Yue; Liu, Hong-Lei; Cheng, Xiao-Bing; Ye, Jun-Na; Su, Yu-Tong; Wu, Xin-Yao; Zhou, Jin-Feng; Norman, Gary L; Gong, Hui-Yun; Shi, Xin-Ming; Peng, Yi-Bing; Wang, Xue-Feng; Yang, Cheng-De

    2018-03-28

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and clinical associations of antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) with thrombosis and pregnancy loss in Chinese patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and seronegative APS (SNAPS). One hundred and eighty six Chinese patients with APS (67 primary, 119 secondary), 48 with SNAPS, 176 disease controls (79 systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], 29 Sjogren's syndrome [SS], 30 ankylosing spondylitis [AS], 38 rheumatoid arthritis [RA]) and 90 healthy donors were examined. IgG and IgM aPS/PT, IgG/IgM/IgA anticardiolipin (aCL) and IgG/IgM/IgA anti-β2-glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) antibodies were tested by ELISA. One hundred and sixty (86.0%) of APS patients were positive for at least one aPS/PT isotype. One hundred and thirty five (72.6%) were positive for IgG aPS/PT, 124/186 (66.7%) positive for IgM aPS/PT and 99 (53.2%) positive for both. Approximately half of the SNAPS patients were positive for IgG and/or IgM aPS/PT. Highly significant associations between IgG aPS/PT and venous thrombotic events (odds ratio [OR]=6.72) and IgG/IgM aPS/PT and pregnancy loss (OR=9.44) were found. Levels of IgM aPS/PT were significantly different in APS patients with thrombotic manifestations and those with fetal loss (p=0.014). The association between IgG/IgM aPS/PT and lupus anticoagulant (LAC) was highly significant (pAPS was 101.6. Notably, 91.95% (80/87) of LAC-positive specimens were positive for IgG and/or IgM aPS/PT, suggesting aPS/PT is an effective option when LAC testing is not available. Anti-PS/PT antibody assays demonstrated high diagnostic performance for Chinese patients with APS, detected some APS patients negative for criteria markers and may serve as potential risk predictors for venous thrombosis and obstetric complications.

  6. Learning to coexist with wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.A. Moritz; E. Batlloria; R.A. Bradstock; Jeff Stringer; Robbie Sitzlar; P.F. Hessburg; J. Leonard; S. McCaffrey; D.C. Odion; T. Schoennagel; A.D. Syphard

    2014-01-01

    The impacts of escalating wildfire in many regions — the lives and homes lost, the expense of suppression and the damage to ecosystem services — necessitate a more sustainable coexistence with wildfire. Climate change and continued development on fire-prone landscapes will only compound current problems. Emerging strategies for managing ecosystems and mitigating risks...

  7. Shape coexistence in 74Se

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thiamová, Gabriela

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 6 (2001), s. 553-556 ISSN 0011-4626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : shape coexistence * 74Se Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.345, year: 2001

  8. Anti-ganglioside antibody induction by swine (A/NJ/1976/H1N1) and other influenza vaccines: insights into vaccine-associated Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachamkin, Irving; Shadomy, Sean V; Moran, Anthony P; Cox, Nancy; Fitzgerald, Collette; Ung, Huong; Corcoran, Adrian T; Iskander, John K; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Chen, Robert T

    2008-07-15

    Receipt of an A/NJ/1976/H1N1 "swine flu" vaccine in 1976, unlike receipt of influenza vaccines used in subsequent years, was strongly associated with the development of the neurologic disorder Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Anti-ganglioside antibodies (e.g., anti-GM(1)) are associated with the development of GBS, and we hypothesized that the swine flu vaccine contained contaminating moieties (such as Campylobacter jejuni antigens that mimic human gangliosides or other vaccine components) that elicited an anti-GM(1) antibody response in susceptible recipients. Surviving samples of monovalent and bivalent 1976 vaccine, comprising those from 3 manufacturers and 11 lot numbers, along with several contemporary vaccines were tested for hemagglutinin (HA) activity, the presence of Campylobacter DNA, and the ability to induce anti-Campylobacter and anti-GM(1) antibodies after inoculation into C3H/HeN mice. We found that, although C. jejuni was not detected in 1976 swine flu vaccines, these vaccines induced anti-GM(1) antibodies in mice, as did vaccines from 1991-1992 and 2004-2005. Preliminary studies suggest that the influenza HA induces anti-GM(1) antibodies. Influenza vaccines contain structures that can induce anti-GM(1) antibodies after inoculation into mice. Further research into influenza vaccine components that elicit anti-ganglioside responses and the role played by these antibodies (if any) in vaccine-associated GBS is warranted.

  9. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection in a Male Patient with Takayasu’s Arteritis and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Menekşe Gerede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 34-year-old male who presented to the emergency ward with fever and abdominal pain. The diagnosis of Takayasu’s arteritis and also antiphospholipid syndrome was made during an imaging workup of deep-vein thrombosis. A spontaneous coronary artery dissection was revealed in coronary CT angiography requested for chest pain and dyspnea. The patient was treated medically and discharged on close followup. The concurrence of spontaneous coronary artery dissection with antiphospholipid syndrome and Takayasu’s arteritis has not been reported in the previous literature. The possibility of a spontaneous coronary artery dissection should be considered in patients presenting with both diseases.

  10. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Freire da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A major cause of morbidity and mortality in the context of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is the occurrence of thrombotic events. Besides the pathogenic roles of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL, other risk factors and medical conditions, which are conditions for traditional risk of an individual without the APS, can coexist in this patient, raising their risk of developing thrombosis. Therefore, the clinical and laboratory investigation of comorbidities known to increase cardiovascular risk in patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is crucial for the adoption of a more complete and effective treatment. Experimental models and clinical studies show evidence of association between APS and premature formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Atherosclerosis has major traditional risk factors: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemia, smoking, and sedentary lifestyle that may be implicated in vascular involvement in patients with APS. The influence of nontraditional risk factors as hyperhomocysteinemia, increased lipoprotein a, and anti-oxLDL in the development of thromboembolic events in APS patients has been studied in scientific literature. Metabolic syndrome with all its components also has been recently studied in antiphospholipid syndrome and is associated with arterial events.

  11. Shape coexistence in 153Ho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Dibyadyuti; Sarkar, S.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta; Dasgupta, Shinjinee; Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan, Kshetri, Ritesh; Ray, Indrani; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Ray Basu, M.; Raut, R.; Ganguly, G.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Basu, S. K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, P.; Goswami, A.

    2016-08-01

    The high-spin states in 153Ho have been studied by the La57(20Ne139,6 n ) reaction at a projectile energy of 139 MeV at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata, India, utilizing an earlier campaign of the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA) setup. Data from γ -γ coincidence, directional correlation, and polarization measurements have been analyzed to assign and confirm the spins and parities of the levels. We have suggested a few additions and revisions of the reported level scheme of 153Ho. The RF-γ time difference spectra have been useful to confirm the half-life of an isomer in this nucleus. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical results, it is found that there are definite indications of shape coexistence in this nucleus. The experimental and calculated lifetimes of several isomers have been compared to follow the coexistence and evolution of shape with increasing spin.

  12. Turbulent dispersal promotes species coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkley, Heather A; Kendall, Bruce E; Mitarai, Satoshi; Siegel, David A

    2010-01-01

    Several recent advances in coexistence theory emphasize the importance of space and dispersal, but focus on average dispersal rates and require spatial heterogeneity, spatio-temporal variability or dispersal-competition tradeoffs to allow coexistence. We analyse a model with stochastic juvenile dispersal (driven by turbulent flow in the coastal ocean) and show that a low-productivity species can coexist with a high-productivity species by having dispersal patterns sufficiently uncorrelated from those of its competitor, even though, on average, dispersal statistics are identical and subsequent demography and competition is spatially homogeneous. This produces a spatial storage effect, with an ephemeral partitioning of a ‘spatial niche’, and is the first demonstration of a physical mechanism for a pure spatiotemporal environmental response. ‘Turbulent coexistence’ is widely applicable to marine species with pelagic larval dispersal and relatively sessile adult life stages (and perhaps some wind-dispersed species) and complements other spatial and temporal storage effects previously documented for such species. PMID:20455921

  13. Clinical performance of antibodies to prothrombin and thrombin in Chinese patients with antiphospholipid syndrome: potential interest in discriminating patients with thrombotic events and non-thrombotic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shulan; Wu, Ziyan; Li, Jing; Li, Ping; Chen, Si; Wen, Xiaoting; Li, Liubing; Zhang, Wen; Zhao, Jiuliang; Zhang, Fengchun; Li, Yongzhe

    2017-04-01

    A hallmark feature of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the presence of a wide spectrum of antiphospholipid antibodies. In this study, we evaluated the clinical relevance of antibodies to prothrombin (PT) (aPT) and thrombin (aThr) in Chinese patients with APS. A total of 229 subjects were tested, including 86 patients with APS [35 patients with primary APS (PAPS), 51 patients with APS associated with other diseases (APSAOD)], 104 patients with non-APS diseases (disease controls), and 39 healthy controls. Serum IgG/IgM/IgA aPT and aThr were determined by ELISA. The levels of both IgG/IgM/IgA aPT and IgG/IgM/IgA aThr were significantly increased in patients with PAPS and APSAOD compared with patients with non-APS thrombosis and non-APS PRM, and HC. Both IgG aPT and IgG aThr exhibited promising diagnostic potentials for APS with sensitivities and specificities of 16.3 and 95.8% (IgG aPT), and 19.8 and 99.3% (IgG aThr), respectively. Importantly, both IgG aPT (OR 4.06; 95% CI 1.49-11.05) and IgG aThr (OR 4.49; 95% CI 1.62-12.45) were significantly correlated with arterial, but not venous, thrombotic events. Our findings highlighted that IgG aPT and IgG aThr could serve as promising biomarkers to identify patients at risk of arterial thrombosis in China.

  14. Coexistent pulmonary granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener granulomatosis) and Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaszar, Laszlo T; Orzechowski, Nicole M; Specks, Ulrich; Ytterberg, Steven R; Loftus, Edward V; Mark, Eugene J; Tazelaar, Henry D

    2014-03-01

    Crohn disease (CD) may be associated with various extraintestinal manifestations, including, rarely, respiratory tract involvement. When necrobiotic pulmonary nodules are present, the differential diagnosis includes granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener granulomatosis) (GPA). The respiratory tract manifestations of CD and GPA may mimic each other, complicating the diagnosis and suggesting the possible coexistence of these 2 conditions. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of patients in whom CD and GPA coexist. We reviewed the teaching files of the authors and searched the Mayo Clinic medical records for coexistent inflammatory bowel diseases and antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitides. We reviewed in detail 97 patient charts and excluded cases of ulcerative colitis and those in whom only one of the diagnoses was present. Pulmonary and gastrointestinal biopsies were reviewed when available. We also searched the medical literature for previously published cases. We found 6 cases of coexistent CD and pulmonary GPA and 4 cases with extrapulmonary GPA; 3 cases (all with extrapulmonary GPA) have been published previously. The diagnosis of CD preceded that of GPA in 11 cases. Proteinase 3-ANCA was positive in 6 cases, negative in 2, and not reported in 5 cases. Myeloperoxidase-ANCA was negative in 6 cases and unavailable in the remainder of patients. Pathology revealed features diagnostic of GPA in all cases with necrotizing granulomatous inflammation and segmental vasculitis. Pulmonary findings in patients with CD or the presence of granulomatous colitis in patients with GPA should prompt the inclusion in the differential diagnosis of a possible coexistence of CD and GPA.

  15. A hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) DNA vaccine delivered using a spring-powered jet injector elicits a potent neutralizing antibody response in rabbits and nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwilas, Steve; Kishimori, Jennifer M; Josleyn, Matthew; Jerke, Kurt; Ballantyne, John; Royals, Michael; Hooper, Jay W

    2014-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV) cause most of the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in North and South America, respectively. The chances of a patient surviving HPS are only two in three. Previously, we demonstrated that SNV and ANDV DNA vaccines encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins elicit high-titer neutralizing antibodies in laboratory animals, and (for ANDV) in nonhuman primates (NHPs). In those studies, the vaccines were delivered by gene gun or muscle electroporation. Here, we tested whether a combined SNV/ANDV DNA vaccine (HPS DNA vaccine) could be delivered effectively using a disposable syringe jet injection (DSJI) system (PharmaJet, Inc). PharmaJet intramuscular (IM) and intradermal (ID) needle-free devices are FDA 510(k)-cleared, simple to use, and do not require electricity or pressurized gas. First, we tested the SNV DNA vaccine delivered by PharmaJet IM or ID devices in rabbits and NHPs. Both IM and ID devices produced high-titer anti-SNV neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits and NHPs. However, the ID device required at least two vaccinations in NHP to detect neutralizing antibodies in most animals, whereas all animals vaccinated once with the IM device seroconverted. Because the IM device was more effective in NHP, the Stratis(®) (PharmaJet IM device) was selected for follow-up studies. We evaluated the HPS DNA vaccine delivered using Stratis(®) and found that it produced high-titer anti-SNV and anti-ANDV neutralizing antibodies in rabbits (n=8/group) as measured by a classic plaque reduction neutralization test and a new pseudovirion neutralization assay. We were interested in determining if the differences between DSJI delivery (e.g., high-velocity liquid penetration through tissue) and other methods of vaccine injection, such as needle/syringe, might result in a more immunogenic DNA vaccine. To accomplish this, we compared the HPS DNA vaccine delivered by DSJI versus needle/syringe in NHPs (n=8/group). We found

  16. Passive transfer of virus-specific antibodies confers protection against reproductive failure induced by a virulent strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and establishes sterilizing immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, F A; Galeota, J A; Nelson, E; Brodersen, B; Doster, A; Wills, R; Zuckermann, F; Laegreid, W W

    2002-10-10

    Immune mechanisms mediating protective immunity against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are not well understood. The PRRSV-specific humoral immune response has been dismissed as being ineffective and perhaps deleterious for the host. The function of PRRSV antibodies in protective immunity against infection with a highly abortifacient strain of this virus was examined by passive transfer experiments in pregnant swine. All of a group of pregnant gilts (n = 6) that received PRRSV immunoglobulin (Ig) from PRRSV-convalescent, hyperimmune animals were fully protected from reproductive failure as judged by 95% viability of offspring at weaning (15 days of age). On the other hand, the totality of animals in a matched control group (n = 6) receiving anti-pseudorabies virus (PRV) Ig exhibited marked reproductive failure with 4% survival at weaning. Besides protecting the pregnant females from clinical reproductive disease, the passive transfer of PRRSV Ig prevented the challenge virus from infecting the dams and precluded its vertical transmission, as evidenced by the complete absence of infectious PRRSV from the tissues of the dams and lack of infection in their offspring. In summary, these results indicate that PRRSV-Igs are capable of conferring protective immunity against PRRSV and furthermore that these Igs can provide sterilizing immunity in vivo.

  17. IgA-gliadin antibodies, IgA-containing circulating immune complexes, and IgA glomerular deposits in wasting marmoset syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, C; Osman, A A; Roggenbuck, D; Mothes, T

    1999-08-01

    Marmosets in captivity are highly susceptible to wasting marmoset syndrome (WMS), the aetiology of which is still not fully determined. The level of IgA-gliadin antibodies (IgA-AGA), of IgA-containing circulating immune complexes (IgA-CIC), and the degree of glomerular IgA deposits were compared between marmosets suffering from WMS and animals not affected by the disorder. Both IgA-AGA and IgA-CIC were demonstrable in all groups of monkeys investigated. IgA-AGA and IgA-CIC were significantly higher in monkeys with WMS than in non-affected animals. There was a significant correlation between the glomerular IgA-deposition and titre of IgA-AGA. The group of marmosets strongly positive for glomerular IgA deposits comprised significantly more animals suffering from WMS than the group without deposits. In the diet of the animals a considerable amount of gliadin-like cereal proteins was assayed. There are several parallels between the human disorders (coeliac disease and IgA-nephropathy/Berger's disease) and the changes observed in WMS. It should be further investigated if WMS in marmosets is a suitable animal model for both human diseases.

  18. The obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, R. H. W. M.; de Grootb, Ph. G.

    The association of persistent presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies and thromboembolic events, (recurrent) pregnancy loss or both is termed antiphospholipid syndrome. Pregnancies in women with the syndrome should be regarded as at high-risk for complications. Optimal management

  19. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A antibodies in a group of normal and Down Syndrome children in Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Targa Ferreira

    Full Text Available The high incidence of Hepatitis A and B in institutionalized patients with Down Syndrome (DS is not fully understood. Under poor hygienic conditions, immunological alterations might predispose individuals to these infections. Sixty three DS children between 1 and 12 years old living at home with their families were examined for anti-HAV and compared to age-matched controls (64 healthy children. This cross-sectional study was carried out from May, 1999, to April, 2000, at the Hospital de Clínicas of Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. Groups were compared in terms of age, sex, skin color, and family income (> R$ 500 and < R$ 500/ month by the chi-square test, with Yates' correction and for the prevalence of anti-HAV (Fisher's exact test. In the DS group (n=63, the mean age was 4.4 ± 3.3 years, 94% of the patients were white and 51% were female. Family income was <= R$ 500/month in 40 cases (63%. In the control group (n=64, the mean age was 4.8 ± 2.7 years, 81% of the patients were white and 56% were female. Family income was <= R$ 500 in 20 patients (31%. DS children's families had a significantly lower income (P<0.0005. In the DS group there were 6 positive (9.5% anti-HAV cases, and all came from low-income families (less than R$ 500/ month. In the control group, 3 cases (4.7% were positive for anti-HAV (two were from a low-income family and one was from a higher income family. These differences were not significant. Our data indicate that Hepatitis A is not a special risk for mentally retarded DS outpatients, even in a developing country like Brazil.

  20. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A antibodies in a group of normal and Down Syndrome children in Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Cristina Targa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of Hepatitis A and B in institutionalized patients with Down Syndrome (DS is not fully understood. Under poor hygienic conditions, immunological alterations might predispose individuals to these infections. Sixty three DS children between 1 and 12 years old living at home with their families were examined for anti-HAV and compared to age-matched controls (64 healthy children. This cross-sectional study was carried out from May, 1999, to April, 2000, at the Hospital de Clínicas of Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. Groups were compared in terms of age, sex, skin color, and family income (> R$ 500 and < R$ 500/ month by the chi-square test, with Yates' correction and for the prevalence of anti-HAV (Fisher's exact test. In the DS group (n=63, the mean age was 4.4 ± 3.3 years, 94% of the patients were white and 51% were female. Family income was <= R$ 500/month in 40 cases (63%. In the control group (n=64, the mean age was 4.8 ± 2.7 years, 81% of the patients were white and 56% were female. Family income was <= R$ 500 in 20 patients (31%. DS children's families had a significantly lower income (P<0.0005. In the DS group there were 6 positive (9.5% anti-HAV cases, and all came from low-income families (less than R$ 500/ month. In the control group, 3 cases (4.7% were positive for anti-HAV (two were from a low-income family and one was from a higher income family. These differences were not significant. Our data indicate that Hepatitis A is not a special risk for mentally retarded DS outpatients, even in a developing country like Brazil.

  1. Failure of anti-T-cell receptor V beta antibodies to consistently identify a malignant T-cell clone in Sézary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, R D; Boselli, C M; Foley, B; Vonderheid, E C

    1996-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reacting with the human T cell receptor (TCR) V beta or V alpha region have been shown to be almost as specific as a private idiotypic MAb in identifying T cell clones. When available, V beta-specific MAbs offer the ease of immunofluorescence analysis to identify and quantitate expanded malignant or nonmalignant T cell populations without requiring polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to evaluate expression of V beta gene families. The V beta expression of peripheral blood lymphocytes from twenty-three consecutive patients with Sézary syndrome has been analyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. Ten patients had malignant T cell clones that expressed a TCR V beta corresponding to a commercially available anti-V beta antibody. Immunofluorescence staining with anti-V beta MAbs showed a direct correlation with RT-PCR results in seven of ten patients. No false positive reactivity was noted on immunofluorescence staining with any MAb. Cells from three patients, however, did not react with the corresponding anti-V beta MAb. These three cases expressed a TCR V beta from gene families containing a single member, ie, V beta 14, V beta 18, and V beta 20, yet MAbs reported to be specific for these regions failed to react with the T cell clone from these patients. Sequencing of the PCR product in these cases confirmed the RT-PCR results. Cells from two patients expressed a TCR using V beta 5.1-D beta 1.1 genes with different J-C segments. One patient's cells reacted with an anti-V beta 5.1 MAb (LC4) whereas the other patient's cells bound one-tenth the amount of this same MAb. These results indicate that currently available anti-TCR V region MAbs may not react consistently with T cell clones expressing the corresponding V region or may react with a low affinity making detection difficult. Differences in the J-C junction or in CDR3 may influence the binding of these MAbs. Until the false negative rate is reduced and the fine specificity and

  2. Impact of double positive for anti-centromere and anti-SS-a/Ro antibodies on clinicopathological characteristics of primary Sjögren's syndrome: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasunori; Fujii, Hiroshi; Nomura, Hideki; Mizushima, Ichiro; Yamada, Kazunori; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Kawano, Mitsuhiro

    2018-01-09

    The purpose of our study was to define the clinical characteristics of anti-centromere antibody and anti-SS-A/Ro antibody (ACA/SS-A) double positive Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and to clarify the clinical impact of these antibodies. We examined 108 patients (6 males, mean age 57.9 years) with SS who underwent labial salivary gland biopsy. The patients were divided into four groups by ACA and anti-SS-A/Ro antibody positivity. Symptoms, laboratory and pathological data, and scleroderma-related data were compared among the groups. The cohort consisted of 16 ACA/SS-A double positive, 20 ACA single positive, 67 SS-A single positive, and 5 ACA/SS-A double negative SS. ACA/SS-A double positive SS were significantly older than SS-A single positive SS (mean age 71.1 vs. 53.1 years). They had higher EULAR Sjögren's syndrome disease activity index (ESSDAI) at diagnosis (mean 3.81 vs. 0.50) and higher serum IgG (mean 2009 vs. 1389 mg/dL) than ACA single positive SS. No patients developed skin sclerosis during a mean follow-up period of 45.6 months (range: 1-178). These results demonstrate that ACA/SS-A double positive SS is distinct from ACA single positive and SSA single positive SS. The combination of ACA and anti-SS-A/Ro antibody in SS should deserve greater attention in clinical practice.

  3. Microangiopatia livedóide associada à síndrome do anticorpo antifosfolípide (SAF Livedoid microangiopathy associated to antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Munhoz Sanches

    2005-12-01

    argues against vasculitis, favouring a thrombotic process. Livedoid microangiopathy attacks mainly young and middle-aged women; can be idiopathic, or associated with coagulation alterations including the factor V Leiden mutation, protein C deficiency, increased plasmatic homocysteine, fibrinolysis abnormalities, platelet activation and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS. We describe a case of a patient with livedoid microangiopathy associated with the presence of APS with multiple ulcers in the lower limbs who showed a clinical improvement only after total anticoagulation with warfarin and association with danazol. Livedoid vasculitis can represent an initial clinical manifestation of a group of diseases which cause occlusive vasculopathy; so, every patient should be investigated for the presence of antiphospholipid antibody or of another cause of thrombophilia.

  4. Distal Angiopathy and Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Clinical and Functional Properties of an Anti-Factor H IgAλ Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigothier, Claire; Delmas, Yahsou; Roumenina, Lubka T; Contin-Bordes, Cécile; Lepreux, Sébastien; Bridoux, Frank; Goujon, Jean Michel; Bachelet, Thomas; Touchard, Guy; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Combe, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Abnormal regulation of the alternative pathway of the complement system is a well-described trigger of microangiopathy leading to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). However, the involvement of complement dysregulation in distal angiopathy has not been reported in adults. We describe the clinical course of a patient with severe distal angiopathy (amputation of all fingers and toes) followed 3 years later by aHUS with end-stage renal disease. This course was attributed to a circulating monoclonal immunoglobulin A λ light chain (IgAλ) with unusual properties: it bound complement factor H (CFH) and impaired CFH-glycosaminoglycan interaction and cell-surface protection. Local complement activation with distal angiopathy and microvascular injury was suggested by deposition of IgA, C4d, and C5b-9 in limb and preglomerular arteries. We therefore postulated that the monoclonal IgAλ inhibited activity of endothelial cell-bound CFH, which led to local activation of complement, vasoconstriction (distal angiopathy), and aHUS. While the patient was dependent on dialysis and plasma exchange, treatment with the anti-C5 antibody eculizumab induced remission of distal angiopathy and aHUS. During eculizumab treatment, kidney transplantation was performed. The patient had normal kidney function at the 3-year follow-up. We suggest that the association of distal angiopathy and aHUS in this patient is clearly linked to anti-CFH properties of the monoclonal IgAλ. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Detrimental roles of TNF-alpha in the antiphospholipid syndrome and de novo synthesis of antiphospholipid antibodies induced by biopharmaceuticals against TNF-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bećarević, Mirjana

    2017-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis and/or recurrent pregnancy losses. Obstetric APS (OAPS) is considered as a distinct entity from vascular APS (VAPS). In the absence of any additional disease, APS is designated as primary (PAPS), while the term secondary APS (SAPS) is used when other diseases are associated. Catastrophic APS (CAPS) is characterized by the rapid development of multiple thrombosis in various vital organs. The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL Abs) is considered as a laboratory criterion for APS diagnosis. aPL Abs cause an increase in systemic and decidual TNF-alpha levels in experimental model of APS (eAPS), while paradoxically, administration of TNF-alpha blockers has been associated with de novo synthesis of aPL Abs in patients with various autoimmune diseases. While eAPS provides evidence for the fact that application of TNF-alpha blockers has beneficial effects, lack of randomized prospective studies is the main obstacle for consideration of TNF-alpha blockers administration as a therapeutic option not for all, but at least for selected cases of APS patients despite compelling evidence for detrimental roles of TNF-alpha for both VASP and OAPS. This article represents a review of previously published reports on detrimental roles of TNF-alpha in APS, reports on the application of anti-TNF-alpha agents in eAPS and articles that reported de novo synthesis of aPL Abs induced by biopharmaceuticals against TNF-alpha.

  6. Hu and Yo antibodies have heterogeneous avidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totland, Cecilie; Aarseth, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2007-04-01

    Onconeural antibodies such as anti-Hu and anti-Yo may be important in the pathogenesis of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. The avidity of these antibodies is not known. In this study, we compared the avidity of Hu and Yo antibodies both at single time points and over a time range of 2 months to 6 years. The avidity of Yo and Hu antibodies differed among the patients, but anti-Yo generally had higher avidity than anti-Hu. Whether Yo antibodies are more pathogenic than Hu antibodies are presently unknown.

  7. Is extra-glandular organ damage in primary Sjögren's syndrome related to the presence of systemic auto-antibodies and/or hypergammaglobulinemia? A long-term cohort study with 110 patients from the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Borg, Evert-Jan; Kelder, Johannes Cornelis

    2017-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that systemic auto-antibodies or hypergammaglobulinemia are related to the prevalence of extra-glandular tissue organ damage (EGOD) in primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS). A real practice-based investigation of a relatively large (n = 110) Dutch cohort of primary SS patients systematically followed up in a large non-academic hospital. After a follow up of mean 8.2 years a significant correlation was found between disease duration and the prevalence of EGOD. We did not observe a relationship between the total number or type of systemic auto-antibodies or hypergammaglobulinemia and the total number of EGOD. However, there was a correlation between the prevalence of polyneuropathy (PNP) and antinuclear antibodies (ANA) as well as anti-Ro/SS-A positivity and there was an inverse relationship between the presence of anti-Ro/SS-A antibodies and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). All PBC cases were anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-La/SS-B negative but ANA positive. There was a trend for a higher occurrence of pleuro-pulmonary disease in the ANA negative cases. Although we did not find a relationship between the total number or type of systemic auto-antibodies and the total number of EGOD, there were correlations between specific systemic auto-antibodies and specific types of EGOD. The presence of ANA and anti-Ro/SS-A was associated with the occurrence of PNP, as well as was the absence of anti-Ro/SS-A with PBC. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. [Evaluation of usefulness of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of antibodies to lipopolysaccharides of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains in patients with gastrointestinal disorders and patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains are an important zoonotic food-borne and waterborne pathogens causing diarrhea and the severe hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of enzyme immunoassay ELISA for detection of antibodies to the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of EHEC in patients with gastrointestinal disorders and patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Sera obtained from 526 patients with gastrointestinal disorders, 26 patients with HUS and 74 patients with different bacterial gastroenteritis infections were screened by an LPS-based ELISA. The LPS antigens of EHEC belonging to serogroups O26, O103, O104, O111, O121, O145, and O157 were obtained by modified Boivin's method. Additionally, to determine the cut-off level, the 122 sera from healthy people were tested. Cellular extract from E. coli O14 were used to remove by absorption antibodies to the Enterobacteriaceae Common Antigen (ECA). Generally, seroprevalence of antibodies to the LPS of different EHEC serogroups in patients with gastrointestinal disorders was low. Additionally, interpretation of the some positive results was difficult to the fact of many serological mutual interactions. Particularly a lot of cross-reactions were seen in the group of sera obtained from patients with different bacterial gastroenteritis infections. The study showed also that in most cases the absorption of antibodies to the ECA had no significant effect on the cross-reactions observed in ELISA. On the other hand, the very high level of antibodies to the LPS antigen of E. coli O26 was found in 5 patients, to E. coli O157 in 4 patients, to E. coli O104 and O145 in 3 patients and E. coli O111 in 2 patients with HUS. Analysis of antibody levels in paired sera taken 2-3 weeks apart obtained from six HUS patients showed a rapid decline of antibody levels to the LPS antigens. The results showed the usefulness of the ELISA with lipopolysaccharides antigens to

  9. Nodding syndrome in Tanzania may not be associated with circulating anti-NMDA-and anti-VGKC receptor antibodies or decreased pyridoxal phosphate serum levels-a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietmann, Anelia; Wallner, Bernd; König, Rebekka; Friedrich, Katrin; Pfausler, Bettina; Deisenhammer, Florian; Griesmacher, Andrea; Seger, Christoph; Matuja, William; JilekAall, Louise; Winkler, Andrea S; Schmutzhard, Erich

    2014-06-01

    Nodding syndrome (NS) is a seemingly progressive epilepsy disorder of unknown underlying cause. We investigated association of pyridoxal-phosphate serum levels and occurrence of anti-neuronal antibodies against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex in NS patients. Sera of a Tanzanian cohort of epilepsy and NS patients and community controls were tested for the presence of anti-NMDA-receptor and anti-VGKC complex antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Furthermore pyridoxal-phosphate levels were measured. Auto-antibodies against NMDA receptor or VGKC (LG1 or Caspr2) complex were not detected in sera of patients suffering from NS (n=6), NS plus other seizure types (n=16), primary generalized epilepsy (n=1) and community controls without epilepsy (n=7). Median Pyridoxal-phosphate levels in patients with NS compared to patients with primary generalized seizures and community controls were not significantly different. However, these median pyridoxal-phosphate levels are significantly lower compared to the range considered normal in Europeans. In this pilot study NS was not associated with serum anti-NMDA receptor or anti-VGKC complex antibodies and no association to pyridoxal-phosphate serum levels was found.

  10. Spatial complementarity and the coexistence of species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Jorge; Garrahan, Juan P; Eichhorn, Markus P

    2014-01-01

    Coexistence of apparently similar species remains an enduring paradox in ecology. Spatial structure has been predicted to enable coexistence even when population-level models predict competitive exclusion if it causes each species to limit its own population more than that of its competitor. Nevertheless, existing hypotheses conflict with regard to whether clustering favours or precludes coexistence. The spatial segregation hypothesis predicts that in clustered populations the frequency of intra-specific interactions will be increased, causing each species to be self-limiting. Alternatively, individuals of the same species might compete over greater distances, known as heteromyopia, breaking down clusters and opening space for a second species to invade. In this study we create an individual-based model in homogeneous two-dimensional space for two putative sessile species differing only in their demographic rates and the range and strength of their competitive interactions. We fully characterise the parameter space within which coexistence occurs beyond population-level predictions, thereby revealing a region of coexistence generated by a previously-unrecognised process which we term the triadic mechanism. Here coexistence occurs due to the ability of a second generation of offspring of the rarer species to escape competition from their ancestors. We diagnose the conditions under which each of three spatial coexistence mechanisms operates and their characteristic spatial signatures. Deriving insights from a novel metric - ecological pressure - we demonstrate that coexistence is not solely determined by features of the numerically-dominant species. This results in a common framework for predicting, given any pair of species and knowledge of the relevant parameters, whether they will coexist, the mechanism by which they will do so, and the resultant spatial pattern of the community. Spatial coexistence arises from complementary combinations of traits in each species

  11. Intermittent control of coexisting attractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wiercigroch, Marian; Ing, James; Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina

    2013-06-28

    This paper proposes a new control method applicable for a class of non-autonomous dynamical systems that naturally exhibit coexisting attractors. The central idea is based on knowledge of a system's basins of attraction, with control actions being applied intermittently in the time domain when the actual trajectory satisfies a proximity constraint with regards to the desired trajectory. This intermittent control uses an impulsive force to perturb one of the system attractors in order to switch the system response onto another attractor. This is carried out by bringing the perturbed state into the desired basin of attraction. The method has been applied to control both smooth and non-smooth systems, with the Duffing and impact oscillators used as examples. The strength of the intermittent control force is also considered, and a constrained intermittent control law is introduced to investigate the effect of limited control force on the efficiency of the controller. It is shown that increasing the duration of the control action and/or the number of control actuations allows one to successfully switch between the stable attractors using a lower control force. Numerical and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Benefit from B-lymphocyte depletion using the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in chronic fatigue syndrome. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øystein Fluge

    Full Text Available Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a disease of unknown aetiology. Major CFS symptom relief during cancer chemotherapy in a patient with synchronous CFS and lymphoma spurred a pilot study of B-lymphocyte depletion using the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab, which demonstrated significant clinical response in three CFS patients.In this double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study (NCT00848692, 30 CFS patients were randomised to either Rituximab 500 mg/m(2 or saline, given twice two weeks apart, with follow-up for 12 months. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was not detected in any of the patients. The responses generally affected all CFS symptoms. Major or moderate overall response, defined as lasting improvements in self-reported Fatigue score during follow-up, was seen in 10 out of 15 patients (67% in the Rituximab group and in two out of 15 patients (13% in the Placebo group (p = 0.003. Mean response duration within the follow-up period for the 10 responders to Rituximab was 25 weeks (range 8-44. Four Rituximab patients had clinical response durations past the study period. General linear models for repeated measures of Fatigue scores during follow-up showed a significant interaction between time and intervention group (p = 0.018 for self-reported, and p = 0.024 for physician-assessed, with differences between the Rituximab and Placebo groups between 6-10 months after intervention. The primary end-point, defined as effect on self-reported Fatigue score 3 months after intervention, was negative. There were no serious adverse events. Two patients in the Rituximab group with pre-existing psoriasis experienced moderate psoriasis worsening.The delayed responses starting from 2-7 months after Rituximab treatment, in spite of rapid B-cell depletion, suggests that CFS is an autoimmune disease and may be consistent with the gradual elimination of autoantibodies preceding clinical responses. The present findings will impact

  13. Shape coexistence in N = 40 isotones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, G.; Kumawat, M.; Kaushik, M.; Jain, S.K.; Aggarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    Recently, shape coexistence in 72 Ge is investigated using projectile multistep Coulomb excitation with GRETINA and CHICO-2 and shape coexistence in the Ge and Se isotopes are studied within the interacting boson model (IBM) with the microscopic input from the self-consistent meanfield calculation based on the Gogny-D1M energy density functional. We investigated the phenomenon of shape coexistence in N = 40 isotones using Relativistic Mean-Field (RMF) plus BCS approach with TMA parameter and Nilson Strutinsky (NS) method that includes triaxial shapes also

  14. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or vomit that looks like coffee grounds Bright red blood in your stools or black, tarry stools Pain in your abdomen or severe pain in your head Sudden changes in vision Sudden loss of movement in your limbs Memory loss or confusion A lot of bleeding after ...

  15. Hypertension og det metaboliske syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael Hecht; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...... syndrome is of clinical importance as it makes the treating physician test for other elements of the syndrome in patients with one of the elements, e.g. hypertension. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun-15...

  16. Hypertension og det metaboliske syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael Hecht; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...... syndrome is of clinical importance as it makes the treating physician test for other elements of the syndrome in patients with one of the elements, e.g. hypertension. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun...

  17. [Simultaneous onset of steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome and type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego Filho, Eduardo A; Mello, Solange F R; Omuro, André M; Loli, José O C

    2003-01-01

    We describe the case of a boy with steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome coexisting with type-1 diabetes mellitus. Nephrotic syndrome was diagnosed in a boy (age 3 years and 11 months) with generalized edema. Marked weight loss (23 to 16 kg), polyuria, polydipsia and weakness were observed after three weeks of treatment with prednisone 2 mg/kg/day. Diabetic ketoacidosis was confirmed by laboratory tests: hyperglycemia (glucose 657 mg/dl), glycosuria without proteinuria, acidosis and ketonuria. Therapy with insulin and prednisone was started. He was then maintained on a daily dose of NPH insulin. At age 4 years and 1 month a new episode of ketoacidosis without proteinuria occurred in association with a viral infection of the upper airways. At age 4 years and 4 months nephrotic syndrome relapsed, but the child responded well to steroid therapy. There was another relapse three months later, when prednisone treatment was interrupted. This led to the introduction of cyclophosphamide, with good results. Since then, the patient (now 5 years and 6 months old) has been taking insulin daily and nephrotic syndrome has not relapsed. Plasma levels of C3 and C4 and renal function are normal. Hematuria is occasionally present. Anti-GAD antibodies (glutamic decarboxilase) are normal and anti-islet cell antibodies are positive. HLA antigens: A2; B44; B52; DR4; DR8; DR53. The simultaneous occurrence of steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome and type-1 diabetes mellitus is rare.

  18. Public Spaces - Coexistence and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiak, Anna; Wojtowicz-Jankowska, Dorota

    2017-10-01

    question: who nowadays is a citizen and how to assist in the creation of civil society with a system of public spaces with thoughtful application program. Currently the city, through its scale, deepens the alienation of residents, therefore appears a need for treatments favouring social interaction. The aforementioned spatial actions motivate people to go out and find themselves in the public space. Coexistence is the first necessary step to produce community. This relationship and the specifics of this co-presence may encourage citizens to return to the public space.

  19. Equilibrium coexistence of three amphiboles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P.; Jaffe, H.W.; Klein, C.; Ross, M.

    1969-01-01

    Electron probe and wet chemical analyses of amphibole pairs from the sillimanite zone of central Massachusetts and adjacent New Hampshire indicated that for a particular metamorphic grade there should be a restricted composition range in which three amphiboles can coexist stably. An unequivocal example of such an equilibrium three amphibole rock has been found in the sillimanite-orthoclase zone. It contains a colorless primitive clinoamphibole, space group P21/m, optically and chemically like cummingtonite with blue-green hornblende exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; blue-green hornblende, space group C2/m, with primitive cummingtonite exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; and pale pinkish tan anthophyllite, space group Pnma, that is free of visible exsolution lamellae but is a submicroscopic intergrowth of two orthorhombic amphiboles. Mutual contacts and coarse, oriented intergrowths of two and three host amphiboles indicate the three grew as an equilibrium assemblage prior to exsolution. Electron probe analyses at mutual three-amphibole contacts showed little variation in the composition of each amphibole. Analyses believed to represent most closely the primary amphibole compositions gave atomic proportions on the basis of 23 oxygens per formula unit as follows: for primitive cummingtonite (Na0.02Ca0.21- Mn0.06Fe2+2.28Mg4.12Al0.28) (Al0.17Si7.83), for hornblende (Na0.35Ca1.56Mn0.02Fe1.71Mg2.85Al0.92) (Al1.37Si6.63), and for anthophyllite (Na0.10Ca0.06Mn0.06Fe2.25Mg4.11Al0.47) (Al0.47Si7.53). The reflections violating C-symmetry, on X-ray single crystal photographs of the primitive cummingtonite, are weak and diffuse, and suggest a partial inversion from a C-centered to a primitive clinoamphibole. Single crystal photographs of the anthophyllite show split reflections indicating it is an intergrowth of about 80% anthophyllite and about 20% gedrite which differ in their b crystallographic dimensions. Split reflections are

  20. Energetic Constraints on Species Coexistence in Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigot, Alexander L; Tobias, Joseph A; Jetz, Walter

    2016-03-01

    The association between species richness and ecosystem energy availability is one of the major geographic trends in biodiversity. It is often explained in terms of energetic constraints, such that coexistence among competing species is limited in low productivity environments. However, it has proven challenging to reject alternative views, including the null hypothesis that species richness has simply had more time to accumulate in productive regions, and thus the role of energetic constraints in limiting coexistence remains largely unknown. We use the phylogenetic relationships and geographic ranges of sister species (pairs of lineages who are each other's closest extant relatives) to examine the association between energy availability and coexistence across an entire vertebrate class (Aves). We show that the incidence of coexistence among sister species increases with overall species richness and is elevated in more productive ecosystems, even when accounting for differences in the evolutionary time available for coexistence to occur. Our results indicate that energy availability promotes species coexistence in closely related lineages, providing a key step toward a more mechanistic understanding of the productivity-richness relationship underlying global gradients in biodiversity.

  1. Pseudohypoparathyroidism with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Turner syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wen-Heng; Xu, Jiao-Jun; Jia, Min-Yue; Ren, Yue-Zhong

    2014-10-01

    To report the case of an individual with PHP, Turner syndrome and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A 16-year-old girl was referred to our hospital with chief complaint of short stature. She presented with round chubby facies, short neck, obesity and short stature. Radiography indicated short metatarsals and metacarpals, which mainly affected the second, third and fourth digits. Biochemistry revealed hyperphosphatemia, increased serum concentrations of parathyroid hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone, elevated levels of follicular-stimulating hormone and prolactin, and increased thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody. Radiographic examination revealed delayed bone age and pelvic ultrasonography demonstrated an immature uterus. Karyotype analysis showed 46,X,i(Xq10), while molecular analysis revealed a same sense mutation in exon 5 of GNAS (ATC → ATT, Ile).The specific diagnosis was made of Turner syndrome in the presence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and PHP. She was treated with calcium supplementation, calcitriol and thyroxine. This is the first case report to describe a combination of Turner syndrome with these other clinical entities, and their co-existence should be considered and further investigated.

  2. Linking metacommunity paradigms to spatial coexistence mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Lauren G; Melbourne, Brett A

    2016-09-01

    Four metacommunity paradigms-usually called neutral, species sorting, mass effects, and patch dynamics, respectively-are widely used for empirical and theoretical studies of spatial community dynamics. The paradigm framework highlights key ecological mechanisms operating in metacommunities, such as dispersal limitation, competition-colonization tradeoffs, or species equivalencies. However, differences in coexistence mechanisms between the paradigms and in situations with combined influences of multiple paradigms are not well understood. Here, we create a common model for competitive metacommunities, with unique parameterizations for each metacommunity paradigm and for scenarios with multiple paradigms operating simultaneously. We derive analytical expressions for the strength of Chesson's spatial coexistence mechanisms and quantify these for each paradigm via simulation. For our model, fitness-density covariance, a concentration effect measuring the importance of intraspecific aggregation of individuals, is the dominant coexistence mechanism in all three niche-based metacommunity paradigms. Increased dispersal between patches erodes intraspecific aggregation, leading to lower coexistence strength in the mass effects paradigm compared to species sorting. Our analysis demonstrates the potential importance of aggregation of individuals (fitness-density covariance) over co-variation in abiotic environments and competition between species (the storage effect), as fitness-density covariance can be stronger than the storage effect and is the sole stabilizing mechanism in the patch dynamics paradigm. As expected, stable coexistence does not occur in the neutral paradigm, which requires species to be equal and emphasizes the role of stochasticity. We show that stochasticity also plays an important role in niche-structured metacommunities by altering coexistence strength. We conclude that Chesson's spatial coexistence mechanisms provide a flexible framework for comparing

  3. Macro-amylasemia in a patient with selective IgA deficiency and antiphospholipid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkçapar, Nuran; Ozyüncü, Nil; Idilman, Ramazan; Ensari, Arzu; Soylu, Kazim; Ozden, Ali

    2006-06-01

    We report an unusual case with macro-amylasemia with coexistent selective IgA deficiency and antiphospholipid antibodies. A 16-year-old girl was referred to us with a history of episodic abdominal pain accompanied by vomiting and diarrhea. Macroamylasemia was demonstrated by precipitation of 99% amylase activity with polyethylene glycol 6000. She had high levels of anticardiolipin IgG and beta2 glycoprotein 1 IgG antibodies in the blood, but no evidence of clinical criteria of antiphospholipid syndrome. In the literature, although macro-amylasemia has been found to occur in a variety of diseases including autoimmune disorders, to our knowledge, this is the first well-documented case of macro-amylasemia associated with selective IgA deficiency and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. It is important that clinicians be aware of their existence in order to avoid unnecessary procedures and that the patient is informed of the macro-amylasemia; moreover, it should be stated in the patient's health record.

  4. Polyvalent immunoglobulins with vitamin D3 and vitamin B12 in the treatment of Sjogren's syndrome in a vegetarian with stomatitis, glossodynia, xerostomia, and elevated antinuclear antibodies: Case report
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, Clemens; Vaerst, Barbara; Gabrielpillai, Jennis; Tahtali, Aykut; Balster, Sven; Lissner, Reinhard; Woodcock, Barry G

    2018-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome, involving sicca symptoms with xerostomia, stomatitis, and considerable pain is a difficult-to-treat autoimmune disease where the treatment options are limited and, as in the case of methotrexate, have a low therapeutic index. This case report concerns a male patient, aged 75 years and vegetarian, with Sjogren's syndrome subsequently confirmed by salivary gland biopsy. Serum antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were elevated (1 : 320). Low serum vitamin B12 and iron levels could be improved after 20 days using vitamin B12 and iron oral supplements. Despite symptomatic treatment, xerostomia, glossitis, and glossodynia were still present, at times marked, after 12 months when the ANA titer was unchanged. Following treatment with an anti-inflammatory polyvalent immunoglobulin formulation (Lactobin®N, 7 g daily), a bovine colostrum concentrate given orally in combination with oral vitamin D3 (2,000 IU daily), sicca symptoms and xerostomia progressively decreased and at day 750 were confined to occasional and minor glossitis of the upper lip. This case report demonstrates the satisfactory control of Sjogren's syndrome using oral polyvalent immunoglobulins with vitamin D3. In contrast to treatment options involving antimalarial drugs and methotrexate, there are no safety issues in patients tolerant to milk products.
.

  5. The effects of intransitive competition on coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallien, Laure; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Levine, Jonathan M; Adler, Peter B

    2017-07-01

    Coexistence theory has been developed with an almost exclusive focus on interactions between two species, often ignoring more complex and indirect interactions, such as intransitive loops, that can emerge in competition networks. In fact, intransitive competition has typically been studied in isolation from other pairwise stabilising processes, and thus little is known about how intransitivity interacts with more traditional drivers of species coexistence such as niche partitioning. To integrate intransitivity into traditional coexistence theory, we developed a metric of growth rate when rare, Δri¯, to identify and quantify the impact of intransitive competition against a backdrop of pairwise stabilising niche differences. Using this index with simulations of community dynamics, we demonstrate that intransitive loops can both stabilise or destabilise species coexistence, but the strength and importance of intransitive interactions are significantly affected by the length and the topology of these loops. We conclude by showing how Δri¯ can be used to evaluate effects of intransitivity in empirical studies. Our results emphasise the need to integrate complex mechanisms emerging from diverse interactions into our understanding of species coexistence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  6. Social factors mediating human-carnivore coexistence: Understanding thematic strands influencing coexistence in Central Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorresteijn, Ine; Milcu, Andra Ioana; Leventon, Julia; Hanspach, Jan; Fischer, Joern

    2016-05-01

    Facilitating human-carnivore coexistence depends on the biophysical environment but also on social factors. Focusing on Central Romania, we conducted 71 semi-structured interviews to explore human-bear (Ursus arctos) coexistence. Qualitative content and discourse analysis identified three socially mediated thematic strands, which showed different ways in which perceived interactions between people, bears and the environment shape coexistence. The "landscape-bear strand" described perceptions of the way in which the landscape offers resources for the bear, while the "landscape-human strand" related to ways in which humans experience the landscape. The "management strand" related to the way bears was managed. All three strands highlight both threats and opportunities for the peaceful coexistence of people and bears. Management and policy interventions could be improved by systematically considering the possible effects of interventions on each of the three strands shaping coexistence. Future research should explore the relevance of the identified thematic strands in other settings worldwide.

  7. Coexistence of competing stage-structured populations.

    KAUST Repository

    Fujiwara, Masami

    2011-10-05

    This paper analyzes the stability of a coexistence equilibrium point of a model for competition between two stage-structured populations. In this model, for each population, competition for resources may affect any one of the following population parameters: reproduction, juvenile survival, maturation rate, or adult survival. The results show that the competitive strength of a population is affected by (1) the ratio of the population parameter influenced by competition under no resource limitation (maximum compensatory capacity) over the same parameter under a resource limitation due to competition (equilibrium rate) and (2) the ratio of interspecific competition over intraspecific competition; this ratio was previously shown to depend on resource-use overlap. The former ratio, which we define as fitness, can be equalized by adjusting organisms\\' life history strategies, thereby promoting coexistence. We conclude that in addition to niche differentiation among populations, the life history strategies of organisms play an important role in coexistence.

  8. Print vs digital the future of coexistence

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sul H

    2013-01-01

    Libraries are currently confronted by the challenges of managing increasing amounts of electronic information. Print vs. Digital: The Future of Coexistence presents the expert perspectives of eight of America's leading library administrators on ways to effectively manage digital flow and offers strategies to provide a level of coexistence between digital and print information. This excellent overview explores how to best balance print and electronic resources, and explores important issues such as the selection of electronic resources, improving access to digital information for a larger user

  9. Coexistence of Strategic Vertical Separation and Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jos

    2003-01-01

    This paper gives conditions under which vertical separation is chosen by some upstream firms, while vertical integration is chosen by others in the equilibrium of a symmetric model. A vertically separating firm trades off fixed contracting costs against the strategic benefit of writing a (two......-part tariff, exclusive dealing) contract with its retailer. Coexistence emerges when more than two vertical Cournot oligopolists supply close substitutes. When vertical integration and separation coexist, welfare could be improved by reducing the number of vertically separating firms. The scope...

  10. Coexistence of Chiari malformation type I and isolated hemihypertrophy in a 15-year old girl: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kazanasmaz, Halil; Calik, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Hemihypertrophy is the asymmetrical growth of one or more parts of the body, and might beeither isolated or a component of various syndromes. Coexistence of isolated hemihypertrophyand Chiari malformation type I are very rarely. In this study, our objective was to present a 15years old girl case with isolated hemihypertrophy and Chiari malformation type I in the light ofliterature data. 

  11. Ecophysiological adaptations of coexisting Sphagnum mosses

    OpenAIRE

    HÁJEK, Tomáš

    2008-01-01

    I studied ecological and physiological adaptations of peat misses (Sphagnum species) coexisting along the environmental gradients in mires. Production, decomposition, water relations, desiccation tolerance and nutrient economy of Sphagnum species were evaluates along the hummock-hollow gradient of water table, while the light adaptations were assessed in an open and forested mire

  12. Shape coexistence in light Xe-isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gast, K.F.W.

    1982-01-01

    There are essentially four regions of problems which are discussed in the framework of this thesis. They can be entitled as follows: Backbending and the nature of the S-band, Nuclear softness and shape coexistence, the validity of the IBA-approximation, and the boson cutoff effect. (orig./HSI) [de

  13. Introduction to the Issue of Coexistence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalaitzandonakes, N.; Philips, P.C.; Smyth, S.; Wesseler, J.H.H.

    2016-01-01

    In many ways, the debate about coexistence is about the future of the global food system and its capacity to meet the rapidly growing demand for food and nutrition. Since their commercial introduction in 1995 and 1996, genetically modified (GM) crops have been adopted by farmers around the world at

  14. Coexisting tensions between the 'traditionmodernity' and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coexisting tensions between the 'traditionmodernity' and the 'sustainability- integration' approaches to urban development policy and planning practices in Botswana. ... exists at several levels and manifest in urban planning's preoccupation with the physicality of spatial forms, often justified in the embracing of globalization.

  15. Shape coexistence in the platinum isotopes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thiamová, Gabriela; Van Isacker, P.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2001), s. 23-25 ISSN 0031-8949 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : shape coexistence * Pt * IBA Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.663, year: 1999

  16. Coexistence of Superconductivity and Ferromagnetism in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KBHEEMA

    ABSTRACT. This research work focuses on the theoretical investigation of the possible coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in ErRh4B4. By developing a model Hamiltonian for the given system and by using the double time temperature-dependent Green's function formalism, we obtained expressions for ...

  17. Anorectal malformation coexisting with Hirschsprung's disease: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simultaneous occurrence of both conditions is rare. Few have been reported in Europe and Asia, but we have no knowledge so far of such report from Nigeria. We present two patients managed in our centre to highlight the challenges of management of this uncommon coexistence. The first patient was a 5-year-old girl who ...

  18. Phase Coexistence in a Dynamic Phase Diagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Luigi; Coppola, Luigi; Balog, Sandor; Mortensen, Kell; Ranieri, Giuseppe A; Olsson, Ulf

    2015-08-03

    Metastability and phase coexistence are important concepts in colloidal science. Typically, the phase diagram of colloidal systems is considered at the equilibrium without the presence of an external field. However, several studies have reported phase transition under mechanical deformation. The reason behind phase coexistence under shear flow is not fully understood. Here, multilamellar vesicle (MLV)-to-sponge (L3 ) and MLV-to-Lα transitions upon increasing temperature are detected using flow small-angle neutron scattering techniques. Coexistence of Lα and MLV phases at 40 °C under shear flow is detected by using flow NMR spectroscopy. The unusual rheological behavior observed by studying the lamellar phase of a non-ionic surfactant is explained using (2) H NMR and diffusion flow NMR spectroscopy with the coexistence of planar lamellar-multilamellar vesicles. Moreover, a dynamic phase diagram over a wide range of temperatures is proposed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. How variation between individuals affects species coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Simon P; Schreiber, Sebastian J; Levine, Jonathan M

    2016-08-01

    Although the effects of variation between individuals within species are traditionally ignored in studies of species coexistence, the magnitude of intraspecific variation in nature is forcing ecologists to reconsider. Compelling intuitive arguments suggest that individual variation may provide a previously unrecognised route to diversity maintenance by blurring species-level competitive differences or substituting for species-level niche differences. These arguments, which are motivating a large body of empirical work, have rarely been evaluated with quantitative theory. Here we incorporate intraspecific variation into a common model of competition and identify three pathways by which this variation affects coexistence: (1) changes in competitive dynamics because of nonlinear averaging, (2) changes in species' mean interaction strengths because of variation in underlying traits (also via nonlinear averaging) and (3) effects on stochastic demography. As a consequence of the first two mechanisms, we find that intraspecific variation in competitive ability increases the dominance of superior competitors, and intraspecific niche variation reduces species-level niche differentiation, both of which make coexistence more difficult. In addition, individual variation can exacerbate the effects of demographic stochasticity, and this further destabilises coexistence. Our work provides a theoretical foundation for emerging empirical interests in the effects of intraspecific variation on species diversity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  20. Energetic constraints on species coexistence in birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pigot, Alexander L.; Tobias, Joseph A.; Jetz, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The association between species richness and ecosystem energy availability is one of the major geographic trends in biodiversity. It is often explained in terms of energetic constraints, such that coexistence among competing species is limited in low productivity environments. However, it has proven

  1. Nailfold capillaroscopic findings in primary Sjögren's syndrome with and without Raynaud's phenomenon and/or positive anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, Hèctor; Ortiz-Santamaría, Vera; Castellví, Iván; Moreno, Mireia; Morlà, Rosa; Clavaguera, Teresa; Erra, Alba; Martínez-Pardo, Silvia; Ordóñez, Sergi; Santo, Pilar; Reyner, Patricia; González, Maria José; Codina, Oriol; Gelman, Mario Saul; Juanola-Roura, Xavier; Olivé, Alex; Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess nailfold capillaroscopic (NC) findings in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (PSS) with and without Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) as well as in the presence of positive anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. Videocapillaroscopy was performed in 150 patients with PSS. Data collected included demographics, presence of RP, PSS symptoms, antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-CCP, salivary scintigraphy, labial biopsy, and NC findings. RP was present in 32% of PSS, keratoconjunctivitis sicca in 91%, oral xerosis in 93%, and skin or genital xerosis in 53%. In patients with positive anti-SSA/Ro (75%) and positive anti-SSB/La (40%), NC showed normal findings in 53% of cases and non-specific in 36%. In patients with PSS, NC was normal in 51% of cases and non-specific in 34%. Scleroderma pattern was found in 14 patients. RP associated with PSS had non-specific capillaroscopy in 40% of cases (p = 0.1). Pericapillary haemorrhages (p = 0.06) and capillary thrombosis (p = 0.2) were not increased, but more dilated capillaries were detected in 48% of cases. Patients with positive anti-Ro and/or anti-La have not a distinct NC profile. Patients with RP associated with PSS had more dilated capillaries, but neither pericapillary haemorrhages nor capillary thrombosis was observed.

  2. Avidity of onconeural antibodies is of clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totland, Cecilie; Ying, Ming; Haugen, Mette; Mazengia, Kibret; Storstein, Anette; Aarseth, Jan; Martinez, Aurora; Vedeler, Christian

    2013-08-01

    Onconeural antibodies are important in the detection of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). The avidity of Hu, Yo, and CRMP5 antibodies from 100 patients was determined by immunoprecipitation (IP), and 13 of the Yo positive sera were also tested by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). There was a significant association between the results from IP and SPR. Yo antibodies had higher avidity than Hu and CRMP5 antibodies, and both high- and low-avidity antibodies were associated with tumors and PNS. High-avidity Yo antibodies were mainly associated with ovarian cancer, whereas high-avidity Hu and CRMP5 antibodies were mainly associated with small-cell lung cancer. Low-avidity CRMP5 and Yo antibodies were less often detected by a commercial line blot than high-avidity antibodies. The failure to detect low-avidity onconeural antibodies may result in under diagnosis of PNS.

  3. Peripheral nerve P2 basic protein and the Guillain-Barre syndrome : In vitro demonstration of P2-specific antibody-secreting cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijten, J.A.F.M.; Jong, W.A.C. de; Demel, R.A.; Heijnen, C.J.; Ballieux, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    An immune response to the peripheral nerve basic protein P2 may be operative in the pathogenesis of the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). A method is described for the purification of P2 of human origin. Purified P2 was used to investigate whether lymphocytes derived from peripheral blood of GBS

  4. Release patterns of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in patients with acute coronary syndromes assessed by an optimized monoclonal antibody assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Mikkel; Iversen, Kasper; Teisner, Ane

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) is expressed in eroded and ruptured atheromatous plaques, and circulating levels are elevated in acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Our objective was to investigate release patterns of PAPP-A in ACS and whether they differ among different types...

  5. Antibody biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... and automated, the hybrid cells can be stored for many years in liquid nitrogen and antibodies production is homogeneous. The hybridoma method .... they may be modified to vehicle active molecules such as radio-isotopes, toxins, cytokines, enzyme etc. In these cases, the therapeutic effect is due to ...

  6. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ability of the highly evolved machinery of immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex ... to Pauling, if the structure of the antigen binding site of antibodies were to be produced in a random ..... where the immune system of the body is destructive, as in autoimmune disorders or after organ transplant.

  7. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While chemistry provides the framework for understanding the structure and function of biomolecules, the immune sys- tem provides a highly evolved natural process to generate one class of complex biomolecules – the antibodies. A combination of the two could be exploited to generate new classes of molecules with novel ...

  8. {sup 18}F-FDG PET for exploration of para-neoplastic syndromes with anti-h.u. antibodies and small cell lung cancer: clinical case and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricard, F.; Giammarile, F.; Houzard, C. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, 69 - Pierre Benite (France); Giammarile, F.; Houzard, C. [Lyon-1 Univ., EA 3738, 69 (France); Didelot, A.; Mauguiere, F. [Hopital Neurologique, U 301, 69 - Bron (France)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction. - Small cell lung cancer (S.C.L.C.) is a neuroendocrine tumour representing 20% of bronchopulmonary cancers. Its metastatic potential is high, so 2/3 of diagnoses are made at disseminated stage. Anti H.u. antibodies are part of the anti neuronal antibodies, often associated to S.C.L.C.. However, 16% of cancers have positive anti H.u. with no para neoplastic syndrome (P.N.S.). (Graus, Brain, 2001). P.N.S. associated with anti H.u. are encephalomyelitis, sensitive neuropathy, chronic pseudo intestinal obstruction, cerebellar degeneration and limbic encephalitis. Case report. - A 75-year-old patient was hospitalized for exploration of an atypical tri-facial neuralgia. Anti H.u. antibodies were found and P.N.S. of a S.C.L.C. was therefore suspected. The biopsy of a thoracic parietal adenopathy confirmed the diagnostic of S.C.L.C. metastasis. Conventional imaging and {sup 18}F-FDG (Fluorodeoxyglucose) PET/CT (Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography)) did not localize the primary tumour, despite advanced dissemination stage, only showing lymphatic secondary locations at the left axillary and under the diaphragm areas. Literature review. - Younes-Mhenni (Brain, 2004, 20 patients); and Linke (Neurology, 2004, 13 patients) studied patients presenting with anti H.u. antibodies (13 and eight respectively) and other anti neuronal antibodies (Y.o., Ri, C.V.2, Tr) associated with different cancers. PET sensitivity was respectively 83.3 and 90% with a specificity of 25 and 67%. In both series, specificity of anti H.u. antibodies for S.C.L.C. was estimated at 53% and 62.5%. Size is a limiting factor for S.C.L.C. detection and Watanabe (Nihon Kokyuki Gakkai Zasshi, 2001) showed that sensitivity for detection of less than 1 cm tumour was 0% in five patients. Moreover, P.N.S. can precess S.C.L.C. detection for many years and PET/CT has to be repeated. (Gaillard, Revue neurologique, 2005).In two other studies (Schumacher, EJNM, 2001, 30 patients; and Niho, Lung

  9. Coexistent lymphoma with tuberculosis and Kaposi's sarcoma with tuberculosis occurring in lymph node in patients with AIDS: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanjewar, D N; Lanjewar, Sonali D; Chavan, Gajanan

    2010-01-01

    Although there have been a few reports of simultaneous infections and neoplasm in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, no reports of coexistent lymphoma with tuberculosis and Kaposi's sarcoma with tuberculosis occurring in the same lymph node have been described. In this article, we describe coexistent lymphoma with tuberculosis in one case and Kaposi's sarcoma with tuberculosis in another case of human immune deficiency virus-infected individuals.

  10. Co-existence in multispecies biofilm communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng

    with an increased tolerance against e.g. antibiotics, which could otherwise have killed the individual bacteria. In natural environments biofilm consists of several distinct species increasing the complexity of interactions between the species. When several bacterial species co-exist, they influence each other...... environment to evaluate their biofilm formation capability. It was found that multispecies consortia could lead to increased biofilm formation compared to mono species growth. This shows how co-localized isolates are able to influence biofilm production in a community with high relevance for food safety...... and production. The analysis was further extended in manuscript 3, in which the effect of social interac-tions on biofilm formation in multispecies co-cultures isolated from a diverse range of environments was examined. The question raised was whether the interspecific interactions of co-existing bacteria...

  11. Coexistence and sport: the Israeli case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Galily

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing sports and other recreational activities to foster peaceful relations and coexistence is an idea that has gained popularity in recent years, particularly in Israel. The aim of the current research is to fill a gap in the research literature on the subject of coexistence programming. The Mifalot organization conducts a program called “Get to Know Your Neighbor” in which Palestinian, Jordanian, and Israeli youth play soccer together. The program, based mainly on the participants’ love for football, is a series of activities and lessons designed to prepare children to meet and interact with youth from neighboring communities. The study examines the effects of participation in this program on the attitudes of the Palestinians, Jordanians, and Israelis toward each other.

  12. Exophthalmos in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, W

    1996-08-01

    Exophthalmos was noted in 4 of the 12 patients reported by Harvey Cushing in 1932. Although exophthalmos has often been included in clinical descriptions, no previous study has reported actual measurements in patients with active and treated Cushing's syndrome, and in control patients. The aim of this study was to obtain these measurements. Thirty-one patients with active Cushing's syndrome (19 iatrogenic), 15 with treated Cushing's syndrome, 18 with Graves' ophthalmopathy, 59 control patients, and 3 patients with active Cushing's syndrome plus a family or personal history of thyroid disease. A consecutive series of patients with active and treated Cushing's syndrome were assessed. They were compared with patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy, and with control patients. Exophthalmos was assessed by the author using a Hertel meter. Urinary free cortisol was measured on patients with Cushing's syndrome, and serum thyroxine was estimated for them, and for the patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Exophthalmos exceeding 16 mm (> 2 SD above normal mean) was found in 45% of active Cushing's syndrome, 21% of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, 20% of treated Cushing's syndrome, 2% of normal controls, and 77% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. No patient with Cushing's syndrome had significant symptoms due to exophthalmos. Patients with active Cushing's syndrome have statistically significant exophthalmos. This rarely causes symptoms, and diminishes when cortisol concentrations become normal. Cushing's syndrome and autoimmune thyroid disease may coexist in patients with exophthalmos.

  13. 78 FR 65960 - Enhancing Agricultural Coexistence; Request for Public Input

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... on the topic of coexistence as well as how USDA can best communicate and collaborate with those.... agriculture increases, so does the importance of managing issues that affect agricultural coexistence, such as... when it comes to communicating and collaborating about coexistence. Specific topics for input are...

  14. 78 FR 79660 - Enhancing Agricultural Coexistence; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ...] Enhancing Agricultural Coexistence; Extension of Comment Period ACTION: Notice; extension of comment period... order to further agricultural coexistence. This action will allow interested persons additional time to... among those involved in diverse agricultural systems on the topic of coexistence as well as how USDA can...

  15. Coexisting chondroblastoma and osteochondroma: a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardiwala D

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of two different types of benign cartilaginous tumours of bone in the same patient has not been reported in literature. We report a case in which a sixteen-year-old male had a benign chondroblastoma of the proximal left humerus and an osteochondroma of the distal left femur. Both originated at the same time and had a progressive increase in size with growth.

  16. Species coexistence in a changing world

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando eValladares; Fernando eValladares; Cristina C. Bastias; Oscar eGodoy; Elena eGranda; Elena eGranda; Adrian eEscudero

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of global change for the maintenance of species diversity will depend on the sum of each species responses to the environment and on the interactions among them. A wide ecological literature supports that these species-specific responses can arise from factors related to life strategies, evolutionary history and intraspecific variation, and also from environmental variation in space and time. In the light of recent advances from coexistence theory combined with mechanistic ex...

  17. Gastric schwannoma coexists with peptic ulcer perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan İnce

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastric schwannoma is a benign neoplasm that originates from sheet of nerve cell in stomach. Differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, (GISTs which have malign potential, than these tumors, which definite diagnosis is determined by histopathological and immunohistochemical methods have clinical significance due to gastric schwannomas have excellent progress after surgical resection. We presented a case of gastric schwannoma coexists with peptic ulcer perforation with guide of literature in this study.

  18. Species coexistence in a changing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando eValladares

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of global change for the maintenance of species diversity will depend on the sum of each species responses to the environment and on the interactions among them. A wide ecological literature supports that these species-specific responses can arise from factors related to life strategies, evolutionary history and intraspecific variation, and also from environmental variation in space and time. In the light of recent advances from coexistence theory combined with mechanistic explanations of diversity maintenance, we discuss how global change drivers can influence species coexistence. We revise the importance of both competition and facilitation for understanding coexistence in different ecosystems, address the influence of phylogenetic relatedness, functional traits, phenotypic plasticity and intraspecific variability, and discuss lessons learnt from invasion ecology. While most previous studies have focused their efforts on disentangling the mechanisms that maintain the biological diversity in species-rich ecosystems such as tropical forests, grasslands and coral reefs, we argue that much can be learnt from pauci-specific communities where functional variability within each species, together with demographic and stochastic processes becomes key to understand species interactions and eventually community responses to global change.

  19. Species coexistence in a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Fernando; Bastias, Cristina C.; Godoy, Oscar; Granda, Elena; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of global change for the maintenance of species diversity will depend on the sum of each species responses to the environment and on the interactions among them. A wide ecological literature supports that these species-specific responses can arise from factors related to life strategies, evolutionary history and intraspecific variation, and also from environmental variation in space and time. In the light of recent advances from coexistence theory combined with mechanistic explanations of diversity maintenance, we discuss how global change drivers can influence species coexistence. We revise the importance of both competition and facilitation for understanding coexistence in different ecosystems, address the influence of phylogenetic relatedness, functional traits, phenotypic plasticity and intraspecific variability, and discuss lessons learnt from invasion ecology. While most previous studies have focused their efforts on disentangling the mechanisms that maintain the biological diversity in species-rich ecosystems such as tropical forests, grasslands and coral reefs, we argue that much can be learnt from pauci-specific communities where functional variability within each species, together with demographic and stochastic processes becomes key to understand species interactions and eventually community responses to global change. PMID:26528323

  20. Emergent neutrality drives phytoplankton species coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Angel M.; Calliari, Danilo; Kruk, Carla; Conde, Daniel; Bonilla, Sylvia; Fort, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that drive species coexistence and community dynamics have long puzzled ecologists. Here, we explain species coexistence, size structure and diversity patterns in a phytoplankton community using a combination of four fundamental factors: organism traits, size-based constraints, hydrology and species competition. Using a ‘microscopic’ Lotka–Volterra competition (MLVC) model (i.e. with explicit recipes to compute its parameters), we provide a mechanistic explanation of species coexistence along a niche axis (i.e. organismic volume). We based our model on empirically measured quantities, minimal ecological assumptions and stochastic processes. In nature, we found aggregated patterns of species biovolume (i.e. clumps) along the volume axis and a peak in species richness. Both patterns were reproduced by the MLVC model. Observed clumps corresponded to niche zones (volumes) where species fitness was highest, or where fitness was equal among competing species. The latter implies the action of equalizing processes, which would suggest emergent neutrality as a plausible mechanism to explain community patterns. PMID:21177680

  1. Tuberous sclerosis complex coexistent with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Min; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis and hippocampal sclerosis are both well-defined entities associated with medically intractable epilepsy. To our knowledge, there has been only one prior case of these two pathologies being co-existent. We report a 7-month-old boy who presented with intractable seizures at 2 months of age. MRI studies showed diffuse volume loss in the brain with bilateral, multiple cortical tubers and subcortical migration abnormalities. Subependymal nodules were noted without subependymal giant cell astrocytoma. Genetic testing revealed TSC2 and PRD gene deletions. Histopathology of the hippocampus showed CA1 sclerosis marked by loss of neurons in the CA1 region. Sections from the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes showed multiple cortical tubers characterized by cortical architectural disorganization, gliosis, calcifications and increased number of large balloon cells. Focal white matter balloon cells and spongiform changes were also present. The patient underwent resection of the right fronto-parietal lobe and a subsequent resection of the right temporal, parietal and occipital lobes. The patient is free of seizures on anti-epileptic medication 69 months after surgery. Although hippocampal sclerosis is well documented to be associated with coexistent focal cortical dysplasia, the specific co-existence of cortical tubers and hippocampal sclerosis appears to be rare. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Arterial thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, R.T

    2008-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a non-inflammatory autoimmune disease that mainly affects young women. The syndrome is characterized by recurrent thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity in association with the persistent serological presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Antiphospholipid

  3. Determinación de anticuerpos anti-β2glicoproteína I en pacientes con síndrome antifosfolípido Anti- β2 glycoprotein antibodies in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Uribe Uribe

    2004-09-01

    and with the clinical manifestations of the Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS. In this study 80 women with APS (35 from the Rheumatology Service and 45 with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion, RSA were included, as well as 5 women with rheumatic diseases but no APS, 27 RSA-women without APS and 20 healthy women in their reproductive age. The presence of IgG and IgM anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL, anti- β2GPI antibodies by ELISA method and lupus anticoagulant by the test of activated partial thromboplastin time was investigated. Additionally the clinical manifestations associated to APS were registered. In the group of women with APS, 25.7% (9/35 of those with rheumatic diseases and 4.4% /2/45 of the ones with RSA were positive for anti- β2GPI while none of the women without APS or the controls had such positive reaction. There was a significant association at titers of 3+ (highly positive between the presence of anti- β2GPI antibodies and IgG and IgM aCL in contrast to anti- β2GPI-negative individu als. The positivity of lupus anticoagulant also correlated with the presence of anti- β2GPI antibodies. There was no significant correlation between any specific clinical manifestation and the presence of anti- β2GPI antibodies. In conclusion, the determination of anti- β2GPI antibodies was highly specific in patients with APS but did not associate with any clinical manifestation of the syndrome.

  4. A phase I study evaluating the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of an antibody-based tissue factor antagonist in subjects with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Peter E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue factor (TF-dependent extrinsic pathway has been suggested to be a central mechanism by which the coagulation cascade is locally activated in the lungs of patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS and thus represents an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. This study was designed to determine the pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of ALT-836, an anti-TF antibody, in patients with ALI/ARDS. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation Phase I clinical trial in adult patients who had suspected or proven infection, were receiving mechanical ventilation and had ALI/ARDS (PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 300 mm. Eighteen patients (6 per cohort were randomized in a 5:1 ratio to receive ALT-836 or placebo, and were treated within 48 hours after meeting screening criteria. Cohorts of patients were administered a single intravenously dose of 0.06, 0.08 or 0.1 mg/kg ALT-836 or placebo. Blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetic and immunogenicity measurements. Safety was assessed by adverse events, vital signs, ECGs, laboratory, coagulation and pulmonary function parameters. Results Pharmacokinetic analysis showed a dose dependent exposure to ALT-836 across the infusion range of 0.06 to 0.1 mg/kg. No anti-ALT-836 antibody response was observed in the study population during the trial. No major bleeding episodes were reported in the ALT-836 treated patients. The most frequent adverse events were anemia, observed in both placebo and ALT-836 treated patients, and ALT-836 dose dependent, self-resolved hematuria, which suggested 0.08 mg/kg as an acceptable dose level of ALT-836 in this patient population. Conclusions Overall, this study showed that ALT-836 could be safely administered to patients with sepsis-induced ALI/ARDS. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01438853

  5. The leukocyte-stiffening property of plasma in early acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) revealed by a microfluidic single-cell study: the role of cytokines and protection with antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preira, Pascal; Forel, Jean-Marie; Robert, Philippe; Nègre, Paulin; Biarnes-Pelicot, Martine; Xeridat, Francois; Bongrand, Pierre; Papazian, Laurent; Theodoly, Olivier

    2016-01-12

    Leukocyte-mediated pulmonary inflammation is a key pathophysiological mechanism involved in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Massive sequestration of leukocytes in the pulmonary microvasculature is a major triggering event of the syndrome. We therefore investigated the potential role of leukocyte stiffness and adhesiveness in the sequestration of leukocytes in microvessels. This study was based on in vitro microfluidic assays using patient sera. Cell stiffness was assessed by measuring the entry time (ET) of a single cell into a microchannel with a 6 × 9-μm cross-section under a constant pressure drop (ΔP = 160 Pa). Primary neutrophils and monocytes, as well as the monocytic THP-1 cell line, were used. Cellular adhesiveness to human umbilical vein endothelial cells was examined using the laminar flow chamber method. We compared the properties of cells incubated with the sera of healthy volunteers (n = 5), patients presenting with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE; n = 6), and patients with ARDS (n = 22), of whom 13 were classified as having moderate to severe disease and the remaining 9 as having mild disease. Rapid and strong stiffening of primary neutrophils and monocytes was induced within 30 minutes (mean ET >50 seconds) by sera from the ARDS group compared with both the healthy subjects and the ACPE groups (mean ET leukocyte-endothelium adhesion showed a weak and slow response after incubation with the sera of patients with ARDS (several hours), suggesting a lesser role of leukocyte adhesiveness compared with leukocyte stiffness in early ARDS. The leukocyte stiffening induced by cytokines in the sera of patients might play a role in the sequestration of leukocytes in the lung capillary beds during early ARDS. The inhibition of leukocyte stiffening with blocking antibodies might inspire future therapeutic strategies.

  6. Poland's syndrome associated with chronic granulocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, R; Afonso, E; Benedito, M; Maricato, L

    1991-10-01

    Poland's syndrome has been sporadically associated with haematological neoplasms, namely acute lymphoblastic and myeloblastic leukaemias and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The authors present the case of a child in whom this syndrome coexists with a Philadelphia negative, chronic granulocytic leukaemia, which has only required one course of treatment with busulphan in two and a half years of follow-up.

  7. Anticuerpos anti 21 hidroxilasa séricos en pacientes con anticuerpos antifracción microsomal: Síndrome poliendocrino autoinmune Seric 21- hydroxilase antibodies in patients with anti-microsomal fraction antibodies: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Botta

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome poliendocrino autoinmune (SPA es la asociación de enfermedades endocrinas autoinmunes con otros desórdenes autoinmunes no endocrinos. Los tipos 1, 2 y 4 presentan adrenalitis autoinmune, esto indica la presencia de autoanticuerpos, y su marcador serológico específico es el anti 21 hidroxilasa (a21-OH. El SPA tipo 2 es la asociación de adrenalitis, enfermedad tiroidea y/o diabetes mellitus inducidas por autoanticuerpos. Como componentes menores, pueden estar asociados entre otros, vitiligo, alopecia y miastenia. Nuestros objetivos fueron: establecer la prevalencia de a21-OH séricos en pacientes con anticuerpos anti fracción microsomal (AFM positivos, enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune y/o afecciones endocrinas y no endocrinas autoinmunes; diagnosticar formas incompletas de SPA y estudiar individuos con probable riesgo de progresión a un SPA completo. Estudiamos 72 pacientes AFM positivos y 60 sujetos tomados como grupo control, AFM negativos. Hallamos a21-OH elevados en dos pacientes: A= 47 U/ml, hipotiroidismo autoinmune y miastenia; y B= 8.75 U/ml, hipotiroidismo autoinmune y vitiligo; ambos con ausencia de insuficiencia adrenal. La prevalencia de a21-OH encontrada fue del 2.8%. Las pacientes A y B corresponden a un SPA tipo 2 incompleto y latente en relación al componente adrenal. Considerando a los a21-OH marcadores de enfermedad autoinmune latente, el eventual riesgo de evolución hacia la afección clínica sugiere la necesidad de estrechos controles clínicos y bioquímicos periódicos.Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS is the association of autoimmune endocrine diseases, with other autoimmune nonendocrine disorders. APS types 1, 2 and 4 include autoimmune adrenalitis; this suggests the presence of autoantibodies. A specific serological marker for these is the anti 21- hydroxilase autoantibody (a21-OH. APS type 2 is the association of autoimmune adrenalitis, to autoimmune thyroid disease and/or diabetes mellitus, all

  8. Coexisting typical migraine in familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Thomsen, Lise Lykke; Olesen, Jes

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to patients with migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO), most patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) do not report migraine-like attacks after pharmacologic provocation with glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a donor of nitric oxide. In the present study, we examined...... patients with FHM without known gene mutations and hypothesized that 1) GTN would cause more migraine-like attacks in patients with FHM compared to controls, and 2) GTN would cause more migraine attacks in patients with FHM with coexisting MA or MO compared to the pure FHM phenotype....

  9. Onconeural antibodies: improved detection and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storstein, Anette; Monstad, Sissel Evy; Haugen, Mette; Mazengia, Kibret; Veltman, Dana; Lohndal, Emilia; Aarseth, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Onconeural antibodies are found in many patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) and define the disease as paraneoplastic. The study describes the presence of onconeural antibodies and PNS in 555 patients with neurological symptoms and confirmed cancer within five years, and compares the diagnostic accuracy of different antibody assays (immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence and immunoblot). Onconeural antibodies were found in 11.9% of the patients by immunoprecipitation, in 7.0% by immunofluorescence and in 6.3% by immunoblot. PNS were present in 81.8% of the cancer patients that were seropositive by immunoprecipitation. Immunofluorescence and immunoblot failed to detect onconeural antibodies in almost one third of the PNS cases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The SSB-positive/SSA-negative antibody profile is not associated with key phenotypic features of Sjögren's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Alan N; McAdams DeMarco, Mara; Shiboski, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    phenotypic features. Among SICCA participants classified with SS on the basis of the American-European Consensus Group or American College of Rheumatology criteria, only 2% required the anti-SSB-alone test result to meet these criteria. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of anti-SSB, without anti-SSA antibodies, had...... participants, 2061 (63%) had negative anti-SSA/anti-SSB, 1162 (35%) had anti-SSA with or without anti-SSB, and 74 (2%) anti-SSB alone. Key SS phenotypic features were more prevalent and had measures indicative of greater disease activity in those participants with anti-SSA, either alone or with anti-SSB, than...... in those with anti-SSB alone or negative SSA/SSB serology. These between-group differences were highly significant and not explained by confounding by age, race/ethnicity or gender. Participants with anti-SSB alone were comparable to those with negative SSA/SSB serology in their association with these key...

  11. Coexistence of Phases in a Protein Heterodimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Liwo, Adam; Niemi, Antti J.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2012-07-01

    A heterodimer consisting of two or more different kinds of proteins can display an enormous number of distinct molecular architectures. The conformational entropy is an essential ingredient in the Helmholtz free energy and, consequently, these heterodimers can have a very complex phase structure. Here, it is proposed that there is a state of proteins, in which the different components of a heterodimer exist in different phases. For this purpose, the structures in the protein data bank (PDB) have been analyzed, with radius of gyration as the order parameter. Two major classes of heterodimers with their protein components coexisting in different phases have been identified. An example is the PDB structure 3DXC. This is a transcriptionally active dimer. One of the components is an isoform of the intra-cellular domain of the Alzheimer-disease related amyloid precursor protein (AICD), and the other is a nuclear multidomain adaptor protein in the Fe65 family. It is concluded from the radius of gyration that neither of the two components in this dimer is in its own collapsed phase, corresponding to a biologically active protein. The UNRES energy function has been utilized to confirm that, if the two components are separated from each other, each of them collapses. The results presented in this work show that heterodimers whose protein components coexist in different phases, can have intriguing physical properties with potentially important biological consequences.

  12. Coexistence Curve of Perfluoromethylcyclohexane-Isopropyl Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, D. T.; Kuhl, D. E.; Selby, C. E.

    1996-01-01

    The coexistence curve of the binary fluid mixture perfluoromethylcyclohexane-isopropyl alcohol was determined by precisely measuring the refractive index both above and below its upper critical consolute point. Sixty-seven two-phase data points were obtained over a wide range of reduced temperatures, 10(exp -5) less than t less than 2.5 x 10(exp -1), to determine the location of the critical point: critical temperature=89.901 C, and critical composition = 62.2% by volume perfluoromethylcyclohexane. These data were analyzed to determine the critical exponent 8 close to the critical point, the amplitude B, and the anomaly in the diameter. The volume-fraction coexistence curve is found to be as symmetric as any composition like variable. Correction to scaling is investigated as well as the need for a crossover theory. A model is proposed that describes the asymptotic approach to zero of the effective exponent Beta, which allows an estimation of the temperature regime free of crossover effects.

  13. Sleep overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Overlap syndrome, which is known as the coexistence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, was first defined by Flenley. Although it can refer to concomitant occurrence of any of the pulmonary diseases and OSA, overlap syndrome is commonly considered as the coexistence of OSA and COPD. This disease has unique adverse health consequences distinct from either condition alone. Given the high prevalence of each solitary disease, overlap syndrome is also likely to be common and clinically relevant. Despite the fact that overlap syndrome has been described in the literature for nearly 30 years, paucity of evaluations and studies limited the discussion on diagnosis, prevalence, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcomes of this disease. This review article addresses these issues by reviewing several recent studies conducted in Iran or other countries. This review suggests that overlap syndrome has worse outcomes than either disease alone. Our findings accentuated the urgent need for further studies on overlap syndrome and all overlaps between OSA and chronic pulmonary disease to provide a deeper insight into diagnosis and non-invasive treatments of this disease.

  14. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-12-24

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

  15. Evaluation of monoclonal antibody-based immunohistochemistry for the detection of European and North American Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and a comparison with in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kiwon; Seo, Hwi Won; Oh, Yeonsu; Kang, Ikjae; Park, Changhoon; Kang, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Bog-Hieu; Kwon, Byungjoon; Chae, Chanhee

    2012-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the ability of 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs; SDOW17 and SR30) to detect types 1 and 2 Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) lung tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and to compare the immunohistochemical results with in situ hybridization (ISH) and reverse transcription nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR) detection techniques. Lungs from 30 experimentally infected pigs (15 pigs with each genotype of PRRSV) and 20 naturally infected pigs (10 pigs with each genotype of PRRSV) with types 1 and 2 PRRSV, respectively, were used for the IHC, ISH, and RT-nPCR analyses. The SR30 mAb-based IHC detected significantly more type 1 PRRSV-positive cells in the accessory and caudal lobes from the experimentally infected pigs at 7 (P = 0.025) and 14 (P = 0.018) days postinoculation, respectively, compared to the SDOW17 mAb-based IHC. The results demonstrated that SR30 mAb-based IHC is useful for detecting both types 1 and 2 PRRSV antigen in FFPE lung tissues.

  16. [Isaacs's syndrome and associated diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Isaacs' syndrome is an antibody-mediated potassium channel disorder. Clinical symptoms of Isaacs' syndrome are characterized by muscle cramp, slow relaxation following muscle contraction, and hyperhidrosis. Hyperexcitability of the peripheral nerve cause these symptoms, which are relieved by administration of Na channel blockers and immunotherapy.The target channel proteins are voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). The suppression of voltage-gated outward K(+) current by antibodies induces hyperexcitability of the peripheral nerve. Electrophysiological findings show that antibodies may not directly block the kinetics of VGKCs, but may decrease channel density. From the electrophysiological, pharmacologic and immunologic view points, the site of origin of spontaneous discharges is located principally in the distal portion of the motor nerve."VGKC antibodies" are also detected in Morvan syndrome (severe insomnia with neuromyotonia and various autonomic disorders) and in a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC antibodies" are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1, CASPR-2) that complex with VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC antibodies" are now usually known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most common in limbic encephalitis with SIADH. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan syndrome.

  17. [Guillain-Barré syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeszutko, W; Sciborski, R; Bilińska, M

    1989-05-01

    A case of the Gullain-Barré syndrome was observed in a woman aged 18 years. The course was acute and fatal. Sedimentation plasmaferesis was applied in the treatment. A peculiarity of the case was the ascending course of paralysis and coexistence of encephalomyelitis.

  18. The challenges of managing coexistent disorders with phenylketonuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacDonald, A; Ahring, K; Almeida, M F

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The few published case reports of co-existent disease with phenylketonuria (PKU) are mainly genetic and familial conditions from consanguineous marriages. The clinical and demographic features of 30 subjects with PKU and co-existent conditions were described in this multi-centre, re......INTRODUCTION: The few published case reports of co-existent disease with phenylketonuria (PKU) are mainly genetic and familial conditions from consanguineous marriages. The clinical and demographic features of 30 subjects with PKU and co-existent conditions were described in this multi...

  19. Extinction dynamics from metastable coexistences in an evolutionary game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Jin; Traulsen, Arne

    2017-10-01

    Deterministic evolutionary game dynamics can lead to stable coexistences of different types. Stochasticity, however, drives the loss of such coexistences. This extinction is usually accompanied by population size fluctuations. We investigate the most probable extinction trajectory under such fluctuations by mapping a stochastic evolutionary model to a problem of classical mechanics using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. Our results show that more abundant types in a coexistence may be more likely to go extinct first, in good agreement with previous results. The distance between the coexistence and extinction points is not a good predictor of extinction either. Instead, the WKB method correctly predicts the type going extinct first.

  20. Different dispersal abilities allow reef fish to coexist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Michael; Bode, Lance; Armsworth, Paul R

    2011-09-27

    The coexistence of multiple species on a smaller number of limiting resources is an enduring ecological paradox. The mechanisms that maintain such biodiversity are of great interest to ecology and of central importance to conservation. We describe and prove a unique and robust mechanism for coexistence: Species that differ only in their dispersal abilities can coexist, if habitat patches are distributed at irregular distances. This mechanism is straightforward and ecologically intuitive, but can nevertheless create complex coexistence patterns that are robust to substantial environmental stochasticity. The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is noted for its diversity of reef fish species and its complex arrangement of reef habitat. We demonstrate that this mechanism can allow fish species with different pelagic larval durations to stably coexist in the GBR. Further, coexisting species on the GBR often dominate different subregions, defined primarily by cross-shelf position. Interspecific differences in dispersal ability generate similar coexistence patterns when dispersal is influenced by larval behavior and variable oceanographic conditions. Many marine and terrestrial ecosystems are characterized by patchy habitat distributions and contain coexisting species that have different dispersal abilities. This coexistence mechanism is therefore likely to have ecological relevance beyond reef fish.

  1. Coexistence in a variable environment: eco-evolutionary perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Colin T; Klausmeier, Christopher A

    2013-12-21

    A central question in community ecology is the means by which species coexist. Models of coexistence often assume that species have fixed trait values and consider questions such as how tradeoffs and environmental variation influence coexistence and diversity. However, species traits can be dynamic, varying between populations and individuals and changing over time as species adapt and evolve, at rates that are relevant to ecological processes. Consequently, adding evolution to ecological coexistence models may modify their predictions and stability in complex or unexpected ways. We extend a well-studied coexistence mechanism depending on resource fluctuations by allowing evolution along a tradeoff between maximum growth rate and competitive ability. Interactions between favorable season length and the period of fluctuations constrain coexistence, with two species coexistence favored by intermediate season length and arising through evolutionary branching or non-local invasion. However, these results depend on the relative rates of ecological and evolutionary processes: rapid evolution leads to a complete breakdown of otherwise stable coexistence. Other coexistence mechanisms should be evaluated from an evolutionary perspective to examine how evolutionary forces may alter predicted ecological dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. How can flexibility be integrated into coexistence regulations? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Yann; Dillen, Koen; Demont, Matty

    2014-02-01

    Member states in the European Union (EU) implemented both ex ante coexistence regulations and ex post liability schemes to ensure that genetically modified (GM) and non-GM crops can be cultivated side by side without excluding any agricultural option. Although proportionate coexistence is best achieved if regulated in a flexible manner, most implemented coexistence regulations merely rely on rigid measures. Flexible coexistence regulations, however, would reduce the regulatory burden on certain agricultural options and avoid jeopardizing economic incentives for coexistence. Flexibility can be integrated at: (i) the regulatory level by relaxing the rigidity of coexistence measures in ex ante regulations, yet without offsetting incentives to implement coexistence measures; (ii) the farm level by recommending the use of pollen barriers instead of large and fixed isolation distances; and (iii) the national/regional level by allowing diversified coexistence measures, which are adapted to the heterogeneity of farming in the EU. Owing to difficulties of implementation, the adoption of flexible and proportionate coexistence regulations will inevitably entail challenges. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Coexistence of giant cell fibroblastoma and encephalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroz, Nishat; Shamim, Nida; Jain, Anshu; Soni, Mayank

    2014-04-11

    Giant cell fibroblastoma (GCF) is a rare soft tissue tumour that occurs almost exclusively in children younger than 10 years of age and is mostly located in the superficial soft tissues of the back and thighs. We present a rare case of GCF with encephalocele in a 1.5-year-old boy who presented with a swelling in the occipital area of the scalp since birth. CT scan suggested encephalocele without any suspicion of a mass lesion. On histopathology, an ill-defined proliferation of fibroblasts in a heavily collagenised and focally myxoid stroma was seen containing numerous multinucleated cells having a floret-like appearance along with mature glial tissue bordering a cystic space. Immunohistochemically, the stromal cells were positive for both, vimentin (diffuse) and CD34 (focal) thereby confirming the histological diagnosis of GCF. This case highlights the unusual coexistence of GCF with congenital defects and its histogenetic resemblance to dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans.

  4. Coexisting principles and logics of elder care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene; Eskelinen, Leena; Boll Hansen, Eigil

    2015-01-01

    Healthy and active ageing has become an ideal in Western societies. In the Nordic countries, this ideal has been supported through a policy of help to self-help in elder care since the 1980s. However, reforms inspired by New Public Management (NPM) have introduced a new policy principle of consumer......-oriented service that stresses the wishes and priorities of older people. We have studied how these two principles are applied by care workers in Denmark. Is one principle or logic replacing the other, or do they coexist? Do they create tensions between professional knowledge and the autonomy of older people......? Using neo-institutional theory and feminist care theory, we analysed the articulation of the two policy principles in interviews and their logics in observations in four local authorities. We conclude that help to self-help is the dominant principle, that it is deeply entrenched in the identity...

  5. Limits on new forces coexisting with electromagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloor, H.; Fischbach, E.; Talmadge, C.; Greene, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the limits arising from different electromagnetic systems on the existence of a possible new electromagnetic analogue of the fifth force. Although such a force may have no intrinsic connection to electromagnetism (or gravity), its effects could be manifested through various anomalies in electromagnetic systems, for appropriate values of the coupling strength and range. Our work generalizes that of Bartlett and Loegl (who considered the case of a massive vector field coexisting with massless electrodynamics) to encompass a broad class of phenomenological interactions mediated by both scalar and vector exchanges. By combining data from both gravitational and electromagnetic systems, one can eventually set limits on a new force whose range λ extends from the subatomic scale (λ∼10 -15 m) to the astrophysical scale (λ∼10 12 m)

  6. Coexistence of pheochromocytoma with uncommon vascular lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pheochromocytoma/paragangliomas have been described to be associated with rare vascular abnormalities like renal artery stenosis. Coexistence of physiologically significant renal artery lesions is a compounding factor that alters management and prognosis of pheochromocytoma patients. Apart from individual case reports, data on such association in Indian population is not available. The aim of this study is to find the nature and prevalence of associated vascular abnormalities. Materials and Methods: From 1990 to 2010, a total of 50 patients were diagnosed with pheochromocytoma/paragangliomas. Hospital charts of these patients were reviewed retrospectively to identify those with unusual vascular abnormalities. Available literature was also reviewed. Results: Of the 50 patients with pheochromocytoma, 7 (14% had coexisting vascular lesions including renal artery stenosis in 4, aortoarteritis in 1, aortic aneurysm in 1 and inferior vena cava thrombosis in 1. Pheochromocytoma was adrenal in 42 and extra adrenal in 8. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was done in the patients. One patient with renal artery stenosis due to intimal fibrosis was subjected to percutaneous balloon angioplasty; the other three improved after adrenalectomy and lysis of fibrous adhesive bands. The patient with aortoarteritos was treated with oral steroids. Inferior vena cava thrombosis was reversed with anticoagulants. The patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm was advised for annual follow-up on account of its size of 4.5 cm and asymptomatic presentation. Conclusion: There are multiple mechanisms that can lead to renal artery stenosis and other vascular abnormalities in a case of pheochromocytoma. A high index of suspicion is necessary to enable both entities to be diagnosed preoperatively and allow proper planning of surgical therapy. Incomplete diagnosis may lead to persistent hypertension postoperatively in a case of associated renal artery stenosis.

  7. Coexistence of Chiari malformation type I and isolated hemihypertrophy in a 15-year old girl: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Kazanasmaz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hemihypertrophy is the asymmetrical growth of one or more parts of the body, and might be either isolated or a component of various syndromes. Coexistence of isolated hemihypertrophy and Chiari malformation type I are very rarely. In this study, our objective was to present a 15 years old girl case with isolated hemihypertrophy and Chiari malformation type I in the light of literature data.

  8. Epitope mapping and biological function analysis of antibodies produced by immunization of mice with an inactivated Chinese isolate of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Te-hui W.; Wang, Shixia; Sakhatskyy, Pavlo V.; Mboudoudjeck, Innocent; Lawrence, John M.; Huang Song; Coley, Scott; Yang Baoan; Li Jiaming; Zhu Qingyu; Lu Shan

    2005-01-01

    Inactivated severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been tested as a candidate vaccine against the re-emergence of SARS. In order to understand the efficacy and safety of this approach, it is important to know the antibody specificities generated with inactivated SARS-CoV. In the current study, a panel of twelve monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was established by immunizing Balb/c mice with the inactivated BJ01 strain of SARS-CoV isolated from the lung tissue of a SARS-infected Chinese patient. These mAbs could recognize SARS-CoV-infected cells by immunofluorescence analysis (IFA). Seven of them were mapped to the specific segments of recombinant spike (S) protein: six on S1 subunit (aa 12-798) and one on S2 subunit (aa 797-1192). High neutralizing titers against SARS-CoV were detected with two mAbs (1A5 and 2C5) targeting at a subdomain of S protein (aa 310-535), consistent with the previous report that this segment of S protein contains the major neutralizing domain. Some of these S-specific mAbs were able to recognize cleaved products of S protein in SARS-CoV-infected Vero E6 cells. None of the remaining five mAbs could recognize either of the recombinant S, N, M, or E antigens by ELISA. This study demonstrated that the inactivated SARS-CoV was able to preserve the immunogenicity of S protein including its major neutralizing domain. The relative ease with which these mAbs were generated against SARS-CoV virions further supports that subunit vaccination with S constructs may also be able to protect animals and perhaps humans. It is somewhat unexpected that no N-specific mAbs were identified albeit anti-N IgG was easily identified in SARS-CoV-infected patients. The availability of this panel of mAbs also provided potentially useful agents with applications in therapy, diagnosis, and basic research of SARS-CoV

  9. The challenges of managing coexistent disorders with phenylketonuria: 30 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, A; Ahring, K; Almeida, M F; Belanger-Quintana, A; Blau, N; Burlina, A; Cleary, M; Coskum, T; Dokoupil, K; Evans, S; Feillet, F; Giżewska, M; Gokmen Ozel, H; Lotz-Havla, A S; Kamieńska, E; Maillot, F; Lammardo, A M; Muntau, A C; Puchwein-Schwepcke, A; Robert, M; Rocha, J C; Santra, S; Skeath, R; Strączek, K; Trefz, F K; van Dam, E; van Rijn, M; van Spronsen, F; Vijay, S

    2015-12-01

    The few published case reports of co-existent disease with phenylketonuria (PKU) are mainly genetic and familial conditions from consanguineous marriages. The clinical and demographic features of 30 subjects with PKU and co-existent conditions were described in this multi-centre, retrospective cohort study. Diagnostic age of PKU and co-existent condition, treatment regimen, and impact of co-existent condition on blood phenylalanine (Phe) control and PKU management were reported. 30 patients (11 males and 19 females), with PKU and a co-existent condition, current median age of 14 years (range 0.4 to 40 years) from 13 treatment centres from Europe and Turkey were described. There were 21 co-existent conditions with PKU; 9 were autoimmune; 6 gastrointestinal, 3 chromosomal abnormalities, and 3 inherited conditions. There were only 5 cases of parental consanguinity. Some patients required conflicting diet therapy (n=5), nutritional support (n=7) and 5 children had feeding problems. There was delayed diagnosis of co-existent conditions (n=3); delayed treatment of PKU (n=1) and amenorrhea associated with Grave's disease that masked a PKU pregnancy for 12 weeks. Co-existent conditions adversely affected blood Phe control in 47% (n=14) of patients. Some co-existent conditions increased the complexity of disease management and increased management burden for patients and caregivers. Occurrence of co-existent disease is not uncommon in patients with PKU and so investigation for co-existent disorders when the clinical history is not completely consistent with PKU is essential. Integrating care of a second condition with PKU management is challenging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Origin and pathogenesis of antiphospholipid antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Celli

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL are a heterogeneous group of antibodies that are detected in the serum of patients with a variety of conditions, including autoimmune (systemic lupus erythematosus, infectious (syphilis, AIDS and lymphoproliferative disorders (paraproteinemia, myeloma, lymphocytic leukemias. Thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, recurrent fetal loss and other clinical complications are currently associated with a subgroup of aPL designating the antiphospholipid syndrome. In contrast, aPL from patients with infectious disorders are not associated with any clinical manifestation. These findings led to increased interest in the origin and pathogenesis of aPL. Here we present the clinical features of the antiphospholipid syndrome and review the origin of aPL, the characteristics of experimentally induced aPL and their historical background. Within this context, we discuss the most probable pathogenic mechanisms induced by these antibodies.

  11. Pregnancy and Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Karen; Hunt, Beverley J

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is classified as the association of thrombotic events and/or obstetric morbidity in patients persistently positive for antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). APS is also the most frequently acquired risk factor for a treatable cause of recurrent pregnancy loss...... with antiphospholipid antibodies (HYPATIA) of HCQ versus placebo will provide scientific evidence on the use of HCQ in pregnant women with aPL....

  12. Coexistence of two stage-structured intraguild predators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, T.; Kooten, van T.

    2012-01-01

    An organism can be defined as omnivorous if it feeds on more than one trophic level. Omnivory is present in many ecosystems and multiple omnivorous species can coexist in the same ecosystem. How coexisting omnivores are able to avoid competitive exclusion is very much an open question. In this paper

  13. Geometry of coexistence in the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Frank, A.; Vargas, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Interacting Boson Model (IBM) with configuration mixing is applied to describe the phenomenon of coexistence in nuclei. The analysis suggests that the IBM with configuration mixing, used in conjunction with a (matrix) coherent-state method, may be a reliable tool for the study of geometric aspects of shape coexistence in nuclei

  14. Coexisting Disorders and Academic Achievement among Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Sulak, Tracey N.; Fearon, Danielle D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is a commonly diagnosed neuropsychological disorder among school-aged children with reported high rates of coexisting or comorbid disorders. As ADHD has been associated with academic underachievement, the current study examines this association in view of the presence of coexisting disorders. The purpose of the current study is to…

  15. Tunable two-phase coexistence in half-doped manganites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We discuss our very interesting experimental observation that the low- temperature two-phase coexistence in half-doped manganites is multi-valued (at any field) in that we can tune the coexisting antiferromagnetic-insulating (AF-I) and the ferromagnetic-metallic (FM-M) phase fractions by following different paths in ...

  16. Tunable two-phase coexistence in half-doped manganites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    temperature two-phase coexistence in half-doped manganites is multi-valued (at any field) in that we can tune the coexisting antiferromagnetic-insulating (AF-I) and the ferromagnetic-metallic (FM-M) phase fractions by following different paths in (; ...

  17. Complete Hydatidiform Mole Coexisting with a Live Fetus | Ezem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydatidiform mole co-existing with a normal fetus is very rare. We report a case of a 36 year old woman Para 4+0 who presented with amenorrhoea of twenty four weeks duration, vaginal bleeding , abdominal pain and pre-eclampsia. Ultrasound examination revealed a hydatidiform mole coexisting with a normal living fetus.

  18. [Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odler, Balázs; Müller, Veronika

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive lung diseases represent a major health problem worldwide due to their high prevalence associated with elevated socioeconomic costs. Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are chronic obstructive ventilatory disorders with airway inflammation, however they are separate nosological entities based on thedifferent development, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and prognostic features. However, these diseases may coexist and can be defined as the coexistence of increased variability of airflow in a patient with incompletely reversible airway obstruction. This phenotype is called asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. The syndrome is a clinical and scientific challenge as the majority of these patients have been excluded from the clinical and pharmacological trials, thus well-defined clinical characteristics and therapeutic approaches are lacking. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature focusing on pathophysiological and clinical features, and discuss possible therapeutic approaches of patients with asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1304-1313.

  19. 77 FR 9678 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal Antibodies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... hematological malignancies such as hairy cell leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and autoimmune disease such as lupus and Sjogren's syndrome. The specific antibodies...

  20. Depressive disorders co-existing with Addison–Biermer anemia – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Just MJ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mark Jean Just,1 Mariusz Kozakiewicz2 1Department of General and Endocronological Surgery, Piekary Medical Centre, Piekary Slaskie, 2Department of Food Chemistry Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland Background: Anemia is a disease that can co-exist with depression, other mental disorders, or somatic diseases. Anemia can imitate symptoms of depression, while depression symptoms can mask concurring symptoms of anemia.Case presentation: I am presenting a case of a 48-year-old woman with Addison–Biermer anemia, with co-existing mood disorders. The clinical analysis of the presented patient’s history indicates diagnostic problems and a need for a detailed analysis of drug-related complications that occurred during previous treatment, eg, in the form of neuroleptic malignant syndrome.Conclusion: The presented case report contains valuable guidelines that can be of assistance in diagnostics and treatment of patients treated for mental disorders, who are also diagnosed with somatic diseases. Keywords: anemia, autoimmune diseases, depression, neuroleptic malignant syndrome

  1. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Ricard

    2017-03-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the development of venous and/or arterial thromboses, often multiple, and pregnancy morbidity (mainly, recurrent fetal losses), in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Some estimates indicate that the incidence of the APS is around 5 new cases per 100,000 persons per year and the prevalence around 40-50 cases per 100,000 persons. The aPL are positive in approximately 13% of patients with stroke, 11% with myocardial infarction, 9.5% of patients with deep vein thrombosis and 6% of patients with pregnancy morbidity. Currently, there is consensus in treating APS patients with thrombosis with long-term oral anticoagulation and to prevent obstetric manifestations with the use of aspirin and heparin. This review summarizes the main knowledge on the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Aggression and coexistence in female caribou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckerly, Floyd W.; Ricca, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Female caribou (Rangifer tarandus) are highly gregarious, yet there has been little study of the behavioral mechanisms that foster coexistence. Quantifying patterns of aggression between male and female, particularly in the only cervid taxa where both sexes grow antlers, should provide insight into these mechanisms. We asked if patterns of aggression by male and female caribou followed the pattern typically noted in other polygynous cervids, in which males display higher frequencies and intensity of aggression. From June to August in 2011 and 2012, we measured the frequency and intensity of aggression across a range of group sizes through focal animal sampling of 170 caribou (64 males and 106 females) on Adak Island in the Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska. Males in same-sex and mixed-sex groups and females in mixed-sex groups had higher frequencies of aggression than females in same-sex groups. Group size did not influence frequency of aggression. Males displayed more intense aggression than females. Frequent aggression in mixed-sex groups probably reflects lower tolerance of males for animals in close proximity. Female caribou were less aggressive and more gregarious than males, as in other polygynous cervid species.

  3. Low T3 syndrome in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: Associations with disease activity and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Bin; Min, Ju-Hong; Cho, Hye-Jin; Seok, Jin Myoung; Lee, Hye Lim; Shin, Hee Young; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Byoung Joon

    2016-11-15

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) sometimes coexists with serological marker-positive, non-organ-specific autoimmune disorders. We evaluated the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and anti-thyroid antibodies in patients with NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD) and investigated the associations between thyroid dysfunction/autoimmunity and clinical features of NMOSD. Forty-nine NMOSD patients with anti-aquaporin-4 antibody and 392 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included. We measured the levels of thyroid hormones and anti-thyroid antibodies. The prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism, subclinical hyperthyroidism, and low T3 syndrome were higher in patients with NMOSD (4.1%, 12.2%, and 20.4%, respectively) compared with healthy controls (0.3%, 2.8%, and 0.5%, respectively; p=0.034, p=0.001, and poral prednisolone use, iv methylprednisolone use, other immunosuppressive agents use, and the location of lesion (ρ=-0.416, p=0.010). Our study suggests that thyroid dysfunction is frequent in patients with NMOSD; particularly, serum T3 levels may be a useful indicator of disease activity and disability in NMOSD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Recent developments in our understanding of the antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, P. G.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Urbanus, R. T.

    2012-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disease that manifests clinically as recurrent thrombotic complications or foetal losses and serologically with elevated levels of antiphospholipid antibodies in the plasmas of these patients. The term 'antiphospholipid syndrome' is confusing, because

  5. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Long-term coexistence of rotifer cryptic species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Montero-Pau

    Full Text Available Despite their high morphological similarity, cryptic species often coexist in aquatic habitats presenting a challenge in the framework of niche differentiation theory and coexistence mechanisms. Here we use a rotifer species complex inhabiting highly unpredictable and fluctuating salt lakes to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in stable coexistence in cryptic species. We combined molecular barcoding surveys of planktonic populations and paleogenetic analysis of diapausing eggs to reconstruct the current and historical coexistence dynamics of two highly morphologically similar rotifer species, B. plicatilis and B. manjavacas. In addition, we carried out laboratory experiments using clones isolated from eight lakes where both species coexist to explore their clonal growth responses to salinity, a challenging, highly variable and unpredictable condition in Mediterranean salt lakes. We show that both species have co-occurred in a stable way in one lake, with population fluctuations in which no species was permanently excluded. The seasonal occurrence patterns of the plankton in two lakes agree with laboratory experiments showing that both species differ in their optimal salinity. These results suggest that stable species coexistence is mediated by differential responses to salinity and its fluctuating regime. We discuss the role of fluctuating salinity and a persistent diapausing egg banks as a mechanism for species coexistence in accordance with the 'storage effect'.

  7. Coexistence through mutualist-dependent reversal of competitive hierarchies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrparvar, Mohsen; Zytynska, Sharon E; Balog, Adalbert; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2018-01-01

    Mechanisms that allow for the coexistence of two competing species that share a trophic level can be broadly divided into those that prevent competitive exclusion of one species within a local area, and those that allow for coexistence only at a regional level. While the presence of aphid-tending ants can change the distribution of aphids among host plants, the role of mutualistic ants has not been fully explored to understand coexistence of multiple aphid species in a community. The tansy plant ( Tanacetum vulgare ) hosts three common and specialized aphid species, with only one being tended by ants. Often, these aphids species will not coexist on the same plant but will coexist across multiple plant hosts in a field. In this study, we aim to understand how interactions with mutualistic ants and predators affect the coexistence of multiple species of aphid herbivores on tansy. We show that the presence of ants drives community assembly at the level of individual plant, that is, the local community, by favoring one ant-tended species, Metopeurum fuscoviride , while preying on the untended Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria and, to a lesser extent, Uroleucon tanaceti . Competitive hierarchies without ants were very different from those with ants. At the regional level, multiple tansy plants provide a habitat across which all aphid species can coexist at the larger spatial scale, while being competitively excluded at the local scale. In this case, ant mutualist-dependent reversal of the competitive hierarchy can drive community dynamics in a plant-aphid system.

  8. Evolutionary contribution to coexistence of competitors in microbial food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, Teppo; Kaitala, Veijo; Laakso, Jouni; Becks, Lutz

    2017-10-11

    The theory of species coexistence is a key concept in ecology that has received much attention. The role of rapid evolution for determining species coexistence is still poorly understood although evolutionary change on ecological time-scales has the potential to change almost any ecological process. The influence of evolution on coexistence can be especially pronounced in microbial communities where organisms often have large population sizes and short generation times. Previous work on coexistence has assumed that traits involved in resource use and species interactions are constant or change very slowly in terms of ecological time-scales. However, recent work suggests that these traits can evolve rapidly. Nevertheless, the importance of rapid evolution to coexistence has not been tested experimentally. Here, we show how rapid evolution alters the frequency of two bacterial competitors over time when grown together with specialist consumers (bacteriophages), a generalist consumer (protozoan) and all in combination. We find that consumers facilitate coexistence in a manner consistent with classic ecological theory. However, through disentangling the relative contributions of ecology (changes in consumer abundance) and evolution (changes in traits mediating species interactions) on the frequency of the two competitors over time, we find differences between the consumer types and combinations. Overall, our results indicate that the influence of evolution on species coexistence strongly depends on the traits and species interactions considered. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Pollinator Foraging Adaptation and Coexistence of Competing Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, Tomás A; Křivan, Vlastimil

    2016-01-01

    We use the optimal foraging theory to study coexistence between two plant species and a generalist pollinator. We compare conditions for plant coexistence for non-adaptive vs. adaptive pollinators that adjust their foraging strategy to maximize fitness. When pollinators have fixed preferences, we show that plant coexistence typically requires both weak competition between plants for resources (e.g., space or nutrients) and pollinator preferences that are not too biased in favour of either plant. We also show how plant coexistence is promoted by indirect facilitation via the pollinator. When pollinators are adaptive foragers, pollinator's diet maximizes pollinator's fitness measured as the per capita population growth rate. Simulations show that this has two conflicting consequences for plant coexistence. On the one hand, when competition between pollinators is weak, adaptation favours pollinator specialization on the more profitable plant which increases asymmetries in plant competition and makes their coexistence less likely. On the other hand, when competition between pollinators is strong, adaptation promotes generalism, which facilitates plant coexistence. In addition, adaptive foraging allows pollinators to survive sudden loss of the preferred plant host, thus preventing further collapse of the entire community.

  10. Coexisting Vocal Fold Polyps and Sulcus Vocalis: Coincidence or Coexistence? Characteristics of 14 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel-Neiderman, Narin Nard; Wasserzug, Oshri; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Oestreicher-Kedem, Yael

    2018-03-01

    The study aimed (1) to evaluate the prevalence of sulcus vocalis (SV) coexisting with vocal fold polyp (SV-VFP), and (2) to determine the effect of their coexistence on voice quality. This is a retrospective cohort study in a tertiary referral center. The medical records of all patients who underwent micro direct laryngoscopy due to VFPs between January 2013 and April 2015 were reviewed. Patients with SV-VFP were identified and data of their demographics, medical history, habits, preoperative and intraoperative laryngeal findings, and pre- and postoperative GRBAS (Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain) score, and compared with the data of patients with solitary VFPs (S-VFPs). Eighty-nine patients were diagnosed with VFPs, 14 (15.7%) of whom were diagnosed with SV-VFPs. Patients with SV-VFPs had significantly lower incidence of concurrent leukoplakia (P = 0.01), higher incidence of contralateral vocal fold lesions (P = 0.04), increased voice roughness score postoperatively (P = 0.01) on the GRBAS score, and had a lower rate of cigarette smoking (P = 0.02) compared with patients with S-VFPs. The possibility of a hidden SV should be considered when detecting VFPs, particularly in patients with contralateral vocal fold lesions and without cigarette smoking history. Because the group of patients with SV-VFP presented with unique features, we suspect that the coexistence of VFPs and SVs is not incidental and that SVs may contribute to the formation of VFPs, possibly by alternating glottic airflow. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Coexistence of primary sclerosing cholangitis in a patient with myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P J Lorenzoni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is an immune-mediated disease that compromises the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction. Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is considered an immune-mediated cholestatic liver disease. Both MG and PSC include an autoimmune pathogenesis, so there is some evidence that patients with MG or PSC have a higher risk of developing autoantibodies and other immune disorders than normal controls, but the coexistence of these two disorders has never been documented. We report a 40-year-old woman who presented with MG when she was 20 years old and developed PSC 20 years after a thymectomy. Liver biochemistry revealed cholestasis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed multifocal strictures and beads involving the intrahepatic bile ducts. A liver biopsy confirmed sclerosing cholangitis. Serological analysis demonstrated positive autoantibodies (Anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-smooth muscle antibodies. Repetitive stimulation had a decremental response, and antibodies to acetylcholine receptors were detectable. To our knowledge, this is the first case of PSC in a patient with MG. The main characteristics of both MG and PSC combination are discussed.

  12. Mycorrhizal Associations and Trophic Modes in Coexisting Orchids: An Ecological Continuum between Auto- and Mixotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Waud, Michael; Brys, Rein; Lallemand, Félix; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Robionek, Alicja; Selosse, Marc-André

    2017-01-01

    Two distinct nutritional syndromes have been described in temperate green orchids. Most orchids form mycorrhizas with rhizoctonia fungi and are considered autotrophic. Some orchids, however, associate with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with surrounding trees and derive their carbon from these fungi. This evolutionarily derived condition has been called mixotrophy or partial mycoheterotrophy and is characterized by 13 C enrichment and high N content. Although it has been suggested that the two major nutritional syndromes are clearly distinct and tightly linked to the composition of mycorrhizal communities, recent studies have challenged this assumption. Here, we investigated whether mycorrhizal communities and nutritional syndromes differed between seven green orchid species that co-occur under similar ecological conditions (coastal dune slacks). Our results showed that mycorrhizal communities differed significantly between orchid species. Rhizoctonia fungi dominated in Dactylorhiza sp., Herminium monorchis , and Epipactis palustris , which were autotrophic based on 13 C and N content. Conversely, Liparis loeselii and Epipactis neerlandica associated primarily with ectomycorrhizal fungi but surprisingly, 13 C and N content supported mixotrophy only in E. neerlandica . This, together with the finding of some ectomycorrhizal fungi in rhizoctonia-associated orchids, suggests that there exists an ecological continuum between the two syndromes. The presence of a large number of indicator species associating with individual orchid species further confirms previous findings that mycorrhizal fungi may be important factors driving niche-partitioning in terrestrial orchids and therefore contribute to orchid coexistence.

  13. Coexistence of competitors mediated by nonlinear noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekmann, Ivo; Bengfort, Michael; Malchow, Horst

    2017-06-01

    Stochastic reaction-diffusion equations are a popular modelling approach for studying interacting populations in a heterogeneous environment under the influence of environmental fluctuations. Although the theoretical basis of alternative models such as Fokker-Planck diffusion is not less convincing, movement of populations is most commonly modelled using the diffusion law due to Fick. An interesting feature of Fokker-Planck diffusion is the fact that for spatially varying diffusion coefficients the stationary solution is not a homogeneous distribution - in contrast to Fick's law of diffusion. Instead, concentration accumulates in regions of low diffusivity and tends to lower levels for areas of high diffusivity. Thus, we may interpret the stationary distribution of the Fokker-Planck diffusion as a reflection of different levels of habitat quality. Moreover, the most common model for environmental fluctuations, linear multiplicative noise, is based on the assumption that individuals respond independently to stochastic environmental fluctuations. For large population densities the assumption of independence is debatable and the model further implies that noise intensities can increase to arbitrarily high levels. Therefore, instead of the commonly used linear multiplicative noise model, we implement environmental variability by an alternative nonlinear noise term which never exceeds a certain maximum noise intensity. With Fokker-Planck diffusion and the nonlinear noise model replacing the classical approaches we investigate a simple invasive system based on the Lotka-Volterra competition model. We observe that the heterogeneous stationary distribution generated by Fokker-Planck diffusion generally facilitates the formation of segregated habitats of resident and invader. However, this segregation can be broken by nonlinear noise leading to coexistence of resident and invader across the whole spatial domain, an effect that would not be possible in the non

  14. Avaliação da pesquisa de anticorpos antifosfolipídios para o diagnóstico da síndrome antifosfolípide Evaluation of antiphospholipid antibodies testing for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Gonçalves Perches

    2009-06-01

    June 2006. RESULTS: 106 participants (mean age of 42.2 ± 14.1 years at inclusion and female gender in 84% of patients were included in the study. The prevalence of thrombosis was 17.9% (19/106 patients and pregnancy morbidity was 12.3% (13/106 patients. The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS was confirmed in 23.6% (25/106 patients, and it was primary in 68% (17/25 patients and secondary in 32% (8/25 patients. The ACL antibodies were found in 97.1% (103/106 and LAC in 11.4% (5/44 of the serum samples tested. IgM, IgG and IgA ACL isotypes were respectively found in 100%, 23.3% and in 4.9% of these ACL positive sera. For APS diagnosis the sensitivity of IgM ACL was 92% and its specificity was 1.2%, while IgG ACL had a sensitivity of 40% and specificity of 82.5%. The absence of IgG ACL had a high negative predictive value for APS diagnosis (81.4%.The analysis of the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve showed larger area under the curve for ACL IgG and LAC. CONCLUSION: In a random sample of individuals with positive antiphospholipid antibodies, IgG ACL and LAC showed a larger specificity for APS diagnosis which had been characterized by a higher prevalence of thrombosis.

  15. Multispecies Coexistence without Diffuse Competition; or, Why Phylogenetic Signal and Trait Clustering Weaken Coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Simon Maccracken

    2017-08-01

    Related and phenotypically similar species often compete more strongly than unrelated and dissimilar species. Much is unknown about the community-level implications of such complex interactions. Here, we study how they affect community dynamics differently from diffuse interactions (competing equally with all heterospecifics). We derive results for a model that applies to many forms of density dependence and also examine specific cases using a site-occupancy model of forest dynamics. The results indicate that nondiffuse competition produces three effects that will not occur under diffuse competition: first, the central niche effect-if a species has high niche overlap with several competitors, then its average fitness is reduced; second, the common competitor effect-if a species has high niche overlap with more common species, then its average fitness is reduced (these two effects are usually equalizing, because more favorable niches are likely to contain more species and more abundant species); and, finally, the community redistribution effect-when a species falls to low density, the relative abundance of its competitors will change, altering its ability to recover. The community redistribution effect usually undermines coexistence, because the community will usually become dominated by an invader's closest competitors. This study provides both instructions for measuring these effects in the field and a framework for analyzing how phylogenetic signal, trait-based niche axes, and other forms of nondiffuse competition affect coexistence.

  16. Sustained systemic delivery of monoclonal antibodies by genetically modified skin fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noël, D; Pelegrin, M; Brockly, F

    2000-01-01

    In vivo production and systemic delivery of therapeutic antibodies by engineered cells might advantageously replace injection of purified antibodies for treating a variety of life-threatening diseases, including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and autoimmune diseases. We report here...... that skin fibroblasts retrovirally transduced to express immunoglobulin genes can be used for sustained long-term systemic delivery of cloned antibodies in immunocompetent mice. Importantly, no anti- idiotypic response against the ectopically expressed model antibody used in this study was observed...

  17. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  18. Coexistence of GMO production, labeling policies, and strategic firm interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venus, Thomas Johann

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes the market effects of the coexistence of genetically modified organism (GMO) and conventional production, labeling policies, and strategic firm interactions through vertical product differentiation. Although we focus on GMOs, the applied frameworks can be adopted and

  19. HARMONIC INCLUSION FROM EDUCATION FOR PEACE AND COEXISTENCE PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Genoveva Guerrero-Arce

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article of reflection shown below is an analysis of how inclusion schemes change from a positive perspective from the peace studies and planning coexistence, considering elements of relevance as the conceptualization of discrimination, learned disabilities, public policies that attempt to include from the exclusion and the role of planning in the harmonic coexistence inclusion not only in school settings but socially, as an alternative that promotes respect for differences and consider redesigning programs rather than promote inclusion, wear combating discrimination and exclusion, resulting in more emerging preventive and educational actions. It is considering the need for listing proposals from a new paradigm that considers differences as elements that enrich the school environment and allow peaceful coexistence through diversity, which it is directly linked to that observed in the planning of coexistence that is taking place in schools in School Education of the State of Mexico inclusive education.

  20. Serum BAFF and APRIL Levels, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, and Immunoglobulins after B-Cell Depletion Using the Monoclonal Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunde, Sigrid; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Sapkota, Dipak; Risa, Kristin; Dahl, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Mella, Olav; Fluge, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We have previously suggested clinical benefit from B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in a randomized and placebo-controlled study. Prolonged responses were then demonstrated in an open-label phase-II study with maintenance rituximab treatment. Using blood samples from patients in the previous two clinical trials, we investigated quantitative changes in T-lymphocyte subsets, in immunoglobulins, and in serum levels of two B-cell regulating cytokines during follow-up. B-lymphocyte activating factor of the tumor necrosis family (BAFF) in baseline serum samples was elevated in 70 ME/CFS patients as compared to 56 healthy controls (p = 0.011). There were no significant differences in baseline serum BAFF levels between patients with mild, moderate, or severe ME/CFS, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serum levels were not significantly different in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy controls at baseline, and no changes in serum levels were seen during follow-up. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets and T-cell activation markers at multiple time points during follow-up showed no significant differences over time, between rituximab and placebo groups, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. Baseline serum IgG levels were significantly lower in patients with subsequent response after rituximab therapy compared to non-responders (p = 0.03). In the maintenance study, slight but significant reductions in mean serum immunoglobulin levels were observed at 24 months compared to baseline; IgG 10.6–9.5 g/L, IgA 1.8–1.5 g/L, and IgM 0.97–0.70 g/L. Although no functional assays were performed, the lack of significant associations of T- and NK-cell subset numbers with B-cell depletion, as well as the lack of associations to clinical responses, suggest that B

  1. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  2. Platelet antibodies blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  3. Magnetic nesting and co-existence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elesin, V.F.; Kapaev, V.V.; Kopaev, Yu.V.

    2004-01-01

    In the case of providing for the magnetic nesting conditions of the electron spin dispersion law the co-existence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity is possible by any high magnetization. The co-existence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity in the layered cuprate compounds of the RuSr 2 GdCu 2 O 8 -type is explained on this basis, wherein due to the nonstrict provision of the magnetic nesting condition there exists the finite but sufficiently high critical magnetization [ru

  4. Coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity in semimetals (Triplet pairing case)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do Tran Cat; Nguyen Manh Duc; Nguyen Van Cong.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of coexistence of ferromagnetic ordering and superconductivity in a two-band model of a semimetal with an isotopic current carrier spectrum is investigated in detail. It is shown that for unequal electron and hole concentrations triplet electron-hole and triplet cooper pairings with weak electron coupling may coexist. In this case a nonvanishing mean magnetic moment appears. (author). 9 refs., 4 figs

  5. Effect of genetic and coexisting polymorphisms on platelet response ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    platelet aggregation to clopidogrel treatment, respectively (P <0.001). Patients with CYP2C19*2 allele had a higher risk of high on-treatment platelet reactivity than non carriers (adjusted OR, 5.434; 95% CI, 1.918–15.399, P =0.01). The coexistence of CYP2B6*9 (rs8192719) and P2Y12 (rs2046934) and the coexistence of ...

  6. Idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, Antonio; Ribes, Ramon; Riva, Andres de la; Rubio, Fernando Lopez; Sanchez, Carmen; Sancho, Jose L.

    2002-01-01

    A case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome is presented. Both entities have been described in association with several other chronic systemic inflammatory diseases and autoimmune conditions. To our knowledge the coexistence between Sweet's Syndrome and hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis has not been reported up to date. We suggest a possible autoimmune or dysimmune mechanism in the pathogenesis of these two entities

  7. Persistent coexistence of cyclically competing species in spatially extended ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junpyo; Do, Younghae; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental result in the evolutionary-game paradigm of cyclic competition in spatially extended ecological systems, as represented by the classic Reichenbach-Mobilia-Frey (RMF) model, is that high mobility tends to hamper or even exclude species coexistence. This result was obtained under the hypothesis that individuals move randomly without taking into account the suitability of their local environment. We incorporate local habitat suitability into the RMF model and investigate its effect on coexistence. In particular, we hypothesize the use of "basic instinct" of an individual to determine its movement at any time step. That is, an individual is more likely to move when the local habitat becomes hostile and is no longer favorable for survival and growth. We show that, when such local habitat suitability is taken into account, robust coexistence can emerge even in the high-mobility regime where extinction is certain in the RMF model. A surprising finding is that coexistence is accompanied by the occurrence of substantial empty space in the system. Reexamination of the RMF model confirms the necessity and the important role of empty space in coexistence. Our study implies that adaptation/movements according to local habitat suitability are a fundamental factor to promote species coexistence and, consequently, biodiversity.

  8. Tradeoffs, competition, and coexistence in eastern deciduous forest ant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuble, Katharine L; Rodriguez-Cabal, Mariano A; McCormick, Gail L; Jurić, Ivan; Dunn, Robert R; Sanders, Nathan J

    2013-04-01

    Ecologists have long sought to explain the coexistence of multiple potentially competing species in local assemblages. This is especially challenging in species-rich assemblages in which interspecific competition is intense, as it often is in ant assemblages. As a result, a suite of mechanisms has been proposed to explain coexistence among potentially competing ant species: the dominance-discovery tradeoff, the dominance-thermal tolerance tradeoff, spatial segregation, temperature-based niche partitioning, and temporal niche partitioning. Through a series of observations and experiments, we examined a deciduous forest ant assemblage in eastern North America for the signature of each of these coexistence mechanisms. We failed to detect evidence for any of the commonly suggested mechanisms of coexistence, with one notable exception: ant species appear to temporally partition foraging times such that behaviourally dominant species foraged more intensely at night, while foraging by subdominant species peaked during the day. Our work, though focused on a single assemblage, indicates that many of the commonly cited mechanisms of coexistence may not be general to all ant assemblages. However, temporal segregation may play a role in promoting coexistence among ant species in at least some ecosystems, as it does in many other organisms.

  9. Intraspecific genetic variation and species coexistence in plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Bodil K; Damgaard, Christian F; Laroche, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Many studies report that intraspecific genetic variation in plants can affect community composition and coexistence. However, less is known about which traits are responsible and the mechanisms by which variation in these traits affect the associated community. Focusing on plant-plant interactions, we review empirical studies exemplifying how intraspecific genetic variation in functional traits impacts plant coexistence. Intraspecific variation in chemical and architectural traits promotes species coexistence, by both increasing habitat heterogeneity and altering competitive hierarchies. Decomposing species interactions into interactions between genotypes shows that genotype × genotype interactions are often intransitive. The outcome of plant-plant interactions varies with local adaptation to the environment and with dominant neighbour genotypes, and some plants can recognize the genetic identity of neighbour plants if they have a common history of coexistence. Taken together, this reveals a very dynamic nature of coexistence. We outline how more traits mediating plant-plant interactions may be identified, and how future studies could use population genetic surveys of genotype distribution in nature and methods from trait-based ecology to better quantify the impact of intraspecific genetic variation on plant coexistence. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. [Cramp-fasciculation syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagueny, A

    2005-12-01

    The cramp-fasciculation syndrome is a rare clinical entity in comparison with the frequency of cramps and isolated fasciculations in the general population. It is recognized as a benign syndrome without weakness and atrophy, however a few reports suggest that it may precede the occurrence of a motor neuron disease. Most often, the cramp-fasciculation syndrome is idiopathic and may be a component of a hyperexcitable peripheral nerve syndrome including other activities such as myokymia and neuromyotonia where antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs) appear to be one of the effector mechanisms. The most complete form of this hyperexcitable peripheral nerve syndrome is Isaacs' syndrome. The central nervous system is also concerned with anti-VGKC antibodies found in Morvan's disease and limbic encephalitis which is often a paraneoplastic condition. These findings extend the spectrum of the anti-VGKC syndrome that may be associated with other auto-immune diseases, chiefly myasthenia gravis with thymoma. Carbamazepine and phenytoin cause reduction of the clinical and electrophysiological signs of the nerve hyperexcitability, and plasmapheresis and (or) immunosuppressors are useful when an auto-immune origin is considered.

  11. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  12. Hypertension og det metaboliske syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael Hecht; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...... risk associated with increased blood pressure. As the definition of the metabolic syndrome is based on dichotomization of cardiovascular risk factors with a continuously increasing risk, it cannot match risk stratification tools like the HeartScore for calculation of prognosis. However, the metabolic...... syndrome is of clinical importance as it makes the treating physician test for other elements of the syndrome in patients with one of the elements, e.g. hypertension. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun...

  13. Hypertension og det metaboliske syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...... risk associated with increased blood pressure. As the definition of the metabolic syndrome is based on dichotomization of cardiovascular risk factors with a continuously increasing risk, it cannot match risk stratification tools like the HeartScore for calculation of prognosis. However, the metabolic...... syndrome is of clinical importance as it makes the treating physician test for other elements of the syndrome in patients with one of the elements, e.g. hypertension. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun-15...

  14. Unravelling the role of allo-antibodies and Transplant Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Matsuda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alloimmunity driving rejection in the context of solid organ transplantation can be grossly divided into mechanisms predominantly driven by either T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR or antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR, though the co-existence of both types of rejections can be seen in a variable number of sampled grafts. Acute TCMR can generally be well controlled by the establishment of effective immunosuppression 1, 2. Acute ABMR is a low frequency finding in the current era of blood group and HLA donor/recipient matching and the avoidance of engraftment in the context of high-titer, pre-formed donor specific antibodies. However, chronic ABMR remains a major complication resulting in the untimely loss of transplanted organs 3-10. The close relationship between donor-specific antibodies (DSAs and ABMR has been revealed by the highly sensitive detection of human leukocyte antigen (HLA antibodies 11-16. Injury to transplanted organs by activation of humoral immune reaction in the context of HLA identical transplants and the absence of donor specific antibodies (DSAs, strongly suggest the participation of non HLA (nHLA antibodies in ABMR (17-25. In this review, we discuss the genesis of ABMR in the context of HLA and nHLA antibodies and summarize strategies for ABMR management.

  15. Anticorpos contra LDL-ox e síndrome coronariana aguda Anticuerpos contra LDL-ox y síndrome coronario agudo Antibodies against OxLDL and acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Brito Medeiros

    2010-07-01

    significativamente más elevados (p =0,017 en los casos (0,40 ± 0,22, que en los controles (0,33 ± 0,23. Por otro lado, los títulos de antipeptD fueron significativamente menores (p BACKGROUND: The oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL induces the formation of immunogenic epitopes in molecules. The presence of autoantibodies against oxLDL has been demonstrated in the serum of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. However, the role of these autoantibodies in the pathophysiology of acute coronary syndromes (ACS and their clinical significance remain undefined. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between antibodies against oxLDL and ACS. METHODS: Titers of IgG autoantibodies against oxLDL by copper (anti-oxLDL and anti-D synthetic peptide derived from apolipoprotein B (antipeptD were determined by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in 90 patients, in the first 12 hours of ACS (cases and in 90 patients with chronic CAD (controls. RESULTS: The results showed that the titers of anti-oxLDL were significantly higher (p = 0.017 in cases (0.40 ± 0.22 than in controls (0.33 ± 0.23. On the other hand, the titers of antipeptD were significantly lower (p < 0.01 in cases (0.28 ± 0.23 than in controls (0.45 ± 0.30. The difference in the titers of both antibodies between the two groups was independent of age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, body mass index, smoking, lipid profile, statin use and family history of CAD. CONCLUSION: The results showed that the titers of anti-oxLDL were significantly higher in patients with acute coronary syndrome as compared to patients with coronary artery disease and may be associated with atherosclerotic plaque instability.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  17. Psychiatric emergencies (part II): psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Dain, S

    2013-02-01

    In this Part II psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases are discussed. "Comorbidity phenomenon" defines the not univocal interrelation between medical illnesses and psychiatric disorders, each other negatively influencing morbidity and mortality. Most severe psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, show increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease, related to poverty, use of psychotropic medication, and higher rate of preventable risk factors such as smoking, addiction, poor diet and lack of exercise. Moreover, psychiatric and organic disorders can develop together in different conditions of toxic substance and prescription drug use or abuse, especially in the emergency setting population. Different combinations with mutual interaction of psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders are defined by the so called "dual diagnosis". The hypotheses that attempt to explain the psychiatric disorders and substance abuse relationship are examined: (1) common risk factors; (2) psychiatric disorders precipitated by substance use; (3) psychiatric disorders precipitating substance use (self-medication hypothesis); and (4) synergistic interaction. Diagnostic and therapeutic difficulty concerning the problem of dual diagnosis, and legal implications, are also discussed. Substance induced psychiatric and organic symptoms can occur both in the intoxication and withdrawal state. Since ancient history, humans selected indigene psychotropic plants for recreational, medicinal, doping or spiritual purpose. After the isolation of active principles or their chemical synthesis, higher blood concentrations reached predispose to substance use, abuse and dependence. Abuse substances have specific molecular targets and very different acute mechanisms of action, mainly involving dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems, but finally converging on the brain's reward pathways, increasing dopamine in nucleus accumbens. The most common

  18. Controversies concerning the antiphospholipid syndrome in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarena Cabrera, Dulce María Albertina; Rodriguez-Jaimes, Claudia; Acevedo-Gallegos, Sandra; Gallardo-Gaona, Juan Manuel; Velazquez-Torres, Berenice; Ramírez-Calvo, José Antonio

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a non-inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by recurrent thrombotic events and/or obstetric complications associated with the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (anticardiolipin antibodies, anti-β 2 glycoprotein-i antibodies, and/or lupus anticoagulant. Antiphospholipid antibodies are a heterogeneous group of autoantibodies associated with recurrent miscarriage, stillbirth, fetal growth restriction and premature birth. The diversity of the features of the proposed placental antiphospholipid antibodies fingerprint suggests that several disease processes may occur in the placentae of women with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in the form of immune responses: inflammatory events, complement activation, angiogenic imbalance and, less commonly, thrombosis and infarction. Because of the disparity between clinical and laboratory criteria, and the impact on perinatal outcome in patients starting treatment, we reviewed the aspects of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome related to obstetric complications and seronegative antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and their treatment in obstetrics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiolabeled antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies, in particular monoclonal antibodies, offer the potential for the specific nuclear imaging of malignant and benign diseases in man. If this imaging potential is realized, they may also have a large role in cancer treatment. This paper reviews: (1) what monoclonal antibodies are and how they differ from polyclonal antibodies, (2) how they are produced and radiolabeled, (3) the results of preclinical and clinical trials in cancer imaging, including the utility of SPECT and antibody fragments, (4) the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of benign diseases, (5) alternate routes of antibody delivery, (6) the role of these agents in therapy, and (7) whether this technology ''revolutionizes'' the practice of nuclear radiology, or has a more limited complementary role in the imaging department

  20. Seroprevalence Survey of Rubella Antibodies among Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Rubella virus, teratogen, antibodies, Maiduguri. La rubéole est une infection virale évitable par la vaccination. Son agent étiologique, virus de la rubéole a été identifié comme un tératogène humain capable de provoquer le spectre de malformation congénitale décrite comme le syndrome de rubéole congénitale ...

  1. Coexistence of extra-axial cavernous malformation and cerebellar developmental venous anomaly in the cerebellopontine angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Liu, Weidong; Zhao, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The coexistence of cavernous malformations (CMs) and developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) is exceedingly rare. To the authors' knowledge, only one case of CPA CM with concurrence of a neighboring DVA has been reported to date. The authors presented such vascular malformations in a 36-year-old man with progressive CPA syndrome during the course of six weeks. Preoperative neuroimaging suggested the diagnosis of an extra-axial hemorrhagic lesion in the CPA cistern with a cerebellar DVA in the close vicinity. The lesion was totally removed with the DVA untouched and was confirmed to be extra-axial in intimate contact with only the VII-VIII complex and the draining veins of DVA. Pathology revealed a CM. The patient underwent partial improvement in neurological function postoperatively. The radiographic follow-up at one year revealed no recurrence. CMs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any extra-axial hemorrhagic mass, especially with a DVA in the proximity. The coexistence of CM and DVA in CPA, although maybe just a coincidence, suggests the possibility of a new subtype of extra-axial CPA CM secondary to a preexisting DVA. A long-term follow-up is justified in discovering the potential mechanism and biology of such uncommon vascular malformations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and long-term management of thrombosis in antiphospholipid antibody-positive patients : Report of a Task Force at the 13th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Irastorza, G.; Cuadrado, M. J.; Ruiz-Arruza, I.; Brey, R.; Crowther, M.; Derksen, R.; Erkan, D.; Krilis, S.; Machin, S.; Pengo, V.; Pierangeli, S.; Tektonidou, M.; Khamashta, M.

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the presence of thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity in combination with the persistent presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies: lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies and/or anti-beta 2-glycoprotein I antibodies in medium to

  3. Competitive intransitivity, population interaction structure, and strategy coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Robert A; Schamp, Brandon S

    2015-01-21

    Intransitive competition occurs when competing strategies cannot be listed in a hierarchy, but rather form loops-as in the game rock-paper-scissors. Due to its cyclic competitive replacement, competitive intransitivity promotes strategy coexistence, both in rock-paper-scissors and in higher-richness communities. Previous work has shown that this intransitivity-mediated coexistence is strongly influenced by spatially explicit interactions, compared to when populations are well mixed. Here, we extend and broaden this line of research and examine the impact on coexistence of intransitive competition taking place on a continuum of small-world networks linking spatial lattices and regular random graphs. We use simulations to show that the positive effect of competitive intransitivity on strategy coexistence holds when competition occurs on networks toward the spatial end of the continuum. However, in networks that are sufficiently disordered, increasingly violent fluctuations in strategy frequencies can lead to extinctions and the prevalence of monocultures. We further show that the degree of disorder that leads to the transition between these two regimes is positively dependent on population size; indeed for very large populations, intransitivity-mediated strategy coexistence may even be possible in regular graphs with completely random connections. Our results emphasize the importance of interaction structure in determining strategy dynamics and diversity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Coexistence of competing metabolic pathways in well-mixed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Lenin; Amado, André; Campos, Paulo R A; Ferreira, Fernando Fagundes

    2016-05-01

    Understanding why strains with different metabolic pathways that compete for a single limiting resource coexist is a challenging issue within a theoretical perspective. Previous investigations rely on mechanisms such as group or spatial structuring to achieve a stable coexistence between competing metabolic strategies. Nevertheless, coexistence has been experimentally reported even in situations where it cannot be attributed to spatial effects [Heredity 100, 471 (2008)HDTYAT0018-067X10.1038/sj.hdy.6801073]. According to that study a toxin expelled by one of the strains can be responsible for the stable maintenance of the two strain types. We propose a resource-based model in which an efficient strain with a slow metabolic rate competes with a second strain type which presents a fast but inefficient metabolism. Moreover, the model assumes that the inefficient strain produces a toxin as a by-product. This toxin affects the growth rate of both strains with different strength. Through an extensive exploration of the parameter space we determine the situations at which the coexistence of the two strains is possible. Interestingly, we observe that the resource influx rate plays a key role in the maintenance of the two strain types. In a scenario of resource scarcity the inefficient is favored, though as the resource influx rate is augmented the coexistence becomes possible and its domain is enlarged.

  5. CIRCULATING MICROPARTICLES IN PATIENTS WITH ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES: CHARACTERIZATION AND ASSOCIATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Chaturvedi, Shruti; Cockrell, Erin; Espinola, Ricardo; Hsi, Linda; Fulton, Stacey; Khan, Mohammad; Li, Liang; Fonseca, Fabio; Kundu, Suman; McCrae, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by venous or arterial thrombosis and/or recurrent fetal loss in the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies. These antibodies cause activation of endothelial and other cell types leading to the release of microparticles with procoagulant and pro-inflammatory properties. The aims of this study were to characterize the levels of endothelial cell, monocyte, platelet derived, and tissue factor-bearing microparticles in patients with antip...

  6. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of the ... bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments for these problems are the same. ...

  7. Pure Red Cell Aplasia Associated with Good Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Okui

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA and hypogammaglobulinemia are paraneoplastic syndromes that are rarer than myasthenia gravis in patients with thymoma. Good syndrome coexisting with PRCA is an extremely rare pathology. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with thymoma and PRCA associated with Good syndrome who achieved complete PRCA remission after thymectomy and postoperative immunosuppressive therapy, and provide a review of the pertinent literature.

  8. Partial dynamical symmetries and shape coexistence in nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, A.; Gavrielov, N.

    2017-11-01

    We present a symmetry-based approach for shape coexistence in nuclei, founded on the concept of partial dynamical symmetry (PDS). The latter corresponds to the situation where only selected states (or bands of states) of the coexisting configurations preserve the symmetry while other states are mixed. We construct explicitly critical-point Hamiltonians with two or three PDSs of the types U(5), SU(3), \\overline{{SU}(3)} and SO(6), appropriate to double or triple coexistence of spherical, prolate, oblate and γ-soft deformed shapes, respectively. In each case, we analyze the topology of the energy surface with multiple minima and corresponding normal modes. Characteristic features and symmetry attributes of the quantum spectra and wave functions are discussed. Analytic expressions for quadrupole moments and E2 rates involving the remaining solvable states are derived and isomeric states are identified by means of selection rules.

  9. [Coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiec, Paulina; Pawłowska-Kamieniak, Agnieszka; Pac-Kożuchowska, Elżbieta; Mroczkowska-Juchkiewcz, Agnieszka; Kominek, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease are chronic inflammatory conditions of gastrointestinal tract with complex aetiology with genetic, environmental and immunological factors contributing to its pathogenesis. It was noted that immune-mediated disorders often coexist. There is well-known association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes and ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. However, growing body of literature suggests the association between coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, particularly ulcerative colitis. This is an extremely rare problem in paediatric gastroenterology. To date there have been reported several cases of children with coexisting coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Herewith we present review of current literature on coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  10. Performance Analysis on the Coexistence of Multiple Cognitive Radio Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Qian

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The demand for wireless services is growing on a daily basis while spectral resources to support this growth are static. Therefore, there is need for the adoption of a new spectrum sharing paradigm. Cognitive Radio (CR is a revolutionary technology aiming to increase spectrum utilization through dynamic spectrum access, as well as mitigating interference among multiple coexisting wireless networks. In many practical scenarios, multiple CR networks may coexist in the same geographical area, and they may interfere with each other and also have to yield to the primary user (PU. In this study, we investigate how much throughput a node in a CR network can achieve in the presence of another CR network and a PU. The results of this study illustrate how the transmission probability and sensing performance affect the achievable throughput of a node in coexisting CR networks. In addition, these results may serve as guidance for the deployment of multiple CR networks.

  11. Beyond peaceful coexistence the emergence of space, time and quantum

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Beyond Peaceful Coexistence: The Emergence of Space, Time and Quantum brings together leading academics in mathematics and physics to address going beyond the 'peaceful coexistence' of space-time descriptions (local and continuous ones) and quantum events (discrete and non-commutative ones). Formidable challenges waiting beyond the Standard Model require a new semantic consistency within the theories in order to build new ways of understanding, working and relating to them. The original A. Shimony meaning of the peaceful coexistence (the collapse postulate and non-locality) appear to be just the tip of the iceberg in relation to more serious fundamental issues across physics as a whole.Chapters in this book present perspectives on emergent, discrete, geometrodynamic and topological approaches, as well as a new interpretative spectrum of quantum theories after Copenhagen, discrete time theories, time-less approaches and 'super-fluid' pictures of space-time.As well as stimulating further research among establis...

  12. Thermal expansion of coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatayama, Nobukuni; Konno, Rikio

    2010-01-01

    The temperature dependence of thermal expansion of coexistence of ferromag-netism and superconductivity below the superconducting transition temperature T cu of a majority spin conduction band is investigated. Majority spin and minority spin superconducting gaps exist in the coexistent state. We assume that the Curie temperature is much larger than the superconducting transition temperatures. The free energy that Linder et al. [Phys. Rev. B76, 054511 (2007)] derived is used. The thermal expansion of coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity is derived by the application of the method of Takahashi and Nakano [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18, 521 (2006)]. We find that we have the anomalies of the thermal expansion in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperatures.

  13. Sexual selection enables long-term coexistence despite ecological equivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Gonigle, Leithen K; Mazzucco, Rupert; Otto, Sarah P; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2012-04-26

    Empirical data indicate that sexual preferences are critical for maintaining species boundaries, yet theoretical work has suggested that, on their own, they can have only a minimal role in maintaining biodiversity. This is because long-term coexistence within overlapping ranges is thought to be unlikely in the absence of ecological differentiation. Here we challenge this widely held view by generalizing a standard model of sexual selection to include two ubiquitous features of populations with sexual selection: spatial variation in local carrying capacity, and mate-search costs in females. We show that, when these two features are combined, sexual preferences can single-handedly maintain coexistence, even when spatial variation in local carrying capacity is so slight that it might go unnoticed empirically. This theoretical study demonstrates that sexual selection alone can promote the long-term coexistence of ecologically equivalent species with overlapping ranges, and it thus provides a novel explanation for the maintenance of species diversity.

  14. Coexistence facilitates interspecific biofilm formation in complex microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Røder, Henriette Lyng; Russel, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    , the underlying role of fundamental ecological factors, specifically coexistence and phylogenetic history, in biofilm formation remains unclear. This study examines how social interactions affect biofilm formation in multi-species co-cultures from five diverse environments. We found prevalence of increased...... biofilm formation among co-cultured bacteria that have coexisted in their original environment. Conversely, when randomly co-culturing bacteria across these five consortia, we found less biofilm induction and a prevalence of biofilm reduction. Reduction in biofilm formation was even more predominant when...... co-culturing bacteria from environments where long-term coexistence was unlikely to have occurred. Phylogenetic diversity was not found to be a strong underlying factor but a relation between biofilm induction and phylogenetic history was found. The data indicates that biofilm reduction is typically...

  15. Interdisciplinary and Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Explanatory Coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Jones, Rachel E; Busch, Justin T A; Legare, Cristine H

    2015-10-01

    Natural and supernatural explanations are used to interpret the same events in a number of predictable and universal ways. Yet little is known about how variation in diverse cultural ecologies influences how people integrate natural and supernatural explanations. Here, we examine explanatory coexistence in three existentially arousing domains of human thought: illness, death, and human origins using qualitative data from interviews conducted in Tanna, Vanuatu. Vanuatu, a Melanesian archipelago, provides a cultural context ideal for examining variation in explanatory coexistence due to the lack of industrialization and the relatively recent introduction of Christianity and Western education. We argue for the integration of interdisciplinary methodologies from cognitive science and anthropology to inform research on explanatory coexistence. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  16. Coexistence of multiple sclerosis and ankylosing spondylitis: Report of four cases from Russia and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fominykh, Vera; Shevtsova, Tatyana; Arzumanian, Narine; Brylev, Lev

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system. There are many cases of multiple sclerosis - like syndrome and demyelinating disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren disease, Behcet disease and other autoimmune conditions. Coexistence of ankylosing spondylitis and multiple sclerosis usually is rare but in this article we report 4 Russian patients with concomitant multiple sclerosis and ankylosing spondylitis diseases. None of these patients received anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy prior to diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Pathogenesis, diagnostic and treatment challenges are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathophysiological mechanisms in antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Brock E; Wills, Rohan; Pierangeli, Silvia S

    2013-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease associated with thrombosis and recurrent fetal loss in the setting of detectable antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies. The major antigenic target has been identifed as β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), which mediates binding of aPL antibodies to target cells including endothelial cells, monocytes, platelets and trophoblasts, leading to prothrombotic and proinfammatory changes that ultimately result in thrombosis and fetal loss. This article summarizes recent insights into the role of β2GPI in normal hemostasis, interactions between aPL antibodies, β2GPI and cell-surface molecules, molecular prothrombotic and proinfammatory changes induced by aPL antibodies and pathogenic changes leading to fetal loss in antiphospholipid syndrome. New directions in therapy using these insights are examined. PMID:23487578

  18. Training in Values to Strengthen Social and Civic Coexistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajaira del Valle Cadenas Terán

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to present significantly values training to strengthen social and citizen considering that the coexistence of human beings has not been entirely easy, but so far they have managed to relate many of their problems with how to relate and interact with the environment, especially with the social environment. This study was conducted with a literature review which is the basis for targeted strengthening coexistence and citizenship therefore falls from a descriptive research training documentary. In conclusion, the importance of the subject since doors for values, dialogues, reflections, quality of life, among others that reflect the actions of teachers based on principles axiological open.

  19. Phase coexistence in gallium nanoparticles controlled by electron excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochon, S; MacDonald, K F; Knize, R J; Zheludev, N I

    2004-04-09

    In gallium nanoparticles 100 nm in diameter grown on the tip of an optical fiber from an atomic beam we observed equilibrium coexistence of gamma, beta, and liquid structural phases that can be controlled by e-beam excitation in a highly reversible and reproducible fashion. With 2 keV electrons only 1 pJ of excitation energy per nanoparticle is needed to exercise control, with the equilibrium phase achieved in less than a few tenths of a microsecond. The transformations between coexisting phases are accompanied by a continuous change in the nanoparticle film's reflectivity.

  20. Shape coexistence and phase transitions in the platinum isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Irving O.; Frank, Alejandro; Vargas, Carlos E.; Isacker, P. Van

    2008-01-01

    The matrix coherent-state approach of the interacting boson model with configuration mixing is used to study the geometry of the platinum isotopes. With a parameter set determined in previous studies, it is found that the absolute minimum of the potential for the Pt isotopes evolves from spherical to oblate and finally to prolate shapes when the neutron number decreases from N=126 (semi-magic) to N=104 (mid-shell). Shape coexistence is found in the isotopes 182,184,186,188 Pt. A phase diagram is constructed that shows the coexistence region as a function of the number of bosons and the strength of the mixing parameter

  1. Coexistence of morphea and granuloma annulare: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenay Ağırgöl

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT: Localized scleroderma (morphea is characterized by fibrosis of skin and subcutaneous tissue. Granuloma annulare is a relatively common disease that is characterized by dermal papules and arciform plaques. CASE REPORT: Here, we present the case of a 42-year-old woman who developed granuloma annulare on the dorsum of her feet and abdominal region, and morphea on the anterior side of her lower limbs. We also discuss the etiological and pathogenetic processes that may cause the rare coexistence of these two diseases. CONCLUSION: Only a few cases in the literature have described coexistence of morphea and granuloma annulare.

  2. Coexistence of a General Elliptic System in Population Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a strongly-coupled elliptic system representing a competitive interaction between two species. We give a sufficient condition for the existence of positive solutions. An example is also given to show that there is a coexistence of a steady state if the cross-diffusion......This paper is concerned with a strongly-coupled elliptic system representing a competitive interaction between two species. We give a sufficient condition for the existence of positive solutions. An example is also given to show that there is a coexistence of a steady state if the cross...

  3. Two Paraneoplastic Autoimmune Syndromes: Limbic Encephalitis and Palmar Fasciitis in a Patient with Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, Irina; Shelef, Ilan; Refaely, Yael; Ariad, Samuel; Ifergane, Gal

    2015-09-07

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by a relatively high rate of autoimmune phenomena. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE) is an autoimmune syndrome in which a non-neural tumor containing an antigen normally present in the nervous system precipitates an antibody attack on neural tissues. Patients with PLE usually present with rapidly progressive short-term memory deficits, confusion or even dementia. Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS) is another autoimmune syndrome characterized by rheumatologic manifestations, especially involving the palms of the hands. We report a case of a 59-year old woman who presented with worsening neurological symptoms of two-week duration, and later coma. The combined clinical, serological, and imaging studies suggested a diagnosis of PLE. A chest computed tomographic scan showed a 1.2 cm-diameter mass in the upper lobe of the left lung that was surgically removed and showed SCLC. Following surgery, neurological symptoms rapidly improved, allowing the patient to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. While in remission for both SCLC and PLE, the patient developed pain, soft-tissue swelling, and stiffness in both palms, suggesting the diagnosis of PFPAS. Five months following the diagnosis of palmar fasciitis, SCLC relapsed with mediastinal and cervical lymphadenopathy. This case report underlines the continuous interaction of SCLC with the immune system, expressed by coexistence of two rare paraneoplastic diseases, PLE, and PFPAS, in a patient with SCLC. While symptoms related to PLE preceded the initial diagnosis of SCLC, other symptoms related to PFPAS preceded relapse.

  4. Two paraneoplastic autoimmune syndromes: limbic encephalitis and palmar fasciitis in a patient with small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Lazarev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is characterized by a relatively high rate of autoimmune phenomena. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE is an autoimmune syndrome in which a non-neural tumor containing an antigen normally present in the nervous system precipitates an antibody attack on neural tissues. Patients with PLE usually present with rapidly progressive short-term memory deficits, confusion or even dementia. Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS is another autoimmune syndrome characterized by rheumatologic manifestations, especially involving the palms of the hands. We report a case of a 59-year old woman who presented with worsening neurological symptoms of two-week duration, and later coma. The combined clinical, serological, and imaging studies suggested a diagnosis of PLE. A chest computed tomographic scan showed a 1.2 cm-diameter mass in the upper lobe of the left lung that was surgically removed and showed SCLC. Following surgery, neurological symptoms rapidly improved, allowing the patient to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. While in remission for both SCLC and PLE, the patient developed pain, soft-tissue swelling, and stiffness in both palms, suggesting the diagnosis of PFPAS. Five months following the diagnosis of palmar fasciitis, SCLC relapsed with mediastinal and cervical lymphadenopathy. This case report underlines the continuous interaction of SCLC with the immune system, expressed by coexistence of two rare paraneoplastic diseases, PLE, and PFPAS, in a patient with SCLC. While symptoms related to PLE preceded the initial diagnosis of SCLC, other symptoms related to PFPAS preceded relapse.

  5. Goodpasture’s Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halgrimson, Charles G.; Wilson, Curtis B.; Dixon, Frank J.; Penn, Israel; Anderson, James T.; Ogden, David A.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Three young male patients developed acute glomerulonephritis and serious hemoptysis. All three had evidence of antiglomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies in their serum and native kidneys. The pulmonary hemorrhages ceased after bilateral nephrectomy and splenectomy accompanied by irregular treatment with steroids and other immunosuppressants. Renal homotransplantation was successfully carried out from 95 to 162 days later, after circulating anti-GBM antibodies had disappeared. Two of the homografts were biopsied and the third was removed 20, 34, and 2 months posttransplantation, respectively, and contained little or no immunoglobulin. Therefore, Good-pasture’s syndrome does not contraindicate renal transplantation under the stipulated conditions of staged therapy. PMID:4935099

  6. Identifying the Conditions Under Which Antibodies Protect Against Infection by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Elissa J; Smith, Robert J

    2014-05-27

    The ability to predict the conditions under which antibodies protect against viral infection would transform our approach to vaccine development. A more complete understanding is needed of antibody protection against lentivirus infection, as well as the role of mutation in resistance to an antibody vaccine. Recently, an example of antibody-mediated vaccine protection has been shown via passive transfer of neutralizing antibodies before equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection of horses with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Viral dynamic modeling of antibody protection from EIAV infection in SCID horses may lead to insights into the mechanisms of control of infection by antibody vaccination. In this work, such a model is constructed in conjunction with data from EIAV infection of SCID horses to gain insights into multiple strain competition in the presence of antibody control. Conditions are determined under which wild-type infection is eradicated with the antibody vaccine. In addition, a three-strain competition model is considered in which a second mutant strain may coexist with the first mutant strain. The conditions that permit viral escape by the mutant strains are determined, as are the effects of variation in the model parameters. This work extends the current understanding of competition and antibody control in lentiviral infection, which may provide insights into the development of vaccines that stimulate the immune system to control infection effectively.

  7. Identifying the Conditions Under Which Antibodies Protect Against Infection by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissa J. Schwartz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the conditions under which antibodies protect against viral infection would transform our approach to vaccine development. A more complete understanding is needed of antibody protection against lentivirus infection, as well as the role of mutation in resistance to an antibody vaccine. Recently, an example of antibody-mediated vaccine protection has been shown via passive transfer of neutralizing antibodies before equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV infection of horses with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID. Viral dynamic modeling of antibody protection from EIAV infection in SCID horses may lead to insights into the mechanisms of control of infection by antibody vaccination. In this work, such a model is constructed in conjunction with data from EIAV infection of SCID horses to gain insights into multiple strain competition in the presence of antibody control. Conditions are determined under which wild-type infection is eradicated with the antibody vaccine. In addition, a three-strain competition model is considered in which a second mutant strain may coexist with the first mutant strain. The conditions that permit viral escape by the mutant strains are determined, as are the effects of variation in the model parameters. This work extends the current understanding of competition and antibody control in lentiviral infection, which may provide insights into the development of vaccines that stimulate the immune system to control infection effectively.

  8. Antibody-protein A conjugated quantum dots for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Takashi; Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Tanaka, Shin-Ichi; Inouye, Yasushi; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Tomonobu M

    2010-11-01

    To use quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescent probes for receptor imaging, QD surface should be modified with biomolecules such as antibodies, peptides, carbohydrates, and small-molecule ligands for receptors. Among these QDs, antibody conjugated QDs are the most promising fluorescent probes. There are many kinds of coupling reactions that can be used for preparing antibody conjugated QDs. Most of the antibody coupling reactions, however, are non-selective and time-consuming. In this paper, we report a facile method for preparing antibody conjugated QDs for surface receptor imaging. We used ProteinA as an adaptor protein for binding of antibody to QDs. By using ProteinA conjugated QDs, various types of antibodies are easily attached to the surface of the QDs via non-covalent binding between the F(c) (fragment crystallization) region of antibody and ProteinA. To show the utility of ProteinA conjugated QDs, HER2 (anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) in KPL-4 human breast cancer cells were stained by using anti-HER2 antibody conjugated ProteinA-QDs. In addition, multiplexed imaging of HER2 and CXCR4 (chemokine receptor) in the KPL-4 cells was performed. The result showed that CXCR4 receptors coexist with HER2 receptors in the membrane surface of KPL-4 cells. ProteinA mediated antibody conjugation to QDs is very useful to prepare fluorescent probes for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

  9. Level of reactivity of IgM anticardiolipin antibodies in preeclampsia: a likely early serologic marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla N. Pereira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure the level of anticardiolipin antibodies in preeclamptic pregnant women to verify a possible association between the presence of these antibodies and the development of the syndrome. A total of 36 pregnant women with preeclampsia and 19 women with normal pregnancy were evaluated. Anticardiolipin antibodies were determined by enzyme immunoassay. The reactivity level of anticardiolipin antibodies was significantly higher in the preeclamptic group, with a significance level of 95%. The results can mean the participation of anticardiolipin antibodies in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Future studies may confirm this parameter as an early marker for the development of this disease.

  10. The potential of targeted antibody prophylaxis in SARS outbreak control: a mathematic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaards, Johannes Antonie; Putter, Hein; Jan Weverling, Gerrit; ter Meulen, Jan; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus-like viruses continue to circulate in animal reservoirs. If new mutants of SARS coronavirus do initiate another epidemic, administration of prophylactic antibodies to risk groups may supplement the stringent isolation procedures that

  11. Antiphospholipid antibodies in Brazilian hepatitis C virus carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Atta

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C, a worldwide viral infection, is an important health problem in Brazil. The virus causes chronic infection, provoking B lymphocyte dysfunction, as represented by cryoglobulinemia, non-organ-specific autoantibody production, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The aim of this research was to screen for the presence of antiphospholipid autoantibodies in 109 Brazilian hepatitis C virus carriers without clinical history of antiphospholipid syndrome. Forty healthy individuals were used as the control group. IgA, IgG, and IgM antibodies against cardiolipin and β2-glycoprotein I were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using a cut-off point of either 20 UPL or 20 SBU. While 24 (22.0% hepatitis C carriers had moderate titers of IgM anticardiolipin antibodies (median, 22.5 MPL; 95%CI: 21.5-25.4 MPL, only three carriers (<3% had IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (median, 23 GPL; 95%CI: 20.5-25.5 GPL. Furthermore, IgA anticardiolipin antibodies were not detected in these individuals. Male gender and IgM anticardiolipin seropositivity were associated in the hepatitis C group (P = 0.0004. IgA anti-β2-glycoprotein-I antibodies were detected in 29 of 109 (27.0% hepatitis C carriers (median, 41 SAU; 95%CI: 52.7-103.9 SAU. Twenty patients (18.0% had IgM anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies (median, 27.6 SMU; 95%CI: 23.3-70.3 SMU, while two patients had IgG antibodies against this protein (titers, 33 and 78 SGU. Antiphospholipid antibodies were detected in only one healthy individual, who was seropositive for IgM anticardiolipin. We concluded that Brazilian individuals chronically infected with hepatitis C virus present a significant production of antiphospholipid antibodies, mainly IgA anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, which are not associated with clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome.

  12. Construction of Recombinant Single Chain Variable Fragment (ScFv) Antibody Against Superantigen for Immunodetection Using Antibody Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Agrawal, Ranu; Kamboj, D V; Singh, Lokendra

    2016-01-01

    Superantigens are a class of antigens that bind to the major histocompatibility complex class (MHC) II and T-cell receptor (TCR) and cause the nonspecific activation of T cells, resulting in a massive release of pro-inflammatory mediators. They are produced by the gram-positive organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, and by a variety of other microbes such as viruses and mycoplasma, and cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and even death in some cases. The immunodetection of superantigens is difficult due to the polyclonal activation of T-cells leading to nonspecific antibody production. The production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies against superantigens can solve this problem and are far better than polyclonal antibodies in terms of detection. Here, we describe the construction of recombinant single chain variable fragments (ScFv) antibodies against superantigens with specific reference to SEB (staphylococcal enterotoxin B) using antibody phage display technology.

  13. Antibodies Against Melanin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... Departments of Internal Medicine and Anatomical Pathology, University of Stellenbosch and MRC. Pigment Metabolism Research Unit, ... at the production of antibodies against natural melanoprotein. and a consideration of our negative .... the random polymerization of several monomers, antibody formed ...

  14. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  15. Possible coexistence of superconductivity and magnetic order in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Coexistence of superconductivity and magnetic order has been one of the exciting as- pects of the quaternary borocarbide superconductors. So far, RNi2B2C (R= Tm, Er, Ho and Dy) are the only known magnetic superconductors in this family. Here, we present our resistivity, mag- netization and heat capacity ...

  16. Interference Mitigation for Coexistence of Heterogeneous Ultra-Wideband Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Haitao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Two ultra-wideband (UWB specifications, that is, direct-sequence (DS UWB and multiband-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MB-OFDM UWB, have been proposed as the candidates of the IEEE 802.15.3a, competing for the standard of high-speed wireless personal area networks (WPAN. Due to the withdrawal of the standardization process, the two heterogeneous UWB technologies will coexist in the future commercial market. In this paper, we investigate the mutual interference of such coexistence scenarios by physical layer Monte Carlo simulations. The results reveal that the coexistence severely degrades the performance of both UWB systems. Moreover, such interference is asymmetric due to the heterogeneity of the two systems. Therefore, we propose the goodput-oriented utility-based transmit power control (GUTPC algorithm for interference mitigation. The feasible condition and the convergence property of GUTPC are investigated, and the choice of the coefficients is discussed for fairness and efficiency. Numerical results demonstrate that GUTPC improves the goodput of the coexisting systems effectively and fairly with saved power.

  17. Duodenal Diverticulum Co-Existing with a Bleeding Duodenal Ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Duodenal diverticula are characterized by the presence of sac-like mucosal herniations through weak points in the duodenal wall. Duodenal diverticula co-existing with a bleeding duodenal ulcer is rare. Objective: The objective of this case report is to illustrate an uncommon case of two duodenal diverticula ...

  18. Direct determination of liquid phase coexistence by Monte Carlo simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweistra, H.J.A.; Besseling, N.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    A formalism to determine coexistence points by means of Monte Carlo simulations is presented. The general idea of the method is to perform a simulation simultaneously in several unconnected boxes which can exchange particles. At equilibrium, most of the boxes will be occupied by a homogeneous phase.

  19. Niches and coexistence of ant communities in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.A. Torres

    1984-01-01

    I studied ant coexistence in adjacent areas of upland tropical forest, grassland, and agricultural land in San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico. Data on food utilization, daily activity, nesting sites, microhabitat utilization and interspecific aggression were collected. Ants' tolerance to 45 degree C was determined in the laboratory. Agricultural and grassland ants eat grain...

  20. Coexistence of three different Drosophila species by rescheduling ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present evidence for coexistence of three different Drosophila species by rescheduling their life history traits in a natural population using the same resource, at the ... Genetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India; Department of Zoology, Institute of Basic Sciences, ...

  1. Possible coexistence of superconductivity and magnetic order in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dd; 65.40.+g; 75.50.-y. 1. Introduction. One of the attractions of quaternary borocarbide superconductors [1–3] is the coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism found in some of the members at relatively elevated. (. > ∼ 5 K) temperatures ...

  2. On the coexistence of the magnetic phases in chromium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Bente; Mikke, K.

    1969-01-01

    Detailed neutron diffraction investigations have been performed on Cr-Re alloys in order to explain the several observations in Cr alloys of the coexistence of a commensurable and an oscillatory magnetic phase. It is concluded that the individual magnetic phases probably occur in separate domains....

  3. The costs of coexistence on farms in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Punt, Maarten J.; Venus, Thomas J.; Wesseler, Justus H H

    2017-01-01

    for farmers in their cultivation decisions, and therefore it is important to measure these costs. In this article, we investigate the costs of different coexistence measures for farmers in Germany. Currently, GM crop cultivation is outlawed in Germany, but there was a short period from 2005-2008 when...

  4. Species coexistence: macroevolutionary relationships and the contingency of historical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Rachel M; Weir, Jason T; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2016-03-30

    Evolutionary biologists since Darwin have hypothesized that closely related species compete more intensely and are therefore less likely to coexist. However, recent theory posits that species diverge in two ways: either through the evolution of 'stabilizing differences' that promote coexistence by causing individuals to compete more strongly with conspecifics than individuals of other species, or through the evolution of 'fitness differences' that cause species to differ in competitive ability and lead to exclusion of the weaker competitor. We tested macroevolutionary patterns of divergence by competing pairs of annual plant species that differ in their phylogenetic relationships, and in whether they have historically occurred in the same region or different regions (sympatric versus allopatric occurrence). For sympatrically occurring species pairs, stabilizing differences rapidly increased with phylogenetic distance. However, fitness differences also increased with phylogenetic distance, resulting in coexistence outcomes that were unpredictable based on phylogenetic relationships. For allopatric species, stabilizing differences showed no trend with phylogenetic distance, whereas fitness differences increased, causing coexistence to become less likely among distant relatives. Our results illustrate the role of species' historical interactions in shaping how phylogenetic relationships structure competitive dynamics, and offer an explanation for the evolution of invasion potential of non-native species. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. Coexistence facilitates interspecific biofilm formation in complex microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jonas S; Røder, Henriette L; Russel, Jakob; Sørensen, Helle; Burmølle, Mette; Sørensen, Søren J

    2016-09-01

    Social interactions in which bacteria respond to one another by modifying their phenotype are central determinants of microbial communities. It is known that interspecific interactions influence the biofilm phenotype of bacteria; a phenotype that is central to the fitness of bacteria. However, the underlying role of fundamental ecological factors, specifically coexistence and phylogenetic history, in biofilm formation remains unclear. This study examines how social interactions affect biofilm formation in multi-species co-cultures from five diverse environments. We found prevalence of increased biofilm formation among co-cultured bacteria that have coexisted in their original environment. Conversely, when randomly co-culturing bacteria across these five consortia, we found less biofilm induction and a prevalence of biofilm reduction. Reduction in biofilm formation was even more predominant when co-culturing bacteria from environments where long-term coexistence was unlikely to have occurred. Phylogenetic diversity was not found to be a strong underlying factor but a relation between biofilm induction and phylogenetic history was found. The data indicates that biofilm reduction is typically correlated with an increase in planktonic cell numbers, thus implying a behavioral response rather than mere growth competition. Our findings suggest that an increase in biofilm formation is a common adaptive response to long-term coexistence. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Environmental policy evaluation under co-existing evaluation imaginaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunseler, E.M.; Vasileiadou, E.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines what the co-existence of different evaluation imaginaries – understandings of what environmental policy evaluation ‘is’ and ‘should do’ – means for everyday evaluation practice. We present a case study in which we show how these different understandings influence the evaluation

  7. Beyond Coexistence: Toward a More Reflective Religious Pluralism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblith, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    If a pluralistic democratic state such as the United States wishes to move beyond coexistence and toward a more reflective religious pluralism, then public schools must take epistemic issues seriously. Taking a cue from multicultural education, many have called for including the study of religion from a cultural perspective. I argue instead that,…

  8. [School coexistence and learning in adolescence from a gender perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Aguado Jalón, María José; Martín Seoane, Gema

    2011-04-01

    This article reviews recent research about academic learning and school coexistence in adolescence from a gender perspective. It focuses on the research developed by the Preventive Psychology research group (UCM), specially the results from the Spanish National Study of School Coexistence using a sample of 22,247 secondary school students. Research shows that girls are overrepresented in positive indicators whereas boys are in negative indicators, not only in academic adjustment but also in school coexistence. Girls' better academic achievement can be explained by their higher tendency to overcome sexism: they identify with traditional masculinity values (such as success orientation) without giving up traditional femininity values (such as empathy). Based on this, the following conclusions are reached: 1) to extend the advantages of equality also to men; 2) to emphasize that sharing academic contexts and activities is necessary but sufficient to construct equality; and lastly, 3) to improve school coexistence, it is necessary to adopt a integrative gender approach to prevent any kind of violence, including violence against women.

  9. Coexistence of three different Drosophila species by rescheduling ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    We present evidence for coexistence of three different Drosophila species by rescheduling their life history traits in a natural population using the same resource, at the same time and same place. D. ananassae has faster larval develop- ment time (DT) and faster DT(egg-fly) than other two species thus utilizing the ...

  10. Mechanisms of coexistence of factor VII hyperactivity with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dyslipidaemia, DM and obesity were found to induce FVII hyperactivity. Hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, high levels of FFAs and leptin constitute the underlying mechanisms for coexistence of FVII hyperactivity and metabolic disorders. Factor VII hyperactivity does not cause development of MI de novo. In conclusion ...

  11. 38 CFR 4.113 - Coexisting abdominal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.113 Coexisting abdominal... differing in the site of pathology, produce a common disability picture characterized in the main by varying degrees of abdominal distress or pain, anemia and disturbances in nutrition. Consequently, certain...

  12. Coexistence of GMO production, labeling policies, and strategic firm interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venus, Thomas Johann

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes the market effects of the coexistence of genetically modified organism (GMO) and conventional production, labeling policies, and strategic firm interactions through vertical product differentiation. Although we focus on GMOs, the applied frameworks can be adopted and

  13. Practices that support coexistence: A survey of Alfalfa growers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The alfalfa industry has worked hard to foster the coexistence of genetically-engineered (GE) and conventional alfalfa production by developing a set of best management practices that aim to limit adventitious-presence (AP) of GE traits in conventional seed. The general goal is to minimize transgene...

  14. Tunable two-phase coexistence in half-doped manganites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our recent work on half-doped manganites builds on those ideas to explain our data showing continuously tunable phase coexistence of FM and AFM states. Macroscopic hysteresis across transitions is often used to assert their first-order nature, and this has also been done in the case of half-doped manganites [6]. Kuwa-.

  15. Advanced Cancer Of The Cervix Coexisting With Multiple Fibroids In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of a 47 year old nulliparous woman with advanced cervical cancer coexisting with uterine fibroid is presented. The nulliparity and the presence of Fibroids presented diagnostic challenges especially because epidemiologically the factors present are not commonly associated. Diagnosis was assisted by a thorough ...

  16. Does "supersaturated coexistence" resolve the "paradox of the plankton"?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, P.; Verschoor, A.M.; Vos, Matthijs; Mooij, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    In contradiction with field observations, theory predicts that the number of coexisting plankton species at equilibrium cannot exceed the number of limiting resources, which is called the "paradox of the plankton". Recently, Huisman & Weissing (1999, 2000) showed, in a model study, that the number

  17. Coexistence of two species in a strongly coupled cooperating model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael

    In this paper, the cooperating two-species Lotka-Volterra model is discussed. We study the existence of solutions to a elliptic system with homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions. Our results show that this problem possesses at least one coexistence state if the birth rates are big and self...

  18. Tracking the Roundup Ready® gene: implications for coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA has been conducting research to address concerns voiced by the alfalfa industry regarding the coexistence of genetically engineered and non-GE alfalfa seed production. In 2011 a survey was conducted to get a baseline estimate of the presence of transgenic roadside alfalfa plants. We surveye...

  19. Management of Adult Choledochal Cyst Coexisting with Gallbladder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Choledochal cyst is a relatively rare condition. Even rarer is a choledochal cyst in association with a gallbladder carcinoma. This study reports a rare case of gallbladder carcinoma coexisting with a choledochal cyst in a Nigerian patient. Clinical records of the patient including preoperative evaluation, intraoperative findings, ...

  20. Coexistence in a multispecies assemblage of eagles in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzner, T.E.; Bragin, E.A.; Knick, S.T.; Smith, A.T.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated factors that permit species coexistence in an exceptional assemblage of similar raptor species at the Naurzum Zapovednik (a national nature reserve) in north-central Kazakhstan. White-tailed Sea-Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla), Imperial Eagle (Aquila heliaca), Golden Eagle (A. chrysaetos), and Steppe Eagle (A. nipalensis) all breed at the Zapovednik. Steppe Eagle use of nesting resources was distinct from that of tree-nesting species. We evaluated differences in nest tree and nest habitat characteristics, nest dimensions and positions, and nest spacing among the three forest-dwelling eagle species to distinguish between the effects of inter- and intraspecific resource limitations on species coexistence. Although the different species bred in similar habitat and sometimes reused other species' nests, the dimensions, positions and locations of their nests often differed. These differences did not appear to result from interspecific competition. Nest spacing trends were also species specific; Imperial Eagles generally nested farther from other eagle nests than did Golden Eagles and White-tailed Sea-Eagles. Intraspecific variation in habitat, physical characteristics, and spacing patterns of Imperial Eagle nests was extensive throughout the nature reserve. Although interspecific partitioning of nesting habitat may allow coexistence of ground-nesting Steppe Eagles, interspecific competition did not appear to be a primary determinant of the use of nest habitat, space, or nests by tree-nesting species. Rather, interspecific effects appeared secondary to intraspecific effects in determining coexistence of tree-nesting eagles at this site.

  1. Ontogenetic diet shifts promote predator-mediated coexistence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wollrab, S.; de Roos, A.M.; Diehl, S.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely believed that predation moderates interspecific competition and promotes prey diversity. Still, in models of two prey sharing a resource and a predator, predator-mediated coexistence occurs only over narrow ranges of resource productivity. These models have so far ignored the widespread

  2. Rare Coexistence Of Benign Renal Oncocytoma And Renal Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The coexistence of two tumors in a single person is not common. Finding two tumors in a single organ is rare. We are reporting a 65 years old male who presented with a long history of left loin pain. Clinical examination was unremarkable apart from hypertension. The histopathology of intraabdominal mass seen on ...

  3. Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, Arianna; Valentini, Riccardo; Paparella, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what are the conditions sustaining tree diversity in Mediterranean wet forests under future scenarios of altered hydrological regimes. The core of the work is a quantitative, dynamic model describing the coexistence of different Mediterranean tree species, typical of arid or semi-arid wetlands. Two kind of species, i.e. Hygrophilous (drought sensitive, flood resistant) and Non-hygrophilous (drought resistant, flood sensitive), are broadly defined according to the distinct adaptive strategies of trees against water stress of summer drought and winter flooding. We argue that at intermediate levels of water supply the dual role of water (resource and stress) results in the coexistence of the two kind of species. A bifurcation analysis allows us to assess the effects of climate change on the coexistence of the two species in order to highlight the impacts of predicted climate scenarios on tree diversity. Specifically, the model has been applied to Mediterranean coastal swamp forests of Central Italy located at Castelporziano Estate and Circeo National Park. Our results show that there are distinct rainfall thresholds beyond which stable coexistence becomes impossible. Regional climatic projections show that the lower rainfall threshold may be approached or crossed during the XXI century, calling for an urgent adaptation and mitigation response to prevent biodiversity losses. PMID:23077484

  4. Gas-solid coexistence of the Lennard-Jones system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoef, Martin Anton

    2002-01-01

    Recently, the absolute free energies of the Lennard-Jones system at solid–liquid and solid–gas coexistence were computed from Monte Carlo simulations [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 7145 (2002)]. In this note, we show that the values along the sublimation line are in good agreement with the results from an

  5. Coexistent duodenal ulcer among patients with gastric carcinoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To examine the prevalence of coexistent duodenal ulcers among patients with gastric carcinoma in an otherwise intact stomach, we surveyed 604 endoscopically and pathologically diagnosed gastric carcinoma patients and thoroughly inspected their duodenums. Twenty-two (3,6%) of them had either active ulcers or scars ...

  6. A Case of Miller Fisher Syndrome, Thromboembolic Disease, and Angioedema: Association or Coincidence?

    OpenAIRE

    Salehi, Nooshin; Choi, Eric D.; Garrison, Roger C.

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 32 Final Diagnosis: Miller Fisher syndrome Symptoms: Ataxia ? headache ? ophthalmoplegia Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: Plasmapheresis Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Miller Fisher Syndrome is characterized by the clinical triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia, and is considered to be a variant of Guillain-Barre Syndrome. Miller Fisher Syndrome is observed in approximately 1?5% of all Guillain-Barre cases in Wes...

  7. Cortical heterotopia in Aicardi's syndrome - CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besenski, N.; Bosnjak, V.; Ligutic, I.; Marusic-Della Marina, B.

    1988-01-01

    The case of 5-month-old female infant with Aicardi's syndrome is presented. The main clinical features were severe developmental retardation and intractable epileptic seizures. Ophthalmoscopic examination revealed pathognomonic choriorethinopathy. Ultrasonic examination of the brain detected agenesis of the corpus callosum, whereas CT showed a coexisting malformation of the brain, i.e. cortical heterotopia of the gray matter. Agenesis of the corpus callosum is an entity well-recognized by sonography. However, ultrasonography is an insufficient modality for the visualization of cortical heterotopia which is common to all cases of Aicardi's syndrome. Therefore, in cases of suspected Aicardi's syndrome CT is recommended, as it enables the diagnosis of cortical heterotopia. (orig.)

  8. Antibody engineering: methods and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chames, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    "Antibody Engineering: Methods and Protocols, Second Edition was compiled to give complete and easy access to a variety of antibody engineering techniques, starting from the creation of antibody repertoires and efficient...

  9. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  10. The coexistence of species La coexistencia de especies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CALEB E. GORDON

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a critical literature review on the topic of the coexistence of similar species within ecological communities. A conceptual framework is provided for dividing coexistence studies and concepts into three distinct time scales. The first six sections deal primarily with ecological-scale, or mesoscale coexistence, defined as coexistence in the classic sense of the competitive exclusion principle and Lotka-Volterra models, wherein interacting populations have had enough time to reach equilibrium. The first four sections briefly review resource partitioning studies and competitive coexistence models, and discuss the relative contributions of, and interaction between empirical and theoretical approaches to the problem of ecological-scale coexistence. The next two sections discuss the importance of biological trade-offs and the role of competition in structuring ecological communities. Based on compelling empirical evidence on both sides of the competition debate, a view of competition's role in structuring communities is proposed wherein the effects of competition are important but incomplete. The next section briefly reviews coexistence as it has been incorporated into habitat selection models, which represents coexistence at a finer time scale generated by the behavioral decisions of individual organisms. Linkages between this type of coexistence and mesoscale coexistence are discussed. Finally, a larger scale of coexistence is explored in which the assumptions of fixed niches, habitats, and species pools in communities are relaxed. This section links global and evolutionary species diversity literature to mesoscale ecological coexistence, focusing on the effects of ecosystem productivity and province size. Factors that govern diversity at large scales may be used to calibrate expectations and make predictions about mesoscale coexistence within particular communities. The study of diversity dynamics at geologic time scales suggests some

  11. Antiphospholipid antibodies and non-thrombotic manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İlgen, U; Yayla, M E; Ateş, A; Okatan, İ E; Yurteri, E U; Torgutalp, M; Keleşoğlu, A B D; Turgay, T M; Kınıklı, G

    2018-04-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association between antiphospholipid antibodies and non-thrombotic and non-gestational manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Systemic lupus erythematosus patients with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies or lupus anticoagulant were identified and grouped as systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid syndrome (SLE-APS), systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antiphospholipid antibodies/lupus anticoagulant without antiphospholipid syndrome (SLE-aPL), and systemic lupus erythematosus with negative aPLs (SLE-No aPL). Groups were compared in terms of non-thrombotic systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations and laboratory features retrospectively. Results A total of 150 systemic lupus erythematosus patients, 26 with SLE-APS, 25 with SLE-aPL, and 99 with SLE-No aPL, were identified. Livedo reticularis, neurologic involvement, and thrombocytopenia were more common in antiphospholipid antibody positive systemic lupus erythematosus cases. Malar rash, arthritis, and pleuritis were more common in the SLE-No aPL, SLE-APS, and SLE-aPL groups, respectively. Positivity rates and titers of specific antiphospholipid antibodies did not differ between the SLE-APS and SLE-aPL groups. Conclusions Presence of antiphospholipid syndrome or persistent antiphospholipid antibodies may be related to non-thrombotic and non-gestational systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus plus antiphospholipid syndrome and persistent antiphospholipid antibodies without antiphospholipid syndrome also differ in terms of systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations.

  12. Coexisting disorders and problems in preschool children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Lotta Höglund; Norrelgen, Fritjof; Kjellmer, Liselotte; Westerlund, Joakim; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    To analyze cooccurring disorders and problems in a representative group of 198 preschool children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who had had interventions at a specialized habilitation center. Parents and children were seen by a research team. Data were based on parental interviews, pediatric assessments, and tests of the child. Information on autistic symptoms, general cognitive function, speech and language, motor function, epilepsy, vision, hearing, activity level, behavior, and sleep was collected. Three ASD categories were used: (1) autistic disorder (AD), (2) autistic-like condition (ALC) or Asperger syndrome, and (3) one group with autistic symptoms/traits but not entirely all its criteria met for ASD. Children with autism had a mean of 3.2 coexisting disorders or problems, the ALC/Asperger group had a mean of 1.6, and children with autistic traits had a mean of 1.6. The most common disorder/problems in the total group pertained to language problems (78%), intellectual disability (ID) (49%), below average motor function (37%), and severe hyperactivity/ADHD (33%). The results accord with the concept of early symptomatic syndromes eliciting neurodevelopmental clinical examination (ESSENCE), and highlight the need of considering ASD in a broad perspective taking also other cooccurring developmental disorders into account.

  13. Coexisting Disorders and Problems in Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta Höglund Carlsson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To analyze cooccurring disorders and problems in a representative group of 198 preschool children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD who had had interventions at a specialized habilitation center. Methods. Parents and children were seen by a research team. Data were based on parental interviews, pediatric assessments, and tests of the child. Information on autistic symptoms, general cognitive function, speech and language, motor function, epilepsy, vision, hearing, activity level, behavior, and sleep was collected. Results. Three ASD categories were used: (1 autistic disorder (AD, (2 autistic-like condition (ALC or Asperger syndrome, and (3 one group with autistic symptoms/traits but not entirely all its criteria met for ASD. Children with autism had a mean of 3.2 coexisting disorders or problems, the ALC/Asperger group had a mean of 1.6, and children with autistic traits had a mean of 1.6. The most common disorder/problems in the total group pertained to language problems (78%, intellectual disability (ID (49%, below average motor function (37%, and severe hyperactivity/ADHD (33%. Conclusions. The results accord with the concept of early symptomatic syndromes eliciting neurodevelopmental clinical examination (ESSENCE, and highlight the need of considering ASD in a broad perspective taking also other cooccurring developmental disorders into account.

  14. A case of acquired Gitelman syndrome presenting as hypokalemic paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a young female patient who presented with weakness of upper and lower limbs. On evaluation, she had hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypocalciuria. Anti-Ro (SSA antibody was positive. She had an acquired Gitelman syndrome due to primary Sjögren′s syndrome (SS. SS presenting with features of Gitelman syndrome is very rare.

  15. What is the significance of onconeural antibodies for psychiatric symptomatology? A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæther, Sverre Georg; Schou, Morten; Kondziella, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    % to 4.9%. Antibody prevalence in controls was available from three studies, ranging from 0% to 2.8%. Data heterogeneity precluded a meta-analysis. Two cerebrospinal fluid studies found well-characterized onconeural antibodies in 3.5% and 0% of patients with psychotic and depressive syndromes...

  16. A case of antibody formation against octreotide visualized with 111In-octreotide scintigraphy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwekkeboom, D. J.; Assies, J.; Hofland, L. J.; Reubi, J. C.; Lamberts, S. W.; Krenning, E. P.

    1993-01-01

    A case of antibody formation in a patient with carcinoid syndrome is described. The patient was treated with octreotide in dosages up to 1.5 mg/day. Serum samples were analysed for the presence of octreotide antibodies before and after 20 months of octreotide treatment. In-vivo 111In-octreotide

  17. Erosive arthritis and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Abdessemed

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Erosive arthritis is not rare in SSc, and it might be a marker of severe disease. Anti-CCP antibodies can be present in patients with SSc, and high titers of anti-CCP antibodies may be indicative of SSc-RA overlap syndrome.

  18. Epitope Mapping of Dengue-Virus-Enhancing Monoclonal-Antibody Using Phage Display Peptide Library

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-I Rai; Huan-Yao Lei; Yee-Shin Lin; Hsiao-Sheng Liu; Shun-Hua Chen; Lien-Cheng Chen; Trai-Ming Yeh

    2008-01-01

    The Antibody-Dependent Enhancement (ADE) hypothesis has been proposed to explain why more severe manifestations of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS) occur predominantly during secondary infections of Dengue Virus (DV) with different serotypes. However, the epitopes recognized by these enhancing antibodies are unclear. Recently, anti-pre-M monoclonal antibody (mAb 70-21), which recognized all DV serotypes without neutralizing activity, were generated and demonstrated...

  19. [Primary antiphospholipid syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Angela; Voinea, Liliana; Pop, Monica; Stana, Daniela; Dascalu, Ana-Maria; Alexandrescu, Cristina; Ciuluvica, R

    2008-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a disorder characterised by recurrent arterial or venous thrombosis and/or pregnancy losses, in the presence of persistently elevated levels of anticardiolipin antibodies and/or evidence of circulating lupus anticoagulant (these abnormalities are detected by blood tests). Primary APS occurs when there is no evidence of associated diseases. APS in the presence of an underlying disease, usually systemic lupus erythematosus, is called secondary APS.

  20. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Novel Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Bittar; Imad Uthman

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterised by arterial and/or venous thrombosis, recurrent pregnancy loss, and persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs). It could be life-threatening as in the case of catastrophic APS where multi-organ failure is observed. APS morbidities are thought to be the result of a combination of thrombotic and inflammatory processes. Over the past decades, the mainstay of therapy of APS has been anticoagulation. As new mechan...