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Sample records for antibodies promote initiation

  1. EXPERIENCES WITH IDEA PROMOTING INITIATIVES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gish, Liv

    In new product development a central activity is to provide new ideas. Over the last decades experiences with stimulating employee creativity and establishing idea promoting initiatives have been made in industrial practice. Such initiatives are often labeled Idea Management – a research field with...... a growing interest. In this paper I examine three different idea promoting initiatives carried out in Grundfos, a leading pump manufacturer. In the analysis I address what understandings of idea work are inscribed in the initiatives and what role these initiatives play in the organization with...

  2. EXPERIENCES WITH IDEA PROMOTING INITIATIVES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gish, Liv

    2011-01-01

    In new product development a central activity is to provide new ideas. Over the last decades experiences with stimulating employee creativity and establishing idea promoting initiatives have been made in industrial practice. Such initiatives are often labeled Idea Management – a research field with...... a growing interest. In this paper I examine three different idea promoting initiatives carried out in Grundfos, a leading pump manufacturer. In the analysis I address what understandings of idea work are inscribed in the initiatives and what role these initiatives play in the organization with...

  3. Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis Two types of antibody molecules act in concert to stimulate inflammation in people with rheumatoid arthritis, according to research funded in part by the ...

  4. Mapping of domains in human laminin using monoclonal antibodies: localization of the neurite-promoting site

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were made against a truncated form of human laminin isolated from placenta. 12 antibodies were isolated and characterized. All antibodies stained basement membranes in placenta and immunoprecipitated laminin from media of cultured choriocarcinoma cells. Three antibodies, 3E5, 4C7, and 4E10, partially blocked the neurite-promoting activity of laminin. Addition of a second antibody, goat anti-mouse IgG, caused more complete blocking of the activity. Two of the blocking ant...

  5. Interleukin-6 Promotes Anti-OspA Borreliacidal Antibody Production In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Munson, Erik L.; Dean T. Nardelli; Luk, K. H. Kevin; Remington, Monica C.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2006-01-01

    Determination of the immunological mediators responsible for promoting the production of borreliacidal antibody may facilitate the development of an improved borreliosis vaccine for human and veterinary use. Previously, we developed an in vitro assay to determine if borreliacidal antibody production could be augmented by treatment with different cytokines. In this study, in vitro treatment of lymph node cells producing borreliacidal antibody with recombinant interleukin-6 (rIL-6) resulted in ...

  6. Lymphotoxin-Dependent B Cell-FRC Crosstalk Promotes De Novo Follicle Formation and Antibody Production following Intestinal Helminth Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Lalit Kumar; Lebon, Luc; Mosconi, Ilaria; Yang, Chen-Ying; Scandella, Elke; Ludewig, Burkhard; Luther, Sanjiv A; Harris, Nicola L

    2016-05-17

    Secondary lymphoid tissues provide specialized niches for the initiation of adaptive immune responses and undergo a remarkable expansion in response to inflammatory stimuli. Although the formation of B cell follicles was previously thought to be restricted to the postnatal period, we observed that the draining mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN) of helminth-infected mice form an extensive number of new, centrally located, B cell follicles in response to IL-4Rα-dependent inflammation. IL-4Rα signaling promoted LTα1β2 (lymphotoxin) expression by B cells, which then interacted with CCL19 positive stromal cells to promote lymphoid enlargement and the formation of germinal center containing B cell follicles. Importantly, de novo follicle formation functioned to promote both total and parasite-specific antibody production. These data reveal a role for type 2 inflammation in promoting stromal cell remodeling and de novo follicle formation by promoting B cell-stromal cell crosstalk. PMID:27160906

  7. Promotion of Environmental Technology Export : Governmental Initiatives and Business Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Kanda, Wisdom

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative and quantitative study examines governmental initiatives and business concepts as approaches to promote the export of environmental technology. Here, environmental technology refers to technologies (products, services, organizational models, and large-scaled technical systems) whose development and use actually provide or intends to provide a better environmental performance than their relevant alternatives from a life cycle perspective. Using literature reviews, surveys and ...

  8. Exploring Australian health promotion and environmental sustainability initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Rebecca; Kingsley, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Health promotion practitioners have important roles in applying ecosystem approaches to health and actively promoting environmental sustainability within community-level practice. The present study identified the nature and scope of health promotion activities across Australia that tackle environmental sustainability. Methods A mixed-method approach was used, with 82 participants undertaking a quantitative survey and 11 undertaking a qualitative interview. Purposeful sampling strategies were used to recruit practitioners who were delivering community-level health promotion and sustainability programs in Australia. The data were analysed thematically and interpretation was guided by the principles of triangulation. Results Study participants were at various stages of linking health promotion and environmental sustainability. Initiatives focused on healthy and sustainable food, active transport, energy efficiency, contact with nature and capacity building. Conclusion Capacity building approaches were perceived as essential to strengthening this field of practice. Healthy and sustainable food and active transport were suitable platforms for simultaneously promoting community health and sustainability. There was potential for expansion of programs that emphasise contact with nature and energy issues, as well as interventions that emphasise systems thinking and interdisciplinary approaches. So what? It was promising that Australian health promotion programs have started to address complexity rather than single issues, as evidenced by explicit engagement with environmental sustainability. However, more effort is required to enable a shift towards ecosystem approaches to health. PMID:26650394

  9. United States policy initiatives in promoting the RERTR program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has been successful in furthering efforts to reduce and eventually eliminate highly enriched uranium (HEU) from international commerce. Three key policy initiatives are underway to further promote the RERTR program. The first initiative is implementation of a new nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. Under this policy, the United States will accept over the next 13 years research reactor spent fuel from 41 countries that have converted or plan to convert to use LEU fuels. The second initiative is to pursue cooperative efforts to expand the RERTR program to new regions of the globe, including Russia and China. The third initiative is to restart the advanced LEU fuels development program at the Argonne National Laboratory in order to increase the number of reactors that can convert to use LEU without significant detriment to their performance

  10. PROMOTION OF EMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH – REMARKS FOR NEXT INITIATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR MODRAK

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper authors presets experience of Czestochowa University of Technology within collaboration with Czestochowa Business Incubator (CBI. In 2010, chosen staff of Czestochowa UT have been working within brand new Phare project “Promotion of employment among youth”. Because relatively high unemployment level among young people in Czestochowa city and region, the project has been implemented in order to help graduates to find their strengths and to advise in planning individual job track, to extend their job skills adequate to present and foreseen market needs, prepare them to the job interviews, prepare and help in starting own business. Authors also describes CBI’s other initiatives undertaken to increase number of new business set up by young people, especially.

  11. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  12. Antibody Responses After Analytic Treatment Interruption in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1-Infected Individuals on Early Initiated Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Bricault, Christine A.; Shields, Jennifer; Bayne, Madeleine; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Seaman, Michael S.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    The examination of antibody responses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected individuals in the setting of antiretroviral treatment (ART) interruption can provide insight into the evolution of antibody responses during viral rebound. In this study, we assessed antibody responses in 20 subjects in AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5187, wherein subjects were treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection, underwent analytic treatment interruption, and subsequently demonstrated viral rebound. Our data suggest that early initiation of ART arrests the maturation of HIV-1-specific antibody responses, preventing epitope diversification of antibody binding and the development of functional neutralizing capacity. Antibody responses do not appear permanently blunted, however, because viral rebound triggered the resumption of antibody maturation in our study. We also found that antibody responses measured by these assays did not predict imminent viral rebound. These data have important implications for the HIV-1 vaccine and eradication fields.

  13. Autophagy-associated dengue vesicles promote viral transmission avoiding antibody neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Wei; Mettling, Clément; Wu, Shang-Rung; Yu, Chia-Yi; Perng, Guey-Chuen; Lin, Yee-Shin; Lin, Yea-Lih

    2016-01-01

    One of the major defense mechanisms against virus spread in vivo is the blocking of viral infectibility by neutralizing antibodies. We describe here the identification of infectious autophagy-associated dengue vesicles released from infected cells. These vesicles contain viral proteins E, NS1, prM/M, and viral RNA, as well as host lipid droplets and LC3-II, an autophagy marker. The viral RNA can be protected within the autophagic organelles since anti-dengue neutralizing antibodies do not have an effect on the vesicle-mediated transmission that is able to initiate a new round of infection in target cells. Importantly, such infectious vesicles were also detected in a patient serum. Our study suggests that autophagy machinery plays a new role in dengue virus transmission. This discovery explains the inefficiency of neutralizing antibody upon dengue infection as a potential immune evasion mechanism in vivo. PMID:27558165

  14. [Initiation, promotion, initiation experiments with radon and cigarette smoke: Lung tumors in rats]. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past several years, the authors have made considerable progress in modeling carcinogenesis in general, and in modeling radiation carcinogenesis, in particular. They present an overview of their progress in developing stochastic carcinogenesis models and applying them to experimental and epidemiologic data sets. Traditionally, cancer models have been used for the analysis of incidence (or prevalence) data in epidemiology and time to tumor data in experimental studies. The relevant quantities for the analysis of these data are the hazard function and the probability of tumor. The derivation of these quantities is briefly described here. More recently, the authors began to use these models for the analysis of data on intermediate lesions on the pathway to cancer. Such data are available in experimental carcinogenesis studies, in particular in initiation and promotion studies on the mouse skin and the rat liver. If however, quantitative information on intermediate lesions on the pathway to lung cancer were to be come available at some future date, the methods that they have developed for the analysis of initiation-promotion experiments could easily be applied to the analysis of these lesions. The mathematical derivations here are couched in terms of a particular two-mutation model of carcinogenesis. Extension to models postulating more than two mutations is not always straightforward

  15. Multiplex method for initial complex testing of antibodies to blood transmitted diseases agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltavchenko, Alexander G; Nechitaylo, Oleg V; Filatov, Pavel V; Ersh, Anna V; Gureyev, Vadim N

    2016-10-01

    Initial screening of donors and population at high risk of infection with blood transmitted diseases involves a number of analyses using monospesific diagnostic systems, and therefore is expensive labor- and time-consuming process. The goal of this work is to construct a multiplex test enabling to carry out rapid initial complex testing at a low price. The paper describes a kit making it possible to detect simultaneously antibodies to six agents of the most significant blood transmitted diseases: HIV virus, hepatitis B and C viruses, cytomegalovirus, T. pallidum and T. gondii in blood products. The kit comprises multiplex dot-immunoassay based on plane protein arrays (immune chips) using colloidal gold conjugates and silver development. It provides an opportunity to carry out complex analysis within 70min at room temperature, and there is no need of well-qualified personnel. We compared laboratory findings of the kit with monospecific kits for ELISA produced by two Russian commercial companies. Dot-assay results correlate well with data obtained using commercial kits for ELISA. Furthermore, multiplex analysis is quicker and cheaper in comparison with ELISA and can be carried out in non-laboratory conditions. The kit for multiplex dot-immunoassay of antibodies to blood transmitted agents can significantly simplify initial complex testing. PMID:27497868

  16. A bispecific antibody targeting sclerostin and DKK-1 promotes bone mass accrual and fracture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Monica; Gunasekaran, Kannan; Stolina, Marina; Li, Xiaodong; Liu, Ling; Tipton, Barbara; Salimi-Moosavi, Hossein; Asuncion, Franklin J; Li, Chaoyang; Sun, Banghua; Tan, Hong Lin; Zhang, Li; Han, Chun-Ya; Case, Ryan; Duguay, Amy N; Grisanti, Mario; Stevens, Jennitte; Pretorius, James K; Pacheco, Efrain; Jones, Heidi; Chen, Qing; Soriano, Brian D; Wen, Jie; Heron, Brenda; Jacobsen, Frederick W; Brisan, Emil; Richards, William G; Ke, Hua Zhu; Ominsky, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the Wnt antagonist sclerostin increases bone mass in patients with osteoporosis and in preclinical animal models. Here we show increased levels of the Wnt antagonist Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) in animals treated with sclerostin antibody, suggesting a negative feedback mechanism that limits Wnt-driven bone formation. To test our hypothesis that co-inhibition of both factors further increases bone mass, we engineer a first-in-class bispecific antibody with single residue pair mutations in the Fab region to promote efficient and stable cognate light-heavy chain pairing. We demonstrate that dual inhibition of sclerostin and DKK-1 leads to synergistic bone formation in rodents and non-human primates. Furthermore, by targeting distinct facets of fracture healing, the bispecific antibody shows superior bone repair activity compared with monotherapies. This work supports the potential of this agent both for treatment and prevention of fractures and offers a promising therapeutic approach to reduce the burden of low bone mass disorders. PMID:27230681

  17. Civil Wrongs: Federal Equity Initiative Promotes Paperwork, Not Equality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, R. Shep

    2016-01-01

    In October 2014, U.S. secretary of education Arne Duncan announced the Obama administration's new "education equity initiative," explaining that the president could not "continue to wait" for Congress to act "on behalf of vulnerable children." The centerpiece of this initiative was a 37-page "Dear Colleague"…

  18. Promoting Global Initiatives and Cross-Cultural Understanding in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Susan Trostle; Snodgress, Faye

    2012-01-01

    As an "international" honor society in education, Kappa Delta Pi (KDP) recognizes the importance of encouraging and promoting education internationally in the 21st century. The challenge shared by educators in many countries is to achieve higher levels of learning for all students. Committed educators around the globe are already working to…

  19. PROMOTION OF EMPLOYMENT AMONG YOUTH – REMARKS FOR NEXT INITIATIVES

    OpenAIRE

    VLADIMIR MODRAK; JANUSZ GRABARA; RENATA VOKOROKOSOVA; SEBASTIAN KOT

    2011-01-01

    In the paper authors presets experience of Czestochowa University of Technology within collaboration with Czestochowa Business Incubator (CBI). In 2010, chosen staff of Czestochowa UT have been working within brand new Phare project “Promotion of employment among youth”. Because relatively high unemployment level among young people in Czestochowa city and region, the project has been implemented in order to help graduates to find their strengths and to advise in planning individual job track,...

  20. Promotion Of Employment Among Youth - Remarks For Next Initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In the paper authors presets experience of Czestochowa University of Technology within collaboration with Czestochowa Business Incubator (CBI). In 2005, chosen staff of Czestochowa UT have been working within brand new Phare project “Promotion of employment among youth”. Because relatively high unemployment level among young people in Czestochowa city and region, the project has been implemented in order to help graduates to find their strengths and to advise in planning individual job track,...

  1. University School of Education Promoting Diversity Awareness and Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Greta; Izzard, Marilyn; Faulkner, Rebecca; Charles, Jim

    2012-01-01

    An abundance of research confirms preservice teachers are unprepared to work with diverse populations. This article describes an education program's efforts to support diversity initiatives and provide information and hands-on training to prepare teacher candidates for future work with the diversity they will encounter. Explanations of programs,…

  2. Evaluating School Travel Initiatives and Promoting "Healthy Travel" through PSHCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baslington, Hazel

    2010-01-01

    The number of primary school children travelling to school by car in the UK has almost doubled from 22% to 43% in 20 years. A governmental policy response is school travel plans (STPs). This paper reports the findings of an empirical evaluation designed to measure the effectiveness of the travel initiative at three schools. Quantitative and…

  3. Regional initiatives to promote economic development in north East Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Nijkamp, P.; Wiegmans, B.W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses the economic development potential of the Asian Pacific Rim, with a particular view on north East Asia. It is argued that growth triangles are likely to be a proper way of organizing regional development forces. Next, the attention is focused on the Tumen River Area Development Programme as a potentially interesting region for joint transnational development initiatives. The opportunities and threats of this area are explored by means of scenario analysis. It is conc1uded...

  4. Anti-nuclear antibodies positive serum from systemic lupus erythematosus patients promotes cardiovascular manifestations and the presence of human antibody in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Kelly-Worden

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is characterized by the presence of anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs in the serum of patients. These antibodies may cross over into the brain resulting in the development of neuropsychiatric symptoms and result in abnormal pathology in other organs such as the heart and kidneys. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if SLE pathology could be detected in the hearts and brains of rats injected with positive human ANA serum. Materials and Methods: Lewis rats (n = 31 were selected for this study due to documented research already performed with this strain in the investigation of serum sickness, encephalitis and autoimmune related carditis. Rats were injected once a week with either ANA positive or negative control serum or saline. Hearts were examined for initial signs of heart disease including the presence of lipid deposits, vegetation, increased ventricular thickness and a change in heart weight. Brains were examined for the presence of human antibody and necrotic lesions. Animals were observed for outward signs of neuropathy as well. Blood samples were taken in order to determine final circulating concentrations of IgG and monitor histamine levels. Results: Animals injected with ANA were significantly higher for lipid deposits in the heart and an increased ventricular thickness was noted. One animal even displayed Libman-Sacks endocarditis. Brains were positive for the presence of human IgG and diffuse internal lesions occurred in 80% of the ANA positive serum injected animals examined. Blood histamine levels were not significantly different, but actually lower than controls by the end of the experiment. Conclusion: Since human antibodies were detected in the brain, further studies will have to identify which antibody cross reactions are occurring within the brain, examine cell infiltration as well as characterize the antibodies associated with more destructive consequences such as

  5. Kinetics model for initiation and promotion for describing tumor prevalence from HZE radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1994-01-01

    A kinetics model for cellular repair and misrepair for multiple radiation-induced lesions (mutation-inactivation) is coupled to a two-mutation model of initiation and promotion in tissue to provide a parametric description of tumor prevalence in the Harderian gland in a mouse. Dose-response curves are described for gamma-rays and relativistic ions. The effects of nuclear fragmentation are also considered for high-energy proton and alpha particle exposures The model described provides a parametric description of age-dependent cancer induction for a wide range of radiation fields. We also consider the two hypotheses that radiation acts either solely as an initiator or as both initiator and promoter and make model calculations for fractionation exposures from gamma-rays and relativistic Fe ions. For fractionated Fe exposures, an inverse dose-rate effect is provided by a promotion hypothesis using a mutation rate for promotion typical of single-gene mutations.

  6. Viral promoters can initiate expression of toxin genes introduced into Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Daniela

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of recombinant proteins in eukaryotic cells requires the fusion of the coding region to a promoter functional in the eukaryotic cell line. Viral promoters are very often used for this purpose. The preceding cloning procedures are usually performed in Escherichia coli and it is therefore of interest if the foreign promoter results in an expression of the gene in bacteria. In the case molecules toxic for humans are to be expressed, this knowledge is indispensable for the specification of safety measures. Results We selected five frequently used viral promoters and quantified their activity in E. coli with a reporter system. Only the promoter from the thymidine kinase gene from HSV1 showed no activity, while the polyhedrin promoter from baculovirus, the early immediate CMV promoter, the early SV40 promoter and the 5' LTR promoter from HIV-1 directed gene expression in E. coli. The determination of transcription start sites in the immediate early CMV promoter and the polyhedrin promoter confirmed the existence of bacterial -10 and -35 consensus sequences. The importance of this heterologous gene expression for safety considerations was further supported by analysing fusions between the aforementioned promoters and a promoter-less cytotoxin gene. Conclusion According to our results a high percentage of viral promoters have the ability of initiating gene expression in E. coli. The degree of such heterologous gene expression can be sufficient for the expression of toxin genes and must therefore be considered when defining safety measures for the handling of corresponding genetically modified organisms.

  7. NOTCH1 signaling promotes human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia initiating cell regeneration in supportive niches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxue Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leukemia initiating cells (LIC contribute to therapeutic resistance through acquisition of mutations in signaling pathways, such as NOTCH1, that promote self-renewal and survival within supportive niches. Activating mutations in NOTCH1 occur commonly in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL and have been implicated in therapeutic resistance. However, the cell type and context specific consequences of NOTCH1 activation, its role in human LIC regeneration, and sensitivity to NOTCH1 inhibition in hematopoietic microenvironments had not been elucidated. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established humanized bioluminescent T-ALL LIC mouse models transplanted with pediatric T-ALL samples that were sequenced for NOTCH1 and other common T-ALL mutations. In this study, CD34(+ cells from NOTCH1(Mutated T-ALL samples had higher leukemic engraftment and serial transplantation capacity than NOTCH1(Wild-type CD34(+ cells in hematopoietic niches, suggesting that self-renewing LIC were enriched within the NOTCH1(Mutated CD34(+ fraction. Humanized NOTCH1 monoclonal antibody treatment reduced LIC survival and self-renewal in NOTCH1(Mutated T-ALL LIC-engrafted mice and resulted in depletion of CD34(+CD2(+CD7(+ cells that harbor serial transplantation capacity. CONCLUSIONS: These results reveal a functional hierarchy within the LIC population based on NOTCH1 activation, which renders LIC susceptible to targeted NOTCH1 inhibition and highlights the utility of NOTCH1 antibody targeting as a key component of malignant stem cell eradication strategies.

  8. Analysis of nascent RNA identifies a unified architecture of initiation regions at mammalian promoters and enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Core, Leighton J; Martins, André L; Danko, Charles G; Waters, Colin T; Siepel, Adam; Lis, John T

    2014-12-01

    Despite the conventional distinction between them, promoters and enhancers share many features in mammals, including divergent transcription and similar modes of transcription factor binding. Here we examine the architecture of transcription initiation through comprehensive mapping of transcription start sites (TSSs) in human lymphoblastoid B cell (GM12878) and chronic myelogenous leukemic (K562) ENCODE Tier 1 cell lines. Using a nuclear run-on protocol called GRO-cap, which captures TSSs for both stable and unstable transcripts, we conduct detailed comparisons of thousands of promoters and enhancers in human cells. These analyses identify a common architecture of initiation, including tightly spaced (110 bp apart) divergent initiation, similar frequencies of core promoter sequence elements, highly positioned flanking nucleosomes and two modes of transcription factor binding. Post-initiation transcript stability provides a more fundamental distinction between promoters and enhancers than patterns of histone modification and association of transcription factors or co-activators. These results support a unified model of transcription initiation at promoters and enhancers. PMID:25383968

  9. Initial study with Tc99m antigranulocyte antibody (MAK-47) in detection sources of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antigranulocytes antibodies (AGAB) are antibodies directed against glycoprotein on the surface of granulocytes and as such provides in vivo cell labelling. They are easily labelled with Tc99m and comes a one step labelling technique. 20 patients have been studied 1 h and 4-6 hours after administration of 200 MBq of Tc99m AGAB (MAK-47). Less then 0.5 mg of antibody was given to each patients. Sites of uptake and outside of the reticular-endothelial system were reported as showing positive accumulation. Clinical results were confirmed by microbiological, pathological examinations, clinical follow-up and autopsy. There were 8 patients who had sites of infection confirmed by additional examination. All patients were visualized by Tc99m AGAB (MAK-47). There were 4 cases of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis and 4 cases of focal intra-abdominal infection. Two patients had uptake in non-infected/inflammatory arthritis, both in the knee. The remaining patients had true negative studies. The diagnostic accuracy of this study was as follows: sensitivity 100%, specificity 83%, positive predictive value (PPV) was 80% and negative predictive value (NPV) was 100%. Antigranulocyte antibody (MAK-47) seems to by promising tool in detecting focal infection in bone and soft tissue, except physiological accumulation in some parts of the body. It should be considered that antibodies can have non-specific uptake in non-infected, inflammation sites. It is easy to use and no had allergic reaction and HAMA antibody (human antimouse antibody). (author)

  10. The Sulfolobus initiator element is an important contributor to promoter strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Xiang; Li, Yingjun; Wang, Fan; Feng, Mingxia; Lin, Yanxu; Zhao, Shumiao; Liang, Yunxiang; Peng, Nan

    2013-11-01

    Basal elements in archaeal promoters, except for putative initiator elements encompassing transcription start sites, are well characterized. Here, we employed the Sulfolobus araS promoter as a model to study the function of the initiator element (Inr) in archaea. We have provided evidence for the presence of a third core promoter element, the Sulfolobus Inr, whose action depends on a TATA box and the TFB recognition element (BRE). Substitution mutations in the araS Inr did not alter the location of the transcription start site. Using systematic mutagenesis, the most functional araS Inr was defined as +1 GAGAMK +6 (where M is A/C and K is G/T). Furthermore, WebLogo analysis of a subset of promoters with coding sequences for 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) larger than 4 nucleotides (nt) in Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 identified an Inr consensus that exactly matches the functional araS Inr sequence. Moreover, mutagenesis of 3 randomly selected promoters confirmed the Inr sequences to be important for basal promoter strength in the subgroup. Importantly, the result of the araS Inr being added to the Inr-less promoters indicates that the araS Inr, the core promoter element, is able to enhance the strength of Inr-less promoters. We infer that transcription factor B (TFB) and subunits of RNA polymerase bind the Inr to enhance promoter strength. Taken together, our data suggest that the presence or absence of an Inr on basal promoters is important for global gene regulation in Sulfolobus. PMID:24039266

  11. Neutrophils Are Required for 3-Methylcholanthrene-Initiated, Butylated Hydroxytoluene-Promoted Lung Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Vikis, Haris G.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Franklin, Andrew; Stein, Lauren; Rymaszewski, Amy; Zhu, Jihong; Liu, Pengyuan; Tichelaar, Jay W.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; You, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown a link between chronic inflammation and lung tumorigenesis. Inbred mouse strains vary in their susceptibility to methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated whether neutrophils play a role in strain dependent differences in susceptibility to lung tumor promotion. We observed a significant elevation in homeostatic levels of neutrophils in the lungs of tumor-susceptible BALB/cByJ...

  12. Exploring Opportunities for Promoting Synergies between Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in Forest Carbon Initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Eugene L. Chia; Kalame Fobissie; Markku Kanninen

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in designing and implementing climate change mitigation and adaptation (M + A) in synergy in the forest and land use sectors. However, there is limited knowledge on how the planning and promotion of synergies between M + A can be operationalized in the current efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon. This paper contributes to fill this knowledge gap by exploring ways of planning and promoting M + A synergy outcomes in forest carbon initiatives. It ex...

  13. Structure of promoter-bound TFIID and model of human pre-initiation complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louder, Robert K; He, Yuan; López-Blanco, José Ramón; Fang, Jie; Chacón, Pablo; Nogales, Eva

    2016-03-31

    The general transcription factor IID (TFIID) plays a central role in the initiation of RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent transcription by nucleating pre-initiation complex (PIC) assembly at the core promoter. TFIID comprises the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and 13 TBP-associated factors (TAF1-13), which specifically interact with a variety of core promoter DNA sequences. Here we present the structure of human TFIID in complex with TFIIA and core promoter DNA, determined by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy at sub-nanometre resolution. All core promoter elements are contacted by subunits of TFIID, with TAF1 and TAF2 mediating major interactions with the downstream promoter. TFIIA bridges the TBP-TATA complex with lobe B of TFIID. We also present the cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of a fully assembled human TAF-less PIC. Superposition of common elements between the two structures provides novel insights into the general role of TFIID in promoter recognition, PIC assembly, and transcription initiation. PMID:27007846

  14. Production of interleukin‑4 in CD133+ cervical cancer stem cells promotes resistance to apoptosis and initiates tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Tao; Xin, Ying; Tong, Chun-Yan; Li, Bing; Bao, Hong-Li; Zhang, Cai-Yun; Wang, Xue-Hui

    2016-06-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory suggests that cancer growth and invasion is dictated by the small population of CSCs within the heterogenous tumor. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the cause for chemotherapy failure and the resistance of CSCs to apoptosis. A total of ~2.3% cluster of differentiation (CD)133+ cancer stem‑like side population (SP) cells were identified in cases of uterine cervical cancer. These CD133+ SP cells were found to potently initiate tumor growth and invasion, as they exhibit transcriptional upregulation of stemness genes, including octamer‑binding transcription factor‑4, B‑cell‑specific Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site‑1, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, (sex determining region Y)‑box 2, Nestin and anti‑apoptotic B cell lymphoma‑2. In addition, the CD133+ SP cells showed resistance to multi‑drug treatment and apoptosis. The present study further showed that the secretion of interleukin‑4 (IL‑4) in CD133+ cervical cancer SP cells promoted cell proliferation and prevented the SP cells from apoptosis. Following the neutralization of IL‑4 with anti‑IL‑4 antibody, the CD133+ SP cells were more sensitive to drug treatment and apoptosis. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study suggested that the autocrine secretion of IL‑4 promotes increased survival and resistance to cell death in CSCs. PMID:27121303

  15. Assessment of Site Specific Mutational Effect on Transcription Initiation at Escherichia coli Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kannan

    2009-01-01

    extended promoter region also played a key role in regulation transcription initiation in JM109 strain of E. coli. Conclusion: The present study concluded that the site specific changed in the extended promoter regions, particularly the-17/-16 base pairs had greater influence in the transcription initiation in E. coli. Thus the promoter engineering study will definitely pave the way to do both, on or off the genetic switches in bacterial system according to our needs to produce high protein of interest or decrease or block the expression of a particular unwanted protein.

  16. State Initiatives to Promote Technological Innovation and Economic Growth. Postsecondary Education Research Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Janice

    Activities undertaken by 43 states including Maryland to promote technological innovation and economic growth and the impact of these activities are identified. Implications for Maryland are also noted in a brief section of recommendations. State initiatives include: sponsoring research and development at colleges and companies, improving the…

  17. Nutrition Education Initiative: A School-Based Program to Promote Healthy Eating Practices of Preadolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Bonnie; Ralston, Penny A.; Young-Clark, Iris; Cornille, Tom; Brown, Linda Lockett; Davis, Kimberly E.; Salley, Tihesha J.; Goehrig, Marianne Henderson; Mullins, Amy Piper; Gaskins, Dykibra J.

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of the Nutrition Education Initiative (NEI), a project to promote the adoption of healthy eating practices by middle school students in North Florida, included the development of the "NEI Resource Guide" and pilot study outcomes. Eight schools in North Florida participated in the pilot project. Food recall data from 331 and 768…

  18. Mechanistic aspects of initiation and promotion in C3H/10T1/2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreiko, C J

    1985-01-01

    The transformation of C3H/10T1/2 cells can be made to proceed through discrete stages of initiation and promotion. Studies of the effect of cell density upon focus formation in cultures treated with MNNG and TPA suggest that initiation by MNNG is due to a relatively infrequent, irreversible event induced by a single carcinogen treatment. In contrast, promotion appears to be a reversible process requiring multiple treatments with TPA over a protracted period of time. Some evidence suggests that promotion may entail the induction of phenotypic changes which impart a growth advantage to phenotypically unstable "initiated" cell populations. The actual cellular mechanism(s) for most of the phenomena observed in C3H/10T1/2 cultures have eluded precise definition and widely divergent hypotheses have been advanced to explain transformation, initiation, and promotion. Conceivably there are multiple mechanisms responsible for each of these phenomenon. Some agents may transform by a multistage mechanism whereas others may exert their effects in a more direct fashion. Some of the foci produced by promotion may be the result of simple selective processes, others the product of more complex inductive events. Variations would thus be expected between laboratories working with different protocols and agents. As demonstrated by the possible involvement of an MCA residue in transformation, it is also apparent that fundamental technical aspects of this conceptually simple cell transformation system are poorly understood. While it is natural to develop mechanistic models based on quantitative observations of transformation, a limited understanding of the basic cell culture variables which modulate both the induction and expression of transformation dictate that caution be exercised in extrapolating the significance of such models to in vivo carcinogenesis. PMID:4053071

  19. Immune antibodies and helminth products promote CXCR2-dependent repair of parasite-induced injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminth parasites cause massive damage when migrating through host tissues, thus making rapid tissue repair imperative to prevent bleeding and bacterial dissemination. We observed that mice lacking antibodies (AID-/-) or activating Fc receptors (FcR'-/-) displayed impaired intestinal repair followi...

  20. Exploring Opportunities for Promoting Synergies between Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in Forest Carbon Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene L. Chia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in designing and implementing climate change mitigation and adaptation (M + A in synergy in the forest and land use sectors. However, there is limited knowledge on how the planning and promotion of synergies between M + A can be operationalized in the current efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon. This paper contributes to fill this knowledge gap by exploring ways of planning and promoting M + A synergy outcomes in forest carbon initiatives. It examines eight guidelines that are widely used in designing and implementing forest carbon initiatives. Four guiding principles with a number of criteria that are relevant for planning synergy outcomes in forest carbon activities are proposed. The guidelines for developing forest carbon initiatives need to demonstrate that (1 the health of forest ecosystems is maintained or enhanced; (2 the adaptive capacity of forest-dependent communities is ensured; (3 carbon and adaptation benefits are monitored and verified; and (4 adaptation outcomes are anticipated and planned in forest carbon initiatives. The forest carbon project development guidelines can encourage the integration of adaptation in forest carbon initiatives. However, their current efforts guiding projects and programs to deliver biodiversity and environmental benefits, ecosystem services, and socioeconomic benefits are not considered explicitly as efforts towards enhancing adaptation. An approach for incentivizing and motivating project developers, guideline setters, and offset buyers is imperative in order to enable existing guidelines to make clear contributions to adaptation goals. We highlight and discuss potential ways of incentivizing and motivating the explicit planning and promotion of adaptation outcomes in forest carbon initiatives.

  1. Promotion of Viral IRES-Mediated Translation Initiation under Mild Hypothermia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Licursi

    Full Text Available Internal ribosome entry site (IRES-mediated translation is an essential replication step for certain viruses. As IRES-mediated translation is regulated differently from cap-dependent translation under various cellular conditions, we sought to investigate whether temperature influences efficiency of viral IRES-mediated translation initiation by using bicistronic reporter constructs containing an IRES element of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, human rhinovirus (HRV or poliovirus (PV. Under mild hypothermic conditions (30 and 35°C, we observed increases in the efficiency of translation initiation by HCV and HRV IRES elements compared to translation initiation at 37°C. The promotion of HRV IRES activity was observed as early as 2 hours after exposure to mild hypothermia. We also confirmed the promotion of translation initiation by HRV IRES under mild hypothermia in multiple cell lines. The expression levels and locations of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB and upstream of N-Ras (unr, the IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs of HCV and HRV IRES elements, were not modulated by the temperature shift from 37°C to 30°C. Taken together, this study demonstrates that efficiency of translation initiation by some viral IRES elements is temperature dependent.

  2. An initiation-promotion model of tumour prevalence from high-charge and energy radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    A repair/misrepair kinetic model for multiple radiation-induced lesions (mutation inactivation) is coupled to a two-mutation model of initiation-promotion in tissue to provide a parametric description of tumour prevalence in the mouse Harderian gland from high-energy and charge radiations. Track-structure effects are considered using an action-cross section model. Dose-response curves are described for gamma rays and relativistic ions, and good agreement with experiment is found. The effects of nuclear fragmentation are also considered for high-energy proton and alpha-particle exposures. The model described provides a parametric description of age-dependent cancer induction for a wide range of radiation fields. Radiosensitivity parameters found in the model for an initiation mutation (sigma 0 = 7.6 x 10(-10) cm2 and D0 = 148.0 Gy) are somewhat different than previously observed for neoplastic transformation of C3H10T1/2 cell cultures (sigma 0 = 0.7 x 10(-10) cm2 and D0 = 117.0 Gy). We consider the two hypotheses that radiation acts solely as an initiator or as both initiator and promoter and make model calculations for fractionation exposures from gamma rays and relativistic Fe ions. For fractionated Fe exposures, an inverse-dose-rate effect is provided by a promotion hypothesis with an increase of 30% or more, dependent on the dose level and fractionation schedule, using a mutation rate for promotion similar to that of single-gene mutations.

  3. A survey of local health promotion initiatives for older people in Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Nefyn H

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the demographic profile of the UK changes, policy makers and practitioners have to respond to health challenges presented by a progressively ageing population. The health promotion plan for older people, aged over 50 years, in Wales included eight key areas: physical activity, healthy eating, home safety and warmth, emotional health, health protection, smoking, alcohol and sexual health. The aim of this study was to describe the extent, content and regional variation of existing health promotion initiatives for older people in Wales, provided by statutory, voluntary and private sector agencies. Method A questionnaire was sent to senior health promotion specialists employed in the 22 local authority areas in Wales to ascertain details of all projects promoting health and wellbeing in the eight key areas where the priority population was aged over 50, or the majority of users were older people. Additional information was sought from project leads and websites. Results Eighteen questionnaires were returned; not all were fully completed. Four areas did not return a questionnaire. Additional information was obtained from internet searches but this mainly concerned national initiatives rather than local projects. In all, 120 projects were included, 11 were throughout Wales. Best provision was for physical activity, with 3 national and 42 local initiatives, but local provision was patchy. Healthy eating, and home safety and warmth had far fewer initiatives, as did health protection, which comprised two national immunisation campaigns. Smoking and alcohol misuse were poorly provided for, and there was no provision for older people's sexual health. Evaluation arrangements were poorly described. Half of those who responded identified unmet training needs. Conclusion The reasons for patchy provision of services were not clear. Increased efforts to improve the coverage of interventions known to be effective should be made. Rigorous

  4. The initiatives of a library association for the promotion of grey literature

    OpenAIRE

    Alberani, V; De Castro Pietrangeli, P. (ISS); GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    1994-01-01

    The main initiatives taken in Italy by the Italian Library Association (AIB) for the development and promotion of grey literature since the recommendations of the seminar of York and following the Italian adhesion to EAGLE (through the Central Library of the Italian National Research Council-CNR) are presented, i.e.: survey the main Italian producers of GL through the application and creation of international and national standards; evaluate the use of grey literature in scientific communicat...

  5. The Balance Between Initiation and Promotion in Radiation-Induced Murine Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shuryak, Igor; Ullrich, Robert L.; Sachs, Rainer K.; Brenner, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of radiation carcinogenesis in animals allow detailed investigation of how the risk depends on age at exposure and time since exposure and of the mechanisms that determine this risk, e.g., induction of new pre-malignant cells (initiation) and enhanced proliferation of already existing pre-malignant cells (promotion). To assist the interpretation of these patterns, we apply a newly developed biologically based mathematical model to data on several types of solid tumors induced by acute...

  6. From Heart Health Promotion to Chronic Disease Prevention: Contributions of the Canadian Heart Health Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Robinson, MA

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The Canadian Heart Health Initiative began in 1987 as an 18-year undertaking to address the epidemic of cardiovascular disease in Canada. There is growing recognition in Canada of the need for an integrated approach to prevention that addresses common risks for many chronic diseases. Context Research and intervention activities of the Canadian Heart Health Initiative have shifted toward chronic disease prevention and health promotion. This study explores the contributions of the Canadian Heart Health Initiative to document how single-disease strategies can evolve into integrated chronic disease prevention efforts. Methods Key informant interviews were conducted with project researchers and health system stakeholders from seven Canadian Heart Health Initiative provincial projects. A review of provincial health policy documents was also performed.Consequences Findings indicate that the Canadian Heart Health Initiative projects contributed to public health capacity development, including coalition and partnership building, and development of health knowledge and resource infrastructure. The Canadian Heart Health Initiative projects helped put chronic disease prevention issues onto local and provincial health agendas and provided community-based models to help develop public health policies. Interpretation Experience with the Canadian Heart Health Initiative shows the need for integrated health programs to build on existing infrastructure. Other requirements for integrated chronic disease prevention programs include shared goals, partnerships at various policy levels and in multiple sectors, ongoing information sharing, and funding that is flexible and long-term.

  7. Initiation-promotion model of tumor prevalence in mice from space radiation exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Exposures in space consist of low-level background components from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), occasional intense-energetic solar-particle events, periodic passes through geomagnetic-trapped radiation, and exposure from possible onboard nuclear-propulsion engines. Risk models for astronaut exposure from such diverse components and modalities must be developed to assure adequate protection in future NASA missions. The low-level background exposures (GCR), including relativistic heavy ions (HZE), will be the ultimate limiting factor for astronaut career exposure. We consider herein a two-mutation, initiation-promotion, radiation-carcinogenesis model in mice in which the initiation stage is represented by a linear kinetics model of cellular repair/misrepair, including the track-structure model for heavy ion action cross-sections. The model is validated by comparison with the harderian gland tumor experiments of Alpen et al. for various ion beams. We apply the initiation-promotion model to exposures from galactic cosmic rays, using models of the cosmic-ray environment and heavy ion transport, and consider the effects of the age of the mice prior to and after the exposure and of the length of time in space on predictions of relative risk. Our results indicate that biophysical models of age-dependent radiation hazard will provide a better understanding of GCR risk than models that rely strictly on estimates of the initial slopes of these radiations.

  8. Tumor initiating and promoting activities of various benzo(a)pyrene metabolites in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaga, T J; Bracken, W M; Viaje, A; Berry, D L; Fischer, S M; Miller, D R; Levin, W; Conney, A H; Yagi, H; Jerina, D M

    1977-01-01

    The skin tumor-initiating activities of the twelve isomeric phenols of BP revealed that 2-OHBP was as potent as BP while 11-OHBP was moderately active and the others were weak or inactive. However, 2-OHBP has not been shown to be formed from BP in the skin or any other tissue. The (-)-trans-7,8-diol of BP skin was found to be more active as a skin tumor initiator than BP suggesting that it is a proximal carcinogen. The data on carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and metabolism suggest that BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide is the ultimate carcinogenic form of BP. The skin tumor-initiating activities of the various BP metabolites correlate very well with their complete carcinogenic in mouse skin except for BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide. It was found to have skin tumor initiating activity but not complete carcinogenic activity. However, BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide was found to be a very potent complete carcinogen in newborn mice. It is possible that BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide is only a tumor initiator in which a promoting stimulus must be supplied for carcinogenic activity. A natural tumor promoting stimulus may be present in the newborn mouse. There is also a good correlation between the skin tumor initiating activities of the various BP metabolites and their mutagenic activity in the V79 mammalian cell mediated mutagenesis system.

  9. Core Promoter Plasticity Between Maize Tissues and Genotypes Contrasts with Predominance of Sharp Transcription Initiation Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Guerra, María Katherine; Li, Wei; Galeano, Narmer F; Vidal, Mabel; Gray, John; Doseff, Andrea I; Grotewold, Erich

    2015-12-01

    Core promoters are crucial for gene regulation, providing blueprints for the assembly of transcriptional machinery at transcription start sites (TSSs). Empirically, TSSs define the coordinates of core promoters and other regulatory sequences. Thus, experimental TSS identification provides an essential step in the characterization of promoters and their features. Here, we describe the application of CAGE (cap analysis of gene expression) to identify genome-wide TSSs used in root and shoot tissues of two maize (Zea mays) inbred lines (B73 and Mo17). Our studies indicate that most TSS clusters are sharp in maize, similar to mice, but distinct from Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, or zebra fish, in which a majority of genes have broad-shaped TSS clusters. We established that ∼38% of maize promoters are characterized by a broader TATA-motif consensus, and this motif is significantly enriched in genes with sharp TSSs. A noteworthy plasticity in TSS usage between tissues and inbreds was uncovered, with ∼1500 genes showing significantly different dominant TSSs, sometimes affecting protein sequence by providing alternate translation initiation codons. We experimentally characterized instances in which this differential TSS utilization results in protein isoforms with additional domains or targeted to distinct subcellular compartments. These results provide important insights into TSS selection and gene expression in an agronomically important crop. PMID:26628745

  10. Tumor initiators and promoters in the induction of Epstein—Barr virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausen, Harald zur; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Schmidt, Rainer; Hecker, Erich

    1979-01-01

    The effect of various tumor initiators and promoters on induction of persisting Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in different lines of lymphoblastoid cells was analyzed. Neither five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, amongst them potent tumor initiators (e.g., 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene), nor the potent (ultimate) liver carcinogen N-acetoxy-N-2-acetylamino-fluorene induced EBV. A series of compounds, representing three classes of tumor-promoting diterpene esters (e.g., 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), efficiently induced EBV in persistently infected cells. The concentration required for maximal induction ranged between 0.5 and 100 nM. Some nonpromoting diterpenes (phorbol, 4α-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate, and ingenol) did not induce EBV. However, the nonpromoters, resiniferatoxin and 12-deoxyphorbol-13-decatrienoate, were effective, whereas anthralin, a tumor promoter, did not induce EBV. In three lines of EBV genome-carrying cells (Raji, NC-37, and RPMI 64-10) only abortive induction was noted, leading exclusively to synthesis of early antigen. In cells of lines with low spontaneous virus release (P3HR-1, B95-8, and QIMR-Wil), upon treatment with tetradecanoylphorbol acetate, approximately 20-40 times more viral DNA was recovered as compared to untreated controls. Viral DNA from tetradeca-noylphorbol acetate-induced cultures revealed the same restriction endonuclease cleavage pattern as viral DNA obtained from noninduced cells. Within 10 days after induction, release of infectious virus increased approximately by one order of magnitude. Prostaglandins, reported to be released after treatment with tumor promoters, were ineffective in virus induction under the conditions tested. Images PMID:218219

  11. Intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate the serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Masato; Hosono, Akira; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Kihara-Fujioka, Miran; Hachimura, Satoshi; Itoh, Kikuji; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2010-08-16

    Colonization of the gut by commensal bacteria modulates the induction of oral tolerance and allergy. However, how these intestinal bacteria modulate antigen-specific T cell responses induced by oral antigens remains unclear. In order to investigate this, we used germ-free (GF) ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor transgenic (OVA23-3) mice. Conventional (CV) or GF mice were administered an OVA-containing diet. Cytokine production by CD4(+) cells from spleen (SP), mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) was evaluated by ELISA, as was the peripheral antibody titer. T cell phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry. CD4(+) cells from the SP and MLN of CV and GF mice fed an OVA diet for 3 weeks produced significantly less IL-2 than the corresponding cells from mice receiving a control diet, suggesting that oral tolerance could be induced at the T cell level in the systemic and intestinal immune systems of both bacterial condition of mice. However, we also observed that the T cell hyporesponsiveness induced by dietary antigen was delayed in the systemic immune tissues and was weaker in the intestinal immune tissues of the GF mice. Intestinal MLN and PP CD4(+) T cells from these animals also produced lower levels of IL-10, had less activated/memory type CD45RB(low) cells, and expressed lower levels of CTLA-4 but not Foxp3 compared to their CV counterparts. Furthermore, GF mice produced higher serum levels of OVA-specific antibodies than CV animals. CD40L expression by SP CD4(+) cells from GF mice fed OVA was higher than that of CV mice. These results suggest that intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigens through modulation of the intestinal and systemic T cell phenotype. PMID:20621647

  12. [Constraints and opportunities for inter-sector health promotion initiatives: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Rosana

    2015-07-01

    This article analyzes the implementation of inter-sector initiatives linked to the Family Grant, Family Health, and School Health Programs in the Manguinhos neighborhood in the North Zone of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The study was conducted in 2010 and 2011 and included document review, local observation, and 25 interviews with program managers, professionals, and staff. This was an exploratory case study using a qualitative approach that identified constraints and opportunities for inter-sector health experiences, contributing to the debate on the effectiveness of health promotion and poverty relief programs. PMID:26248098

  13. Releasing stimuli and aggression in crickets: octopamine promotes escalation and maintenance but not initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eRillich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines have widespread effects on numerous behaviors, but their natural functions are often unclear. We investigated the role of octopamine (OA, the invertebrate analogue of noradrenaline, on initiation and maintenance of aggression in male crickets of different social status. The key-releasing stimulus for aggression is antennal fencing between males, a behavior occurring naturally on initial contact. We show that mechanical antennal stimulation (AS alone is sufficient to initiate an aggressive response (mandible threat display. The efficacy of AS was augmented in winners of a previous fight, but unaffected in losers. The efficacy of AS was not, however, influenced by OA receptor (OAR agonists or antagonists, regardless of social status. Additional experiments indicate that the efficacy of AS is also not influenced by dopamine (DA or serotonin (5HT. In addition to initiating an aggressive response, prior AS enhanced aggression exhibited in subsequent fights, whereby AS with a male antenna was now necessary, indicating a role for male contact pheromones. This priming effect of male-AS on subsequent aggression was dependent on OA since it was blocked by OAR-antagonists, and enhanced by OAR-agonists. Together our data reveal that neither OA, DA nor 5HT are required for initiating aggression in crickets, nor do these amines influence the efficacy of the natural releasing stimulus to initiate aggression. OA’s natural function is restricted to promoting escalation and maintenance of aggression once initiated, and this can be invoked by numerous experiences, including prior contact with a male antenna as shown here.

  14. Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells Promote an Early Antibody Response to a Respiratory Antigen in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Li Yin; Iijima, Koji; Bartemes, Kathleen; Kita, Hirohito

    2016-08-15

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a new family of immune cells that play important roles in innate immunity in mucosal tissues, and in the maintenance of tissue and metabolic homeostasis. Recently, group 2 ILCs (ILC2s) were found to promote the development and effector functions of Th2-type CD4(+) T cells by interacting directly with T cells or by activating dendritic cells, suggesting a role for ILC2s in regulating adaptive immunity. However, our current knowledge on the role of ILCs in humoral immunity is limited. In this study, we found that ILC2s isolated from the lungs of naive BALB/c mice enhanced the proliferation of B1- as well as B2-type B cells and promoted the production of IgM, IgG1, IgA, and IgE by these cells in vitro. Soluble factors secreted by ILC2s were sufficient to enhance B cell Ig production. By using blocking Abs and ILC2s isolated from IL-5-deficient mice, we found that ILC2-derived IL-5 is critically involved in the enhanced production of IgM. Furthermore, when adoptively transferred to Il7r(-/-) mice, which lack ILC2s and mature T cells, lung ILC2s promoted the production of IgM Abs to a polysaccharide Ag, 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl Ficoll, within 7 d of airway exposure in vivo. These findings add to the growing body of literature regarding the regulatory functions of ILCs in adaptive immunity, and suggest that lung ILC2s promote B cell production of early Abs to a respiratory Ag even in the absence of T cells. PMID:27421480

  15. Promoter binding, initiation, and elongation by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. A single-molecule view of the transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Gary M; Baumann, Christoph G; Quinn, Diana M; Molloy, Justin E; Hoggett, James G

    2004-01-30

    A single-molecule transcription assay has been developed that allows, for the first time, the direct observation of promoter binding, initiation, and elongation by a single RNA polymerase (RNAP) molecule in real-time. To promote DNA binding and transcription initiation, a DNA molecule tethered between two optically trapped beads was held near a third immobile surface bead sparsely coated with RNAP. By driving the optical trap holding the upstream bead with a triangular oscillation while measuring the position of both trapped beads, we observed the onset of promoter binding, promoter escape (productive initiation), and processive elongation by individual RNAP molecules. After DNA template release, transcription re-initiation on the same DNA template is possible; thus, multiple enzymatic turnovers by an individual RNAP molecule can be observed. Using bacteriophage T7 RNAP, a commonly used RNAP paradigm, we observed the association and dissociation (k(off)= 2.9 s(-1)) of T7 RNAP and promoter DNA, the transition to the elongation mode (k(for) = 0.36 s(-1)), and the processive synthesis (k(pol) = 43 nt s(-1)) and release of a gene-length RNA transcript ( approximately 1200 nt). The transition from initiation to elongation is much longer than the mean lifetime of the binary T7 RNAP-promoter DNA complex (k(off) > k(for)), identifying a rate-limiting step between promoter DNA binding and promoter escape. PMID:14597619

  16. Interleukin-10 promoter polymorphism predicts initial response of chronic hepatitis B to interferon alfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Weimin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to examine whether variation in interleukin-10 promoter polymorphism would predict the likelihood of sustain response of chronic hepatitis B to treatment with interferon alfa (IFN-α, the inheritance of 3 biallelic polymorphisms in the IL-10 gene promoter in patients with 52 chronic hepatitis B were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR-bared techniques, restriction enzyme digestion or direct sequencing. The relationship to the outcome of antiviral therapy for chronic HBV infection was studied in 24 patients who had a virologically sustained response(SR and in 28 non-responder(NR to interferon alfa-2b and several IL-10 variants were more frequent among SR compared with NR. Carriage of the -592A allele, -592A/A genotype and -1082/-1819/-592 ATA haplotype was associated with SR. Our findings indicate that heterogeneity in the promoter region of the IL-10 gene has a role in determining the initial response of chronic hepatitis B to IFN-α therapy.

  17. Peptidoglycan-linked protein A promotes T cell-dependent antibody expansion during Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2016-05-17

    A hallmark of Staphylococcus aureus disease in humans is persistent infections without development of protective immune responses. Infected patients generate VH3 plasmablast expansions and increased VH3 idiotype Ig; however, the mechanisms for staphylococcal modification of immune responses are not known. We report here that S. aureus-infected mice generate VH3 antibody expansions via a mechanism requiring MHC-restricted antigen presentation to CD4(+) T cells and staphylococcal protein A (SpA), a cell wall-anchored surface molecule that binds Fcγ and VH3 variant heavy chains of Ig. VH3 expansion occurred with peptidoglycan-linked SpA from the bacterial envelope but not with recombinant SpA, and optimally required five tandem repeats of its Ig-binding domains. Signaling via receptor-interacting serine/threonine protein kinase 2 (RIPK2) was essential for implementing peptidoglycan-linked SpA superantigen activity. VH3 clan IgG from S. aureus-infected or SpA-treated animals was not pathogen-specific, suggesting that SpA cross-linking of VH3 idiotype B-cell receptors and activation via attached peptidoglycan are the determinants of staphylococcal escape from adaptive immune responses. PMID:27140614

  18. A systematic review on the effectiveness of interventions to promote the initiation, duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding

    OpenAIRE

    Ching, Wan-yee; 程韻儀

    2013-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding is beneficial to infant and child health, woman health and society. Breastfeeding is promoted by various strategies in Hong Kong. Although the breastfeeding initiation rate is increasing, the exclusive breastfeeding rate at 4-6 months remains low in Hong Kong. The current policy and interventions are not effective on promoting breastfeeding and addressing the needs of mothers. Aims This systematic review aimed to identify effective interventions to promote b...

  19. Recent federal initiatives to promote unconventional gas: High octane delivery of just hot air?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griff, M.T.

    1995-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent initiatives of the United States which promote greater use of natural gas and unconventional gas as one part of this nations`s larger response to the global warming threat. Measurable increases in greenhouse gas concentrations since the beginning of the industrial revolution have led to the belief in the existence of a global warming problem. The international community has responded to the global warming threat with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change which is directed toward the stabilization of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The Climate Change Action Plan is the Clinton Administration`s detailed response to the global warming threat. It is designed to return United States emissions of greenhouse gases to their 1990 levels by the year 2000. The Action Plan targets all greenhouse gases and emphasizes energy efficiency. Significant regulatory reformation designed to increase the efficiency of the natural gas industry has already occurred and will be continued. Recovery of methane emissions from landfills will be encouraged through indentification of suitable sites and use of existing technology and development of new technology. Recovery of methane from coal mining operations will be promoted by targeting 50 of the gassiest mines in the United States. Even if the Action Plan is fully implemented. legitimate questions arise as to whether its goals will be achieved as a result of funding shortfalls.

  20. HDAC inhibition promotes both initial consolidation and reconsolidation of spatial memory in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villain, Hélène; Florian, Cédrick; Roullet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a critical role for epigenetic regulations in long term memory (LTM) formation. Among them, post-translational modifications of proteins, as histone acetylation, are an important regulator of chromatin remodelling and gene transcription. While the implication of histone acetylation in memory consolidation is widely accepted, less is known about its role in memory reconsolidation i.e. during memory restabilization after its reactivation. In the present study, we investigated the role of histone acetylation during the initial consolidation and the reconsolidation of spatial memory, using a weak massed learning procedure in the Morris water maze paradigm in mice. Usually a weak learning is sufficient for short term memory (STM) formation, but insufficient to upgrade STM to LTM. We found that promoting histone acetylation through intra-hippocampal infusion of a class I selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor immediately after a subthreshold spatial learning improved LTM but not STM retention. More importantly, inhibiting HDAC activity after the reactivation of a weak memory promoted specifically LTM reconsolidation without affecting post-reactivation STM. These findings argue in favour of an important role for histone acetylation in memory consolidation, and more particularly during the reconsolidation of spatial memory in mice. PMID:27270584

  1. Hormone-mediated promotion of trichome initiation in plants is conserved but utilizes species- and trichome-specific regulatory mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Maes, Lies; Goossens, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Plant trichome initiation is steered by diverse developmental and environmental cues, through molecular mechanisms that remain elusive in most plant species. Using a robust experimental method to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which phytohormones modulate leaf trichome formation, we verified the effect of jasmonates, cytokinins and gibberellins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). All three phytohormones promoted Arabidopsis trichome initiation, but caused divergent effects on tric...

  2. Implementing healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care: a quasi-experimental cross-sectional study evaluating a team initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Kristin; Krevers, Barbro; Bendtsen, Preben

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-communicable diseases are a leading cause of death and can largely be prevented by healthy lifestyles. Health care organizations are encouraged to integrate healthy lifestyle promotion in routine care. This study evaluates the impact of a team initiative on healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care. Methods: A quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design compared three intervention centres that had implemented lifestyle teams with three control centres that used a traditional ...

  3. Ultraviolet irradiation initiates ectopic foot formation in regenerating hydra and promotes budding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saroj S Ghaskadbi; Leena Shetye; Shashi Chiplonkar; Surendra Ghaskadbi

    2005-03-01

    We have studied the effects of ultraviolet-C (UVC) and Ultraviolet-B (UVB) on growth and pattern formation in Pelmatohydra oligactis. UVC brings about a significant increase in budding in intact hydra while UVB does not exhibit such an effect. Excessive budding could be a response for survival at wavelengths that damage biological tissues. If the head or base piece of a bisected hydra is irradiated and recombined with the unirradiated missing part, regeneration proceeds normally indicating that exposure of a body part with either an intact head or foot to UVC does not influence pattern formation. Most significantly, in the middle piece, but not in the head or the base piece of a trisected hydra, UVC leads to initiation of ectopic feet formation in almost one third of the cases. Thus, UV irradiation interferes with pattern formation in regenerating hydra, possibly by changing positional values, and promotes budding in intact hydra. This is the first report on induction of ectopic feet formation by UV in regenerating hydra and opens up the possibility of using UV irradiation as a tool to understand pattern formation in the enigmatic hydra.

  4. Promoting Space Education and Awareness in Pakistan- Initiatives, Achievements, Challenges and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagirani, Aisha

    With about 180 million inhabitants, Pakistan is the sixth most populous and the 34th largest country in the world in terms of area. Pakistan's economy, which is pre-dominantly based on agriculture, is the 26th largest in the world in terms of purchasing power parity and 45th largest in terms of nominal GDP. Pakistan is counted among the Next Eleven (N11) countries that have the potential to become the world's largest economies in the 21st century. Despite considerable potential to develop into a stable, moderate and democratic state, major challenges of internal security, poor agricultural productivity, inadequate infrastructure, food insecurity, insufficient health and educational facilities, depletion of natural resources, rapid environmental degradation and recurring natural disasters have burdened the country and have hampered sustainable development of Pakistan. Space technology applications offer a cost-effective means of addressing many of the above mentioned issues and have made impressive advances in the last few years in different countries in the region. Unfortunately, for various reasons, Pakistan has not been able to fully exploit the benefits of space technology and its applications to meet the challenges she faces. One of the reasons is lack of awareness and understanding by planners, decision-makers and users about the potential benefits of space technology in planning and implementation of developmental plans as well as good governance. Similarly, Pakistan's space program enjoys little public support due, primarily, to lack of awareness of the benefits space offers and the ubiquitousness of space applications in modern life. There is thus an acute need to create awareness and educate all segments of the society and stakeholders in Pakistan about the potential benefits of space technology and its applications. In the past ten years, many initiatives have been taken to promote space education and awareness for students as well as decision-makers in

  5. CXCR7 mediates TGFβ1-promoted EMT and tumor-initiating features in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y-C; Tang, S-J; Sun, G-H; Sun, K-H

    2016-04-21

    In the tumor microenvironment, chemokine system has a critical role in tumorigenesis and metastasis. The acquisition of stem-like properties by cancer cells is involved in metastasis and drug resistance, which are pivotal problems that result in poor outcomes in patients with lung cancer. Patients with advanced lung cancer present high plasma levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1), which correlate with poor prognostic features. Therefore, TGFβ1 may be important in the tumor microenvironment, where chemokines are widely expressed. However, the role of chemokines in TGFβ1-induced tumor progression still remains unclear. In our study, TGFβ1 upregulated CXC chemokine receptor expression, migration, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cell (CSC) formation in lung adenocarcinoma. We found that CXCR7 was the most upregulated chemokine receptor induced by TGFβ1. CXCR7 knockdown resulted in reduction of migration, invasion and EMT induced by TGFβ1, whereas CXCR4 knockdown did not reverse TGFβ1-promoted EMT. CXCR7 silencing significantly decreased cancer sphere-forming capacity, stem-like properties, chemoresistance and TGFβ1-induced CSC tumor initiation in vivo. In clinical samples, high TGFβ1 and CXCR7 expression was significantly associated with the late stages of lung adenocarcinoma. Moreover, TGFβ1 and CXCR7 coexpression was positively correlated with the CSC marker, CD44, which is associated with lymph node metastasis. Besides, patients with high expression of both CXCR7 and TGFβ1 presented a significantly worse survival rate. These results suggest that the TGFβ1-CXCR7 axis may be a prognostic marker and may provide novel targets for combinational therapies to be used in the treatment of advanced lung cancer in the future. PMID:26212008

  6. Endothelial cell-initiated signaling promotes the survival and self-renewal of cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Sudha; Dong, Zhihong; Vodopyanov, Dmitry; Imai, Atsushi; Helman, Joseph I.; Prince, Mark E.; Wicha, Max S.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cancer stem cells play an important role in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). However, little is known about functional interactions between head and neck cancer stem-like cells (CSC) and surrounding stromal cells. Here, we used Aldehyde Dehydrogenase activity and CD44 expression to sort putative stem cells from primary human HNSCC. Implantation of 1,000 CSC (ALDH+CD44+Lin−) led to tumors in 13 (out of 15) mice, while 10,000 non-cancer stem cells (NCSC; ALDH−CD44−Lin−) resulted in 2 tumors in 15 mice. These data demonstrated that ALDH and CD44 select a sub-population of cells that are highly tumorigenic. The ability to self-renew was confirmed by the observation that ALDH+CD44+Lin− cells sorted from human HNSCC formed more spheroids (orospheres) in 3-D agarose matrices or ultra-low attachment plates than controls and were serially passaged in vivo. We observed that approximately 80% of the CSC were located in close proximity (within 100-µm radius) of blood vessels in human tumors, suggesting the existence of perivascular niches in HNSCC. In vitro studies demonstrated that endothelial cell-secreted factors promoted self-renewal of CSC, as demonstrated by the upregulation of Bmi-1 expression and the increase in the number of orospheres as compared to controls. Notably, selective ablation of tumor-associated endothelial cells stably transduced with a caspase-based artificial death switch (iCaspase-9) caused a marked reduction in the fraction of CSC in xenograft tumors. Collectively, these findings indicate that endothelial cell-initiated signaling can enhance the survival and self-renewal of head and neck cancer stem cells. PMID:21098716

  7. Promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed.

  8. Mental health promotion in the health care setting: collaboration and engagement in the development of a mental health promotion capacity-building initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Michelle A; Rauscher, Alana B; Ardiles, Paola A; Griffin, Shannon L

    2014-01-01

    Health Compass is an innovative, multiphased project that aims to transform health care practice and shift organizational culture by building the capacity of Provincial Health Services Authority (PHSA) health care providers to further promote the mental health and well-being of patients and families accessing PHSA's health care services. Health Compass was developed within a health promotion framework, which involved collaboration and engagement with stakeholders across all partnering PHSA agencies. This approach led to the development of an educational and training resource that contributes to increased capacity for mental health promotion within the health care setting. Based on interviews with Health Compass' internal Project Team and findings from a Stakeholder Engagement Evaluation Report, this article outlines the participatory approach taken to develop the Health Compass Mental Health Promotion Resource and E-Learning Tool. A number of key facilitators for collaboration and engagement are discussed, which may be particularly applicable to the implementation of a mental health promotion program or initiative within a complex health care setting. PMID:23493801

  9. HLA Class II Antibody Activation of Endothelial Cells Promotes Th17 and Disrupts Regulatory T Lymphocyte Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, J; Taflin, C; Cross, A R; Robledo-Sarmiento, M; Mariotto, E; Savenay, A; Carmagnat, M; Suberbielle, C; Charron, D; Haziot, A; Glotz, D; Mooney, N

    2016-05-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most successful treatment option for patients with end-stage renal disease, and chronic antibody-mediated rejection is the principal cause of allograft loss. Predictive factors for chronic rejection include high levels of HLA alloantibodies (particularly HLA class II) and activation of graft endothelial cells (ECs). The mechanistic basis for this association is unresolved. We used an experimental model of HLA-DR antibody stimulation of microvascular ECs to examine the mechanisms underlying the association between HLA class II antibodies, EC activation and allograft damage. Activation of ECs with the F(Ab')2 fragment of HLA-DR antibody led to phosphorylation of Akt, ERK and MEK and increased IL-6 production by ECs cocultured with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in an Akt-dependent manner. We previously showed that HLA-DR-expressing ECs induce polarization of Th17 and FoxP3(bright) regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets. Preactivation of ECs with anti-HLA-DR antibody redirected EC allogenicity toward a proinflammatory response by decreasing amplification of functional Treg and by further increasing IL-6-dependent Th17 expansion. Alloimmunized patient serum containing relevant HLA-DR alloantibodies selectively bound and increased EC secretion of IL-6 in cocultures with PBMCs. These data contribute to understanding of potential mechanisms of antibody-mediated endothelial damage independent of complement activation and FcR-expressing effector cells. PMID:26614587

  10. Gene Expression Driven by a Strong Viral Promoter in MVA Increases Vaccination Efficiency by Enhancing Antibody Responses and Unmasking CD8+ T Cell Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo D. Becker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Viral vectors are promising tools for vaccination strategies and immunotherapies. However, CD8+ T cell responses against pathogen-derived epitopes are usually limited to dominant epitopes and antibody responses to recombinant encoded antigens (Ags are mostly weak. We have previously demonstrated that the timing of viral Ag expression in infected professional Ag-presenting cells strongly shapes the epitope immunodominance hierarchy. T cells recognizing determinants derived from late viral proteins have a clear disadvantage to proliferate during secondary responses. In this work we evaluate the effect of overexpressing the recombinant Ag using the modified vaccinia virus early/late promoter H5 (mPH5. Although the Ag-expression from the natural promoter 7.5 (P7.5 and the mPH5 seemed similar, detailed analysis showed that mPH5 not only induces higher expression levels than P7.5 during early phase of infection, but also Ag turnover is enhanced. The strong overexpression during the early phase leads to broader CD8 T cell responses, while preserving the priming efficiency of stable Ags. Moreover, the increase in Ag-secretion favors the induction of strong antibody responses. Our findings provide the rationale to develop new strategies for fine-tuning the responses elicited by recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara by using selected promoters to improve the performance of this viral vector.

  11. Will initiatives to promote hydroelectricity consumption be effective? Evidence from univariate and panel LM unit root tests with structural breaks

    OpenAIRE

    Hooi Hooi Lean; Russell Smyth

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines whether initiatives to promote hydroelectricity consumption are likely to be effective by applying univariate and panel Lagrange Multiplier (LM) unit root tests to hydroelectricity consumption in 55 countries over the period 1965 to 2011. We find that for the panel, as well as about four-fifths of individual countries, that hydroelectricity consumption is stationary. This result implies that shocks to hydroelectricity consumption in most countries will only result in tempo...

  12. Chemo-preventive effect of Star anise in N-nitrosodiethylamine initiated and phenobarbital promoted hepato-carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Amit Singh; Bhatnagar, D

    2007-09-20

    The generation of free radicals is a cause of many pathological conditions like diabetes mellitus, cancer, stroke, etc. Free radicals cause damage to cellular DNA and initiate carcinogenesis. Free radicals also bring about proliferation of cells via cell signaling. An inverse relationship between the consumption of vegetable diets and the risk of cancer has been established. In the present study, Star anise (Illicium verum), which is a commonly used condiment in Indian cuisine, was assessed for its anti-carcinogenic potential in N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) initiated and phenobarbital (PB) promoted hepato-carcinogenesis. Rats were randomly selected for eight experimental groups. The carcinogenesis was induced by injecting the rats, with a single dose of NDEA (200mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally as initiator, followed by promotion with PB (0.05%) in drinking water for 14 consecutive weeks. The treatment with NDEA increased liver weight, while Star anise (Star) treatment reduced the liver weight of rats. The treatment with Star throughout for 20 weeks or during the promotion stage (6-20 weeks) significantly reduced the nodule incidence and nodule multiplicity in the rats, while the treatment with Star at the initiation phase (first 4 weeks) only could not reduce these parameters. The treatment with Star for 20 consecutive weeks significantly reduced the nodule size and nodule volume. The treatment with Star throughout as well as at the promotion stage lowered the lipid peroxidation (LPO) in liver and erythrocytes, while the LPO was not lowered, when Star was administered during initiation stage only. The treatment with Star restored the liver and erythrocyte super-oxide dismutase (SOD) activities to normal in the carcinogenesis-induced rats. The liver catalase (CAT) activity increased in all the treated groups. The erythrocyte CAT activity increased in the rats treated with Star during initiation and promotion stage only. The liver glutathione (GSH) level

  13. Single Clinical Practice's Report of Testing Initiation, Antibody Clearance, and Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in Infants of Chronically HCV-Infected Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Aswine; Petrova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Perinatally acquired hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the main source of pediatric HCV infection. However, the best time for initiation of screening and follow up of these infants is still unknown. Analysis of the clinical data of infants born to HCV-infected mothers, transmission rates, and pathway of HCV testing could be important for optimization of their management. Methods.  Children of mothers with chronic HCV infection, who were observed between 1998 and 2013 at the pediatric infectious disease clinic for the first 18 months of their life, were eligible for enrollment. We analyzed the factors influencing initiation of HCV testing in these children and rate of HCV transmission as demonstrated by consecutive HCV antibody and HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA) amplification testing. Results.  One hundred and forty-two mother-infant pairs were enrolled. The majority of mothers were intravenous drug users, had carried to term, and delivered vaginally. A high proportion of infants had at least 1 positive anti-HCV antibody assay without viremia. True HCV infection and intermittent viremia were recorded in 3.5% and 1.4% of infants, respectively. Initiation of HCV testing after 10 months of age was associated with a significant decline in the probability of obtaining a positive HCV antibody of maternal origin. Conclusions.  The low likelihood for detection and confirmation of true HCV transmission before 10 months of age could challenge the early initiation of HCV screening of infants exposed to maternal HCV infection but may affect the parental need for early monitoring and counseling. PMID:26985444

  14. Child and Adolescent Inpatient Restraint Reduction: A State Initiative to Promote Strength-Based Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBel, Janice; Stromberg, Nan; Duckworth, Ken; Kerzner, Joan; Goldstein, Robert; Weeks, Michael; Harper, Gordon; LaFlair, Lareina; Sudders, Marylou

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To reduce the use of restraint and seclusion with children and adolescents in psychiatric inpatient units by promoting a preventive, strength-based model of care. Method: The State Mental Health Authority used data analysis, quality improvement strategies, regulatory oversight, and technical assistance to develop and implement system…

  15. European Commission initiative to promote technical harmonisation on risk-based decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EC-JRC International Workshop on Promotion of Technical Harmonisation on Risk-Based Decision Making, held at Stresa and Ispra, Italy, 22-25 May 2000, was an experts meeting to discuss the possible need and perspectives of developing an internationally accepted generic 'standard' for risk-based decision making. This paper briefly describes the workshop background, its organisation and summarises its main results and conclusions. (orig.)

  16. Breastfeeding Promotion Research: The ES/WIC Nutrition Education Initiative and Economic Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Weimer, Jon P.

    1998-01-01

    Educating low-income women about the advantages of breastfeeding their babies increases the number who breastfeed. This report summarizes the results of four projects that focused primarily on promoting breastfeeding, which is considered to be the most healthful and beneficial feeding method for most infants. Research has shown that breastfeeding improves the general health, growth, and development of infants and significantly reduces the risk of several health problems both during early life...

  17. Control of mammalian cell mutagenesis and differentiation by chemicals which initiate or promote tumor formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C. A.; Huberman, E.

    1980-01-01

    A cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was developed to predict the potential carcinogenic hazard of some environmental chemicals. In this assay, Chinese hamster V79 cells, which are susceptible to mutagenesis, are co-cultivated with cells capable of metabolizing chemical carcinogens. Use of this assay made it possible to demonstrate a relationship between the degree of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of a series of polycyclic hydrocarbons and nitrosamines and to study the organ specificity exhibited by some chemical carcinogens. However, most short-term in vitro assays are designed to detect mutagenic activity and therefore do not detect tumor promoting agents which are devoid of this activity. By analyzing various markers of terminal differentiation in cultured human melanoma and myeloid leukemia cells, we have established a relationship between the activity of a series of tumor promoting phorbol diesters in the mouse skin and their ability to induce terminal differentiation. We suggest that measuring alterations in the differentiation characteristics of some cultured cells may represent an approach by which environmental tumor promoting agents can be studied and detected.

  18. The initial antibody response to HIV-1: induction of ineffective early B cell responses against GP41 by the transmitted/founder virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, Leslie L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    A window of opportunity for immune responses to extinguish HIV -1 exists from the moment of transmission through establishment of the latent pool of HIV -I-infected cells. A critical time to study the initial immune responses to the transmitted/founder virus is the eclipse phase of HIV-1 infection (time from transmission to the first appearance of plasma virus) but, to date, this period has been logistically difficult to analyze. Studies in non-human primates challenged with chimeric simianhuman immunodeficiency virus have shown that neutralizing antibodies, when present at the time of infection, can prevent virus infection.

  19. Combination coating of chitosan and anti-CD34 antibody applied on sirolimus-eluting stents can promote endothelialization while reducing neointimal formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Feng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs capture technology improves endothelialization rates of sirolimus-eluting stents (SES, but the problem of delayed re-endothelialization, as well as endothelial dysfunction, has still not been overcome. Therefore, we investigated whether the combination coating of hyaluronan-chitosan (HC and anti-CD34 antibody applied on an SES (HCASES can promote endothelialization, while reducing neointimal formation and inflammation. Methods Sirolimus-eluting stents(SES, anti-CD34 antibody stents (GS and HC-anti-CD34 antibody combined with sirolimus-eluting stents (HCASES were deployed in 54 normal porcine arteries and harvested for scanning electron microscopy (SEM and histological analysis. The ratio of endothelial coverage above the stents was evaluated by SEM analysis at 7, 14 and 28 days. The percentage of in-stent stenosis was histologically analyzed at 14 and 28 days. Results SEM analysis at 7 days showed that endothelial strut coverage was increased in the HCASES group (68±7% compared with that in the SES group (31±4%, p=0.02. At 14 days, stent surface endothelialization, evaluated by SEM, showed a significantly higher extent of endothelial coverage above struts in the GS (95 ± 2% and the HCASES groups (87±4% compared with that in the SES group (51±6%, p=0.02. Histological examination showed that the percentage of stenosis in the HCASES group was not significantly different to that of the SES and GS groups (both p> 0.05. At 28 days, there was no difference in the rates of endothelial coverage between the HCASES and GS groups. The HCASES group showed less stenosis than that in the GS group (P Conclusions SEM and histology demonstrated that HCASESs can promote re-endothelialization while enhancing antiproliferative effects.

  20. Initial clinical trial of epratuzumab (humanized anti-CD22 antibody) for immunotherapy of systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Dörner, Thomas; Kaufmann, Joerg; Wegener, William A.; Teoh, Nick; David M Goldenberg; Burmester, Gerd R

    2006-01-01

    B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), so the safety and activity of anti-B cell immunotherapy with the humanized anti-CD22 antibody epratuzumab was evaluated in SLE patients. An open-label, single-center study of 14 patients with moderately active SLE (total British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) score 6 to 12) was conducted. Patients received 360 mg/m2 epratuzumab intravenously every 2 weeks for 4 doses with analgesic/antihistamine pr...

  1. Designing a HER2/neu promoter to drive α1,3galactosyltransferase expression for targeted anti-αGal antibody-mediated tumor cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our goal was to specifically render tumor cells susceptible to natural cytolytic anti-αGal antibodies by using a murine α1,3galactosyltransferase (mαGalT) transgene driven by a designed form of HER2/neu promoter (pNeu), the transcription of which is frequently observed to be above basal in breast tumors. Indeed, the αGalT activity that promotes Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R (αGal) epitope expression has been mutationally disrupted during the course of evolution, starting from Old World primates, and this has led to the counter-production of large amounts of cytotoxic anti-αGal antibodies in recent primates, including man. Expression of the endogenous c-erbB-2 gene was investigated in various cell lines by northern blotting. A mαGalT cDNA was constructed into pcDNA3 vector downstream of the original CMV promoter (pCMV/mαGalT) and various forms of pNeu were prepared by PCR amplification and inserted in the pCMV/mαGalT construct upstream of the mαGalT cDNA, in the place of the CMV promoter. These constructs were transferred into HEK-293 control and breast tumor cell lines. Stably transfected cells were analyzed by northern blotting for their expression of αGalT and c-erbB-2, and by flow cytometry for their binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Griffonia simplicifolia/isolectin B4. We show that expression of the mαGalT was up- or down-modulated according to the level of endogenous pNeu activity and the particular form of constructed pNeu. Among several constructs, two particular forms of the promoter, pNeu250 containing the CCAAT box and the PEA3 motif adjacent to the TATAA box, and pNeu664, which has three additional PEA3 motifs upstream of the CCAAT box, were found to promote differential αGalT expression. Our results strengthen current concepts about the crucial role played by the proximal PEA3 motif of pNeu, and may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the development of targeted transgene expression

  2. Initiatives to Promote Effective Self-Care Skills in Children and Adolescents with Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Barbara J.; Britta Svoren; Lori Laffel

    2007-01-01

    Intensive management of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is increasingly becoming the `ideal' standard of care for pediatric patients at diabetes centers across the world. This `ideal' standard is based on two landmark studies that documented that keeping blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible and achieving this as early as possible in the disease course helps to prevent or delay the devastating long-term complications of T1DM. Simultaneously, initiatives supplemental to the medic...

  3. Promoting child-initiated social-communication in children with autism

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, Kat; Schuchard, Julia; Lewis, Charlie; Thompson, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the Son-Rise Program (SRP), an intensive treatment aimed to improve child-initiated social communication in children with autism. Six children between the ages of 47 and 78 months were provided with 40 h of SRP, with pre- to post-treatment behavioral changes tested using a novel passive interaction probe task. Results showed an increase in the frequency of spontaneous social orienting and gestural communication for the experimental children, compared to six ...

  4. FGFR2 Promotes Breast Tumorigenicity through Maintenance of Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sungeun; Dubrovska, Anna; Salamone, Richard J.; Walker, John R.; Grandinetti, Kathryn B.; Bonamy, Ghislain M.C.; Orth, Anthony P.; Elliott, Jimmy; Porta, Diana Graus; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Reddy, Venkateshwar A.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that some cancers contain a population of stem-like TICs (tumor-initiating cells) and eliminating TICs may offer a new strategy to develop successful anti-cancer therapies. As molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of the TIC pool are poorly understood, the development of TIC-specific therapeutics remains a major challenge. We first identified and characterized TICs and non-TICs isolated from a mouse breast cancer model. TICs displayed increased tumorigenic...

  5. Radiation promotes colorectal cancer initiation and progression by inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S B; Bozeman, R G; Kaisani, A; Kim, W; Zhang, L; Richardson, J A; Wright, W E; Shay, J W

    2016-06-30

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common as protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared with conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole-body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIRs), which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence-associated gene (P19Arf), are markedly increased. Following these changes, loss of Casein kinase Iα and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared with X-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid-ethyl amide (CDDO-EA), reduces proton irradiation-associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA. PMID:26477319

  6. Promoting a quality of service culture in health care: review of a Scottish initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, A C; Keogh, W; Hogg, G M

    1997-05-01

    This paper is a review of a quality of service initiative which was carried out as a PICKUP Quality Project within the Scottish Health Service. This Quality Initiative took place between 1989 and 1990: before the emergence of The Patient's Charter. The aim of the review was to provide answers to a number of important questions which examined the perceptions of staff who took part in the Quality of Service initiative, identified parts of the process which were in need of substantial revision, and reported on the reactions of participants to the overall process. The methodology employed involved questionnaires and interview techniques. A number of problems were identified and, after examination, these were taken to indicate learning pointers for the future. It was evident that good quality of service training can be delivered, but only if it is clearly and appropriately tailored to the audience. It is also of fundamental importance to be familiar with the environment in which the organization is operating. In this instance, as is often the case for health care, there were considerable financial limitations in force at the time. These limitations heightened the general business sensitivity and showed that carrying through quality of service improvements involved the demonstration of commitment and the provision of resources. PMID:10168962

  7. Initial experience with locoregional radioimmunotherapy using 131I-labelled monoclonal antibodies against tenascin (BC-4) for treatment of glioma (WHO III and IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: None of the established treatments (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy) for malignant glioma has improved its very poor prognosis. Adjuvant locoregional radioimmunotherapy (RIT) represents a new therapeutic approach. We present our initial experience with this therapeutic tool with respect to adverse effects, biokinetics and clinical follow-up. Methods: Following surgery and radiotherapy, 12 patients with glioma (4, WHO stage III; 8, WHO stage IV) underwent 1-5 RIT-cycles (average dose 1100 MBq 131labelled monoclonal BC-4 antibodies) at six week intervals. Follow-up included serial FDG-PET and MRI investigations. Evaluation of biokinetics included whole body scans, together with analysis of blood, urine and fluid from the tumor cavity. Results: Following RIT, four patients experienced temporary seizures, which, in one case, were associated with temporary aphasia. Eight patients developed HAMA (human anti-mouse anti-bodies) during follow-up. Mean biologic half-life of the radiopharmaceutical in the resection cavity was 3.9 d (range: 1.0-10.2 d) and remained stable intraindividually during further RIT-cycles. The antibody/radionuclide conjugate remain stable in the tumor cavity for at least 5 d. Median survival presently stands at 18.5 months compared to 9.7 months in a historical patient group (n=89) undergoing conventional therapeutic strategies. Five patients show no signs of recurrence. In three patients with post-surgical evidence of residual tumor, one patient showed partial remission, one stable disease, and one progressive disease during RIT. Four patients without evidence of residual tumor mass at the beginning of RIT developed recurrence during therapy. Conclusions: Initial experience demonstrates that locoregional RIT is a well tolerated treatment modality that may represent a promising new approach in the management of patients with malignant glioma. Advantages of local application include passage of the blood-brain barrier, high concentration of

  8. Young Generation in Nuclear Initiative to Promote Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kenyan Young Generation in Nuclear (KYGN) is a recently founded not to profit organization. Its mandate is to educate, inform, promote and transfer knowledge on the peaceful, safe and secure users of nuclear science and technology in Kenya. It brings on board all scientist and students with special interest in nuclear science and related fields. KYGN is an affiliate of International Youth Nuclear Congress (YNC) whose membership with IYNC whose membership is drawn from member state of United Nations. Through our membership with IYNC, KYGN members have been able to participate in different forums. In this paper, we discuss KYGN’s prime roles opportunities as well as the challenges of the organization

  9. Initial clinical evaluation of radiolabeled MX-DTPA humanized BrE-3 antibody in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, E L; Liebes, L; Wasserheit, C; Noz, M E; Blank, E W; Zabalegui, A; Melamed, J; Furmanski, P; Peterson, J A; Ceriani, R L

    1998-07-01

    To evaluate radiometal-labeled humanized BrE-3 (huBrE-3) monoclonal antibody as a radioimmunolocalization and therapeutic agent in breast cancer patients, tumor localization, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity of (111)In-labeled combined 1-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl 3-methyl- and 1-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl 4-methyldiethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (MX-DTPA) huBrE-3 were studied. Seven women with BrE-3 antigen-positive, metastatic breast carcinoma underwent (111)In huBrE-3 infusion (5 mCi; 50 mg), followed by serial gamma camera imaging and plasma sampling. Region of interest analysis of images was used to make radiation absorbed dose estimates for (111)In huBrE-3. Data were extrapolated to 90Y huBrE-3. Human anti-human antibody (HAHA) response was measured in serum samples obtained up to 3 months after infusion. Patients tolerated infusions well. Seventy-six percent of 105 known sites of disease were identified on planar and single-photon emission computed tomography scans. For six of seven patients, a biexponential model fit the plasma time-activity curve best with an average T1/2alpha=10.6+/-8.5 (SD) h and average T1/2beta=114.2+/-39.2 h. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for (111)In huBrE-3 for whole body averaged 0.53+/-.08 rads/mCi. Dose estimates for 90Y huBrE-3 for marrow averaged 8.4+/-11.9 rads/mCi, and for tumors, 70+/-31.5 rads/mCi. Liver radioactivity uptake averaged 19.7+/-8.8% injected dose at 24 h after infusion, translating into an average radiation absorbed dose 21.1+/-12 rads/90Y mCi administered. Only one of seven patients demonstrated a low level of HAHA response. Although the plasma half-lives are longer and marrow dose higher for radiolabeled huBrE-3 compared with the murine construct, the excellent tumor localization, good tumor dosimetry, and low immunogenicity support the use of 90Y-huBrE-3 antibody for radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:9676842

  10. Hyphal development in Candida albicans requires two temporally linked changes in promoter chromatin for initiation and maintenance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is common in development. For Candida albicans, the most common cause of invasive fungal infections in humans, morphological plasticity is its defining feature and is critical for its pathogenesis. Unlike other fungal pathogens that exist primarily in either yeast or hyphal forms, C. albicans is able to switch reversibly between yeast and hyphal growth forms in response to environmental cues. Although many regulators have been found involved in hyphal development, the mechanisms of regulating hyphal development and plasticity of dimorphism remain unclear. Here we show that hyphal development involves two sequential regulations of the promoter chromatin of hypha-specific genes. Initiation requires a rapid but temporary disappearance of the Nrg1 transcriptional repressor of hyphal morphogenesis via activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway. Maintenance requires promoter recruitment of Hda1 histone deacetylase under reduced Tor1 (target of rapamycin signaling. Hda1 deacetylates a subunit of the NuA4 histone acetyltransferase module, leading to eviction of the NuA4 acetyltransferase module and blockage of Nrg1 access to promoters of hypha-specific genes. Promoter recruitment of Hda1 for hyphal maintenance happens only during the period when Nrg1 is gone. The sequential regulation of hyphal development by the activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway and reduced Tor1 signaling provides a molecular mechanism for plasticity of dimorphism and how C. albicans adapts to the varied host environments in pathogenesis. Such temporally linked regulation of promoter chromatin by different signaling pathways provides a unique mechanism for integrating multiple signals during development and cell fate specification.

  11. Complement C3d conjugation to anthrax protective antigen promotes a rapid, sustained, and protective antibody response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi V Kolla

    Full Text Available B. anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax. Pathogenesis is primarily mediated through the exotoxins lethal factor and edema factor, which bind protective antigen (PA to gain entry into the host cell. The current anthrax vaccine (AVA, Biothrax consists of aluminum-adsorbed cell-free filtrates of unencapsulated B. anthracis, wherein PA is thought to be the principle target of neutralization. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the natural adjuvant, C3d, versus alum in eliciting an anti-PA humoral response and found that C3d conjugation to PA and emulsion in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA imparted superior protection from anthrax challenge relative to PA in IFA or PA adsorbed to alum. Relative to alum-PA, immunization of mice with C3d-PA/IFA augmented both the onset and sustained production of PA-specific antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies to the receptor-binding portion (domain 4 of PA. C3d-PA/IFA was efficacious when administered either i.p. or s.c., and in adolescent mice lacking a fully mature B cell compartment. Induction of PA-specific antibodies by C3d-PA/IFA correlated with increased efficiency of germinal center formation and plasma cell generation. Importantly, C3d-PA immunization effectively protected mice from intranasal challenge with B. anthracis spores, and was approximately 10-fold more effective than alum-PA immunization or PA/IFA based on dose challenge. These data suggest that incorporation of C3d as an adjuvant may overcome shortcomings of the currently licensed aluminum-based vaccine, and may confer protection in the early days following acute anthrax exposure.

  12. Phosphazene-promoted metal-free ring-opening polymerization of ethylene oxide initiated by carboxylic acid

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Junpeng

    2014-03-11

    The effectiveness of carboxylic acid as initiator for the anionic ring-opening polymerization of ethylene oxide was investigated with a strong phosphazene base (t-BuP4) used as promoter. Kinetic study showed an induction period, i.e., transformation of carboxylic acid to hydroxyl ester, followed by slow chain growth together with simultaneous and fast end-group transesterification, which led to poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) consisting of monoester (monohydroxyl), diester, and dihydroxyl species. An appropriate t-BuP4/acid ratio was proven to be essential to achieve better control over the polymerization and low dispersity of PEO. This work provides important information and enriches the toolbox for macromolecular and biomolecular engineering with protic initiating sites. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  13. Will initiatives to promote hydroelectricity consumption be effective? Evidence from univariate and panel LM unit root tests with structural breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines whether initiatives to promote hydroelectricity consumption are likely to be effective by applying univariate and panel Lagrange Multiplier (LM) unit root tests to hydroelectricity consumption in 55 countries over the period 1965–2011. We find that for the panel, as well as about four-fifths of individual countries, that hydroelectricity consumption is stationary. This result implies that shocks to hydroelectricity consumption in most countries will only result in temporary deviations from the long-run growth path. An important consequence of this finding is that initiatives designed to have permanent positive effects on hydroelectricity consumption, such as large-scale dam construction, are unlikely to be effective in increasing the share of hydroelectricity, relative to consumption of fossil fuels. - Highlights: • Applies unit root tests to hydroelectricity consumption. • Hydroelectricity consumption is stationary. • Shocks to hydroelectricity consumption result in temporary deviations from the long-run growth path

  14. "Know your CD4 campaign": 6-year outcomes from a quality improvement initiative to promote earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Memiah

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Late initiation of treatment for illness secondary to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV remains a major challenge in developing countries. Despite the World Health Organization (WHO recommendation that treatment be initiated early in disease management, health providers conducting quality improvement monitoring in one region of Tanzania noted that common management practice relies upon clinical signs of advanced disease alone for initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART. Although Tanzanian National Treatment Guidelines followed standard WHO recommendations, few patients initiated ART based on laboratory parameters. As a potential barrier to optimal patient outcomes, further investigation of this inconsistency led to recognition of challenges reflecting patient, healthcare staff, and laboratory levels that might inhibit the use of CD4 cell counts as the entryway to care. Materials and Methods: Using a quality improvement approach, investigations were pursued for six discrete activities of HIV care delivery with before and after measures of selected indicators. With respect to patient engagement, meetings and informal educational sessions were held to promote understanding of the meaning of and need for CD4 testing. For clinic staff: (1 Qualitative interviews were conducted with providers to understand why laboratory data was not being used and (2 on-site interviews were conducted with laboratory personnel to review beliefs, methods, and practices related to measurement of CD4 cells testing. A large scale local campaign was mounted to (1 educate and empower patients to recognize a need for CD4 information in management of their own care; (2 re-educate and encourage providers to use measured, rather than clinical observation alone to initiate ART; and (3 understand and resolve clinical and laboratory challenges. Based upon findings from the interviews: (1 Meetings with hospital administrations were effected to resolve

  15. IKKβ in intestinal mesenchymal cells promotes initiation of colitis-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliaraki, Vasiliki; Pasparakis, Manolis; Kollias, George

    2015-12-14

    The importance of mesenchymal cells in inflammation and/or neoplastic transformation is well recognized, but their role in the initiation of these processes, particularly in the intestine, remains elusive. Using mouse models of colorectal cancer, we show that IKKβ in intestinal mesenchymal cells (IMCs) is critically involved in colitis-associated, but not spontaneous tumorigenesis. We further demonstrate that IMC-specific IKKβ is involved in the initiation of colitis-associated cancer (CAC), as in its absence mice develop reduced immune cell infiltration, epithelial cell proliferation, and dysplasia at the early stages of the disease. At the molecular level, these effects are associated with decreased early production of proinflammatory and protumorigenic mediators, including IL-6, and reduced STAT3 activation. Ex vivo IKKβ-deficient IMCs show defective responses to innate immune stimuli such as LPS, as shown by decreased NF-κB signaling and reduced expression of important NF-κB target genes. Collectively, our results reveal a hitherto unknown role of mesenchymal IKKβ in driving inflammation and enabling carcinogenesis in the intestine. PMID:26621453

  16. Promoting Robust Design of Diode Lasers for Space: A National Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tratt, David M.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Kashem, Nasir B.; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Mense, Allan T.

    2007-01-01

    The Diode-laser Array Working Group (DAWG) is a national-level consumer/provider forum for discussion of engineering and manufacturing issues which influence the reliability and survivability of high-power broad-area laser diode devices in space, with an emphasis on laser diode arrays (LDAs) for optical pumping of solid-state laser media. The goals of the group are to formulate and validate standardized test and qualification protocols, operational control recommendations, and consensus manufacturing and certification standards. The group is using reliability and lifetime data collected by laser diode manufacturers and the user community to develop a set of standardized guidelines for specifying and qualifying laser diodes for long-duration operation in space, the ultimate goal being to promote an informed U.S. Government investment and procurement strategy for assuring the availability and durability of space-qualified LDAs. The group is also working to establish effective implementation of statistical design techniques at the supplier design, development, and manufacturing levels to help reduce product performance variability and improve product reliability for diodes employed in space applications

  17. Soluble ADAM33 initiates airway remodeling to promote susceptibility for allergic asthma in early life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Elizabeth R.; Kelly, Joanne F.C.; Howarth, Peter H.; Wilson, David I.; Holgate, Stephen T.; Davies, Donna E.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Haitchi, Hans Michael

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airways disease that usually begins in early life and involves gene-environment interactions. Although most asthma exhibits allergic inflammation, many allergic individuals do not have asthma. Here, we report how the asthma gene a disintegrin and metalloprotease 33 (ADAM33) acts as local tissue susceptibility gene that promotes allergic asthma. We show that enzymatically active soluble ADAM33 (sADAM33) is increased in asthmatic airways and plays a role in airway remodeling, independent of inflammation. Furthermore, remodeling and inflammation are both suppressed in Adam33-null mice after allergen challenge. When induced in utero or added ex vivo, sADAM33 causes structural remodeling of the airways, which enhances postnatal airway eosinophilia and bronchial hyperresponsiveness following subthreshold challenge with an aeroallergen. This substantial gene-environment interaction helps to explain the end-organ expression of allergic asthma in genetically susceptible individuals. Finally, we show that sADAM33-induced airway remodeling is reversible, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeting ADAM33 in asthma.

  18. Changes of initiation, promotion and metastatic enzyme system in human breast cancer with the proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton irradiations in the cells were significantly decreased cell viability but increased the QR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Cell viability was 92.3%, 88.4%, 81.8%, 72.4%, 68.9% at doses of 0.5, 2, 8, 16, and 32 Gy, respectively. At doses of 2, 8, 16, and 32 Gy, QR activity was increased 1.27-, 1.31-, 1.45- and 2.08-fold. However, negligible GST activity in the cells was detected and the activity was not changed by proton irradiation. Proton irradiation also increased GSH contents by 1.18- and 1.21-fold at doses of 0.5 and 2 Gy. In contrast, the ODC activity, a key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis and tumor promotion, was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. We also investigated anti-metastatic effects of proton beam irradiation in breast cancer cells. Invasion and wound healing assay showed that metastatic activities in breast cancer cells were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner by proton beam irradiation. In zymography of MMP-9, the activity was slightly diminished. These results suggest that breast cancer chemopreventive potential was increased with proton irradiation by increasing the QR activity and the GSH levels and by inhibiting the ODC activity.

  19. HCV IRES manipulates the ribosome to promote the switch from translation initiation to elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbin, Megan E; Vollmar, Breanna S; Shi, Dan; Gonen, Tamir; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2013-02-01

    The internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) drives noncanonical initiation of protein synthesis necessary for viral replication. Functional studies of the HCV IRES have focused on 80S ribosome formation but have not explored its role after the 80S ribosome is poised at the start codon. Here, we report that mutations of an IRES domain that docks in the 40S subunit's decoding groove cause only a local perturbation in IRES structure and result in conformational changes in the IRES-rabbit 40S subunit complex. Functionally, the mutations decrease IRES activity by inhibiting the first ribosomal translocation event, and modeling results suggest that this effect occurs through an interaction with a single ribosomal protein. The ability of the HCV IRES to manipulate the ribosome provides insight into how the ribosome's structure and function can be altered by bound RNAs, including those derived from cellular invaders. PMID:23262488

  20. Promoting policy and environmental change using photovoice in the Kaiser Permanente Community Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Leila; Schwartz, Pamela; Cheadle, Allen; Borton, J Elaine; Wright, Merrick; Chase, Charlie; Lindley, Corina

    2010-05-01

    Creative ways must be found to engage both community residents and political leaders around policy and environmental solutions to public health issues. Photovoice is a community-based, participatory approach to documentary photography that provides people with training on photography, ethics, critical discussion, and policy advocacy. Photovoice projects have been implemented across the nation as part of Kaiser Permanente's Community Health Initiative-a community-based obesity prevention effort. This article focuses on the first Photovoice project implemented in three communities in Colorado. Photovoice themes related to healthy eating and active living include a lack of access to healthy food choices in stores and schools, unsafe street crossings and sidewalks, and the need to redevelop certain areas to encourage safe recreation. The involvement of policy leaders in the project combined with several dissemination activities has contributed to healthier food offerings in schools and neighborhoods and city planning efforts that emphasize walkability and access to healthy food, and park revitalization. PMID:19843702

  1. Initial clinical trial of epratuzumab (humanized anti-CD22 antibody) for immunotherapy of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörner, Thomas; Kaufmann, Joerg; Wegener, William A; Teoh, Nick; Goldenberg, David M; Burmester, Gerd R

    2006-01-01

    B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), so the safety and activity of anti-B cell immunotherapy with the humanized anti-CD22 antibody epratuzumab was evaluated in SLE patients. An open-label, single-center study of 14 patients with moderately active SLE (total British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) score 6 to 12) was conducted. Patients received 360 mg/m2 epratuzumab intravenously every 2 weeks for 4 doses with analgesic/antihistamine premedication (but no steroids) prior to each dose. Evaluations at 6, 10, 18 and 32 weeks (6 months post-treatment) follow-up included safety, SLE activity (BILAG score), blood levels of epratuzumab, B and T cells, immunoglobulins, and human anti-epratuzumab antibody (HAHA) titers. Total BILAG scores decreased by > or = 50% in all 14 patients at some point during the study (including 77% with a > or = 50% decrease at 6 weeks), with 92% having decreases of various amounts continuing to at least 18 weeks (where 38% showed a >/= 50% decrease). Almost all patients (93%) experienced improvements in at least one BILAG B- or C-level disease activity at 6, 10 and 18 weeks. Additionally, 3 patients with multiple BILAG B involvement at baseline had completely resolved all B-level disease activities by 18 weeks. Epratuzumab was well tolerated, with a median infusion time of 32 minutes. Drug serum levels were measurable for at least 4 weeks post-treatment and detectable in most samples at 18 weeks. B cell levels decreased by an average of 35% at 18 weeks and remained depressed at 6 months post-treatment. Changes in routine safety laboratory tests were infrequent and without any consistent pattern, and there was no evidence of immunogenicity or significant changes in T cells, immunoglobulins, or autoantibody levels. In patients with mild to moderate active lupus, 360 mg/m2 epratuzumab was well tolerated, with evidence of clinical improvement after the first infusion and durable clinical

  2. Where and how breastfeeding promotion initiatives should focus its attention? A study from rural Wardha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongre A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, the practice of breastfeeding is almost universal, but initiation of breastfeeding is generally quite late and colostrum is discarded. Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI strategy recommended systematic assessment of breastfeeding and emphasized counseling of the mother on proper positioning and attachment of infant to the breast. Objective: To assess breastfeeding among mothers of below six months children in rural Wardha. Materials and Methods: The present cross-sectional study was undertaken in surrounding 23 villages of Kasturba Rural Health Training Center (KRHTC, Anji. Two Auxiliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs trained in IMNCI paid house visits to 99 mothers during the study period and undertook the assessment of breastfeeding using IMNCI assessment form for young infants. Auxiliary Nurse Midwives observed and recorded the positioning and attachment of infant to the breast as per IMNCI guidelines. The data were entered and analyzed using Epi_Info (version 6.04d software package. Results: Most of the deliveries 94 (94.9% took place in the healthcare facilities. Majority 61 (61.6% newborn babies had received breastfeeding within half an hour. About half of the mothers had any of the feeding problems like feeding less than eight times in 24 h, giving any other food or drinks or is low weight for age. Significantly more mothers with feeding problems had problems in positioning and attachment of infant to the breast as compared with those mothers who did not have any feeding problems. Conclusions: In the settings, where practice of institutional delivery is high, the staff of healthcare facility should ensure education of the mothers regarding position and attachment of infant to the breast before discharge from the healthcare facility. At the village level, Village Health Nutrition Day (VHND can be utilized for health education of future mothers and support for the breastfeeding mothers. The IMNCI

  3. Investigating ultra high-enthalpy geothermal systems: a collaborative initiative to promote scientific opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.; Nielson, D.; Schiffman, P.; Schriener, A., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Scientists, engineers, and policy makers gathered at a workshop in the San Bernardino Mountains of southern California in October 2013 to discuss the science and technology involved in developing high-enthalpy geothermal fields. A typical high-enthalpy geothermal well between 2000 and 3000 m deep produces a mixture of hot water and steam at 200-300 °C that can be used to generate about 5-10 MWe of electric power. The theme of the workshop was to explore the feasibility and economic potential of increasing the power output of geothermal wells by an order of magnitude by drilling deeper to reach much higher pressures and temperatures. Development of higher enthalpy geothermal systems for power production has obvious advantages; specifically higher temperatures yield higher power outputs per well so that fewer wells are needed, leading to smaller environmental footprints for a given size of power plant. Plans for resource assessment and drilling in such higher enthalpy areas are already underway in Iceland, New Zealand, and Japan. There is considerable potential for similar developments in other countries that already have a large production of electricity from geothermal steam, such as Mexico, the Philippines, Indonesia, Italy, and the USA. However drilling deeper involves technical and economic challenges. One approach to mitigating the cost issue is to form a consortium of industry, government and academia to share the costs and broaden the scope of investigation. An excellent example of such collaboration is the Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP), which is investigating the economic feasibility of producing electricity from supercritical geothermal reservoirs, and this approach could serve as model for future developments elsewhere. A planning committee was formed to explore creating a similar initiative in the USA.

  4. Anti-osteopontin monoclonal antibody prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in mice by promotion of osteoclast apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlight: • We first report that anti-osteopontin mAb could protect osteoporosis in mice. • Anti-osteopontin mAb could promote the osteoclast apoptosis. • Targeting osteopontin might have therapeutic potentials for osteoporosis. - Abstract: Osteopontin (OPN) is abundant in mineralized tissues and has long been implicated in bone remodeling. However, the therapeutic effect of targeting OPN in bone loss diseases and the underlying molecular mechanism remain largely unknown. Here, we reported that anti-OPN mAb (23C3) could protect against ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in mice, demonstrated by microcomputed tomography analysis and histopathology evaluation. In vitro assay showed that 23C3 mAb reduced osteoclasts (OCs)-mediated bone resorption through promotion of mature OC apoptosis. Thus, the study has important implications for understanding the role of OPN in OC bone resorption and survival, and OPN antagonists may have therapeutic potential for osteoporosis and other osteopenic diseases

  5. Anti-osteopontin monoclonal antibody prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in mice by promotion of osteoclast apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bo [International Joint Cancer Institute, The Second Military Medical University, 800 Xiang Yin Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); PLA General Hospital Cancer Center and PLA Cancer Research Institute, PLA Postgraduate School of Medicine, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing (China); Dai, Jianxin [International Joint Cancer Institute, The Second Military Medical University, 800 Xiang Yin Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); PLA General Hospital Cancer Center and PLA Cancer Research Institute, PLA Postgraduate School of Medicine, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing (China); National Engineering Research Center for Antibody Medicine and Shanghai Key Lab. of Cell Engineering and Antibody, 399 Libing Road, Shanghai 201203 (China); Wang, Huaqing [International Joint Cancer Institute, The Second Military Medical University, 800 Xiang Yin Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wei, Huafeng [International Joint Cancer Institute, The Second Military Medical University, 800 Xiang Yin Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); PLA General Hospital Cancer Center and PLA Cancer Research Institute, PLA Postgraduate School of Medicine, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing (China); Zhao, Jian [International Joint Cancer Institute, The Second Military Medical University, 800 Xiang Yin Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Antibody Medicine and Shanghai Key Lab. of Cell Engineering and Antibody, 399 Libing Road, Shanghai 201203 (China); Guo, Yajun, E-mail: yguo_smmu@163.com [International Joint Cancer Institute, The Second Military Medical University, 800 Xiang Yin Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); PLA General Hospital Cancer Center and PLA Cancer Research Institute, PLA Postgraduate School of Medicine, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing (China); National Engineering Research Center for Antibody Medicine and Shanghai Key Lab. of Cell Engineering and Antibody, 399 Libing Road, Shanghai 201203 (China); and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlight: • We first report that anti-osteopontin mAb could protect osteoporosis in mice. • Anti-osteopontin mAb could promote the osteoclast apoptosis. • Targeting osteopontin might have therapeutic potentials for osteoporosis. - Abstract: Osteopontin (OPN) is abundant in mineralized tissues and has long been implicated in bone remodeling. However, the therapeutic effect of targeting OPN in bone loss diseases and the underlying molecular mechanism remain largely unknown. Here, we reported that anti-OPN mAb (23C3) could protect against ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in mice, demonstrated by microcomputed tomography analysis and histopathology evaluation. In vitro assay showed that 23C3 mAb reduced osteoclasts (OCs)-mediated bone resorption through promotion of mature OC apoptosis. Thus, the study has important implications for understanding the role of OPN in OC bone resorption and survival, and OPN antagonists may have therapeutic potential for osteoporosis and other osteopenic diseases.

  6. Improved micro-distribution of antibody-photon absorber conjugates after initial near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Tadanobu; Nakamura, Yuko; Sato, Kazuhide; Harada, Toshiko; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2016-06-28

    Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT), a targeted cancer therapy which uses an antibody-photo absorber conjugate (APC) and near infrared light exposure, dramatically improves nano-drug delivery into treated tumor beds due to enhanced vascular permeability. We investigated the micro-distribution of APCs in a variety of NIR-PIT treated tumors. Either cetuximab (cet) or trastuzumab (tra) conjugated with IR700 (cet-tra-IR700) was administered, as appropriate, to each mouse model of tumor. Tumor-bearing mice implanted with A431-GFP, MDAMB468-GFP, 3T3Her2-GFP or N87-GFP were separated into 5 groups: group 1=no treatment; group 2=cet-tra-IR700 i.v., no light exposure; group 3=cet-tra-IR700 i.v., NIR light exposure; group 4=cet-tra-IR700 i.v. and additional cet-tra-IR700 i.v. at 24h but no light exposure; group 5=cet-tra-IR700 i.v., NIR light exposure and additional cet-tra-IR700 i.v. immediately after NIR but no additional NIR light exposure. In vivo, ex vivo and microscopic fluorescence imaging was performed. Fluorescence from the surface of the tumor (s-tumor) was compared to fluorescence from deeper areas of the tumor (d-tumor). In general, there was no significant difference in the fluorescence intensity of GFP in the tumors among all groups, however the highest IR700 fluorescence intensity was consistently shown in group 5 tumors due to added APC after NIR-PIT. Fluorescence microscopy in all tumor types demonstrated that GFP relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) in s-tumor was significantly lower in group 3 and 5 (NIR-PIT groups) than in group 1, 2, and 4 (no NIR-PIT) yet there was no significant difference in d-tumor RFI among all groups. IR700 fluorescent RFI in the d-tumor was highest in group 5 (NIR-PIT+additional APC) compared to the other groups. Cell killing after NIR-PIT was primarily on the surface, however, APCs administered immediately after NIR-PIT penetrated deeper into tissue resulting in improved cell killing after a 2nd NIR-PIT session. This

  7. Toll-like receptor 5 is not essential for the promotion of secretory immunoglobulin A antibody responses to flagellated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptor 5 recognizes bacterial flagellin, plays a critical role in innate immunity, and contributes to flagellin-specific humoral immunity. Further, TLR5-expressing dendritic cells play an important role in IgA synthesis in the intestine; however, the contribution of TLR5 to antigen (Ag)-specific mucosal immunity remains unclear. Thus, whether TLR5 is essential for the induction of intestinal secretory (S)IgA antibody (Ab) responses against flagellin and bacterial Ags attached to the bacterial surface in response to an oral flagellated bacterium, Salmonella, was explored in this study. Our results indicate that when TLR5 knockout (TLR5(-/-)) mice are orally immunized with recombinant Salmonella expressing fragment C of tetanus toxin (rSalmonella-Tox C), tetanus toxoid (TT)- and flagellin (FliC)-specific systemic IgG and intestinal SIgA Abs are elicited. The numbers of TT-specific IgG Ab-forming cells (AFCs) in the spleen and IgA AFCs in the lamina propria (LP) of TLR5(-/-) mice were comparable to those in wild-type mice. rSalmonella-Tox C was equally disseminated in TLR5(-/-) mice, TLR5(-/-) mice lacking Peyer's patches (PPs), and wild-type mice. In contrast, TLR5(-/-) PP-null mice failed to induce TT- and FliC-specific SIgA Abs in the intestine and showed significantly reduced numbers of TT-specific IgA AFCs in the LP. These results suggest that TLR5 is dispensable for the induction of flagellin and surface Ag-specific systemic and mucosal immunity against oral flagellated bacteria. Rather, pathogen recognition, which occurs in PPs, is a prerequisite for the induction of mucosal immunity against flagellated bacteria. PMID:26564803

  8. The novel adjuvant dmLT promotes dose sparing, mucosal immunity and longevity of antibody responses to the inactivated polio vaccine in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Elizabeth B; Bauer, David L; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Lawson, Louise B; Clements, John D

    2015-04-15

    One option for achieving global polio eradication is to replace the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), which has the risk of reversion to wild-type virulence, with the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) vaccine. Adjuvants and alternate routes of immunization are promising options that may reduce antigen dose in IPV vaccinations, potentially allowing dose sparing and cost savings. Use of adjuvants and alternate routes of immunization could also help promote mucosal immunity, potentially mimicking the protection against intestinal virus shedding seen with OPV. In the current study, we examined the impact of combining the novel adjuvant dmLT with trivalent IPV for dose sparing, induction of mucosal immunity and increasing longevity of anti-poliovirus (PV) responses in a mouse model following either intradermal (ID) or intramuscular (IM) delivery. We found that non-adjuvanted ID delivery was not superior to IM delivery for fractional dose sparing, but was associated with development of mucosal immunity. Vaccination with IPV+dmLT promoted serum anti-PV neutralizing antibodies with fractional IPV doses by either IM or ID delivery, achieving at least five-fold dose sparing above non-adjuvanted fractional doses. These responses were most noticeable with the PV1 component of the trivalent vaccine. dmLT also promoted germinal center formation and longevity of serum anti-PV neutralizing titers. Lastly, dmLT enhanced mucosal immunity, as defined by fecal and intestinal anti-PV IgA secretion, when included in IPV immunization by ID or IM delivery. These studies demonstrate that dmLT is an effective adjuvant for either IM or ID delivery of IPV. Inclusion of dmLT in IPV immunizations allows antigen dose sparing and enhances mucosal immunity and longevity of anti-PV responses. PMID:25765967

  9. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Thyroid Antibodies Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Thyroid Autoantibodies; Antithyroid Antibodies; Antimicrosomal Antibody; Thyroid Microsomal Antibody; ...

  10. Initial Teacher Education for School Health Promotion in Austria: Does It Support the Implementation of the Health-Promoting School Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaschberger, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: School health promotion is said to be most effective when implemented through a comprehensive, settings-based, whole-school approach. The purpose of this paper is to address the current lack of knowledge about the current state of teacher education for health promotion and its potential to further the development of settings-based…

  11. 5-azacytidine promotes microspore embryogenesis initiation by decreasing global DNA methylation, but prevents subsequent embryo development in rapeseed and barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís, María-Teresa; El-Tantawy, Ahmed-Abdalla; Cano, Vanesa; Risueño, María C.; Testillano, Pilar S.

    2015-01-01

    Microspores are reprogrammed by stress in vitro toward embryogenesis. This process is an important tool in breeding to obtain double-haploid plants. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that changes in differentiation and proliferation. We have shown changes in global DNA methylation during microspore reprogramming. 5-Azacytidine (AzaC) cannot be methylated and leads to DNA hypomethylation. AzaC is a useful demethylating agent to study DNA dynamics, with a potential application in microspore embryogenesis. This work analyzes the effects of short and long AzaC treatments on microspore embryogenesis initiation and progression in two species, the dicot Brassica napus and the monocot Hordeum vulgare. This involved the quantitative analyses of proembryo and embryo production, the quantification of DNA methylation, 5-methyl-deoxy-cytidine (5mdC) immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the analysis of chromatin organization (condensation/decondensation) by light and electron microscopy. Four days of AzaC treatments (2.5 μM) increased embryo induction, response associated with a decrease of DNA methylation, modified 5mdC, and heterochromatin patterns compared to untreated embryos. By contrast, longer AzaC treatments diminished embryo production. Similar effects were found in both species, indicating that DNA demethylation promotes microspore reprogramming, totipotency acquisition, and embryogenesis initiation, while embryo differentiation requires de novo DNA methylation and is prevented by AzaC. This suggests a role for DNA methylation in the repression of microspore reprogramming and possibly totipotency acquisition. Results provide new insights into the role of epigenetic modifications in microspore embryogenesis and suggest a potential benefit of inhibitors, such as AzaC, to improve the process efficiency in biotechnology and breeding programs. PMID:26161085

  12. 5-azacytidine promotes microspore embryogenesis initiation by decreasing global DNA methylation, but prevents subsequent embryo development in rapeseed and barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís, María-Teresa; El-Tantawy, Ahmed-Abdalla; Cano, Vanesa; Risueño, María C; Testillano, Pilar S

    2015-01-01

    Microspores are reprogrammed by stress in vitro toward embryogenesis. This process is an important tool in breeding to obtain double-haploid plants. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that changes in differentiation and proliferation. We have shown changes in global DNA methylation during microspore reprogramming. 5-Azacytidine (AzaC) cannot be methylated and leads to DNA hypomethylation. AzaC is a useful demethylating agent to study DNA dynamics, with a potential application in microspore embryogenesis. This work analyzes the effects of short and long AzaC treatments on microspore embryogenesis initiation and progression in two species, the dicot Brassica napus and the monocot Hordeum vulgare. This involved the quantitative analyses of proembryo and embryo production, the quantification of DNA methylation, 5-methyl-deoxy-cytidine (5mdC) immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the analysis of chromatin organization (condensation/decondensation) by light and electron microscopy. Four days of AzaC treatments (2.5 μM) increased embryo induction, response associated with a decrease of DNA methylation, modified 5mdC, and heterochromatin patterns compared to untreated embryos. By contrast, longer AzaC treatments diminished embryo production. Similar effects were found in both species, indicating that DNA demethylation promotes microspore reprogramming, totipotency acquisition, and embryogenesis initiation, while embryo differentiation requires de novo DNA methylation and is prevented by AzaC. This suggests a role for DNA methylation in the repression of microspore reprogramming and possibly totipotency acquisition. Results provide new insights into the role of epigenetic modifications in microspore embryogenesis and suggest a potential benefit of inhibitors, such as AzaC, to improve the process efficiency in biotechnology and breeding programs. PMID:26161085

  13. 5-azacytidine promotes microspore embryogenesis initiation by decreasing global DNA methylation, but prevents subsequent embryo development in rapeseed and barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Teresa eSolís

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microspores are reprogrammed by stress in vitro towards embryogenesis. This process is an important tool in breeding to obtain double-haploid plants. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that changes in differentiation and proliferation. We have shown changes in global DNA methylation during microspore reprogramming. 5-Azacytidine (AzaC cannot be methylated and leads to DNA hypomethylation. AzaC is a useful demethylating agent to study DNA dynamics, with a potential application in microspore embryogenesis. This work analyzes the effects of short and long AzaC treatments on microspore embryogenesis initiation and progression in two species, the dicot Brassica napus and the monocot Hordeum vulgare. This involved the quantitative analyses of proembryo and embryo production, the quantification of DNA methylation, 5mdC immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the analysis of chromatin organization (condensation/ decondensation by light and electron microscopy. Four days of AzaC treatments (2.5 µM increased embryo induction, response associated with a decrease of DNA methylation, modified 5mdC and heterochromatin patterns compared to untreated embryos. By contrast, longer AzaC treatments diminished embryo production. Similar effects were found in both species, indicating that DNA demethylation promotes microspore reprogramming, totipotency acquisition and embryogenesis initiation, while embryo differentiation requires de novo DNA methylation and is prevented by AzaC. This suggests a role for DNA methylation in the repression of microspore reprogramming and possibly totipotency acquisition.Results provide new insights into the role of epigenetic modifications in microspore embryogenesis and suggest a potential benefit of inhibitors, such as AzaC, to improve the process efficiency in biotechnology and breeding programs.

  14. Changing organizational culture: using the CEO cancer gold standard policy initiatives to promote health and wellness at a school of public health

    OpenAIRE

    Towne, Samuel D.; Anderson, Kelsey E.; Smith, Matthew Lee; Dahlke, Deborah Vollmer; Kellstedt, Debra; Purcell, Ninfa Pena; Marcia G. Ory

    2015-01-01

    Background Worksite wellness initiatives for health promotion and health education have demonstrated effectiveness in improving employee health and wellness. We examined the effects of a multifaceted health promotion campaign on organizational capacity to meet requirements to become CEO Cancer Gold Standard Accredited. Methods We conducted an online survey to assess perceived organizational values and support for the five CEO Cancer Gold Standard Pillars for cancer prevention: tobacco cessati...

  15. TATA-binding protein-associated factor(s) in TFIID function through the initiator to direct basal transcription from a TATA-less class II promoter.

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, E; Chiang, C M; Ge, H.; Roeder, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II (Pol II) basal transcription factor TFIID is composed of the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and several TBP-associated factors (TAFs). TBP is required for Pol II transcription from TATA-containing and TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters of mRNA-encoding genes often contain an initiator element at the transcription start site that is sufficient to direct accurate Pol II transcription. Here we address the mechanisms of functional TBP recruitment to the TATA-less initi...

  16. Hmo1 directs pre-initiation complex assembly to an appropriate site on its target gene promoters by masking a nucleosome-free region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Koji; Ohyama, Yoshifumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro

    2011-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hmo1 binds to the promoters of ∼ 70% of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) at high occupancy, but is observed at lower occupancy on the remaining RPG promoters. In Δhmo1 cells, the transcription start site (TSS) of the Hmo1-enriched RPS5 promoter shifted upstream, while the TSS of the Hmo1-limited RPL10 promoter did not shift. Analyses of chimeric RPS5/RPL10 promoters revealed a region between the RPS5 upstream activating sequence (UAS) and core promoter, termed the intervening region (IVR), responsible for strong Hmo1 binding and an upstream TSS shift in Δhmo1 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed that the RPS5-IVR resides within a nucleosome-free region and that pre-initiation complex (PIC) assembly occurs at a site between the IVR and a nucleosome overlapping the TSS (+1 nucleosome). The PIC assembly site was shifted upstream in Δhmo1 cells on this promoter, indicating that Hmo1 normally masks the RPS5-IVR to prevent PIC assembly at inappropriate site(s). This novel mechanism ensures accurate transcriptional initiation by delineating the 5'- and 3'-boundaries of the PIC assembly zone. PMID:21288884

  17. Anti-Aquaporin-4 Antibody-Positive Neuromyelitis Optica Presenting with Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion as an Initial Manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nakajima

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of neuromyelitis optica (NMO-characteristic brain lesions corresponds to sites of high aquaporin-4 (AQP4 expression, and the brainstem and hypothalamus lesions that express high levels of AQP4 protein are relatively characteristic of NMO. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH is one of the important causes of hyponatremia and results from an abnormal production or sustained secretion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH. SIADH has been associated with many clinical states or syndromes, and the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal system regulates the feedback control system for ADH secretion. We report the case of a 63-year-old man with NMO, whose initial manifestation was hyponatremia caused by SIADH. Retrospective analysis revealed that the serum anti-AQP4 antibody was positive, and an MRI scan showed a unilateral lesion in the hypothalamus. SIADH recovered completely with regression of the hypothalamic lesion. As such, NMO should even be considered in patients who develop SIADH and have no optic nerve or spinal cord lesions but have MRI-documented hypothalamic lesions.

  18. "Know your CD4 campaign": 6-year outcomes from a quality improvement initiative to promote earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Memiah; Constance Shumba; Yvonne Henley; Sekela Mwakyusa; Abuu Maghimbi; Patience Komba; Anthony Mlila; Venosa Haule; Tuhuma Tulli; Stafford Kristen; Martine Etienne-Mesubi; Carla Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Background: Late initiation of treatment for illness secondary to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a major challenge in developing countries. Despite the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation that treatment be initiated early in disease management, health providers conducting quality improvement monitoring in one region of Tanzania noted that common management practice relies upon clinical signs of advanced disease alone for initiation of combination antiretroviral ther...

  19. Influence of dietary fat and selenium fed during initiation or promotion on the development of preneoplastic lesions in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)-induced γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)-positive foci in rat liver were assessed in animals fed different levels of fat and selenium (Se) during either initiation (IN) or promotion (PR). Male Sprague Dawley rats (50g) were divided into 12 groups. One of six modified AIN-76 experimental diets were fed to groups 1-6 during weeks 1-4.5 (IN) and to groups 7-12 during weeks 4.5-15 (PR). During weeks 3-4, 13 rats/group received 10 daily doses of AFB1 (.4 mg/kg bwt/dose, i.g.). Two levels of corn oil (2% and 20%) were fed, each containing 3 levels of Se: < 0.02; 0.15; 2.5 (IN) or 1.9 (PR) ppm. When not fed the experimental diets rats were fed a standard AIN-76 diet. In groups 1-6, 0.03% phenobarbital was added to the standard diet. At week 15 rats were sacrificed. Compared to all low-fat groups, the high-fat diets with either < 0.02 or 0.15 ppm Se fed during IN resulted in a marked increase in mean diameter of GGT-positive foci and % liver section occupied by foci. In rats fed high-fat 2.5 ppm Se, preneoplastic development was decreased below all low-fat groups. During PR, Se status but not dietary fat level influenced foci formation. Rats fed < 0.02 ppm Se had greater mean diameter of foci and % section occupied by foci than either 0.15 or 1.9 ppm Se. Thus, an interaction was observed between dietary fat and selenium during IN, but not during PR

  20. Loss of Ezh2 synergizes with JAK2-V617F in initiating myeloproliferative neoplasms and promoting myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takafumi; Kubovcakova, Lucia; Nienhold, Ronny; Zmajkovic, Jakub; Meyer, Sara C; Hao-Shen, Hui; Geier, Florian; Dirnhofer, Stephan; Guglielmelli, Paola; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Feenstra, Jelena D Milosevic; Kralovics, Robert; Orkin, Stuart H; Skoda, Radek C

    2016-07-25

    Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients frequently show co-occurrence of JAK2-V617F and mutations in epigenetic regulator genes, including EZH2 In this study, we show that JAK2-V617F and loss of Ezh2 in hematopoietic cells contribute synergistically to the development of MPN. The MPN phenotype induced by JAK2-V617F was accentuated in JAK2-V617F;Ezh2(-/-) mice, resulting in very high platelet and neutrophil counts, more advanced myelofibrosis, and reduced survival. These mice also displayed expansion of the stem cell and progenitor cell compartments and a shift of differentiation toward megakaryopoiesis at the expense of erythropoiesis. Single cell limiting dilution transplantation with bone marrow from JAK2-V617F;Ezh2(+/-) mice showed increased reconstitution and MPN disease initiation potential compared with JAK2-V617F alone. RNA sequencing in Ezh2-deficient hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors identified highly up-regulated genes, including Lin28b and Hmga2, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of their promoters revealed decreased H3K27me3 deposition. Forced expression of Hmga2 resulted in increased chimerism and platelet counts in recipients of retrovirally transduced HSCs. JAK2-V617F-expressing mice treated with an Ezh2 inhibitor showed higher platelet counts than vehicle controls. Our data support the proposed tumor suppressor function of EZH2 in patients with MPN and call for caution when considering using Ezh2 inhibitors in MPN. PMID:27401344

  1. A Novel Antihepatitis Drug, Bicyclol, Prevents Liver Carcinogenesis in Diethylnitrosamine-Initiated and Phenobarbital-Promoted Mice Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicyclol, an antihepatitis drug developed by Chinese scientists, has been shown to prevent the malignant transformation induced by 3-methylcholanthrene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells. This study provides further evidence on its role as a chemopreventive agent in experimental mice with diethylnitrosamine- (DEN- initiated and phenobarbital- (PB- promoted liver carcinoma. Liver tissue and serum were collected. In the two-stage model of hepatocarcinogenesis in mice, oral administration of bicyclol (100, 200 mg/kg before DEN injection showed significant reduction in the incidence of hepatocellular foci, nodules, or carcinoma. Histopathological examination revealed that there was no hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and hepatoma formation in the mice pretreated with bicyclol (200 mg/kg at week 20, while the mice treated with DEN/PB developed 33.3% HCC and 55.6% hepatoma. Furthermore, the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and α-fetal protein (AFP in serum significantly increased in the DEN/PB model group in comparison with the control group. Pretreatment with bicyclol showed a marked reduction in the above condition. Bicyclol also decreased the expression of AFP and proliferating cell nuclear antigen level in the liver tissue and attenuated the decrease in body weight. In this study, we also found that 10 weeks after stopping the administration of PB and drugs, the control and bicyclol-treated (200 mg/kg animals showed no HCC and hepatoma formation at the time of termination whereas DEN/PB-induced mice developed 100% hepatoma and 50% HCC. These results further indicate that bicyclol has the chemopreventive potential for liver carcinogenesis induced by carcinogens.

  2. The chromatin remodeling factor CSB recruits histone acetyltransferase PCAF to rRNA gene promoters in active state for transcription initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meili Shen

    Full Text Available The promoters of poised rRNA genes (rDNA are marked by both euchromatic and heterochromatic histone modifications and are associated with two transcription factors, UBF and SL1 that nucleate transcription complex formation. Active rRNA genes contain only euchromatic histone modifications and are loaded with all components of transcriptional initiation complex including RNA polymerase I. Coupled with histone acetylation and RNA polymerase I targeting, poised promoters can be converted to active ones by ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factor CSB for initiation of rDNA transcription. However, it is not clear how dynamic histone modifications induce the assembly of polymerase I transcription initiation complex to active promoters during such conversion. Here we show that a complex consisting of CSB, RNA polymerase I and histone acetyltransferase PCAF is present at the rDNA promoters in active state. CSB is required for the association of PCAF with rDNA, which induces acetylation of histone H4 and histone H3K9. Overexpression of CSB promotes the association of PCAF with rDNA. Knockdown of PCAF leads to decreased levels of H4ac and H3K9ac at rDNA promoters, prevents the association of RNA polymerase I and inhibits pre-rRNA synthesis. The results demonstrate that CSB recruits PCAF to rDNA, which allows histone acetylation that is required for the assembly of polymerase I transcription initiation complex during the transition from poised to active state of rRNA genes, suggesting that CSB and PCAF play cooperative roles to establish the active state of rRNA genes by histone acetylation.

  3. Heat shock proteins DnaJ, DnaK, and GrpE stimulate P1 plasmid replication by promoting initiator binding to the origin.

    OpenAIRE

    Sozhamannan, S; Chattoraj, D K

    1993-01-01

    Binding of the P1-encoded protein RepA to the origin of P1 plasmid replication is essential for initiation of DNA replication and for autoregulatory repression of the repA promoter. Previous studies have shown defects in both initiation and repression in hosts lacking heat shock proteins DnaJ, DnaK, and GrpE and have suggested that these proteins play a role in the RepA-DNA binding required for initiation and repression. In this study, using in vivo dimethyl sulfate footprinting, we have conf...

  4. Does the private finance initiative promote innovation in health care? The case of the British National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petratos, Pythagoras

    2005-12-01

    The Private Finance Initiative (PFI) is a specific example of health care privatization within the British National Health Service. In this essay, I critically assess the ways in which various Private Finance Initiatives have increased health care efficiency and effectiveness, as well as encouraged medical innovation. Indeed, as the analysis will demonstrate, significant empirical evidence supports the conclusion that Private Finance Initiatives are a driving force of innovation within the British Health Care System. PMID:16396788

  5. Virus-specific antibodies allow viral replication in the marginal zone, thereby promoting CD8+ T-cell priming and viral control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhan, Vikas; Khairnar, Vishal; Friedrich, Sarah-Kim; Zhou, Fan; Gassa, Asmae; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Gailus, Nicole; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Khandanpour, Cyrus; Dittmer, Ulf; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Lang, Philipp A.; Lang, Karl S.

    2016-01-01

    Clinically used human vaccination aims to induce specific antibodies that can guarantee long-term protection against a pathogen. The reasons that other immune components often fail to induce protective immunity are still debated. Recently we found that enforced viral replication in secondary lymphoid organs is essential for immune activation. In this study we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to determine whether enforced virus replication occurs in the presence of virus-specific antibodies or virus-specific CD8+ T cells. We found that after systemic recall infection with LCMV-WE the presence of virus-specific antibodies allowed intracellular replication of virus in the marginal zone of spleen. In contrast, specific antibodies limited viral replication in liver, lung, and kidney. Upon recall infection with the persistent virus strain LCMV-Docile, viral replication in spleen was essential for the priming of CD8+ T cells and for viral control. In contrast to specific antibodies, memory CD8+ T cells inhibited viral replication in marginal zone but failed to protect mice from persistent viral infection. We conclude that virus-specific antibodies limit viral infection in peripheral organs but still allow replication of LCMV in the marginal zone, a mechanism that allows immune boosting during recall infection and thereby guarantees control of persistent virus. PMID:26805453

  6. Virus-specific antibodies allow viral replication in the marginal zone, thereby promoting CD8(+) T-cell priming and viral control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhan, Vikas; Khairnar, Vishal; Friedrich, Sarah-Kim; Zhou, Fan; Gassa, Asmae; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Gailus, Nicole; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Khandanpour, Cyrus; Dittmer, Ulf; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S

    2016-01-01

    Clinically used human vaccination aims to induce specific antibodies that can guarantee long-term protection against a pathogen. The reasons that other immune components often fail to induce protective immunity are still debated. Recently we found that enforced viral replication in secondary lymphoid organs is essential for immune activation. In this study we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to determine whether enforced virus replication occurs in the presence of virus-specific antibodies or virus-specific CD8(+) T cells. We found that after systemic recall infection with LCMV-WE the presence of virus-specific antibodies allowed intracellular replication of virus in the marginal zone of spleen. In contrast, specific antibodies limited viral replication in liver, lung, and kidney. Upon recall infection with the persistent virus strain LCMV-Docile, viral replication in spleen was essential for the priming of CD8(+) T cells and for viral control. In contrast to specific antibodies, memory CD8(+) T cells inhibited viral replication in marginal zone but failed to protect mice from persistent viral infection. We conclude that virus-specific antibodies limit viral infection in peripheral organs but still allow replication of LCMV in the marginal zone, a mechanism that allows immune boosting during recall infection and thereby guarantees control of persistent virus. PMID:26805453

  7. Multilevel (mental) health promotion as social innovation in peripheral areas of Denmark – reflections on a local initiative targeting vulnerable young mothers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delica, Kristian Nagel

    This paper provides preliminary insights into an ongoing research project focused on marginalized young mothers and mental health initiatives in two peripheral islands of Denmark (Lolland and Falster). The municipalities on the Islands are struggling with a concentration of (mental) health problems...... of local welfare state services at the same time as the number of welfare clients are increasing. To grasp the complexities in understanding the local initiative this paper is grounded in a multilevel perspective on health promotion and addresses perspectives on the work done from the strategic......, bureaucratic level over the front line welfare professionals’ practices to the young mother’s experiences. The paper aligns a multilevel approach to theories of social innovation. This forms a fundament for discussing ‘horizontal’ and ‘vertical’ multilevel health promotion and analysing the interwoven...

  8. Phytohormonal networks promote differentiation of fiber initials on pre-anthesis cotton ovules grown in vitro and in planta

    Science.gov (United States)

    The number of cotton (Gossypium sp.) ovule epidermal cells differentiating into fiber initials is an important factor affecting cotton yield and fiber quality. Despite extensive efforts in determining the molecular mechanisms regulating fiber initial differentiation, only a few genes responsible for...

  9. Initial and Sustained Participation in an Internet-delivered Long-term Worksite Health Promotion Program on Physical Activity and Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Robroek, Suzan JW; Lindeboom, Dennis EM; Burdorf, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Background Determinants of participation in health promotion programs are largely unknown. To evaluate and implement interventions, information is needed regarding their reach as well as regarding the characteristics of program users and non-users. Objective In this study, individual, lifestyle, and health indicators were investigated in relation to initial, and sustained participation in an Internet-delivered physical activity and healthy nutrition program in the workplace setting. In additi...

  10. Promoter opening (melting) and transcription initiation by RNA polymerase I requires neither nucleotide beta,gamma hydrolysis nor protein phosphorylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lofquist, A K; Li, H; Imboden, M A; Paule, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    With some bacterial RNA polymerases and in eukaryotic RNA polymerase II, DNA melting during initiation requires the coupling of energy derived from beta,gamma hydrolysis of ATP. A detailed analysis of this possible requirement for eukaryotic RNA polymerase I reveals no such requirement. However, in some cases, beta,gamma non-hydrolyzable derivatives (beta,gamma imido or methylene) of nucleotide substrates have been found to significantly inhibit transcription initiation because of their ineff...

  11. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked to an increased risk ...

  12. Initial Steps towards Biocontrol in Hops: Successful Colonization and Plant Growth Promotion by Four Bacterial Biocontrol Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriele Berg; Stefan Seefelder; Katja A. Maurer; Christin Zachow

    2013-01-01

    Verticillium wilt, caused by Verticillium nonalfalfae and V. dahliae, is a devastating disease in hops that can cause considerable economic crop losses. The perennial use of hops combined with the long persistence of the pathogen in soil make it difficult to suppress the disease with conventional measures. Biological control agents (BCA) are the basis of an environmentally friendly plant protection strategy that uses plant promotion and antagonistic effects of microorganisms. We evaluated the...

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α promotes primary tumor growth and tumor-initiating cell activity in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, Luciana P; Peacock, Danielle L.; Majumdar, Debeshi; Ingels, Jesse F; Jensen, Laura C; Smith, Keisha D; Cushing, Richard C; Seagroves, Tiffany N

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Overexpression of the oxygen-responsive transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) correlates with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The mouse mammary tumor virus polyoma virus middle T (MMTV-PyMT) mouse is a widely utilized preclinical mouse model that resembles human luminal breast cancer and is highly metastatic. Prior studies in which the PyMT model was used demonstrated that HIF-1α is essential to promoting carcinoma onset and lung metastasis, although...

  14. Water sector fund (CT-hi dro) and wastewater reuse activities: initiatives to promote environment ally sustainable development in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brazilian Water Sector Fund (CT-Hidro) is presented as an innovative mechanism to foster the scientific and technological sector of the country as well as a model instrument to promote environmentally sustainable development in Brazil and in other developing countries. CT-Hidro is shown as an instrument that provides support for scientific and technological development research activities in the following areas: experimental technological development, scientific and technological research projects, development of basic industrial technology and implantation of research infrastructure. CT-Hidro is presented as a key mechanism to finance wastewater reuse projects as an imperative action to fight poverty and promote social inclusion in Brazil. The concept of wastewater reuse for beneficial purposes is presented. Its growing importance as an essential part of the planning of the integrated and sustainable water resources management is also evidenced. In this perspective, the need for sanitation, wastewater treatment and its reuse in agriculture for food production are presented as imperative measures that must be taken in Brazil in order to promote sustainable development, fight poverty, improve public health conditions and enhance environmental quality in the country. (author)

  15. Antiphospholipid Antibody and Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴竞生

    2008-01-01

    @@ Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) APA is a big category for all kinds of negative charge phospholipid or lecithin - a protein complex autoantibodies or the same antibody, through its recognition of antigen (target protein) different, and phospholipids or lecithin - protein complex combination of various rely on the interference Phospholipid clotting and anti-coagulation factor, and promote endothelial cells, platelets, complement activation and play a role. APA including lupus anticoagulant(LA) and anticardiolipin antibody (ACA), In addition, there are anti-β2 glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI) antibody, anti-prothrombin (a- PT) antibody, anti-lysophosphatidic acid antibody and anti-phosphatidylserine antibody, and so on. APA as the main target of phospholipid-binding protein, including β2-GPI, prothrombin, annexin, protein C (PC) and protein S (PS), plasminogen, and so on.

  16. A downstream CpG island controls transcript initiation and elongation and the methylation state of the imprinted Airn macro ncRNA promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha V Koerner

    Full Text Available A CpG island (CGI lies at the 5' end of the Airn macro non-protein-coding (nc RNA that represses the flanking Igf2r promoter in cis on paternally inherited chromosomes. In addition to being modified on maternally inherited chromosomes by a DNA methylation imprint, the Airn CGI shows two unusual organization features: its position immediately downstream of the Airn promoter and transcription start site and a series of tandem direct repeats (TDRs occupying its second half. The physical separation of the Airn promoter from the CGI provides a model to investigate if the CGI plays distinct transcriptional and epigenetic roles. We used homologous recombination to generate embryonic stem cells carrying deletions at the endogenous locus of the entire CGI or just the TDRs. The deleted Airn alleles were analyzed by using an ES cell imprinting model that recapitulates the onset of Igf2r imprinted expression in embryonic development or by using knock-out mice. The results show that the CGI is required for efficient Airn initiation and to maintain the unmethylated state of the Airn promoter, which are both necessary for Igf2r repression on the paternal chromosome. The TDRs occupying the second half of the CGI play a minor role in Airn transcriptional elongation or processivity, but are essential for methylation on the maternal Airn promoter that is necessary for Igf2r to be expressed from this chromosome. Together the data indicate the existence of a class of regulatory CGIs in the mammalian genome that act downstream of the promoter and transcription start.

  17. Systemic foot-and-mouth disease vaccination in cattle promotes specific antibody secreting cells at the respiratory tract and triggers local anamnestic-compatible responses upon aerosol infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease affecting biungulate species. Commercial vaccines, formulated with inactivated whole FMD virus (FMDV) particles, are regularly used worldwide in regions recognized as free from the disease. Here, we studied the generation of antibody ...

  18. 76 FR 52845 - Establishing a Coordinated Government-Wide Initiative to Promote Diversity and Inclusion in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ..., integrated, and strategic focus on diversity and inclusion as a key component of their human resources... Initiative and Strategic Plan. The Director of the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and the Deputy... Plan, merit system principles, the agency's overall strategic plan, its human capital plan...

  19. Mild leptospirosis with three-year persistence of IgG- and IgM-antibodies, initially manifesting as carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Sehnal, Ernst; Stanek, Gerold

    2005-08-01

    Long-term persistence of IgG- and IgM-antibodies against leptospira after mild leptospirosis has not been reported. In a 45-year-old female pet-shop worker with carpal tunnel syndrome, accompanied by arthralgias, coughing, repeatedly elevated temperature, followed by easy fatigability, personality change, memory and speech disturbance, blurred vision, myalgia and swollen lymph nodes, leptospirosis was diagnosed, based upon history, clinical findings, and serological investigations. After the described symptoms had disappeared following doxycyclin for 2 weeks, IgG- and IgM-antibodies against leptospira remained positive during the next three years. This case illustrates that leptospirosis may start as carpal tunnel syndrome and that the severity of leptospirosis does not seem to be related to the intensity of the humoral immune response against the causative agent. PMID:16038755

  20. Promoting Nature-Based Activity for People With Mental Illness Through the US "Exercise Is Medicine" Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Julie; Jette, Shannon

    2016-05-01

    Nature-based physical activity programming (e.g., countryside walks, hiking, horseback riding) has been found to be an effective way to help improve the health of people with mental illness. Exercise referral initiatives, whereby health practitioners prescribe exercise in an attempt to prevent or treat chronic illnesses, have helped make such nature-based activities accessible to this population in the United Kingdom and Australia; however, there is a dearth of research related to the most prominent exercise referral program in the United States: Exercise is Medicine. Taking into account the barriers to physical activity faced by people with mental illness, we explore how nature-based programming for this population might be mobilized in the United States through the growing Exercise is Medicine initiative. PMID:26985618

  1. Extending stakeholder theory to promote resource management initiatives to key stakeholders: a case study of water transfers in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafreniere, Katherine C; Deshpande, Sameer; Bjornlund, Henning; Hunter, M Gordon

    2013-11-15

    Many attempts to implement resource management initiatives in Canadian and international communities have been resisted by stakeholders despite inclusion of their representatives in the decision-making process. Managers' failure to understand stakeholders' perspectives when proposing initiatives is a potential cause of this resistance. Our study uses marketing thought to enhance stakeholder theory by bringing in an audience-centric perspective. We attempt to understand how stakeholders perceive their interests in an organization and consequently decide how to influence that organization. By doing so, we investigate whether a disconnect exists between the perceptions of managers and those of stakeholders. Natural resource managers can utilize this knowledge to garner stakeholder support for the organization and its activities. We support this claim with findings from a water transfer plebiscite held in the Canadian province of Alberta. Sixteen personal interviews employing narrative inquiry were conducted to document voters' (i.e., irrigators') interpretations. PMID:23895936

  2. Activation of the H-ras oncogene in hepatocellular carcinomas initiated with diethylnitrosamine and promoted by a dietary methyl deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High molecular weight DNA was isolated from control livers and from hepatocellular carcinomas produced in F344 rats initiated with diethylnitrosamine (20 mg/kg body weight) then fed a methyl-deficient diet. The DNAs were used to transfect NIH 3T3 cells by the calcium phosphate precipitation technique. Cultures were scored for foci of morphologically transformed cells after 21 days. Three of 24 DNAs isolated from tumors initiated with diethylnitrosamine were able to transform NIH 3T3 cells (frequency = 0.01 to 0.04 foci/μg DNA). Secondary transformants were produced when DNA isolated from transformed foci were used in the transfection assay. The presence of rat DNA sequences in the primary transformants was demonstrated using a probe specific for rat repetitive sequences. High molecular weight DNA isolated from each of the 3 primary transformants was digested with BamH1 and was subjected to Southern blot analysis using a 32P-labelled probe for the H-ras gene. Each transformant tested exhibited a fragment not present in 3T3 DNA that hybridized with the H-ras probe. Twelve control DNAs isolated from livers of tumor-free animals were negative in the transfection assay. The results are consistent with the involvement of the activated H-ras gene in the development of these chemically-initiated carcinomas in methyl-deficient animals

  3. Growth Performance, Carcass Characteristics, Antibody Titer and Blood Parameters in Broiler Chickens Fed Dietary Myrtle (Myrtus communis) Essential Oil as an Alternative to Antibiotic Growth Promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoodi Bardzardi M; Ghazanfari S; Sharifi SD

    2014-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of Myrtle Essential Oil (MEO) on growth performance, carcass characteristics, antibody titer and blood parameters of broiler chickens. A total of 200 Ross 308 broiler chickens were allocated to five dietary treatments with four replicates of 10 birds each. Dietary treatments were prepared by formulating a corn-soybean meal-based diet free of antibiotics (Control) and supplementing the basal diet with three levels of MEO at 100, 200, 300 m...

  4. Virus-specific antibodies allow viral replication in the marginal zone, thereby promoting CD8+ T-cell priming and viral control

    OpenAIRE

    Vikas Duhan; Vishal Khairnar; Sarah-Kim Friedrich; Fan Zhou; Asmae Gassa; Nadine Honke; Namir Shaabani; Nicole Gailus; Lacramioara Botezatu; Cyrus Khandanpour; Ulf Dittmer; Dieter Häussinger; Mike Recher; Cornelia Hardt; Lang, Philipp A.

    2016-01-01

    Clinically used human vaccination aims to induce specific antibodies that can guarantee long-term protection against a pathogen. The reasons that other immune components often fail to induce protective immunity are still debated. Recently we found that enforced viral replication in secondary lymphoid organs is essential for immune activation. In this study we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to determine whether enforced virus replication occurs in the presence of virus-spec...

  5. Natural killer T (NKT)–B-cell interactions promote prolonged antibody responses and long-term memory to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Li; Deng, Shenglou; Reboulet, Rachel; Mathew, Rebecca; Teyton, Luc; Savage, Paul B.; Bendelac, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies directed against microbial polysaccharides are a critical component of protective immune responses and vaccines. We used nanoparticles coexpressing pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides and a cell wall lipid antigen analog to model NKT–B-cell interactions. Our study demonstrated CD1d-restricted cognate interactions, isotype switch, affinity maturation, and long-term memory, despite the apparent failure of NKT cells to differentiate into follicular helper cells. The findings demonst...

  6. Feasibility, acceptability, and initial efficacy of an online sexual health promotion program for LGBT youth: the Queer Sex Ed intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustanski, Brian; Greene, George J; Ryan, Daniel; Whitton, Sarah W

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth experience multiple sexual health inequities driven, in part, by deficits in parental and peer support, school-based sex education programs, and community services. Research suggests that the Internet may be an important resource in the development of sexual health among LGBT youth. We examined the feasibility of recruiting youth in same-sex relationships into an online sexual health intervention, evaluated intervention acceptability, and obtained initial estimates of intervention efficacy. LGBT youth (16 to 20 years old) completed Queer Sex Ed (QSE), an online, multimedia sexual health intervention consisting of five modules. The final sample (N = 202) completed the pretest, intervention, and posttest assessments. The primary study outcomes were sexual orientation identity and self-acceptance (e.g., coming-out self-efficacy), sexual health knowledge (e.g., sexual functioning), relationship variables (e.g., communication skills), and safer sex (e.g., sexual assertiveness). Analyses indicated that 15 of the 17 outcomes were found to be significant (p < .05). Effect sizes ranged from small for sexual orientation (e.g., internalized homophobia) and relationship variables (e.g., communication skills) to moderate for safer sex (e.g., contraceptive knowledge) outcomes. This study demonstrated the feasibility, acceptability, and initial efficacy of QSE, an innovative online comprehensive sexual health program for LGBT youth. PMID:24588408

  7. Youth, Caregiver, and Staff Perspectives on an Initiative to Promote Success of Emerging Adults with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Kathleen F; Connors, Elizabeth H; Chambers, Kerri L; Thomas, Charmaine L; Stephan, Sharon H

    2014-07-01

    Transitioning to adulthood is more challenging for youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) as compared to youth with other disability types and typically-developing peers. Outcomes for emerging adults with EBD as a group are particularly concerning in the domains of unemployment, educational dropout rates, and interactions with the judicial system including incarceration, early parenting, homelessness, substance abuse, mental health problems, and suicide. The current study presents qualitative program evaluation data for one of seven grantee states awarded 5-year cooperative agreements by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to build developmentally-appropriate and effective youth-guided local systems of care for transition age youth, ages 16-25 years, to promote positive transition outcomes. Findings, obtained from focus groups of 25 participating transition age youth, caregivers, staff, and supervisors, include strategies for maintaining and expanding on the strengths of program, as well as for improving specific program areas. Also, consistent with the goals of the program, this process provided an opportunity for the youth and caregivers to voice their opinions and perspectives regarding their services. Implications for research and practice on effectively serving the unique needs of young adults experiencing EBD and their families in areas such as navigating special education, providing emotional and behavioral supports, and leveraging interagency collaboration are discussed. PMID:25005428

  8. 非洲推动传统医学发展的举措与进展%African initiatives and progress in promoting the development of traditional medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄睿; 潘艳丽; 柳长华

    2014-01-01

    To study the initiatives and progress of African nations in promoting the development of traditional medicine to determine if these measures can be applied to the protection of traditional Chinese medicine knowledge. Information research methods were used to collect and analyze relevant literature. The development of African traditional medicine has been effectively promoted through various measures taken by African organizations and governments. In recent years, Africa has achieved remarkable results in promoting the development of traditional medicine. Many other countries will benefit from studying their examples and adopting similar measures.%本文采用信息研究的方法收集和分析相关文献,重点研究了非洲推动传统医学发展的举措与进展,为中医药传统知识保护提供思路。结果表明,非洲各组织和各国家政府采取多种措施,有力地促进了非洲传统医学发展,其成效值得其他国家推广和借鉴。

  9. Growth Performance, Carcass Characteristics, Antibody Titer and Blood Parameters in Broiler Chickens Fed Dietary Myrtle (Myrtus communis Essential Oil as an Alternative to Antibiotic Growth Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoodi Bardzardi M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of Myrtle Essential Oil (MEO on growth performance, carcass characteristics, antibody titer and blood parameters of broiler chickens. A total of 200 Ross 308 broiler chickens were allocated to five dietary treatments with four replicates of 10 birds each. Dietary treatments were prepared by formulating a corn-soybean meal-based diet free of antibiotics (Control and supplementing the basal diet with three levels of MEO at 100, 200, 300 mg/Kg or antibiotic Flavophospholipol (FPL at 600 mg/Kg. The results showed that diets supplemented with MEO and FPL increased the feed intake, body weight gain and improved the feed conversion ratio compared to the control treatment (P. The relative carcass weight was significantly increased, whereas the weight of gastrointestinal tract and liver were decreased in broilers fed MEO (P. Supplementing the basal diet with MEO increased the antibody titers against Avian Influenza Virus (AIV and Newcastle disease Virus (NDV, although supplementing diet with 200 mg/Kg of MEO was more effective (P. Broilers fed MEO diets especially at the level of 300 mg/Kg had a lower white blood cells count and heterophil, heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin, but a higher lymphocyte and red blood cells count (P. In conclusion, data showed that diet supplemented with MEO improved the growth performance and increased antibody titers against AIV and NDV, especially at the level of 200 mg/Kg, in broiler chickens and could be an adequate alternative to antibiotics.

  10. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 3a (eIF3a) Promotes Cell Proliferation and Motility in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu Qian; Liu, Yu; Yao, Min Ya; Jin, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Identifying a target molecule that is crucially involved in pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis is necessary in developing an effective treatment. The study aimed to investigate the role of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3a (eIF3a) in the cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic cancer. Our data showed that the expression of eIF3a was upregulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as compared with its expression in normal pancreatic tissues. Knockdown of eIF3a by a specific shRNA caused significant decreases in cell proliferation and clonogenic abilities in pancreatic cancer SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Consistently, the pancreatic cancer cell growth rates were also impaired in xenotransplanted mice. Moreover, wound-healing assay showed that depletion of eIF3a significantly slowed down the wound recovery processes in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Transwell migration and invasion assays further showed that cell migration and invasion abilities were significantly inhibited by knockdown of eIF3a in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Statistical analysis of eIF3a expression in 140 cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma samples revealed that eIF3a expression was significantly associated with tumor metastasis and TNM staging. These analyses suggest that eIF3a contributes to cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27550487

  11. The Ne3LS Network, Quebec's initiative to evaluate the impact and promote a responsible and sustainable development of nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectacular progress made by nanosciences and nanotechnologies elicits as much hope and fear. Consequently, a great number of research and training initiatives on the ethical, environmental, economic, legal and social issues regarding nanotechnology development (Ne3LS) are emerging worldwide. In Quebec, Canada, a Task Force was mandated by NanoQuebec to conceive a Ne3LS research and training strategy to assess those issues. This Task Force brought together experts from universities, governments or industry working in nanosciences and nanotechnologies or in Ne3LS. Their resulting action plan, made public in November 2006, contained several recommendations, including the creation of a knowledge network (Ne3LS Network). In the following years, after consulting with numerous key players concerned with the possible impacts of nanosciences and nanotechnologies in Quebec, the Ne3LS Network was launched in January 2010 in partnership with the Fonds quebecois de la recherche sur la nature et les technologies, the Fonds quebecois de la recherche sur la societe et la culture and the Fonds de la recherche en sante du Quebec, NanoQuebec, the Institut de recherche Robert-Sauve en sante et en securite du travail as well as the University of Montreal. Its objectives are to 1) Foster the development of Ne3LS research activities (grants and fellowships); 2) Spearhead the Canadian and international Ne3LS network; 3) Take part in the training of researchers and experts; 4) Encourage the creation of interactive tools for the general public; 5) Facilitate collaboration between decision-makers and experts; 6) Involve the scientific community through a host of activities (symposium, conferences, thematic events); 7) Build multidisciplinary research teams to evaluate the impact of nanotechnology.

  12. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment–apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Natasha M.; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A.; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B.; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I.; Forte, Trudy M.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25994015

  13. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment-apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Natasha M; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25994015

  14. Biosimilars in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases: initial lessons from the first approved biosimilar anti-tumour necrosis factor monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, J D; Cutolo, M; Keystone, E C; Park, W; Braun, J

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted biological therapies has revolutionised the management of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease. Following treatment with these therapies, many patients experience significant improvements in different aspects of their disease, including symptoms, work productivity and other outcomes relevant for individuals and society. However, due to the complexity of biological drug development and manufacturing processes, the costs of these therapies are relatively high. Indeed, the financial burden on healthcare systems due to biological therapies is considerable and lack of patient access to effective treatment remains a concern in many parts of the world. As many reference biological therapies have now reached or are near to patent expiry, a number of 'biosimilar' drugs have been developed for use in various clinical settings, and some of these drugs are already in use in several countries. While the potential pharmacoeconomic benefits of cost-effective biosimilars seem clear, several issues have been raised regarding, for example, the definition of biosimilarity and the validity of indication extrapolation, as well as the 'switchability' and relative immunogenicity of biosimilars and their reference drugs. In this review, these issues will be discussed with reference to CT-P13, a biosimilar of the anti-tumour necrosis factor monoclonal antibody infliximab, which is approved in Europe and elsewhere for the treatment of various IMIDs. Other important issues, including those related to data collection during nonclinical and clinical development of biosimilars, are also discussed. PMID:26403380

  15. AITI and GELATI - Initiatives to promote education and training for the next generation of educators and scientists during the IPY 2007/08 and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, S. W.; Bouchard, M.; Das, S.; Gillermann, J.; Greve, R.; Matsuoka, K.; Pasotti, J.; Tweedie, C.

    2005-05-01

    The fourth International Polar Year (IPY) in 2007/08 provides a unique opportunity to enhance international collaboration in research and education. Here we present an IPY-teaching initiative (AITI), which proposes to develop an interdisciplinary international short course series promoting and fostering education and training of the next generation(s) of scientists and educators interested in natural and social sciences related to Polar Regions; a short course series (GELATI) focusing on the impact of the cryosphere on the Earth system. The main goals of the short course series are to: a) provide education and training for the next generation of graduate students, science teachers, researchers in science related to Polar Regions; b) provide training for junior faculty c) integrate research and education; d) create awareness for Polar Regions related questions in class-rooms and beyond; e) create international partnerships in education and training; f) promote multidisciplinary thinking; g) increase gender diversity in science and teaching; h) encourage minority participation. To achieve these goals it is intended to develop a curriculum of specialized and interdisciplinary courses considering various aspects of science and scientific activities, which study, or are concerned with processes/developments in Polar Regions. Due to the vast dimensions and distribution of Polar Regions across international boundaries as well as the complexity of environmental studies in Polar Regions these courses will internationally pool students and instructors. Pooling of experts and students internationally will not only ensure highest standards but also foster international partnership. To allow the integration of research and teaching and to provide the best possible study environment the up to two to three weeklong, courses will be held at international field stations or will be incorporated into large research projects. To ensure training of the next generation of

  16. Effect of enamel organic matrix on the potential of Galla chinensis to promote the remineralization of initial enamel carious lesions in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Linglin; Zou Ling; Li Jiyao; Hao Yuqing; Xiao Liying; Zhou Xuedong; Li Wei, E-mail: leewei2000@sina.co, E-mail: zhll_sc@yahoo.c [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China College of Stomatology, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2009-06-15

    Galla chinensis, a natural traditional Chinese medicine with main composition of tannic acid and gallic acid, is formed when the Chinese sumac aphid Baker (Melaphis chinensis bell) parasitizes the levels of Rhus chinensis Mill. Galla chinensis has shown the potential to enhance the remineralization of initial enamel carious lesion, but the mechanism is still unknown. This study was to investigate whether the enamel organic matrix plays a significant role in the potential of Galla chinensis to promote the remineralization of initial enamel caries. Bovine sound enamel blocks and non-organic enamel blocks were demineralized and exposed to a 12 day pH cycling. During the pH cycling, 30 specimens with the enamel organic matrix were randomly divided into three groups, and treated with 1 g L{sup -1} NaF (group A), 4 g L{sup -1} Galla chinensis extract (group B1) or double deionized water (group C1). Twenty specimens without the enamel organic matrix were randomly divided into two groups, and treated with 4 g L{sup -1} Galla chinensis extract (group B2) or double deionized water (group C2). The integrated mineral loss and lesion depth of all the specimens were analysed by transverse microradiography. The integrated mineral loss and lesion depth of group B1 were less than those of groups B2, C1 and C2, and there were no statistical differences among groups B2, C1 and C2. In conclusion, Galla chinensis can enhance the remineralization of initial enamel carious lesion, and the enamel organic matrix plays a significant role in this potential of Galla chinensis.

  17. Anti-CD20 antibody promotes cancer escape via enrichment of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells expressing low levels of CD20 and CD137L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodogai, Monica; Lee Chang, Catalina; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Lai, Jinping; Merino, Maria; Wersto, Robert P; Gress, Ronald E; Chan, Andrew C; Hesdorffer, Charles; Biragyn, Arya

    2013-04-01

    The possible therapeutic benefits of B-cell depletion in combating tumoral immune escape have been debated. In support of this concept, metastasis of highly aggressive 4T1 breast cancer cells in mice can be abrogated by inactivation of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells (tBreg). Here, we report the unexpected finding that B-cell depletion by CD20 antibody will greatly enhance cancer progression and metastasis. Both murine and human tBregs express low levels of CD20 and, as such, anti-CD20 mostly enriches for these cells. In the 4T1 model of murine breast cancer, this effect of enriching for tBregs suggests that B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 may not be beneficial at all in some cancers. In contrast, we show that in vivo-targeted stimulation of B cells with CXCL13-coupled CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODN) can block cancer metastasis by inhibiting CD20(Low) tBregs. Mechanistic investigations suggested that CpG-ODN upregulates low surface levels of 4-1BBL on tBregs to elicit granzyme B-expressing cytolytic CD8(+) T cells, offering some explanative power for the effect. These findings underscore the immunotherapeutic importance of tBreg inactivation as a strategy to enhance cancer therapy by targeting both the regulatory and activating arms of the immune system in vivo. PMID:23365136

  18. Creating Ordered Antibody Arrays with Antibody-Polymer Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuehui; Obermeyer, Allie; Olsen, Bradley

    Antibodies are a category of functional proteins that play crucial roles in the immune system and have been widely applied in the area of cancer therapeutics, targeting delivery, signal detection, and sensors. Due to the extremely large size and lack of specific functional groups on the surface, it is challenging to functionalize antibodies and manipulate the ordered packing of antibodies in an array with high density and proper orientation, which is critical to achieve outstanding performance in materials. In this work, we demonstrate an efficient and facile approach for preparing antibody-polymer conjugates with two-step sequential ``click'' reaction to form antibody-polymer block copolymers. Highly ordered nanostructures are fabricated based on the principles of block copolymer self-assembly. The nanostructures are studied with both small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Lamellae with alternating antibody domain and polymer domain are observed with an overall domain size of ~50 nm. The nanostructure not only increases the packing density and promotes proper orientation of the antibody, but also provides possible channel to facilitate substrate transportation and improves the stability of the antibody.

  19. Bispecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontermann, Roland E; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) combine specificities of two antibodies and simultaneously address different antigens or epitopes. BsAbs with 'two-target' functionality can interfere with multiple surface receptors or ligands associated, for example with cancer, proliferation or inflammatory processes. BsAbs can also place targets into close proximity, either to support protein complex formation on one cell, or to trigger contacts between cells. Examples of 'forced-connection' functionalities are bsAbs that support protein complexation in the clotting cascade, or tumor-targeted immune cell recruiters and/or activators. Following years of research and development (R&D), the first bsAb was approved in 2009. Another bsAb entered the market in December 2014 and several more are in clinical trials. Here, we describe the potentials of bsAbs to become the next wave of antibody-based therapies, focusing on molecules in clinical development. PMID:25728220

  20. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies against human Ia antigens stimulate monocytes to secrete interleukin 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Palacios, R

    1985-01-01

    The monoclonal antibodies (mAb) DA6.147, DA6.164, and HIG.48 against human Ia antigens, but not the W6/32 mAb against human class I major histocompatibility complex antigens or the anti-monocyte OKM1 and 63D3 mAb, stimulated monocytes to secrete interleukin 1 (IL-1). IL-1 was measured by its property of promoting the production of interleukin 2 (IL-2) by phytohemagglutinin-treated LBRM-33 clone 1A5 cells. IL-1 activity induced by anti-Ia antibodies could be detected 24 hr after initiation of ...

  2. Ten steps or climbing a mountain: A study of Australian health professionals' perceptions of implementing the baby friendly health initiative to protect, promote and support breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheehan Athena

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Baby Friendly Hospital (Health Initiative (BFHI is a global initiative aimed at protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding and is based on the ten steps to successful breastfeeding. Worldwide, over 20,000 health facilities have attained BFHI accreditation but only 77 Australian hospitals (approximately 23% have received accreditation. Few studies have investigated the factors that facilitate or hinder implementation of BFHI but it is acknowledged this is a major undertaking requiring strategic planning and change management throughout an institution. This paper examines the perceptions of BFHI held by midwives and nurses working in one Area Health Service in NSW, Australia. Methods The study used an interpretive, qualitative approach. A total of 132 health professionals, working across four maternity units, two neonatal intensive care units and related community services, participated in 10 focus groups. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Three main themes were identified: 'Belief and Commitment'; 'Interpreting BFHI' and 'Climbing a Mountain'. Participants considered the BFHI implementation a high priority; an essential set of practices that would have positive benefits for babies and mothers both locally and globally as well as for health professionals. It was considered achievable but would take commitment and hard work to overcome the numerous challenges including a number of organisational constraints. There were, however, differing interpretations of what was required to attain BFHI accreditation with the potential that misinterpretation could hinder implementation. A model described by Greenhalgh and colleagues on adoption of innovation is drawn on to interpret the findings. Conclusion Despite strong support for BFHI, the principles of this global strategy are interpreted differently by health professionals and further education and accurate information is required. It may be that the

  3. MicroRNA-183 promotes migration and invasion of CD133(+)/CD326(+) lung adenocarcinoma initiating cells via PTPN4 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Conghui; Deng, Xi; Wu, Jingbo; Zhang, Jianwen; Yang, Hongru; Fu, Shaozhi; Zhang, Yan; Han, Yunwei; Zou, Yuanmei; Chen, Zhengtang; Lin, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cancer worldwide and is a leading cause of lung cancer mortality due to early stage metastases. Cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are rare subpopulation cells that are responsible for maintaining tumor growth and invasion leading to recurrence and metastasis. Previous studies revealed that miR-183 can mediate the invasiveness and growth of NSCLC. However, the exact role of miR-183 in regulating the biological behavior of CSLCs in NSCLC remains unclear. In the present study, we explored the regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) by miR-183 in vitro using luciferase reporter assays, and we further analyzed the effects of miR-183 on the invasiveness of CSLCs in vitro and in vivo using transwell and bioluminescence assays. Following our finding that miR-183 binds to PTPN4 messenger RNA (mRNA) to prevent its translation through the 3'-untranslated region (UTR), we found that overexpression of miR-183 in CSLCs decreased PTPN4 protein levels while inhibition of miR-183 increased PTPN4 protein levels. The suppression of PTPN4 levels in CSLCs by miR-183 paralleled with a significant promotion in their motility in vitro and in vivo, while anti-sense miR-183 increased PTPN4 levels in CSLCs, which paralleled with a significant decrease in their invasiveness. Furthermore, correlation analysis between miR-183 and PTPN4 in clinical samples demonstrated a statistically significant inverse correlation between PTPN4 mRNA levels and miR-183. In brief, our data indicate that miR-183 plays a pro-invasive role by inverse regulation of PTPN4, and this axis may be a new therapeutic target for suppressing the metastatic capability of CSLCs in NSCLC. PMID:26951513

  4. A Guide to Emerging Strategies for Promoting Prevention and Improving Oral Health Care Delivery in Head Start Lessons from the Oral Health Initiative Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Del Grosso; Amy Brown; Sandra Silva; Jamila Henderson; Naomi Tein; Diane Paulsell

    2008-01-01

    This volume highlights service delivery approaches and strategies that show promise for improving the oral health care delivery system and promoting oral health. It includes descriptions and examples of implementation in different program settings and with different target populations.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are antibodies having single specificity for a given antigen site (epitope). The development of hybridoma technology and the relative ease by which MAbs can be prepared has revolutionized many aspects of serological applications in diagnosis and differentiation of disease producing agents. The property of monospecificity offers advantages in diagnostic applications over polyclonal sera in that tests can be defined exactly with regard to the antigen detected and the affinity of reaction between the given antigenic site and the monoclonal reagent. In addition, MAbs offer better possibilities for test standardization, because the same reagent can be used in different laboratories. Such an MAb can be supplied by a central laboratory or 'grown' from hybridoma cells, ensuring that the resultant product is identical from laboratory to laboratory and that the part of the test involving the MAb reaction is the same. The methodologies for inoculation regimes, mice, cloning methods, selection of fusion partners, etc., have been validated extensively in developed country laboratories. The decision to establish a MAb production facility must be examined on a strict cost-benefit basis, since it is still expensive to produce a product. There are many MAbs available that should be sought to allow exploitation in developing tests. If a production facility is envisaged, it should produce reagents for national needs, i.e. there should be a clear problem oriented approach whereby exact needs are defined. In the field of veterinary applications, MAbs are the central reagent in many immunoassays based on the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The development of specific tests for diagnosing diseases is dominated by MAbs and has been fuelled by a strong research base, mainly in developed countries allied to developing countries through the study of related diseases. Thus, there are very many assays dependent on MAbs, some of which form the basis of

  6. Antibody Glossary —

    Science.gov (United States)

    The components of the immune system have diverse roles in the initial development of cancers, progression of early-stage malignancies to invasive tumors, establishment of metastatic lesions, tumor dormancy, and response or resistance to therapy. Characterizing the components of the immune system and their functional status in tissues and in tumors requires the use of highly specific reagents. Researchers employ antibodies in a variety of in vitro and in vivo applications to delineate, enrich, or deplete specific immune subsets in order to understand their role(s) in tumorigenesis. This is a glossary of validated reagents and protocols that are useful for functional phenotyping of the immune system in murine cancer models.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  8. ICT-enabled Social Innovation in support of the Implementation of the Social Investment Package (IESI) - Mapping and Analysis of ICT-enabled Social Innovation Initiatives promoting Social Investment through Integrated Approaches to the Provision of Social Services

    OpenAIRE

    Gianluca Misuraca; Clelia Colombo; Csaba Kucsera; Stephanie Carretero; Margherita Bacigalupo; Raluca Radescu

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the results of the mapping and analysis of ICT-enabled social innovation initiatives promoting social investment through integrated approaches to the provision of social services, which was conducted as part of the research on ICT-Enabled Social Innovation in support of the Social Investment Package (SIP). The main goal of the research carried out by the European Commission's JRC-IPTS jointly with the Directorate General Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion, was to ex...

  9. Inhibition of mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium and skin tumor initiating and tumor promoting activities in SENCAR mice by glycyrrhetinic acid: comparison of 18 alpha- and 18 beta-stereoisomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z Y; Agarwal, R; Zhou, Z C; Bickers, D R; Mukhtar, H

    1991-02-01

    Licorice has been used as medicine and as sweetening agent in food products. The major water-soluble constituent of licorice is glycyrrhizin (GL), an oleanane triterpenoide, which is known to be partly hydrolyzed by glucuronidase to its aglycone glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) which exists in 18 alpha (alpha-GA) and 18 beta (beta-GA) stereoisomeric forms. In this study alpha-GA and beta-GA were found to inhibit the mutagenicity of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), 2-aminofluorene and aflatoxin B1 in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100. beta-GA was more effective than alpha-GA as an antimutagen. In the two-stage skin tumorigenesis protocol using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) as the tumor initiating agent followed by twice weekly applications of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate as tumor promoter, pretreatment of SENCAR mice with alpha-GA or beta-GA resulted in significant protection against tumor initiation as well as tumor promotion. As an anti-tumor initiating agent, beta-GA was found to be more effective than alpha-GA. Similarly, topical application of beta-GA was found to be more effective than alpha-GA in inhibiting the binding of both [3H]B[a]P and [3H]DMBA to epidermal DNA. However, as an anti-tumor promoter, alpha-GA and beta-GA showed comparable effects. Our results suggest that both alpha-GA and beta-GA possess substantial anti-skin tumor initiating and anti-skin tumor promoting activities. PMID:1899808

  10. School Health Promotion to Increase Empowerment, Gender Equality and Pupil Participation: A Focus Group Study of a Swedish Elementary School Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadin, Katja Gillander; Weiner, Gaby; Ahlgren, Christina

    2013-01-01

    A school health promotion project was carried out in an elementary school in Sweden where active participation, gender equality, and empowerment were leading principles. The objective of the study was to understand challenges and to identify social processes of importance for such a project. Focus group interviews were conducted with 6 single-sex…

  11. Promoting Awareness of Sounds in Speech: An Initial Report of an Early Intervention Program for Children with Speech and Language Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Froma P.; Troia, Gary A.; Worthington, Colleen K.; Dow, Kathy Ayala

    2002-01-01

    Demonstrates the efficacy of the rhyming portion of the Promoting Awareness Sounds in Speech (PASS) program, a comprehensive and explicit phonological awareness intervention curriculum that was designed specifically for preschool children with speech and language impairments. A single-subject research design was used to examine treatment effects…

  12. Building Analytic Capacity, Facilitating Partnerships, and Promoting Data Use in State Health Agencies: A Distance-Based Workforce Development Initiative Applied to Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Rankin, Kristin M; Kroelinger, Charlan D.; Rosenberg, Deborah; Barfield, Wanda D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the methodology, partnerships, and products developed as a result of a distance-based workforce development initiative to improve analytic capacity among maternal and child health (MCH) epidemiologists in state health agencies. This effort was initiated by the Centers for Disease Control’s MCH Epidemiology Program and faculty at the University of Illinois at Chicago to encourage and support the use of surveillance data by MCH epidemiologists and pro...

  13. Characterization of human serum spreading factor with monoclonal antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, D W; Silnutzer, J; See, C; Shaffer, M

    1983-01-01

    Serum spreading factor is a glycoprotein isolated from human serum that promotes spreading of a variety of cell types on culture dishes. We developed mouse hybridoma lines secreting monoclonal antibody to serum spreading factor that markedly inhibited the rate of serum spreading factor-promoted spreading of both fibroblastic and epithelial cells in culture. Fibronectin-promoted cell spreading was unaffected by monoclonal antibody to serum spreading factor, and the factor appeared to be distin...

  14. Promotion of hand hygiene strengthening initiative in a Nigerian teaching hospital: implication for improved patient safety in low-income health facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Chigozie Jesse Uneke; Chinwendu Daniel Ndukwe; Patrick Gold Oyibo; Kingsley Onuoha Nwakpu; Richard Chukwuka Nnabu; Nittita Prasopa-Plaizier

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health care-associated infection remains a significant hazard for hospitalized patients. Hand hygiene is a fundamental action for ensuring patient safety. Objective: To promote adoption of World Health Organization Hand Hygiene Guidelines to enhance compliance among doctors and nurses and improve patient safety. Methods: The study design was a cross sectional intervention in a Federal Teaching Hospital South-eastern Nigeria. Interventions involved training/education; introduct...

  15. The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 substitutes for the cap-binding protein eIF4E to promote compartmentalized translation initiation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Rubilar, Paulina S; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2013-07-01

    Here, we show a novel molecular mechanism promoted by the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 for translation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA. This occurs through the adenosine triphosphate-dependent formation of a translation initiation complex that is assembled at the 5' m(7)GTP cap of the HIV-1 mRNA. This is due to the property of DDX3 to substitute for the initiation factor eIF4E in the binding of the HIV-1 m(7)GTP 5' cap structure where it nucleates the formation of a core DDX3/PABP/eIF4G trimeric complex on the HIV-1 genomic RNA. By using RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled to indirect immunofluorescence, we further show that this viral ribonucleoprotein complex is addressed to compartmentalized cytoplasmic foci where the translation initiation complex is assembled. PMID:23630313

  16. Promoting an optimal networking of fishing actors to organize a responsible, optimal and sustainable exploitation of marine resources: the FAROS Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Antelo, L. T.; Ordóñez, Tatiana; Franco-Uría, A.; Gómez-Gesteira, J. L.; Fernández-Cañamero, M. L.; Castro, J.; Bellido, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In the aim of promoting the responsible and sustainable management of the European fishing activity, the European Commission took a number of actions oriented to the implementation of “no-discard” and “zero-waste” policies to be followed by the European fishing fleets in the near future. In particular, actions were directed to the development of policies to reduce unwanted by-catches and eliminate discards in European fisheries, as well as to make the best possible use of the captured resourc...

  17. TBP-TAF Complex SL1 Directs RNA Polymerase I Pre-initiation Complex Formation and Stabilizes Upstream Binding Factor at the rDNA Promoter*||

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, J. Karsten; Panov, Kostya I.; Cabart, Pavel; Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of the role of components of the RNA polymerase I transcription machinery is paramount to understanding regulation of rDNA expression. We describe key findings for the roles of essential transcription factor SL1 and activator upstream binding factor (UBF). We demonstrate that human SL1 can direct accurate Pol I transcription in the absence of UBF and can interact with the rDNA promoter independently and stably, consistent with studies of rodent SL1 but contrary to previous reports o...

  18. Interaction of the RNP1 motif in PRT1 with HCR1 promotes 40S binding of eukaryotic initiation factor 3 in yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nielsen, K. H.; Valášek, Leoš; Sykes, C.; Jivotovskaya, A.; Hinnebusch, A. G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 8 (2006), s. 2984-2998. ISSN 0270-7306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : rnp1 * yeast * aukaryotic initiation factor Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.773, year: 2006

  19. Promoting College Completion through Leadership among Underrepresented Urban College Students: A Theory of Change and Evaluation of College Retention Outcomes for the Act Six Leadership and Scholarship Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Act Six Leadership and Scholarship Initiative is a leadership development and college retention and success program developed by the Northwest Leadership Foundation that provides intensive cohort-based training and support, along with full-tuition, full-need scholarships, to underrepresented urban college students to attend religiously…

  20. An Analysis of the Current Tribally Initiated Rincon Cham'teela Program as a Way to Promote and Encourage Sustainability of the Luiseno Language

    OpenAIRE

    Fasthorse, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Native American languages in the United States are struggling to survive. Therefore, many tribal communities are committed to language revitalization programs in order to sustain the vitality of their tribal nation and its future. Using a sociocultural theory this thesis offers a preliminary analysis of the Rincon Luiseño community's effort to create a language revitalization program. This unique language program is a tribally initiated community-based program without no outside influence. I ...

  1. A hazy nuclear renaissance [Global initiatives call for developing advanced reactors and promoting nuclear education. The future is far from clear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As energy issues rise on the global agenda, what role is foreseen for nuclear power over the coming decades? Is enough being done to bring new reactors - and the knowledge to run them safely - on line when they are needed, especially in developing countries where energy demand is growing fastest? There are no easy answers, though some directions are emerging. Important developments are influencing the changing nuclear workforce, nuclear power technology, and the education of the next generation of leaders. A prime challenge is to preserve the knowledge and experience already acquired in nuclear fields so as to have a solid foundation from which to achieve safe and secure solutions. Fortunately, some global initiatives can help to pave the road to nuclear power's future and its contributions to sustainable development. They include steps taken by the IAEA, such as the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) and the World Nuclear University (WNU). Both initiatives are helping to raise awareness about education and knowledge management and the need for advanced nuclear technologies. Regrettably in Russia, as in the USA, Western Europe and developing nuclear countries, more attention and support is needed for nuclear education and training - and in preserving decades of nuclear experience that has fed such international initiatives. According to this author, opportunities are being lost in his view, leading to a hazy nuclear future

  2. Tumour-initiating cell-specific miR-1246 and miR-1290 expression converge to promote non-small cell lung cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen Cai; Chin, Tan Min; Yang, Henry; Nga, Min En; Lunny, Declan Patrick; Lim, Edwin Kok Hao; Sun, Li Li; Pang, Yin Huei; Leow, Yi Ning; Malusay, Shanneen Rossellini Y; Lim, Priscilla Xin Hui; Lee, Jeravan Zili; Tan, Benedict Jian Wei; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Lim, Elaine Hsuen; Lim, Wan Teck; Tan, Daniel Shao Weng; Tan, Eng Huat; Tai, Bee Choo; Soo, Ross Andrew; Tam, Wai Leong; Lim, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The tumour-initiating cell (TIC) model accounts for phenotypic and functional heterogeneity among tumour cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulatory molecules frequently aberrantly expressed in cancers, and may contribute towards tumour heterogeneity and TIC behaviour. More recent efforts have focused on miRNAs as diagnostic or therapeutic targets. Here, we identified the TIC-specific miRNAs, miR-1246 and miR-1290, as crucial drivers for tumour initiation and cancer progression in human non-small cell lung cancer. The loss of either miRNA impacted the tumour-initiating potential of TICs and their ability to metastasize. Longitudinal analyses of serum miR-1246 and miR-1290 levels across time correlate their circulating levels to the clinical response of lung cancer patients who were receiving ongoing anti-neoplastic therapies. Functionally, direct inhibition of either miRNA with locked nucleic acid administered systemically, can arrest the growth of established patient-derived xenograft tumours, thus indicating that these miRNAs are clinically useful as biomarkers for tracking disease progression and as therapeutic targets. PMID:27325363

  3. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology. PMID:27236550

  4. Human haematopoietic stem cells express Oct4 pseudogenes and lack the ability to initiate Oct4 promoter-driven gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strain Alastair J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transcription factor Oct4 is well defined as a key regulator of embryonic stem (ES cell pluripotency. In recent years, the role of Oct4 has purportedly extended to the self renewal and maintenance of multipotency in adult stem cell (ASC populations. This profile has arisen mainly from reports utilising reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR based methodologies and has since come under scrutiny following the discovery that many developmental genes have multiple pseudogenes associated with them. Six known pseudogenes exist for Oct4, all of which exhibit very high sequence homology (three >97%, and for this reason the generation of artefacts may have contributed to false identification of Oct4 in somatic cell populations. While ASC lack a molecular blueprint of transcription factors proposed to be involved with 'stemness' as described for ES cells, it is not unreasonable to assume that similar gene patterns may exist. The focus of this work was to corroborate reports that Oct4 is involved in the regulation of ASC self-renewal and differentiation, using a combination of methodologies to rule out pseudogene interference. Haematopoietic stem cells (HSC derived from human umbilical cord blood (UCB and various differentiated cell lines underwent RT-PCR, product sequencing and transfection studies using an Oct4 promoter-driven reporter. In summary, only the positive control expressed Oct4, with all other cell types expressing a variety of Oct4 pseudogenes. Somatic cells were incapable of utilising an exogenous Oct4 promoter construct, leading to the conclusion that Oct4 does not appear involved in the multipotency of human HSC from UCB.

  5. Platelet Factor 4/Heparin Antibodies in Blood Bank Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Hursting, Marcie J; Pai, Poulomi J.; McCracken, Julianna E.; Hwang, Fred; Suvarna, Shayela; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Bandarenko, Nicholas; Arepally, Gowthami M.

    2010-01-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin antibody, typically associated with heparin therapy, is reported in some heparin-naive people. Seroprevalence in the general population, however, remains unclear. We prospectively evaluated PF4/heparin antibody in approximately 4,000 blood bank donors using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for initial and then repeated (confirmatory) testing. Antibody was detected initially in 249 (6.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.8%-7.4%) of 3,795 donors and...

  6. Activated KRAS Cooperates with MLL-AF4 to Promote Extramedullary Engraftment and Migration of Cord Blood CD34+ HSPC But Is Insufficient to Initiate Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Cristina; Stam, Ronald W; Agraz-Doblas, Antonio; Ballerini, Paola; Camos, Mireia; Castaño, Julio; Marschalek, Rolf; Bursen, Aldeheid; Varela, Ignacio; Bueno, Clara; Menendez, Pablo

    2016-04-15

    The MLL-AF4 (MA4) fusion gene is the genetic hallmark of an aggressive infant pro-B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Our understanding of MA4-mediated transformation is very limited. Whole-genome sequencing studies revealed a silent mutational landscape, which contradicts the aggressive clinical outcome of this hematologic malignancy. Only RAS mutations were recurrently detected in patients and found to be associated with poorer outcome. The absence of MA4-driven B-ALL models further questions whether MA4 acts as a single oncogenic driver or requires cooperating mutations to manifest a malignant phenotype. We explored whether KRAS activation cooperates with MA4 to initiate leukemia in cord blood-derived CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC). Clonogenic and differentiation/proliferation assays demonstrated that KRAS activation does not cooperate with MA4 to immortalize CD34(+) HSPCs. Intrabone marrow transplantation into immunodeficient mice further showed that MA4 and KRAS(G12V) alone or in combination enhanced hematopoietic repopulation without impairing myeloid-lymphoid differentiation, and that mutated KRAS did not cooperate with MA4 to initiate leukemia. However, KRAS activation enhanced extramedullary hematopoiesis of MA4-expressing cell lines and CD34(+) HSPCs that was associated with leukocytosis and central nervous system infiltration, both hallmarks of infant t(4;11)(+) B-ALL. Transcriptional profiling of MA4-expressing patients supported a cell migration gene signature underlying the mutant KRAS-mediated phenotype. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that KRAS affects the homeostasis of MA4-expressing HSPCs, suggesting that KRAS activation in MA4(+) B-ALL is important for tumor maintenance rather than initiation. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2478-89. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26837759

  7. eIF2B promotes eIF5 dissociation from eIF2•GDP to facilitate guanine nucleotide exchange for translation initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Jennings, Martin D.; Zhou, Yu; Mohammad-Qureshi, Sarah S.; Bennett, David; Pavitt, Graham D.

    2013-01-01

    Protein synthesis factor eIF2 delivers initiator tRNA to the ribosome. Two proteins regulate its G-protein cycle: eIF5 has both GTPase-activating protein (GAP) and GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) functions, and eIF2B is the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). Jennings et al. now establish a second activity for eIF2B (as a GDI displacement factor [GDF]) and demonstrate that this function is independent of its GEF activity. This study suggests that eIF2B is a bifunctional protein and def...

  8. Protection against Chlamydia trachomatis infection and upper genital tract pathological changes by vaccine-promoted neutralizing antibodies directed to the VD4 of the major outer membrane protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anja W.; Follmann, Frank; Erneholm, Karin Susanne;

    2015-01-01

    bacterial numbers in vagina and prevention of pathological changes in the upper genital tract. Adoptive transfer of serumand T-cell depletion experiments demonstrated a dominant role for antibodies and CD4+ T cells in the protective immune response. Integrating a multivalent VD4 construct into the sequence...

  9. Oral priming with replicating adenovirus serotype 4 followed by subunit H5N1 vaccine boost promotes antibody affinity maturation and expands H5N1 cross-clade neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Surender; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa R; Ishioka, Glenn; Alexander, Jeff; Smith, Jon; Gurwith, Marc; Golding, Hana

    2015-01-01

    A Phase I trial conducted in 2009-2010 demonstrated that oral vaccination with a replication competent Ad4-H5 (A/Vietnam) vector with dosages ranging from 107-1011 viral particles was well tolerated. HA-specific T-cell responses were efficiently induced, but very limited hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) humoral responses were measured. However, a single boost of Ad4-H5-Vtn vaccinated individuals with a unadjuvanted licensed H5N1 (A/Vietnam) subunit vaccine resulted in superior HI titers compared with unprimed subjects. In the current study, the impact of Ad4-H5 priming on the quality of the polyclonal humoral immune response was evaluated using a real-time kinetics assay by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Total binding of serum polyclonal antibodies from the Ad4-H5-Vtn primed groups against both homologous H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1) and heterologous A/Indonesia-5/2005 (clade 2.1) HA1 head domain was significantly higher compared with sera from individuals that received subunit H5N1 vaccination alone. SPR measurements also demonstrated that the antigen-antibody complex dissociation rates (a surrogate for antibody affinity) of serum antibodies against the HA1 of H5N1-A/Vietnam were significantly higher in the Ad4-H5 primed groups compared with those from the unprimed group. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between the antibody affinities for HA1 (but not HA2) and the virus neutralization titers against the homologous strain and a panel of heterologous clade 2 H5N1 strains. These findings support the concept of oral prime-boost vaccine approaches against pandemic influenza to elicit long-term memory B cells with high affinity capable of rapid response to variant pandemic viruses likely to emerge and adapt to human transmissions. PMID:25629161

  10. Members of the NODE (Nanog and Oct4-associated deacetylase) complex and SOX-2 promote the initiation of a natural cellular reprogramming event in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Ahier, Arnaud; Fischer, Nadine; Jarriault, Sophie

    2012-04-24

    Differentiated cells can be forced to change identity, either to directly adopt another differentiated identity or to revert to a pluripotent state. Direct reprogramming events can also occur naturally. We recently characterized such an event in Caenorhabditis elegans, in which a rectal cell switches to a neuronal cell. Here we have used this single-cell paradigm to investigate the molecular requirements of direct cell-type conversion, with a focus on the early steps. Our genetic analyses revealed the requirement of sem-4/Sall, egl-27/Mta, and ceh-6/Oct, members of the NODE complex recently identified in embryonic stem (ES) cells, and of the OCT4 partner sox-2, for the initiation of this natural direct reprogramming event. These four factors have been shown to individually impact on ES cell pluripotency; however, whether they act together to control cellular potential during development remained an open question. We further found that, in addition to acting at the same time, these factors physically associate, suggesting that they could act together as a NODE-like complex during this in vivo process. Finally, we have elucidated the functional domains in EGL-27/MTA that mediate its reprogramming activity in this system and have found that modulation of the posterior HOX protein EGL-5 is a downstream event to allow the initiation of Y identity change. Our data reveal unique in vivo functions in a natural direct reprogramming event for these genes that impact on ES cells pluripotency and suggest that conserved nuclear events could be shared between different cell plasticity phenomena across phyla. PMID:22493276

  11. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome? Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody ... weeks or months. This condition is called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). People who have APS also are at ...

  12. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Geetaram; Farley, Kalamo [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); El-Hage, Nazira [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Fassnacht, Ryan [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah [George Mason University, Manassas, VA (United States); Ochem, Alex [ICGEB, Wernher and Beit Building, Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925 Cape Town (South Africa); Simon, Gary L. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Karn, Jonathan [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hauser, Kurt F. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Tyagi, Mudit, E-mail: tmudit@email.gwu.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-ĸB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-ĸB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. - Highlights: • Cocaine induces the initiation phase of HIV transcription by activating NF-ĸB. • Cocaine induced NF-ĸB phosphorylation promotes its interaction with P300. • Cocaine enhances the elongation phase of HIV transcription by stimulating MSK1. • Cocaine activated MSK1 catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at its Ser10. • Cocaine induced H3S10 phosphorylation facilitates the recruitment of P-TEFb at LTR.

  13. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-ĸB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-ĸB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. - Highlights: • Cocaine induces the initiation phase of HIV transcription by activating NF-ĸB. • Cocaine induced NF-ĸB phosphorylation promotes its interaction with P300. • Cocaine enhances the elongation phase of HIV transcription by stimulating MSK1. • Cocaine activated MSK1 catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at its Ser10. • Cocaine induced H3S10 phosphorylation facilitates the recruitment of P-TEFb at LTR

  14. The antibody mining toolbox

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew RM; Kiss, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput ...

  15. Heavy chain only antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud;

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen...

  16. Hepatitis A virus antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is presented of a radioimmunoassay designed to prove the presence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus (HA Ab, anti-Ha) using an Abbott HAVAB set. This proof as well as the proof of the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis B virus is based on competition between a normal antibody against hepatitis A virus and a 125I-labelled antibody for the binding sites of a specific antigen spread all over the surface of a tiny ball; this is then indirect proof of the antibody under investigation. The method is described of reading the results from the number of impulses per 60 seconds: the higher the titre of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in the serum examined, the lower the activity of the specimen concerned. The rate is reported of incidence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in a total of 68 convalescents after hepatitis A; the antibody was found in 94.1%. The immunoglobulin made from the convalescents' plasma showed the presence of antibodies in dilutions as high as 1:250 000 while the comparable ratio for normal immunoglobulin Norga was only 1:2500. Differences are discussed in the time incidence of the antibodies against the hepatitis A virus, the antibodies against the surface antigen of hepatitis B, and the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis V virus. (author)

  17. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111In, 67Ga and 131I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  18. The Initiator Methionine tRNA Drives Secretion of Type II Collagen from Stromal Fibroblasts to Promote Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Cassie J; Berg, Tracy J; Birch, Joanna; Ennis, Darren; Mitchell, Louise; Cloix, Catherine; Campbell, Andrew; Sumpton, David; Nixon, Colin; Campbell, Kirsteen; Bridgeman, Victoria L; Vermeulen, Peter B; Foo, Shane; Kostaras, Eleftherios; Jones, J Louise; Haywood, Linda; Pulleine, Ellie; Yin, Huabing; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen; Blyth, Karen; McNeish, Iain; Zanivan, Sara; Reynolds, Andrew R; Norman, Jim C

    2016-03-21

    Expression of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAi(Met)) is deregulated in cancer. Despite this fact, it is not currently known how tRNAi(Met) expression levels influence tumor progression. We have found that tRNAi(Met) expression is increased in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, implicating deregulated expression of tRNAi(Met) in the tumor stroma as a possible contributor to tumor progression. To investigate how elevated stromal tRNAi(Met) contributes to tumor progression, we generated a mouse expressing additional copies of the tRNAi(Met) gene (2+tRNAi(Met) mouse). Growth and vascularization of subcutaneous tumor allografts was enhanced in 2+tRNAi(Met) mice compared with wild-type littermate controls. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by fibroblasts from 2+tRNAi(Met) mice supported enhanced endothelial cell and fibroblast migration. SILAC mass spectrometry indicated that elevated expression of tRNAi(Met) significantly increased synthesis and secretion of certain types of collagen, in particular type II collagen. Suppression of type II collagen opposed the ability of tRNAi(Met)-overexpressing fibroblasts to deposit pro-migratory ECM. We used the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB) to determine whether collagen synthesis contributes to the tRNAi(Met)-driven pro-tumorigenic stroma in vivo. DHB had no effect on the growth of syngeneic allografts in wild-type mice but opposed the ability of 2+tRNAi(Met) mice to support increased angiogenesis and tumor growth. Finally, collagen II expression predicts poor prognosis in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Taken together, these data indicate that increased tRNAi(Met) levels contribute to tumor progression by enhancing the ability of stromal fibroblasts to synthesize and secrete a type II collagen-rich ECM that supports endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. PMID:26948875

  19. The Ne3LS Network, Québec's initiative to evaluate the impact and promote a responsible and sustainable development of nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Charles-Anica; Emond, Claude; Battista, Renaldo; Parizeau, Marie-Hélène; Beaudry, Catherine

    2011-07-01

    The spectacular progress made by nanosciences and nanotechnologies elicits as much hope and fear. Consequently, a great number of research and training initiatives on the ethical, environmental, economic, legal and social issues regarding nanotechnology development (Ne3LS) are emerging worldwide. In Québec, Canada, a Task Force was mandated by NanoQuébec to conceive a Ne3LS research and training strategy to assess those issues. This Task Force brought together experts from universities, governments or industry working in nanosciences and nanotechnologies or in Ne3LS. Their resulting action plan, made public in November 2006, contained several recommendations, including the creation of a knowledge network (Ne3LS Network). In the following years, after consulting with numerous key players concerned with the possible impacts of nanosciences and nanotechnologies in Québec, the Ne3LS Network was launched in January 2010 in partnership with the Fonds québécois de la recherche sur la nature et les technologies, the Fonds québécois de la recherche sur la société et la culture and the Fonds de la recherche en santé du Québec, NanoQuébec, the Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail as well as the University of Montreal. Its objectives are to 1) Foster the development of Ne3LS research activities (grants and fellowships); 2) Spearhead the Canadian and international Ne3LS network; 3) Take part in the training of researchers and experts; 4) Encourage the creation of interactive tools for the general public; 5) Facilitate collaboration between decision-makers and experts; 6) Involve the scientific community through a host of activities (symposium, conferences, thematic events); 7) Build multidisciplinary research teams to evaluate the impact of nanotechnology.

  20. Virus-specific antibodies in sera from patients with genital herpes simplex virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Zweerink, H J; Corey, L

    1982-01-01

    Virus-specific antibodies against a number of herpes simplex virus type 2 antigens were determined by radioimmunoprecipitation assays in sequential serum samples obtained from 12 patients with initial genital herpes simplex virus infection. The progressive appearance of antibodies to virus-specific antigens was observed; antibodies against a 130,000-molecular-weight glycoprotein complex appeared first, followed by antibodies against the major nucleocapsid polypeptide and then antibodies again...

  1. Preparation and initial identification of monoclonal antibody of anti-vibrio fluvialis%抗河流弧菌单克隆抗体的建立及初步鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付凯飞; 马骢; 郭建巍; 郝秀红

    2012-01-01

    Objective To prepare high-performance and specific monoclonal antibody of vibrio fluvialis,and to provide a technical platform for the development of a rapid ELISA kit.Methods BALB/c mice (8 weeks) were immunized with inactivated vibrio fluvialis,and hybridoma cell strains of anti-vibrio fluvialis were prepared with cell-fusion technology.Chromatosomes of hybridoma cells were identified with Giemsa staining,and the potency and cross-reactivity of anti-vibrio fluvialis as well as other important marine bacteria were screened and identified with ELISA.Results Four strains of hybridoma (named as 01H10,02F12,05F3 and 03G10 ) were obtained,all having the features of hybridoma cell chromatosomes,and with good specificity and immunorcactivity.The hybridoma also had favourable specificity and immunoreactivity.Conclusions Specific antibodies of anti-vibriofluvialis prepared and screened in the study would be useful for the development of the rapid detection kit of vibrio fluvialis.%目的 制备高效、特异的抗河流弧菌单克隆抗体(monoclonal antibody,mAb),为海洋致病细菌的快速免疫诊断提供技术支持.方法 选用雌性BALB/c小鼠(8周龄)制备成为灭活河流弧菌免疫小鼠,利用杂交瘤细胞融合技术,制备出抗河流弧菌杂交瘤细胞株,用Giemsa染色对其进行染色体鉴定,并用酶联免疫吸附试验(enzyme linked immunosorbent assay,ELISA)方法筛选其与河流弧菌及其他重要海洋细菌的交叉反应特异性.结果 共获得4株抗河流弧菌mAb,均符合杂交瘤细胞染色体特点,具有良好的特异性和免疫反应性,分别命名为01H10,02F12,05F3和03G10.结论 本研究制备、筛选出抗河流弧菌的mAb,有助于建立抗河流弧菌快速免疫检测试剂盒.

  2. Conformational Isomerism Can Limit Antibody Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debler, E.W.; Muller, R.; Hilvert, D.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-14

    Ligand binding to enzymes and antibodies is often accompanied by protein conformational changes. Although such structural adjustments may be conducive to enzyme catalysis, much less is known about their effect on reactions promoted by engineered catalytic antibodies. Crystallographic and pre-steady state kinetic analyses of antibody 34E4, which efficiently promotes the conversion of benzisoxazoles to salicylonitriles, show that the resting catalyst adopts two interconverting active-site conformations, only one of which is competent to bind substrate. In the predominant isomer, the indole side chain of Trp{sup L91} occupies the binding site and blocks ligand access. Slow conformational isomerization of this residue, on the same time scale as catalytic turnover, creates a deep and narrow binding site that can accommodate substrate and promote proton transfer using Glu{sup H50} as a carboxylate base. Although 34E4 is among the best catalysts for the deprotonation of benzisoxazoles, its efficiency appears to be significantly limited by this conformational plasticity of its active site. Future efforts to improve this antibody might profitably focus on stabilizing the active conformation of the catalyst. Analogous strategies may also be relevant to other engineered proteins that are limited by an unfavorable conformational pre-equilibrium.

  3. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  4. Antibodies recognizing a variety of different structural motifs on meningococcal Lip antigen fail to demonstrate bactericidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, C R; Virji, M; Heckels, J E

    1992-11-01

    The neisserial Lip antigen is a conserved antigen associated with the pathogenic Neisseria species, and is composed of multiple repeats of a consensus pentapeptide. A series of monoclonal antibodies reacting with meningococcal Lip antigen were subjected to epitope mapping, using solid-phase synthetic peptides based on the consensus repeat sequence. The antibodies were found to recognize different continuous epitopes based on the consensus sequence. One monoclonal antibody was utilized in affinity chromatography to obtain purified Lip antigen and the antigen was used for immunization of mice. The resulting antisera did not recognize Lip antigen on Western blots but reacted specifically with Lip antigen in immune precipitation experiments, indicating that the predominant polyclonal immune response was directed against conformational epitopes. Despite the diversity of both continuous and conformational epitopes recognized by the antibodies produced, none of the antibodies demonstrated the ability to promote complement-mediated bactericidal activity. Thus despite its initial apparent promise as a potential vaccine candidate the case for the inclusion of Lip antigen in vaccine formulation cannot be supported at present. PMID:1282535

  5. Promoting industrialisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the first nuclear power programme is decided upon, automatically the country has to initiate in parallel a programme to modify or add to its current industrial structure and resources. The extent of this new industrialisation depends upon many factors which both, the Government and the Industries have to consider. The Government has a vital role which includes the setting up of the background against which the industrial promotion should take place and in many cases may have also to play an active role all along this programme. Equally, the existing industries have an important role so as to achieve the most efficient participation in the nuclear programme. Invariably the industrial promotional programme will incur a certain degree of transfer of technology, the extent depending on the policies adopted. For this technology transfer to take place efficiently, both the donor and the receiver have to recognise each other's legitimate ambitions and fears. The transfer of technology is a process having a high human content and both donor and receiver have to take this into account. This can be further complicated when there is a difference in culture between them. Technology transfer is carried out within a contractual and organisational framework which will identify the donor (licensor) and the receiver (licensee). This framework may take various forms from a simple cooperative agreement, through a joint-venture organisation right to a standard contract between two separate entities. Each arrangement has its advantages and drawbacks and requires investment of different degrees. One of the keys to a successful industrial promotion is having it carried out in a timely fashion which will be parallel with the nuclear power programme. Experience in some countries has shown the problems when the industrialisation is out of phase with the programme whilst in other cases this industrialisation was at a level and scale unjustified. (author)

  6. Trihalomethanes as initiators and promoters of carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. PEREIRA; Lin, L. H.; Lippitt, J M; Herren, S L

    1982-01-01

    Chloroform and other trihalomethanes are contaminants of drinking water that have been demonstrated to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals. Determination of the mechanism of carcinogenicity of chloroform is required so that the animal data can be extrapolated to estimate the human health hazard. The extent of the binding of chloroform to rat liver and kidney DNA was approximately 0.1% the level of binding found for dimethylnitrosamine. Neither chloroform nor bromoform, in contrast to diethy...

  7. TRIHALOMETHANES AS INITIATORS AND PROMOTERS OF CARCINOGENESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloroform and other trihalomethanes are contaminants of drinking water that have been demonstrated to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals. Determination of the mechanism of carcinogenicity of chloroform is required so that the animal data can be extrapolated to estimate the hu...

  8. B cells contribute to MS pathogenesis through antibody-dependent and antibody-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson HL

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Heather L Wilson1,21Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Center, 2Department of Biochemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaAbstract: For many years, central dogma defined multiple sclerosis (MS as a T cell-driven autoimmune disorder; however, over the past decade there has been a burgeoning recognition that B cells contribute to the pathogenesis of certain MS disease subtypes. B cells may contribute to MS pathogenesis through production of autoantibodies (or antibodies directed at foreign bodies, which unfortunately cross-react with self-antigens, through promotion of T cell activation via antigen presentation, or through production of cytokines. This review highlights evidence for antibody-dependent and antibody-independent B cell involvement in MS pathogenesis.Keywords: autoantibodies, antibody targets, clinically isolated MS, primary progressive MS, secondary progressive MS, relapsing and remitting MS, T cells, T regulatory cells

  9. 抗腐败西瓦菌单克隆抗体杂交瘤细胞系的建立及初步鉴定%Preparation and initial characterization of monoclonal antibody against Shewanella putre faciens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付凯飞; 马骢; 郭建巍; 乔媛媛; 王大鹏

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To prepare high-performance and specific monoclonal antibody (mAbs) against Shewanella putrefaciens so as to establish rapid ELISA kit of the important marine bacteria. METHODS BALB/c mice were immunized with S. putrefaciens, and hybridoma cells against S. putrefaciens were produced by cell-fusion technology. The chromatosomes of hybridoma cells were identified by Giemsa, the potency and cross-reactivity against S. putrefaciens as well as other important marine bacteria were screened by ELISA. RESULTS We obtained four strains of hybridoma against S. putrefaciens (02D6, 02H12, 03G4 and 03A7), all of which had the characteristics of hybridoma cells. The titer ranges of the cultivation supernatant of hybridoma was 10-1 - 10-2. The hybridoma had favourable specifity and immunoreactivity. CONCLUSION Specific antibodies against S. putrefaciens are produced in this study, which might also be useful for establishing rapid-detection kit of the important marine bacteria.%目的 制备和鉴定抗腐败西瓦菌单克隆抗体(mAbs),为建立重要海洋细菌快速ELISA检测试剂盒奠定基础.方法 用灭活腐败西瓦菌免疫小鼠,利用杂交瘤细胞融合技术,制备出抗腐败西瓦菌杂交瘤细胞株,用Giemsa染色对其进行染色体鉴定,并用间接ELISA方法筛选、鉴定其与腐败西瓦菌及其他重要海洋细菌的交叉反应性和效价.结果 共获得4株抗腐败西瓦菌的杂交瘤细胞株(02D6、02H12、03G4、03A7),均符合杂交瘤细胞染色体特点,其培养上清效价为10-1~10-2,具有良好的特异性和免疫反应性.结论 研究制备、筛选出抗腐败西瓦菌的特异性抗体,有助于进一步建立重要海洋细菌快速检测试剂盒.

  10. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  11. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  12. Production Of Human Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  13. RBC Antibody Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the baby is Rh-positive and the mother's antibody status is negative for anti-D, the mother is given additional RhIG. This test also may be used to help diagnose autoimmune-related hemolytic anemia ... when a person produces antibodies against his or her own RBC antigens. This ...

  14. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    Yeast surface display is an effective tool for antibody affinity maturation because yeast can be used as an all-in-one workhorse to assemble, display and screen diversified antibody libraries. By employing the natural ability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently recombine multiple DNA...

  15. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies. PMID:27236551

  16. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Antibody Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  17. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Antibody Scientific Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  18. What do health-promoting schools promote?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka

    2012-01-01

    -promotion interventions. Directly or indirectly the articles reiterate the idea that health promotion in schools needs to be linked with the core task of the school – education, and to the values inherent to education, such as inclusion, democracy, participation and influence, critical literacy and action competence......Purpose – The editorial aims to provide a brief overview of the individual contributions to the special issue, and a commentary positioning the contributions within research relating to the health-promoting schools initiative in Europe. Design/methodology/approach – The members of the Schools...... for Health in Europe Research Group were invited to submit their work addressing processes and outcomes in school health promotion to this special issue of Health Education. Additionally, an open call for papers was published on the Health Education web site. Following the traditional double blind peer...

  19. Antibody discovery: sourcing of monoclonal antibody variable domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohl, William R

    2014-03-01

    Historically, antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies have been sourced primarily from the mouse IgG repertoire, and typically either chimerized or humanized. More recently, human antibodies from transgenic mice producing human IgG, phage display libraries, and directly from human B lymphocytes have been used more broadly as sources of antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies. Of the total 36 antibodies approved by major maket regulatory agencies, the variable domain sequences of 26 originate from the mouse. Of these, four are marketed as murine antibodies (of which one is a mouse-rat hybrid IgG antibody), six are mouse-human chimeric antibodies, and 16 are humanized. Ten marketed antibodies have originated from human antibody genes, three isolated from phage libraries of human antibody genes and seven from transgenic mice producing human antibodies. Five antibodies currently in clinical trials have been sourced from camelids, as well as two from non-human primates, one from rat, and one from rabbit. Additional sources of antibody variable domains that may soon find their way into the clinic are potential antibodies from sharks and chickens. Finally, the various methods for retrieval of antibodies from humans, mouse and other sources, including various display technologies and amplification directly from B cells, are described. PMID:24168292

  20. Production of monoclonal antibody with Celline-350 bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies are protein that are highly specific and sensitive in their reaction with specific sites on target molecules that they have become reagents of central importance in the diagnostic and treatment of human diseases. This paper reports the use of CELLine-350 bioreactor to produce continuous supply of serum-free breast cancer monoclonal antibody. Initial volume of 5ml (1.5 x 106 viable cells/ml) is inoculated into the bioreactor and harvesting is done every 5 days to obtain high yield monoclonal antibody. The serum-free supernatant is precipitated with 50% saturated ammonia sulfate and the antibody is purified by protein-G affinity chromatography. The concentration of monoclonal antibody successfully produced by the bioreactor is 0.91mg/ml respectively and it is measured by the Lowry method. This result shows that bioreactor Celline-350 is easy to handle and cost effective for the continuous production of serum free monoclonal antibody. (Author)

  1. Antibody engineering: facing new challenges in cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laura SANZ; (A)ngel M CUESTA; Marta COMPTE; Luis (A)LVAREZ-VALLINA

    2005-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics are beginning to realize the promise enclosed in their early denomination as "magic bullets". Initial disappointment has turned into clinical and commercial success, and engineered antibodies currently represent over 30% of biopharmaceuticals in clinical trials. Recent structural and functional data have allowed the design of a new generation of therapeutic antibodies, with strategies ranging from complement-mediated and antibody-dependant cellular cytotoxicity enhancement to improved cytotoxic payloads using toxins, drugs,radionucleids and viral delivery. This review considers the structure of different types of recombinant antibodies, their mechanism of action and how their efficacy has been increased using a broad array of approaches. We will also focus on the additional benefits offered by the use of gene therapy methods for the in vivo production of therapeutic antibodies.

  2. Radiolabelled antibodies in imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent technological advances make it possible to produce pure (monoclonal) antibodies in unlimited quantities without the need for continuous immunization of animals and to label these antibodies with a variety of radionuclides which can be traced by single-photon computed tomography. An outline review of the state of the art is presented, with particular reference to the imaging of myocardial infarcts and to tumour imaging studies using labelled monoclonal antibodies (sup(99m)Tc and 125I). Lengthy bibliography. (U.K.)

  3. Macrophages are critical effectors of antibody therapies for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that derive from circulating monocytes, reside in all tissues, and participate in many states of pathology. Macrophages play a dichotomous role in cancer, where they promote tumor growth but also serve as critical immune effectors of therapeutic antibodies. Macrophages express all classes of Fcγ receptors, and they have immense potential to destroy tumors via the process of antibody-dependent phagocytosis. A number of studies have demonstrated that macrophage phagocytosis is a major mechanism of action of many antibodies approved to treat cancer. Consequently, a number of approaches to augment macrophage responses to therapeutic antibodies are under investigation, including the exploration of new targets and development of antibodies with enhanced functions. For example, the interaction of CD47 with signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα) serves as a myeloid-specific immune checkpoint that limits the response of macrophages to antibody therapies, and CD47-blocking agents overcome this barrier to augment phagocytosis. The response of macrophages to antibody therapies can also be enhanced with engineered Fc variants, bispecific antibodies, or antibody-drug conjugates. Macrophages have demonstrated success as effectors of cancer immunotherapy, and further investigation will unlock their full potential for the benefit of patients. PMID:25667985

  4. Implementing Development Initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Jamal Khan

    1999-01-01

    Implementation is at the core of all development initiatives and strategies and experience has shown that there exists a gap between formulation and implementation. This paper focuses on the attempts for implementing initiatives for promoting decentralised management and increased participation in developing countries arid identifies the obstacles in the process. It is generally seen that problems of implementation cannot be entirely anticipated and planned for in advance. Also decentralisati...

  5. Phage Display for the Generation of Antibodies for Proteome Research, Diagnostics and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hust

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years after its development, antibody phage display using filamentous bacteriophage represents the most successful in vitro antibody selection technology. Initially, its development was encouraged by the unique possibility of directly generating recombinant human antibodies for therapy. Today, antibody phage display has been developed as a robust technology offering great potential for automation. Generation of monospecific binders provides a valuable tool for proteome research, leading to highly enhanced throughput and reduced costs. This review presents the phage display technology, application areas of antibodies in research, diagnostics and therapy and the use of antibody phage display for these applications.

  6. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  7. HIV Antibody Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: HIV Screening Tests; AIDS Test; AIDS Screen; HIV Serology; ...

  8. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood may be due to: Chronic liver disease Collagen vascular disease Drug-induced lupus erythematosus Myositis (inflammatory muscle disease) ... Saunders; 2011:chap 51. Read More Antibody Arthritis Collagen vascular disease Drug-induced lupus erythematosus Liver disease Scleroderma Systemic ...

  9. PRODUCTION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOLKOVA E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the use of monoclonal antibodies in immunotherapy and immunodiagnostics of oncological diseases and their production using hybridoma technolody with flow diagram and technological scheme of manufacturing process

  10. PRODUCTION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

    OpenAIRE

    TOLKOVA E.S.

    2015-01-01

    The article considers the use of monoclonal antibodies in immunotherapy and immunodiagnostics of oncological diseases and their production using hybridoma technolody with flow diagram and technological scheme of manufacturing process

  11. Macrophages are critical effectors of antibody therapies for cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that derive from circulating monocytes, reside in all tissues, and participate in many states of pathology. Macrophages play a dichotomous role in cancer, where they promote tumor growth but also serve as critical immune effectors of therapeutic antibodies. Macrophages express all classes of Fcγ receptors, and they have immense potential to destroy tumors via the process of antibody-dependent phagocytosis. A number of studies have demonstrated that macropha...

  12. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transg...

  13. Current Status: Site-Specific Antibody Drug Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Dominik; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Helma, Jonas

    2016-05-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), a promising class of cancer biopharmaceuticals, combine the specificity of therapeutic antibodies with the pharmacological potency of chemical, cytotoxic drugs. Ever since the first ADCs on the market, a plethora of novel ADC technologies has emerged, covering as diverse aspects as antibody engineering, chemical linker optimization and novel conjugation strategies, together aiming at constantly widening the therapeutic window for ADCs. This review primarily focuses on novel chemical and biotechnological strategies for the site-directed attachment of drugs that are currently validated for 2nd generation ADCs to promote conjugate homogeneity and overall stability. PMID:27003914

  14. IgG antibodies in early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cordon, S M; Elborn, J. S.; Rayner, R J; Hiller, E. J.; Shale, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between IgG antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its isolation from sputum was determined in 100 patients with cystic fibrosis observed at intervals of two months for a median period of one year. Only one patient had a raised antibody titre (greater than 22.9 ELISA units) before isolation of P aeruginosa. Initially 65 patients were antibody negative, of whom 48 were also culture negative. Of 24 patients with positive sputum culture and negative antibodies, seven became an...

  15. Using the Concept of Health Promoting School as New Initiatives for School Based Management to Promote Healthy Educational Environments: The Hong Kong Healthy Schools Award Scheme%推动学校健康教育环境形成的新政策:香港健康学校奖励计划

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李大拔

    2006-01-01

    大量证据显示,儿童及青少年的健康是影响他们学习能力的重要因素.学校环境对学童及职员的自信、学术成就及健康有直接的影响.健康教育及促进健康中心于1998年在香港首次推行健康促进学校计划,创办训练课程及开展香港健康学校奖励计划,为健康学校的发展提供有结构的蓝本及有系统的监察过程,以认证学校的成就.根据世界卫生组织的指引,计划有六个主要范畴:健康政策、学校环境及校风、人际关系、社区关系、个人健康生活技能及健康服务.每个范畴都包含一系列的校本改革活动,家长、学校管理层及社区的参与,以及教师培训.中心为每个主要范畴制定一套指标,以评估计划是否成功推广.%There is abundant evidence to demonstrate that the health of children and adolescents constitutes a major factor affecting their capacity to learn. The school environment has a direct impact on the self-esteem, educational achievement, and health of pupils and staff. The Centre for Health Education and Health Promotion (CHEP) initiated the Health Promoting School(HPS) programme in Hong Kong in 1998 by launching a training course, and then developed the Hong Kong Healthy Schools Award Scheme (HKHSA), which provided a structured framework for the development of a system of monitoring progress and recognition of achievement. The programme and Scheme cover six key areas, including health policy,physical and social environments, community relationships, personal health skills and health services, all being adapted from the World Health Organization's (WHO) Guidelines. Each key area has a number of components covering school-based changes and initiatives, and the involvement of parents, school management committees and community, as well as teacher training. The CHEP has developed a set of indicators for each key area and an evaluation framework to measure the success.

  16. Pre-existing Antibody: Biotherapeutic Modality-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorovits, Boris; Clements-Egan, Adrienne; Birchler, Mary; Liang, Meina; Myler, Heather; Peng, Kun; Purushothama, Shobha; Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Salazar-Fontana, Laura; Sung, Crystal; Xue, Li

    2016-03-01

    Pre-existing antibodies to biotherapeutic drugs have been detected in drug-naïve subjects for a variety of biotherapeutic modalities. Pre-existing antibodies are immunoglobulins that are either specific or cross-reacting with a protein or glycan epitopes on a biotherapeutic compound. Although the exact cause for pre-existing antibodies is often unknown, environmental exposures to non-human proteins, glycans, and structurally similar products are frequently proposed as factors. Clinical consequences of the pre-existing antibodies vary from an adverse effect on patient safety to no impact at all and remain highly dependent on the biotherapeutic drug modality and therapeutic indication. As such, pre-existing antibodies are viewed as an immunogenicity risk factor requiring a careful evaluation. Herein, the relationships between biotherapeutic modalities to the nature, prevalence, and clinical consequences of pre-existing antibodies are reviewed. Initial evidence for pre-existing antibody is often identified during anti-drug antibody (ADA) assay development. Other interfering factors known to cause false ADA positive signal, including circulating multimeric drug target, rheumatoid factors, and heterophilic antibodies, are discussed. PMID:26821802

  17. Promoção de reflexividade na formação inicial docente: o papel do professor orientador de pesquisa/Promotion of reflexivity in the initial education of teachers: the role of the research tutor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Buzzi Rausch,

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A formação inicial de professores, comumente, propõe princípios da prática investigativa como abordagem metodológica docente, constituindo-se em aprendizagem e construção reflexiva do professor. Nesta perspectiva, muitas instituições incluíram no currículo o Trabalho de Conclusão de Curso. Nesta atividade, investigamos os principais atributos do professor orientador ao desenvolvimento da reflexividade dos orientandos. Os sujeitos foram sete acadêmicas de Pedagogia. Os encontros de orientação foram gravados e transcritos e a apresentação oral da pesquisa videogravada. Foi solicitado para que cada acadêmica registrasse em portfólios, o processo de pesquisa vivenciado. Na realização de sua primeira pesquisa verificamos que as acadêmicas foram dependentes, apresentando medos e inseguranças frente ao novo. Os principais atributos da orientação à promoção da reflexividade das acadêmicas foram: mediação do conhecimento; auxílio na definição e compreensão da teoria; sinalização da necessidade de um olhar crítico frente ao fenômeno estudado; indicação de cuidados éticos à pesquisa; assunção de uma atitude indagativa; sinalização da incerteza do processo de pesquisa; animação do processo de aprendizagem das acadêmicas; inserção das acadêmicas em eventos científicos e solicitação do registro da pesquisa em portfólio. Este resultado vem ressaltar a importância da figura do orientador no processo de pesquisa à promoção da reflexividade docente. Principles of investigative practice are commonly proposed as teaching methodological approach in the initial education of teachers, which constitutes a reflexive construction and learning for the teacher. Under this perspective, a great number of institutions have included the End of Term Paper in their program. In this activity, it has been investigated tutors’ main attributes for the development of their tutees’ reflexivity. Seven academic learners

  18. Prediction of antibody persistency from antibody titres to natalizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Poul Erik H; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sellebjerg, Finn; Sørensen, Per S

    2012-01-01

    In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients.......In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients....

  19. Metazoan promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenhard, Boris; Sandelin, Albin Gustav; Carninci, Piero

    2012-01-01

    Promoters are crucial for gene regulation. They vary greatly in terms of associated regulatory elements, sequence motifs, the choice of transcription start sites and other features. Several technologies that harness next-generation sequencing have enabled recent advances in identifying promoters ...

  20. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin.Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody...

  1. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.;

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  2. Health Promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Lene; Borup, I.

    2015-01-01

    In 1953 when the Nordic School of Public Health was founded, the aim of public health programmes was disease prevention more than health promotion. This was not unusual, since at this time health usually was seen as the opposite of disease and illness. However, with the Ottawa Charter of 1986......, the World Health Organization made a crucial change to view health not as a goal in itself but as the means to a full life. In this way, health promotion became a first priority and fundamental action for the modern society. This insight eventually reached NHV and in 2002 - 50 years after the foundation...... - an associate professorship was established with a focus on health promotion. Nevertheless, the concept of health promotion had been integrated with or mentioned in courses run prior to the new post. Subsequently, a wide spectrum of courses in health promotion was introduced, such as Empowerment for Child...

  3. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red ...

  4. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  5. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  6. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  7. Recombinant antibodies and tumor targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikholvaezin, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Different antibody derived constructs are rapidly advancing as putative tools for treatment of malignant diseases. Antibody engineering has added significant new technologies to modify size, affinities, solubility, stability and biodistribution properties for immunoconjugates. In the present thesis, the aim was to increase our knowledge on how new recombinant antibodies could be tailored to optimize localization to experimental tumors in mice. One hybridoma, producing the monoclonal antibody ...

  8. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul WHI; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Adams, Gregory P; Weiner, Louis M.; Scott, Jamie K; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Bi...

  9. Coupling purification and in situ immobilization process of monoclonal antibodies to clenbuterol for immunosensor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Yuan, Min; Wang, Lili; Yu, Jingsong; Xu, Fei

    2015-05-01

    Clenbuterol (CL), which promotes the growth of muscular tissue and the reduction of body fat in pigs and cattle, has been confirmed to be a potential hazard to human health. In this study, a monoclonal antibody to clenbuterol (CL mAb) from a hybridoma culture supernatant was purified by an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) at different polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentrations, PEG molecular weights, pH values, and NaCl concentrations. Then the CL mAb was immobilized in situ by directly adding polystyrene microspheres (PSMSs) into a PEG phase containing CL mAb. Using the immobilized antibody, an immunosensor was constructed to detect the CL residues in pork samples. The results showed that using an ATPS composed of 15% (w/w) PEG6000, 15% (w/w) phosphate, and 15% (w/w) NaCl at pH 8.0, the partition coefficient was 7.24, the activity recovery was 87.86%, and the purification fold was 2.88. The PEG-CL mAb-PSMS retained approximately 98% of its initial activity after 30-ml phosphate buffer (PBS) washings. After 30days of storage, the CL mAb-PSMS lost nearly 75% of its activity, whereas the PEG-CL mAb-PSMS retained as much as 95% of its initial activity. Furthermore, the constructed immunosensor obtained recoveries of 90.5 to 102.6% when applied to pork samples spiked with CL. PMID:25660529

  10. Radiolabeled antibodies as imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author gives a survey of the progress made on radioimmunodetection. Antibodies may now be more readily used in scintigraphy as a result of the development of labeling methods that apply more suitable radionuclides without significant loss of the antigen-binding activity. Antibodies to tumor-specific or tumor-associated antigens can now be produced in large quantities by monoclonal antibody technology

  11. Expression and assembly of a fully active antibody in algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Stephen P.; Franklin, Scott E.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    Although combinatorial antibody libraries have solved the problem of access to large immunological repertoires, efficient production of these complex molecules remains a problem. Here we demonstrate the efficient expression of a unique large single-chain (lsc) antibody in the chloroplast of the unicellular, green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We achieved high levels of protein accumulation by synthesizing the lsc gene in chloroplast codon bias and by driving expression of the chimeric gene using either of two C. reinhardtii chloroplast promoters and 5' and 3' RNA elements. This lsc antibody, directed against glycoprotein D of the herpes simplex virus, is produced in a soluble form by the alga and assembles into higher order complexes in vivo. Aside from dimerization by disulfide bond formation, the antibody undergoes no detectable posttranslational modification. We further demonstrate that accumulation of the antibody can be modulated by the specific growth regime used to culture the alga, and by the choice of 5' and 3' elements used to drive expression of the antibody gene. These results demonstrate the utility of alga as an expression platform for recombinant proteins, and describe a new type of single chain antibody containing the entire heavy chain protein, including the Fc domain.

  12. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  13. Monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Halpern, J L; Lundgren, B; Swan, J C; Parrillo, J E; Masur, H

    1989-01-01

    To increase understanding of the antigenic structure of Pneumocystis carinii, we developed monoclonal antibodies to rat and human P. carinii. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and immunoblot studies. Only one of five monoclonal antibodies to rat P. carinii...... reacted with human P. carinii, and none of four monoclonal antibodies to human P. carinii reacted with rat P. carinii. Two antibodies to human P. carinii reacted by immunofluorescence with only one human P. carinii isolate. Immunoblot studies identified major antigens of rat P. carinii with molecular...

  14. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  15. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps......Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can...

  16. Thyroid Antibodies and Miscarriage: Where Are We at a Generation Later?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Stagnaro-Green

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1990, an association between thyroid antibody positivity and spontaneous miscarriage was first reported. A generation has passed since the initial observation. Over that time a robust literature has developed which has confirmed the initial finding and expanded upon it. The present paper reviews the literature that has been generated over the last twenty years on the following topics: (1 thyroid antibodies and spontaneous miscarriage, (2 thyroid antibodies and recurrent abortion, (3 etiology of pregnancy loss in thyroid antibody positive women, and (4 discussion of future research directions.

  17. Monoclonal antibody as radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purification of anti-CEA monoclonal antibody 4C11 belonging to IgG sub(2a) subclass from mouse ascitis, donated by Ludwig Institute, Brazil was developed. The fragmentation of purified IgG sub(2a) by pepsin digestion and analytical studies by polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) were done as preliminary assessment for their specific application in immunoscintigraphy. (author)

  18. Anticardiolipin antibodies in leptospirosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rugman, F P; Pinn, G.; Palmer, M. F.; Waite, M.; Hay, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical course and serology of 16 cases of leptospirosis in an area with an unusually high endemic infection rate were studied to gain further insight into the pathology of the secondary immune phase that is typical of the disease. IgG anticardiolipin antibody concentrations were measured by immunoassay and found to be increased in eight serologically confirmed cases with severe complicated disease, compared with eight patients with relatively uncomplicated leptospirosis who had IgG anti...

  19. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin. PMID:23098305

  20. Antibody therapy for Ebola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary P

    2014-01-01

    Ebola viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with fatality rates up to 90%, and are identified as biosafety level 4 pathogens and CDC Category A Agents of Bioterrorism. To date, there are no approved therapies and vaccines available to treat these infections. Antibody therapy was estimated to be an effective and powerful treatment strategy against infectious pathogens in the late 19th, early 20th centuries but has fallen short to meet expectations to widely combat infectious diseases. Passive immunization for Ebola virus was successful in 2012, after over 15 years of failed attempts leading to skepticism that the approach would ever be of potential benefit. Currently, monoclonal antibody (mAbs)-based therapies are the most efficient at reversing the progression of a lethal Ebola virus infection in nonhuman primates, which recapitulate the human disease with the highest similarity. Novel combinations of mAbs can even fully cure lethally infected animals after clinical symptoms and circulating virus have been detected, days into the infection. These new developments have reopened the door for using antibody-based therapies for filovirus infections. Furthermore, they are reigniting hope that these strategies will contribute to better control the spread of other infectious agents and provide new tools against infectious diseases. PMID:24503566

  1. Sustainable Agricultural Marketing Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Adanacıoğlu

    2015-07-01

    important in terms of the success of the initiatives. It's also essential to bring to the fore the various themes, such as regional delicacies, safe production methods, human and environmental health, regionalism, regional artisanship, and biodiversity to cultivate a successful marketing strategy in promotional activities of sustainable agricultural marketing initiatives.

  2. Characterization of a Bispecific FLT3 X CD3 Antibody in an Improved, Recombinant Format for the Treatment of Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Durben, Michael; Schmiedel, Dominik; Hofmann, Martin; Vogt, Fabian; Nübling, Tina; Pyz, Elwira; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Salih, Helmut R.; Große-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram

    2015-01-01

    FLT3 is a receptor-tyrosine-kinase that is expressed on leukemic cells of the myeloid and lymphoid lineage rather specifically. We here report on the construction and selection of bispecific FLT3 X CD3 antibodies in a new recombinant format, termed Fabsc, that resembles the normal antibody structure more closely than the well-established bispecific single chain (bssc)-format. Our preferred antibody, which emerged from an initial selection procedure utilizing different FLT3- and CD3-antibodies...

  3. Treatment of leukemia with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouros, G; Scheinberg, D A

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to radioimmunotherapy of solid disease, wherein the primary obstacle to success is access of radiolabeled antibody to antigen-positive cells, in the treatment of leukemia delivering a lethal absorbed dose to the isolated cell appears to be the primary obstacle. The isolated cell is defined as one that is exposed only to self-irradiation (from internalized or surface-bound radiolabeled antibody) and to irradiation from free antibody in the blood. It is isolated in the sense that the particulate (beta, electron, alpha) emissions from its nearest neighboring antigen-positive cell do not contribute to its absorbed dose. Disease in the bone marrow and other tissues, since it is confined to a smaller volume, is more easily eradicated because the absorbed dose to a given cell nucleus is enhanced by emissions from adjacent cells (a smaller fraction of the emission energy is 'wasted'). The optimization simulations presented above for the M195 antibody suggest that the optimum dose of antibody that should be administered is that required to yield a concentration within the distribution volume of the antibody that is approximately equal to the concentration of antigen sites as determined by the tumor burden. Although not specifically considered in the modeling example presented above, antibody internalization and catabolism may be expected to play an important role in radioimmunotherapy treatment planning of leukemia. Depending upon the kinetics of internalization and catabolism, the absorbed dose to the red marrow and to antigen-positive cells may be reduced considerably, since catabolism, assuming that it is followed by rapid extrusion of the radioactive label, would decrease the cells' exposure time considerably. The recently demonstrated effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy in certain cases of B-cell lymphoma and in reducing tumor burden in acute myelogenous leukemia suggests that radioimmunotherapy is beginning to fulfill the promise held when it was initially

  4. Identification and characterization of the human SOX6 promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study attempted to identify and characterize the embryonic promoter of Sox6, a determinant regulator of chondrogenic differentiation. A common transcription start region for human and mouse Sox6 was initially identified, which contained a highly conserved sequence, A-box. Tandem repeats of A-box had a strong transcriptional activity both at the basal level and in response to Sox9. Cells carrying the 4xA-box-DsRed2 reporter fluoresced only upon chondrogenic differentiation. The 46-bp core enhancer region (CES6) was then identified in the 3' half of A-box, within which a C/EBP-binding motif was identified. Overexpressed C/EBPβ activated the Sox6 promoter, and mutant 4xCES6 constructs lacking the C/EBP motif lost their basal activity. CES6 and nuclear extracts formed a specific complex, which was supershifted by anti-C/EBPβ antibody, and in vitro translated C/EBPβ specifically bound to CES6. Thus, we successfully identified the Sox6 promoter and its core enhancer and characterized the interactions with regulatory transcription factors

  5. Promoting Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Zhao, Yongxin; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Si

    There can be multitudinous models specifying aspects of the same system. Each model has a bias towards one aspect. These models often override in specific aspects though they have different expressions. A specification written in one model can be refined by introducing additional information from other models. The paper proposes a concept of promoting models which is a methodology to obtain refinements with support from cooperating models. It refines a primary model by integrating the information from a secondary model. The promotion principle is not merely an academic point, but also a reliable and robust engineering technique which can be used to develop software and hardware systems. It can also check the consistency between two specifications from different models. A case of modeling a simple online shopping system with the cooperation of the guarded design model and CSP model illustrates the practicability of the promotion principle.

  6. Second antibody clearance of radiolabeled antibody in cancer radioimmunodetection.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharkey, R M; Primus, F J; Goldenberg, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The imaging of tumors using radiolabeled antibodies previously has required the implementation of computer-assisted subtraction techniques to reduce background radioactivity. A decrease in radioactivity in the blood of hamsters bearing human colonic tumor xenografts has been achieved by administering a second antibody directed against a radiolabeled primary antibody to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). This method was found to reduce the level of blood radioactivity by a factor of 4 within 2 hr...

  7. Initial Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    increased. In the initial study presented here, the time it takes to pass an intersection is studied in details. Two major signal-controlled four-way intersections in the center of the city Aalborg are studied in details to estimate the congestion levels in these intersections, based on the time it takes to...

  8. The antibody Hijikata Tatsumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éden Peretta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Considered one of the most influential modern dance representatives in Japan, Tatsumi Hijikata’s work was a milestone in the Japanese post-war experimental artistic scene. Heretic son of his time, he staged a fertile mix of artistic and cultural influences, overlapping subversive elements of European arts and philosophy with radical references from pre-modern Japanese culture. In this way he built the foundations of its unstable antibody, its political-artistic project of dissolution of a organism, both physical and social.

  9. Haploinsufficiency of activation-induced deaminase for antibody diversification and chromosome translocations both in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isora V Sernández

    Full Text Available The humoral immune response critically relies on the secondary diversification of antibodies. This diversification takes places through somatic remodelling of the antibody genes by two molecular mechanisms, Class Switch Recombination (CSR and Somatic Hypermutation (SHM. The enzyme Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID initiates both SHM and CSR by deaminating cytosine residues on the DNA of immunoglobulin genes. While crucial for immunity, AID-catalysed deamination is also the triggering event for the generation of lymphomagenic chromosome translocations. To address whether restricting the levels of AID expression in vivo contributes to the regulation of its function, we analysed mice harbouring a single copy of the AID gene (AID(+/-. AID(+/- mice express roughly 50% of normal AID levels, and display a mild hyperplasia, reminiscent of AID deficient mice and humans. Moreover, we found that AID(+/- cells have an impaired competence for CSR and SHM, which indicates that AID gene dose is limiting for its physiologic function. We next evaluated the impact of AID reduction in AID(+/- mice on the generation of chromosome translocations. Our results show that the frequency of AID-promoted c-myc/IgH translocations is reduced in AID(+/- mice, both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, AID is haploinsufficient for antibody diversification and chromosome translocations. These findings suggest that limiting the physiologic levels of AID expression can be a regulatory mechanism that ensures an optimal balance between immune proficiency and genome integrity.

  10. VIRAL ANTIBODIES IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saidi

    1974-08-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sera from children 1 - 6 years of age, representative of a large serum collection, were tested for the prevalence of antibodies against different viruses. Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI antibodies were found in 68% for measles; 61 % for rubella; 75'% for influenza A2/Hong Kong/68, 16% for influenza B/Md./59, 0% for group A arboviruses, 10% for group B arboviruses, 3% for phlebotomus fever group and 4% for Congo-Crimean hemorrhagic fever (C-CHF group of arboviruses Poliomyelitis-neutralizing antibodies for type 1, 2 and 3 were 90%; 85% and 84%~ respectively. Antibody to EH virus was detected in 84% of the sera by immuno-fluorescence. None of the sera were positive for hepatitis-B antigen or antibody by immuno-precipitation test. The prevalence of some viral antibodies found in this survey are compared with results obtained from surveys in other parts of the country.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to cell surface antigens of human melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have worked with three human melanoma antigens which have been defined by monoclonal mouse antibodies: p97, a glycoprotein that is structurally related to transferrin, a proteoglycan, and a GD3 ganglioside that is slightly different from the GD3 of normal brain. All three antigens can be detected in frozen sections of melanoma, using immunohistological techniques. Antibodies and Fab fragments, specific for either p97 or the proteoglycan antigen, have been radiolabelled with 131I and successfully used for tumor imaging, and Phase I therapeutic trails are underway, using 131I-labelled Fab fragments, specific for p97 or the proteoglycan antigen, to localize a potentially therapeutic dose of radiation into tumors. It may be feasible to use the same monoclonal antibodies, or antibody fragments, as carriers of neutron capturers, such as boron, for possible use in tumor therapy. The initial experiments on this are best carried out by using nude mice (or rats) carrying human melanoma xenografts

  12. The importance of non-HLA antibodies in transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuheng; Reed, Elaine F

    2016-08-01

    The development of post-transplantation antibodies against non-HLA autoantigens is associated with rejection and decreased long-term graft survival. Although our knowledge of non-HLA antibodies is incomplete, compelling experimental and clinical findings demonstrate that antibodies directed against autoantigens such as angiotensin type 1 receptor, perlecan and collagen, contribute to the process of antibody-mediated acute and chronic rejection. The mechanisms that underlie the production of autoantibodies in the setting of organ transplantation is an important area of ongoing investigation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury, surgical trauma and/or alloimmune responses can result in the release of organ-derived autoantigens (such as soluble antigens, extracellular vesicles or apoptotic bodies) that are presented to B cells in the context of the transplant recipient's antigen presenting cells and stimulate autoantibody production. Type 17 T helper cells orchestrate autoantibody production by supporting the proliferation and maturation of autoreactive B cells within ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Conversely, autoantibody-mediated graft damage can trigger alloimmunity and the development of donor-specific HLA antibodies that can act in synergy to promote allograft rejection. Identification of the immunologic phenotypes of transplant recipients at risk of non-HLA antibody-mediated rejection, and the development of targeted therapies to treat such rejection, are sorely needed to improve both graft and patient survival. PMID:27345243

  13. Antibodies to watch in 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 6 antibody therapeutics (sec...

  14. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  15. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approv...

  16. Empowered Antibody Therapies - IBC conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Jens

    2010-10-01

    The Empowered Antibody Therapies conference, held in Burlingame, CA, USA, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of multispecific antibodies. This conference report highlights selected presentations on DVD-Igs from Abbott Laboratories, ImmTACs from Immunocore, 'Dock-and-Lock' technology from Immunomedics, the bispecific BiTE antibody blinatumomab from Micromet, and Triomabs from TRION Pharma and Fresenius Biotech. PMID:20878591

  17. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi;

    2014-01-01

    infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... (iii) antibody numbering and IMGT. Here, we review “antibody informatics,” which may integrate the above three fields so that bridging the gaps between industrial needs and academic solutions can be accelerated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering...

  18. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab)2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  19. Evidence for variation in the optimal translation initiation complex: plant eIF4B, eIF4F, and eIF(iso)4F differentially promote translation of mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Laura K; Allen, M Leah; Dennis, Michael D; Browning, Karen S

    2009-08-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4B is known to interact with multiple initiation factors, mRNA, rRNA, and poly(A) binding protein (PABP). To gain a better understanding of the function of eIF4B, the two isoforms from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were expressed and analyzed using biophysical and biochemical methods. Plant eIF4B was found by ultracentrifugation and light scattering analysis to most likely be a monomer with an extended structure. An extended structure would facilitate the multiple interactions of eIF4B with mRNA as well as other initiation factors (eIF4A, eIF4G, PABP, and eIF3). Eight mRNAs, barley (Hordeum vulgare) alpha-amylase mRNA, rabbit beta-hemoglobin mRNA, Arabidopsis heat shock protein 21 (HSP21) mRNA, oat (Avena sativa) globulin, wheat (Triticum aestivum) germin, maize (Zea mays) alcohol dehydrogenase, satellite tobacco necrosis virus RNA, and alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) 4, were used in wheat germ in vitro translation assays to measure their dependence on eIF4B and eIF4F isoforms. The two Arabidopsis eIF4B isoforms, as well as native and recombinant wheat eIF4B, showed similar responses in the translation assay. AMV RNA 4 and Arabidopsis HSP21 showed only a slight dependence on the presence of eIF4B isoforms, whereas rabbit beta-hemoglobin mRNA and wheat germin mRNA showed modest dependence. Barley alpha-amylase, oat globulin, and satellite tobacco necrosis virus RNA displayed the strongest dependence on eIF4B. These results suggest that eIF4B has some effects on mRNA discrimination during initiation of translation. Barley alpha-amylase, oat globulin, and rabbit beta-hemoglobin mRNA showed the highest activity with eIF4F, whereas Arabidopsis HSP21 and AMV RNA 4 used both eIF4F and eIF(iso)4F equally well. These results suggest that differential or optimal translation of mRNAs may require initiation complexes composed of specific isoforms of initiation factor gene products. Thus, individual mRNAs or classes of mRNAs may respond to the

  20. A Kinase Activity Associated with Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen Phosphorylates Upstream Binding Factor (UBF) and Promotes Formation of a Stable Initiation Complex between UBF and SL1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Weiguo; Comai, Lucio

    1999-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large T antigen is a multifunctional protein which has been shown to modulate the expression of genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I (Pol I), II, and III. In all three transcription systems, a key step in the activation process is the recruitment of large T antigen to the promoter by direct protein-protein interaction with the TATA binding protein (TBP)-TAF complexes, namely, SL1, TFIID, and TFIIIB. However, our previous studies on large T antigen stimulation of Pol I transcr...

  1. How antibodies alter the cell entry pathway of dengue virus particles in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Nunez, Nilda V.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P.I.; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Flipse, Jacky; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus (DENV) infection plays an important role in the exacerbation of DENV-induced disease. To understand how antibodies influence the fate of DENV particles, we explored the cell entry pathway of DENV in the absence and presence of antibodies in macrophage-like P388D1 cells. Recent studies unraveled that both mature and immature DENV particles contribute to ADE, hence, both particles were studied. We observed that antibody-opsonized DENV enters P388D1 cells through a different pathway than non-opsonized DENV. Antibody-mediated DENV entry was dependent on FcγRs, pH, Eps15, dynamin, actin, PI3K, Rab5, and Rab7. In the absence of antibodies, DENV cell entry was FcγR, PI3K, and Rab5-independent. Live-cell imaging of fluorescently-labeled particles revealed that actin-mediated membrane protrusions facilitate virus uptake. In fact, actin protrusions were found to actively search and capture antibody-bound virus particles distantly located from the cell body, a phenomenon that is not observed in the absence of antibodies. Overall, similar results were seen for antibody-opsonized standard and antibody-bound immature DENV preparations, indicating that the maturation status of the virus does not control the entry pathway. Collectively, our findings suggest that antibodies alter the cell entry pathway of DENV and trigger a novel mechanism of initial virus-cell contact. PMID:27385443

  2. Antiphospholipid antibodies and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chighizola, C B; de Jesus, G R

    2014-10-01

    Since the late 1980s some publications have proposed that antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) may have some relationship with infertility, considering reported deleterious effects that aPL exert on trophoblast proliferation and growth. Although not included in current classification criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome, many physicians investigate for aPL in patients with a history of infertility, including antibodies not listed in classification criteria, and most of those patients will receive anticoagulant therapy if any of those antibodies have a result considered positive. A review of literature was conducted searching for studies that investigated the association of aPL and infertility and if aPL positivity alters in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome. The definition of infertility, routine work-up to exclude other causes of infertility, definition of IVF failure as inclusion criteria and control populations were heterogeneous among studies. Most of them enrolled women over 40 years of age, and exclusion of other confounding factors was also inconsistent. Of 29 studies that assessed aPL positivity rates in infertile women, the majority had small sample sizes, implying a lack of power, and 13 (44.8%) reported higher frequency of aPL in infertile patients compared to controls, but most of them investigated a panel of non-criteria aPL tests, whose clinical significance is highly controversial. Only two studies investigated all three criteria tests, and medium-high titer of anticardiolipin cut-off conforming to international guidelines was used in one study. Considering IVF outcome, there was also disparity in this definition: few studies assessed the live birth rate, others the implantation rate. Of 14 publications that addressed the relationship between aPL and IVF outcome, only two described a detrimental effect of these autoantibodies. In conclusion, available data do not support an association between aPL and infertility, and aPL positivity does not seem to

  3. IAEA knowledge management initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its inception the IAEA has always been a knowledge based organization, requested to serve and promote the cause of peaceful use of nuclear science and technology. For nearly five decades the IAEA has been providing nuclear information and knowledge to Member States. A substantial part of the IAEA's activities under the regular budget and technical cooperation programme are aimed at developing and sustaining adequate nuclear competence in the Member States, including helping to build capacity in different aspects of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The paper describes some knowledge management initiatives that are being implemented within the framework of the IAEA programme on nuclear knowledge management. (author)

  4. Rill Initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ottosen, Thor-Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    This project is about rill erosion. The aim is to test whether rill initiation can be predicted from the shear strength of the soil as measured with a torvane on saturated soil. This approach was set forward by Rauws and Govers 1988. Rainfall simulation experiments are conducted at a plot size 2x1m, performed in May on the Marbjerg experimental field. The results are evaluated using a chain set to measure alterations of the surface roughness as a result of the erosion, visual evaluation of ph...

  5. Targeting of Antibodies using Aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    Missailidis, Sotiris

    2003-01-01

    The chapter presents a methodology for the rapid selection of aptamers against antibody targets. It is a detailed account of the various methodological steps that describe the selection of aptamers, including PCR steps, buffers to be used, target immobilisation, partitioning and amplification of aptamers, clonning and sequencing, to results in high affinity and specificity ligands for the chosen target antibody.

  6. Refolding Technologies for Antibody Fragments

    OpenAIRE

    Tsutomu Arakawa; Daisuke Ejima

    2014-01-01

    Refolding is one of the production technologies for pharmaceutical grade antibody fragments. Detergents and denaturants are primarily used to solubilize the insoluble proteins. The solubilized and denatured proteins are refolded by reducing the concentration of the denaturants or detergents. Several refolding technologies have been used for antibody fragments, comprising dilution, dialysis, solid phase solvent exchange and size exclusion chromatography, as reviewed here. Aggregation suppresso...

  7. ANTISPERM ANTIBODIES IN VASOVASOSTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Pourmand

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and forty patients, who had undergone vasectomy from 1977 to 1985 and subsequent vasovasostomy ,were studied for the presence of sperm-specific antibodies by using the Kibrick's gelatin agglutination test. The number of successful pregnancies and the presence of agglutination were also considered in this survey. Sixty-nine pregnancies occurred in total and agglutination was present in 49% out of 51% positive specimens by the Kibrick Test."nThe average sperm motility was slightly higher in the negative Kibrick group than in the positive Kibrick group. The obtained data indicated that there seems to be a relationship between the increased titers and percentage of agglutination in semen samples.

  8. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed. PMID:20930555

  9. Detection of B-lymphocytes secreting antibodies to Dermatophagoides antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparholt, S H; Barington, T; Schou, C

    1991-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELI-spot assay) has been established to count individual cells secreting antibodies to Dermatophagoides spp. allergens. Initial optimization of the assay was performed using Der p I-specific murine hybridoma cell lines. Inhibition with soluble purified allergen ...

  10. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    EBV antibody test; EBV serology ... a lab, where a lab specialist looks for antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus. In the first stages of an illness, little antibody may be detected. For this reason, the test ...

  11. Measurement of antibodies to tubulin by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solid-phase double antibody radioimmunoassay capable of measuring antibody to tubulin, the principal component of microtubules, is described. This assay is simple, combining sensitivity with specificity and also allowing determination of antibody subclasses. (Auth.)

  12. Antibodies - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit.

  13. 美国推进学前教育均衡发展的举措探析%The Initiatives to Promote Balanced Development in American Preschool Education and its Inspirations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蓉

    2011-01-01

    Since 1980s,in order to promote the balanced development of preschool education,American government take some measures, such as setting a reform objective of high quality preschool education, increasing financial investment, emphasizing the disadvantaged%20世纪80年代以来,为推进学前教育的均衡发展,美国采取了一系列举措,主要包括:以发展优质学前教育为目标,加大学前教育经费投入;关注处境不利儿童教育;加强学前教育质量管理;培养优质学前教育师资等。

  14. Brazilian Nanotechnology Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzio, Adalberto

    2015-03-01

    In Brazil there is intense research activity in nanotechnology, most of these developed in universities and research institutes. The Brazilian Nanotechnology Initiative (BNI) aims to integrate government actions to promote the competitiveness of the Brazilian industry. This initiative is founded on support for research and development in the laboratories of the National Laboratories for Nanotechnology (SisNANO), starting from an improvement in infrastructure and opening of laboratories for users of academia and business, promoting interaction and transfer knowledge between academia and business. Country currently has 26 thematic networks of nanotechnology, 16 -Virtual-National Institutes of Technology, seven National- Laboratories and 18 Associate Laboratories, which comprise the SisNANO. Seeking to expand and share governance with other government actors, the Interministries Committee for Nanotechnology was set up, composed of 10 ministries, and has the task of coordinating the entire program of the Federal Government Nanotechnology.Cooperation activities are an important part of BNI. Currently Brazil has cooperation programs with U.S., China, Canada and European Union among others. Recently, Brazil decided to join the European NanoReg program where 60 research groups are joining efforts to provide protocols and standards that can help regulatory agencies and governments.

  15. Monoclonal antibody therapy for Junin virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Larry; Geisbert, Joan B; Deer, Daniel J; Fenton, Karla A; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael H; Velasco, Jesus; Whaley, Kevin J; Altmann, Friedrich; Gruber, Clemens; Steinkellner, Herta; Honko, Anna N; Kuehne, Ana I; Aman, M Javad; Sahandi, Sara; Enterlein, Sven; Zhan, Xiaoguo; Enria, Delia; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2016-04-19

    Countermeasures against potential biothreat agents remain important to US Homeland Security, and many of these pharmaceuticals could have dual use in the improvement of global public health. Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), is an arenavirus identified as a category A high-priority agent. There are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs available for preventing or treating AHF, and the current treatment option is limited to administration of immune plasma. Whereas immune plasma demonstrates the feasibility of passive immunotherapy, it is limited in quantity, variable in quality, and poses safety risks such as transmission of transfusion-borne diseases. In an effort to develop a monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based alternative to plasma, three previously described neutralizing murine mAbs were expressed as mouse-human chimeric antibodies and evaluated in the guinea pig model of AHF. These mAbs provided 100% protection against lethal challenge when administered 2 d after infection (dpi), and one of them (J199) was capable of providing 100% protection when treatment was initiated 6 dpi and 92% protection when initiated 7 dpi. The efficacy of J199 is superior to that previously described for all other evaluated drugs, and its high potency suggests that mAbs like J199 offer an economical alternative to immune plasma and an effective dual use (bioterrorism/public health) therapeutic. PMID:27044104

  16. Are Onconeural Antibodies a Clinical Phenomenology in Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis?

    OpenAIRE

    Hongliang Zhang; Chunkui Zhou; Limin Wu; Fengming Ni; Jie Zhu; Tao Jin

    2013-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs) occur in patients with cancer and can cause clinical symptoms and signs of dysfunction of the nervous system that are not due to a local effect of the tumor or its metastases. Most of these clinical syndromes in adults are associated with lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer (SCLC), lymphoma, and gynecological tumors. The finding of highly specific antibodies directed against onconeural antigens has revolutionized the diagnosis and promot...

  17. Promoting Health in Early Childhood Environments: A Health-Promotion Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniss, Fiona Rowe; Wardrope, Cheryl; Johnston, Donni; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the mechanisms by which a health-promotion intervention might influence the health-promoting behaviours of staff members working in early childhood centres. The intervention was an ecological health-promotion initiative that was implemented within four early childhood centres in South-East Queensland, Australia. In-depth,…

  18. Openness initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  19. A double antibody radioimmunoassay for mouse hemoglobins: use of polyethylene glycol in conjunction with the second antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double antibody radioimmunoassay (RIA) system is described for detection of small quantities of hemoglobins. Mouse (C57BL/6) hemoglobin and horse anti-mouse hemoglobin antiserum were used to develop the system. The first phase of the RIA, i.e., the initial reaction between the antigen and the antibody, was found to be complete within 24 h. The reaction proceeded better at 40C than at 250C. The second phase, i.e., separation of bound from unbound antigen, was achieved by precipitation with a second antibody (goat anti-horse IgG) and polyethlene glycol (PEG). A 50 g/l concentration of PEG was found to be best suited for the assay. Mixing of all the reagents together was found to decrease the binding as compared to the system in which second antibody and PEG were added after completion of the first phase. Maximum precipitation of the complex took place within 30 min after the addition of the second antibody and 1 h after the addition of 50 g/l PEG. The RIA system described here combines the conventional double antibody RiA with the PEG method. This method has decreased the amount of time necessary for precipitation from 24 h (or longer) to 1 h. Large molecular weight antigens could not be estimated in the conventional PEG method because of their insolubility in 200 g/l PEG utilized in the assay. The use of a low concentration of PEG along with the second antibody in the method described here allows the estimation of large molecular weight antigens. This double antibody-PEG method has a general applicability for small as well as large molecular weight antigens. (Auth.)

  20. Antibody fragments: Hope and hype

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Aaron L

    2010-01-01

    The antibody molecule is modular and separate domains can be extracted through biochemical or genetic means. It is clear from review of the literature that a wave of novel, antigen-specific molecular forms may soon enter clinical evaluation. This report examines the developmental histories of therapeutics derived from antigen-specific fragments of antibodies produced by recombinant processes. Three general types of fragments were observed, antigen-binding fragments (Fab), single chain variabl...

  1. Functional effects of anticardiolipin antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, E N; Pierangeli, S S

    1996-10-01

    The 'lupus anticoagulant' phenomenon is the best documented functional effect of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies, occurring either by inhibition of the prothrombinase and/or Factor X activation reactions. Understanding the mechanism by which aPL antibodies inhibit phospholipid dependent coagulation reactions may yield important clues about their 'thrombogenic effects' in vivo. We conducted a series of studies to determine the specificity, diversity, and mechanism by which aPL antibodies inhibit phospholipid dependent reactions. Results showed that purified immunoglobulins with lupus anticoagulant and anti-cardiolipin activities were absorbed by negatively charged phospholipids and both activities were recovered from the phospholipid-antibody precipitate. Purified aPL antibodies inhibited the prothrombinase reaction in a plasma free system in which beta 2-glycoprotein 1 (beta 2-GP1) was absent. Affinity purified aPL antibodies had 25-50 times the inhibitory activity of immunoglobulin preparations. The phospholipid binding proteins, beta 2-GPI and placental anticoagulant protein I (PAP I), independently inhibited the prothrombinase reaction, and when these proteins were combined with aPL, inhibition of the prothrombinase reaction was additive. Antibodies of syphilis had no inhibitory effect, partially accounted for by lack of specificity for phosphotidylserine (PS). Although aPL antibodies inhibited the protein C activation reaction, there was no correlation of these activities with inhibition of the prothrombinase reaction. Together, these results show that aPL exert their effects by interaction with negatively charged phospholipids, in particular phosphotidylserine, but lack of correlation between inhibition of the prothrombinase and protein C activation reactions, suggests that the nature of the coagulation protein is also important. PMID:8902763

  2. The antineutrophil antibody in uveitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, D W

    1991-01-01

    Ninety eight patients with uveitis of various types were tested for the presence of the antineutrophil antibody or ANCA by an indirect immunofluorescence method. This antibody is found in patients with diseases associated with small vessel vasculitis, including Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyarteritis. Eleven true positive cases were found. A positive test was not associated with the anatomical site of the uveitis but was related to the time course of the disease. In particular ...

  3. Interfacial metal and antibody recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Tongqing; Hamer, Dean H.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Sattentau, Quentin J.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    The unique ligation properties of metal ions are widely exploited by proteins, with approximately one-third of all proteins estimated to be metalloproteins. Although antibodies use various mechanisms for recognition, to our knowledge, none has ever been characterized that uses an interfacial metal. We previously described a family of CD4-reactive antibodies, the archetype being Q425. CD4:Q425 engagement does not interfere with CD4:HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein binding, but it blocks subse...

  4. Pyoderma gangrenosum and anticardiolipin antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Godoy Jose Maria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is a rare ulceronecrotic inflammatory cutaneous disorder and is frequently associated with systemic diseases. The authors report a 22-year-old male patient with pyoderma gangrenosum, thrombosis of both popliteal arteries, ischemic stroke and seropositivity for anticardiolipin antibody. Despite intravenous treatment with antibiotics, corticosteroid and heparin, pyoderma gangrenosum caused necrosis of his right lower limb which resulted in amputation. It was concluded that the anticardiolipin antibody may have contributed to the gravity of this case.

  5. Antibodies to watch in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry's progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the "Antibodies to watch" series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration's Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

  6. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  7. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  8. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author)

  9. Radioimmunoguided surgery using monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential proficiency of radioimmunoguided surgery in the intraoperative detection of tumors was assessed using labeled monoclonal antibody B72.3 in 66 patients with tissue-proved tumor. Monoclonal antibody B72.3 was injected 5 to 42 days preoperatively, and the hand-held gamma-detecting probe was used intraoperatively to detect the presence of tumor. Intraoperative probe counts of less than 20 every 2 seconds, or tumor-to-adjacent normal tissue ratios less than 2:1 were considered negative (system failure). Positive probe counts were detected in 5 of 6 patients with primary colon cancer (83 percent), in 31 of 39 patients with recurrent colon cancer (79 percent), in 4 of 5 patients with gastric cancer (80 percent), in 3 of 8 patients with breast cancer (37.5 percent), and in 4 of 8 patients with ovarian cancer (50 percent) undergoing second-look procedures. Additional patients in each group were scored as borderline positive. Overall, radioimmunoguided surgery using B72.3 identified tumors in 47 patients (71.2 percent), bordered on positive in 6 patients (9.1 percent), and failed to identify tumor in 13 patients (19.7 percent). Improved selection of patients for antigen-positive tumors, the use of higher affinity second-generation antibodies, alternate routes of antibody administration, alternate radionuclides, and more sophisticatedly bioengineered antibodies and antibody combinations should all lead to improvements in radioimmunoguided surgery

  10. 7 CFR 1160.301 - Promotion, consumer education and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PROGRAM Fluid Milk Promotion Order Promotion, Consumer Education and Research § 1160.301 Promotion, consumer education and research. (a) The Board shall receive and evaluate, or on its own initiative develop... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Promotion, consumer education and research....

  11. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Immunization. The first step in preparing useful monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is to immunize an animal (Balb/c for example) with an appropriate antigen. Methods (only for soluble antigen): Solubilize selected antigen in Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.2-7.4, ideally at a final concentration per animal between 10 to 50 μg/ml. It is recommended that the antigen under consideration be incorporated into the emulsion adjuvants in 1:1 volumetric relation. We commonly use Frend's adjuvant (FA) to prepared immunized solution. The first immunization should be prepared with complete FA, and the another could be prepared with incomplete FA. It is recommended to inject mice with 0.2 ml intraperitoneal (ip) or subcutaneous (sc). Our experience suggests the sc route is the preferred route. A minimum protocol for immunizing mice to generate cells for preparing hybridomas is s follows: immunize sc on day 0, boost sc on day 21, take a trial bleeding on day 26; if antibody titters are satisfactory, boost ip on day 35 with antigen only, and remove the spleen to obtain cells for fusion on day 38. Fusion protocol. The myeloma cell line we are using is X63 Ag8.653. At the moment of fusion myeloma cells need a good viability (at least a 95%). 1. Remove the spleen cells from immunized mice using sterile conditions. An immune spleen should yield between 7 a 10x107 nucleated cells. 2. Place the spleen in 20 ml of serum-free RPMI 1640 in a Petri dish. Using a needle and syringe, inject the spleen with medium to distend and disrupt the spleen stroma and free the nucleated cells. 3. Flush the cell suspension with a Pasteur pipet to disperse clumps of cells. 4. Centrifuge the spleen cell suspension at 250g for 10 min. Resuspend the pellet in serum-free RPMI 1640. Determine cell concentration using Neuhabuer chamber. 5. Mix the myeloma cells and spleen cells in a conical 50-ml tube in serum-free RPMI 1640, 1 x107 spleen cells to 1x106 myeloma cells (ratio 10:1). Centrifuge

  12. The C-Terminal Domain of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 5 Promotes Start Codon Recognition by Its Dynamic Interplay with eIF1 and eIF2β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael E. Luna

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of the proper start codon on mRNAs is essential for protein synthesis, which requires scanning and involves eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs eIF1, eIF1A, eIF2, and eIF5. The carboxyl terminal domain (CTD of eIF5 stimulates 43S preinitiation complex (PIC assembly; however, its precise role in scanning and start codon selection has remained unknown. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, we identified the binding sites of eIF1 and eIF2β on eIF5-CTD and found that they partially overlapped. Mutating select eIF5 residues in the common interface specifically disrupts interaction with both factors. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that these eIF5-CTD mutations impair start codon recognition and impede eIF1 release from the PIC by abrogating eIF5-CTD binding to eIF2β. This study provides mechanistic insight into the role of eIF5-CTD's dynamic interplay with eIF1 and eIF2β in switching PICs from an open to a closed state at start codons.

  13. The Tri-Agency Climate Education (TrACE) Catalog: Promoting collaboration, effective practice, and a robust portfolio by sharing educational resources developed across NASA, NOAA & NSF climate education initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, C.; Martin, A.; Givens, S. M.; Yue, S.; Wilson, C. E.; Karsten, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Tri-Agency Climate Education (TrACE) Catalog is an online, interactive, searchable and browsable web product driven by a database backend. TrACE was developed for and by the community of educators, scientists, and Federal agency representatives involved in a tri-agency collaboration for climate education. NASA, NOAA, and NSF are working together to strategically coordinate and support a portfolio of projects focused on climate literacy and education in formal and informal learning environments. The activities of the tri-agency collaboration, including annual meetings for principal investigators and the ongoing development of a nascent common evaluation framework, have created a strong national network for effectively engaging diverse audiences with the principles of climate literacy (see Eos Vol. 92, No. 24, 14 June 2011). TrACE is a tool for the climate education community that promotes the goals of the tri-agency collaboration to leverage existing resources, minimize duplicate efforts, and facilitate communication among this emergent community of scientists and educators. TrACE was born as "The Matrix," a product of the 2011 Second Annual NASA, NOAA and NSF Climate Change Education Principal Investigators Meeting (see McDougall, Wilson, Martin & Knippenberg, 2011, Abstract ED21B-0583 presented at 2011 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, CA.) Meeting attendees were asked to populate a pen-and-paper matrix with all of the activities or deliverables they had created or anticipated creating as part of their NOAA/NASA/NSF-funded project. During the 2012 Third Annual Tri-Agency PI Meeting, projects were given the opportunity to add and update their products and deliverables. In the intervening year, the dataset comprising the Matrix was converted to a MySQL database, with a standardized taxonomy and minimum criteria for inclusion, and further developed into the interactive TrACE Catalog. In the fall of 2012, the TrACE Catalog web product will be made publicly

  14. Production of recombinant antibodies using bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Shukra, A. M.; Sridevi, N. V.; Dev Chandran,; Kapil Maithal,

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant antibody fragments such as Fab, scFv, diabodies, triabodies, single domain antibodies and minibodies have recently emerged as potential alternatives to monoclonal antibodies, which can be engineered using phage display technology. These antibodies match the strengths of conventionally produced monoclonal antibodies and offer advantages for the development of immunodiagnostic kits and assays. These fragments not only retain the specificity of the whole monoclonal ...

  15. Rapid optimization and prototyping for therapeutic antibody-like molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lihui; Kohli, Neeraj; Rennard, Rachel; Jiao, Yang; Razlog, Maja; Zhang, Kathy; Baum, Jason; Johnson, Bryan; Tang, Jian; Schoeberl, Birgit; Fitzgerald, Jonathan; Nielsen, Ulrik; Lugovskoy, Alexey A

    2013-01-01

    Multispecific antibody-like molecules have the potential to advance the standard-of-care in many human diseases. The design of therapeutic molecules in this class, however, has proven to be difficult and, despite significant successes in preclinical research, only one trivalent antibody, catumaxomab, has demonstrated clinical utility. The challenge originates from the complexity of the design space where multiple parameters such as affinity, avidity, effector functions, and pharmaceutical properties need to be engineered in concurrent fashion to achieve the desired therapeutic efficacy. Here, we present a rapid prototyping approach that allows us to successfully optimize these parameters within one campaign cycle that includes modular design, yeast display of structure focused antibody libraries and high throughput biophysical profiling. We delineate this approach by presenting a design case study of MM-141, a tetravalent bispecific antibody targeting two compensatory signaling growth factor receptors: insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and v-erb-b2 erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 3 (ErbB3). A MM-141 proof-of-concept (POC) parent molecule did not meet initial design criteria due to modest bioactivity and poor stability properties. Using a combination of yeast display, structured-guided antibody design and library-scale thermal challenge assay, we discovered a diverse set of stable and active anti-IGF-1R and anti-ErbB3 single-chain variable fragments (scFvs). These optimized modules were reformatted to create a diverse set of full-length tetravalent bispecific antibodies. These re-engineered molecules achieved complete blockade of growth factor induced pro-survival signaling, were stable in serum, and had adequate activity and pharmaceutical properties for clinical development. We believe this approach can be readily applied to the optimization of other classes of bispecific or even multispecific antibody-like molecules. PMID:23392215

  16. How can a multilevel promotion of breastfeeding reduce the required budget for rotavirus vaccination in Indonesia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakiyah, N.; Suwantika, A.A.; Postma, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Breast milk is considered to give protection against rotavirus infection since it contains anti-rotavirus maternal antibodies and other nonspecific inhibitors. Multilevel promotion of breastfeeding is a complex intervention that modifies behavioral determinants through multiple levels of

  17. Reference ranges and cutoff levels of pneumococcal antibody global serum assays (IgG and IgG2) and specific antibodies in healthy children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, M A; Buess, J; Ventur, Y; Zielen, S; Herrmann, E; Schulze, J; Schubert, R

    2013-08-01

    Pneumococcal antibodies represent the acquisition of natural immunity. Determination of pneumococcal antibodies is an important screening tool for immunodeficiencies. Our study generated reference ranges and cutoff levels for pneumococcal antibody global serum assays correlated to a specific pneumococcal antibody ELISA. Specific pneumococcal antibody levels were measured from 457 children undergoing elective surgery and 46 healthy adult volunteers (88 with previous pneumococcal immunization from both groups), 22 severe immunodeficient subjects with ataxia telangiectasia (A-T, negative controls), and age-matched 36 healthy allergic asthmatics. We determined a representative panel of serotype-specific pneumococcal antibodies (serotype 4, 5, 6B, 7F, 14, 18C, 19F, 23F) by ELISA and global pneumococcal IgG and IgG2 antibodies by EIA. In vaccine-naïve healthy subjects, initial pneumococcal IgG geometric mean concentrations of 13.1 μg/ml were low in the first year of life and increased over the time, reaching adult levels (70.5 μg/ml) at age 8-12 years. In parallel, IgG2 antibodies increased from 20.7 % (0.5-1 year old) to adult proportions (>30 %) in preschoolers. Correlation between the pneumococcal IgG screening assay and specific pneumococcal antibody levels was acceptable (Pearson's coefficient r = 0.4455; p = 0.001). Cutoff levels showed high sensitivity, whereas specificity was high to moderate calculated from correlations with the specific ELISA. We provide reference ranges and cutoff levels for the interpretation of specific antibody determinations in the clinical setting. The global pneumococcal IgG/IgG2 assay is a suitable screening tool and correlates with the ELISA serotype-specific pneumococcal antibodies. However, results below our cutoff values should be re-evaluated by serotype-specific ELISA testing. PMID:23529214

  18. Antibody-Directed Phototherapy (ADP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adil Butt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically-approved but rather under-exploited treatment modality for cancer and pre-cancerous superficial lesions. It utilises a cold laser or LED to activate a photochemical reaction between a light activated drug (photosensitiser-drug and oxygen to generate cytotoxic oxygen species. These free radical species damage cellular components leading to cell death. Despite its benefits, the complexity, limited potency and side effects of PDT have led to poor general usage. However, the research area is very active with an increasing understanding of PDT-related cell biology, photophysics and significant progress in molecular targeting of disease. Monoclonal antibody therapy is maturing and the next wave of antibody therapies includes antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs, which promise to be more potent and curable. These developments could lift antibody-directed phototherapy (ADP to success. ADP promises to increase specificity and potency and improve drug pharmacokinetics, thus delivering better PDT drugs whilst retaining its other benefits. Whole antibody conjugates with first generation ADP-drugs displayed problems with aggregation, poor pharmacokinetics and loss of immuno-reactivity. However, these early ADP-drugs still showed improved selectivity and potency. Improved PS-drug chemistry and a variety of conjugation strategies have led to improved ADP-drugs with retained antibody and PS-drug function. More recently, recombinant antibody fragments have been used to deliver ADP-drugs with superior drug loading, more favourable pharmacokinetics, enhanced potency and target cell selectivity. These improvements offer a promise of better quality PDT drugs.

  19. Ionizing radiation in tumor promotion and progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic exposure to beta radiation has been tested as a tumor promoting or progressing agent. The dorsal skins of groups of 25 female SENCAR mice were chemically initiated with a single exposure to DMBA, and chronic exposure to strontium-90/yttrium-90 beta radiation was tested as a stage 1, stage 2 or complete skin tumor promoter. Exposure of initiated mice to 0.5 gray twice a week for 13 weeks produced no papillomas, indicating no action as a complete promoter. Another similar group of animals was chemically promoted through stage 1 (with TPA) followed by 0.5 gray of beta radiation twice a week for 13 weeks. Again no papillomas developed indicating no action of chronic radiation as a stage 2 tumor promoter. The same radiation exposure protocol in another DMBA initiated group receiving both stage 1 and 2 chemical promotion resulted in a decrease in papilloma frequency, compared to the control group receiving no beta irradiation, indicating a tumor preventing effect of radiation at stage 2 promotion, probably by killing initiated cells. Chronic beta radiation was tested three different ways as a stage 1 tumor promoter. When compared to the appropriate control, beta radiation given after initiation as a stage 1 promoter (0.5 gray twice a week for 13 weeks), after initiation and along with a known stage 1 chemical promoter (1.0 gray twice a week for 2 weeks), or prior to initiation as a stage 1 promoter (0.5 gray twice a week for 4 weeks), each time showed a weak (∼ 15% stimulation) but statistically significant (p<0.01) ability to act as a stage 1 promoter. When tested as a tumor progressing agent delivered to pre-existing papillomas, beta radiation (0.5 gray twice a week for 13 weeks) increased carcinoma frequency from 0.52 to 0.68 carcinoma/animal, but this increase was not statistically significant at the 95% confidence level. We conclude that in the addition to the known initiating, progressing and complete carcinogenic action of acute exposures to ionizing

  20. Intratumoral delivery of CpG-conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody enhances NK cell anti-tumor activity

    OpenAIRE

    Schettini, Jorge; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Besmer, Dahlia M; Tinder, Teresa L; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Lustgarten, Joseph; Gendler, Sandra J.; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against tumor-associated antigens are useful anticancer agents. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is one of the major mechanisms responsible for initiating natural killer cell (NK)-mediated killing of tumors. However, the regulation of ADCC via NK cells is poorly understood. We have investigated the cytolytic activity of NK cells against pancreatic cancer cells that were coated with an antibody directed against the human tumor antigen, Mucin-1 design...

  1. Antibodies to watch in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, are projected to gain first approvals in 2016. Commercial late-stage antibody therapeutics development exceeded expectations by increasing from 39 candidates in Phase 3 studies as of late 2014 to 53 as of late 2015. Of the 53 candidates, transitions to regulatory review by the end of 2016 are projected for 8 (atezolizumab, benralizumab, bimagrumab, durvalumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, lebrikizumab, ocrelizumab, tremelimumab). Other "antibodies to watch" include 15 candidates (bavituximab, bococizumab, dupilumab, fasinumab, fulranumab, gevokizumab, guselkumab, ibalizumab, LY2951742, onartuzumab, REGN2222, roledumab, romosozumab, sirukumab, Xilonix) undergoing evaluation in Phase 3 studies that have estimated primary completion dates in 2016. As evidenced by the antibody therapeutics discussed in this perspective, the biopharmaceutical industry has a highly active late-stage clinical pipeline that may deliver numerous new products to the global market in the near future. *See Note added in proof for updates through December 31, 2015. PMID:26651519

  2. Corynebacterium glutamicum promoters: a practical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Pátek, M. (Miroslav); Holátko, J. (Jiří); Busche, T.; Kalinowski, J; Nešvera, J. (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    Summary Transcription initiation is the key step in gene expression in bacteria, and it is therefore studied for both theoretical and practical reasons. Promoters, the traffic lights of transcription initiation, are used as construction elements in biotechnological efforts to coordinate ‘green waves’ in the metabolic pathways leading to the desired metabolites. Detailed analyses of Corynebacterium glutamicum promoters have already provided large amounts of data on their structures, regulatory...

  3. Promoter hypomethylation regulates CD133 expression in human gliomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kouichi Tabu; Ken Sasai; Taichi Kimura; Lei Wang; Eiko Aoyanagi; Shinji Kohsaka; Mishie Tanino; Hiroshi Nishihara; Shinya Tanaka

    2008-01-01

    Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) have been enriched using antibodies against the cell surface protein CD133;however,the biological relevance and the regulatory mechanism of CD133 expression in human gliomas are not yet understood.In this study,we initially demonstrated that CD133 was overexpressed in high-grade human glioblastomas where CD133-positive cells were focally observed as a micro-cluster.In addition,CD133 transcripts with exon 1A,1B,or 1C were predominantly expressed in glioblastomas.To elucidate the mechanism regulating this aberrant expression of CD133,three proximal promoters (P1,P2,and P3) containing a CpG island were isolated.In U251MG and T98Gglioblastoma cells,the P1 region flanking exon 1A exhibited the highest activity among the three promoters,and this activity was significantly inactivated by in vitro methylation.After treatment with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine and/or the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid,the expression level of CD133 mRNA was significantly restored in glioma cells.Importantly,hypomethylation of CpG sites within the P1,P2,and P3 regions was observed by bisulfite sequencing in human glioblastoma tissues with abundant CD133 mRNA.Taken together,our results indicate that DNA hypomethylation is an important determinant of CD133 expression in glioblastomas,and this epigenetic event may be associated with the development of BTICs expressing CD133.

  4. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  5. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies. PMID:26210205

  6. Antisperm antibodies and in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, H J; Bastiaans, B A; Goverde, H J; Hollanders, H M; Wetzels, A A; Schellekens, L A

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of antisperm antibodies in the male, the female, or both partners on the outcome of in vitro fertilization treatment. The results in terms of ongoing pregnancies in the male and female antibody-positive group were the same as in the antibody-negative group. In the double antibody-positive group two of the three patients became pregnant. When high levels of antisperm antibodies were present on the spermatozoa, the fertilization rate was significantly reduced. In the female positive group no clear relationship between the antibody titer and the fertilization percentage could be detected. Abnormal semen quality was responsible for a much lower fertilization rate than the presence of antibodies. The conclusion of this study is that in vitro fertilization provides an equal change of conception in couples with antisperm antibodies in comparison with couples with no antibodies if the other semen parameters are normal. PMID:1472812

  7. End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Quality Initiative promotes ongoing CMS strategies to improve the quality of care provided to ESRD patients. This initiative...

  8. Remembering antibodies coming of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchers, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Norbert Hilschmann discovered that antibodies have variable immunoglobulin domains to bind antigens, and constant domains to carry out effector functions in the immune system. Just as this happened, the author of this perspective entered the field of immunology. Ten years later, the genetic basis of antibody variability was discovered by Susumu Tonegawa and his colleagues at the Basel Institute for Immunology, where the author had become a scientific member. At the same time, Georges Köhler, a former graduate student of the author's at the Basel Institute, invented with Cesar Milstein at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, the method to produce monoclonal antibodies. The author describes here his memories connected to these three monumental, paradigm-changing discoveries, which he observed in close proximity. PMID:27144253

  9. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  10. An atypical presentation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti D′Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS though common, are extremely diverse and it is important to know which dermatological finding should prompt consideration of antiphospholipid syndrome. The cutaneous manifestations of APS vary from livedo reticularis to cutaneous necrosis, and systemic involvement is invariably an accomplice in APS. Cutaneous ulcers with sharp margins can be seen in APS and they are usually seen on the legs. This case had an atypical presentation, as the initial presentation was painful necrotic ulcers over the legs, which resembled pyoderma gangrenosum and she had no systemic manifestations. There was no history of any arterial or venous thrombosis or any abortions. Antiphospholipid syndrome can be tricky to diagnose when cutaneous lesions are atypical. Nonetheless, it is very important to pin down this syndrome early due to its systemic complications.

  11. Antibody Response to Pneumocystis jirovecii

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Kieran R.; Huang, Laurence; Morris, Alison; Koch, Judy; Crothers, Kristina; Levin, Linda; Eiser, Shary; Satwah, Supriya; Zucchi, Patrizia; Walzer, Peter D.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a prospective pilot study of the serologic responses to overlapping recombinant fragments of the Pneumocystis jirovecii major surface glycoprotein (Msg) in HIV-infected patients with pneumonia due to P. jirovecii and other causes. Similar baseline geometric mean antibody levels to the fragments measured by an ELISA were found in both groups. Serum antibodies to MsgC in P. jirovecii patients rose to a peak level 3–4 weeks (p50 cells/μL and first episode of pneumocystosis were the ...

  12. Radioimmunotherapy with engineered antibody fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors have developed and begun evaluating radiometal-chelated (213Bi) engineered antibody fragments as radioimmunotherapy agents that target the HER2/neu (c-erbB-2) antigen. The diabody format was found to have 40-fold greater affinity for HER2/neu and to be associated with significantly greater tumor localization than is achieved with scFv molecule. It is shown that short-lived isotopes like 213Bi would be most effective when used in conjunction with antibodies that targeted diffuse malignancies (leukemia or lymphoma) or when used for very rapid pretargeted radioimmunotherapy application in which the radioisotope is conjugated to a very small ligand

  13. Antibody sensed protein surface conformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R. Schricker

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An antibody-modified atomic force microscope (AFM tip was used to detect conformational changes of fibronectin deposited on a poly(methyl methacrylate/poly(acrylic acid block copolymer compared to PMMA and a random poly(methyl methacrylate/poly(acrylic acid copolymer with an identical chemical composition. Based on the antibody-protein adhesive force maps and phase imaging, it was found that the nanomorphology of the triblock copolymer induces the desired conformation of fibronectin. This finding demonstrates that block copolymer nanomorphology can be used to regulate protein conformation and potentially cellular response.

  14. Nuclear energy research initiative (NERI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives of the nuclear energy research initiative are: to address and help to overcome the principal technical and scientific obstacles to expand the use of nuclear energy in the US; advance the state of nuclear technology to maintain a competitive position in the overseas markets and a future domestic market; promote and maintain nuclear science and engineering; and to improve the performance, efficiency, reliability, economics and other attributes to enhance nuclear energy application

  15. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  16. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  17. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  18. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  19. Developing a promotional strategy: important questions for social marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L; Hanson, Carl L

    2007-10-01

    Health practitioners often use the terms marketing and promotion interchangeably. Yet, promotion is just one element of an overall marketing strategy. To realize the greatest impact there must be a combination of all the marketing components, including product, price, place, and promotion. The purpose of this article is to clarify the role of promotion and describe key elements of developing a promotional strategy within the broader context of a social marketing initiative. PMID:17982003

  20. Optimizing selection of large animals for antibody production by screening immune response to standard vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mary K; Fridy, Peter C; Keegan, Sarah; Chait, Brian T; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies made in large animals are integral to many biomedical research endeavors. Domesticated herd animals like goats, sheep, donkeys, horses and camelids all offer distinct advantages in antibody production. However, their cost of use is often prohibitive, especially where poor antigen response is commonplace; choosing a non-responsive animal can set a research program back or even prevent experiments from moving forward entirely. Over the course of production of antibodies from llamas, we found that some animals consistently produced a higher humoral antibody response than others, even to highly divergent antigens, as well as to their standard vaccines. Based on our initial data, we propose that these "high level responders" could be pre-selected by checking antibody titers against common vaccines given to domestic farm animals. Thus, time and money can be saved by reducing the chances of getting poor responding animals and minimizing the use of superfluous animals. PMID:26775851

  1. Development of an EGFRvIII specific recombinant antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gordon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EGF receptor variant III (EGFRvIII is the most common variant of the EGF receptor observed in human tumors. It results from the in frame deletion of exons 2-7 and the generation of a novel glycine residue at the junction of exons 1 and 8. This novel juxtaposition of amino acids within the extra-cellular domain of the EGF receptor creates a tumor specific and immunogenic epitope. EGFRvIII expression has been seen in many tumor types including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, breast adenocarcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer, but has been rarely observed in normal tissue. Because this variant is tumor specific and highly immunogenic, it can be used for both a diagnostic marker as well as a target for immunotherapy. Unfortunately many of the monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against EGFRvIII have cross reactivity to wild type EGFR or other non-specific proteins. Furthermore, a monoclonal antibody to EGFRvIII is not readily available to the scientific community. Results In this study, we have developed a recombinant antibody that is specific for EGFRvIII, has little cross reactivity for the wild type receptor, and which can be easily produced. We initially designed a recombinant antibody with two anti-EGFRvIII single chain Fv's linked together and a human IgG1 Fc component. To enhance the specificity of this antibody for EGFRvIII, we mutated tyrosine H59 of the CDRH2 domain and tyrosine H105 of the CDRH3 domain to phenylalanine for both the anti-EGFRvIII sequence inserts. This mutated recombinant antibody, called RAbDMvIII, specifically detects EGFRvIII expression in EGFRvIII expressing cell lines as well as in EGFRvIII expressing GBM primary tissue by western blot, immunohistochemistry (IHC and immunofluorescence (IF and FACS analysis. It does not recognize wild type EGFR in any of these assays. The affinity of this antibody for EGFRvIII peptide is 1.7 × 107 M-1 as

  2. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    OpenAIRE

    Schoot, van der, B.H.; Vidarsson, G.; Kapur, R.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Diagnostically, for HDFN laboratory tests are in place in order to predict risk for severe fetal RBC destruction and thereby initiate appropriate treatments. This test is sensitive, but has relativel...

  3. Aortitis with antiphospholipid antibodies: CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of aortitis associated with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APAs) are reported. Only CT and MR imaging were able to show these unusual form of aortitis preferentially affecting the outer aortic tunics. We conclude that aortitis could be a new manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and the initial pathological process before the development of aortic thrombosis, reported as a classical complication of APS. (orig.) (orig.)

  4. Aortitis with antiphospholipid antibodies: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seror, O.; Dordea, M.; Ghenassia, C.; Coderc, E.; Sellier, N. [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Paris XIII, Bondy (France); Fain, O. [Department of Medicine, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Paris XIII, Bondy (France)

    1998-10-01

    Two cases of aortitis associated with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APAs) are reported. Only CT and MR imaging were able to show these unusual form of aortitis preferentially affecting the outer aortic tunics. We conclude that aortitis could be a new manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and the initial pathological process before the development of aortic thrombosis, reported as a classical complication of APS. (orig.) (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  5. Polymerase chain reaction facilitates the cloning, CDR-grafting, and rapid expression of a murine monoclonal antibody directed against the CD18 component of leukocyte integrins.

    OpenAIRE

    Daugherty, B L; DeMartino, J A; Law, M F; Kawka, D W; Singer, I I; Mark, G E

    1991-01-01

    Two novel approaches of recombinant PCR technology were employed to graft the complementarity determining regions from a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) onto human antibody frameworks. One approach relied on the availability of cloned human variable region templates, whereas the other strategy was dependent only on human variable region protein sequence data. The transient expression of recombinant humanized antibody was driven by the adenovirus major late promoter and was detected 48 hrs po...

  6. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    better understand the underlying mechanisms of antibody-antigen interaction here we present a pipeline developed by us to structurally classify immunoglobulin antigen binding sites and to infer key sequence residues and other variables that have a prominent role in each structural class....

  7. Monoclonal antibody against human ovarian tumor-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies (OV-TL 3) were raised against human ovarian tumor-associated antigens for diagnostic purposes. A cloned hybridoma cell line was obtained by fusion of murine myeloma cells with spleen lymphocytes from BALB/c mice immunized with a tumor cell suspension prepared from an ovarian endometrioid carcinoma. The antibodies were initially screened for their ability to bind on frozen sections of human ovarian carcinoma tissue and a negative reaction on gastric carcinoma tissue by indirect immunofluorescence. The reactivity of the selected OV-TL 3 clone (IgG1 subclass) was studied on normal and neoplastic tissues as well as on a cell line derived from the original tumor cell suspension used for immunization. OV-TL 3 antibodies stained frozen sections of human ovarian carcinomas of the following histological types: serous, mucinous, endometrioid, and clear cell. No reaction was found with breast cancers or other nongynecological tumors. No differences in staining pattern were observed between primary and metastatic ovarian carcinomas. OV-TL 3 antibodies brightly stained ovarian carcinoma cell clusters in ascitic fluids and left unstained mesothelial cells and peripheral blood cells. The OV-TL 3-defined antigen also remained strongly expressed on a cell line derived from the endometrioid ovarian carcinoma originally used for generation of OV-TL 3 clone. Reactivity was weak and irregular in a few ovarian cysts, while traces of fluorescence were sometimes detected in epithelial cells lining the female genital tract. In only 3 specimens of 15 endometrium carcinomas was weak focal reactivity with OV-TL 3 antibodies observed. The results of the immunofluorescence study were confirmed by the more sensitive avidin-biotin method and by 125I-labeled OV-TL 3 antibodies

  8. A STUDY OF IRREGULAR ANTIBODIES IN 200 MULTI - TRANSFUSED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh P

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alloimmunization is one of the major concern in the management of patients who required repeated blood transfusion as a lifesaving treatment . The knowledge of incidence of such alloantibodies is essential for selecting appropriate red blood cells for transfusion . AIMS: This study was carried out to get the frequency and type of unexpected red cell antibodies in the multi - transfused patient at a tertiary level government hospital in South Gujarat . MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective study was carried out in 200 patients who required multiple blood transfusions . The antibody screening was done with 3 & 11 commercial cell screening & identification panel by column agglutination technique (Matrix Gel System & Matrix Erygen AS - ID, Tulip Diagnostics, India at saline & anti - human globulin phase . RESULTS: The overall prevalence of alloimmunization was 7 . 0% . The majority of these had a single alloantibody (11 cases, 84 . 62% whereas the remaining 2 cases (15 . 38% had multiple antibodies . The anti - c and anti - D antibodies comprised the most common alloantibody (27 % each both followed by, anti - N (20%, anti - C (13%, anti - e & anti - M (7% antibodies . Gender & number of blood units were found to be risk factors of alloimmunization in transfused patients . In our study we found females (79% are more prone to alloimmunization . Those who were transfused more than 2 units have higher frequency of alloimmunization . The highest incidence of alloimmunization was observed in obstetrics and sickle cell patients . CONCLUSIONS: The majority of alloantibodies detected in the current study were clinically significant and of mainly belonging to Rh blood group system . Thus pre - transfusion antibody screening on patients’ samples prior to cross - match needs to be initiated in India and we can at - least provide corresponding Rh antigen negative blood to ensure safe transfusion practice

  9. Roles of antibody and complement in the bactericidal activity of mouse peritoneal exudate neutrophils.

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, P. H.; Spencer, L. K.; Hill, N L; McDonald, P J; Finlay-Jones, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of complement and antibody to phagocytosis and, as a separate process, intracellular killing of Proteus mirabilis, were investigated using mouse peritoneal exudate neutrophils. Phagocytosis of P. mirabilis was promoted by both immune mouse (IMS) and normal mouse (NMS) sera. Opsonization by IMS promoted significantly greater phagocytosis than did NMS, as did NMS compared with heated IMS (HIMS). The ability of NMS to opsonize P. mirabilis for both phagocytosis and phagocytic k...

  10. Alternative affinity tools: more attractive than antibodies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, V.J.B.; Levisson, M.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Smidt, H.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies are the most successful affinity tools used today, in both fundamental and applied research (diagnostics, purification and therapeutics). Nonetheless, antibodies do have their limitations, including high production costs and low stability. Alternative affinity tools based on nucleic acids

  11. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  12. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23149338

  13. Promoter architectures and developmental gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberle, Vanja; Lenhard, Boris

    2016-09-01

    Core promoters are minimal regions sufficient to direct accurate initiation of transcription and are crucial for regulation of gene expression. They are highly diverse in terms of associated core promoter motifs, underlying sequence composition and patterns of transcription initiation. Distinctive features of promoters are also seen at the chromatin level, including nucleosome positioning patterns and presence of specific histone modifications. Recent advances in identifying and characterizing promoters using next-generation sequencing-based technologies have provided the basis for their classification into functional groups and have shed light on their modes of regulation, with important implications for transcriptional regulation in development. This review discusses the methodology and the results of genome-wide studies that provided insight into the diversity of RNA polymerase II promoter architectures in vertebrates and other Metazoa, and the association of these architectures with distinct modes of regulation in embryonic development and differentiation. PMID:26783721

  14. Collagen density promotes mammary tumor initiation and progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knittel Justin G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammographically dense breast tissue is one of the greatest risk factors for developing breast carcinoma. Despite the strong clinical correlation, breast density has not been causally linked to tumorigenesis, largely because no animal model has existed for studying breast tissue density. Importantly, regions of high breast density are associated with increased stromal collagen. Thus, the influence of the extracellular matrix on breast carcinoma development and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. Methods To study the effects of collagen density on mammary tumor formation and progression, we utilized a bi-transgenic tumor model with increased stromal collagen in mouse mammary tissue. Imaging of the tumors and tumor-stromal interface in live tumor tissue was performed with multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy to generate multiphoton excitation and spectrally resolved fluorescent lifetimes of endogenous fluorophores. Second harmonic generation was utilized to image stromal collagen. Results Herein we demonstrate that increased stromal collagen in mouse mammary tissue significantly increases tumor formation approximately three-fold (p p Conclusion This study provides the first data causally linking increased stromal collagen to mammary tumor formation and metastasis, and demonstrates that fundamental differences arise and persist in epithelial tumor cells that progressed within collagen-dense microenvironments. Furthermore, the imaging techniques and signature identified in this work may provide useful diagnostic tools to rapidly assess fresh tissue biopsies.

  15. Promoting Patient Safety: Results of a TeamSTEPPS® Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Teresa; Short, Nancy; Ralyea, Christina; Casterline, Gayle

    2016-04-01

    Teamwork is an essential component of communication in a safety-oriented culture. The Joint Commission has identified poor communication as one of the leading causes of patient sentinel events. The aim of this quality improvement project was to design, implement, and evaluate a customized TeamSTEPPS® training program. After implementation, staff perception of teamwork and communication improved. The data support that TeamSTEPPS is a practical, effective, and low-cost patient safety endeavor. PMID:27011154

  16. Student initiative: A conceptual analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovina Nada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the description and scientific consideration of the attitude of children and youth towards their education and development, the concept of student initiative has been gaining ground lately, and it is hence the subject of analysis in this paper. The analysis is important because of the discrepancy between the increased efforts of the key educational policy holders to promote the idea about the importance of the development of student initiative and rare acceptance of this idea among theoreticians, researchers and practitioners dealing with the education and development of children and youth. By concretising the features of initiative student behaviour, our aim was, on the one hand, to observe the structural determinants and scientific status of the very concept of an initiative student, and, on the other, to contribute to the understanding of the initiative behaviour in practice. In the first part of the paper we deal with different notions and concretisations of the features of initiative behaviour of children and youth, which includes the consideration of: basic student initiative, academic student initiative, individual student initiative, the capacity for initiative and personal development initiative. In the second part of the paper, we discuss the relations of the concept of student initiative with the similar general concepts (activity/passivity, proactivity, agency and the concepts immediately related to school environment (student involvement, student participation. The results of our analysis indicate that the concept of student initiative has: particular features that differentiate it from similar concepts; the potential to reach the status of a scientific concept, bearing in mind the initial empirical specifications and general empirical verifiability of the yet unverified determinants of the concept. In the concluding part of the paper, we discuss the implications of the conceptual analysis for further research, as well as for

  17. Virus Strain Discrimination Using Recombinant Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Boonham, N.; Barker, I.

    2002-01-01

    Most routine testing for plant viruses is currently carried out using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Traditional methods of antibody production however can be time consuming and require the use of expensive cell culture facilities. Recombinant antibody technology however is starting to make an impact in this area, enabling the selection of antibody fragments in a few weeks compared with the many months associated with traditional methods and requires only basic microbiological faciliti...

  18. DNA signals at isoform promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional heterogeneity is extensive in the genome, and most genes express variable transcript isoforms. However, whether variable transcript isoforms of one gene are regulated by common promoter elements remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isoform promoters of one gene have separated DNA signals for transcription and translation initiation. We found that TATA box and nucleosome-disfavored DNA sequences are prevalent in distinct transcript isoform promoters of one gene. These DNA signals are conserved among species. Transcript isoform has a RNA-determined unstructured region around its start site. We found that these DNA/RNA features facilitate isoform transcription and translation. These results suggest a DNA-encoded mechanism by which transcript isoform is generated. PMID:27353836

  19. Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines Overcome Splenic Dependency of Antibody Response to Pneumococcal Polysaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Breukels, Mijke A.; Zandvoort, Andre; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P. J. M.; van den Muijsenberg, Adrie; Lodewijk, Monique E.; Beurret, Michel; Pieter A Klok; Timens, Wim; Rijkers, Ger T.

    2001-01-01

    Protection against infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae depends on the presence of antibodies against capsular polysaccharides that facilitate phagocytosis. Asplenic patients are at increased risk for pneumococcal infections, since both phagocytosis and the initiation of the antibody response to polysaccharides take place in the spleen. Therefore, vaccination with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines is recommended prior to splenectomy, which, as in the case of trauma, is not always feasi...

  20. Differences in the composition of the human antibody repertoire by B cell subsets in the blood

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Szymanska eMroczek; Ippolito, Gregory C.; Tobias eRogosch; Kam Hon eHoi; Tracy A Hwangpo; Marsha G Brand; Yingxin eZhuang; Cun Ren eLiu; Schneider, David A; Michael eZemlin; Brown, Elizabeth E.; George eGeorgiou; Schroeder, Harry W.

    2014-01-01

    The vast initial diversity of the antibody repertoire is generated centrally by means of a complex series of V (D) J gene rearrangement events, variation in the site of gene segment joining, and TdT catalyzed N- region addition. Although the diversity is great, close inspection has revealed distinct and unique characteristics in the antibody repertoires expressed by different B cell developmental subsets. In order to illustrate our approach to repertoire analysis, we present an in-depth com...

  1. Differences in the Composition of the Human Antibody Repertoire by B Cell Subsets in the Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Mroczek, Eva Szymanska; Ippolito, Gregory C.; Rogosch, Tobias; Hoi, Kam Hon; Tracy A Hwangpo; Marsha G Brand; Zhuang, Yingxin; Liu, Cun Ren; Schneider, David A; Zemlin, Michael; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Georgiou, George; Schroeder, Harry W.

    2014-01-01

    The vast initial diversity of the antibody repertoire is generated centrally by means of a complex series of V(D)J gene rearrangement events, variation in the site of gene segment joining, and TdT catalyzed N-region addition. Although the diversity is great, close inspection has revealed distinct and unique characteristics in the antibody repertoires expressed by different B cell developmental subsets. In order to illustrate our approach to repertoire analysis, we present an in-depth comparis...

  2. Immunization with synthetic peptides containing epitopes of the class 1 outer-membrane protein of Neisseria meningitidis: production of bactericidal antibodies on immunization with a cyclic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulides, M; McGuinness, B T; Heckels, J E

    1993-08-01

    The class 1 outer-membrane protein of Neisseria meningitidis is the target for subtype-specific, bactericidal monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The epitopes recognized by these antibodies have been mapped previously to linear peptides corresponding to the sequences thought to be exposed at the apices of surface-exposed loops of the protein. In this work several synthetic peptides containing the subtype Pl.16b epitope have been synthetized with the aim of inducing a polyclonal immune response resembling the reactivity of the mAbs. Initially, peptides of 9 and 15 amino acid residues were synthesized and used for immunization after coupling to a carrier protein. The reactivity of the resulting antisera, with synthetic linear decapeptides, resembled that seen in previous epitope mapping experiments with the protective mAbs. However, despite the induction of antibodies having the desired specificity, the antisera reacted poorly with the native protein in outer membranes, and were non-bactericidal. A 36mer peptide, consisting of the entire surface-exposed loop 4 of the class 1 protein was then synthesized and used for immunization as (i) free peptide, (ii) peptide coupled to carrier and (iii) peptide subjected to cyclization, in an attempt to restrict it to conformations that might more closely resemble the native loop structure. In contrast to antisera raised against linear peptides, antibodies raised by immunization with the 36mer cyclic peptide, did not react with linear peptides recognized by the mAbs, but instead appeared to recognize conformational determinants. This antiserum promoted complement-mediated bactericidal killing of the homologous meningococcal strain, demonstrating the potential of synthetic peptide immunogens for inducing a protective immune response against group B meningococci. PMID:7691983

  3. Anti-natrium/iodide symporter antibodies and other anti-thyroid antibodies in children with Turner's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharska, Anna M; Czarnocka, Barbara; Demkow, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies against the Na/I symporter (anti-NIS ab) have been found in adult patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases. As easily available for the immune system, NIS can play a role in the initial stage of autoimmune thyroid diseases. Children with Turner's syndrome (TS) being at high risk of autoimmune thyroid disease development seem a valuable group for the investigation of the early autoimmune process. The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of anti-NIS ab and its potential clinical significance in TS children. Fifty four girls with TS were examined (age 11.9 ± 2.46 years), and 23 healthy girls with normal thyroid function, free of autoimmune diseases. Anti-NIS antibodies were measured by the in-house ELISA method and the Western blotting. Sera considered positive for anti-NIS ab were used for the iodide uptake bioassay using COS7 cells stably transfected with hNIS. In all patients the thyroid function, antithyroid antibodies presence and thyroid ultrasonography were evaluated. In 20% of the patients a subclinical hypothyroidism was diagnosed and 70.4% had antithyroid antibodies (anti-TPO - 64.8% and Anti-Tg - 24%). Anti-NISab were present in 14.8% girls with TS and in none of the control group. Their presence was unrelated to other antithyroid antibodies titre or patients' age. A positive correlation between the anti-NIS ab presence and the hypothyroidism was found (p < 0.04). Anti-NIS ab-positive sera did not suppress iodine uptake. In conclusion, anti-NIS antibodies were present in 14.8% of children with TS and they were related to the presence of hypothyroidism. PMID:22836628

  4. Phosphazene-promoted anionic polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Junpeng

    2014-01-01

    In the recent surge of metal-free polymerization techniques, phosphazene bases have shown their remarkable potential as organic promoters/catalysts for the anionic polymerization of various types of monomers. By complexation with the counterion (e.g. proton or lithium cation), phosphazene base significantly improve the nucleophilicity of the initiator/chain-end resulting in rapid and usually controlled anionic/quasi-anionic polymerization. In this review, we will introduce the general mechanism, i.e. in situ activation (of initiating sites) and polymerization, and summarize the applications of such a mechanism on macromolecular engineering toward functionalized polymers, block copolymers and complex macromolecular architectures.

  5. Immunoglobulin G4: an odd antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Aalberse; S.O. Stapel; J. Schuurman; T. Rispens

    2009-01-01

    Despite its well-known association with IgE-mediated allergy, IgG4 antibodies still have several poorly understood characteristics. IgG4 is a very dynamic antibody: the antibody is involved in a continuous process of half-molecules (i.e. a heavy and attached light-chain) exchange. This process, also

  6. Anti-S100A4 antibody suppresses metastasis formation by blocking stroma cell invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Grum-Schwensen, Birgitte; Beck, Mette K;

    2012-01-01

    microenvironment, making it an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. In this study, we produced a function-blocking anti-S100A4 monoclonal antibody with metastasis-suppressing activity. Antibody treatment significantly reduced metastatic burden in the lungs of experimental animals by blocking the recruitment......The small Ca-binding protein, S100A4, has a well-established metastasis-promoting activity. Moreover, its expression is tightly correlated with poor prognosis in patients with numerous types of cancer. Mechanistically, the extracellular S100A4 drives metastasis by affecting the tumor...... of T cells to the site of the primary tumor. In vitro studies demonstrated that this antibody efficiently reduced the invasion of T cells in a fibroblast monolayer. Moreover, it was capable of suppressing the invasive growth of human and mouse fibroblasts. We presume therefore that the antibody...

  7. Antibody to eosinophil cationic protein suppresses dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuko Shichijo; Kazuya Makiyama; Chun-Yang Wen; Mutsumi Matsuu; Toshiyuki Nakayama; Masahiro Nakashima; Makoto Ihara; Ichiro Sekine

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To produce an antibody against rat eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and to examine the effects of the antibody in rats with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis.METHODS: An antibody was raised against rat ECP. Rats were treated with 3% DSS in drinking water for 7 d and received the antibody or normal serum. The colons were exarmined histologically and correlated with clinical symptoms.Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were estimated as a grade of inflammation.RESULTS: The ECP antibody stained the activated eosinophils around the injured crypts in the colonic mucosa.Antibody treatment reduced the severity of colonic ulceration and acute clinical symptoms (diarrhea and/or blood-stained stool). Body weight gain was significantly greater and the colon length was significantly longer in anti-ECP-treated rats than in normal serum-treated rats. Expression of ECP in activated eosinophils was associated with the presence of erosions and inflammation. The number of Ki-67-positive cells in the regenerated surface epithelium increased in anti-ECP-treated rats compared with normal serum-treated rats. Western blot analysis revealed reduced expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in anti-ECP-treated rats.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that treatment with ECP antibody, improved DSS-induced colitis in rats, possibly by increasing the regenerative activity of the colonic epithelium and downregulation of the immune response,and suggest that anti-ECP may promote intestinal wound healing in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC).

  8. Opsonization of Treponema pallidum is mediated by immunoglobulin G antibodies induced only by pathogenic treponemes.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, J M; Baker-Zander, S A; Lukehart, S A

    1993-01-01

    Rabbit antisera to Leptospira interrogans, Borrelia hermsii, and Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter, reactive to shared spirochetal antigens, failed to enhance phagocytosis of Treponema pallidum by macrophages, while immunoglobulin G to Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue and Treponema paraluiscuniculi promoted phagocytosis. Opsonic antibodies are directed to pathogen-restricted, not shared spirochetal, antigens.

  9. Mechanisms of resistance to HER family targeting antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of receptor tyrosine kinases consists of four members: EGFR (HER1/ErbB1), HER2/neu (ErbB2), HER3 (ErbB3) and HER4 (ErbB4). Receptor activation via ligand binding leads to downstream signaling that influence cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR and HER2 have been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), and breast cancer. With this, intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of the EGFR and HER2 by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab, panitumumab and trastuzumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domains (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Both approaches have shown considerable clinical promise. However, increasing evidence suggests that the majority of patients do not respond to these therapies, and those who show initial response ultimately become refractory to treatment. While mechanisms of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been extensively studied, resistance to monoclonal antibodies is less well understood, both in the laboratory and in the clinical setting. In this review, we discuss resistance to antibody-based therapies against the EGFR and HER2, similarities between these resistance profiles, and strategies to overcome resistance to HER family targeting monoclonal antibody therapy.

  10. Mechanisms of resistance to HER family targeting antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Wheeler, Deric L., E-mail: dlwheeler@wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of receptor tyrosine kinases consists of four members: EGFR (HER1/ErbB1), HER2/neu (ErbB2), HER3 (ErbB3) and HER4 (ErbB4). Receptor activation via ligand binding leads to downstream signaling that influence cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR and HER2 have been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), and breast cancer. With this, intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of the EGFR and HER2 by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab, panitumumab and trastuzumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domains (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Both approaches have shown considerable clinical promise. However, increasing evidence suggests that the majority of patients do not respond to these therapies, and those who show initial response ultimately become refractory to treatment. While mechanisms of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been extensively studied, resistance to monoclonal antibodies is less well understood, both in the laboratory and in the clinical setting. In this review, we discuss resistance to antibody-based therapies against the EGFR and HER2, similarities between these resistance profiles, and strategies to overcome resistance to HER family targeting monoclonal antibody therapy.

  11. Linkers Having a Crucial Role in Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) comprised of a desirable monoclonal antibody, an active cytotoxic drug and an appropriate linker are considered to be an innovative therapeutic approach for targeted treatment of various types of tumors and cancers, enhancing the therapeutic parameter of the cytotoxic drug and reducing the possibility of systemic cytotoxicity. An appropriate linker between the antibody and the cytotoxic drug provides a specific bridge, and thus helps the antibody to selectively deliver the cytotoxic drug to tumor cells and accurately releases the cytotoxic drug at tumor sites. In addition to conjugation, the linkers maintain ADCs' stability during the preparation and storage stages of the ADCs and during the systemic circulation period. The design of linkers for ADCs is a challenge in terms of extracellular stability and intracellular release, and intracellular circumstances, such as the acid environment, the reducing environment and cathepsin, are considered as the catalysts to activate the triggers for initiating the cleavage of ADCs. This review discusses the linkers used in the clinical and marketing stages for ADCs and details the fracture modes of the linkers for the further development of ADCs. PMID:27089329

  12. Production, isolation, and characterization of rabbit anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against human antithyrotrophin receptor antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, J. R.; Lukes, Y G; Burman, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that anti-idiotypic antibodies can be developed in vivo through animal immunization with idiotype, and that these antibodies can be isolated from other anti-immunoglobulin antibodies by affinity purification. These techniques have relied on large amounts of idiotype, which were produced either by hyperimmunization or by monoclonal antibodies, to serve as the affinity adsorbent. In the present study, we produced anti-idiotypic antibodies to human anti-thyroid-stimul...

  13. Function and glycosylation of plant-derived antiviral monoclonal antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Kisung; Tekoah, Yoram; Rudd, Pauline M.; Harvey, David J.; Dwek, Raymond A.; Spitsin, Sergei; Hanlon, Cathleen A.; Rupprecht, Charles; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Golovkin, Maxim; Koprowski, Hilary

    2003-01-01

    Plant genetic engineering led to the production of plant-derived mAb (mAbP), which provides a safe and economically feasible alternative to the current methods of antibody production in animal systems. In this study, the heavy and light chains of human anti-rabies mAb were expressed and assembled in planta under the control of two strong constitutive promoters. An alfalfa mosaic virus untranslated leader sequence and Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu (KDEL) endoplasmic reticulum retention signal were lin...

  14. Solid phase double-antibody radioimmunoassay procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention is concerned with the radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure for assaying body fluid content of an antigenic substance which may either be an antigen itself or a hapten capable of being converted, such as by means of reaction with a protein, to an antigenic material. The present invention is concerned with a novel and improved modification of a double-antibody RIA technique in which there is a first antibody that is specific to the antigenic substance suspected to be present in a body fluid from which the assay is intended. The second antibody, however, is not specific to the antigenic substance or analyte, but is an antibody against the first antibody

  15. The role of antibodies in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, M; Stassen, M H W

    2002-10-15

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease associated with antibodies directed to the postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor. These antibodies reduce the number of receptors. Autoantibodies against AChR and other muscle antigens can be used for the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and related disorders. The origin and the role of these antibodies in the disease are discussed. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis, an experimental model closely mimicking the disease, has provided answers to many questions about the role of antibodies, complement macrophages and AChR anchor proteins. Genetically modified anti-AChR antibodies may also be used in the future to treat myasthenia. PMID:12220686

  16. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  17. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140–250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such a...

  18. Marketing: Giveaways that Give Back--Marketing with Promotional Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Carol Anne

    2006-01-01

    In marketing one's library wares, an effective publicity strategy is to use promotional giveaway materials, mainly personalized items that promote one's resources and services. As with any marketing effort, it is important to be clear about the promotional initiative and whom librarians are attempting to reach. This author emphasizes that…

  19. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  20. Monoclonal Antibody Therapies against Anthrax

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaochun Chen; Mahtab Moayeri; Robert Purcell

    2011-01-01

    Anthrax is a highly lethal infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. It not only causes natural infection in humans but also poses a great threat as an emerging bioterror agent. The lethality of anthrax is primarily attributed to the two major virulence factors: toxins and capsule. An extensive effort has been made to generate therapeutically useful monoclonal antibodies to each of the virulence components: protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF) and ede...

  1. Antibody Peptide Based Antifungal Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Giovati, Laura; Zanello, Pier Paolo; Sperindè, Martina; Ciociola, Tecla; Polonelli, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections still represent relevant human illnesses worldwide and some are accompanied by unacceptably high mortality rates. The limited current availability of effective and safe antifungal agents makes the development of new drugs and approaches of antifungal vaccination/immunotherapy every day more needed. Among them, small antibody(Ab)-derived peptides are arousing great expectations as new potential antifungal agents. In this topic, the search path from the study of the yeast kill...

  2. Epigenetics of the antibody response

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone posttranslational modifications and microRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and microRNAs modulate t...

  3. Pharmacological selection of antibodies for immunoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent development of hybridoma technology has resulted in the production of monoclonal antibodies that recognize a variety of tumor antigens. Many antibodies have been developed and some of them are used with different success in clinical practice. A list of criteria is proposed for the selection of antibodies suitable for imaging studies illustrated with the example of two monoclonal antibodies anti-CEA and 19.9 used in colorectal carcinoma imaging. Monoclonal antibodies obtained today are not truly tumor-specific, they are tumor-associated; this suggests that some cross-reactions with normal tissues exist. For immunoscintigraphical use it is important to select antibodies which procedure high tumor cell staining with limited reactivity against normal tissues. Antibodies can be separated into F(ab')2 and Fab fragments which diffuse more easily into the tumor with a rapid clearance from the circulation giving higher tumor to normal tissues ratio at an early time. Antibodies with both high affinity and avidity towards tumor cell receptors produce better imaging results. Antibodies can be labelled directly with iodine or technetium and with indium using chelating agents. In vivo kinetics of radiolabelled antibodies are very different considering the nuclide and the labelling method used. Pharmacokinetics on nude mice grated with human tumors are very useful for selecting the most appropriate nuclide antibody fragment and the most efficient labelling technique for a given application. (author)

  4. Brazilian physical activity guidelines as a strategy for health promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Emerson Sebastião; Andiara Schwingel; Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko

    2014-01-01

    Public health actions endorsed by the federal government, for instance, health promotion initiatives, usually have greater impact at population level compared to other types of initiatives. This commentary aims to instigate debate on the importance and necessity of producing federally endorsed brazilian physical activity guidelines as a strategy for health promotion.

  5. Application of Monoclonal Antibodies in Veterinary Parasitology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of hybridoma technology by Kohler and Milstein in 1975, heralded a new era in antibody research. Mouse hybridomas were the first reliable source of monoclonal antibodies. The generation of monoclonal antibodies from species other than rats and mice, has developed slowly over the last 30 years. The advent of antibody engineering and realization of the advantages of non murine antibodies has increased their relevance recently. However, in the area of veterinary parasitology, monoclonal antibodies are just beginning to fulfill the promises inherent in their great specificity for recognizing and selectively binding to antigens. This review describes the recent advances in the application of monoclonal antibodies for immunodiagnosis / prophylaxis and immunotherapy of parasitic diseases. [Vet. World 2011; 4(4.000: 183-188

  6. Development of antibody against sulfamethazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfamethazine (SMT) is widely used to treat bacterial and protozoan infections in food animals. So its residue has been detected in various food products, and in Europe, the tolerance level for sulfonamides in meat and milk is 100 ng/g. To ensure that residues in animal food products do not exceed this limit, a simple, sensitive, and rapid method to determinate their residues in animal tissues is needed. In this paper the development of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies against sulfamethazine (SMT) and a simplified method to identify residual sulfamethazine by radio immunoassay (RIA) is presented. Polyclonal antibodies (PcAbs) against sulfamethazine (SMT) were obtained by immunizing rabbits with SMT-conjugated bovine serum albumin (BSA). The association constants (Ka) of the PcAbs were higher than 108 and the cross-reactivities with Sulfadiazine(SD), Sulfaquinoxaline(SQX) which were structurally related compounds were lower than 0.05%(RIA). Simultaneous, six strains of hybridoma cell were prepared which can secrete monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) against SMT . The Ka of the McAbs against SMT were higher than 107 and the cross-reactivities with SD, SQX were lower than 0.1%(RIA). (authors)

  7. Monoclonal antibodies in targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Powroźnik

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy is a new therapeutic method consisting in the inhibition of specific molecular pathways. In modern therapy, the key role is played by monoclonal antibodies, included in the group of biological agents. The success of molecularly targeted therapy is to define the proper “molecular target”, selecting the right drug active against a specific “target” and selecting a group of patients who benefit from treatment. Introduction of targeted therapy resulted in improved results of the treatment of many serious and chronic diseases. In general, targeted molecular therapies have good toxicity profiles, but some patients are exquisitely sensitive to these drugs and can develop particular and severe toxicities. Patient selection and proper monitoring significantly decrease the risk of life-threatening adverse events. Data concerning late side effects are still unavailable because of the short follow-up of molecularly targeted therapy. Currently in the U.S. and Europe there are approximately 31 registered therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, while 160 are subjected to clinical trials. This paper presents an overview of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies currently used in therapy and the present state of knowledge about them. 

  8. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na HAN; Shuang HE; Yu-tang WANG; Li-ming YANG; Si-yu LIU; Ting ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories.Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases,inflammatory diseases,cancer,and other immune-associated diseases.This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis,an inflammatory disease of the heart,could be a novel approach in the future.In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis,we,through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad,developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies,pathogenesis of myocarditis,and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis.This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future.Under conventional therapy,myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome,indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results.Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis,we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above.However,several issues remain.The technology on howto make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues.If we are to further stimulate

  9. Non-HLA antibodies against endothelial targets bridging allo- and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragun, Duska; Catar, Rusan; Philippe, Aurélie

    2016-08-01

    Detrimental actions of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) directed against both major histocompatibility antigens (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]) and specific non-HLA antigens expressed on the allograft endothelium are a flourishing research area in kidney transplantation. Newly developed solid-phase assays enabling detection of functional non-HLA antibodies targeting G protein-coupled receptors such as angiotensin type I receptor and endothelin type A receptor were instrumental in providing long-awaited confirmation of their broad clinical relevance. Numerous recent clinical studies implicate angiotensin type I receptor and endothelin type A receptor antibodies as prognostic biomarkers for earlier occurrence and severity of acute and chronic immunologic complications in solid organ transplantation, stem cell transplantation, and systemic autoimmune vascular disease. Angiotensin type 1 receptor and endothelin type A receptor antibodies exert their pathophysiologic effects alone and in synergy with HLA-DSA. Recently identified antiperlecan antibodies are also implicated in accelerated allograft vascular pathology. In parallel, protein array technology platforms enabled recognition of new endothelial surface antigens implicated in endothelial cell activation. Upon target antigen recognition, non-HLA antibodies act as powerful inducers of phenotypic perturbations in endothelial cells via activation of distinct intracellular cell-signaling cascades. Comprehensive diagnostic assessment strategies focusing on both HLA-DSA and non-HLA antibody responses could substantially improve immunologic risk stratification before transplantation, help to better define subphenotypes of antibody-mediated rejection, and lead to timely initiation of targeted therapies. Better understanding of similarities and dissimilarities in HLA-DSA and distinct non-HLA antibody-related mechanisms of endothelial damage should facilitate discovery of common downstream signaling targets and pave the

  10. Antibodies to the neutral glycolipid asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide: association with gynecologic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkin, S S; Bongiovanni, A M; Birnbaum, S; Caputo, T; Ledger, W J

    1985-03-01

    As part of our efforts to define subpopulations at increased risk for gynecologic malignancies, sera from 145 women were obtained prior to diagnosis and analyzed for antibody to asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide. This neutral glycolipid is present on the surface of thymocytes and natural killer cells, and asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide antibody has been shown in animals to block natural killer cell activity and promote tumor cell proliferation. With the use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and with a value of 2 SD above the mean for healthy women designated as the boundary for a positive response, antibody to asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide was detected in only one of 30 (3%) healthy women, none of 16 pregnant women, none of 18 women with benign masses, and two of 24 (8%) women with microbial infections. All of the above samples that contained antibodies were barely over the 2 SD limit. In marked contrast, 19 of 35 (54%) women with gynecologic malignancies had asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide antibodies, with positive values ranging to greater than 10 SD above the control mean. Asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide antibody was found in six of eight (75%) patients with cervical cancer, five of eight (63%) with endometrial cancer, and seven of 15 (47%) with ovarian cancer. Of the eight patients with Stage I gynecologic cancer at any site, five (62%) had asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide antibodies. Four of 22 (18%) women with Hodgkin's disease also had antibodies, with values just exceeding 2 SD above control levels. The presence of these antibodies may contribute to an impaired immune surveillance system in these women and so increase their susceptibility to malignancy. PMID:3976767

  11. HLA and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies: Building blocks in RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Woude, Diane; Catrina, Anca I

    2015-12-01

    Antibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPAs) are specific for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ACPA-positive RA is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting from the complex interaction between genetic (mainly HLA class II genes) and environmental factors (mainly smoking). Recent findings have offered new insights into where, when and how anti-citrulline immunity develops. Some studies have found that a mucosal site, such as the lungs, may function as the initiating site for the immune response against citrullinated proteins, in line with the known association between smoking and ACPA. Other studies, focusing rather on the HLA associations, have suggested that cross-reactivity between microbial sequences and citrullinated self-proteins may lead to ACPA formation. Once ACPAs have developed, they can circulate throughout the body and upon reaching the joints exert direct pathogenic effects themselves. ACPAs can target first the bone compartment of the joints to activate osteoclasts and release interleukin (IL)-8 that in turn will promote bone loss and pain-like behaviour. In the current review, we will present the current understanding of the genetic associations in RA contributing to ACPA occurrence and offer insight in the latest findings explaining how and why autoimmunity generated in the lungs of genetically susceptible hosts might lead to chronic inflammation in the joints. PMID:27107507

  12. A robust robotic high-throughput antibody purification platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter M; Abdo, Michael; Butcher, Rebecca E; Yap, Min-Yin; Scotney, Pierre D; Ramunno, Melanie L; Martin-Roussety, Genevieve; Owczarek, Catherine; Hardy, Matthew P; Chen, Chao-Guang; Fabri, Louis J

    2016-07-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become the fastest growing segment in the drug market with annual sales of more than 40 billion US$ in 2013. The selection of lead candidate molecules involves the generation of large repertoires of antibodies from which to choose a final therapeutic candidate. Improvements in the ability to rapidly produce and purify many antibodies in sufficient quantities reduces the lead time for selection which ultimately impacts on the speed with which an antibody may transition through the research stage and into product development. Miniaturization and automation of chromatography using micro columns (RoboColumns(®) from Atoll GmbH) coupled to an automated liquid handling instrument (ALH; Freedom EVO(®) from Tecan) has been a successful approach to establish high throughput process development platforms. Recent advances in transient gene expression (TGE) using the high-titre Expi293F™ system have enabled recombinant mAb titres of greater than 500mg/L. These relatively high protein titres reduce the volume required to generate several milligrams of individual antibodies for initial biochemical and biological downstream assays, making TGE in the Expi293F™ system ideally suited to high throughput chromatography on an ALH. The present publication describes a novel platform for purifying Expi293F™-expressed recombinant mAbs directly from cell-free culture supernatant on a Perkin Elmer JANUS-VariSpan ALH equipped with a plate shuttle device. The purification platform allows automated 2-step purification (Protein A-desalting/size exclusion chromatography) of several hundred mAbs per week. The new robotic method can purify mAbs with high recovery (>90%) at sub-milligram level with yields of up to 2mg from 4mL of cell-free culture supernatant. PMID:27283099

  13. Are Onconeural Antibodies a Clinical Phenomenology in Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs occur in patients with cancer and can cause clinical symptoms and signs of dysfunction of the nervous system that are not due to a local effect of the tumor or its metastases. Most of these clinical syndromes in adults are associated with lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer (SCLC, lymphoma, and gynecological tumors. The finding of highly specific antibodies directed against onconeural antigens has revolutionized the diagnosis and promoted the understanding of these syndromes and led to the current hypothesis of an autoimmune pathophysiology. Accumulating data strongly suggested direct pathogenicity of these antibodies. The field of PNS has expanded rapidly in the past few years with the discovery of limbic encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD 65, the voltage (VGKC-gated potassium channel complex, the methyl (N-NMDA-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA, and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA (B receptors, and so forth. Despite this, the clinical spectrum of these diseases has not yet been fully investigated. The clinical importance of these conditions lies in their frequent response to immunotherapies and, less commonly, their association with distinctive tumors. This review provides an overview on the pathogenesis and diagnosis of PNS, with emphasis on the role of antibodies in limbic encephalitis.

  14. Function and glycosylation of plant-derived antiviral monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kisung; Tekoah, Yoram; Rudd, Pauline M; Harvey, David J; Dwek, Raymond A; Spitsin, Sergei; Hanlon, Cathleen A; Rupprecht, Charles; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Golovkin, Maxim; Koprowski, Hilary

    2003-06-24

    Plant genetic engineering led to the production of plant-derived mAb (mAbP), which provides a safe and economically feasible alternative to the current methods of antibody production in animal systems. In this study, the heavy and light chains of human anti-rabies mAb were expressed and assembled in planta under the control of two strong constitutive promoters. An alfalfa mosaic virus untranslated leader sequence and Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu (KDEL) endoplasmic reticulum retention signal were linked at the N and C terminus of the heavy chain, respectively. mAbP was as effective at neutralizing the activity of the rabies virus as the mammalian-derived antibody (mAbM) or human rabies Ig (HRIG). The mAbP contained mainly oligomannose type N-glycans (90%) and had no potentially antigenic alpha(1,3)-linked fucose residues. mAbP had a shorter half-life than mAbM. The mAbP was as efficient as HRIG for post-exposure prophylaxis against rabies virus in hamsters, indicating that differences in N-glycosylation do not affect the efficacy of the antibody in this model. PMID:12799460

  15. Expression of recombinant rubella virus E1 protein and initial application for detecting of antibody%重组风疹病毒外膜蛋白E1的表达及其在血清学中的初步应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伊瑶; 郭敏卓; 余陶; 许文波; 杨进业; 陈斯勇

    2008-01-01

    目的 在大肠埃希菌中表达重组风疹病毒外膜蛋白E1,用其作为包被抗原,建立一种用于诊断风疹病毒感染的ELISA检测方法 .方法 通过基因重组的方式构建表达质粒并在大肠埃希菌中表达风疹病毒外膜蛋白E1,蛋白纯化后作为包被抗原,用ELISA的方法 检测世界卫生组织(WHO)的风疹检测质控血清以及来自广西桂林的未知血清样本.结果 采用WHO用于风疹检测的质控血清对所表达的重组抗原的抗原性进行鉴定,通过试验,特异性、敏感性均为100%.用表达的抗原对来自我国广西的200份未知血清样本进行风疹病毒外膜蛋白抗体的检测,阳性率为93%,与文献报道的我国其他地区风疹病毒抗体阳性率基本一致.结论 通过实验我们表达了具有良好抗原性的风疹病毒外膜蛋白E1,为进一步研究风疹病毒感染的实验室诊断技术奠定了基础.%Objective To apply recombinant rubella virus envelope protein-1 (E1) to detect human rubella vires IgG antibody .Methods Rubella virus E1 protein was expressed in E. coli., purified E1 protein was used as the antigen for the detecting of anti rubella in human sera in the way of enzyme linked Immunosorbant assay (ELISA) .Results The antigeneity of the recombinant protein was checked by WHO rubella sera panel. We detected 200 sera samples, which came from Guangxi Guilin. 93% of these samples were positive.Conclusion The antigenicity of recombinant E1 is a satisfied candidate antigen for the detecting of human rubella virus antibody. The prevalence of anti rubella virus IgG in Guangxi is 93 %. It is at the some level compared with other provinces in China.

  16. N-Glycosylation of Antibodies Characterized by Mass Spectrometry: An Integrated Software Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asperger, A.; Resemann, A.; Suckau, D.; Schweiger-Hufnagel, U.

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies represent one of the most important classes of glycoproteins playing a central role in the immune response of living organisms. Furthermore, there is a growing interest in recombinant antibodies as potential biotherapeutic agents. The analysis of the N-glycosylation pattern present on antibodies is challenging due to its heterogeneous structure. The glycan profile is highly dependent on the process by which a recombinant glycoprotein is generated, such as host organism and growth conditions. Changes to the glycosylation pattern can significantly alter biological function. To characterize the N-glycosylation pattern of a recombinant antibody, a bottom-up approach was pursued. Tryptic digests of antibody samples were separated by nano-LC and analyzed by MALDI mass spectrometry. An integrated software approach allowed a detailed characterization of the glycosylation pattern and visualization of the relevant mass spectra. LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis of the digested antibody provided, in addition to the nearly complete sequence coverage of the nonglycosylated peptides, a detail-rich picture of the highly complex pattern of N-linked glycans in form of the respective N-glycopeptides. Targeted analysis of potential glycopeptides significantly increased the information content. Integrated glycoprotein analysis software tools (ProteinScape 2.2) allowed identification of glycan modifications and interactive result validation. In this process software facilitated the initial characterization of the antibody as well as the subsequent quality control tasks.

  17. A high affinity monoclonal antibody recognizing the light chain of human coagulating factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarial, Sheila; Asadi, Farzad; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Hadavi, Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Shokri, Fazel; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2012-12-01

    Factor VII (FVII) is a serine protease-coagulating element responsible for the initiation of an extrinsic pathway of clot formation. Here we generated and characterized a high affinity monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes human FVII. Recombinant human FVII (rh-FVII) was used for the production of a monoclonal antibody using BALB/c mice. The specificity of the antibody was determined by Western blot using plasma samples from human, mouse, sheep, goat, bovine, rabbit, and rat. Furthermore, the antibody was used to detect transiently expressed rh-FVII in BHK21 cell line using Western blot and sandwich ELISA. A mouse IgG1 (kappa chain) monoclonal antibody clone 1F1-B11 was produced against rh-FVII. The affinity constant (K(aff)) of the antibody was calculated to be 6.4×10(10) M(-1). The antibody could specifically recognize an epitope on the light chain of hFVII, with no reactivity with factor VII from several other animals. In addition, transiently expressed rh-FVII in BHK21 cells was recognized by 1F1-B11. The high affinity as well as the specificity of 1F1-B11 for hFVII will facilitate the affinity purification of hFVII and also production of FVII deficient plasma and minimizes the risk of bovine FVII contamination when fetal bovine serum-supplemented media are used for production and subsequent purification of rh-FVII. PMID:23244324

  18. Antibody humanization by molecular dynamics simulations-in-silico guided selection of critical backmutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margreitter, Christian; Mayrhofer, Patrick; Kunert, Renate; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies represent the fastest growing class of biotherapeutic proteins. However, as they are often initially derived from rodent organisms, there is a severe risk of immunogenic reactions, hampering their applicability. The humanization of these antibodies remains a challenging task in the context of rational drug design. "Superhumanization" describes the direct transfer of the complementarity determining regions to a human germline framework, but this humanization approach often results in loss of binding affinity. In this study, we present a new approach for predicting promising backmutation sites using molecular dynamics simulations of the model antibody Ab2/3H6. The simulation method was developed in close conjunction with novel specificity experiments. Binding properties of mAb variants were evaluated directly from crude supernatants and confirmed using established binding affinity assays for purified antibodies. Our approach provides access to the dynamical features of the actual binding sites of an antibody, based solely on the antibody sequence. Thus we do not need structural data on the antibody-antigen complex and circumvent cumbersome methods to assess binding affinities. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Molecular Recognition Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26748949

  19. Health Promotion Viewed in a Critical Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to reflect critically on the current health promotion initiatives targeting overweight individuals in Western countries. The paper’s methodological approach is to draw on analytical findings from my and other sociologists’ empirical work on how the problems of overweight ...... values such as  self-responsibility and self-control, and that a combination of biomedicine and these dominating values can lead to health promotion becoming a problematic moral endeavour....

  20. Affitins as alternative to antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. We have developed the use of Sac7d archaeal polypeptide and its homologues as a non-antibody scaffold from which artificial affinity proteins (Affitins) can be derived with a number of favorable properties. Affitins show affinity (sub-nanomolar) and specificity that compare well with those of antibodies [Ref.1]. They are thermally (up to 90 C. degrees) and chemically stable (pH 0-12+, denaturants), well expressed in E. coli (up to 200 mg/L), lack disulfide bridge and have a size compatible with chemical synthesis (7 kDa). We have demonstrated their use as reagents for intra-cellular inhibition [Ref.1], affinity purification [Ref.2], immuno-localization [Ref.3], protein chip array [Ref.4] and biosensors [Ref.5]. We have also shown that Affitins are plastic enough to tolerate several mutagenesis schemes while their fold and their favorable properties are conserved [Ref.6]. Compared to Affitins, monoclonal antibodies are 20 times larger, less stable and more complex molecules. Furthermore, the remarkable stability properties of Affitins make them suited for demanding labeling protocols that are usually used for peptides. All together, these results show that Affitins should be well suited for biomedical applications where fine tuning of the affinity reagent properties is needed. References: [Ref.1] Mouratou, B. et al., (2007), Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104, 17983-17988; [Ref.2] Krehenbrink, M. et al. (2008), J Mol Biol 383, 1058-1068; [Ref.3] Buddelmeijer, N. et al. (2009), J Bacteriol 191, 161-168; [Ref.4] Cinier, M. et al. (2009), Bioconjug. Chem. 20, 2270-2277; [Ref.5] Miranda, F. F. et al. (2011), Biosens. Bioelectron. 26, 4184-4190; [Ref.6] Behar G.et al. (2013), Protein Eng Des Sel. 26(4):267-75. (authors)

  1. Mechanisms of Ricin Toxin Neutralization Revealed through Engineered Homodimeric and Heterodimeric Camelid Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Cristina; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Shoemaker, Charles B; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2015-11-13

    Novel antibody constructs consisting of two or more different camelid heavy-chain only antibodies (VHHs) joined via peptide linkers have proven to have potent toxin-neutralizing activity in vivo against Shiga, botulinum, Clostridium difficile, anthrax, and ricin toxins. However, the mechanisms by which these so-called bispecific VHH heterodimers promote toxin neutralization remain poorly understood. In the current study we produced a new collection of ricin-specific VHH heterodimers, as well as VHH homodimers, and characterized them for their ability neutralize ricin in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that the VHH heterodimers, but not homodimers were able to completely protect mice against ricin challenge, even though the two classes of antibodies (heterodimers and homodimers) had virtually identical affinities for ricin holotoxin and similar IC50 values in a Vero cell cytotoxicity assay. The VHH heterodimers did differ from the homodimers in their ability to promote toxin aggregation in solution, as revealed through analytical ultracentrifugation. Moreover, the VHH heterodimers that were most effective at promoting ricin aggregation in solution were also the most effective at blocking ricin attachment to cell surfaces. Collectively, these data suggest that heterodimeric VHH-based neutralizing agents may function through the formation of antibody-toxin complexes that are impaired in their ability to access host cell receptors. PMID:26396190

  2. European initiatives in psychology education and research

    OpenAIRE

    Foreman, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Psychology within the EU is likely to become more coherent as a discipline with initiatives such as the European Diploma of Psychology, and more and morecountries adopting the Bologna process as the basis of their educational provision. In addition, text books now appear which are adapted from American versions, giving a European perspective. The European Federation of Psychologists Associations (EFPA), though it does not award research grants, is keen to promote initiatives such as the new E...

  3. European initiatives in psychology education and research:

    OpenAIRE

    Foreman, Nigel

    2006-01-01

    Psychology within the EU is likely to become more coherent as a discipline with initiatives such as the European Diploma of Psychology, and more and morecountries adopting the Bologna process as the basis of their educational provision. In addition, text books now appear which are adapted from American versions, giving a European perspective. The European Federation of Psychologists Associations (EFPA), though it does not award research grants, is keen to promote initiatives such as the new E...

  4. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies are...... powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors such as......, including solid-phase peptide-carrier conjugation and peptide-carrier conjugation in solution. Upon immunization, adjuvants such as Al(OH)(3) are added together with the immunogenic peptide-carrier conjugate, which usually leads to high-titred antisera. Following immunization and peptide antibody...

  5. Twenty years with monoclonal antibodies. State of the art - where do we go?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review, we have selected some parameters with the potential to improve the efficacy of RIL and RIT. Focus has partially been on the behaviour of radiolabelled antibodies in vivo in relation to properties and amounts of both target antigen and the antibodies used. If, out of the 28 factors listed in Table 1, some should be given preference in future work, it is our opinion that after the initial saturation of the tumour site a rapid decrease in redundant antibody is of significant importance. Furthermore, quantitative aspects of both antigens and antibodies should be more carefully evaluated when possible. By combining several of the listed approaches toward incresing efficiency, a more extensive use of RIL and RIT could be expected in the future. (orig.)

  6. Detection of antibodies directed at M. hyorhinis p37 in the serum of men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and molecular studies suggest infection and inflammation initiate certain cancers, including cancers of the prostate. Over the past several years, our group has been studying how mycoplasmas could possibly initiate and propagate cancers of the prostate. Specifically, Mycoplasma hyorhinis encoded protein p37 was found to promote invasion of prostate cancer cells and cause changes in growth, morphology and gene expression of these cells to a more aggressive phenotype. Moreover, we found that chronic exposure of benign human prostate cells to M. hyorhinis resulted in significant phenotypic and karyotypic changes that ultimately resulted in the malignant transformation of the benign cells. In this study, we set out to investigate another potential link between mycoplasma and human prostate cancer. We report the incidence of men with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) being seropositive for M. hyorhinis. Antibodies to M. hyorhinis were surveyed by a novel indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum samples collected from men presenting to an outpatient Urology clinic for BPH (N = 105) or prostate cancer (N = 114) from 2006-2009. A seropositive rate of 36% in men with BPH and 52% in men with prostate cancer was reported, thus leading us to speculate a possible connection between M. hyorhinis exposure with prostate cancer. These results further support a potential exacerbating role for mycoplasma in the development of prostate cancer

  7. Lymphoma, melanoma, colon cancer: diagnosis and treatment with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. The 1986 Eugene P. Pendergrass New Horizons Lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of monoclonal antibodies for use as in vivo carriers of radioactivity for diagnosis and therapy of malignant neoplasms is proceeding rapidly within academic and commercial sectors. The author and his colleagues studied anticancer antibodies formed against tumors of both somatic and hematopoietic origins. Several general principles have been established with the work with somatic tumors, including the following: Improved tumor-to-normal-tissue ratios can be achieved with Fab fragments as opposed to whole IgG; each antitumor antibody has a characteristic biodistribution in humans that cannot be readily predicted from tissue or small animal studies; and for many antibodies, there is a strong dependency of tumor uptake on total mass amount of antibody administered (greater uptake with greater mass dose). Initial work with iodine-131 labeled Fab fragments of the antimelanoma antibodies, 96.5 and 48-7, documented that tumor uptake was broadly proportional to antigen content of the tumors and that under optimal conditions, some tumors were sufficiently loaded with radiolabeled antibody to serve as radiation therapy. The antitumor antibody B-72.3, as IgG, has been particularly promising when administered intraperitoneally. In ten patients who were administered I-131 B-72.3 via a Tenkhoff catheter, the sensitivity and specificity of tumor location were excellent for peritoneal implants, and in three of these patients, surgically confirmed tumor was seen with the radiolabeled antibody technique when abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance studies were negative

  8. Promoting preschool reading

    OpenAIRE

    Istenič, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    The thesis titled Promoting preschool reading consists of a theoretiral and an empirical part. In the theoretical part I wrote about reading, the importance of reading, types of reading, about reading motivation, promoting reading motivation, internal and external motivation, influence of reading motivation on the child's reading activity, reading and familial literacy, the role of adults in promotion reading literacy, reading to a child and promoting reading in pre-school years, where I ...

  9. Sport Promotion Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandru Lucian MIHAI

    2013-01-01

    In sport marketing, the word promotion covers a range of interrelated activities. All of these activities are designed to attract attention, stimulate the interest and awareness of consumers, and of course, encourage them to purchase a sport product. Promotion is about communicating with and educating consumers. The purpose of a sport promotional strategy is to build brand loyalty and product credibility, develop image, and position the brand. A promotional strategy is similar to a marketing ...

  10. How Promotions Work

    OpenAIRE

    Robert C. Blattberg; Richard Briesch; Fox, Edward J.

    1995-01-01

    By synthesizing findings across the sales promotion literature, this article helps the reader understand how promotions work. We identify and explain empirical generalizations related to sales promotion; that is, effects that have been found consistently in multiple studies involving different researchers. We also identify issues which have generated conflicting findings in the research, as well as important sales promotion topics that have not yet been studied. This overview of the research ...

  11. Immunogenicity of an engineered internal image antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Billetta, R; Hollingdale, M. R.; Zanetti, M

    1991-01-01

    We engineered an antibody expressing in the third complementarity-determining region of its heavy chain variable region a "foreign" epitope, the repetitive tetrapeptide Asn-Ala-Asn-Pro (NANP) of the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum parasite, one of the etiologic agents of malaria in humans. A monoclonal antibody to P. falciparum specific for the (NANP)n amino acid sequence bound to the engineered antibody, and a synthetic (NANP)3 peptide blocked this interaction. Immunization...

  12. A general approach to antibody thermostabilization

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, Audrey D; Xue ZHANG; Macomber, John L.; Chau, Betty; Sheffer, Joseph C; Rahmanian, Sorena; Hare, Eric; Spasojevic, Vladimir; Horlick, Robert A.; King, David J; Bowers, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody engineering to enhance thermostability may enable further application and ease of use of antibodies across a number of different areas. A modified human IgG framework has been developed through a combination of engineering approaches, which can be used to stabilize antibodies of diverse specificity. This is achieved through a combination of complementarity-determining region (CDR)-grafting onto the stable framework, mammalian cell display and in vitro somatic hypermutation (SHM). Thi...

  13. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunctio...

  14. Imaging tumors with radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a metallic radionuclide, either directly bound to a monoclonal antibody, or to a chelating agent (such as di-ethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)) conjugated to the antibody, a tumor can be traced rapidly and with high specificity. The labelled antibody is injected into the host. In some cases, a localization of distant metastases is possible, giving an indication of tumor spreading. Detection occurs by photoscanning. (Auth.)

  15. Haptens, conjugates and antibodies for pyrimethanil fungicide

    OpenAIRE

    Mercader Badia, Josep Vicent; Abad Fuentes, Antonio; Abad Somovilla, Antonio; Agulló, Consuelo

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to haptens, conjugates and antibodies for pyrimethanil fungicide. In addition, the invention relates to the use of pyrimethanil conjugates as assay antigens or immunogens in order to obtain antibodies of the aforementioned fungicide, and to the use of the labelled derivatives of pyrimethanil as assay antigens. The invention also relates to a pyrimethanil analysis method using the antibodies obtained, at times together with assay antigens which are conjugates or labe...

  16. Initiatives of Ecological Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Sergeevich Volodin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of environment is one of the global problems for the mankind. The concept of sustainable development presented at the governmental level in 1987 urged to fix at the interstate level the basic principles of development of humanity in harmony with the nature. The Charter signed in 1991 “Business and sustainable development” proclaimed a new stage of development of world entrepreneurship – business had to become ecologicallyoriented and to form the ecologically-oriented demand. In recent years it is possible to state the huge growth of technologies of effective environmental management, energy saving and energy efficiency. The leading world corporations include reduction of the ecological aspects in priority strategic objectives, as much as possible promoting transition to the use of green technologies. “Green” experience of the Western companies showed that reduction of influence on environment is not only the task of the state, but also the effective instrument to increase competitiveness of the organization. Besides the growth of favorable perception of the company by consumers, it receives considerable decrease in prime cost of the made production or the rendered services due to effective and economical use of natural resources. Russia is among the first countries who accepted the concept of sustainable development at the legislative level, nevertheless, only recently we can note that technologies of rational environmental management, energy saving and energy efficiency became one of priority problems of its development. In the present article the advanced methods of the state and private initiatives in the field of ecological responsibility are considered, and the methods of overcoming the new challenges are offered.

  17. Anti-S100A4 Antibody Suppresses Metastasis Formation by Blocking Stroma Cell Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Jörg Klingelhöfer; Birgitte Grum-Schwensen; Beck, Mette K.; Rikke Stagaard Petersen Knudsen; Mariam Grigorian; Eugene Lukanidin; Noona Ambartsumian

    2012-01-01

    The small Ca-binding protein, S100A4, has a well-established metastasis-promoting activity. Moreover, its expression is tightly correlated with poor prognosis in patients with numerous types of cancer. Mechanistically, the extracellular S100A4 drives metastasis by affecting the tumor microenvironment, making it an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. In this study, we produced a function-blocking anti-S100A4 monoclonal antibody with metastasis-suppressing activity. Antibody treatment si...

  18. Developing a Promotional Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for Extension professionals to show clientele the benefits of their program. This article shares how promotional videos are one way of reaching audiences online. An example is given on how a promotional video has been used and developed using iMovie software. Tips are offered for how professionals can create a promotional video and…

  19. Monoclonal antibodies as diagnostics; an appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the development of Hybridoma Technology in 1975 by Kohler and Milstein, our vision for antibodies as tools for research for prevention, detection and treatment of diseases, vaccine production, antigenic characterization of pathogens and in the study of genetic regulation of immune responses and disease susceptibility has been revolutionized. The monoclonal antibodies being directed against single epitopes are homogeneous, highly specific and can be produced in unlimited quantities. In animal disease diagnosis, they are very useful for identification and antigenic characterization of pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies have tremendous applications in the field of diagnostics, therapeutics and targeted drug delivery systems, not only for infectious diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and protozoa but also for cancer, metabolic and hormonal disorders. They are also used in the diagnosis of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, tissue typing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, radio immunoassay, serotyping of microorganisms, immunological intervention with passive antibody, antiidiotype inhibition, or magic bullet therapy with cytotoxic agents coupled with anti mouse specific antibody. Recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology through genetic engineering has successfully led to the possibility of reconstruction of monoclonal antibodies viz. chimeric antibodies, humanized antibodies and complementarily determining region grafted antibodies and their enormous therapeutic use.

  20. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development. PMID:26551147

  1. Mouse monoclonal antibodies against estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Caterina; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies, by cloning hybridoma derived from the fusion of myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes, has allowed to obtain great advances in many fields of biological knowledge. The use of specific antibodies to the estrogen receptor, in fact, has been an invaluable method to bring out its mechanisms of action and its effects, both genomic and extra-genomic. Here we describe, step by step, the production of monoclonal antibodies, starting from protocol for antigen preparation to the selection of antibody-secreting hybridoma. PMID:25182770

  2. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thrombocytopenia Platelet Factor 4 Antibody Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Platelet Count , Serotonin Release Assay, Heparin-induced Platelet Aggregation All content on Lab Tests Online has been ...

  3. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  4. Monoclonal Antibodies for Lipid Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Matthew J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, biochemical and genetic studies have identified proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a major mediator of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) levels and thereby a potential novel target for reducing risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). These observations led to the development of PCSK9 inhibitors, which lower LDL-c levels more than any other non-invasive lipid-lowering therapy presently available. The PCSK9 inhibitors furthest along in clinical trials are subcutaneously injected monoclonal antibodies. These PCSK9 inhibitors have demonstrated LDL-c-lowering efficacy with acceptable safety in phase III clinical trials and may offer a useful therapy in addition to maximally tolerated HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in certain patient groups. Longer-term data are required to ensure sustained efficacy and safety of this new class of medications. This review provides an overview of the biology, genetics, development, and clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit PCSK9. PMID:27221501

  5. Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Systemic Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awa Oumar Touré

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Antiphospholipid antibodies (APLs could be associated with an increased risk of vascular pathologies in systemic scleroderma. The aim of our study was to search for APLs in patients affected by systemic scleroderma and to evaluate their involvement in the clinical manifestations of this disease. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study, from January 2009 until August 2010, with patients received at the Department of Dermatology (Dakar, Senegal. Blood samples were taken at the hematology laboratory and were analyzed for the presence of APLs. Results: Forty patients were recruited. Various types of either isolated or associated APLs were found in 23 patients, i.e. 57.5% of the study population. The most frequently encountered antibody was IgG anti-β2 GPI (37.5% of the patients, followed by anticardiolipins (17.5% and lupus anticoagulants (5%. No statistically significant association of positive antiphospholipid-related tests to any of the scleroderma complications could be demonstrated. Conclusion: A high proportion of patients showing association of systemic scleroderma and APLs suggests the presence of a morbid correlation between these 2 pathologies. It would be useful to follow a cohort of patients affected by systemic scleroderma in order to monitor vascular complications following confirmation of the presence of antiphospholipid syndrome.

  6. Cetuximab in combination with anti-human IgG antibodies efficiently down-regulates the EGF receptor by macropinocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Christian [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Madshus, Inger Helene [Institute of Pathology, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Stang, Espen, E-mail: espsta@rr-research.no [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway)

    2012-12-10

    The monoclonal antibody C225 (Cetuximab) blocks binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In addition, it is known that incubation with C225 induces endocytosis of the EGFR. This endocytosis has previously been shown to be increased when C225 is combined with an additional monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. However, the effects of antibody combinations on EGFR activation, endocytosis, trafficking and degradation have been unclear. By binding a secondary antibody to the C225-EGFR complex, we here demonstrate that a combination of antibodies can efficiently internalize and degrade the EGFR. Although the combination of antibodies activated the EGFR kinase and induced ubiquitination of the EGFR, the kinase activity was not required for internalization of the EGFR. In contrast to EGF-induced EGFR down-regulation, the antibody combination efficiently degraded the EGFR without initiating downstream proliferative signaling. The antibody-induced internalization of EGFR was found not to depend on clathrin and/or dynamin, but depended on actin polymerization, suggesting induction of macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis may cause internalization of large membrane areas, and this could explain the highly efficient internalization of the EGFR induced by combination of antibodies. -- Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cetuximab induced endocytosis of EGFR increases upon combination with anti-human IgG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination causes internalization of EGFR by macropinocytosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody-induced internalization of EGFR is independent of EGFR kinase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination may have a zipper effect and cross-link EGFRs on neighboring cells.

  7. Cetuximab in combination with anti-human IgG antibodies efficiently down-regulates the EGF receptor by macropinocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monoclonal antibody C225 (Cetuximab) blocks binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In addition, it is known that incubation with C225 induces endocytosis of the EGFR. This endocytosis has previously been shown to be increased when C225 is combined with an additional monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. However, the effects of antibody combinations on EGFR activation, endocytosis, trafficking and degradation have been unclear. By binding a secondary antibody to the C225-EGFR complex, we here demonstrate that a combination of antibodies can efficiently internalize and degrade the EGFR. Although the combination of antibodies activated the EGFR kinase and induced ubiquitination of the EGFR, the kinase activity was not required for internalization of the EGFR. In contrast to EGF-induced EGFR down-regulation, the antibody combination efficiently degraded the EGFR without initiating downstream proliferative signaling. The antibody-induced internalization of EGFR was found not to depend on clathrin and/or dynamin, but depended on actin polymerization, suggesting induction of macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis may cause internalization of large membrane areas, and this could explain the highly efficient internalization of the EGFR induced by combination of antibodies. -- Highlight: ► Cetuximab induced endocytosis of EGFR increases upon combination with anti-human IgG. ► Antibody combination causes internalization of EGFR by macropinocytosis. ► Antibody-induced internalization of EGFR is independent of EGFR kinase activity. ► Antibody combination may have a zipper effect and cross-link EGFRs on neighboring cells.

  8. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do not...... scFvs were sequenced and characterized, and specificity was characterized by ELISA. The methods developed in this study are universally applicable for antibody phage display to efficiently produce antibody fragments against small peptides....

  9. Stratification of Antibody-Positive Subjects by Antibody Level Reveals an Impact of Immunogenicity on Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A.; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J.; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2012-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic....

  10. High level transient production of recombinant antibodies and antibody fusion proteins in HEK293 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jäger, Volker; Büssow, Konrad; Wagner, Andreas; Weber, Susanne; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand of monospecific high affinity binding reagents, particularly monoclonal antibodies, has been steadily increasing over the last years. Enhanced throughput of antibody generation has been addressed by optimizing in vitro selection using phage display which moved the major bottleneck to the production and purification of recombinant antibodies in an end-user friendly format. Single chain (sc)Fv antibody fragments require additional tags for detection and are not as suitable...

  11. Antibodies to human fetal erythroid cells from a nonimmune phage antibody library

    OpenAIRE

    Huie, Michael A.; Cheung, Mei-Chi; Muench, Marcus O.; Becerril, Baltazar; Kan, Yuet W.; Marks, James D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to isolate fetal nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) from the maternal circulation makes possible prenatal genetic analysis without the need for diagnostic procedures that are invasive for the fetus. Such isolation requires antibodies specific to fetal NRBCs. To generate a panel of antibodies to antigens present on fetal NRBCs, a new type of nonimmune phage antibody library was generated in which multiple copies of antibody fragments are displayed on each pha...

  12. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. These maternal antibodies, depending on the pathogen, can provide early protection from some diseases, but it may also interfere with the vaccination re...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  14. Isolated Central Nervous System Vasculitis Associated with Antiribonuclear Protein Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer M. Awad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a young woman who was referred to a tertiary care center with unexplained subacute progressive encephalopathy preceded by long-standing severe headaches. Her extensive workup was remarkable for abnormal intracranial angiography suggestive of small- and medium-vessel vasculitis, persistently elevated protein in the cerebrospinal fluid and persistently high titers of antiribonuclear protein antibody. The patient showed a modest response to intravenous high-dose steroids. We propose that the patient's neurologic disease is secondary to immune-mediated central nervous system vasculitis, possibly as an initial manifestation of mixed connective tissue disease.

  15. An alternative chemical redox method for the production of bispecific antibodies: implication in rapid detection of food borne pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Owais

    Full Text Available Bi-functional antibodies with the ability to bind two unrelated epitopes have remarkable potential in diagnostic and bio-sensing applications. In the present study, bispecific antibodies that recognize human red blood cell (RBC and the food borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes were engineered. The procedure involves initial reduction of a mixture of anti-RBC and anti-Listeria antibodies followed by gradual re-oxidation of the reduced disulphides. This facilitates association of the separated antibody chains and formation of hybrid immunoglobulins with affinity for the L. monocytogenes and human RBC. The bispecific antibodies caused the agglutination of the RBCs only in the presence of L. monocytogenes cells. The agglutination process necessitated the specific presence of L. monocytogenes and the red colored clumps formed were readily visible with naked eyes. The RBC agglutination assay described here provides a remarkably simple approach for the rapid and highly specific screening of various pathogens in their biological niches.

  16. Promoter clearance by RNA polymerase II

    OpenAIRE

    Luse, Donal S.

    2012-01-01

    Many changes must occur to the RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription complex as it makes the transition from initiation into transcript elongation. During this intermediate phase of transcription, contact with initiation factors is lost and stable association with the nascent transcript is established. These changes collectively comprise promoter clearance. Once the transcript elongation complex has reached a point where its properties are indistinguishable from those of complexes with muc...

  17. Antibody degradation in tobacco plants: a predominantly apoplastic process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hehle Verena K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in using plants for production of recombinant proteins such as monoclonal antibodies is growing, but proteolytic degradation, leading to a loss of functionality and complications in downstream purification, is still a serious problem. Results In this study, we investigated the dynamics of the assembly and breakdown of a human IgG1κ antibody expressed in plants. Initial studies in a human IgG transgenic plant line suggested that IgG fragments were present prior to extraction. Indeed, when the proteolytic activity of non-transgenic Nicotiana tabacum leaf extracts was tested against a human IgG1 substrate, little activity was detectable in extraction buffers with pH > 5. Significant degradation was only observed when the plant extract was buffered below pH 5, but this proteolysis could be abrogated by addition of protease inhibitors. Pulse-chase analysis of IgG MAb transgenic plants also demonstrated that IgG assembly intermediates are present intracellularly and are not secreted, and indicates that the majority of proteolytic degradation occurs following secretion into the apoplastic space. Conclusions The results provide evidence that proteolytic fragments derived from antibodies of the IgG subtype expressed in tobacco plants do not accumulate within the cell, and are instead likely to occur in the apoplastic space. Furthermore, any proteolytic activity due to the release of proteases from subcellular compartments during tissue disruption and extraction is not a major consideration under most commonly used extraction conditions.

  18. Overview of tumor promotion in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaga, T J

    1983-04-01

    Our present understanding of two-stage carcinogenesis encompasses almost four decades of research. Evidence for chemical promotion or cocarcinogenesis was first provided by Berenblum, who reported that a regimen of croton oil (weak or noncarcinogenic) applied alternately with small doses of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) to mouse skin induced a larger number of tumors than BP alone. Subsequently, Moltram found that a single subcarcinogenic dose of BP followed by multiple applications of croton oil could induce a large number of skin tumors. These investigations as well as a number of others, such as Boutwell, Van Duuren and Hecker, were responsible in defining many important aspects of the initiation and promotion of two-stage carcinogenesis. The initiation stage in mouse skin requires only a single application of either a direct-acting carcinogen or a procarcinogen and is essentially an irreversible step which as data suggests probably involves a somatic cell mutation. The promotion stage in mouse skin can be accomplished by a wide variety of weak or noncarcinogenic agents and is initially reversible later becoming irreversible. Current information suggests that skin tumor promoters are not mutagenic but bring about a number of important epigenetic changes, such as epidermal hyperplasia, and an increase in polyamines, prostaglandins and dark basal keratinocytes as well as other embryonic conditions. Recently, tumor promotion in mouse skin was shown to consist of at least two stages, in which each stage can be accomplished by either a known promoter or a weak or nonpromoting agent. Some of the important characteristics of the first stage of promotion are: (1) only one application of a first-stage promoter, such as phorbol ester tumor promoters, calcium ionophore A23187, hydrogen peroxide and wounding is needed; (2) the action is partially irreversible; (3) an increase in dark basal keratinocytes and prostaglandins is important; and (4) such an increase can be inhibited by

  19. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duval, A; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J B; Hoiby, P E; Missier, V; Pedersen, L H; Hansen, Theis Peter; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Bang, Ole

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy and...

  20. Receptor antibodies as novel therapeutics for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussar, Siegfried; Vienberg, Sara Gry; Kahn, C Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to receptors can block or mimic hormone action. Taking advantage of receptor isoforms, co-receptors, and other receptor modulating proteins, antibodies and other designer ligands can enhance tissue specificity and provide new approaches to the therapy of diabetes and other diseases....

  1. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  2. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  3. Thyrotropin receptor antibodies and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAb) are not homogeneous, which are composed by four antibodies at least. TRAb plays very important roles in autoimmune thyroid diseases ad off-thyroid symptoms associated, and other thyroiditis in clinical diagnosis, assessment of curative effects, determination of the time to stop medicine, prognostication of recurrence and inspection of high risk population

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona.

    OpenAIRE

    Ainsworth, A J; Lester, T L; Capley, G

    1985-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies produced against Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona have been studied for their diagnostic usefulness. All three monoclonals reacted strongly in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect fluorescent antibody test with serovar pomona and did not react with serovars grippotyphosa, canicola, icterohaemorrhagiae and hardjo.

  5. "Unconventional" Neutralizing Activity of Antibodies Against HIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are recognized to be one of the essential elements of the adaptive immune response that must be induced by an effective vaccine against HIV. However, only a limited number of antibodies have been identified to neutralize a broad range of primary isolates of HIV-1 and attempts to induce such antibodies by immunization were unsuccessful. The difficulties to generate such antibodies are mainly due to intrinsic properties of HIV-1 envelope spikes, such as high sequence diversity, heavy glycosylation, and inducible and transient nature of certain epitopes. In vitro neutralizing antibodies are identified using "conventional" neutralization assay which uses phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human PBMCs as target cells. Thus, in essence the assay evaluates HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells. Recently, several laboratories including us demonstrated that some monoclonal antibodies and HIV-1-specific polyclonal IgG purified from patient sera, although they do not have neutralizing activity when tested by the "conventional" neutralization assay, do exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity in "unconventional" ways. The neutralizing activity of these antibodies and IgG fractions is acquired through post-translational modifications, through opsonization of virus particles into macrophages and immature dendritic cells (iDCs), or through expression of antibodies on the surface of HIV-1-susceptible cells. This review will focus on recent findings of this area and point out their potential applications in the development of preventive strategies against HIV.

  6. Determination of Biotin: Antibody Molar Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of the biotinylation yield (number of biotin molecules per molecule of antibody) is important to ensure that the MAb has maintained its immunoreactivity. If the biotinylation of the MAb is carried out with a molar ratio of biotin:antibody ~10:1, then the number of biotins per MAb usually ranges between 6 and 8

  7. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  8. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  9. Nano antibody therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanomedicine, an offshoot of nanotechnology, refers to highly specific medical intervention at the molecular scale for curing disease or repairing damaged tissues, such as bone, muscle, or nerve. Nanotechnology can have an early, paradigm-changing impact on how clinicians will detect cancer in its earliest stages. Exquisitely sensitive devices constructed of nanoscale components-such as nanocantilevers, nanowires and nanochannels-offer the potential for detecting even the rarest molecular signals associated with malignancy. One of the most pressing needs in clinical oncology is for imaging agents that can identify tumors that are far smaller than is possible with today's technology, at a scale of 100,000 cells rather than 1,000,000,000 cells. A new approach in nanotechnology for treating cancer incorporates nano iron particles and attaches them to an antibody that has targets only cancer cells and not healthy cells. The treatment works in two steps. This treatment is an ingenious way to make localized tumor ablation a systemic treatment. The advantages are incredible. There are absolutely no side effects from this treatment. It is not painful or even uncomfortable. The iron particles get flushed harmlessly from the body. It is not a drug and so the cancer cannot build up a resistance to the treatment. It is a systematic treatment; even cancer cells and tumors that are not known about get heated up and ablated. This treatment can even be used to enhance imaging of the cancer because once the cancer cells are coated with the iron particles, they are easy to identify. Everything depends on how reliably the antibodies target cancer cells and not healthy cells. When used in conjunction with other systemic treatments, such as vaccine treatments, we could be looking at a time when even advanced cancers can be brought under control. (author)

  10. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-mediated cell recognition plays a critical role in various biological and biomedical applications. However, strong antibody-cell interactions can lead to the difficulty of separating antibodies from the bound cells in a simple and non-destructive manner, which is often necessary to numerous applications such as cell sorting or separation. Thus, this thesis research is aimed to create an antibody-like nanomaterial with the function of reversible cell recognition It was hypothesized that nucleic acid aptamer and dendrimer could be used as fundamental structural components to develop an antibody-like nanomaterial. The aptamer functions as the binding site of an antibody; the dendrimer is used as a robust, defined nano-scaffold to support the aptamer and to carry small molecules (e.g., fluorophores). To test this hypothesis, a novel method was first developed to discover the essential nucleotides of full-length aptamers to mimic the binding sites of antibodies. The essential nucleotides were further conjugated with a dendrimer to synthesize a monovalent aptamer-dendrimer nanomaterial. The results clearly showed that the essential nucleotides could maintain high affinity and specificity after tethered on dendrimer surface. To further test the hypothesis that antibody-like nanomaterials can be rationally designed to acquire the capability of reversible cell recognition, an aptamer that was selected at 0 °C was used as a model to synthesize a "Y-shaped" nanomaterial by conjugating two aptamers to the same dendrimer. The results showed that the nanomaterial-cell interaction could be affected by the distance between two binding aptamers. In addition, the "Y-shaped" antibody-like nanomaterial could bind target cells more strongly than its monovalent control. Importantly, the strong cell-nanomaterial interaction could be rapidly reversed when the temperature was shifted from 0 °C to 37 °C. In summary, we developed a synthetic antibody that can not only mimic the

  11. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana; Clemmentsen, I; Schumacher, H; Høiby, N

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody...... response was studied with serum samples collected in 1992 from 56 CF patients in a cross-sectional study and with serum samples from 18 CF patients in a longitudinal study. Anti-beta-lactamase immunoglobulin G antibodies were present in all of the serum samples from the patients with chronic...... bronchopulmonary P. aeruginosa infection (CF + P) but in none of the CF patients with no or intermittent P. aeruginosa infection. Anti-beta-lactamase antibodies were present in serum from CF + P patients after six antipseudomonal courses (median) and correlated with infection with a beta-lactam-resistant strain of...

  12. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  13. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  14. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  15. Vaccine-induced cross-genotype reactive neutralizing antibodies against hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Gottwein, Judith M; Houghton, Michael; Russell, Rodney S; Emerson, Suzanne U; Bukh, Jens; Purcell, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    We detected cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (NtAb) against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in chimpanzees vaccinated with HCV-1 (genotype 1a) recombinant E1/E2 envelope glycoproteins. Five vaccinated chimpanzees, protected following HCV-1 challenge, were initially studied using the heterologous H77...

  16. An Approach to Breast Cancer Immunotherapy: The Apoptotic Activity of Recombinant Anti-Interleukin-6 Monoclonal Antibodies in Intact Tumour Microenvironment of Breast Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Shousha, S; Moaaz, M; Sheta, M; Motawea, M A

    2016-06-01

    Current work is one of our comprehensive preclinical studies, a new approach to breast cancer (BC) immunotherapy through induction of tumour cell apoptosis. Tumour growth is not just a result of uncontrolled cell proliferation but also of reduced apoptosis. High levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) are associated with metastatic BC and correlated with poor survival as it promotes growth of tumour-initiating cells during early tumorigenesis protecting these cells from apoptosis. Therefore, this study aims at investigating the potential of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies to suppress IL-6 proliferative/anti-apoptotic activities in intact tumour microenvironment of BC. Fresh sterile tumour and normal breast tissue specimens were taken from 50 female Egyptian patients with BC undergoing radical mastectomy. A unique tissue culture system designed to provide cells of each intact tumour/normal tissue sample with its proper microenvironment either supplemented or not with anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies. To evaluate the apoptotic activity of anti-IL-6 as a novel candidate for BC treatment strategy, we compared its effects with those obtained using tumour necrosis-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL as an established apoptotic agent. Our results revealed that levels of either anti-IL-6- or TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the tumour or normal tissue cultures were significantly higher than those in their corresponding untreated ones (P Recombinant anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies could represent a novel effective element of immunotherapeutic treatment strategy for BC. The selectivity and anti-apoptotic potential of anti-IL-6 is highly hopeful in IL-6- abundant BC tumour microenvironment. PMID:26971879

  17. Serological survey of normal humans for natural antibody to cell surface antigens of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, A N; Taormina, M C; Ikeda, H; Watanabe, T; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1980-01-01

    Sera of 106 normal adult men were tested for antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens of three established lines of cultured malignant melanoma. Positive reactions with a protein A assay for IgG antibodies were extremely rare (1-2%). The frequency of positive reactions with assays for IgM antibodies was higher: 5-15% in immune adherence assays and 55-82% in anti-C3 mixed hemadsorption assays. After low-titered sera and sera reacting with fetal calf serum components, conventional alloantigens, and widely distributed class 3 antigens were excluded, sera from seven individuals (one with IgG antibody and six with IgM antibodies) were selected for detailed analysis. The serum containing the IgG antibody came from a healthy 65-year-old Caucasian man; titers of antibody in his serum ranged from < 1/10 to 1/40,000 in tests with different melanoma cell lines. This IgG antibody identifies a differentiation antigen of melanocytes, provisionally designated Mel 1, that distinguishes two classes of melanomas: 22 melanoma cell lines typed Mel 1+ and 17 types Mel 1-. Mel 1 is expressed by fetal fibroblasts but not adult fibroblasts and can be found on a proportion of cultured epithelial cancer cell lines (5 out of 23) but not on glioma or B-cell lines. The melanoma antigens detected by the naturally occurring IgM antibodies are serologically unrelated to Mel 1 but, like Mel 1, appear to be differentiation antigens that distinguish subsets of melanoma. These IgM antibodies detect antigens that are identical or closely related to the AH antigen, a melanoma surface antigen that was initially defined by autologous antibody in a patient with melanoma. In view of the immunogenicity of both Mel 1 and the AH antigens in humans and their occurrence on more than 50% of melanomas, it remains to be seen whether antibody to these antigens can be elicited by specific vaccination of seronegative melanoma patients and whether this will have an influence on the clinical course of the disease

  18. HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) -Mediating Antibodies Decline while NK Cell Function Increases during Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Jensen, Sanne; Fomsgaard, Anders; Borggren, Marie; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Rasmussen, Line Dahlerup; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Understanding alterations in HIV-specific immune responses during antiretroviral therapy (ART), such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is important in the development of novel strategies to control HIV-1 infection. This study included 53 HIV-1 positive individuals. We evaluated...... the ability of effector cells and antibodies to mediate ADCC separately and in combination using the ADCC-PanToxiLux assay. The ability of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mediate ADCC was significantly higher in individuals who had been treated with ART before seroconversion......, compared to the individuals initiating ART at a low CD4+ T cell count (<350 cells/μl blood) and the ART-naïve individuals. The frequency of CD16 expressing natural killer (NK) cells correlated with both the duration of ART and Granzyme B (GzB) activity. In contrast, the plasma titer of antibodies mediating...

  19. Therapeutic approaches in antibody-associated central nervous system pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnorat, J

    2014-10-01

    Initially, antibodies targeting intracellular compounds were described in patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) such as anti-Hu, anti-Yo, anti-Ri or anti-CV2/CRMP5 antibodies. As more than 90% of patients with these antibodies suffer from an associated cancer, these antibodies were used as biomarkers of an underlying tumour. Recently, autoantibodies targeting cell-surface synaptic antigens have been described in patients with neurological symptoms suggesting PNS. These autoantibodies being less frequently associated with a tumour, they completely changed the concept of PNS. They lead to a new classification, not based on clinical symptoms or oncological status but on the location of the targeted antigens. Three groups of autoantibodies can be delineated according to the neuronal localization of the targeted antigen: Group 1: cytoplasmic neuronal antigens (CNA) (anti-Hu, Yo, CV2/CRMP5, Ri, Ma1/2, Sox, Zic4). Group 2: cell-surface neuronal antigens (CSNA) (anti-NMDAR, Lgi1, CASPR2, VGCC, AMPAr, GlyR, DNER, GABABR, GABAAR, IgLONS, mGluR1 and mGluR5). Group 3: intracellular synaptic antigens (ISA) (anti-GAD65 and anti-amphiphysin). More than being solely a classification of patients, these three groups are related to profound differences in the pathophysiology and in the pathogenic role of the associated autoantibody. According to the type of associated autoantibody, the age and sex of patients, physicians are now able to predict the presence or absence of tumour, the clinical evolution and prognostic and also the response to immunomodulator treatments that differ fundamentally from one group to the others. PMID:25189679

  20. Isolation of Balamuthia mandrillaris-specific antibody fragments from a bacteriophage antibody display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Kulsoom, Huma; Lalani, Salima; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a protist pathogen that can cause encephalitis with a mortality rate of more than 95%. Early diagnosis followed by aggressive treatment is a pre-requisite for successful prognosis. Current methods for identifying this organism rely on culture and microscopy, antibody-based methods using animals, or involve the use of molecular tools that are expensive. Here, we describe the isolation of antibody fragments that can be used for the unequivocal identification of B. mandrillaris. B. mandrillaris-specific antibody fragments were isolated from a bacteriophage antibody display library. Individual clones were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunofluorescence. Four antibody clones showed specific binding to B. mandrillaris. The usefulness of phage antibody display technology as a diagnostic tool for isolating antibody fragments against B. mandrillaris antigens and studying their biological role(s) is discussed further. PMID:27055361

  1. Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization at low temperatures was studied. The antibody activity of antibody was not affected by irradiation at an irradiation dose of below 8 MR and low temperatures. Immobilization of peroxidase-labeled anti-rabbit IgG goat IgG, anti-peroxidase, peroxidase, and anti-alpha-fetoprotein was carried out with hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers. The activity of the immobilized enzyme-labeled antibody membranes varied with the thickness of the membranes and increased with decreasing membrane thickness. The activity of the immobilized antibody particles was varied by particle size. Immobilized anti-alpha-fetoprotein particles and membranes can be used for the assay of alpha-fetoprotein by the antigen-antibody reaction, such as a solid-phase sandwich method with high sensitivity

  2. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. PMID:26104192

  3. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To Promote Translational Research and Development Opportunities of Nanotechnology-Based Cancer Solutions... industry partnership called TONIC (Translation Of Nanotechnology In Cancer) to promote...

  4. 7 CFR 1219.31 - Initial nomination and appointment of producer members and alternates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order The Hass Avocado Board § 1219.31 Initial nomination and appointment of...

  5. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, A.I.; Khawli, L.A.

    1991-02-19

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabeled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody. No Drawings

  6. A SHORT HISTORY OF THE INITIAL APPLICATION OF ANTI-5-BRDU TO THE DETECTION AND MEASUREMENT OF S PHASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACTBackground: The early history of the development of an antibody to 5-BrdU for the detection and quantitation of DNA synthesis is described. The period covered includes the original concept, which employed a polyclonal antibody, through the creation and initial testing...

  7. Successful event promotions

    OpenAIRE

    Vitikainen, Anna; Pakarinen, Siiri

    2015-01-01

    The field of event promotions is a growing industry. As it is still a new area of business, the information available is broad and not very detailed. Promotions are usually seen as a bigger field in advertising and specific information about event promotions is more difficult to find. Today marketing is shifting from basic, traditional advertising to digital marketing and telling the brands’ story by creating an unforgettable and positive experience. Companies are trying to come up with new w...

  8. Is Lamb Promotion Working?

    OpenAIRE

    Capps, Oral, Jr.; Williams, Gary W.

    2007-01-01

    This objective of this study is to determine whether the advertising and promotion dollars collected and spent by the American Lamb Board on lamb promotion since the inception of the Lamb Checkoff Program have effectively increased lamb consumption in the United States. The main conclusion is that program has resulted in roughly 7.6 additional pounds of total lamb consumption per dollar spent on advertising and promotion and $41.59 in additional lamb sales per dollar spent on advertising and ...

  9. Strategic Promotion and Compensation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhardt, Dan

    1995-01-01

    Within a hierarchical firm structure, this paper details how the composition of a worker's skills and the nonobservability of a worker's ability affect wage and promotion paths. Promotion-based compensation schemes derive naturally from the worker's asymmetrically observed ability. Promotion takes place over time and is inefficient since employers strategically exploit their knowledge of an able worker's ability. Conversely, employers may be unable to efficiently demote and retain bad manager...

  10. Simple Method To Prepare Oligonucleotide-Conjugated Antibodies and Its Application in Multiplex Protein Detection in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haibiao; Holcomb, Ilona; Ooi, Aik; Wang, Xiaohui; Majonis, Daniel; Unger, Marc A; Ramakrishnan, Ramesh

    2016-01-20

    The diversity of nucleic acid sequences enables genomics studies in a highly multiplexed format. Since multiplex protein detection is still a challenge, it would be useful to use genomics tools for this purpose. This can be accomplished by conjugating specific oligonucleotides to antibodies. Upon binding of the oligonucleotide-conjugated antibodies to their targets, the protein levels can be converted to oligonucleotide levels. In this report we describe a simple method for preparing oligonucleotide-conjugated antibodies and discuss this method's application in oligonucleotide extension reaction (OER) for multiplex protein detection. Conjugation is based on strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (the Cu-free click reaction), in which the antibody is activated with a dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) moiety and subsequently linked covalently with an azide-modified oligonucleotide. In the functional test, the reaction conditions and purification processes were optimized to achieve maximum yield and best performance. The OER assay employs a pair of antibody binders (two antibodies, each conjugated with its own oligonucleotide) developed for each protein target. The two oligonucleotides contain unique six-base complementary regions at their 3' prime ends to allow annealing and extension by DNA synthesis enzymes to form a DNA template. Following preamplification, the DNA template is detected by qPCR. Distinct oligonucleotide sequences are assigned to different antibody binders to enable multiplex protein detection. When tested using recombinant proteins, some antibody binders, such as those specific to CSTB, MET, EpCAM, and CASP3, had dynamic ranges of 5-6 logs. The antibody binders were also used in a multiplexed format in OER assays, and the binders successfully detected their protein targets in cell lysates, and in single cells in combination with the C1 system. This click reaction-based antibody conjugation procedure is cost-effective, needs minimal hands-on time, and

  11. School Health Promotion and Teacher Professional Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Didier; Simar, Carine; Deasy, Christine; Carvalho, Graça S.; McNamara, Patricia Mannix

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Health and education are inextricably linked. Health promotion sits somewhat uncomfortably within schools, often remaining a marginal aspect of teachers' work. The purpose of this paper is to examine the compatibility of an HP-initiative with teacher professional identity. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative research design was…

  12. Promoting the female condom to refugees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Papo

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available UNHCR and its partners have been providing male condoms since the late 1990s. However, uptake remains alarmingly low. Will the agency be more successful in promoting the female condom, a female-initiated barrier method of contraception and disease prevention?

  13. 21 CFR 601.94 - Promotional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Promotional materials. 601.94 Section 601.94 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS... initial publication of the advertisement....

  14. 21 CFR 601.45 - Promotional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Promotional materials. 601.45 Section 601.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS... initial publication of the advertisement....

  15. European nuclear education initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whatever option regarding their future nuclear energy development is chosen by European Union Member States, the availability of a sufficient number of well trained and experienced staff is key for the responsible use of nuclear energy. This is true in all areas including design, construction, operation, decommissioning, fuel cycle and waste management as well as radiation protection. Given the high average age of existing experts leading to a significant retirement induce a real risk of the loss of nuclear competencies in the coming years. Therefore the demand of hiring skilled employees is rising. The challenge of ensuring a sufficient number of qualified staff in the nuclear sector has been acknowledged widely among the different stakeholders, in particular the nuclear industry, national regulatory authorities and Technical Support Organisations (TSOs). Already the EURATOM Treaty refers explicitly to the obligation for the Commission to carry out training actions. Recently initiatives have been launched at EU level to facilitate and strengthen the efforts of national stakeholders. The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association aims at preservation and further development of expertise in the nuclear field by higher education and training. The goal of the European Nuclear Energy Leadership Academy (ENELA) is to educate future leaders in the nuclear field to ensure the further development of sustainable European nuclear energy solutions The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) is a platform operated by the European Commission for a broad discussion on the opportunities and risks of nuclear energy. The nuclear programs under investigation in the Joint Research Center (JRC) are increasingly contributing to Education and Training (E and T) initiatives, promoting a better cooperation between key players and universities as well as operators and regulatory bodies in order to mutually optimise their training programmes. Another objective is to increase

  16. Generation and characterization of heavy chain antibodies derived from Camelids

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidthals, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies and antibody fragments are essential tools in basic research, diagnostics and therapy. Conventional antibodies consist of two heavy and two light chains with both chains contributing to the antigen-binding site. In addition to these conventional antibodies, camelids (llamas, alpacas, dromedaries and camels) possess so-called heavy chain antibodies (hcAbs) that lack the light chains. The antigen binding site of these unusual antibodies is formed by one single domain only, the so cal...

  17. Food waste and promotions

    OpenAIRE

    LE BORGNE, Guillaume; Sirieix, Lucie; Costa, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    This research builds a conceptual framework to analyze the links between promotions and food waste, based on the results of a qualitative study on 20 French consumers. More precisely, we study how promotions may increase food waste, but also how this wastage may change consumer’s perception of promotions. ....French Abstract : Cet article propose un cadre conceptuel pour l’analyse des liens entre les promotions et le gaspillage alimentaire, basé sur les résultats d’une enquête qualitative men...

  18. Analysis of promotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Bozhkova

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Article describes the classification of promotions and determining the effectiveness of specific measures to stimulate sales (which isnt possible practically in most advertising companies.

  19. Health promotion in globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Franco-Giraldo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to unravel some theoretical and factual elements required to implement more effective health promotion strategies and practices in the field of health services whilst following the great challenges that globalization has imposed on the health systems, which are inevitably expressed in the local context (glocalization. Methodology: a narrative review taking into account the concepts of globalization and health promotion in relation to health determinants. The authors approach some courses of action and strategies for health promotion based on the social principles and universal values that guide health promotion, health service reorientation and primary healthcare, empowerment, social participation, and inter-sectoral and social mobilization. Discussion: the discussion focuses on the redirection of health promotion services in relation to the wave of health reforms that has spread throughout the world under the neoliberal rule. The author also discusses health promotion, its ineffectiveness, and the quest for renewal. Likewise, the author sets priorities for health promotion in relation to social determinants. Conclusion: the current global order, in terms of international relations, is not consistent with the ethical principles of health promotion. In this paper, the author advocates for the implementation of actions to change the social and physical life conditions of people based on changes in the use of power in society and the appropriate practice of politics in the context of globalization in order to achieve the effectiveness of the actions of health promotion.

  20. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-01-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  1. Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) – findings on cross reactivity and longevity of TBEV antibodies in animal sera

    OpenAIRE

    Klaus, Christine; Ziegler, Ute; Kalthoff, Donata; Hoffmann, Bernd; Beer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background By using animal sera as sentinels, natural TBEV foci could be identified and further analyses including investigations of ticks could be initiated. However, antibody response against TBEV-related flaviviruses might adversely affect the readout of such a monitoring. Therefore, the cross-reactivity of the applied TBEV serology test systems – enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and virus neutralization test (VNT) – as well as the longevity of TBEV antibody titres in sheep and go...

  2. Antibody-directed targeting of lysostaphin adsorbed onto polylactide nanoparticles increases its antimicrobial activity against S. aureus in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper was to study the effect of antibody-directed targeting of S. aureus by comparing the activities of lysostaphin conjugated to biodegradable polylactide nanoparticles (NPs) in the presence and in the absence of co-immobilized anti-S. aureus antibody. Lysostaphin–antibody–NP conjugates were synthesized through physical adsorption at different enzyme:antibody:NP ratios. The synthesized enzyme–NP conjugates were characterized by means of dynamic light scattering and zeta potential analysis, and the total protein binding yield on the NPs was characterized using Alexa Fluor 350 and 594 dyes for the S. aureus antibody and lysostaphin respectively. We observed enhanced antimicrobial activity for both enzyme-coated and enzyme–antibody-coated NPs for lysostaphin coatings corresponding to ∼ 40% of the initial monolayer and higher compared to the free enzyme case (p < 0.05). At the highest antibody coating concentration, bacterial lysis rates for antibody-coated samples were significantly higher than for lysostaphin-coated samples lacking the antibody (p < 0.05). Such enzyme–NP conjugates thus have the potential for becoming novel therapeutic agents for treating antibiotic-resistant S. aureus infections.

  3. CoSMoS Unravels Mysteries of Transcription Initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Gourse, Richard L.; Landick, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Using a fluorescence method called colocalization single-molecule spectroscopy (CoSMoS), Friedman and Gelles dissect the kinetics of transcription initiation at a bacterial promoter. Ultimately, CoSMoS could greatly aid the study of the effects of DNA sequence and transcription factors on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic promoters.

  4. Origin, diversity and maturation of human antiviral antibodies analyzed by high-throughput sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponraj ePrabakaran

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of how antibodies are generated and function could help develop effective vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics against viruses such as HIV-1, SARS Coronavirus (CoV, and Hendra and Nipah viruses (henipaviruses. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs against the HIV-1 were observed in patients, elicitation of such bnAbs remains a major challenge when compared to other viral targets. We previously hypothesized that HIV-1 could have evolved a strategy to evade the immune system due to absent or very weak binding of germline antibodies to the conserved epitopes that may not be sufficient to initiate and/or maintain an effective immune response. To further explore our hypothesis, we used the 454 sequence analysis of a large naïve library of human IgM antibodies which had been used for selecting antibodies against SARS Coronavirus (CoV receptor-binding domain (RBD, and soluble G proteins (sG of Hendra and Nipah viruses (henipaviruses. We found that the human IgM repertoires from the 454 sequencing have diverse germline usages, recombination patterns, junction diversity and a lower extent of somatic mutation. In this study, we identified germline intermediates of antibodies specific to HIV-1 and other viruses as observed in normal individuals, and compared their genetic diversity and somatic mutation level along with available structural and functional data. Further computational analysis will provide framework for understanding the underlying genetic and molecular determinants related to maturation pathways of antiviral bnAbs that could be useful for applying novel approaches to the design of effective vaccine immunogens and antibody-based therapeutics.

  5. Seroprevalence of unexpected red blood cell antibodies among pregnant women in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eipl, K; Nakabiito, C; Bwogi, K; Motevalli, M; Roots, A; Blagg, L; Jackson, J B

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study among pregnant women in Kampala, Uganda, to determine ABO and D blood types and to determine the percentage who have unexpected red blood cell (RBC) antibodies and their specificities. De-identified blood samples from routine testing of 1001 pregnant women at the Mulago Hospital antenatal clinics in Kampala were typed for ABO and D and screened for the presence of unexpected RBC antibodies with confirmation and subsequent antibody identification. Of the 1001 blood samples tested, 48.9 percent, 26.4 percent, 21.0 percent, and 3.8 percent tested positive for blood groups 0, A, B, and AB, respectively. Of these samples, 23 (2.3%)were negative forD, and 55 (5.5%) showed initial reactivity with at least one screening RBC. The RBC antibody screen was repeated on these 55 samples, and antibody identification was performed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Blood Bank in Baltimore, Maryland. Twenty-one of the 55 samples were confirmed to have evidence of agglutination. Nine of the 21 samples demonstrated the presence of clinically significant RBC antibodies with anti-S being the most common, 8 samples demonstrated the presence of benign or naturally occurring antibodies, and 4 had only inconclusive reactivity. This study revealed a relatively high frequency of D and a low frequency of demonstrable clinically significant alloantibodies that may cause hemolytic disease of the newborn or hemolytic transfusion reactions among pregnant women in Kampala, with anti-S being the most frequent antibody specificity. PMID:23421539

  6. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    OpenAIRE

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference ...

  7. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodis, Ioannis; Arnaud, Laurent; Gerhardsson, Jakob; Zickert, Agneta; Sundelin, Birgitta; Malmström, Vivianne; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204) or without (n = 294) LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous), before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes). Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8). Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all), but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are affected by

  8. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Parodis

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204 or without (n = 294 LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous, before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes. Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8. Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all, but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are

  9. Distinctive effects of CD34- and CD133-specific antibody-coated stents on re-endothelialization and in-stent restenosis at the early phase of vascular injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xue; Yin, Tieying; Tian, Jie; Tang, Chaojun; Huang, Junli; Zhao, Yinping; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Yu, Donghong; Wang, Guixue

    2015-01-01

    antibodies) to promote adhesion and proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The in vitro study revealed that the adhesion force enabled the EPCs coated on glass slides to withstand flow-induced shear stress, so that allowing for the growth of the cells on the slides for 48 h. The in vivo...... capturing EPCs is better than anti-CD34 antibody in promoting endothelialization and reducing ISR....

  10. Fayette County Better Buildings Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capella, Arthur

    2015-03-04

    The Fayette County Better Buildings Initiative represented a comprehensive and collaborative approach to promoting and implementing energy efficiency improvements. The initiative was designed to focus on implementing energy efficiency improvements in residential units, while simultaneously supporting general marketing of the benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures. The ultimate goal of Fayette County’s Better Buildings Initiative was to implement a total of 1,067 residential energy efficiency retrofits with a minimum 15% estimated energy efficiency savings per unit. Program partners included: United States Department of Energy, Allegheny Power, and Private Industry Council of Westmoreland-Fayette, Fayette County Redevelopment Authority, and various local partners. The program was open to any Fayette County residents who own their home and meet the prequalifying conditions. The level of assistance offered depended upon household income and commitment to undergo a BPI – Certified Audit and implement energy efficiency measures, which aimed to result in at least a 15% reduction in energy usage. The initiative was designed to focus on implementing energy efficiency improvements in residential units, while simultaneously supporting general marketing of the benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures. Additionally, the program had components that involved recruitment and training for employment of persons in the energy sector (green jobs), as well as marketing and implementation of a commercial or community facilities component. The residential component of Fayette County’s Better Buildings Initiative involved a comprehensive approach, providing assistance to low- moderate- and market-rate homeowners. The initiative will also coordinate activities with local utility providers to further incentivize energy efficiency improvements among qualifying homeowners. The commercial component of Fayette County’s Better Building Initiative involved grants

  11. Antibodies Against Three Forms of Urokinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that bind to preselected regions of the urokinase molecule have been developed. These antibodies can be used to measure small quantities of each of three molecular forms of urokinase that could be contained in microsamples or conditioned media harvested from cultures of mammalian cells. Previously available antibodies and assay techniques do not yield both clear distinctions among, and measurements of, all three forms. Urokinase is a zymogen that is synthesized in a single-chain form, called ScuPA, which is composed of 411 amino acid residues (see figure). ScuPA has very little enzyme activity, but it can be activated in two ways: (1) by cleavage of the peptide bond lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the loss of lysine 158 to obtain the high molecular-weight (HMW) form of the enzyme or (2) by cleavage of the bond lysine 135/lysine 136 to obtain the low-molecular-weight (LMW) form of the enzyme. The antibodies in question were produced in mice and rabbits by use of peptides as immunogens. The peptides were selected to obtain antibodies that bind to regions of ScuPA that include the lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the lysine 135/lysine 136 bonds. The antibodies include monoclonal and polyclonal ones that yield indications as to whether either of these bonds is intact. The polyclonal antibodies include ones that preferentially bind to the HMW or LMW forms of the urokinase molecule. The monoclonal antibodies include ones that discriminate between the ScuPA and the HMW form. A combination of these molecular-specific antibodies will enable simultaneous assays of the ScuPA, HMW, and LMW forms in the same specimen of culture medium.

  12. A single dose of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine promotes HAV-specific memory cellular response similar to that induced by a natural infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgaço, Juliana Gil; Morgado, Lucas Nóbrega; Santiago, Marta Almeida; Oliveira, Jaqueline Mendes de; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Hasselmann, Bárbara; Cruz, Oswaldo Gonçalves; Pinto, Marcelo Alves; Vitral, Claudia Lamarca

    2015-07-31

    Based on current studies on the effects of single dose vaccines on antibody production, Latin American countries have adopted a single dose vaccine program. However, no data are available on the activation of cellular response to a single dose of hepatitis A. Our study investigated the functional reactivity of the memory cell phenotype after hepatitis A virus (HAV) stimulation through administration of the first or second dose of HAV vaccine and compared the response to that of a baseline group to an initial natural infection. Proliferation assays showed that the first vaccine dose induced HAV-specific cellular response; this response was similar to that induced by a second dose or an initial natural infection. Thus, from the first dose to the second dose, increase in the frequencies of classical memory B cells, TCD8 cells, and central memory TCD4 and TCD8 cells were observed. Regarding cytokine production, increased IL-6, IL-10, TNF, and IFNγ levels were observed after vaccination. Our findings suggest that a single dose of HAV vaccine promotes HAV-specific memory cell response similar to that induced by a natural infection. The HAV-specific T cell immunity induced by primary vaccination persisted independently of the protective plasma antibody level. In addition, our results suggest that a single dose immunization system could serve as an alternative strategy for the prevention of hepatitis A in developing countries. PMID:26144899

  13. Studies on Purification of Methamidophos Monoclonal Antibodies and Comoarative Immunoactivity of Purified Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU-QING ZHAO; YUAN-MING SUN; CHUN-YAN ZHANG; XIAO-YU HUANG; HOU-RUI ZHANG; ZHEN-YU ZHU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To purify Methamidophos (Met) monoclonal antibodies with two methods andcompare immune activity of purified antibodies. Method Caprylic acid ammonium sulphateprecipition (CAASP) method and Sepharose protein-A (SPA) affinity chromatography method wereused to purify Met monoclonal antibodies, UV spectrum scanning was used to determine proteincontent and recovery of purified antibodies, sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gelelectrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used to analyze the purity of purified antibodies, and enzyme-linkedimmunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine immune activity of purified antibodies.Results Antibody protein content and recovery rate with CAASP method were 7.62 mg/mL and8.05% respectively, antibody protein content and recovery rate with SPA method were 6.45 mg/mLand 5.52% respectively. Purity of antibodies purified by SPA method was higher than that by CAASPmethod. The half-maximal inhibition concentration (IC50) of antibodies purified by SPA to Met was181.26 μg/mL, and the linear working range and the limit of quantification (LOD) were 2.43-3896.01μg/mL and 1.03 μg/mL, respectively. The IC50 of antibodies purified by CAASP to Met was 352.82μg/mL, and the linear working range and LOD were 10.91-11412.29 ug/mL and 3.42 μg/mL,respectively. Conclusion Antibodies purified by SPA method are better than those by CAASPmethod, and Met monoclonal antibodies purified by SPA method can be used to prepare gold-labelledtesting paper for analyzing Met residue in vegetable and drink water.

  14. Dengue Virus Envelope Dimer Epitope Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Dengue Patients Are Protective against Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanstrom, J. A.; Plante, J. A.; Plante, K. S.; Young, E. F.; McGowan, E.; Gallichotte, E. N.; Widman, D. G.; Heise, M. T.; de Silva, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for thousands of cases of severe fetal malformations and neurological disease since its introduction to Brazil in 2013. Antibodies to flaviviruses can be protective, resulting in lifelong immunity to reinfection by homologous virus. However, cross-reactive antibodies can complicate flavivirus diagnostics and promote more severe disease, as noted after serial dengue virus (DENV) infections. The endemic circulation of DENV in South America and elsewhere raises concerns that preexisting flavivirus immunity may modulate ZIKV disease and transmission potential. Here, we report on the ability of human monoclonal antibodies and immune sera derived from dengue patients to neutralize contemporary epidemic ZIKV strains. We demonstrate that a class of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from DENV patients neutralizes ZIKV in cell culture and is protective in a lethal murine model. We also tested a large panel of convalescent-phase immune sera from humans exposed to primary and repeat DENV infection. Although ZIKV is most closely related to DENV compared to other human-pathogenic flaviviruses, most DENV immune sera (73%) failed to neutralize ZIKV, while others had low (50% effective concentration [EC50], 1:100 serum dilution; 9%) levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies. Our results establish that ZIKV and DENV share epitopes that are targeted by neutralizing, protective human antibodies. The availability of potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies provides an immunotherapeutic approach to control life-threatening ZIKV infection and also points to the possibility of repurposing DENV vaccines to induce cross-protective immunity to ZIKV. PMID:27435464

  15. Prebiotic and probiotic agents enhance antibody-based immune responses to Salmonella Typhimurium infection in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Naqid, Ibrahim A.; Jonathan P. Owen; Maddison, Ben C; Gardner, David S.; Foster, Neil; Tchorzewska, Monika; La Ragione, Roberto M; Gough, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonellosis causes significant economic losses to the pig industry and contaminated pork products are an important source of Salmonella for humans. The EU ban on the use of antibiotic growth promoters in pig production, and the emergence of antibiotic resistance has meant there is a pressing need for alternative control strategies for pathogenic bacteria such as S. Typhimurium in pigs. Here, we determined the effects of prebiotic, probiotic and synbiotic diet regimes on antibody responses t...

  16. Generation of Antibody-Producing Hybridomas Following One Single Immunization with a Targeted DNA Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Øynebråten, I; Løvås, T-O; Thompson, K.; Bogen, B

    2012-01-01

    The standard protocol for generating antibody (Ab)-producing hybridomas is based on fusion of plasmacytoma cells with Ab-producing B cells harvested from immunized mice. To increase the yield of hybridomas, it is important to use immunization protocols that induce a high frequency of B cells producing specific Abs. Our laboratory has developed a vaccine format, denoted vaccibody that promotes the immune responses towards the delivered antigen. The vaccine format targets antigens in a bivalent...

  17. The effect of anti-human plasminogen monoclonal antibodies on Glu-plasminogen activation by plasminogen activators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akrami

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human plasminogen is a plasma glycoprotein synthesized mainly in the liver. Conversion of plasminogen to plasmin by plasminogen activators is a key event in the fibrinolytic system. In this study, we investigated the effects of two anti-human plasminogen monoclonal antibodies, A1D12 and MC2B8 on Glu-plasminogen activation in presence of u-PA, t-PA and streptokinase. Methods: Producing of Hybridoma antibodies was performed by fusion of spleen cells from BALB/C mice immunized with Glu-plasminogen and NS1 myeloma cells. Antibody binding to Human Glu-plasminogen was assessed using an ELISA assay. Activation of plasminogen was determined by measuring plasmin generation using the chromogenic substrate S-2251 and the effect of monoclonal antibodies, A1D12 and MC2B8 on plasminogen activation in solution was then evaluated. Initial rates and kinetic parameters of plasminogen activation in the presence of monoclonal antibodies were calculated. The effect of the monoclonal antibody MC2B8 on the rate of plasmin hydrolysis was measured. The effect of F(ab'2 fragment of A1D12 on u-PA catalyzed-plasminogen activation also compared with the effect of the whole antibody in this reaction. Results: ELISA assay showed that the antibodies reacted well with antigens. A1D12 increased the maximum velocity (Vmax of plasminogen activation by each of the three plasminogen activators and MC2B8 decreased it. In all activation reactions, the KM value of plasminogen activation did not significantly change in the presence of antibody A1D12 whereas antibody MC2B8 increased the KM value of plasminogen activation by u-PA, fibrin monomer dependent t-PA and streptokinase. Monoclonal antibody MC2B8 had no significant effect on plasmin hydrolysis rate of synthetic substrate S-2251. Activation rate of plasminogen by u-PA in the lower concentration of F (ab2 fragment of A1D12 was identical to activation in the presence of the whole antibody. Conclusion: The binding of

  18. Uses of monoclonial antibody 8H9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-06-23

    This invention provides an antibody that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the heavy chain CDR (Complementary Determining Region)1 comprises NYDIN, heavy chain CDR2 comprises WIFPGDGSTQY, heavy chain CDR3 comprises QTTATWFAY, and the light chain CDR1 comprises RASQSISDYLH, light chain CDR2 comprises YASQSIS, and light chain CDR3 comprises QNGHSFPLT. In another embodiment, there is provided a polypeptide that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the polypeptide comprises NYDIN, WIFPGDGSTQY, QTTATWFAY, RASQSISDYLH, YASQSIS, and QNGHSFPLT.

  19. Clinical application of a new antimyosin antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mouse monoclonal antibody, 3-48 (Rougier Bio-Tech Ltd, Montreal) which recognizes the alpha and beta heavy chains of human atrial and ventricular myosin, and the beta heavy chain of human slow skeletal muscle, has recently been developed. In the rat isoproterenol-induced infarction model and the canine model of selective obstruction of a coronary artery, the antibody was shown to be specifically localized to the necrotic myocardium. A selected group of patients with known infarction was imaged with the 111indium labeled F(ab')2 protion of this antibody in a pre-clinical feasibility study, and the results therefrom are reported in this communication. (orig.)

  20. Antibody catalysis of peptide bond formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsen, J R; Schultz, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    An antibody generated against a neutral phosphonate diester transition-state (TS not equal to) analog catalyzes the formation of an amide bond between a phenylalanyl amino group and an acyl azide derived from L-alanine. The antibody is selective for L- vs. D-alanine and does not catalyze the hydrolysis of the acyl azide to an appreciable degree. A rate acceleration of 10,000-fold relative to the uncatalyzed reaction is observed. The antibody may achieve its catalytic efficiency both by acting...