WorldWideScience

Sample records for antibiotics enter bacteria

  1. Antibiotic-Resistant Enteric Bacteria in Environmental Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Casanova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sources of antibiotic resistant organisms, including concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs, may lead to environmental surface and groundwater contamination with resistant enteric bacteria of public health concern. The objective of this research is to determine whether Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, and enterococci resistant to clinically relevant antibiotics are present in surface and groundwater sources in two eastern North Carolina counties, Craven and Wayne. 100 surface and groundwater sites were sampled for Salmonella, E. coli, and enterococci, and the bacteria isolated from these samples were tested for susceptibility to clinically relevant antibiotics. Salmonella were detected at low levels in some surface but not groundwater. E. coli were in surface waters but not ground in both counties. Enterococci were present in surface water and a small number of groundwater sites. Yersinia was not found. Bacterial densities were similar in both counties. For Salmonella in surface water, the most frequent type of resistance was to sulfamethoxazole. There was no ciprofloxacin resistance. There were a few surface water E. coli isolates resistant to chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and ampicillin. Enterococci in surface water had very low levels of resistance to vancomycin, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and streptomycin. E. coli and enterococci are present more frequently and at higher levels in surface water than Salmonella, but groundwater contamination with any of these organisms was rare, and low levels of resistance can be found sporadically. Resistant bacteria are relatively uncommon in these eastern N.C. surface and groundwaters, but they could pose a risk of human exposure via ingestion or primary contact recreation.

  2. Incidence and transferability of antibiotic resistance in the enteric bacteria isolated from hospital wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zubair Alam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the occurrence of antibiotic resistance and production of β-lactamases including extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESβL in enteric bacteria isolated from hospital wastewater. Among sixty-nine isolates, tested for antibiotic sensitivity, 73.9% strains were resistant to ampicillin followed by nalidixic acid (72.5%, penicillin (63.8%, co-trimoxazole (55.1%, norfloxacin (53.6%, methicillin (52.7%, cefuroxime (39.1%, cefotaxime (23.2% and cefixime (20.3%. Resistance to streptomycin, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, tetracycline, and doxycycline was recorded in less than 13% of the strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC showed a high level of resistance (800-1600 µg/mL to one or more antibiotics. Sixty three (91% isolates produced β-lactamases as determined by rapid iodometric test. Multiple antibiotic resistances were noted in both among ESβL and non-ESβL producers. The β-lactamases hydrolyzed multiple substrates including penicillin (78.8% isolates, ampicillin (62.3%, cefodroxil (52.2%, cefotoxime (21.7% and cefuroxime (18.8%. Fifteen isolates producing ESβLs were found multidrug resistant. Four ESβL producing isolates could transfer their R-plasmid to the recipient strain E. coli K-12 with conjugation frequency ranging from 7.0 x 10-3 to 8.8 x 10-4. The findings indicated that ESβL producing enteric bacteria are common in the waste water. Such isolates may disseminate the multiple antibiotic resistance traits among bacterial community through genetic exchange mechanisms and thus requires immediate attention.

  3. The carriage of antibiotic resistance by enteric bacteria from imported tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) destined for the pet trade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Christine L. [Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, Department of Population Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Hernandez, Sonia M., E-mail: shernz@uga.edu [Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, Department of Population Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Yabsley, Michael J. [Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, Department of Population Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Smith, Katherine F. [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Sanchez, Susan [The Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); The Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a growing public health concern and has serious implications for both human and veterinary medicine. The nature of the global economy encourages the movement of humans, livestock, produce, and wildlife, as well as their potentially antibiotic-resistant bacteria, across international borders. Humans and livestock can be reservoirs for antibiotic-resistant bacteria; however, little is known about the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria harbored by wildlife and, to our knowledge, limited data has been reported for wild-caught reptiles that were specifically collected for the pet trade. In the current study, we examined the antibiotic resistance of lactose-positive Enterobacteriaceae isolates from wild-caught Tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) imported from Indonesia for use in the pet trade. In addition, we proposed that the conditions under which wild animals are captured, transported, and handled might affect the shedding or fecal prevalence of antibiotic resistance. In particular we were interested in the effects of density; to address this, we experimentally modified densities of geckos after import and documented changes in antibiotic resistance patterns. The commensal enteric bacteria from Tokay geckos (G. gecko) imported for the pet trade displayed resistance against some antibiotics including: ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin and tetracycline. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria after experimentally mimicking potentially stressful transportation conditions reptiles experience prior to purchase. There were, however, some interesting trends observed when comparing Tokay geckos housed individually and those housed in groups. Understanding the prevalence of antibiotic resistant commensal enteric flora from common pet reptiles is paramount because of the potential for humans exposed to these animals to acquire antibiotic

  4. The carriage of antibiotic resistance by enteric bacteria from imported tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) destined for the pet trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Christine L.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Smith, Katherine F.; Sanchez, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a growing public health concern and has serious implications for both human and veterinary medicine. The nature of the global economy encourages the movement of humans, livestock, produce, and wildlife, as well as their potentially antibiotic-resistant bacteria, across international borders. Humans and livestock can be reservoirs for antibiotic-resistant bacteria; however, little is known about the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria harbored by wildlife and, to our knowledge, limited data has been reported for wild-caught reptiles that were specifically collected for the pet trade. In the current study, we examined the antibiotic resistance of lactose-positive Enterobacteriaceae isolates from wild-caught Tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) imported from Indonesia for use in the pet trade. In addition, we proposed that the conditions under which wild animals are captured, transported, and handled might affect the shedding or fecal prevalence of antibiotic resistance. In particular we were interested in the effects of density; to address this, we experimentally modified densities of geckos after import and documented changes in antibiotic resistance patterns. The commensal enteric bacteria from Tokay geckos (G. gecko) imported for the pet trade displayed resistance against some antibiotics including: ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin and tetracycline. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria after experimentally mimicking potentially stressful transportation conditions reptiles experience prior to purchase. There were, however, some interesting trends observed when comparing Tokay geckos housed individually and those housed in groups. Understanding the prevalence of antibiotic resistant commensal enteric flora from common pet reptiles is paramount because of the potential for humans exposed to these animals to acquire antibiotic

  5. Enteric dysbiosis promotes antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection: systemic dissemination of resistant and commensal bacteria through epithelial transcytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Shih, Yi-An; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Yang-Ding; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Peng, Wei-Hao; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Wei, Shu-Chen; Turner, Jerrold R; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2014-10-15

    Antibiotic usage promotes intestinal colonization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, whether resistant bacteria gain dominance in enteric microflora or disseminate to extraintestinal viscera remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate temporal diversity changes in microbiota and transepithelial routes of bacterial translocation after antibiotic-resistant enterobacterial colonization. Mice drinking water with or without antibiotics were intragastrically gavaged with ampicillin-resistant (Amp-r) nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) and given normal water afterward. The composition and spatial distribution of intestinal bacteria were evaluated using 16S rDNA sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Bacterial endocytosis in epithelial cells was examined using gentamicin resistance assay and transmission electromicroscopy. Paracellular permeability was assessed by tight junctional immunostaining and measured by tissue conductance and luminal-to-serosal dextran fluxes. Our results showed that antibiotic treatment enabled intestinal colonization and transient dominance of orally acquired Amp-r E. coli in mice. The colonized Amp-r E. coli peaked on day 3 postinoculation and was competed out after 1 wk, as evidenced by the recovery of commensals, such as Escherichia, Bacteroides, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridium, and Lactobacillus. Mucosal penetration and extraintestinal dissemination of exogenous and endogenous enterobacteria were correlated with abnormal epithelial transcytosis but uncoupled with paracellular tight junctional damage. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced enteric dysbiosis predisposes to exogenous infection and causes systemic dissemination of both antibiotic-resistant and commensal enterobacteria through transcytotic routes across epithelial layers. These results may help explain the susceptibility to sepsis in antibiotic-resistant enteric bacterial infection. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. How beta-lactam antibiotics enter bacteria: a dialogue with the porins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Chloë E; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R; Molitor, Alexander; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Bessonov, Andrey N; Winterhalter, Mathias; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections have become a major concern in hospitals worldwide. This study investigates membrane translocation, which is the first step required for drug action on internal bacterial targets. beta-lactams, a major antibiotic class, use porins to pass through the outer membrane barrier of Gram-negative bacteria. Clinical reports have linked the MDR phenotype to altered membrane permeability including porin modification and efflux pump expression. Here influx of beta-lactams through the major Enterobacter aerogenes porin Omp36 is characterized. Conductance measurements through a single Omp36 trimer reconstituted into a planar lipid bilayer allowed us to count the passage of single beta-lactam molecules. Statistical analysis of each transport event yielded the kinetic parameters of antibiotic travel through Omp36 and distinguishable translocation properties of beta-lactams were quantified for ertapenem and cefepime. Expression of Omp36 in an otherwise porin-null bacterial strain is shown to confer increases in the killing rate of these antibiotics and in the corresponding bacterial susceptibility. We propose the idea of a molecular "passport" that allows rapid transport of substrates through porins. Deciphering antibiotic translocation provides new insights for the design of novel drugs that may be highly effective at passing through the porin constriction zone. Such data may hold the key for the next generation of antibiotics capable of rapid intracellular accumulation to circumvent the further development MDR infections.

  7. How beta-lactam antibiotics enter bacteria: a dialogue with the porins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloë E James

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multi-drug resistant (MDR infections have become a major concern in hospitals worldwide. This study investigates membrane translocation, which is the first step required for drug action on internal bacterial targets. beta-lactams, a major antibiotic class, use porins to pass through the outer membrane barrier of Gram-negative bacteria. Clinical reports have linked the MDR phenotype to altered membrane permeability including porin modification and efflux pump expression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here influx of beta-lactams through the major Enterobacter aerogenes porin Omp36 is characterized. Conductance measurements through a single Omp36 trimer reconstituted into a planar lipid bilayer allowed us to count the passage of single beta-lactam molecules. Statistical analysis of each transport event yielded the kinetic parameters of antibiotic travel through Omp36 and distinguishable translocation properties of beta-lactams were quantified for ertapenem and cefepime. Expression of Omp36 in an otherwise porin-null bacterial strain is shown to confer increases in the killing rate of these antibiotics and in the corresponding bacterial susceptibility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose the idea of a molecular "passport" that allows rapid transport of substrates through porins. Deciphering antibiotic translocation provides new insights for the design of novel drugs that may be highly effective at passing through the porin constriction zone. Such data may hold the key for the next generation of antibiotics capable of rapid intracellular accumulation to circumvent the further development MDR infections.

  8. Carriage of antibiotic-resistant enteric bacteria varies among sites in Galapagos reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Emily; Hong, Pei-Ying; Bedon, Lenin Cruz; Mackie, Roderick I

    2012-01-01

    Increased overlap between humans and wildlife populations has increased the risk for novel disease emergence. Detecting contacts with a high risk for transmission of pathogens requires the identification of dependable measures of microbial exchange. We evaluated antibiotic resistance as a molecular marker for the intensity of human-wildlife microbial connectivity in the Galápagos Islands. We isolated Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica from the feces of land iguanas (Conolophus sp.), marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus), giant tortoises (Geochelone nigra), and seawater, and tested these bacteria with the use of the disk diffusion method for resistance to 10 antibiotics. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were found in reptile feces from two tourism sites (Isla Plaza Sur and La Galapaguera on Isla San Cristóbal) and from seawater close to a public use beach near Puerto Baquerizo Moreno on Isla San Cristóbal. No resistance was detected at two protected beaches on more isolated islands (El Miedo on Isla Santa Fe and Cape Douglas on Isla Fernandina) and at a coastal tourism site (La Lobería on Isla San Cristóbal). Eighteen E. coli isolates from three locations, all sites relatively proximate to a port town, were resistant to ampicillin, doxycycline, tetracycline, and trimethoprin/sulfamethoxazole. In contrast, only five S. enterica isolates showed a mild decrease in susceptibility to doxycycline and tetracycline from these same sites (i.e., an intermediate resistance phenotype), but no clinical resistance was detected in this bacterial species. These findings suggest that reptiles living in closer proximity to humans potentially have higher exposure to bacteria of human origin; however, it is not clear from this study to what extent this potential exposure translates to ongoing exchange of bacterial strains or genetic traits. Resistance patterns and bacterial exchange in this system warrant further investigation to understand better how human associations

  9. Antibacterial and Antibiotic-Modifying Activity of Methanol Extracts from Six Cameroonian Food Plants against Multidrug-Resistant Enteric Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim K. Dzotam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was designed to investigate the antibacterial activities of methanol extracts from six Cameroonian edible plants and their synergistic effects with some commonly used antibiotics against multidrug-resistant (MDR Gram-negative bacteria expressing active efflux pumps. The extracts were subjected to qualitative phytochemical screening and the microdilution broth method was used for antibacterial assays. The results of phytochemical tests indicate that all tested crude extracts contained polyphenols, flavonoids, triterpenes, and steroids. Extracts displayed selective antibacterial activities with the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values ranging from 32 to 1024 μg/mL. The lowest MIC value (32 μg/mL was recorded with Coula edulis extract against E. coli AG102 and K. pneumoniae K2 and with Mangifera indica bark extract against P. aeruginosa PA01 and Citrus sinensis extract against E. coli W3110 which also displayed the best MBC (256 μg/mL value against E. coli ATCC8739. In combination with antibiotics, extracts from M. indica leaves showed synergistic effects with 75% (6/8 of the tested antibiotics against more than 80% of the tested bacteria. The findings of the present work indicate that the tested plants may be used alone or in combination in the treatment of bacterial infections including the multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  10. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  11. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Korp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism.

  12. Ecosystem response to antibiotics entering the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Simon D; Murby, John; Bates, John

    2005-01-01

    Awareness of antibiotics in wastewaters and aquatic ecosystems is growing as investigations into alternate pollutants increase and analytical techniques for detecting these chemicals improve. The presence of three antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and cephalexin) was evaluated in both sewage effluent and environmental waters downstream from a sewage discharge. Bacteria cultured from the sewage bioreactor and receiving waters were tested for resistance against six antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, ampicillin, trimethoprim, erythromycin and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole) and effects of short term exposure (24 h) to antibiotics on bacterial denitrification rates were examined. Antibiotics were detected entering the sewage treatment plant with varying levels of removal during the treatment process. Antibiotics were also detected in effluent entering receiving waters and detectable 500 m from the source. Among the bacteria cultured from the sewage bioreactor, resistance was displayed against all six antibiotics tested and bacteria cultured from receiving waters were resistant against two of the antibiotics tested. Rates of denitrification were observed to decrease in response to some antibiotics and not to others, though this was only observed at concentrations exceeding those likely to be found in the environment. Findings from this preliminary research have indicated that antibiotics are entering our aquatic systems and pose a potential threat to ecosystem function and potentially human health.

  13. Emerging antibiotic resistant enteric bacterial flora among food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotic in food animals is an emerging public health concern as a result of increasing multi-resistant bacteria found in Abeokuta. Therefore, occurrence rate and resistant profile of the emerging enteric pathogens were determined in food animals in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Fecal and rectal samples of 82 ...

  14. Inhibitory Activity of Lactid Acid Bacteria Isolated from Tape Waterlily Seed to Enteric Pathogenic Bacteria (Vibrio cholera, Salmonella typhi, Shigella disentri, and E.coli and Its’ Susceptibility to Antibiotic, Bile Salt and Acidic Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iin Khusnul Khotimah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to observe inhibitory activity of LAB isolated from tape waterlily seed to enteric pathogenic bacteria (Vibrio cholera, Salmonella typhi, Shigella disentri, E.coli ATCC 25922 and it’s susceptibility to antibiotic, in bile salt and under acidic condition. Microbia in the tape ( a fermented product of waterlily seed to showed were Streptococcus thermophilus (IKH-1, Pediococcus pentosaceus (IKH-2 and Leuconostoc mesentroides (IKH-8. Streptococcus thermophillus showed inhibition against the growth of Shigella disentri with inhibition zones 16,28 mm, but did not against the growth of V. Cholera, S. typhi, E.coli. Pediococcus pentosaceus inhibit Vibrio cholera, dan Salmonella thypi with inhibition zones 18,59 mm dan 7,91 mm. So that, Leuconostoc mesenteroides inhibit Salmonella thypi with zones inhibits average 8,25 mm. Chloramfenicol at 0.05 mg concentrations did not show inhibition against the growth of isolated Streptococcus thermophillus, Pediococcus pentosaceus and Leuconostoc mesentroides. These isolates could survive too in bile salt (2% and acidified media (pH 3.   Keyword : The tape of  waterlily seed, LAB, probiotic and enteric pathogenic   KEMAMPUAN PENGHAMBATAN BAKTERI ASAM LAKTAT DARI TAPE BIJI TERATAI TERHADAP PATOGENIK ENTERIK (VIBRIO CHOLERA, SALMONELLA THYPI, SHIGELLA DISENTRI, E. COLI, ANTIBIOTIK, KETAHANANNYA TERHADAP BILE SALT DAN ASAM   ABSTRAK   Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menguji kemampuan penghambatan bakteri asam laktat yang diisolasi dari tape biji teratai terhadap patogenik enterik (Vibrio cholera, Salmonella thypi, Shigella disentri, E. Coli ATCC 25922, antibiotik, bile salt dan asam. Jenis bakteri yang diketahui tumbuh selama fermentasi tape biji teratai adalah Streptococcus thermopilus (IKH-1, Pediococcus pentosaceus(IKH-2, dan Leuconostoc mesentroides (IKH-8. Pengamatan terhadap uji penghambatan patogenik enterik (Vibrio cholera, Salmonella thypi, Shigella disentri, dan E. Coli ATCC

  15. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eGueimonde

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue.

  16. Low prevalence of antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine antibiotic resistance patterns and specific resistance genes in Gram-negative enteric bacteria recovered from 42 different drinking water sources servicing 2 rural villages in south-western Uganda. These water sites were prone to contamination by both human and cattle activity.

  17. Antibiotic resistance profiles and relatedness of enteric bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic resistance profiles and relatedness of enteric bacterial pathogens isolated from HIV/AIDS patients with and without diarrhoea and their household drinking water in rural communities in Limpopo Province South Africa.

  18. Antibiotic resistance profiles and relatedness of enteric bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-16

    Apr 16, 2007 ... Antibiotic resistance profiles and the correlation of enteric bacterial pathogens from HIV positive indivi- duals with and ... from the various study cohorts showed multiple antibiotic resistance to penicillin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin .... chose to work closely with support groups, NGOs and HIV care-.

  19. Antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bulajić Snežana; Mijačević Zora; Savić-Radovanović Radoslava

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge on the antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria is still limited, possibly because of the large numbers of genera and species encountered in this group, as well as variances in their resistance spectra. The EFSA considers antibiotic resistances, especially transferable resistances, an important decision criterion for determining a strain's QPS status. There are no approved standards for the phenotypic or genotypic evaluation of antibiotic resistances in food isolat...

  20. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria: There is Hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Argues that reduction in the use of antibiotics would enable antibiotic-sensitive bacteria to flourish. Presents an activity designed to show students how a small, seemingly unimportant difference in doubling time can, over a period of time, make an enormous difference in population size. (DDR)

  1. Antibiogram of enteric bacteria isolated from rats cohabiting with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 228 gram-negative bacteria comprising 211 Enterobacteria from 10 genera, 16 Pseudomonas species, and one Aeromonas hydrophila were subjected to the susceptibility testing with antibiotic discs of 10 commonly used antibiotics. Nineteen of the 21 species were multidrug-resistant with 50%-100% of the ...

  2. Antibiotic Resistance of Bacteria: A Global Challenge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vealed several aminoglycoside resistances in nonculturable bac- teria. Notwithstanding the availability of so many antimicrobial agents, infectious diseases still remain the second leading cause of death worldwide. Eventually, the widespread occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has added a new dimension to the.

  3. Antimicrobial effect of Malaysian vegetables against enteric bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanain Al-Talib

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Garlic had excellent antimicrobial effects against enteric bacteria and was recommended to be given to patients with gastroenteritis. The other vegetables (pennywort, mint, parsley and celery showed no inhibitory effects on enteric bacteria but still can be used for its richness in vitamins and fibers. The performance of the well diffusion method was better than that of the disc diffusion method in detecting the antibacterial effects of green vegetables.

  4. Antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in waters associated with a hospital in Ujjain, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marothi Yogyata

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concerns have been raised about the public health implications of the presence of antibiotic residues in the aquatic environment and their effect on the development of bacterial resistance. While there is information on antibiotic residue levels in hospital effluent from some other countries, information on antibiotic residue levels in effluent from Indian hospitals is not available. Also, concurrent studies on antibiotic prescription quantity in a hospital and antibiotic residue levels and resistant bacteria in the effluent of the same hospital are few. Therefore, we quantified antibiotic residues in waters associated with a hospital in India and assessed their association, if any, with quantities of antibiotic prescribed in the hospital and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli found in the hospital effluent. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in a teaching hospital outside the city of Ujjain in India. Seven antibiotics - amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, amikacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and levofloxacin - were selected. Prescribed quantities were obtained from hospital records. The samples of the hospital associated water were analysed for the above mentioned antibiotics using well developed and validated liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry technique after selectively isolating the analytes from the matrix using solid phase extraction. Escherichia coli isolates from these waters were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, by standard Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method using Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute breakpoints. Results Ciprofloxacin was the highest prescribed antibiotic in the hospital and its residue levels in the hospital wastewater were also the highest. In samples of the municipal water supply and the groundwater, no antibiotics were detected. There was a positive correlation between the quantity of antibiotics prescribed in the hospital and antibiotic residue levels in

  5. Enteral Antibiotics are Non-inferior to Intravenous Antibiotics After Complicated Appendicitis in Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleif, Jakob; Rasmussen, Louise; Fonnes, Siv

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prolonging post-operative antibiotic treatment beyond 3 days does not seem to reduce the incidence of post-operative abscess formation or wound infection after surgery for complicated appendicitis. The route of administration seems to be based on an empirical basis. Using enteral...... antibiotics could reduce length of stay and reduce overall costs. We aimed to examine whether treatment with enteral antibiotics during the first three post-operative days is non-inferior to intravenous antibiotics regarding intra-abdominal abscess formation or wound infection after surgery for complicated...... of surgery. Route of antibiotic administration for the first three post-operative days was registered for all patients. RESULTS: A total of 1141 patients were included in the study. The overall risk of developing an intra-abdominal abscess was 6.7% (95% CI 5.2%; 8.1%), and the risk of wound infection was 1...

  6. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase prevents antibiotic-induced susceptibility to enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Sayeda Nasrin; Yammine, Halim; Moaven, Omeed; Ahmed, Rizwan; Moss, Angela K; Biswas, Brishti; Muhammad, Nur; Biswas, Rakesh; Raychowdhury, Atri; Kaliannan, Kanakaraju; Ghosh, Sathi; Ray, Madhury; Hamarneh, Sulaiman R; Barua, Soumik; Malo, Nondita S; Bhan, Atul K; Malo, Madhu S; Hodin, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of oral supplementation of the gut enzyme intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) in preventing antibiotic-associated infections from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and Clostridium difficile. The intestinal microbiota plays a pivotal role in human health and well-being. Antibiotics inherently cause dysbiosis, an imbalance in the number and composition of intestinal commensal bacteria, which leads to susceptibility to opportunistic bacterial infections. Previously, we have shown that IAP preserves the normal homeostasis of intestinal microbiota and that oral supplementation with calf IAP (cIAP) rapidly restores the normal gut flora. We hypothesized that oral IAP supplementation would protect against antibiotic-associated bacterial infections. C57BL/6 mice were treated with antibiotic(s) ± cIAP in the drinking water, followed by oral gavage of S. Typhimurium or C. difficile. Mice were observed for clinical conditions and mortality. After a defined period of time, mice were killed and investigated for hematological, inflammatory, and histological changes. We observed that oral supplementation with cIAP during antibiotic treatment protects mice from infections with S. Typhimurium as well as with C. difficile. Animals given IAP maintained their weight, had reduced clinical severity and gut inflammation, and showed improved survival. Oral IAP supplementation protected mice from antibiotic-associated bacterial infections. We postulate that oral IAP supplementation could represent a novel therapy to protect against antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD), C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD), and other enteric infections in humans.

  7. Influence of enteric bacteria and parasite infection and nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of enteric bacteria and parasite infection and nutritional status on diarrhoea occurrence in six to 60 month old children admitted at Morogoro ... Other factors found to significantly (p<0.05) influence diarrhoea occurrence included age when breastfeeding stopped, food(s) given, feeding utensils and the child´s toilet.

  8. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2013-07-31

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  9. Bacteria resitnce to antibiotics: an analysis of hospital conduct

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Andrea Luiza de; CESUMAR

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the main medical-hospital practices that aggravate bacteria resistance and reflect the indiscriminate use of antibiotics leaging to hospital infections. To that aim, we present general concepts on antibiotic therapy. We analyse the development of induced bacteria resistance by the indiscriminate use of antibiotics, describing the genetic and biochemical resistance mechanisms. We focus on the incidence of bacteria resistance in hospital in relation to...

  10. Curing bacteria of antibiotic resistance: reverse antibiotics, a novel class of antibiotics in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Morimoto, Yuh; Baba, Tadashi; Umekita, Maya; Akamatsu, Yuzuru

    2012-06-01

    By screening cultures of soil bacteria, we re-discovered an old antibiotic (nybomycin) as an antibiotic with a novel feature. Nybomycin is active against quinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with mutated gyrA genes but not against those with intact gyrA genes against which quinolone antibiotics are effective. Nybomycin-resistant mutant strains were generated from a quinolone-resistant, nybomycin-susceptible, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain Mu 50. The mutants, occurring at an extremely low rate (generation), were found to have their gyrA genes back-mutated and to have lost quinolone resistance. Here we describe nybomycin as the first member of a novel class of antibiotics designated 'reverse antibiotics'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  11. Transfer of antibiotic resistant bacteria from animals to man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Gerner-Smidt, P.

    1999-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance develops in zoonotic bacteria in response to antibiotics used in food animals. A close association exists between the amounts of antibiotics used and the levels of resistance observed. The classes of antibiotics routinely used for treatment of human infections are also used...... for animals either for therapy or for growth promotion. Antibiotic resistance in zoonotic bacteria constitute a public health hazard, primarily through the increased risk of treatment failures. This paper describes the zoonotic bacteria, salmonella, campylobacter, yersinia and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC......). Infections with these agents do not generally require antibiotic therapy, but in some cases antibiotics are essential to obtain a successful cure. The levels and types of resistance observed in zoonotic bacteria in some countries, especially the increasing levels of fluoroquinolone resistance in salmonella...

  12. Alternatives to antibiotics to prevent necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens: a microbiologist’s perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Louise Caly

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the 2006 European ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal feed, numerous studies have been published describing alternative strategies to prevent diseases in animals. A particular focus has been on prevention of necrotic enteritis in poultry caused by Clostridium perfringens by the use of microbes or microbe-derived products. Microbes produce a plethora of molecules with antimicrobial properties and they can also have beneficial effects through interactions with their host. Here we review recent developments in novel preventive treatments against C. perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens that employ yeasts, bacteria and bacteriophages or secondary metabolites and other microbial products in disease control.

  13. Membrane-active macromolecules kill antibiotic-tolerant bacteria and potentiate antibiotics towards Gram-negative bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakara S S M Uppu

    Full Text Available Chronic bacterial biofilms place a massive burden on healthcare due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant dormant bacteria. Some of the conventional antibiotics such as erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin etc. are inherently ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly in their biofilms. Here, we report membrane-active macromolecules that kill slow dividing stationary-phase and antibiotic tolerant cells of Gram-negative bacteria. More importantly, these molecules potentiate antibiotics (erythromycin and rifampicin to biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria. These molecules eliminate planktonic bacteria that are liberated after dispersion of biofilms (dispersed cells. The membrane-active mechanism of these molecules forms the key for potentiating the established antibiotics. Further, we demonstrate that the combination of macromolecules and antibiotics significantly reduces bacterial burden in mouse burn and surgical wound infection models caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC clinical isolate respectively. Colistin, a well-known antibiotic targeting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS of Gram-negative bacteria fails to kill antibiotic tolerant cells and dispersed cells (from biofilms and bacteria develop resistance to it. On the contrary, these macromolecules prevent or delay the development of bacterial resistance to known antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the potential of targeting the bacterial membrane in antibiotic potentiation for disruption of biofilms and suggest a promising strategy towards developing therapies for topical treatment of Gram-negative infections.

  14. Membrane-active macromolecules kill antibiotic-tolerant bacteria and potentiate antibiotics towards Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Sarkar, Paramita; Samaddar, Sandip; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Farias-Junior, Celio; Krishnamoorthy, Paramanandam; Shome, Bibek R; Franco, Octávio L; Haldar, Jayanta

    2017-01-01

    Chronic bacterial biofilms place a massive burden on healthcare due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant dormant bacteria. Some of the conventional antibiotics such as erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin etc. are inherently ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly in their biofilms. Here, we report membrane-active macromolecules that kill slow dividing stationary-phase and antibiotic tolerant cells of Gram-negative bacteria. More importantly, these molecules potentiate antibiotics (erythromycin and rifampicin) to biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria. These molecules eliminate planktonic bacteria that are liberated after dispersion of biofilms (dispersed cells). The membrane-active mechanism of these molecules forms the key for potentiating the established antibiotics. Further, we demonstrate that the combination of macromolecules and antibiotics significantly reduces bacterial burden in mouse burn and surgical wound infection models caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC) clinical isolate respectively. Colistin, a well-known antibiotic targeting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria fails to kill antibiotic tolerant cells and dispersed cells (from biofilms) and bacteria develop resistance to it. On the contrary, these macromolecules prevent or delay the development of bacterial resistance to known antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the potential of targeting the bacterial membrane in antibiotic potentiation for disruption of biofilms and suggest a promising strategy towards developing therapies for topical treatment of Gram-negative infections.

  15. Antibiotic resistance among heterotrophic bacteria in Lagos Lagoon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the aquatic environment are considered reservoirs for drug-resistant genes. Therefore, culturable heterotrophic bacteria isolated from Lagos Lagoon surface waters between 2011 and 2012 were screened for their susceptibility to 14 commonly used antibiotics belonging to six major classes.

  16. The Effect of Antioxidants on Antibiotic Sensitivity of Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Azade ATTAR; Akif İ. QURBANOV

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The effect of different concentrations of antioxidants (ascorbic acid, emoxipin, tocopherol acetate and ionol) on antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria was studied. Method: Bacteria belong to different respiration types: Pseudomonas aeruginosa as aerobe and Escherichia coli as facultative anaerobe were used. Antibiotic sensitivity of microorganisms was determined as minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) by dilution test. Results: Different concentrations of antioxidants increased the...

  17. Influence of Chicken Manure Fertilization on Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria in Soil and the Endophytic Bacteria of Pakchoi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxiang Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Animal manure is commonly used as fertilizer for agricultural crops worldwide, even though it is believed to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance from animal intestines to the soil environment. However, it is unclear whether and how there is any impact of manure fertilization on populations and community structure of antibiotic-resistant endophytic bacteria (AREB in plant tissues. To investigate the effect of manure and organic fertilizer on endophytic bacterial communities, pot experiments were performed with pakchoi grown with the following treatments: (1 non-treated; (2 chicken manure-treated and (3 organic fertilizer-treated. Manure or organic fertilizer significantly increased the abundances of total cultivable endophytic bacteria (TCEB and AREB in pakchoi, and the effect of chicken manure was greater than that of organic fertilizer. Further, 16S rDNA sequencing and the phylogenetic analysis indicated that chicken manure or organic fertilizer application increased the populations of multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria (MARB in soil and multiple antibiotic-resistant endophytic bacteria (MAREB in pakchoi. The identical multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterial populations detected in chicken manure, manure- or organic fertilizer-amended soil and the vegetable endophytic system were Brevundimonas diminuta, Brachybacterium sp. and Bordetella sp., suggesting that MARB from manure could enter and colonize the vegetable tissues through manure fertilization. The fact that some human pathogens with multiple antibiotic resistance were detected in harvested vegetables after growing in manure-amended soil demonstrated a potential threat to human health.

  18. Influence of Chicken Manure Fertilization on Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria in Soil and the Endophytic Bacteria of Pakchoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingxiang; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Yuhui; Tian, Tiantian

    2016-06-30

    Animal manure is commonly used as fertilizer for agricultural crops worldwide, even though it is believed to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance from animal intestines to the soil environment. However, it is unclear whether and how there is any impact of manure fertilization on populations and community structure of antibiotic-resistant endophytic bacteria (AREB) in plant tissues. To investigate the effect of manure and organic fertilizer on endophytic bacterial communities, pot experiments were performed with pakchoi grown with the following treatments: (1) non-treated; (2) chicken manure-treated and (3) organic fertilizer-treated. Manure or organic fertilizer significantly increased the abundances of total cultivable endophytic bacteria (TCEB) and AREB in pakchoi, and the effect of chicken manure was greater than that of organic fertilizer. Further, 16S rDNA sequencing and the phylogenetic analysis indicated that chicken manure or organic fertilizer application increased the populations of multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria (MARB) in soil and multiple antibiotic-resistant endophytic bacteria (MAREB) in pakchoi. The identical multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterial populations detected in chicken manure, manure- or organic fertilizer-amended soil and the vegetable endophytic system were Brevundimonas diminuta, Brachybacterium sp. and Bordetella sp., suggesting that MARB from manure could enter and colonize the vegetable tissues through manure fertilization. The fact that some human pathogens with multiple antibiotic resistance were detected in harvested vegetables after growing in manure-amended soil demonstrated a potential threat to human health.

  19. Diversity and antibiotic resistance of uropathogenic bacteria from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.-L.A. Moroh

    Abstract. Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are one of the major causes of prescribing and antibiotic con- sumption. In order to use the best antibiotic treatment for their patients, reliable and recent data about epidemiology and antibiotic resistance profile of uropathogenic bacteria must be available for clinicians.

  20. Demonstrating Effectiveness of Antibiotics Against Known Bacteria Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Lois M.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures are described for showing the effectiveness of antibiotics (penicillin, ampicillin, and tetracycline) against a nonpathogenic bacteria strain (Bacillus cereus). Methods are outlined for preparing nutrient agar, sterilizing tubes, pouring agar plates, preparing antibiotic discs, and transferring antibiotic discs to agar plates. (CS)

  1. Diversity and antibiotic resistance of uropathogenic bacteria from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are one of the major causes of prescribing and antibiotic consumption. In order to use the best antibiotic treatment for their patients, reliable and recent data about epidemiology and antibiotic resistance profile of uropathogenic bacteria must be available for clinicians. Therefore ...

  2. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Commensal Bacteria from Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Wen; Tseng, Shu-Ying; Huang, Mao-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have focused on foodborne or commensal bacteria as vehicles of antibiotic resistance. However, the antibiotic resistance of milk bacteria from healthy donors is still vague in Taiwan. For this purpose, human milk samples were obtained from randomly recruited 19 healthy women between 3 and 360 days post-partum. Antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacteria from milk samples was determined. About 20 bacterial species were isolated from milk samples including Staphylococcus (6 species), Streptococcus (4 species), Enterococcus (2 species), Lactobacillus (1 species), and bacteria belonging to other genera (7 species). Some opportunistic or potentially pathogenic bacteria including Kluyvera ascorbata, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Actinomyces bovis, and Staphylococcus aureus were also isolated. Intriguingly, Staphylococcus isolates (22 strains) were resistant to 2–8 of 8 antibiotics, while Streptococcus isolates (3 strains) were resistant to 3–7 of 9 antibiotics, and members of the genus Enterococcus (5 strains) were resistant to 3–8 of 9 antibiotics. Notably, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, S. aureus, Streptococcus parasanguinis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Enterococcus faecalis were resistant to vancomycin, which is considered as the last-resort antibiotic. Therefore, this study shows that most bacterial strains in human milk demonstrate mild to strong antibiotic resistance. Whether commensal bacteria in milk could serve as vehicles of antibiotic resistance should be further investigated.

  3. Countermeasures to Antibiotics Crisis: a Global Priority List of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria for Research and Development of New Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Editorial

    2017-01-01

    On 27 Feb., 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced the first list of important antibiotic-resistant bacteria (http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2017/bacteria-antibiotics-needed/en/), which tremendously threat human-being’s health. This list included 12 kinds of bacteria that were categorized into three priority tiers: Critical, High and Medium. In the first tier, Critical, three Gram negative bacteria were included: Acinetobacter baumannii with carbapenem-resis...

  4. Enteral but not parenteral antibiotics enhance gut function and prevent necrotizing enterocollitis in forumula-fed newborn preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birck, Malene M; Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Cilieborg, Malene Skovsted

    2016-01-01

    , relative to CON pigs (P pigs were intermediate with few affected parameters (reduced lactic acid levels and density and adherence of Gram-positive bacteria, relative to CON pigs, P antimicrobial resistance following the treatments. We......Preterm infants are susceptible to infection and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and are often treated with antibiotics. Simultaneous administration of enteral and parenteral antibiotics during the first days after preterm birth prevents formula-induced NEC lesions in pigs, but it is unknown which...... administration route is most effective. We hypothesized that only enteral antibiotics suppress gut bacterial colonization and NEC progression in formula-fed preterm pigs. Caesarean-delivered preterm pigs (90–92% of gestation) were fed increasing amounts of infant formula from birth to day 5 and given saline (CON...

  5. Probing minority population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianxun; Zheng, Yan; Yan, Ya; Yang, Lingling; Yao, Yihui; Zheng, Jiaxin; Wu, Lina; Wang, Xu; Chen, Yuqing; Xing, Jinchun; Yan, Xiaomei

    2016-06-15

    The evolution and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has become a major threat to public health. Advanced tools are urgently needed to quickly diagnose antibiotic-resistant infections to initiate appropriate treatment. Here we report the development of a highly sensitive flow cytometric method to probe minority population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria via single cell detection. Monoclonal antibody against TEM-1 β-lactamase and Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated secondary antibody were used to selectively label resistant bacteria green, and nucleic acid dye SYTO 62 was used to stain all the bacteria red. A laboratory-built high sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM) was applied to simultaneously detect the side scatter and dual-color fluorescence signals of single bacteria. By using E. coli JM109/pUC19 and E. coli JM109 as the model systems for antibiotic-resistant and antibiotic-susceptible bacteria, respectively, as low as 0.1% of antibiotic-resistant bacteria were accurately quantified. By monitoring the dynamic population change of a bacterial culture with the administration of antibiotics, we confirmed that under the antimicrobial pressure, the original low population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria outcompeted susceptible strains and became the dominant population after 5hours of growth. Detection of antibiotic-resistant infection in clinical urine samples was achieved without cultivation, and the bacterial load of susceptible and resistant strains can be faithfully quantified. Overall, the HSFCM-based quantitative method provides a powerful tool for the fundamental studies of antibiotic resistance and holds the potential to provide rapid and precise guidance in clinical therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Silver enhances antibiotic activity against gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morones-Ramirez, J Ruben; Winkler, Jonathan A; Spina, Catherine S; Collins, James J

    2013-06-19

    A declining pipeline of clinically useful antibiotics has made it imperative to develop more effective antimicrobial therapies, particularly against difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogens. Silver has been used as an antimicrobial since antiquity, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. We show that silver disrupts multiple bacterial cellular processes, including disulfide bond formation, metabolism, and iron homeostasis. These changes lead to increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased membrane permeability of Gram-negative bacteria that can potentiate the activity of a broad range of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria in different metabolic states, as well as restore antibiotic susceptibility to a resistant bacterial strain. We show both in vitro and in a mouse model of urinary tract infection that the ability of silver to induce oxidative stress can be harnessed to potentiate antibiotic activity. Additionally, we demonstrate in vitro and in two different mouse models of peritonitis that silver sensitizes Gram-negative bacteria to the Gram-positive-specific antibiotic vancomycin, thereby expanding the antibacterial spectrum of this drug. Finally, we used silver and antibiotic combinations in vitro to eradicate bacterial persister cells, and show both in vitro and in a mouse biofilm infection model that silver can enhance antibacterial action against bacteria that produce biofilms. This work shows that silver can be used to enhance the action of existing antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria, thus strengthening the antibiotic arsenal for fighting bacterial infections.

  7. Mathematical studies on nosocomial spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurieva, T.V.

    2017-01-01

    Infections with antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a worldwide problem in hospitals and their rates remain high in many countries despite efforts to reduce the rates. Infection prevention is complicated by asymptomatic carriers. Using mathematical modelling, different intervention strategies were

  8. Plasmid-Encoded Multidrug Resistance of Salmonella typhi and some Enteric Bacteria in and around Kolkata, India: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishith Kumar Pal

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the occurrence of R-plasmid in Salmonella typhi isolates from enteric fever cases in and around Kolkata (1991-2001, India following in vitro conjugation experiments, isolation of plasmid DNAs and agarose gel electrophoretic analysis. The multidrug resistant (MDR S. typhi strains contained a transferable plasmid conferring resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, cotrimoxazole and tetracycline. The plasmid encoding ACCoT-resistance of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris were conjugative and co-migrated with the plasmid of MDR S. typhi isolates. The antibiotic sensitive S. typhi isolates did not contain any plasmid. Thus the findings of the present study confirmed the instability of the R-plasmid in S. typhi, and that the antibiotic sensitive S. typhi strains acquired the R-plasmid from other enteric bacteria such as E. coli, K. pneumoniae and P.vulgaris to undergo a suitable adaptation for survival in the changing antibiotic environment.

  9. Suppression of Enteric Bacteria by Bacteriophages: Importance of Phage Polyvalence in the Presence of Soil Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pingfeng; Mathieu, Jacques; Yang, Yu; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2017-05-02

    Bacteriophages are widely recognized for their importance in microbial ecology and bacterial control. However, little is known about how phage polyvalence (i.e., broad host range) affects bacterial suppression and interspecies competition in environments harboring enteric pathogens and soil bacteria. Here we compare the efficacy of polyvalent phage PEf1 versus coliphage T4 in suppressing a model enteric bacterium (E. coli K-12) in mixtures with soil bacteria (Pseudomonas putida F1 and Bacillus subtilis 168). Although T4 was more effective than PEf1 in infecting E. coli K-12 in pure cultures, PEf1 was 20-fold more effective in suppressing E. coli under simulated multispecies biofilm conditions because polyvalence enhanced PEf1 propagation in P. putida. In contrast, soil bacteria do not propagate coliphages and hindered T4 diffusion through the biofilm. Similar tests were also conducted under planktonic conditions to discern how interspecies competition contributes to E. coli suppression without the confounding effects of restricted phage diffusion. Significant synergistic suppression was observed by the combined effects of phages plus competing bacteria. T4 was slightly more effective in suppressing E. coli in these planktonic mixed cultures, even though PEf1 reached higher concentrations by reproducing also in P. putida (7.2 ± 0.4 vs 6.0 ± 1.0 log 10 PFU/mL). Apparently, enhanced suppression by higher PEf1 propagation was offset by P. putida lysis, which decreased stress from interspecies competition relative to incubations with T4. In similar planktonic tests with more competing soil bacteria species, P. putida lysis was less critical in mitigating interspecies competition and PEf1 eliminated E. coli faster than T4 (36 vs 42 h). Overall, this study shows that polyvalent phages can propagate in soil bacteria and significantly enhance suppression of co-occurring enteric species.

  10. correlations between antibiotic intake and resistance of some enteric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    2010-06-25

    Jun 25, 2010 ... Bacterial resistance to antibiotics has been attributed to many different factors with emphasis on the widespread use, misuse or overuse of antibiotics. Current thinking has referenced these as providing the selective pressure favouring propagation of resistant organisms (Livermore, 2003). This, however ...

  11. Stalking Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria in Common Vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, David; Boeke, Caroline; Josowitz, Rebecca; Loya, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    The study developed a simple experimental protocol for studying antibiotic resistant bacteria that will allow students to determine the proportion of such bacteria found on common fruit and vegetable crops. This protocol can open up the world of environmental science and show how human behavior can dramatically alter ecosystems.

  12. Multiple-antibiotic-resistant bacteria from cockroaches trapped from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of cockroaches, found in and around hospital settings, to harbour multiple- antibioticresistant bacteria poses serious health implications. This study investigated and compared multiple-antibioticresistant bacteria carried by cockroaches from a hospital environment. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of isolated ...

  13. Marine bacteria: potential sources for compounds to overcome antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Young-Mog; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most problematic Gram-positive bacterium in the context of public health due to its resistance against almost all available antibiotics except vancomycin and teicoplanin. Moreover, glycopeptide-resistant S. aureus have been emerging with the increasing use of glycopeptides. Recently, resistant strains against linezolid and daptomycin, which are alternative drugs to treat MRSA infection, have also been reported. Thus, the development of new drugs or alternative therapies is clearly a matter of urgency. In response to the antibiotic resistance, many researchers have studied for alternative antibiotics and therapies. In this review, anti-MRSA substances isolated from marine bacteria, with their potential antibacterial effect against MRSA as potential anti-MRSA agents, are discussed and several strategies for overcoming the antibiotic resistance are also introduced. Our objective was to highlight marine bacteria that have potential to lead in developing novel antibiotics or clinically useful alternative therapeutic treatments.

  14. Antibiotic oxylipins from Alternanthera brasiliana and its endophytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Marília Almeida; Kai, Marco; Mithöfer, Axel; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson

    2015-02-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of Alternanthera brasiliana stem extracts resulted in the isolation of an antibiotically active fraction. Five human pathogenic bacteria were used to guide the fractionation process for the isolation of antimicrobial compounds. Finally, 17 linoleate oxylipins were identified by LC-MS/MS and NMR spectroscopy. Five of the isolated compounds present in A. brasiliana tissues were also detected to be synthesized by endophytic bacteria of the genus Bacillus that were isolated from A. brasiliana. It is speculated that the antibiotic oxylipins from A. brasiliana might derive from bacteria and be involved in an ecological relationship between this plant and its endophytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Electromagnetic interactions between antibiotics and bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Moqueet, Mohammad M.

    The effect of weak electromagnetic fields on the interaction of the antibiotic erythromycin on E.coli has been studied. Erythromycin is a first derivative antibiotic which is bacteriostatic in nature. E.coli's structure has been well studied and provides a baseline for understanding the interaction. Electromagnetic fields are shown to influence the growth curve of bacterium depending on the field's geometry. The theoretical model discussed in this thesis describes the interaction using a two-fluid model. The basis of this two-fluid model has been tested and shown that the concentration of antibiotics in the fluid environment is proportional to the response seen by the bacterium. The response of the bacterium has been determined using optical density measurements from which the behavior of the antibiotic-cell system has been studied.

  16. Antibiotic-resistant soil bacteria in transgenic plant fields

    OpenAIRE

    Demaneche, S.; Sanguin, H.; Pote, J.; Navarro, Elisabeth; Bernillon, D.; Mavingui, P.; Wildi, W.; Vogel, T. M.; Simonet, P.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the prevalence and polymorphism of antibiotic resistance genes in soil bacteria and their potential to be transferred horizontally is required to evaluate the likelihood and ecological (and possibly clinical) consequences of the transfer of these genes from transgenic plants to soil bacteria. In this study, we combined culture-dependent and -independent approaches to study the prevalence and diversity of bla genes in soil bacteria and the potential impact that a 10-successive-y...

  17. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the Hudson River Estuary linked to wet weather sewage contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Suzanne; Juhl, Andrew; O'Mullan, Gregory D

    2013-06-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria resistant to tetracycline and ampicillin were assessed in waterways of the New York City metropolitan area using culture-dependent approaches and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of resultant isolates. Resistant microbes were detected at all 10 sampling sites in monthly research cruises on the lower Hudson River Estuary (HRE), with highest concentrations detected at nearshore sites. Higher frequency sampling was conducted in Flushing Bay, to enumerate resistant microbes under both dry and wet weather conditions. Concentrations of ampicillin- and tetracycline-resistant bacteria, in paired samples, were positively correlated with one another and increased following precipitation. Counts of the fecal indicator, Enterococcus, were positively correlated with levels of resistant bacteria, suggesting a shared sewage-associated source. Analysis of 16S rRNA from isolates identified a phylogenetically diverse group of resistant bacteria, including genera containing opportunistic pathogens. The occurrence of Enterobacteriaceae, a family of enteric bacteria, was found to be significantly higher in resistant isolates compared to total heterotrophic bacteria and increased following precipitation. This study is the first to document the widespread distribution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the HRE and to demonstrate clearly a link between the abundance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and levels of sewage-associated bacteria in an estuary.

  18. Linking microbial community structure and function to characterize antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistant genes from cattle feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is widespread interest in monitoring the development of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in agriculturally impacted environments, however little is known about the relationships between bacterial community structure, and antibiotic resistance gene profiles. Cattl...

  19. Antibiotic resistance shaping multi-level population biology of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero, Fernando; Tedim, Ana P.; Coque, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics have natural functions, mostly involving cell-to-cell signaling networks. The anthropogenic production of antibiotics, and its release in the microbiosphere results in a disturbance of these networks, antibiotic resistance tending to preserve its integrity. The cost of such adaptation is the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes, and of all genetic and cellular vehicles in which these genes are located. Selection of the combinations of the different evolutionary units (genes, integrons, transposons, plasmids, cells, communities and microbiomes, hosts) is highly asymmetrical. Each unit of selection is a self-interested entity, exploiting the higher hierarchical unit for its own benefit, but in doing so the higher hierarchical unit might acquire critical traits for its spread because of the exploitation of the lower hierarchical unit. This interactive trade-off shapes the population biology of antibiotic resistance, a composed-complex array of the independent “population biologies.” Antibiotics modify the abundance and the interactive field of each of these units. Antibiotics increase the number and evolvability of “clinical” antibiotic resistance genes, but probably also many other genes with different primary functions but with a resistance phenotype present in the environmental resistome. Antibiotics influence the abundance, modularity, and spread of integrons, transposons, and plasmids, mostly acting on structures present before the antibiotic era. Antibiotics enrich particular bacterial lineages and clones and contribute to local clonalization processes. Antibiotics amplify particular genetic exchange communities sharing antibiotic resistance genes and platforms within microbiomes. In particular human or animal hosts, the microbiomic composition might facilitate the interactions between evolutionary units involved in antibiotic resistance. The understanding of antibiotic resistance implies expanding our knowledge on multi

  20. Rapid electrochemical phenotypic profiling of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besant, Justin D; Sargent, Edward H; Kelley, Shana O

    2015-07-07

    Rapid phenotyping of bacteria to identify drug-resistant strains is an important capability for the treatment and management of infectious disease. At present, the rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility is hindered by the requirement that, in existing devices, bacteria must be pre-cultured for 2-3 days to reach detectable levels. Here we report a novel electrochemical approach that achieves rapid readout of the antibiotic susceptibility profile of a bacterial infection within one hour. The electrochemical reduction of a redox-active molecule is monitored that reports on levels of metabolically-active bacteria. Bacteria are captured in miniaturized wells, incubated with antimicrobials and monitored for resistance. This electrochemical phenotyping approach is effective with clinically-relevant levels of bacteria, and provides results comparable to culture-based analysis. Results, however, are delivered on a much faster timescale, with resistance profiles available after a one hour incubation period.

  1. Antibiotic Resistance of Bacteria: A Global Challenge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    provided a distinct advantage to the physicians in controlling bacterial infections. Discovery of streptomycin, the ... resistance to virtually all the therapeutically useful antibiotics had been evidenced. Emergence of ..... Genomic tools are helping us to select for antibacterial targets and understand bacterial resistance. On the ...

  2. Multi-antibiotics-resistance plasmid profile of enteric pathogens in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr J. T. Ekanem

    from ≤0.55kbp to ≥1.14kbp. This indicates that plasmids allow the movement of genetic materials, including antimicrobial resistance genes between bacterial species and strains. Keywords: Diarrheagenic pathogens, antibiotics resistance plasmids profile. E-mail: yahclar@yahoo.com; Tel: 08053336108, 08063418265.

  3. Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  4. Antibiotic concentration and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in two shallow urban lakes after stormwater event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songhe; Pang, Si; Wang, PeiFang; Wang, Chao; Han, Nini; Liu, Bin; Han, Bing; Li, Yi; Anim-Larbi, Kwaku

    2016-05-01

    Stormwater runoff is generally characterized as non-point source pollution. In the present study, antibiotic concentration and antibiotic susceptibilities of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria were investigated in two small shallow urban lakes before and after strong storm event. Several antibiotics, lactose-fermenting bacteria and cultivable heterotrophic bacteria concentrations increased in surface water and/or surface sediment of two small urban lakes (Lake Xuanwu and Wulongtan) after strong storm event. In general, the frequencies of bacteria showing resistance to nine antibiotics increased after storm event. Based on the 16S rRNA genes of 50 randomly selected isolates from each water sample of two lakes, Aeromonas and Bacillus were dominant genera in samples from two lakes, while genera Proteus and Lysinibacillus were the third abundant genera in Lake Xuanwu and Wulongtu, respectively. Presences of nine antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the 100 isolates were detected and most of these isolates harbored at least two ARGs with different functions. The detection frequency of ARGs in Gram-negative isolates was higher than that in Gram-positive isolates. The most prevalent integron in 100 isolates was int(II) (n = 28), followed by int(I) (n = 17) and int(III) (n = 17). Our results indicate that strong storm events potentially contribute to the transfer of ARGs and antibiotic-resistant bacteria from land-sewer system to the urban Lakes.

  5. A bacteria antibiotic system in space (23-F ANTIBIO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixador, Rene; Gasset, G.; Eche, B.; Moatti, N.; Lapchine, L.; Woldringh, C.; Toorop, P.; Moatti, J. P.; Delmotte, F.; Tap, G.

    1995-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of weightlessness and cosmic radiations on the bacteria resistance to antibiotics, the Antibio 23F experiment was undertaken onboard Discovery during the 1st International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) mission. The effects of various antibiotic concentrations (dihydrostreptomycin) on Escherichia coli growth and cell division behavior were studied. The antibiotic binding was investigated using a radioactive tracer (tritium). The results showed that microgravity did not affect E. coli cells in regards the growth and the cell division. The antibiotic added to the culture medium induced an inhibition of the cultures both in the flight and ground controls. However, the antibiotic was less efficient in flight. The behavior of bacteria was modified, and the exponential growth rate was increased in flight. The incorporation of radioactive antibiotics in flight was comparatively different to ground incorporation, which indicated some perturbations in antibiotic binding. The experiments performed in the 1 g centrifuge did not show any difference in the cultures developed on the static rack, and could support a radiative effect of cosmic radiation to explain the results.

  6. Interventions on Metabolism: Making Antibiotic-Susceptible Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Baquero

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics act on bacterial metabolism, and antibiotic resistance involves changes in this metabolism. Interventions on metabolism with drugs might therefore modify drug susceptibility and drug resistance. In their recent article, Martin Vestergaard et al. (mBio 8:e01114-17, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01114-17 illustrate the possibility of converting intrinsically resistant bacteria into susceptible ones. They reported that inhibition of a central metabolic enzyme, ATP synthase, allows otherwise ineffective polymyxin antibiotics to act on Staphylococcus aureus. The study of the intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens has shown that several metabolic genes, including multigene transcriptional regulators, contribute to antibiotic resistance. In some cases, these genes only marginally increase antibiotic resistance, but reduced levels of susceptibility might be critical in the evolution or resistance under low antibiotic concentrations or in the clinical response of highly resistant bacteria. Drug interventions on bacterial metabolism might constitute a critical adjuvant therapy in combination with antibiotics to ensure susceptibility of pathogens with intrinsic or acquired antimicrobial resistance.

  7. Off-label abuse of antibiotics by bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, V K

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance made news on several fronts in the past year. Many public health organizations, including the CDC, used terms such as "crisis", "catastrophic consequences", and "nightmare scenario" to highlight the rapid emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. A report from the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production, on the fifth anniversary of the publication of its landmark 2008 report, noted that state and federal legislative efforts to limit non-therapeutic use of antibiotics in animal production were thwarted by drug and food animal industries. In its lobbying disclosures, the Farm Bureau stated that such efforts to limit use of animal antibiotics were "based on emotion and no credible peer reviewed science." Meanwhile, there have been inexorable advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which antibiotics induce diversity and resistance in bacteria. This article reviews one study that probed the role of the bacterial general stress response in sub-inhibitory antibiotic-induced mutagenesis and antibiotic resistance.

  8. Chitosan conjugation enables intracellular bacteria susceptible to aminoglycoside antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Haibo; Niu, Hong; Wang, Dongdong; Sun, Feifei; Sun, Yuelin; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-11-01

    Most chronic infections are difficult to eradicate because bacteria capable of surviving in host-infected cells may be protected from the killing actions of antibiotics, leading to therapy failures and disease relapses. Here we demonstrated that covalent-coupling chitosan to streptomycin significantly improved intracellular bactericidal capacity towards multiple organisms within phagocytic or nonphagocytic cells. Structure-activity relationship investigations indicated that antibiotic contents, molecular size and positive charges of the conjugate were the key to retain this intracellular bactericidal activity. Mechanistic insight demonstrated the conjugate was capable to target and eliminate endocytic or endosomal escaped bacteria through facilitating the direct contact between the antibiotic and intracellular organism. In vivo acute infection models indicated that compared to equal dose of the antibiotic, chitosan-streptomycin (C-S) conjugate and especially the human serum album binding chitosan-streptomycin conjugate (HCS) complex formed by human serum album and C-S conjugate greatly decreased the bacteria burden in the spleen and liver in both wild type and immuno-suppressive mice. Furthermore, the HCS complex remarkably reduced mortality of infected TLR2 deficient mice, mimicking immune-compromised persons who were more susceptible to bacterial infections. These findings might open up a new avenue to combat intracellular bacterial infection by aminoglycosides antibiotics at a lower effective dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria: a challenge for the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capita, Rosa; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were first described in the 1940s, but whereas new antibiotics were being discovered at a steady rate, the consequences of this phenomenon were slow to be appreciated. At present, the paucity of new antimicrobials coming into the market has led to the problem of antibiotic resistance fast escalating into a global health crisis. Although the selective pressure exerted by the use of antibiotics (particularly overuse or misuse) has been deemed the major factor in the emergence of bacterial resistance to these antimicrobials, concerns about the role of the food industry have been growing in recent years and have been raised at both national and international levels. The selective pressure exerted by the use of antibiotics (primary production) and biocides (e.g., disinfectants, food and feed preservatives, or decontaminants) is the main driving force behind the selection and spread of antimicrobial resistance throughout the food chain. Genetically modified (GM) crops with antibiotic resistance marker genes, microorganisms added intentionally to the food chain (probiotic or technological) with potentially transferable antimicrobial resistance genes, and food processing technologies used at sub-lethal doses (e.g., alternative non-thermal treatments) are also issues for concern. This paper presents the main trends in antibiotic resistance and antibiotic development in recent decades, as well as their economic and health consequences, current knowledge concerning the generation, dissemination, and mechanisms of antibacterial resistance, progress to date on the possible routes for emergence of resistance throughout the food chain and the role of foods as a vehicle for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The main approaches to prevention and control of the development, selection, and spread of antibacterial resistance in the food industry are also addressed.

  10. Emerging antibiotic resistance in bacteria with special reference to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic as well as emergent and reemergent infections have rekindled the interest in infectious diseases but the antibiotic scene remains ..... to control spread of resistant bacteria and investigation of outbreaks add to the cost of health care. On a national scale the burden is considerable amounting to about ...

  11. Prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria and chromosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-19

    Jan 19, 2009 ... Prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria and chromosomal determinants in surface water of. Bangladesh. Hasan M. Zahid1*, Zinat Mahal2, and Mamun R. Chowdhury2. 1Tissue Banking and Biomaterial Research Unit, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Bangladesh Atomic Energy.

  12. Antibiotic resistant bacteria in faecal samples of apparently healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in faeces of apparently healthy individual volunteers was investigated. Faecal samples were collected from 216 individuals comprising 138 adults (70 males and 68 females) and 78 children aged between 4 months and 42 years (mean age was 30.2 months). Individuals on ...

  13. Antibiotic resistance in bacteria - an emerging public health problem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The discovery and eventual introduction of anti-microbial agents to clinical medicine was one of the greatest medical triumphs of the twentieth century that revolutionized the treatment of bacterial diseases. However, the gradual emergence of populations of antibiotic-resistant bacteria resulting from use, misuse and outright ...

  14. Antibiotic resistance in bacteria – an emerging public

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In spite of the many advances in microbiology, biochemistry and drug discovery and development in recent years, the world is not keeping pace with the ability of bacteria to adapt to and resist antibacterials. It is believed that the rise in bacterial resistance is partly because there have been no new classes of antibiotics.

  15. Selection and Transmission of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Dan I; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2017-07-01

    Ever since antibiotics were introduced into human and veterinary medicine to treat and prevent bacterial infections there has been a steady selection and increase in the frequency of antibiotic resistant bacteria. To be able to reduce the rate of resistance evolution, we need to understand how various biotic and abiotic factors interact to drive the complex processes of resistance emergence and transmission. We describe several of the fundamental factors that underlay resistance evolution, including rates and niches of emergence and persistence of resistant bacteria, time- and space-gradients of various selective agents, and rates and routes of transmission of resistant bacteria between humans, animals and other environments. Furthermore, we discuss the options available to reduce the rate of resistance evolution and/ or transmission and their advantages and disadvantages.

  16. Secular Trends in Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections : Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Increase the Total Burden of Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, H. S. M.; Harbarth, S.; Buiting, A. G. M.; Crook, D. W.; Fitzpatrick, F.; Hanberger, H.; Herwaldt, L. A.; van Keulen, P. H. J.; Kluytmans, J. A. J. W.; Kola, A.; Kuchenbecker, R. S.; Lingaas, E.; Meessen, N.; Morris-Downes, M. M.; Pottinger, J. M.; Rohner, P.; dos Santos, R. P.; Seifert, H.; Wisplinghoff, H.; Ziesing, S.; Walker, A. S.; Bonten, M. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether rising incidence rates of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) replace antibiotic-susceptible bacteria (ASB), leaving the total BSI rate unaffected. Methods. We investigated temporal trends in annual incidence

  17. Differential sensitivity of pigmented and non-pigmented marine bacteria to metals and antibiotics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    The response of pigmented and non-pigmented marine bacteria to metals and antibiotics was investigated. The two groups responded differently to heavy metals and antibiotics. Pigmented bacteria were more resistant to metals. Among the metals, Zn...

  18. Density-dependent adaptive resistance allows swimming bacteria to colonize an antibiotic gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, F.J.H.; Hubert, A.W.R.; Dekker, C.; Keymer Vergara, J.E.

    2016-01-01

    During antibiotic treatment, antibiotic concentration gradients develop. Little is know regarding the effects of antibiotic gradients on populations of nonresistant bacteria. Using a microfluidic device, we show that high-density motile Escherichia coli populations composed of nonresistant

  19. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria as an alternative to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ołdak, Aleksandra; Zielińska, Dorota

    2017-05-05

    Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized, proteinaceous substances that inhibit the growth of closely related species through numerous mechanisms. The classification system used in this review divided bacteriocins into four sub-groups based on their size. Currently, there is extensive research focused on bacteriocins and their usage as a food preservative. The increasing incidence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens is one of the most pressing medical problems in recent years. Recently, the potential clinical application of LAB (Lactic Acid Bacteria) bacteriocin has been the subject of investigations by many scientists. Bacteriocins can be considered in a sense as antibiotic, although they differ from conventional antibiotics in numerous aspects. The gene-encoded nature of bacteriocins makes them easily amenable through bioengineering to either increase their activity or specify target microorganism. Owing to this feature of bacteriocins, antibiotic therapy would become less damaging to the natural gut microflora, which is a common drawback of conventional antibiotic use. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria represent one of the most studied microbial defense systems and the idea of subjecting them to bioengineering to either increase antimicrobial activity or further specify their target microorganism is now a rapidly expanding field. This review aimed to present bacteriocins as a possible alternative to conventional antibiotics basic on latest scientific data.

  20. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria as an alternative to antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Ołdak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized, proteinaceous substances that inhibit the growth of closely related species through numerous mechanisms. The classification system used in this review divided bacteriocins into four sub-groups based on their size. Currently, there is extensive research focused on bacteriocins and their usage as a food preservative.The increasing incidence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens is one of the most pressing medical problems in recent years. Recently, the potential clinical application of LAB (Lactic Acid Bacteria bacteriocin has been the subject of investigations by many scientists.Bacteriocins can be considered in a sense as antibiotic, although they differ from conventional antibiotics in numerous aspects. The gene-encoded nature of bacteriocins makes them easily amenable through bioengineering to either increase their activity or specify target microorganism. Owing to this feature of bacteriocins, antibiotic therapy would become less damaging to the natural gut microflora, which is a common drawback of conventional antibiotic use. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria represent one of the most studied microbial defense systems and the idea of subjecting them to bioengineering to either increase antimicrobial activity or further specify their target microorganism is now a rapidly expanding field. This review aimed to present bacteriocins as a possible alternative to conventional antibiotics basic on latest scientific data.

  1. Antibiotics involved in the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria: a nationwide multilevel study suggests differences within antibiotic classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Dumartin, Catherine; L'Hériteau, François; Péfau, Muriel; Hocquet, Didier; Rogues, Anne-Marie; Bertrand, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    To identify the antibiotics potentially the most involved in the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from an ecological perspective in French healthcare facilities (HCFs). This study was based on data from the French antimicrobial surveillance network (ATB-RAISIN, 2007-09). Antibiotics were expressed in defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were considered as count data adjusted for patient-days. These were third-generation cephalosporin (3GC)- and ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli, cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacter cloacae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ceftazidime-, imipenem- and ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Three-level negative binomial regression models were built to take into account the hierarchical structure of data: level 1, repeated measures each year (count outcome, time, antibiotics); level 2, HCFs (type and size); and level 3, regions (geographical area). A total of 701 HCFs from 20 French regions and up to 1339 HCF-years were analysed. The use of ceftriaxone, but not of cefotaxime, was positively correlated with incidence rates of 3GC- and ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli. In contrast, both 3GCs were positively correlated with the incidence rate of cefotaxime-resistant E. cloacae. Higher levels of use of ciprofloxacin and/or ofloxacin, but not of levofloxacin, were associated with higher incidence rates of 3GC- and ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli, cefotaxime-resistant E. cloacae, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and ceftazidime- and ciprofloxacin-resistant P. aeruginosa. Our study suggests differences within antibiotic classes in promoting antibiotic resistance. We identified ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin as priority targets in public health strategies designed to reduce antibiotic use and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in French HCFs.

  2. Countermeasures to Antibiotics Crisis: a Global Priority List of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria for Research and Development of New Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available On 27 Feb., 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO announced the first list of important antibiotic-resistant bacteria (http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2017/bacteria-antibiotics-needed/en/, which tremendously threat human-being’s health. This list included 12 kinds of bacteria that were categorized into three priority tiers: Critical, High and Medium. In the first tier, Critical, three Gram negative bacteria were included: Acinetobacter baumannii with carbapenem-resistant, Pseudomonas aeruginosa with carbapenem-resistant; and Enterobacteriaceae with carbapenem-resistant, the third generation cephalosporin-resistant. In the second tier, High, six bacteria were suggested: Enterococcus faecium with vancomycin-resistant, Staphylococcus aureus with methicillin-resistant, vancomycin intermediate and resistant, Helicobacter pylori with clarithromycin-resistant, Campylobacter with fluoroquinolone-resistant, Salmonella spp. with fluoroquinolone-resistant, Neisseria gonorrhoeae with the third generation cephalosporin-resistant, fluoroquinolone-resistant. In the third tier, Medium, three bacteria were listed: Streptococcus pneumonia with penicillin-non-susceptible, Haemophilus influenza with ampicillin-resistant, and Shigella spp. with fluoroquinolone-resistant. This list was proposed by an expert panel, chaired by Dr. E. Tacconelli from Infectious Diseases, DZIF Center, Tübingen University, Germany and Dr. N. Magrini from EMP Department of WHO. This proposal recommended some key steps to countermeasure the challenges posed by multi-drug- and extensively drug-resistant bacteria, including research and development of new classes of antibiotics for the paediatric population, for preventing cross- and co-resistance to existing classes of antibiotics, and for oral formulations for community-acquired diseases with a high morbidity burden. This list will guide our future research and development of new antibiotics in future.

  3. Fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes during wastewater chlorination: implication for antibiotic resistance control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Bin Yuan

    Full Text Available This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L. The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L. By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L. However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination.

  4. Fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes during wastewater chlorination: implication for antibiotic resistance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination.

  5. Luminous Enteric Bacteria of Marine Fishes: a Study of Their Distribution, Densities, and Dispersion †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, E. G.; Morin, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Three taxa of luminous bacteria (Photobacterium fischeri, P. phosphoreum, and Beneckea spp.) were found in the enteric microbial populations of 22 species of surface- and midwater-dwelling fishes. These bacteria often occurred in concentrations ranging between 105 and 107 colony-forming units per ml of enteric contents. By using a genetically marked strain, it was determined that luminous cells entering the fish during ingestion of seawater or contaminated particles traversed the alimentary tract and survived the digestive processes. After excretion, luminous bacteria proliferated extensively on the fecal material and became distributed into the surrounding seawater. Thus, this enteric habitat may serve as an enrichment of viable cells entering the planktonic luminous population. PMID:16345429

  6. Luminous enteric bacteria of marine fishes: a study of their distribution, densities, and dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, E G; Morin, J G

    1979-09-01

    Three taxa of luminous bacteria (Photobacterium fischeri, P. phosphoreum, and Beneckea spp.) were found in the enteric microbial populations of 22 species of surface- and midwater-dwelling fishes. These bacteria often occurred in concentrations ranging between 10 and 10 colony-forming units per ml of enteric contents. By using a genetically marked strain, it was determined that luminous cells entering the fish during ingestion of seawater or contaminated particles traversed the alimentary tract and survived the digestive processes. After excretion, luminous bacteria proliferated extensively on the fecal material and became distributed into the surrounding seawater. Thus, this enteric habitat may serve as an enrichment of viable cells entering the planktonic luminous population.

  7. [State-of-the-art status on airborne antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Yao, M S

    2018-04-06

    The world is facing more deaths due to increasing antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and the shortage of new highly effective antibiotics, however the air media as its important transmission route has not been adequately studied. Based on the latest literature acquired in this work, we have discussed the state-of-the-art research progress of the concentration, distribution and spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in different environmental air media, and also analyzed some future prevention and control measures. The large use of antibiotics in the medical settings and animal husbandry places has resulted in higher abundances of ARB and ARGs in the relevant and surrounding atmosphere than in urban and general indoor air environments. ARGs can be spread by adhering to airborne particles, and researchers have also found that air media contain more abundant ARGs than other environmental media such as soil, water and sediment. It was suggested in this review that strengthening the monitoring, study on spreading factors and biological toxicity, and also research and development on pathogen accurate diagnosis and new green antibiotic are expected to help effectively monitor, prevent and control of the impacts of airborne resistant bacteria and resistance genes on both human and ecologies.

  8. Bacteriophages as potential treatment option for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Robert; van der Westhuizen, Wouter; Lee, Ji-Yun; Coetsee, Elke; Boucher, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The world is facing an ever-increasing problem with antibiotic resistant bacteria and we are rapidly heading for a post-antibiotic era. There is an urgent need to investigate alterative treatment options while there are still a few antibiotics left. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically target bacteria. Before the development of antibiotics, some efforts were made to use bacteriophages as a treatment option, but most of this research stopped soon after the discovery of antibiotics. There are two different replication options which bacteriophages employ. These are the lytic and lysogenic life cycles. Both these life cycles have potential as treatment options. There are various advantages and disadvantages to the use of bacteriophages as treatment options. The main advantage is the specificity of bacteriophages and treatments can be designed to specifically target pathogenic bacteria while not negatively affecting the normal microbiota. There are various advantages to this. However, the high level of specificity also creates potential problems, the main being the requirement of highly specific diagnostic procedures. Another potential problem with phage therapy includes the development of immunity and limitations with the registration of phage therapy options. The latter is driving research toward the expression of phage genes which break the bacterial cell wall, which could then be used as a treatment option. Various aspects of phage therapy have been investigated in studies undertaken by our research group. We have investigated specificity of phages to various avian pathogenic E. coli isolates. Furthermore, the exciting NanoSAM technology has been employed to investigate bacteriophage replication and aspects of this will be discussed.

  9. Fate of antibiotic resistant cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songhe; Han, Bing; Gu, Ju; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Ma, Yanyan; Cao, Jiashun; He, Zhenli

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging contaminants of environmental concern. Heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge have an important role in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). However, the fate of cultivable heterotrophic ARB and ARGs in WWPTs process remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the antibiotic-resistant phenotypes of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria from influent and effluent water of three WWTPs and analysed thirteen ARGs in ARB and in activated sludge from anoxic, anaerobic and aerobic compartments. From each influent or effluent sample of the three plants, 200 isolates were randomly tested for susceptibility to 12 antibiotics. In these samples, between 5% and 64% isolates showed resistance to >9 antibiotics and the proportion of >9-drug-resistant bacteria was lower in isolates from effluent than from influent. Eighteen genera were identified in 188 isolates from influent (n=94) and effluent (n=94) of one WWTP. Six genera (Aeromonas, Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Microbacterium, Providencia, and Staphylococcus) were detected in both influent and effluent samples. Gram-negative and -positive isolates dominated in influent and effluent, respectively. The 13 tetracycline-, sulphonamide-, streptomycin- and β-lactam-resistance genes were detected at a higher frequency in ARB from influent than from effluent, except for sulA and CTX-M, while in general, the abundances of ARGs in activated sludge from two of the three plants were higher in aerobic compartments than in anoxic ones, indicating abundant ARGs exit in the excess sledges and/or in uncultivable bacteria. These findings may be useful for elucidating the effect of WWTP on ARB and ARGs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neonatal sepsis: causative bacteria and their resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Zardad; Ahmed, Ashfaq; Hayat, Umar; Wazir, Muhammad Salim; Rafiyatullah; Waqas, Huma

    2010-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is one of the major causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality, particularly in developing countries. The objective of this study was to determine the causative bacteria and level of their resistance to commonly used antibiotics. This descriptive study was carried out at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from April 2009 to January 2010. All neonates of either gender admitted in neonatology unit with clinical sepsis and positive blood culture were included in the study. Neonatal period was defined as 28 days of life at term and up to 44 weeks of gestational age in preterm babies. One hundred and thirty neonates of either gender were studied during the period. Blood sample for culture was taken from a peripheral vein or an artery ensuring standard anti-septic measures. BACTEC technique was used for obtaining bacterial growth and drug sensitivity after incubation of 24-48 hours. Second blood culture was also performed in few cases which were not showing improvement after initial treatment. Male to female ratio was 1.3:1. Early and late onset sepsis was found in 29.2% and 70.8% respectively. Gram-negative bacteria were more frequent than gram-positive bacteria with a frequency of 54.6% and 45.4% respectively. Gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria showed high resistance against commonly used antibiotics such as ampicillin, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriazone and gentamicin. Staph. aureus is the most common gram-positive bacterium and E. coli is the most common gram-negative bacterium causing neonatal sepsis. Gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria are highly resistant against commonly used antibiotics such as ampicillin, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriazone and gentamicin, and are relatively more sensitive to less commonly used drugs like amikacin and ceftazidime.

  11. Antibiotics, bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes: aerial transport from cattle feed yards via particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachran, Andrew D; Blackwell, Brett R; Hanson, J Delton; Wooten, Kimberly J; Mayer, Gregory D; Cox, Stephen B; Smith, Philip N

    2015-04-01

    Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance has become a global health threat and is often linked with overuse and misuse of clinical and veterinary chemotherapeutic agents. Modern industrial-scale animal feeding operations rely extensively on veterinary pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics, to augment animal growth. Following excretion, antibiotics are transported through the environment via runoff, leaching, and land application of manure; however, airborne transport from feed yards has not been characterized. The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which antibiotics, antibiotic resistance genes (ARG), and ruminant-associated microbes are aerially dispersed via particulate matter (PM) derived from large-scale beef cattle feed yards. PM was collected downwind and upwind of 10 beef cattle feed yards. After extraction from PM, five veterinary antibiotics were quantified via high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, ARG were quantified via targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and microbial community diversity was analyzed via 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing. Airborne PM derived from feed yards facilitated dispersal of several veterinary antibiotics, as well as microbial communities containing ARG. Concentrations of several antibiotics in airborne PM immediately downwind of feed yards ranged from 0.5 to 4.6 μg/g of PM. Microbial communities of PM collected downwind of feed yards were enriched with ruminant-associated taxa and were distinct when compared to upwind PM assemblages. Furthermore, genes encoding resistance to tetracycline antibiotics were significantly more abundant in PM collected downwind of feed yards as compared to upwind. Wind-dispersed PM from feed yards harbors antibiotics, bacteria, and ARGs.

  12. Establishing an enteric bacteria reference laboratory in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattaway, Marie Anne; Kamara, Abdul; Rhodes, Fay; Kaffeta, Konneh; Jambai, Amara; Alemu, Wondimagegnehu; Islam, Mohammed Sirajul; Freeman, Molly M; Welfare, William; Harding, Doris; Samba, Ahmed F; Abu, Musu; Kamanda, Sylvester; Grant, Kathie; Jenkins, Claire; Nair, Satheesh; Connell, Steve; Siorvanes, Lisa; Desai, Sarika; Allen, Collette; Frost, Margaret; Hughes, Daniel; Jeffrey, Zonya; Gill, Noel; Salter, Mark

    2014-06-09

    In 2012, Sierra Leone experienced its worst cholera outbreak in over 15 years affecting 12 of the country's 13 districts. With limited diagnostic capability, particularly in bacterial culture, the cholera outbreak was initially confirmed by microbiological testing of clinical specimens outside of Sierra Leone. During 2012 - 2013, in direct response to the lack of diagnostic microbiology facilities, and to assist in investigating and monitoring the cholera outbreak, diagnostic and reference services were established in Sierra Leone at the Central Public Health Reference Laboratory focusing specifically on isolating and identifying Vibrio cholerae and other enteric bacterial pathogens. Sierra Leone is now capable of confirming cholera cases by reference laboratory testing.

  13. Density-dependent adaptive resistance allows swimming bacteria to colonize an antibiotic gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, Felix J H; Hubert, Bert; Dekker, Cees; Keymer, Juan E

    2016-01-01

    During antibiotic treatment, antibiotic concentration gradients develop. Little is know regarding the effects of antibiotic gradients on populations of nonresistant bacteria. Using a microfluidic device, we show that high-density motile Escherichia coli populations composed of nonresistant bacteria can, unexpectedly, colonize environments where a lethal concentration of the antibiotic kanamycin is present. Colonizing bacteria establish an adaptively resistant population, which remains viable for over 24 h while exposed to the antibiotic. Quantitative analysis of multiple colonization events shows that collectively swimming bacteria need to exceed a critical population density in order to successfully colonize the antibiotic landscape. After colonization, bacteria are not dormant but show both growth and swimming motility under antibiotic stress. Our results highlight the importance of motility and population density in facilitating adaptive resistance, and indicate that adaptive resistance may be a first step to the emergence of genetically encoded resistance in landscapes of antibiotic gradients.

  14. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) versus their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1- a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10- a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts ...

  15. Behavior of bacteria and antibiotics under space conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixador, R; Gasset, G; Eche, B; Moatti, N; Lapchine, L; Woldringh, C; Toorop, P; Moatti, J P; Delmotte, F; Tap, G

    1994-06-01

    We have previously reported an increase of the "resistance" to antibiotics of bacteria during space missions. In the present experiment, we studied the growth of Escherichia coli cultured in vitro in space in the presence of dihydrostreptomycin: tritiated and nontritiated. This experiment was carried out during the STS 42 mission aboard the U.S. Space Shuttle Discovery (IML-1 program). Cells were cultured in plastic bags and growth was stopped at six different time points by lowering the temperature to 5 degrees C. Several methods were used: viable cell counting by Colony Forming Units; total cell number by optical densitometry; electron microscopy; radioactivity measurements. The investigations show no difference between flight and ground experiments for the cultures without antibiotic. The growth rate with antibiotic was accelerated in flight, the growth yield was not changed, and there were no differences in the ultrastructures. The results suggest some changes in antibiotic binding in space. We did not observe any differences between the cultures developed in flight in the 1-g centrifuge and the cultures placed in the static rack in microgravity.

  16. Lack of evidence that DNA in antibiotic preparations is a source of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria from animal or human sources

    OpenAIRE

    Yuen, KY; Lau, SKP; Woo, PCY; Lau, ATK; To, APC

    2004-01-01

    Although DNA encoding antibiotic resistance has been discovered in antibiotic preparations, its significance for the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is unknown. No phylogenetic evidence was obtained for recent horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes from antibiotic-producing organisms to bacteria from human or animal sources.

  17. “Infectious Supercarelessness” in Discussing Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil S. Greenspan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial pathogens are exhibiting resistance to increasing numbers of antibiotics making it much more challenging to treat the infections caused by these microbes. In many reports in the media and perhaps even in discussions among physicians and biomedical scientists, these bacteria are frequently referred to as “bugs” with the prefix “super” appended. This terminology has a high potential to elicit unjustified inferences and fails to highlight the broader evolutionary context. Understanding the full range of biological and evolutionary factors that influence the spread and outcomes of infections is critical to formulating effective individual therapies and public health interventions. Therefore, more accurate terminology should be used to refer these multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  18. Triclosan resistant bacteria in sewage effluent and cross-resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, I; Bezuidenhout, C C; Bezuidenhout, J J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify triclosan tolerant heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria from sewage effluent and to determine cross-resistance to antibiotics. R2 agar supplemented with triclosan was utilised to isolate triclosan resistant bacteria and 16S rRNA gene sequencing was conducted to identify the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of organisms were determined at selected concentrations of triclosan and cross-resistance to various antibiotics was performed. High-performance liquid chromatography was conducted to quantify levels of triclosan in sewage water. Forty-four HPC were isolated and identified as the five main genera, namely, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Enterococcus, Brevibacillus and Paenibacillus. MIC values of these isolates ranged from 0.125 mg/L to >1 mg/L of triclosan, while combination of antimicrobials indicated synergism or antagonism. Levels of triclosan within the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) ranged between 0.026 and 1.488 ppb. Triclosan concentrations were reduced by the WWTP, but small concentrations enter receiving freshwater bodies. Results presented indicate that these levels are sufficient to maintain triclosan resistant bacteria under controlled conditions. Further studies are thus needed into the impact of this scenario on such natural receiving water bodies.

  19. Vanillin selectively modulates the action of antibiotics against resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Camila Fonseca; Camilo, Cicera Janaine; do Nascimento Silva, Maria Karollyna; de Freitas, Thiago Sampaio; Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo

    2017-12-01

    The treatment of infections caused by microorganisms that are resistant to antibiotics represent one of the main challenges of medicine today, especially due to the inefficacy of long-term drug therapy. In the search for new alternatives to treat these infections, many researchers have been looking for new substances derived from natural products to replace, or be used in combination with conventional antibiotics. Vanillin is a phenolic compound whose antimicrobial activity has been used in the elimination of pathogens present in fruits and vegetables. However, its antibacterial and modulating properties remain to be characterized. Therefore, this work aimed to evaluate the antibacterial activity and analyze the modulator activity of vanillin in association with conventional antibiotics. The antimicrobial activity of vanillin was evaluated using the microdilution method to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) Standard strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and multi-resistant strains of Escherichia coli 06, Staphylococcus aureus 10, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 24 were used in this study. The antibiotic modulating effect was analyzed by combining vanillin with Norfloxacin, Imipenem, Gentamicin, Erythromycin and Tetracycline against the following multiresistant bacteria strains: Escherichia coli 06, Staphylococcus aureus 10 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 24. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA test of two tracks followed by the post hoc Bonferroni test. Vanillin presented CIMs ≥1024μg/mL against all tested strains demonstrating that it did not present significant antibacterial activity. However, modulated the activity of gentamicin and imipenem against S. aureus and E. coli, causing a synergistic effect, but did not affect the activity of norfloxacin, tetracycline and erythromycin against these same microorganisms. A synergistic effect was also obtained from the association of vanillin with norfloxacin against P

  20. Zonulin Regulates Intestinal Permeability and Facilitates Enteric Bacteria Permeation in Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chuanwei; Gao, Min; Zhang, Wen; Chen, Caiyu; Zhou, Faying; Hu, Zhangxu; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported an association between enteric bacteria and atherosclerosis. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene belong to Enterobacteriaceae have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques. How intestinal bacteria go into blood is not known. Zonulin reversibly modulate intestinal permeability (IP), the circulating zonulin levels were increased in diabetes, obesity, all of which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. It is unclear whether the circulating zonulin levels were cha...

  1. Relationship between antibiotic- and disinfectant-resistance profiles in bacteria harvested from tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sadia; Beattie, Tara K; Knapp, Charles W

    2016-06-01

    Chlorination is commonly used to control levels of bacteria in drinking water; however, viable bacteria may remain due to chlorine resistance. What is concerning is that surviving bacteria, due to co-selection factors, may also have increased resistance to common antibiotics. This would pose a public health risk as it could link resistant bacteria in the natural environment to human population. Here, we investigated the relationship between chlorine- and antibiotic-resistances by harvesting 148 surviving bacteria from chlorinated drinking-water systems and compared their susceptibilities against chlorine disinfectants and antibiotics. Twenty-two genera were isolated, including members of Paenibacillus, Burkholderia, Escherichia, Sphingomonas and Dermacoccus species. Weak (but significant) correlations were found between chlorine-tolerance and minimum inhibitory concentrations against the antibiotics tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole and amoxicillin, but not against ciprofloxacin; this suggest that chlorine-tolerant bacteria are more likely to also be antibiotic resistant. Further, antibiotic-resistant bacteria survived longer than antibiotic-sensitive organisms when exposed to free chlorine in a contact-time assay; however, there were little differences in susceptibility when exposed to monochloramine. Irrespective of antibiotic-resistance, spore-forming bacteria had higher tolerance against disinfection compounds. The presence of chlorine-resistant bacteria surviving in drinking-water systems may carry additional risk of antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Indirect resistance to several classes of antibiotics in cocultures with resistant bacteria expressing antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoloff, Hervé; Andersson, Dan I

    2016-01-01

    Indirect resistance (IR), the ability of an antibiotic-resistant population of bacteria to protect a susceptible population, has been previously observed for β-lactamase-producing bacteria and associated with antimicrobial treatment failures. Here, we determined whether other resistance determinants could cause IR in the presence of five other classes of antibiotics. A test was designed to detect IR and 14 antibiotic resistance genes were tested in the presence of 13 antibiotics from six classes. A bioassay was used to measure the ability of resistance-causing enzymes to decrease the concentration of active antibiotics in the medium. We confirmed IR in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics (ampicillin and mecillinam) when TEM-1A was expressed. We found that bacteria expressing antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes Ere(A), Tet(X2) or CatA1 caused IR in the presence of macrolides (erythromycin and clarithromycin), tetracyclines (tetracycline and tigecycline) and chloramphenicol, respectively. IR was not observed with resistance determinants that did not modify or destroy antibiotics or with enzymes modifying aminoglycosides or degrading fosfomycin. IR was dependent on the resistance enzymes decreasing the concentration of active antibiotics in the medium, hence allowing nearby susceptible bacteria to resume growth once the antibiotic concentration fell below their MIC. IR was not limited to β-lactamase-producing bacteria, but was also caused by resistant bacteria carrying cytoplasmic antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes that catalyse energy-consuming reactions requiring complex cellular cofactors. Our results suggest that IR is common and further emphasizes that coinfecting agents and the human microflora can have a negative impact during antimicrobial therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A review of the influence of treatment strategies on antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Virender K; Johnson, Natalie; Cizmas, Leslie; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in the aquatic environment have become an emerging contaminant issue, which has implications for human and ecological health. This review begins with an introduction to the occurrence of ARB and ARG in different environmental systems such as natural environments and drinking water resources. For example, ARG or ARB with resistance to ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, quinolone, vancomycin, or tetracycline (e.g., tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(G), tet(O), tet(M), tet(W), sul I, and sul II) have been detected in the environment. The development of resistance may be intrinsic, may be acquired through spontaneous mutations (de novo), or may occur due to horizontal gene transfer from donor bacteria, phages, or free DNA to recipient bacteria. An overview is also provided of the current knowledge regarding inactivation of ARB and ARG, and the mechanism of the effects of different disinfection processes in water and wastewater (chlorination, UV irradiation, Fenton reaction, ozonation, and photocatalytic oxidation). The effects of constructed wetlands and nanotechnology on ARB and ARG are also summarized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of commonly used anticoccidials and antibiotics in a subclinical necrotic enteritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanckriet, A; Timbermont, L; De Gussem, M; Marien, M; Vancraeynest, D; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2010-02-01

    Necrotic enteritis poses an important health risk to broilers. The ionophore anticoccidials lasalocid, salinomycin, maduramicin, narasin and a combination of narasin and nicarbazin were tested in feed for their prophylactic effect on the incidence of necrotic enteritis in a subclinical experimental infection model that uses coccidia as a predisposing factor. In addition, drinking water medication with the antibiotics amoxicillin, tylosin and lincomycin was evaluated as curative treatment in the same experimental model. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of all antibiotics and anticoccidials were determined in vitro against 51 Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broilers. The strains examined appeared uniformly susceptible to lasalocid, maduramicin, narasin, salinomycin, amoxicillin and tylosin, whereas an extended frequency distribution range of MICs for lincomycin was seen, indicating acquired resistance in 36 isolates in the higher range of MICs. Nicarbazin did not inhibit the in vitro growth of the C. perfringens strains even at a concentration of 128 microg/ml. Supplementation of the diet from day 1 onwards with lasalocid, salinomycin, narasin or maduramicin led to a reduction in birds with necrotic enteritis lesions as compared with the non-medicated infected control group. A combination product of narasin and nicarbazin had no significant protective effect. Treatment with amoxicillin, lincomycin and tylosin completely stopped the development of necrotic lesions.

  5. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the guts of insects feeding on plants: prospects for discovering plant-derived antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Ignasiak, Katarzyna; Maxwell, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Background Although plants produce many secondary metabolites, currently none of these are commercial antibiotics. Insects feeding on specific plants can harbour bacterial strains resistant to known antibiotics suggesting that compounds in the plant have stimulated resistance development. We sought to determine whether the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in insect guts was a widespread phenomenon, and whether this could be used as a part of a strategy to identify antibacterial com...

  6. Bacteria antibiotic resistance: New challenges and opportunities for implant-associated orthopedic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingyun; Webster, Thomas J

    2018-01-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, which has made antibiotic choices for infection control increasingly limited and more expensive. In the U.S. alone, antibiotic-resistant bacteria cause at least 2 million infections and 23,000 deaths a year resulting in a $55-70 billion per year economic impact. Antibiotics are critical to the success of surgical procedures including orthopedic prosthetic surgeries, and antibiotic resistance is occurring in nearly all bacteria that infect people, including the most common bacteria that cause orthopedic infections, such as Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Most clinical cases of orthopedic surgeries have shown that patients infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This paper reviews the severity of antibiotic resistance at the global scale, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and the pathways bacteria used to develop antibiotic resistance. It highlights the opportunities and challenges in limiting antibiotic resistance through approaches like the development of novel, non-drug approaches to reduce bacteria functions related to orthopedic implant-associated infections. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:22-32, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Bacteria Antibiotic Resistance: New Challenges and Opportunities for Implant-Associated Orthopaedic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingyun; Webster, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains, which has made antibiotic choices for infection control increasingly limited and more expensive. In the U.S. alone, antibiotic resistant bacteria cause at least 2 million infections and 23,000 deaths a year resulting in a $55–70 billion per year economic impact. Antibiotics are critical to the success of surgical procedures including orthopaedic prosthetic surgeries, and antibiotic resistance is occurring in nearly all bacteria that infect people, including the most common bacteria that cause orthopaedic infections, such as Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Most clinical cases of orthopaedic surgeries have shown that patients infected with antibiotic resistant bacteria, such as methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This paper reviews the severity of antibiotic resistance at the global scale, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and the pathways bacteria used to develop antibiotic resistance. It highlights the opportunities and challenges in limiting antibiotic resistance through approaches like the development of novel, non-drug approaches to reduce bacteria functions related to orthopaedic implant-associated infections. PMID:28722231

  8. Modelling dynamics of plasmid-gene mediated antimicrobial resistance in enteric bacteria using stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Victoriya V; Lu, Zhao; Lanzas, Cristina; Scott, H Morgan; Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitous commensal bacteria harbour genes of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), often on conjugative plasmids. Antimicrobial use in food animals subjects their enteric commensals to antimicrobial pressure. A fraction of enteric Escherichia coli in cattle exhibit plasmid-gene mediated AMR to a third-generation cephalosporin ceftiofur. We adapted stochastic differential equations with diffusion approximation (a compartmental stochastic mathematical model) to research the sources and roles of stochasticity in the resistance dynamics, both during parenteral antimicrobial therapy and in its absence. The results demonstrated that demographic stochasticity among enteric E. coli in the occurrence of relevant events was important for the AMR dynamics only when bacterial numbers were depressed during therapy. However, stochasticity in the parameters of enteric E. coli ecology, whether externally or intrinsically driven, contributed to a wider distribution of the resistant E. coli fraction, both during therapy and in its absence, with stochasticities in individual parameters interacting in their contribution.

  9. Irrigation waters and pipe-based biofilms as sources for antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in environmental surface waters has gained recent attention. Wastewater- and drinking water distribution systems are known to disseminate antibiotic-resistant bacteria, with the biofilms that form on the inner-surfaces of the pipeline as a hotspot for pr...

  10. Vesicle-mediated transfer of virulence genes from Escherichia coli O157:H7 to other enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaron, S; Kolling, G L; Simon, L; Matthews, K R

    2000-10-01

    Membrane vesicles are released from the surfaces of many gram-negative bacteria during growth. Vesicles consist of proteins, lipopolysaccharide, phospholipids, RNA, and DNA. Results of the present study demonstrate that membrane vesicles isolated from the food-borne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 facilitate the transfer of genes, which are then expressed by recipient Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis or E. coli JM109. Electron micrographs of purified DNA from E. coli O157:H7 vesicles showed large rosette-like structures, linear DNA fragments, and small open-circle plasmids. PCR analysis of vesicle DNA demonstrated the presence of specific genes from host and recombinant plasmids (hly, L7095, mobA, and gfp), chromosomal DNA (uidA and eaeA), and phage DNA (stx1 and stx2). The results of PCR and the Vero cell assay demonstrate that genetic material, including virulence genes, is transferred to recipient bacteria and subsequently expressed. The cytotoxicity of the transformed enteric bacteria was sixfold higher than that of the parent isolate (E. coli JM109). Utilization of the nonhost plasmid (pGFP) permitted the evaluation of transformation efficiency (ca. 10(3) transformants microg of DNA(-1)) and demonstrated that vesicles can deliver antibiotic resistance. Transformed E. coli JM109 cells were resistant to ampicillin and fluoresced a brilliant green. The role vesicles play in genetic exchange between different species in the environment or host has yet to be defined.

  11. Distribution and quantification of antibiotic resistance genes and bacteria across agricultural and non-agricultural metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is concern that antibiotic resistance can potentially be transferred from animals to humans through the food chain. The relationship between specific antibiotic resistant bacteria and the genes they carry remains to be described and few details are known about how antibiotic resistance genes i...

  12. Conjugation Inhibitors and Their Potential Use to Prevent Dissemination of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Cabezón Navarro, María Elena; Cruz Calahorra, Fernando de la; Arechaga Iturregui, Ignacio María

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become one of the most challenging problems in health care. Bacteria conjugation is one of the main mechanisms whereby bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. Therefore, the search for specific conjugation inhibitors (COINs) is of interest in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistances in a variety of laboratory and natural environments. Several compounds, discovered as COINs, are promising candidates in the fight against plasmid dissemination. In this r...

  13. Bloom of resident antibiotic-resistant bacteria in soil following manure fertilization.

    OpenAIRE

    Udikovic-Kolic Nikolina; Wichmann Fabienne; Broderick Nichole A; Handelsman Jo

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria is a global threat to public health. Agricultural use of antibiotics is believed to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance but the mechanisms by which many agricultural practices influence resistance remain obscure. Although manure from dairy farms is a common soil amendment in crop production its impact on the soil microbiome and resistome is not known. To gain insight into this impact we cultured bacteria from soil before...

  14. Antibiotic resistance of bacteria isolated from heavy metal-polluted soils with different land uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari Sinegani, Ali Akbar; Younessi, Nayereh

    2017-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the antibiotic and heavy metal tolerance of culturable bacteria isolated from mining waste, pasture, and agricultural soils containing different levels of heavy metals. The populations of total culturable bacteria, and heavy metal- and antibiotic-tolerant bacteria in the soils were enumerated on nutrient agar, nutrient agar amended with metals, and Mueller-Hinton agar amended with antibiotics, respectively. The multiple antibiotic resistance index, and patterns of antibiotic resistance and heavy metal-antibiotic co-resistance were determined for 237 isolates. Among all the samples, those of the tailings of mines with higher levels of heavy metals had the lowest number of bacteria, but a relatively higher abundance of heavy metal- and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A high degree of resistance was observed for ampicillin and amoxicillin in the isolates from all soils. The agricultural soil isolates had a high prevalence of resistance towards vancomycin, tetracycline, and streptomycin. Among all the tested antibiotics, gentamicin was the most potent. The most frequent pattern of multiple antibiotic resistance in the isolates from agricultural soils was amoxicillin, ampicillin, streptomycin, vancomycin, tetracycline, and doxycycline. The percentage of isolates with multiple antibiotic resistance was considerably higher in the agricultural soils than in the mining waste soils. A high rate of co-resistance towards Hg and antibiotics was observed among the gram-negative isolates, and towards Zn, Ni, Hg, and the beta-lactam antibiotics among the gram-positive isolates. The higher percentage of isolates with multiple antibiotic resistance in the agricultural soils that in the mining waste soils may be related to (1) the level of soil heavy metals, (2) the population and diversity of soil bacteria, (3) the application of manures, and (4) other factors affecting gene transfer between bacteria

  15. Antibiotic susceptibilities of bacteria isolated within the oral flora of Florida blacktip sharks: guidance for empiric antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Nathan R; Ritter, Erich; Borrego, Robert; Goodman, Jay; Osiyemi, Olayemi O

    2014-01-01

    Sharks possess a variety of pathogenic bacteria in their oral cavity that may potentially be transferred into humans during a bite. The aim of the presented study focused on the identification of the bacteria present in the mouths of live blacktip sharks, Carcharhinus limbatus, and the extent that these bacteria possess multi-drug resistance. Swabs were taken from the oral cavity of nineteen live blacktip sharks, which were subsequently released. The average fork length was 146 cm (±11), suggesting the blacktip sharks were mature adults at least 8 years old. All swabs underwent standard microbiological work-up with identification of organisms and reporting of antibiotic susceptibilities using an automated microbiology system. The oral samples revealed an average of 2.72 (±1.4) bacterial isolates per shark. Gram-negative bacteria, making up 61% of all bacterial isolates, were significantly (pbacteria (39%). The most common organisms were Vibrio spp. (28%), various coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (16%), and Pasteurella spp. (12%). The overall resistance rate was 12% for all antibiotics tested with nearly 43% of bacteria resistant to at least one antibiotic. Multi-drug resistance was seen in 4% of bacteria. No association between shark gender or fork length with bacterial density or antibiotic resistance was observed. Antibiotics with the highest overall susceptibility rates included fluoroquinolones, 3rd generation cephalosporins and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Recommended empiric antimicrobial therapy for adult blacktip shark bites should encompass either a fluoroquinolone or combination of a 3rd generation cephalosporin plus doxycycline.

  16. Resistance of Bacteria Isolated from Otamiri River to Heavy Metals and Some Selected Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    I.C. Mgbemena; J.C. Nnokwe; L.A. Adjeroh; N.N. Onyemekara

    2012-01-01

    This study is aimed at determining the resistance of bacteria to heavy metals and some antibiotics. The ability of aquatic bacteria isolates from Otamiri River at Ihiagwa in Owerri North, Imo State to tolerate or resist the presence of certain selected heavy metals: Pb+, Zn2+ and Fe2+ and some antibiotics was investigated. Identification tests for the bacteria isolates from Otamiri River revealed them to belong to the genera Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Bacillus, Escherichia, Micrococcus and Prote...

  17. Do antibiotic residues in soils play a role in amplification and transmission of antibiotic resistant bacteria in cattle populations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Ruben Call

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available When we consider factors that contribute to the emergence, amplification, and persistence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, the conventional assumption is that antibiotic use is the primary driver in these processes and that selection occurs primarily in the patient or animal. Evidence suggests that this may not always be the case. Experimental trials show that parenteral administration of a third-generation cephalosporin (ceftiofur in cattle has limited or short-term effects on the prevalence of ceftiofur-resistant bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. While this response may be sufficient to explain a pattern of widespread resistance to cephalosporins, approximately two-thirds of ceftiofur metabolites are excreted in the urine raising the possibility that environmental selection plays an important additive role in the amplification and maintenance of antibiotic resistant E. coli on farms. Consequently, we present a rationale for an environmental selection hypothesis whereby excreted antibiotic residues such as ceftiofur are a significant contributor to the proliferation of antibiotic resistant bacteria in food animal systems. We also present a mathematical model of our hypothesized system as a guide for designing experiments to test this hypothesis. If supported for antibiotics such as ceftiofur, then there may be new approaches to combat the proliferation of antibiotic resistance beyond the prudent use mantra.

  18. Antibiotics influence on lactic acid bacteria inhibiting gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Čanžek Majhenič

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are common inhabitants of the gastrointestinal (GI tract and have important role in maintaining the equilibrium of GI flora, which can be influenced by various factors like diets, antimicrobials and stress. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC of 6 antibiotics, commonly used in human medicine for 8 selected lactobacilli strains were determined by macrodilution and microdilution methods in liquid media and by diffusion method on agar plates. The effects of Penicillin G and Ampicillin on intestinal LAB were tested in vivoon mice as well. Lactobacilli were sensitive to Penicillin G, (penicillines and their derivatives and Erythromycin (macrolides by in vitro testing. Clyndamycin (pyranosid showed moderate inhibitory effect. All lactobacilli strains were resistant to Kanamycin and Neomycin (aminoglycosides, while L. salivarius IM 124 has shown extra resistance to Erythromycin and Clyndamycin. The influence of orally administered Ampicillin showed no significant influence on LAB count in mice faeces. The effect of Penicillin G on mice LAB total count was significant, while no effect of orally administered lactobacilli was determined.

  19. Zonulin Regulates Intestinal Permeability and Facilitates Enteric Bacteria Permeation in Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanwei; Gao, Min; Zhang, Wen; Chen, Caiyu; Zhou, Faying; Hu, Zhangxu; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-06-29

    Several studies have reported an association between enteric bacteria and atherosclerosis. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene belong to Enterobacteriaceae have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques. How intestinal bacteria go into blood is not known. Zonulin reversibly modulate intestinal permeability (IP), the circulating zonulin levels were increased in diabetes, obesity, all of which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. It is unclear whether the circulating zonulin levels were changed in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and modulate IP. The 16S rRNA gene of bacteria in blood sample was checked by 454 pyrosequencing. The zonulin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The distribution of zonulin was detected by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Bacteria and Caco-2 cell surface micro-structure were checked by transmission electron microscopy. A high diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA gene can be detected in samples from CAD patients, most of them (99.4%) belong to Enterobacteriaceaes, eg. Rahnella. The plasma zonulin levels were significantly higher in CAD patients. Pseudomonas fluorescens exposure significantly increased zonulin expression and decreased IP in a time dependent manner. The elevated zonulin increase IP and may facilitate enteric translocation by disassembling the tight junctions, which might explain the observed high diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in blood samples.

  20. Enteric-coated and highly standardized cranberry extract reduces antibiotic and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use for urinary tract infections during radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonetta A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Bonetta,1 Giandomenico Roviello,2,3 Daniele Generali,3,4 Laura Zanotti,3 Maria Rosa Cappelletti,3 Chiara Pacifico,5 Francesco Di Pierro6 1Oncological Radiotherapy Operative Unit, ASST, Cremona, 2Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia, 3Molecular Therapy and Pharmacogenomics Unit, ASST, Cremona, 4Department of Medical, Surgery and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, 5Department of Medical, Surgical and Neurological Sciences, University Hospital of Siena, Siena, 6Velleja Research Scientific Department, Milan, Italy Introduction: Worldwide, bacterial resistance to antibiotic therapy is a major concern for the medical community. Antibiotic resistance mainly affects Gram-negative bacteria that are an important cause of lower urinary tract infections (LUTIs. Pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer is a risk factor for LUTIs. Cranberry extract is reported to reduce the incidence of LUTIs. The prophylactic role of an enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract (VO370® in reducing LUTI episodes, urinary discomfort, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID and antibiotic use during radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma was evaluated. Methods: A total of 924 patients with prostate carcinoma treated by radiotherapy to the prostatic and pelvic areas were randomized to receive (n=489 or not (n=435 the enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract for 6–7 weeks concurrently with irradiation. Outcomes were analyzed by using Mann–Whitney U test and Pearson’s X2 test. Primary endpoint was the number of patients with LUTI; secondary endpoints were incidence of recurrence, days of treatment with antibiotics and number of subjects treated with NSAIDs, and incidence of dysuria. Results: The treatment was very well tolerated, and there were no serious side effects. All enrolled patients completed the study. Urinary infections were detected in 53 of the 489 patients (10

  1. A mathematical model for expected time to extinction of pathogenic bacteria through antibiotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M. K.; Nandi, S.; Roy, P. K.

    2016-04-01

    Application of antibiotics in human system to prevent bacterial diseases like Gastritis, Ulcers, Meningitis, Pneumonia and Gonorrhea are indispensable. Antibiotics saved innumerable lives and continue to be a strong support for therapeutic application against pathogenic bacteria. In human system, bacterial diseases occur when pathogenic bacteria gets into the body and begin to reproduce and crowd out healthy bacteria. In this process, immature bacteria releases enzyme which is essential for bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis. After complete formation of cell wall, immature bacteria are converted to mature or virulent bacteria which are harmful to us during bacterial infections. Use of antibiotics as drug inhibits the bacterial cell wall formation. After application of antibiotics within body, the released bacterial enzyme binds with antibiotic molecule instead of its functional site during the cell wall synthesis in a competitive inhibition approach. As a consequence, the bacterial cell-wall formation as well as maturation process of pathogenic bacteria is halted and the disease is cured with lysis of bacterial cells. With this idea, a mathematical model has been developed in the present research investigation to review the inhibition of biosynthesis of bacterial cell wall by the application of antibiotics as drug in the light of enzyme kinetics. This approach helps to estimate the expected time to extinction of the pathogenic bacteria. Our mathematical approach based on the enzyme kinetic model for finding out expected time to extinction contributes favorable results for understanding of disease dynamics. Analytical and numerical results based on simulated findings validate our mathematical model.

  2. The Shared Antibiotic Resistome of Soil Bacteria and Human Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kevin J.; Reyes, Alejandro; Wang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    From Farm to Clinic?Soil organisms have long been assumed to be an important source of antibiotic resistance genes, in part because of antibiotic-treated livestock and in part because of the natural ecology of antibiotic production in the soil. Forsberg et al. (p. 1107) developed a metagenomic...

  3. Occurrence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in dogs presented with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriological examinations of swab samples from the affected ears were done using standard methods, followed by invitro antibiotic sensitivity test by agar disk diffusion method using the Oxoid® antibiotic discs of the commonly used antibiotics in Nigeria. Results were presented in percentages, pie chart and tables.

  4. [Inactivation and reactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria during and after UV disinfection in reclaimed water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Jing; Tang, Fang; Xi, Jin-Ying; Pang, Yu-Chen; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2014-04-01

    Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wastewater effluents is concerned as an emerging contaminant. To estimate inactivation and reactivation potentials of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by UV disinfection, inactivation and reactivation of penicillin-, ampicillin-, cephalexin-, chloramphenicol-and rifampicin-resistant bacteria in the secondary effluent were studied under different UV doses. The results showed that the inactivation ratios of penicillin-, ampicillin-, cephalexin-and chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria were higher than 4-log, which was closed to that of total heterotrophic bacteria; however, the inactivation ratio of rifampicin-resistant bacteria was lower (3.7-log) under 20 mJ x cm(-2) UV exposure. After 22 h standing incubation, antibiotic-resistant bacteria widely reactivated. The colony forming ability of antibiotic-resistant bacteria was as high as 3-log when exposed to 20 mJ x cm(-2) UV light. Hence, conventional UV dose can not effectively control reactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in reclaimed water by UV disinfection.

  5. The Impact of Different Antibiotic Regimens on the Emergence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magal, Pierre; Olivier, Damien; Ruan, Shigui

    2008-01-01

    Backgroud The emergence and ongoing spread of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria is a major public health threat. Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are associated with substantially higher rates of morbidity and mortality compared to infections caused by antimicrobial-susceptible bacteria. The emergence and spread of these bacteria is complex and requires incorporating numerous interrelated factors which clinical studies cannot adequately address. Methods/Principal Findings A model is created which incorporates several key factors contributing to the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria including the effects of the immune system, acquisition of resistance genes and antimicrobial exposure. The model identifies key strategies which would limit the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial strains. Specifically, the simulations show that early initiation of antimicrobial therapy and combination therapy with two antibiotics prevents the emergence of resistant bacteria, whereas shorter courses of therapy and sequential administration of antibiotics promote the emergence of resistant strains. Conclusions/Significance The principal findings suggest that (i) shorter lengths of antibiotic therapy and early interruption of antibiotic therapy provide an advantage for the resistant strains, (ii) combination therapy with two antibiotics prevents the emergence of resistance strains in contrast to sequential antibiotic therapy, and (iii) early initiation of antibiotics is among the most important factors preventing the emergence of resistant strains. These findings provide new insights into strategies aimed at optimizing the administration of antimicrobials for the treatment of infections and the prevention of the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:19112501

  6. Discovery, research, and development of new antibiotics: the WHO priority list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconelli, Evelina; Carrara, Elena; Savoldi, Alessia; Harbarth, Stephan; Mendelson, Marc; Monnet, Dominique L; Pulcini, Céline; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Kluytmans, Jan; Carmeli, Yehuda; Ouellette, Marc; Outterson, Kevin; Patel, Jean; Cavaleri, Marco; Cox, Edward M; Houchens, Chris R; Grayson, M Lindsay; Hansen, Paul; Singh, Nalini; Theuretzbacher, Ursula; Magrini, Nicola

    2018-03-01

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria poses a substantial threat to morbidity and mortality worldwide. Due to its large public health and societal implications, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has been long regarded by WHO as a global priority for investment in new drugs. In 2016, WHO was requested by member states to create a priority list of other antibiotic-resistant bacteria to support research and development of effective drugs. We used a multicriteria decision analysis method to prioritise antibiotic-resistant bacteria; this method involved the identification of relevant criteria to assess priority against which each antibiotic-resistant bacterium was rated. The final priority ranking of the antibiotic-resistant bacteria was established after a preference-based survey was used to obtain expert weighting of criteria. We selected 20 bacterial species with 25 patterns of acquired resistance and ten criteria to assess priority: mortality, health-care burden, community burden, prevalence of resistance, 10-year trend of resistance, transmissibility, preventability in the community setting, preventability in the health-care setting, treatability, and pipeline. We stratified the priority list into three tiers (critical, high, and medium priority), using the 33rd percentile of the bacterium's total scores as the cutoff. Critical-priority bacteria included carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and carbapenem-resistant and third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. The highest ranked Gram-positive bacteria (high priority) were vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Of the bacteria typically responsible for community-acquired infections, clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori, and fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter spp, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Salmonella typhi were included in the high-priority tier. Future development strategies should focus on

  7. A mathematical model for antibiotic control of bacteria in peritoneal dialysis associated peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmelet, Colette; Hotchkiss, John; Crooke, Philip

    2014-12-01

    A study of the process of pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics (PKPD) of antibiotics and their interaction with bacteria during peritoneal dialysis associated peritonitis (PDAP) is presented. We propose a mathematical model describing the evolution of bacteria population in the presence of antibiotics for different peritoneal dialysis regimens. Using the model along with experimental data, clinical parameters, and physiological values, we compute variations in PD fluid distributions, drug concentrations, and number of bacteria in peritoneal and extra-peritoneal cavities. Scheduling algorithms for the PD exchanges that minimize bacteria count are investigated.

  8. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the guts of insects feeding on plants: prospects for discovering plant-derived antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignasiak, Katarzyna; Maxwell, Anthony

    2017-12-01

    Although plants produce many secondary metabolites, currently none of these are commercial antibiotics. Insects feeding on specific plants can harbour bacterial strains resistant to known antibiotics suggesting that compounds in the plant have stimulated resistance development. We sought to determine whether the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in insect guts was a widespread phenomenon, and whether this could be used as a part of a strategy to identify antibacterial compounds from plants. Six insect/plant pairs were selected and the insect gut bacteria were identified and assessed for antibiotic susceptibilities compared with type strains from culture collections. We found that the gut strains could be more or less susceptible to antibiotics than the type strains, or show no differences. Evidence of antibacterial activity was found in the plant extracts from five of the six plants, and, in one case Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar Periwinkle), compounds with antibacterial activity were identified. Bacterial strains isolated from insect guts show a range of susceptibilities to antibiotics suggesting a complex interplay between species in the insect gut microbiome. Extracts from selected plants can show antibacterial activity but it is not easy to isolate and identify the active components. We found that vindoline, present in Madagascar Periwinkle extracts, possessed moderate antibacterial activity. We suggest that plant-derived antibiotics are a realistic possibility given the advances in genomic and metabolomic methodologies.

  9. Resistance to antibiotics in Lacid acid bacteria - strain Lactococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipić Brankica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are widely used in the food industry, especially in the production of fermented dairy products and meat. The most studied species among Lis Lactococcus lactis. L. lactis strains are of great importance in the production of fermented dairy products such as yogurt, butter, fresh cheese and some kind of semi-hard cheese. Although L. lactis acquired the „Generally Regarded As Safe“ (GRAS status, many investigations indicated that lactococci may act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, which could be transferred to other bacterial species in human gastrointestinal tract includ­ing pathogens. The genome analysis of L. lactis indicated the presence of at least 40 putative drug transporter genes, and only four multidrug resistance (MDR transporters are functionally characterized: LmrA, LmrP, LmrCD i CmbT. LmrA is the first described MDR transporter in prokaryotes. LmrCD is responsible for resistance to cholate, which is an integral part of human bile and LmrCD is important for intestinal survival of lactococci that are used as probiotics. Secondary multidrug transporter LmrP confers resistance to lincosamides, macrolides, streptogramins and tetracyclines. CmbT protein has an effect on the host cell resistance to lincomycin, sulfadiazine, streptomycin, rifampicin, puromycin and sulfametox­azole. Since the food chain is an important way of transmitting resistance genes in human and animal population, it is of great importance to study the mechanisms of resistance in lactococci and other LAB, intended for the food industry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173019: Izučavanje gena i molekularnih mehanizama u osnovi probiotičke aktivnosti bakterija mlečne kiseline izolovanih sa područja Zapadnog Balkana

  10. Surveillance of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria from Wastewater Effluents Across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation will inform the audience of the purpose and importance of the antibiotic resistant bacteria surveillances that have been conducted to date. And an overview of why the EPA is looking into this problem in wastewater effluents.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Intrinsic and Acquired antibiotic resistance in lactic Acid bacteria and Bifidobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammor, M.S.; Flórez, A.B.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Reyes-Gavilan, de los C.G.; Aarts, H.J.M.; Margolles, A.; Mayo, B.

    2008-01-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 6 different antibiotics (chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and vancomycin) were determined for 143 strains of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria using the Etest. Different MICs were found for different species

  12. Release of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria by a Waste Treatment Plant from Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupan, Iulia; Carpa, Rahela; Oltean, Andreea; Kelemen, Beatrice Simona; Popescu, Octavian

    2017-09-27

    The occurrence and spread of bacterial antibiotic resistance are subjects of great interest, and the role of wastewater treatment plants has been attracting particular interest. These stations are a reservoir of bacteria, have a large range of organic and inorganic substances, and the amount of bacteria released into the environment is very high. The main purpose of the present study was to assess the removal degree of bacteria with resistance to antibiotics and identify the contribution of a wastewater treatment plant to the microbiota of Someşul Mic river water in Cluj county. The resistance to sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline and some of their representative resistance genes: sul1, tet(O), and tet(W) were assessed in this study. The results obtained showed that bacteria resistant to sulphonamides were more abundant than those resistant to tetracycline. The concentration of bacteria with antibiotic resistance changed after the treatment, namely, bacteria resistant to sulfamethoxazole. The removal of all bacteria and antibiotic-resistant bacteria was 98-99% and the degree of removal of bacteria resistant to tetracycline was higher than the bacteria resistant to sulfamethoxazole compared to total bacteria. The wastewater treatment plant not only contributed to elevating ARG concentrations, it also enhanced the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) by increasing the abundance of the intI1 gene. Even though the treatment process reduced the concentration of bacteria by two orders of magnitude, the wastewater treatment plant in Cluj-Napoca contributed to an increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria concentrations up to 10 km downstream of its discharge in Someşul Mic river.

  13. Microbial selectivity of UV treatment on antibiotic-resistant heterotrophic bacteria in secondary effluents of a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2013-10-15

    Little is known about the microbial selectivity of UV treatment for antibiotic resistant bacteria, and the results of limited studies are conflicting. To understand the effect of UV disinfection on antibiotic resistant bacteria, both total heterotrophic bacteria and antibiotic resistant bacteria (including cephalexin-, ciprofloxacin-, erythromycin-, gentamicin-, vancomycin-, sulfadiazine-, rifampicin-, tetracycline- and chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria) were examined in secondary effluent samples from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Bacteria resistant to both erythromycin and tetracycline were chosen as the representative of multiple-antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their characteristics after UV treatment were also investigated. UV disinfection results in effective inactivation for total heterotrophic bacteria, as well as all antibiotic resistant bacteria. After UV treatment at a fluence of 5 mJ/cm(2), the log reductions of nine types of antibiotic resistant bacteria varied from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 2.4 ± 0.1. Bacteria resistant to both erythromycin and tetracycline had a similar fluence response as did total heterotrophic bacteria. The findings suggest that UV disinfection could eliminate antibiotic resistance in wastewater treatment effluents and thus ensure public health security. Our experimental results indicated that UV disinfection led to enrichment of bacteria with resistance to sulfadiazine, vancomycin, rifampicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol, while the proportions of cephalexin-, erythromycin-, gentamicin- and ciprofloxacin-resistant bacteria in the wastewater decreased. This reveals the microbial selectivity of UV disinfection for antibiotic resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria, antibiotics, and mercury in surface waters of Oakland County, Michigan, 2005-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Duris, Joseph W.; Crowley, Suzanne L.; Hardigan, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Water samples collected from 20 stream sites in Oakland and Macomb Counties, Mich., were analyzed to learn more about the occurrence of cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and the co-occurrence of antibiotics and mercury in area streams. Fecal indicator bacteria concentrations exceeded the Michigan recreational water-quality standard of 300 E. coli colony forming units (CFU) per 100 milliliters of water in 19 of 35 stream-water samples collected in Oakland County. A gene commonly associated with enterococci from humans was detected in samples from Paint Creek at Rochester and Evans Ditch at Southfield, indicating that human fecal waste is a possible source of fecal contamination at these sites. E. coli resistant to the cephalosporin antibiotics (cefoxitin and/ or ceftriaxone) were found at all sites on at least one occasion. The highest percentages of E. coli isolates resistant to cefoxitin and ceftriaxone were 71 percent (Clinton River at Auburn Hills) and 19 percent (Sashabaw Creek near Drayton Plains), respectively. Cephalosporin-resistant E. coli was detected more frequently in samples from intensively urbanized or industrialized areas than in samples from less urbanized areas. VRE were not detected in any sample collected in this study. Multiple antibiotics (azithromycin, erythromycin, ofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim) were detected in water samples from the Clinton River at Auburn Hills, and tylosin (an antibiotic used in veterinary medicine and livestock production that belongs to the macrolide group, along with erythromycin) was detected in one water sample from Paint Creek at Rochester. Concentrations of total mercury were as high as 19.8 nanograms per liter (Evans Ditch at Southfield). There was no relation among percentage of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and measured concentrations of antibiotics or mercury in the water. Genetic elements capable of exchanging multiple antibiotic

  15. Irrigation waters and pipe-based biofilms as sources for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaustein, Ryan A; Shelton, Daniel R; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S; Karns, Jeffrey S; Stocker, Matthew D; Pachepsky, Yakov A

    2016-01-01

    The presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in environmental surface waters has gained recent attention. Wastewater and drinking water distribution systems are known to disseminate antibiotic-resistant bacteria, with the biofilms that form on the inner-surfaces of the pipeline as a hot spot for proliferation and gene exchange. Pipe-based irrigation systems that utilize surface waters may contribute to the dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a similar manner. We conducted irrigation events at a perennial stream on a weekly basis for 1 month, and the concentrations of total heterotrophic bacteria, total coliforms, and fecal coliforms, as well as the concentrations of these bacterial groups that were resistant to ampicillin and tetracycline, were monitored at the intake water. Prior to each of the latter three events, residual pipe water was sampled and 6-in. sections of pipeline (coupons) were detached from the system, and biofilm from the inner-wall was removed and analyzed for total protein content and the above bacteria. Isolates of biofilm-associated bacteria were screened for resistance to a panel of seven antibiotics, representing five antibiotic classes. All of the monitored bacteria grew substantially in the residual water between irrigation events, and the biomass of the biofilm steadily increased from week to week. The percentages of biofilm-associated isolates that were resistant to antibiotics on the panel sometimes increased between events. Multiple-drug resistance was observed for all bacterial groups, most often for fecal coliforms, and the distributions of the numbers of antibiotics that the total coliforms and fecal coliforms were resistant to were subject to change from week to week. Results from this study highlight irrigation waters as a potential source for antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which can subsequently become incorporated into and proliferate within irrigation pipe-based biofilms.

  16. Monitoring and evaluation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria at a municipal wastewater treatment plant in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Jing; Hu, Hong-Ying; Lu, Sun-Qin; Li, Yi; Tang, Fang; Lu, Yun; Wei, Bin

    2012-07-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is becoming a concern of public health. In order to acquire information on the emission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from WWTP effluents into natural waters, both average antibiotic tolerance and concentrations of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the effluent of a WWTP in Beijing, China were investigated. A new index of IC(50)/MIC ratio (the antibiotic concentration required to inhibit 50% of total heterotrophic bacteria compared to the highest minimum inhibitory concentration value of a group of pathogens according to a specific antibiotic, as defined by CLSI) was used to reflect the average antibiotic tolerance of total heterotrophic bacteria in the secondary effluent. The results showed that the IC(50)/MIC ratios of heterotrophic bacteria in the secondary effluent to penicillin, ampicillin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol and rifampicin were >2, >1, >1, and 1.08, respectively, which reflected a significantly high general level of heterotrophic bacteria found in the secondary effluent resistant to these five antibiotics. The concentrations of penicillin-, ampicillin-, cephalothin-, and chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria were as high as 1.5×10(4)-1.9×10(5), 1.2×10(4)-1.5×10(5), 8.9×10(3)-1.9×10(5) and 2.6×10(4)-2.0×10(5) CFU/mL, and the average percentages in relation to total heterotrophic bacteria were 63%, 47%, 55%, and 69%, respectively. The concentrations of tetracycline- and rifampicin-resistant bacteria were 840-6.1×10(3) and 310-6.1×10(4) CFU/mL with average percentages of 2.6% and 11%, respectively. Furthermore, our study found that five- and six-antibiotic-resistant bacteria were widely distributed in four types of enterobacteria from the secondary effluent. The presence of multiple-antibiotic-resistant bacteria from effluents of WWTPs into natural waters could pose a serious problem as a secondary pollutant of drinking water. Copyright © 2011

  17. THAWING PROCEDURES FOR HOSPITAL-MADE ENTERAL FEEDINGS: SURVIVAL OF COLIFORM AND MESOPHILIC AEROBIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATHIA ROSSI ROLIM LOPES

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available

    ABSTRACT: This study had the purpose to observe the effect of thawing procedures on survival of coliform and mesophilic aerobic bacteria in hospital-made enteral feedings. The samples are represented by three different lots. The tests were realized in three moments: immediately after the sample preparation and after freezing during 1 or 2 months. The thawing procedures were denominated convencional and alternative. The first, used by hospital, utilizes water bath at 50ºC, considering the time spent from the total thawing to its distribution in the infirmaries. The second was the fast thawing made by microwaving. The results showed that the reduction of the mesophiles and coliform was related to the time the samples were frozen. The results obtained indicate an advantage of the alternative method, which presented lower total and fecal coliform counts than the conventional one. KEYWORDS: Enteral feedings; thawing; food microbiology.

  18. Off-label abuse of antibiotics by bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, VK

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance made news on several fronts in the past year. Many public health organizations, including the CDC, used terms such as “crisis”, “catastrophic consequences”, and “nightmare scenario” to highlight the rapid emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. A report from the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production, on the fifth anniversary of the publication of its landmark 2008 report, noted that state and federal legislative efforts to limit non-t...

  19. Antibiotic resistance in conjunctival and enteric bacterial flora in raptors housed in a zoological garden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Andrea; Taddei, Simone; Santospirito, Davide; Sandri, Camillo; Magnone, William; Cabassi, Clotilde S

    2016-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in a wide range of infectious agents is a growing public health threat. Birds of prey are considered indicators of the presence of AMR bacteria in their ecosystem because of their predatory behaviour. Only few data are reported in the literature on AMR strains isolated from animals housed in zoos and none about AMR in raptors housed in zoological gardens. This study investigated the antibiotic sensitivity profile of the isolates obtained from the conjunctival and cloacal bacterial flora of 14 healthy birds of prey, 6 Accipitriformes , 3 Falconiformes and 5 Strigiformes , housed in an Italian zoological garden. Staphylococcus spp. was isolated from 50% of the conjunctival swabs, with S. xylosus as the most common species. From cloacal swabs, Escherichia coli was cultured from all animals, while Klebsiella spp. and Proteus spp. were isolated from a smaller number of birds. Worthy of note is the isolation of Escherichia fergusonii and Serratia odorifera , rarely isolated from raptors. Staphylococci were also isolated. All the isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR). To the author's knowledge, this is the first report regarding the presence of MDR strains within raptors housed in a zoological garden. Since resistance genes can be transferred to other pathogenic bacteria, this represents a potential hazard for the emergence of new MDR pathogens. In conclusion, the obtained data could be useful for ex-situ conservation programmes aimed to preserve the health of the endangered species housed in a zoo.

  20. Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria Isolated from Commercial Meat Samples and Air Samples Near Agricultural Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Helen Mariette

    2015-01-01

    The rising level of antibiotic resistance is a serious public health issue, posing a global threat to human health. The common practice of applying sub-therapeutic dosages of antibiotics to livestock has been shown to foster the development of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB). ARB originating in livestock can reach the general population via multiple pathways: air downwind of animal feeding operations and transportation vehicles, indoor air, soil following land application, surface and gro...

  1. The Culturable Soil Antibiotic Resistome: A Community of Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Fiona; Duffy, Brion

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the soil bacterial resistome is essential to understanding the evolution and development of antibiotic resistance, and its spread between species and biomes. We have identified and characterized multi-drug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in the culturable soil antibiotic resistome and linked the resistance profiles to bacterial species. We isolated 412 antibiotic resistant bacteria from agricultural, urban and pristine soils. All isolates were multi-drug resistant, of which greater ...

  2. A Model of the Number of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, Bonita; Mummert, Anna; Somerville, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The large reservoir of antibiotic resistant bacteria in raw and treated water supplies is a matter of public health concern. Currently, the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Systems, a collaborative effort of the Centers for Disease Control, the US Department of Agriculture, and the US Food and Drug Administration, does not monitor antimicrobial resistance in surface waters. Given the serious nature of antibiotic resistance in clinical settings, and the likelihood that antibiotic r...

  3. Assessment of Antibiotic Resistant Commensal Bacteria in Food

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lehman, Mark

    2006-01-01

    .... Although antibiotic resistance (AR) in foodborne pathogens has been studied extensively, the contribution of foodborne commensals in disseminating the resistance genes has been neglected in the past...

  4. Diversity and natural functions of antibiotics produced by beneficial and plant pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, J.M.; Mazzola, M.

    2012-01-01

    Soil- and plant-associated environments harbor numerous bacteria that produce antibiotic metabolites with specific or broad-spectrum activities against coexisting microorganisms. The function and ecological importance of antibiotics have long been assumed to yield a survival advantage to the

  5. Recycling antibiotics into GUMBOS: A new combination strategy to combat multi-drug resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria, coupled with the lack of new antibiotics in development, is fast evolving into a global crisis. New strategies utilizing existing antibacterial agents are urgently needed. We propose one such strategy in which four outmoded ß-lactam antibiotics (amp...

  6. Impact of preoperative screening for rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric bacteria on the incidence of sepsis following transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrell JJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available John J Farrell,1,2 Jennifer L Hicks,3 Stephanie E Wallace,2 Allen D Seftel4,5 1Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Illinois College of Medicine, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Microbiology & Serology, OSF/Saint Francis Medical Center, 3Department of Urology, OSF /Saint Francis Medical Center, Peoria, IL, 4Department of Urology, Cooper University Hospital, 5Department of Surgery, Cooper University School of Medicine, Camden, NJ, USA Abstract: With the universal adoption of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to prostate biopsy, the current risk of post-biopsy infection (including sepsis is <2%. Preoperative prophylactic antibiotic regimens can vary, and although fluoroquinolones have emerged as the standard of care, there is no universally agreed upon preoperative antibiotic regimen. Recently, an increase in the proportion of postoperative infections caused by fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli (as well as other Enterobacteriaceae has led to the exploration of simple, practical, and cost-effective methods to minimize this postoperative infection risk. We performed a prospective, nonrandomized, controlled study of preoperative rectal cultures to screen for rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria using ciprofloxacin-supplemented MacConkey agar culture media. To evaluate the feasibility and practicality of this test, one provider used the results of rectal swab cultures collected during the preoperative outpatient evaluation to adjust each patient’s preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis when fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric bacteria were detected, whereas two other providers continued usual preoperative care and empiric antimicrobial prophylaxis. Rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria was detected in 19/152 (12.5% of patients. In our intention-to-treat analysis (N=268, the rate of post-biopsy sepsis was 3.6% lower in the group that was screened

  7. Removal of enteric bacteria in constructed treatment wetlands with emergent macrophytes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vymazal, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Domestic and municipal sewage contains various pathogenic or potentially pathogenic microorganisms which, depending on species concentration, pose a potential risk to human health and whose presence must therefore be reduced in the course of wastewater treatment. The removal of microbiological pollution is seldom a primary target for constructed treatment wetlands (CWs). However, wetlands are known to act as excellent biofilters through a complex of physical, chemical and biological factors which all participate in the reduction of the number of bacteria. Measurement of human pathogenic organisms in untreated and treated wastewater is expensive and technically challenging. Consequently, environmental engineers have sought indicator organisms that are (1) easy to monitor and (2) correlate with population of pathogenic organisms. The most frequently used indicators are total coliforms, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci and Escherichia coli. The literature survey of 60 constructed wetlands with emergent vegetation around the world revealed that removal of total and fecal coliforms in constructed wetlands with emergent macrophytes is high, usually 95 to > 99% while removal of fecal streptococci is lower, usually 80-95%. Because bacterial removal efficiency is a function of inflow bacteria number, the high removal effects are achieved for untreated or mechanically pretreated wastewater. Therefore, the outflow numbers of bacteria are more important. For TC and FC the outflow concentrations are usually in the range of 10(2) to 10(5) CFU/ 100 ml while for FS the range is between 10(2) and 10(4) CFU/ 100 ml. Results from operating systems suggest that enteric microbe removal efficiency in CWs with emergent macrophytes is primarily influenced by hydraulic loading rate (HLR) and the resultant hydraulic residence time (HRT) and the presence of vegetation. Removal of enteric bacteria follows approximately a first-order relationship.

  8. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases activate nucleoside antibiotics in severely pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Shannon, O.; Clausen, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Common bacterial pathogens are becoming progressively more resistant to traditional antibiotics, representing a major public-health crisis. Therefore, there is a need for a variety of antibiotics with alternative modes of action. In our study, several nucleoside analogs were tested against...

  9. In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibility Studies Of Bacteria Associated With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro tests of the susceptibility of isolates of bacterial keratitis pathogens to antibiotics were carried out in this study. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated organisms followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Antibiotic sensitivity testing showed a high susceptibility to ...

  10. Molecular tools for the characterisation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, H.J.M.; Boumedine, K.S.; Nesme, X.; Cloeckaert, A.

    2001-01-01

    This review will discuss a number of molecular tools which are currently used as well as some innovative approaches for the characterisation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Various methods involved in the detection and characterisation of genes and mutations associated with antibiotic

  11. Enteric bacteria of food ice and their survival in alcoholic beverages and soft drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglio, Raimondo; Francesca, Nicola; Di Gerlando, Rosalia; Mahony, Jennifer; De Martino, Simone; Stucchi, Carlo; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Settanni, Luca

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the levels of enteric bacteria in ice cubes produced in different environments (home-made, prepared in bars and pubs with ice machines and produced in industrial plants) and to determine their survival in different alcoholic beverages and soft drinks. Members of the Enterobacteriaceae family were found in almost all samples analysed. All industrial and the majority of home-made samples did not contain coliforms. Enterococci were not identified in domestic samples while they were detected in two industrial and three bar/pub samples. The samples collected from bars and pubs were characterized by the highest levels of enteric bacteria. Fourteen strains representing 11 species of eight bacterial genera were identified, some of which are known agents of human infections. The most numerous groups included Enterococcus and Stenotrophomonas. The survival of Enterococcus faecium ICE41, Pantoea conspicua ICE80 and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ICE272, that were detected at the highest levels (100-400 CFU/100 mL thawed ice) in the ice cubes, was tested in six drinks and beverages characterized by different levels of alcohol, CO 2 , pH and the presence of antibacterial ingredients. The results showed a species-specific behaviour and, in general, a reduction of the microbiological risks associated with ice after its transfer to alcoholic or carbonated beverages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Photodynamic inactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and biofilms by hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Hu, Min; Ma, Dandan; Lei, Jin'e; Xu, Jiru

    2016-02-01

    The worldwide increase in bacterial antibiotic resistance has led to a search for alternative antibacterial therapies. A promising approach to killing antibiotic-resistant bacteria is photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy, which uses light in combination with a photosensitizer to induce a phototoxic reaction. We evaluated the photodynamic inactivation (PDI) efficiency of hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME) on antibiotic-resistant bacteria and biofilms. HMME exhibited no significant dark toxicity and provided dose-dependent inactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and biofilms. After incubation with 100-μM HMME and irradiation with 72-J cm(-2) white light, 4.19-7.59 log10 reductions in survival were achieved in planktonic suspension. Antibiotic-resistant strains were as susceptible to PDI in biofilms as in planktonic suspensions, but the inactivation of bacterial cells in biofilms was attenuated. In addition, gram-positive bacterial strains and biofilms were more susceptible than gram-negative strains and biofilms to the PDI effect of HMME. Thus, HMME is a promising photosensitizer for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria, especially gram-positive bacteria.

  13. Antibiotics resistance phenomenon and virulence ability in bacteria from water environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I. Azzam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the impact of five main drains as sources of antibiotics resistant bacteria in River Nile at Rosetta branch, and to generate a baseline data on their virulence ability. Out of 212 bacterial isolates, 39.2% and 60.8% were recovered from drains and Rosetta branch, respectively. Susceptibility of bacteria to different antibiotics showed multiple antibiotics resistances (MAR for the majority of isolates. Meanwhile, sensitivity was mostly directed to ofloxacin and norfloxacin antibiotics. Calculated MAR index values (>0.25 classified area of study as potentially health risk environment. Testing virulence ability of bacteria from drains showed positive results (65%. Contrastively, virulent strains in Rosetta branch were mostly lacking in this study. Concluding remarks justify the strong correlation (r = +0.82 between MAR and virulence of bacteria in polluted aquatic ecosystems, and highlight the potential of drains as reactors for their amplification and dissemination. The study suggests regular monitoring for antibiotics resistance in native bacteria of River Nile, prohibition of unregulated use of antibiotics, and proper management for wastes disposal.

  14. Cecum lymph node dendritic cells harbor slow-growing bacteria phenotypically tolerant to antibiotic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Kaiser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN, the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%-20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103⁺CX₃CR1⁻CD11c⁺ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics.

  15. Cecum Lymph Node Dendritic Cells Harbor Slow-Growing Bacteria Phenotypically Tolerant to Antibiotic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolowschiak, Tamas; Wotzka, Sandra Y.; Lengefeld, Jette; Slack, Emma; Grant, Andrew J.; Ackermann, Martin; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN), the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%–20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103+CX3CR1−CD11c+ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics. PMID:24558351

  16. Perinatal vertical transmission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria: a systematic review and proposed research strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, J; Millar, M

    2014-07-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria contribute to both early- and late-onset sepsis and outbreaks in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The extent to which vertical transmission of these resistant bacteria contributes to colonisation or infection of vulnerable infants in NICUs is unclear. Risk factors for vertical transmission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are not well described. To identify studies describing vertical transmission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, risk factors for transmission and the impact of colonisation on neonatal outcomes. EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane, PubMed, and MEDLINE databases were searched using selected terminology. Titles and abstracts were screened by two reviewers. Selected papers were reviewed in full by two individuals to ascertain whether they fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Any original article investigating perinatal vertical transmission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria between a mother and neonate was included. Data were extracted on study design, organism, antibiotic resistance, and means of ascertaining vertical transmission. Five papers out of 4839 titles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Four studies were predominantly observational and one was a case report. Each demonstrated perinatal transmission. No study reported risk factors for the transmission of resistant bacteria or the impact of colonisation on neonatal outcomes. There is an absence of research into the perinatal transmission of resistant organisms despite the potential implications of such a situation. We outline objectives that need to be addressed in future research and describe a study design to ascertain the prevalence and risk factors for vertical transmission. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  17. Abundance and distribution of enteric bacteria and viruses in coastal and estuarine sediments – a review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Hassard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The long term survival of faecal indicator organisms (FIOs and human pathogenic microorganisms in sediments is important from a water quality, human health and ecological perspective. Typically, both bacteria and viruses strongly associate with particulate matter present in freshwater, estuarine and marine environments. This association tends to be stronger in finer textured sediments and is strongly influenced by the type and quantity of clay minerals and organic matter present. Binding to particle surfaces promotes the persistence of bacteria in the environment by offering physical and chemical protection from biotic and abiotic stresses. How bacterial and viral viability and pathogenicity is influenced by surface attachment requires further study. Typically, long-term association with surfaces including sediments induces bacteria to enter a viable-but-non-culturable (VBNC state. Inherent methodological challenges of quantifying VBNC bacteria may lead to the frequent under-reporting of their abundance in sediments. The implications of this in a quantitative risk assessment context remain unclear. Similarly, sediments can harbour significant amounts of enteric viruses, however, the factors regulating their persistence remains poorly understood. Quantification of viruses in sediment remains problematic due to our poor ability to recover intact viral particles from sediment surfaces (typically <10%, our inability to distinguish between infective and damaged (non-infective viral particles, aggregation of viral particles, and inhibition during qPCR. This suggests that the true viral titre in sediments may be being vastly underestimated. In turn, this is limiting our ability to understand the fate and transport of viruses in sediments. Model systems (e.g. human cell culture are also lacking for some key viruses, preventing our ability to evaluate the infectivity of viruses recovered from sediments (e.g. norovirus. The release of particle

  18. Mobile antibiotic resistance – the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Godziszewska

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  19. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-07-07

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  20. Anthrax lethal toxin disrupts intestinal barrier function and causes systemic infections with enteric bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Sun

    Full Text Available A variety of intestinal pathogens have virulence factors that target mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways, including Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax lethal toxin (LT has specific proteolytic activity against the upstream regulators of MAPKs, the MAPK kinases (MKKs. Using a murine model of intoxication, we show that LT causes the dose-dependent disruption of intestinal epithelial integrity, characterized by mucosal erosion, ulceration, and bleeding. This pathology correlates with an LT-dependent blockade of intestinal crypt cell proliferation, accompanied by marked apoptosis in the villus tips. C57BL/6J mice treated with intravenous LT nearly uniformly develop systemic infections with commensal enteric organisms within 72 hours of administration. LT-dependent intestinal pathology depends upon its proteolytic activity and is partially attenuated by co-administration of broad spectrum antibiotics, indicating that it is both a cause and an effect of infection. These findings indicate that targeting of MAPK signaling pathways by anthrax LT compromises the structural integrity of the mucosal layer, serving to undermine the effectiveness of the intestinal barrier. Combined with the well-described immunosuppressive effects of LT, this disruption of the intestinal barrier provides a potential mechanism for host invasion via the enteric route, a common portal of entry during the natural infection cycle of Bacillus anthracis.

  1. [BACTERIA WITHOUT BORDERS: A HIGH CARRIAGE RATE OF ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT BACTERIA AMONG SYRIAN CHILDREN HOSPITALIZED IN GALILEE MEDICAL CENTER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faour Kassem, Diana; Shahar, Naama; Ocampo, Smadar; Bader, Tarif; Zonis, Zeev; Glikman, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    As the civil war in Syria enters its fifth year, the Israeli government continues to provide humanitarian aid to Syrian civilians in Israeli hospitals. Many wounded Syrian children are treated at the Galilee Medical Center (GMC). Due to the patients' incomplete medical history and increasing infection rates in Syria, contact isolation and screening cultures for multi-drug resistant bacteria (MDR's) are conducted upon admission for all Syrian children. To describe the rate of MDR carriage in Syrian children and compare it to hospitalized Israeli children. Prospective collection of screening culture data of Syrian patients admitted to GMC between 6/2013-11/2014 and comparison with Israeli children admitted between 1-3/2014. Extended-spectrum beta- lactamase-producing Enterobateriaceae (ESBL), Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were considered MDR's. Of 47 pediatric Syrian patients, 41 were severely wounded. MDR's were found in 37 (79%) children; most of the isolates were ESBL+ Escherichia coli. Over half of the ESBL's were resistant to additional antibiotics such as sulfa and quinolones; no resistance to amikacin was found. In comparison, in 6 of 40 (15%) Israeli children, MDR's (all ESBL's) were found (pSyrian children, contact isolation and screening cultures for MDR's have an important role in the prevention of nosocomial transmission and establishment of empiric antimicrobial protocols. In suspected infections in Syrian children, amikacin and carbapenems are the antimicrobials of choice. MDR's are carried to a lesser extent in Israeli children but due to their importance, further largescale research is needed.

  2. Automated annotation of mobile antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria: the Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Annotator (MARA) and database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Sally R; Tsafnat, Guy

    2018-04-01

    Multiresistance in Gram-negative bacteria is often due to acquisition of several different antibiotic resistance genes, each associated with a different mobile genetic element, that tend to cluster together in complex conglomerations. Accurate, consistent annotation of resistance genes, the boundaries and fragments of mobile elements, and signatures of insertion, such as DR, facilitates comparative analysis of complex multiresistance regions and plasmids to better understand their evolution and how resistance genes spread. To extend the Repository of Antibiotic resistance Cassettes (RAC) web site, which includes a database of 'features', and the Attacca automatic DNA annotation system, to encompass additional resistance genes and all types of associated mobile elements. Antibiotic resistance genes and mobile elements were added to RAC, from existing registries where possible. Attacca grammars were extended to accommodate the expanded database, to allow overlapping features to be annotated and to identify and annotate features such as composite transposons and DR. The Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Annotator (MARA) database includes antibiotic resistance genes and selected mobile elements from Gram-negative bacteria, distinguishing important variants. Sequences can be submitted to the MARA web site for annotation. A list of positions and orientations of annotated features, indicating those that are truncated, DR and potential composite transposons is provided for each sequence, as well as a diagram showing annotated features approximately to scale. The MARA web site (http://mara.spokade.com) provides a comprehensive database for mobile antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria and accurately annotates resistance genes and associated mobile elements in submitted sequences to facilitate comparative analysis.

  3. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of Bacteria Causing Urinary Tract Infections in Children of Fasa During the years 2012 and 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    alireza molazade

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: Regarding the results, it is recommended to use Ciprofloxacin and Nitrofurantoin for outpatient treatment of UTI. Selecting proper antibiotics for UTI treatment should be on the basis of the local prevalence of pathogenic bacteria and antibiotic resistance pattern.

  4. Fate and transport of antibiotic resistant bacteria and resistance genes in artificially drained agricultural fields receiving swine manure application

    Science.gov (United States)

    While previous studies have examined the occurrence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistant genes around confined swine feeding operations, little information is known about their release and transport from artificially drained fields receiving swine manure application. Much of the...

  5. Diarrhea-associated pathogens, lactobacilli and cellulolytic bacteria in equine feces: responses to antibiotic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Brittany E; Lawrence, Laurie M; Flythe, Michael D

    2013-09-27

    Antibiotics are important to equine medicine, but antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) can lead to poor performance and even mortality. AAD is attributed to disruption of the hindgut microbiota, which permits proliferation of pathogenic microbes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of common antibiotics on cellulolytic bacteria, lactobacilli, and AAD-associated pathogens in the feces of healthy horses. Fifteen horses were assigned to three treatment groups (blocked by age and sex): control (no antibiotics), trimethoprim-sulfadiazine (PO), or ceftiofur (IM). Fecal samples (n=8 per horse) were taken during dietary adaptation (3 weeks), antibiotic challenge (1 week), and withdrawal (1 week). Bacteria were enumerated by serial dilution and viable count. Cellulolytic bacteria decreased by >99% during administration of either antibiotic (Pantibiotic challenge period (PAntibiotic challenged horses also shed more salmonella than control horses (PAntibiotics had no effect on the number of Clostridium perfringens isolates. There was no detectable Clostridium difficile during adaptation or in any control horse. C. difficile increased (Pantibiotics, and were still detectable 1 week after withdrawal. These results indicate that antibiotics can disrupt the normal gastrointestinal microbiota and allow proliferation of Salmonella spp. and C. difficile. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. An Antibiotic Selection System For Protein Overproducing Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennig, Maja; Nørholm, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Protein overproduction is a major bottleneck for analyses of membrane proteins and for the construction of cell factories. Screening for optimized protein production can be very time consuming. In this study we show that the coupling of antibiotic resistance to poorly produced...... membrane proteins of Escherichia coli can be used as a fast and simple selection system for protein overproduction.Methods: We designed an expression plasmid encoding the gene of interest and an additional, inducible antibiotic resistance marker. Both genes were linked by a hairpin structure...... that translationally couples the genes. Consequently, high expressing gene variants also allow for higher production of the coupled antibiotic resistance marker. Therefore, high expressing gene variants in a library can be determined either by plating the expression library on selection plates or by growing...

  7. Bloom of resident antibiotic-resistant bacteria in soil following manure fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udikovic-Kolic, Nikolina; Wichmann, Fabienne; Broderick, Nichole A; Handelsman, Jo

    2014-10-21

    The increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a global threat to public health. Agricultural use of antibiotics is believed to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance, but the mechanisms by which many agricultural practices influence resistance remain obscure. Although manure from dairy farms is a common soil amendment in crop production, its impact on the soil microbiome and resistome is not known. To gain insight into this impact, we cultured bacteria from soil before and at 10 time points after application of manure from cows that had not received antibiotic treatment. Soil treated with manure contained a higher abundance of β-lactam-resistant bacteria than soil treated with inorganic fertilizer. Functional metagenomics identified β-lactam-resistance genes in treated and untreated soil, and indicated that the higher frequency of resistant bacteria in manure-amended soil was attributable to enrichment of resident soil bacteria that harbor β-lactamases. Quantitative PCR indicated that manure treatment enriched the blaCEP-04 gene, which is highly similar (96%) to a gene found previously in a Pseudomonas sp. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the abundance of Pseudomonas spp. increased in manure-amended soil. Populations of other soil bacteria that commonly harbor β-lactamases, including Janthinobacterium sp. and Psychrobacter pulmonis, also increased in response to manure treatment. These results indicate that manure amendment induced a bloom of certain antibiotic-resistant bacteria in soil that was independent of antibiotic exposure of the cows from which the manure was derived. Our data illustrate the unintended consequences that can result from agricultural practices, and demonstrate the need for empirical analysis of the agroecosystem.

  8. On the contribution of reclaimed wastewater irrigation to the potential exposure of humans to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes - NEREUS COST Action ES1403 position paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piña, Benjamin; Bayona, Josep M.; Christou, Anastasis

    2018-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is becoming a worldwide threat due to the increasing occurrence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacterial strains. There is a general consensus about the potential implications of the use of antibiotics in livestock on the onset of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB)...

  9. Sulfhydryl variable-5 extended spectrum β-lactamase in nosocomial enteric bacteria causing sepsis in mexican children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Flores-Pérez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enteric bacteria causing nosocomial infections are often resistant to third-generation cephalosporins due to the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs. Objective: To describe and characterize the ESBLs pattern present in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Serratia marcescens strains, isolated as causative of nosocomial sepsis in pediatric patients at Instituto Nacional de Pediatría (National Institute of Pediatrics. Material and methods: We analyzed 94 strains of K. pneumoniae and 7 of S. marcescens isolated from clinical specimens from 2002-2005, causative of sepsis in a children’s hospital. We evaluated antibiotic susceptibility and detection of ESBL phenotypes by disk diffusion methods; ceftazidime-resistant isolates were further characterized by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE; and ESBLs were phenotypically and genotypically characterized by isoelectric focusing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing. We also assed for presence of conjugative plasmids bearing the ESBL gene. Results: 51/94 (54% of K. pneumoniae isolates, and 5/7 (71% of S. marcescens isolates were resistant to ceftazidime; all carried a blaSHV-5 gene. All K. pneumoniae isolates had a distinct PFGE profile, yet all carried a ~48-Kb plasmid, that was conjugatively transferable to an Escherichia coli receptor, which expressed the resistance phenotype. On the other hand, all S. marcescens isolates had a similar PFGE profile, were unable to transfer the ceftazidime-resistance phenotype, and were isolated from the same ward in a short time-span suggesting an outbreak. Conclusions: The overall prevalence of ESBL-producing enteric bacteria in this hospital is high but similar to other Latin American reports. The sulfhydryl variable-5 (SHV-5 ESBL gene appears to reside in a highly mobile plasmid, capable of spreading among different K. pneumoniae clones and perhaps even to S. marcescens.

  10. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance pattern of bacteria isolated from urinary tract infections in Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Mihankhah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to investigate the bacteria associated with urinary tract infection (UTI and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of the isolates during 2013–2015 in Northern Iran. Materials and Methods: Overall 3798 patients with clinical symptoms of UTI were subjected as samples, and they were cultured and pure isolated bacteria were identified using biochemical tests and subjected to antibiogram assessment using disc diffusion method. Results: Totally, 568 (14.96% from 3798 patients had positive UTI. Four hundred and ninety-seven (87.5% from 568 isolated bacteria were resistant to at least one antibiotic. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus spp., and Pseudomonas spp. were the most prevalent bacteria. Isolated bacteria indicated the highest antibiotic resistance to methicillin (76.06% and ampicillin (89.29% and also revealed the most sensitivity to imipenem (99.1% and amikacin (91.57%. Statistical analysis of the resistance pattern trend during 3 years indicated the insignificant increase (P > 0.05 in antibiotic resistance of the isolates. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed a great concern for emerging UTI-related multidrug-resistant strains of bacteria causing UTI in Iran.

  11. Emerging antibiotic resistance in bacteria with special reference to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Sir Dorabji Tata Centre for Research in Tropical Diseases, Innovation Centre, Indian Institute of Science Campus,. Bangalore 560 012 ... The antibiotic era started in the 1940s and changed the profile of infectious diseases and human demography. The ... any resistance conferring factor, while the clinical term would cover ...

  12. Emerging antibiotic resistance in bacteria with special reference to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-10-15

    Oct 15, 2008 ... The burgeoning classes and numbers promised much and elimination of this major cause of human (and animal) morbidity appeared possible. Bacterial antibiotic ... Sir Dorabji Tata Centre for Research in Tropical Diseases, Innovation Centre, Indian Institute of Science Campus, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  13. Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria--What Everyone Needs To Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Neil; Felkner, Marilyn; Maldonado, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Notes the overuse of antibiotics and the resulting resistant bacterial strains. Describes how to control and prevent staphylococcal infections specifically, and almost all infectious diseases generally. Specific sections address: (1) what are staph infections; (2) preventing staph infections; (3) caring for wounds; and (4) controlling staph…

  14. Fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric bacteria in sub-Saharan Africa: Clones, Implications and Research needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Anne Chattaway

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolones came into widespread use in African countries in the early 2000s, after patents for the first generation of these drugs expired. By that time, quinolone antibacterial agents had been used intensively worldwide and resistant lineages of many bacterial species had evolved. We sought to understand which Gram negative enteric pandemic lineages have been reported from Africa, as well as the nature and transmission of any indigenous resistant clones. A systematic review of articles indexed in the Medline and AJOL literature databases was conducted. We report on the findings of 43 eligible studies documenting local or pandemic fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric clones in sub-Sahara African countries. Most reports are of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella and Escherichia coli lineages and there have been three reports of cholera outbreaks caused by fluoroquinolone-resistant Vibrio cholerae O1. Fluoroquinolone-resistant clones have also been reported from commensals and animal isolates but there are few data for non-Enterobacteriaceae and almost none for difficult-to-culture Campylobacter spp. Fluoroquinolone-resistant lineages identified in African countries were universally resistant to multiple other classes of antibacterial agents. Although as many as 972 non-duplicate articles refer to fluoroquinolone resistance in enteric bacteria from Africa, most do not report on subtypes and therefore information on the epidemiology of fluoroquinolone-resistant clones is available from only a handful of countries in the subcontinent. When resistance is reported, resistance mechanisms and lineage information is rarely investigated. Insufficient attention has been given to molecular and sequence-based methods necessary for identifying and tracking resistant clones in Africa and more research is needed in this area.

  15. Dead bacteria reverse antibiotic-induced host defense impairment in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee-Wei; Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Fung, Chang-Phone; Hsu, Ching-Mei

    2014-10-01

    Burn patients can incur high rates of hospital-acquired infections. The mechanism of antibiotic exposure on inducing infection vulnerability has not been determined. This study aimed to examine the effects of antibiotic treatment on host defense mechanisms. First we treated C57/BL6 mice with combined antibiotic treatment after 30% to 35% total body surface area burn. Animals were sacrificed at 48 hours after sham or thermal injury treatment. Bacterial counts in intestinal lumen and mucosa were measured. Next, we treated animals with or without oral dead Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus supplementation to stimulate Toll-like receptor in the intestinal mucosa. Toll-like receptor 4, antibacterial protein expression, nuclear factor (NF)-κB DNA-binding activity, and bacteria-killing activity in the intestinal mucosa; intestinal permeability; bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes; Klebsiella pneumoniae translocation; interleukin-6 in the blood; and phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages, were assessed. Thermal injury increased microflora and NF-κB DNA-binding activity of the intestine. Systemic antibiotic treatment decreased gut microflora and increased bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes, intestinal permeability, and interleukin-6 levels in the blood. Antibiotic treatment also decreased bacteria-killing activity in intestinal mucosa and phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages. Oral dead E coli and S aureus supplementation induced NF-κB DNA-binding activity, Toll-like receptor 4, and antibacterial protein expression of the intestinal mucosa. Taken together with the fact that dead bacteria reversed antibiotic-induced K pneumoniae translocation and intestinal and pulmonary defense impairment, we conclude that combined antibiotic treatment results in systemic host defense impairment in burns through the decrease in intestinal flora. We suggest that dead bacteria supplementation could induce nondefensin protein expression and

  16. Genomic characterization of key bacteriophages to formulate the potential biocontrol agent to combat enteric pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Krupa M; Dafale, Nishant A; Tikariha, Hitesh; Purohit, Hemant J

    2018-01-12

    Combating bacterial pathogens has become a global concern especially when the antibiotics and chemical agents are failing to control the spread due to its resistance. Bacteriophages act as a safe biocontrol agent by selectively lysing the bacterial pathogens without affecting the natural beneficial microflora. The present study describes the screening of prominent enteric pathogens NDK1, NDK2, NDK3, and NDK4 (Escherichia, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Serratia) mostly observed in domestic wastewater; against which KNP1, KNP2, KNP3, and KNP4 phages were isolated. To analyze their potential role in eradicating enteric pathogens and toxicity issue, these bacteriophages were sequenced using next-generation sequencing and characterized based on its genomic content. The isolated bacteriophages were homologous to Escherichia phage (KNP1), Klebsiella phage (KNP2), Enterobacter phage (KNP3), Serratia phage (KNP4), and belonged to Myoviridae family of Caudovirales except for the unclassified KNP4 phage. Draft genome analysis revealed the presence of lytic enzymes such as holing and lysozyme in KNP1 phage, endolysin in KNP2 phage, and endopeptidase with holin in KNP3 phage. The absence of any lysogenic and virulent genes makes this bacteriophage suitable candidate for preparation of phage cocktail to combat the pathogens present in wastewater. However, KNP4 contained a virulent gene rendering it unsuitable to be used as a biocontrol agent. These findings make the phages (KNP1-KNP3) as a promising alternative for the biocontrol of pathogens in wastewater which is the main culprit to spread these dominated pathogens in different natural water bodies. This study also necessitates for genomic screening of bacteriophages for lysogenic and virulence genes prior to its use as a biocontrol agent.

  17. Identification and Determination of Antibiotic Multiresistance of Gram-negative Bacteria Isolated from Hospital Sewage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Matyar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study it was aimed to determine the microbial diversity and level of antibiotic resistance patterns of Gram-negative bacterial isolates from the hospital sewages. The 219 Gram-negative bacterial isolates to 16 different antibiotics (belonging 10 classes, was investigated by agar diffusion method. A total of 18 species of bacteria were isolated: the most common strains isolated from all samples were Klebsiella oxytoca (27.4%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (20.5% and Escherichia coli (20.1%. There was a high incidence of resistance to ampicillin (98.6%, streptomycin (95.9% and erythromycin (90.0%, and a low incidence of resistance to cefepim (13.2%, imipenem (5.0% and meropenem (3.2%. 35.6% of all bacteria isolated from hospital sewage were resistant to 9 different antibiotics. The multiple antibiotic resistances (MAR index ranged from 0.25 to 0.94. Results show that hospital sewages have a significant proportion of antibiotic resistant Gram-negative bacteria, and these bacteria constitute a potential risk for public health.

  18. Functional characterization of bacteria isolated from ancient arctic soil exposes diverse resistance mechanisms to modern antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel G Perron

    Full Text Available Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes.

  19. Functional characterization of bacteria isolated from ancient arctic soil exposes diverse resistance mechanisms to modern antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Gabriel G; Whyte, Lyle; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Goordial, Jacqueline; Hanage, William P; Dantas, Gautam; Desai, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes.

  20. Functional Characterization of Bacteria Isolated from Ancient Arctic Soil Exposes Diverse Resistance Mechanisms to Modern Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Gabriel G.; Whyte, Lyle; Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Goordial, Jacqueline; Hanage, William P.; Dantas, Gautam; Desai, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes. PMID:25807523

  1. The culturable soil antibiotic resistome: a community of multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Walsh

    Full Text Available Understanding the soil bacterial resistome is essential to understanding the evolution and development of antibiotic resistance, and its spread between species and biomes. We have identified and characterized multi-drug resistance (MDR mechanisms in the culturable soil antibiotic resistome and linked the resistance profiles to bacterial species. We isolated 412 antibiotic resistant bacteria from agricultural, urban and pristine soils. All isolates were multi-drug resistant, of which greater than 80% were resistant to 16-23 antibiotics, comprising almost all classes of antibiotic. The mobile resistance genes investigated, (ESBL, bla NDM-1, and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR resistance genes were not responsible for the respective resistance phenotypes nor were they present in the extracted soil DNA. Efflux was demonstrated to play an important role in MDR and many resistance phenotypes. Clinically relevant Burkholderia species are intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin but the soil Burkholderia species were not intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin. Using a phenotypic enzyme assay we identified the antibiotic specific inactivation of trimethoprim in 21 bacteria from different soils. The results of this study identified the importance of the efflux mechanism in the soil resistome and variations between the intrinsic resistance profiles of clinical and soil bacteria of the same family.

  2. Cleaning, resistant bacteria, and antibiotic prescribing in residential aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Raquel U; Kishan, Divya; Walton, Aaron L; Sneath, Emmy; Cheah, Thomas; Butwilowsky, Judith; Friedman, N Deborah

    2016-03-01

    Residents of residential aged care facilities (RACFs) are at risk of colonization and infection with multidrug-resistant bacteria, and antibiotic prescribing is often inappropriate and not based on culture-proven infection. We describe low levels of resident colonization and environmental contamination with resistant gram-negative bacteria in RACFs, but high levels of empirical antibiotic use not guided by microbiologic culture. This research highlights the importance of antimicrobial stewardship and environmental cleaning in aged care facilities. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Surgical site infection in orthopedic implants and its common bacteria with their sensitivities to antibiotics, in open reduction internal fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.Q.; Zardad, M.S.; Khan, A.; Ahmed, S.; Awan, A. S.; Mohammad, T.

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants is a major problem, causing long hospital stay, cost to the patient and is a burden on health care facilities. It increases rate of non-union, osteomyelitis, implant failure, sepsis, multiorgan dysfunction and even death. Surgical site infection is defined as pain, erythema, swelling and discharge from wound site. Surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants is more challenging to the treating orthopaedic surgeon as the causative organism is protected by a biofilm over the implant's surface. Antibiotics cannot cross this film to reach the bacteria's, causing infection. Method: This descriptive case series study includes 132 patients of both genders with ages between 13 years to 60 years conducted at Orthopaedic Unit, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from 1st October 2015 to 31st March 2016. Patients with close fractures of long bones were included in the study to determine the frequency of surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants and the type of bacteria involved and their sensitivity to various antibiotics. All implants were of stainless steel. The implants used were Dynamic hip screws, Dynamic compression screws, plates, k-wires, Interlocking nails, SIGN nails, Austin Moore prosthesis and tension band wires. Pre-op and post-op antibiotics used were combination of Sulbactum and Cefoperazone which was given 1 hour before surgery and continued for 72 hours after surgery. Patients were followed up to 4 weeks. Pus was taken on culture stick, from those who developed infection. Results were entered in the pro forma. Results: A total of 132 patients of long bone fractures, who were treated with open reduction and internal fixation, were studied. Only 7 patients developed infection. Staphylococcus Aureus was isolated from all 7 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was sensitive to Linezolid, Fusidic Acid, and vancomycin. Cotrimoxazole, tetracycline, Gentamycin and Clindamycin were partially effective

  4. Survey of Antibiotic-producing Bacteria Associated with the Epidermal Mucus Layers of Rays and Skates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim B. Ritchie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Elasmobranchs represent a distinct group of cartilaginous fishes that harbor a remarkable ability to heal wounds rapidly and without infection. To date very little work has addressed this phenomenon although it is suggested that antibiotic capabilities associated with epidermal surfaces may be a factor. The study of benefits derived from mutualistic interactions between unicellular and multicellular organisms is a rapidly growing area of research. Here we survey and identify bacterial associates of three ray and one skate species in order to assess the potential for antibiotic production from elasmobranch associated bacteria as a novel source for new antibiotics.

  5. Inactivation and reactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by chlorination in secondary effluents of a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Jing; Hu, Hong-Ying; Tang, Fang; Li, Yi; Lu, Sun-Qin; Lu, Yun

    2011-04-01

    Reports state that chlorination of drinking water and wastewater affects the proportions of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by potentially assisting in microbial selection. Studies on the effect of chlorination on like species of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, however, have shown to be conflicting; furthermore, few studies have inspected the regrowth or reactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria after chlorination in wastewater. To understand the risks of chlorination resulting from potentially selecting for antibiotic-resistant bacteria, inactivation and reactivation rates of both total heterotrophic bacteria and antibiotic-resistant bacteria (including penicillin-, ampicillin-, tetracycline-, chloramphenicol-, and rifampicin-resistant bacteria) were examined after chlorinating secondary effluent samples from a municipal wastewater treatment plant in this study. Our experimental results indicated similar inactivation rates of both total heterotrophic bacteria and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Microbial community composition, however, was affected by chlorination: treating samples with 10 mg Cl(2)/L for 10 min resulted in chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria accounting for nearly 100% of the microbial population in contrast to 78% before chlorination. This trend shows that chlorination contributes to selection of some antibiotic-resistant strains. Reactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria occurred at 2.0 mg Cl(2)/L for 10 min; specifically, chloramphenicol-, ampicillin-, and penicillin-resistant bacteria were the three prevalent groups present, and the reactivation of chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria exceeded 50%. Regrowth and reactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in secondary effluents after chlorination with a long retention time could threaten public health security during wastewater reuse. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A quorum sensing small volatile molecule promotes antibiotic tolerance in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yok-Ai Que

    Full Text Available Bacteria can be refractory to antibiotics due to a sub-population of dormant cells, called persisters that are highly tolerant to antibiotic exposure. The low frequency and transience of the antibiotic tolerant "persister" trait has complicated elucidation of the mechanism that controls antibiotic tolerance. In this study, we show that 2' Amino-acetophenone (2-AA, a poorly studied but diagnostically important small, volatile molecule produced by the recalcitrant gram-negative human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, promotes antibiotic tolerance in response to quorum-sensing (QS signaling. Our results show that 2-AA mediated persister cell accumulation occurs via alteration of the expression of genes involved in the translational capacity of the cell, including almost all ribosomal protein genes and other translation-related factors. That 2-AA promotes persisters formation also in other emerging multi-drug resistant pathogens, including the non 2-AA producer Acinetobacter baumannii implies that 2-AA may play an important role in the ability of gram-negative bacteria to tolerate antibiotic treatments in polymicrobial infections. Given that the synthesis, excretion and uptake of QS small molecules is a common hallmark of prokaryotes, together with the fact that the translational machinery is highly conserved, we posit that modulation of the translational capacity of the cell via QS molecules, may be a general, widely distributed mechanism that promotes antibiotic tolerance among prokaryotes.

  7. Antibiotic-resistant genes and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the effluent of urban residential areas, hospitals, and a municipal wastewater treatment plant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianan; Cheng, Weixiao; Xu, Like; Strong, P J; Chen, Hong

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we determined the abundance of 8 antibiotics (3 tetracyclines, 4 sulfonamides, and 1 trimethoprim), 12 antibiotic-resistant genes (10 tet, 2 sul), 4 antibiotic-resistant bacteria (tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and combined resistance), and class 1 integron integrase gene (intI1) in the effluent of residential areas, hospitals, and municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) systems. The concentrations of total/individual targets (antibiotics, genes, and bacteria) varied remarkably among different samples, but the hospital samples generally had a lower abundance than the residential area samples. The WWTP demonstrated removal efficiencies of 50.8% tetracyclines, 66.8% sulfonamides, 0.5 logs to 2.5 logs tet genes, and less than 1 log of sul and intI1 genes, as well as 0.5 log to 1 log removal for target bacteria. Except for the total tetracycline concentration and the proportion of tetracycline-resistant bacteria (R (2) = 0.330, P antibiotics and the corresponding resistant bacteria (P > 0.05). In contrast, various relationships were identified between antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (P antibiotic-resistant bacteria (P < 0.01).

  8. High prevalence of antibiotic resistance among bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mid-stream urine was collected and subjected to rapid dipstick and urine culture media. Antibacterial susceptibility tests were conducted against the bacteria. Risk factors for AUTI and demographic data were obtained using pretested questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS Vs. 20 software package. Results: Of the ...

  9. “Neonatal Sepsis”: Bacteria & their Susceptibility Pattern towards Antibiotics in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Chandra Madhur; Agrawal, Ravi Prakash; Sharan, Hariom; Kumar, Bijay; Sharma, Deepti; Bhatia, Santokh Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neonatal sepsis is one of the most common causes of neonatal mortality and morbidity, particularly in the developing countries. Its causative bacteria and their respective sensitivity patterns are different in each hospital and region. The objective of this study was to determine the causative bacteria and pattern of susceptibility to antibiotics in NICU of a tertiary care centre, which in turn may help in implementation of empirical therapy.

  10. Determination of Antibiotic resistance pattern of Biofilm producing Pathogenic Bacteria associated with UTI

    OpenAIRE

    Kabir Md. Shahidul; Akter Asma; Feroz Farahnaaz; Ahsan Sunjukta

    2013-01-01

    The present study was aimed to ascertain the antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic bacteria associated with urinary tract infections (UTIs). Escherichia coli was found to be the most prevalent uropathogen (75.0%), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (12.5%), Pseudomonas spp. (8.33%) and Staphylococcus aureus (4.16%). Isolated bacteria (n=24) were characterized for their sensitivity to commonly prescribed antibiotics. Although Congo red binding assay indicated that all of the isolates (100%) we...

  11. Enabling Passive Immunization as an Alternative to Antibiotics for Controlling Enteric Infections in Production Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Hald, Birthe; Madsen, M.

    massive use of antibiotics in food animals. Thus there is a pressing need for economically feasible, efficient, non-antibiotics based means for controlling the problem. Passive immunization has been known for decades as an efficient way of endowing humans or animals with short-term (weeks) immunity...

  12. Activity and selectivity of histidine-containing lytic peptides to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharidia, Riddhi; Tu, Zhigang; Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F

    2012-09-01

    Lytic peptides are a group of membrane-acting peptides that are active to antibiotic-resistant bacteria but demonstrate high toxicity to tissue cells. Here, we reported the construction of new lytic peptide derivatives through the replacement of corresponding lysine/arginine residues in lytic peptide templates with histidines. Resulting lytic peptides had the same lethality to antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, but showed greatly improved selectivity to bacteria. When incubated with co-cultured bacteria and tissue cells, these histidine-containing lytic peptide derivatives killed bacteria selectively but spared co-cultured human cells. Membrane insertion and peptide-quenching studies revealed that histidine protonation controlled peptide interactions with cell membranes determined the bacterial selectivity of lytic peptide derivatives. Compared with parent peptides, lytic peptide derivatives bound to bacteria strongly and inserted deeply into the bacterial cell membrane. Therefore, histidine-containing lytic peptides represent a new group of antimicrobial peptides for bacterial infections in which the antibiotic resistance has developed.

  13. Self-defensive layer-by-layer films with bacteria-triggered antibiotic release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuk, Iryna; Jariwala, Freneil; Attygalle, Athula B; Wu, Yong; Libera, Matthew R; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A

    2014-08-26

    We report on highly efficient, bioresponsive, controlled-release antibacterial coatings constructed by direct assembly of tannic acid (TA) with one of several cationic antibiotics (tobromycin, gentamicin, and polymyxin B) using the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. These films exhibit a distinct “self-defense” behavior triggered by acidification of the immediate environment by pathogenic bacteria, such as Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) or Escherichia coli (E. coli). Films assembled using spin-assisted and dip-assisted techniques show drastically different morphology, thickness and pH-/bacteria-triggered antibiotic release characteristics. While dip-deposited films have rough surfaces with island-like, granular structures regardless of the film thickness, spin-assisted LbL assemblies demonstrate a transition from linear deposition of uniform 2D films to a highly developed 3D morphology for films thicker than ∼45 nm. Ellipsometry, UV–vis and mass spectrometry confirm that all coatings do not release antibiotics in phosphate buffered saline at pH 7.4 for as long as one month in the absence of bacteria and therefore do not contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance. These films do, however, release antibiotics upon pH lowering. The rate of triggered release can be controlled through the choice of assembled antibiotic and the assembly technique (spin- vs dip-deposition) and by the spinning rate used during deposition, which all affect the strength of TA–antibiotic binding. TA/antibiotic coatings as thin as 40 nm strongly inhibit S. epidermidis and E. coli bacterial growth both at surfaces and in surrounding medium, but support adhesion and proliferation of murine osteoblast cells. These coatings thus present a promising way to incorporate antibacterial agents at surfaces to prevent bacterial colonization of implanted biomedical devices.

  14. The Structure of Fitness Landscapes in Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deris, Barrett; Kim, Minsu; Zhang, Zhongge; Okano, Hiroyuki; Hermsen, Rutger; Gore, Jeff; Hwa, Terence

    2014-03-01

    To predict the emergence of antibiotic resistance, quantitative relations must be established between the fitness of drug-resistant organisms and the molecular mechanisms conferring resistance. We have investigated E. coli strains expressing resistance to translation-inhibiting antibiotics. We show that resistance expression and drug inhibition are linked in a positive feedback loop arising from an innate, global effect of drug-inhibited growth on gene expression. This feedback leads generically to plateau-shaped fitness landscapes and concomitantly, for strains expressing at least moderate degrees of drug resistance, gives rise to an abrupt drop in growth rates of cultures at threshold drug concentrations. A simple quantitative model of bacterial growth based on this innate feedback accurately predicts experimental observations without ad hoc parameter fitting. We describe how drug-inhibited growth rate and the threshold drug concentration (the minimum inhibitory concentration, or MIC) depend on the few biochemical parameters that characterize the molecular details of growth inhibition and drug resistance (e.g., the drug-target dissociation constant). And finally, we discuss how these parameters can shape fitness landscapes to determine evolutionary dynamics and evolvability.

  15. Current and novel antibiotics against resistant Gram-positive bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Federico; Salata, Robert A; Bonomo, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    The challenge posed by resistance among Gram-positive bacteria, epitomized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and vancomycin-intermediate and -resistant S. aureus (VISA and VRSA) is being met by a new generation of antimicrobials. This review focuses on the new β-lactams with activity against MRSA (ceftobiprole and ceftaroline) and on the new glycopeptides (oritavancin, dalbavancin, and telavancin). It will also consider the role of ...

  16. Current and novel antibiotics against resistant Gram-positive bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Federico

    2008-01-01

    Federico Perez1, Robert A Salata1, Robert A Bonomo21Division of Infectious Diseases and HIV Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland OH, USA; 2Research Service, Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: The challenge posed by resistance among Gram-positive bacteria, epitomized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and vancomycin-intermediate and -resis...

  17. [Distribution and removal of anaerobic antibiotic resistant bacteria during mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Juan; Wang, Yuan-Yue; Wei Yuan, Song

    2014-10-01

    Sewage sludge is one of the major sources that releasing antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistant genes (ARG) into the environment since it contains large amount of ARB, but there is little information about the fate of the anaerobic ARB in the anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge. Therefore, the distribution, removal and seasonal changes of tetracycline and β-lactam antibiotics resistant bacteria in the mesophilic egg-shaped digesters of a municipal wastewater treatment plant were investigated for one year in this study. Results showed that there were higher amounts of ARB and higher resistance rate of β-lactam antibiotics than that of tetracycline antibiotics in the sewage sludge. All ARB could be significantly reduced during the mesophilic anaerobic digestion process by 1.48-1.64 log unit (P resistance rates were significantly increased after anaerobic digestion by 12.0% and 14.3%, respectively (P resistant bacteria, there were more ARB in the sewage sludge in cold season than in warm season (P < 0.05).

  18. Reduced ability to detect surface-related biofilm bacteria after antibiotic exposure under in vitro conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravn, Christen; Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Bétrisey, Bertrand; Overgaard, Søren; Trampuz, Andrej

    2016-12-01

    Background and purpose - Antibiotic treatment of patients before specimen collection reduces the ability to detect organisms by culture. We investigated the suppressive effect of antibiotics on the growth of non-adherent, planktonic, and surface-related biofilm bacteria in vitro by using sonication and microcalorimetry methods. Patients and methods - Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli, and Propionibacterium acnes were formed on porous glass beads and exposed for 24 h to antibiotic concentrations from 1 to 1,024 times the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin, daptomycin, rifampin, flucloxacillin, or ciprofloxacin. The beads were then sonicated to dislodge biofilm, followed by culture and measurement of growth-related heat flow by microcalorimetry of the resulting sonication fluid. Results - Vancomycin did not inhibit the heat flow of staphylococci and P. acnes at concentrations ≤1,024 μg/mL, whereas flucloxacillin at >128 μg/mL inhibited S. aureus. Daptomycin inhibited heat flow of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and P. acnes at lower concentrations (32-128 times MIC, p antibiotics (i.e. vancomycin and flucloxacillin) showed only weak growth suppression, concentration-dependent drugs (i.e. daptomycin and ciprofloxacin) had a strong suppressive effect on bacterial growth and reduced the ability to detect planktonic and biofilm bacteria. Exposure to rifampin rapidly caused emergence of resistance. Our findings indicate that preoperative administration of antibiotics may have heterogeneous effects on the ability to detect biofilm bacteria.

  19. Widespread Attenuation of Antibiotics by Soil Bacteria Promotes Intermixed Microbial Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetsigin, Kalin; Kelsic, Eric; Zhao, Jeffrey; Kishony, Roy

    2014-03-01

    In natural soil environments, antibiotic sensitive bacteria coexist with antibiotic producers, even in close proximities. Efforts to understand diversity in microbial communities have focused on pairwise interactions between species, yet mathematical models of such interactions lead to distinct spatial domains of individual species, rather than to intermixed multi-species communities. In this work, we measured interactions between triplets of species and asked and how the presence of these higher-order interactions affects community structure and diversity. We developed a 3-species diffusion-based assay in which a modulator species either intensifies or attenuates the toxicity of compounds made by a producer species against a fluorescently labeled indicator species. We found that intensifying interactions were quite rare among soil bacteria, while attenuating interactions that protected nearby sensitive species from the antibiotic producer were abundant. Furthermore, many soil bacteria attenuated multiple classes of antibiotics with widely varying mechanisms of action. Computer simulations showed that such cross-species protection, when abundant, promoted the spontaneous formation and expansion of intermixed multi-species communities that overtook or assimilated single species domains. These findings suggest that drug attenuation is a widespread phenomenon that can be key to the coexistence of antibiotic producing and sensitive microbes in close proximity and thereby to the overall species diversity within soil microenvironments.

  20. Heavy metal and antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from the environment of swine farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.; Ping, C.; Mei, L.S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the level of heavy metal resistance and antibiotic resistance patterns of bacterial isolates from environment of swine farms in China. A total of 284 bacteria were isolated, 158 from manure, 62 from soil and 64 from wastewater in different swine farm samples. All the isolates were tested for resistant against eight heavy metals. From the total of 284 isolates, maximum bacterial isolates were found to be resistant to Zn/sup 2+/ (98.6%) followed by Cu/sup 2+/ (97.5%), Cd/sup 2+/ (68.3%), Mn/sup 2+/ (60.2%), Pb/sup 2+/(51.4%), Ni/sup 2+/(41.5%) and Cr/sup 2+/(45.1%). However, most of the isolates were sensitive to Co/sup 2+/. Meanwhile,all the isolates were tested for sensitively to nine antibiotics. The results shows that most isolates were sensitive to cefoxitin and oxacillin, but resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin, gentamicin, amikacin, erythromycin, clindamycin were widespread. Multiple resistant to metals and antibiotics were also observed in this study. Most isolates were tolerant to different concentrations of various heavy metals and antibiotics. Our results confirmed that environment of swine farms in China has a significant proportion of heavy metal and antibiotic resistant bacteria, and these bacteria constitute a potential risk for swine health and public health. (author)

  1. Emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in patients with Fournier gangrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chao, Chien-Ming; Lin, Hsin-Lan; Hung, Ming-Chran; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the bacteriology and associated patterns of antibiotic resistance Fournier gangrene. Patients with Fournier's gangrene from 2008 to 2012 were identified from the computerized database in a medical center in southern Taiwan. The medical records of all patients with Fournier's gangrene were reviewed retrospectively. There were 61 microorganisms, including 60 bacteria and one Candida spp, isolated from clinical wound specimens from 32 patients. The most common isolates obtained were Streptococcus spp. (n=12), Peptoniphilus spp. (n=8), Staphylococcus aureus (n=7), Escherichia coli (n=7), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=7). Among 21 strains of gram-negative bacilli, five (23.8%) were resistant to fluoroquinolones, and three isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone. Two E. coli strains produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamase. Four of the seven S. aureus isolates were methicillin-resistant. Among 15 anaerobic isolates, nine (60%) were resistant to penicillin, and eight (53.3%) were resistant to clindamycin. Four (26.7%) isolates were resistant to metronidazole. The only independent risk factor associated with mortality was inappropriate initial antibiotic treatment (p=0.021). Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are emerging in the clinical setting of Fournier gangrene. Clinicians should use broad-spectrum antibiotics initially to cover possible antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  2. Methanobactin: a copper binding compound having antibiotic and antioxidant activity isolated from methanotrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSpirito, Alan A [Ames, IA; Zahn, James A [Harbor Beach, MI; Graham, David W [Lawrence, KS; Kim, Hyung J [St. Paul, MN; Alterman, Michail [Lawrence, KS; Larive, Cynthia [Lawrence, KS

    2007-04-03

    A means and method for treating bacterial infection, providing antioxidant activity, and chelating copper using a copper binding compound produced by methanotrophic bacteria is described. The compound, known as methanobactin, is the first of a new class of antibiotics having gram-positive activity. Methanobactin has been sequenced, and its structural formula determined.

  3. Frequency and antibiotic resistance patterns of isolated bacteria from positive blood culture of hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Vahedi

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: The most prevalent bacterial isolate among the blood cultures of patients was Pseudomonas. The patients more than 50 years were more susceptible to blood stream infections. The most bacteria were isolated from the internal medicine department of hospital. The antibiotic resistance was also increasing especially in Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus coagulase negative, Escherichia coil and Klebsiella

  4. Effect of manure application rate and timing on the leaching potential of antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are used in swine production for therapeutic and growth promotion purposes. Because land application is the most common method of disposing of swine lagoon effluent, there exists the potential threat of contaminating the underlying groundwater with antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB) ...

  5. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Samonella, Shigella and Yersinia: cellular aspects of host-bacteria interactions in enteric diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Roberta

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A successful infection of the human intestine by enteropathogenic bacteria depends on the ability of bacteria to attach and colonize the intestinal epithelium and, in some cases, to invade the host cell, survive intracellularly and disseminate from cell to cell. To accomplish these processes bacteria have evolved an arsenal of molecules that are mostly secreted by dedicated type III secretion systems, and that interact with the host, subverting normal cellular functions. Here we overview the most important molecular strategies developed by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Shigella flexneri, and Yersinia enterocolitica to cause enteric infections. Despite having evolved different effectors, these four microorganisms share common host cellular targets.

  6. Occurrence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from seawater organisms caught in Campania Region: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldone, Giorgio; Marrone, Raffaele; Cappiello, Silvia; Martin, Giuseppe A; Oliva, Gaetano; Cortesi, Maria L; Anastasio, Aniello

    2014-07-15

    Environmental contamination by pharmaceuticals is a public health concern: drugs administered to humans and animals are excreted with urine or faeces and attend the sewage treatment. The main consequences of use and abuse of antibiotics is the development and diffusion of antibiotic resistance that has become a serious global problem. Aim of the study is to evaluate the presence of antimicrobial residues and to assess the antimicrobial resistance in bacteria species isolated from different wild caught seawater fish and fishery products. Three antibiotic substances (Oxytetracicline, Sulfamethoxazole and Trimethoprim) were detected (by screening and confirmatory methods) in Octopus vulgaris, Sepia officinalis and Thais haemastoma. All Vibrio strains isolated from fish were resistant to Vancomycin (VA) and Penicillin (P). In Vibrio alginolyticus, isolated in Octopus vulgaris, a resistance against 9 antibiotics was noted. Wild caught seawater fish collected in Gulf of Salerno (Campania Region), especially in marine areas including mouths of streams, were contaminated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria strains and that they might play an important role in the spread of antibiotic-resistance.

  7. Reduced ability to detect surface-related biofilm bacteria after antibiotic exposure under in vitro conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Christen; Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Bétrisey, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Antibiotic treatment of patients before specimen collection reduces the ability to detect organisms by culture. We investigated the suppressive effect of antibiotics on the growth of non-adherent, planktonic, and surface-related biofilm bacteria in vitro by using sonication......-dependent drugs (i.e. daptomycin and ciprofloxacin) had a strong suppressive effect on bacterial growth and reduced the ability to detect planktonic and biofilm bacteria. Exposure to rifampin rapidly caused emergence of resistance. Our findings indicate that preoperative administration of antibiotics may have......, daptomycin, rifampin, flucloxacillin, or ciprofloxacin. The beads were then sonicated to dislodge biofilm, followed by culture and measurement of growth-related heat flow by microcalorimetry of the resulting sonication fluid. Results - Vancomycin did not inhibit the heat flow of staphylococci and P. acnes...

  8. The potential implications of reclaimed wastewater reuse for irrigation on the agricultural environment: The knowns and unknowns of the fate of antibiotics and antibiotic resistant bacteria and resistance genes - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Anastasis; Agüera, Ana; Bayona, Josep Maria; Cytryn, Eddie; Fotopoulos, Vasileios; Lambropoulou, Dimitra; Manaia, Célia M; Michael, Costas; Revitt, Mike; Schröder, Peter; Fatta-Kassinos, Despo

    2017-10-15

    The use of reclaimed wastewater (RWW) for the irrigation of crops may result in the continuous exposure of the agricultural environment to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). In recent years, certain evidence indicate that antibiotics and resistance genes may become disseminated in agricultural soils as a result of the amendment with manure and biosolids and irrigation with RWW. Antibiotic residues and other contaminants may undergo sorption/desorption and transformation processes (both biotic and abiotic), and have the potential to affect the soil microbiota. Antibiotics found in the soil pore water (bioavailable fraction) as a result of RWW irrigation may be taken up by crop plants, bioaccumulate within plant tissues and subsequently enter the food webs; potentially resulting in detrimental public health implications. It can be also hypothesized that ARGs can spread among soil and plant-associated bacteria, a fact that may have serious human health implications. The majority of studies dealing with these environmental and social challenges related with the use of RWW for irrigation were conducted under laboratory or using, somehow, controlled conditions. This critical review discusses the state of the art on the fate of antibiotics, ARB and ARGs in agricultural environment where RWW is applied for irrigation. The implications associated with the uptake of antibiotics by plants (uptake mechanisms) and the potential risks to public health are highlighted. Additionally, knowledge gaps as well as challenges and opportunities are addressed, with the aim of boosting future research towards an enhanced understanding of the fate and implications of these contaminants of emerging concern in the agricultural environment. These are key issues in a world where the increasing water scarcity and the continuous appeal of circular economy demand answers for a long-term safe use of RWW for irrigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  9. A radiotracer study of the sensitivity of bacteria to antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, E.J.

    1975-01-01

    In the developed measuring apparatus the test bacterium E.coli was dissolved in 25 ml of the synthetic medium M9 (pH=7.0) and 2 μCi of D-glucose- 14 C (80 μg of glucose) was added to the solution. The test material was incubated at 37+-0.2 degC. In closed system the quantity of developing 14 CO 2 have been proportional to the multiplication rate of bacterium. The radioactive CO 2 have been absorbed in the box containing the liquid scintillation material. The absorption capacity of the toluene-base scintillation liquid was increased by adding diethanolamine (pH=10) and the multiplication was promoted by constant mixing. The sensitivity of the given bacterium to antibiotics like Penicillin G, Tetracyclin, Ampicillin, Polymycin B can be given in 60-120 min. (K.A.)

  10. Proliferation of Antibiotic-Producing Bacteria and Concomitant Antibiotic Production as the Basis for the Antibiotic Activity of Jordan's Red Soils▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkinham, Joseph O.; Wall, Thomas E.; Tanner, Justin R.; Tawaha, Khaled; Alali, Feras Q.; Li, Chen; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2009-01-01

    Anecdotes, both historical and recent, recount the curing of skin infections, including diaper rash, by using red soils from the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. Following inoculation of red soils isolated from geographically separate areas of Jordan, Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus were rapidly killed. Over the 3-week incubation period, the number of specific types of antibiotic-producing bacteria increased, and high antimicrobial activity (MIC, ∼10 μg/ml) was observed in methanol extracts of the inoculated red soils. Antibiotic-producing microorganisms whose numbers increased during incubation included actinomycetes, Lysobacter spp., and Bacillus spp. The actinomycetes produced actinomycin C2 and actinomycin C3. No myxobacteria or lytic bacteriophages with activity against either M. luteus or S. aureus were detected in either soil before or after inoculation and incubation. Although protozoa and amoebae were detected in the soils, the numbers were low and did not increase over the incubation period. These results suggest that the antibiotic activity of Jordan's red soils is due to the proliferation of antibiotic-producing bacteria. PMID:19286796

  11. Use of a radiorespirometric assay for testing the antibiotic sensitivity of catheter-associated bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladd, T.I.; Schmiel, D.; Nickel, J.C.; Costerton, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    A 14 C-radiorespirometric assay was used to show the sensitivity of fixed-film (sessile), catheter-associated and free-living (planktonic) cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to varying concentrations (100 micrograms/mL to 1000 micrograms/mL) tobramycin sulfate. This strain of P. aeruginosa has an MIC of 0.6 microgram/ml and an MBC of 50 micrograms/mL when tested by conventional methods. When 14 C-glutamic acid was used as a substrate in this radiorespirometric assay, it could be completed in less than one hour and planktonic samples showed a significant reduction in mineralization activity (evolution of 14 CO 2 ) within eight hours of the antibiotic challenge. These changes in respiratory activity appeared to be dose and time dependent. Within 18 hr. at 1000 micrograms/mL, there was no significant residual respiratory activity in planktonic samples. Some residual respiratory activity was detected, however, in samples exposed to 100 micrograms/mL for 36 hours. The mineralization activity of sessile catheter-associated bacteria was unaffected by four hr. and eight hr. exposures to 1000 micrograms/mL of the antibiotic. A significant reduction in respiratory activity was recorded in catheter samples exposed for 18 hr. or more at each concentration examined. Unlike the planktonic samples, however, the antibiotic challenge failed to eradicate the metabolic activity of the attached bacteria. Antibiotic stressed, catheter-associated bacteria transferred to a post-exposure enrichment broth showed a limited ability to re-establish respiratory activity. This apparent recovery was limited to antibiotic exposures less than 24 hr. and was not observed in planktonic samples. The radioisotopic assay is a non-culture method which can be used to assess the antibiotic sensitivity of both planktonic bacteria and in situ biofilm populations

  12. Calcined Eggshell Waste for Mitigating Soil Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria/Antibiotic Resistance Gene Dissemination and Accumulation in Bell Pepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Mao; Sun, Mingming; Feng, Yanfang; Li, Xu; Schwab, Arthur P; Wan, Jinzhong; Liu, Manqiang; Tian, Da; Liu, Kuan; Wu, Jun; Jiang, Xin

    2016-07-13

    The combined accumulation of antibiotics, heavy metals, antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB)/antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in vegetables has become a new threat to human health. This is the first study to investigate the feasibility of calcined eggshells modified by aluminum sulfate as novel agricultural wastes to impede mixed contaminants from transferring to bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). In this work, calcined eggshell amendment mitigated mixed pollutant accumulation in bell pepper significantly, enhanced the dissipation of soil tetracycline, sulfadiazine, roxithromycin, and chloramphenicol, decreased the water-soluble fractions of antibiotics, and declined the diversity of ARB/ARGs inside the vegetable. Moreover, quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis detected that ARG levels in the bell pepper fruits significantly decreased to 10(-10) copies/16S copies, indicating limited risk of ARGs transferring along the food chain. Furthermore, the restoration of soil microbial biological function suggests that calcined eggshell is an environmentally friendly amendment to control the dissemination of soil ARB/ARGs in the soil-vegetable system.

  13. The antimicrobial efficacy of silver on antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Steven L; Thomas, John; Linton, Sara; Okel, Tyler; Corum, Linda; Slone, Will

    2012-10-01

    The antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a major concern to wound care because of their ability to resist many of the antibiotics used today to treat infections. Consequently, other antimicrobials, in particular ionic silver, are considered ideal topical agents for effectively helping to manage and prevent local infections. Little is known about the antimicrobial efficacy of ionic silver on antibiotic-resistant bacteria at different pH values. Consequently, in this study our aim was to evaluate the effect of pH on the antimicrobial efficacy of a silver alginate (SA) and a silver carboxymethyl cellulose (SCMC) dressing on antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from burn patients. Forty-nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, MDR Vibrio sp, MDR Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL) producing Salmonella sp, ESBL producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, ESBL producing Proteus mirabilis, ESBL producing Escherichia coli and MDR Acinetobacter baumannii, routinely isolated from burn wounds were used in the study and evaluated for their susceptibility to two silver containing wound dressings using a standardised antimicrobial efficacy screening assay [corrected zone of inhibition (CZOI)]. The mean overall CZOI for the Gram-positive isolates at a pH of 5·5 were very similar for both dressings. A mean CZOI of 5 mm was recorded for the SCMC dressing, which was slightly higher, at 5·4 mm for the SA dressing. At a pH of 7·0 both dressings, in general, showed a similar activity. However, at a pH of 8·5 the mean CZOI of the SCMC dressing was found to be significantly (P bacteria followed a similar pattern as observed with the Gram-positive bacteria. Susceptibility to silver ions did vary significantly between genera and species of bacteria. Interestingly, when pH was changed from 8·5 to 5·5 antimicrobial activity

  14. [The importance of wildlife as reservoir of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in Bavaria--first results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Cornelia; Heurich, Marco; Huber, Ingrid; Krause, Gladys; Ullrich, Ulrike; Fetsch, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents is responsible for the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Nevertheless, multiresistant bacteria have been found in animals that have never been exposed to antimicrobial agents. Wild animals that are carriers of methicillin-resistant organisms represent a hazard since they can transmit their bacteria to other animals and to humans. In the hunting season 2009/2010 nasal swabs of 98 red deer and 109 wild boars were examined for the presence of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant staphylococci. From each wild boar methicillin-susceptible staphylococci (Staphylococcus aureus in 28% and Staphylococcus spp. in 72% of the animals) were isolated. In red deer the detection rate of Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and methicillin-susceptible staphylococci was 49% and 17%, respectively. The occurrence of S. aureus was significantly higher (p resistant staphylococci were not found. However, in one third of the red deer, methicillin-resistant bacteria of the genus Enterococcus spp. and Bacillus spp. were isolated. The results of the present study indicate that wildlife, especially red deer are an important reservoir for S. aureus and that the upper respiratory tract of red deer is regularly colonised with methicillin-resistant bacteria such as Bacillus spp. and Enterococcus spp. Primarily, commensal bacteria are harmless to human health, however, red deer may be a reservoir for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  15. Combination antibiotic therapy for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tängdén, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Combination antibiotic therapy for Gram-negative sepsis is controversial. The present review provides a brief summary of the existing knowledge on combination therapy for severe infections with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas spp., Acinetobacter spp., and Enterobacteriaceae. Empirical combination antibiotic therapy is recommended for severe sepsis and septic shock to reduce mortality related to inappropriate antibiotic treatment. Because definitive combination therapy has not been proven superior to monotherapy in meta-analyses, it is generally advised to de-escalate antibiotic therapy when the antibiotic susceptibility profile is known, although it cannot be excluded that some subgroups of patients might still benefit from continued combination therapy. Definitive combination therapy is recommended for carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and should also be considered for severe infections with Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter spp. when beta-lactams cannot be used. Because resistance to broad-spectrum beta-lactams is increasing in Gram-negative bacteria and because no new antibiotics are expected to become available in the near future, the antibacterial potential of combination therapy should be further explored. In vitro data suggest that combinations can be effective even if the bacteria are resistant to the individual antibiotics, although existing evidence is insufficient to support the choice of combinations and explain the synergistic effects observed. In vitro models can be used to screen for effective combinations that can later be validated in animal or clinical studies. Further, in the absence of clinical evidence, in vitro data might be useful in supporting therapeutic decisions for severe infections with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Colonisation of antibiotic resistant bacteria in a cohort of HIV infected children in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampane-Donkor, Eric; Badoe, Ebenezer Vincent; Annan, Jennifer Adoley; Nii-Trebi, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic use not only selects for resistance in pathogenic bacteria, but also in commensal flora of exposed individuals. Little is known epidemiologically about antibiotic resistance in relation to people with HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa. This study investigated the carriage of antibiotic resistant bacteria among HIV infected children at a tertiary hospital in Ghana. One hundred and eighteen HIV positive children were recruited at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana and nasopharyngeal specimens were collected from them. The specimens were cultured for bacteria, and the isolates were identified by standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were carried out on selected bacterial organisms by the Kirby Bauer method. Bacteria isolated from the study subjects included Moraxella catarrhalis (39.8%), coagulase negative staphylococci (33.1%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (30.5%), diptheroids (29.7%), viridian streptococci (27.1%), Staphylococcus aureus (22.0%), Citrobacter spp. (4.2%) and Neisseria meningitidis (0.9%). Prevalence of antibiotic resistance of S. pneumoniae ranged from 5.6% (ceftriaxone) to 58.3% (cotrimoxazole), M. catarrhalis ranged from 2.1% (gentamicin) to 80.6% (ampicillin), and S. aureus ranged from 7.7% (cefoxitin) to 100% (penicillin). The prevalence of multiple drug resistance was 16.7% for S. pneumoniae, 57.4% for M. catarrhalis and 84.6% for S. aureus. HIV infected children in the study area commonly carry multi-drug resistant isolates of several pathogenic bacteria such as S. aureus and S. pneumoniae. Infections arising in these patients that are caused by S. aureus and S. pneumoniae could be treated with ceftriaxone and cefoxitin respectively.

  17. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-07-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics.

  18. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1—a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10—a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457–0.829, P digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130–0.486, P = 0.075–0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene transfer between raw sludge bacteria and the digester microbial community. PMID:27014196

  19. Non-invasive determination of conjugative transfer of plasmids bearing antibiotic-resistance genes in biofilm-bound bacteria: effects of substrate loading and antibiotic selection

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Hongyan; Bryers, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms cause much of all human microbial infections. Attempts to eradicate biofilm-based infections rely on disinfectants and antibiotics. Unfortunately, biofilm bacteria are significantly less responsive to antibiotic stressors than their planktonic counterparts. Sublethal doses of antibiotics can actually enhance biofilm formation. Here, we have developed a non-invasive microscopic image analyses to quantify plasmid conjugation within a developing biofilm. Corroborating destructive sample...

  20. The role of surveillance systems in confronting the global crisis of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Federico; Villegas, Maria Virginia

    2015-08-01

    It is widely accepted that infection control, advanced diagnostics, and novel therapeutics are crucial to mitigate the impact of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The role of global, national, and regional surveillance systems as part of the response to the challenge posed by antibiotic resistance is not sufficiently highlighted. We provide an overview of contemporary surveillance programs, with emphasis on gram-negative bacteria. The WHO and public health agencies in Europe and the United States recently published comprehensive surveillance reports. These highlight the emergence and dissemination of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and other multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria. In Israel, public health action to control carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, especially Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase producing K. pneumoniae, has advanced together with a better understanding of its epidemiology. Surveillance models adapted to the requirements and capacities of each country are in development. Robust surveillance systems are essential to combat antibiotic resistance, and need to emphasize a 'one health' approach. Refinements in surveillance will come from advances in bioinformatics and genomics that permit the integration of global and local information about antibiotic consumption in humans and animals, molecular mechanisms of resistance, and bacterial genotyping.

  1. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria inhibited by extracts and fractions from Brazilian marine sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palloma R. Marinho

    Full Text Available The growing number of bacterial strains resistant to conventional antibiotics has become a serious medical problem in recent years. Marine sponges are a rich source of bioactive compounds, and many species can be useful for the development of new antimicrobial drugs. This study reports the in vitro screening of marine sponges in the search for novel substances against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Sponge extracts were tested against 44 bacterial strains, including fourteen antibiotic-resistant strains. Ten out of the twelve sponge species studied showed activity in one or more of the bioassays. Aqueous extracts of Cinachyrella sp. and Petromica citrina showed a large action spectrum over resistant-bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci and Enterococcus faecalis. Aqueous extract of P. citrina was fractioned and aqueous fraction showed a greatest inhibitory activity on Staphylococcus strains. In addition, this fraction demonstrated a bactericidal effect on exponentially growing S. aureus cells at the MIC (16 µg/mL. The mechanism of action of bioactive fraction is still unclear, but we showed that it affect protein biosynthesis of Staphylococcus. Our results demonstrated for the first time that P. citrina is a potential source of new drugs for the treatment of infections by antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  2. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria gain antibiotic resistance during long-term acclimatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng-Zhe; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Guo, Qiong; Chen, Qian-Qian; Jiang, Xiao-Yan; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2015-09-01

    Three broad-spectrum antibiotics, amoxicillin (AMX), florfenicol (FF) and sulfamethazine (SMZ), that inhibit bacteria via different target sites, were selected to evaluate the acute toxicity and long-term effects on anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) granules. The specific anammox activity (SAA) levels reduced by approximately half within the first 3 days in the presence of antibiotics but no nitrite accumulation was observed in continuous-flow experiments. However, the SAA levels and heme c content gradually recovered as the antibiotic concentrations increased. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) analysis suggested that anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria gradually developed a better survival strategy during long-term acclimatization, which reduced the antibiotic stress via increased EPS secretion that provided a protective 'cocoon.' In terms of nitrogen removal efficiency, anammox granules could resist 60 mg-AMX L(-1), 10 mg-FF L(-1) and 100 mg-SMZ L(-1). This study supported the feasibility of using anammox granules to treat antibiotic-containing wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Protein-inspired antibiotics active against vancomycin- and daptomycin-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskovich, Mark A T; Hansford, Karl A; Gong, Yujing; Butler, Mark S; Muldoon, Craig; Huang, Johnny X; Ramu, Soumya; Silva, Alberto B; Cheng, Mu; Kavanagh, Angela M; Ziora, Zyta; Premraj, Rajaratnam; Lindahl, Fredrik; Bradford, Tanya A; Lee, June C; Karoli, Tomislav; Pelingon, Ruby; Edwards, David J; Amado, Maite; Elliott, Alysha G; Phetsang, Wanida; Daud, Noor Huda; Deecke, Johan E; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Ramaologa, Sefetogi; Zuegg, Johannes; Betley, Jason R; Beevers, Andrew P G; Smith, Richard A G; Roberts, Jason A; Paterson, David L; Cooper, Matthew A

    2018-01-02

    The public health threat posed by a looming 'post-antibiotic' era necessitates new approaches to antibiotic discovery. Drug development has typically avoided exploitation of membrane-binding properties, in contrast to nature's control of biological pathways via modulation of membrane-associated proteins and membrane lipid composition. Here, we describe the rejuvenation of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin via selective targeting of bacterial membranes. Peptide libraries based on positively charged electrostatic effector sequences are ligated to N-terminal lipophilic membrane-insertive elements and then conjugated to vancomycin. These modified lipoglycopeptides, the 'vancapticins', possess enhanced membrane affinity and activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other Gram-positive bacteria, and retain activity against glycopeptide-resistant strains. Optimised antibiotics show in vivo efficacy in multiple models of bacterial infection. This membrane-targeting strategy has potential to 'revitalise' antibiotics that have lost effectiveness against recalcitrant bacteria, or enhance the activity of other intravenous-administered drugs that target membrane-associated receptors.

  4. Is screening patients for antibiotic-resistant bacteria justified in the Indian context?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, S

    2011-01-01

    Infection with multi-antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a common clinical problem in India. In some countries and centres, screening patients to detect colonisation by these organisms is used to determine specific interventions such as decolonisation treatment, prophylactic antibiotics prior to surgical interventions or for selection of empirical antibiotic therapy, and to isolate patients so that transmission of these difficult to treat organisms to other patients could be prevented. In India, there is no national guideline or recommendation for screening patients for multi-drug-resistant (MDR) bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), VRE (vancomycin-resistant enterococcus), ESBL (extended spectrum beta-lactamase) or MBL (metallo-beta-lactamase) producers. The present article discusses the relevance of screening patients for multi-antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the Indian context. Literature has been reviewed about antibiotic resistance in India, screening methodology, economic debate about screening. The percentages of strains from various hospitals in India which were reported to be MRSA was between 8 and 71%, those for ESBL between 19 and 60% and carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli between 5.3 and 59%. There exists culture-based technology for the detection of these resistant organisms from patient samples. For some pathogens, such as MRSA and VRE Polymerase chain reaction-based tests are also becoming available. Screening for MDR bacteria is an option which may be used after appraisal of the resources available, and after exploring possibility of implementing the interventions that may be required after a positive screening test result.

  5. Effect of antibiotic stewardship on the incidence of infection and colonisation with antibiotic-resistant bacteria and Clostridium difficile infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, David; Gladstone, Beryl Primrose; Burkert, Francesco; Carrara, Elena; Foschi, Federico; Döbele, Stefanie; Tacconelli, Evelina

    2017-09-01

    Antibiotic stewardship programmes have been shown to reduce antibiotic use and hospital costs. We aimed to evaluate evidence of the effect of antibiotic stewardship on the incidence of infections and colonisation with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. For this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science for studies published from Jan 1, 1960, to May 31, 2016, that analysed the effect of antibiotic stewardship programmes on the incidence of infection and colonisation with antibiotic-resistant bacteria and Clostridium difficile infections in hospital inpatients. Two authors independently assessed the eligibility of trials and extracted data. Studies involving long-term care facilities were excluded. The main outcomes were incidence ratios (IRs) of target infections and colonisation per 1000 patient-days before and after implementation of antibiotic stewardship. Meta-analyses were done with random-effect models and heterogeneity was calculated with the I 2 method. We included 32 studies in the meta-analysis, comprising 9 056 241 patient-days and 159 estimates of IRs. Antibiotic stewardship programmes reduced the incidence of infections and colonisation with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (51% reduction; IR 0·49, 95% CI 0·35-0·68; pbacteria (48%; 0·52, 0·27-0·98; p=0·0428), and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (37%; 0·63, 0·45-0·88; p=0·0065), as well as the incidence of C difficile infections (32%; 0·68, 0·53-0·88; p=0·0029). Antibiotic stewardship programmes were more effective when implemented with infection control measures (IR 0·69, 0·54-0·88; p=0·0030), especially hand-hygiene interventions (0·34, 0·21-0·54; pAntibiotic stewardship did not affect the IRs of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and quinolone-resistant and aminoglycoside-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Significant heterogeneity

  6. Enteric bacteria and their antigens may stimulate postoperative peritoneal adhesion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Ronan A; Wang, Jiang Huai; Redmond, H Paul

    2007-03-01

    Intraabdominal sepsis causes exuberant inflammation, which results in dense adhesions. Translocation of enteric bacteria and/or their antigens after laparotomy may therefore also affect peritoneal healing by promoting local release of proinflammatory cytokines. Our hypothesis was that targeted counter therapy could be beneficial if such contamination was to augment postoperative adhesion formation. Two endotoxin-hyposensitive mouse strains (C3H/HeJ and C57BL/10ScCr) and their syngeneic counterparts (C3H/HeN and C57BL10/ScSn, respectively) underwent reproducible adhesion-inducing operation (AIO) (n=10/group) with sacrifice and blinded adhesion grading 14 days later. In addition, CD-1 mice were gavaged with fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled-lipopolysaccharide (FITC-LPS) prior to either AIO or sham laparotomy and had both peritoneal macrophages and circulating monocytes assessed by flow cytometry afterward. The cytokine-release response of resident peritoneal cells to LPS stimulation was assessed in vitro (murine peritoneal mast cell cultures) and in vivo (unoperated CD-1 mice administered LPS intraperitoneally [10 & 50 microg/mouse]). Finally, CD-1 mice (n=10/group) had AIO and received either bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (rBPI, 2 mg/mouse) or vehicle solution in the early postoperative period with assessment of adhesion formation 2 weeks later. Both HeJ and ScCr mice had less adhesions than their controls (P=.0015 and .0001, respectively, Mann Whitney U test). FITC-LPS uptake by peritoneal macrophages was striking after AIO. Intraperitoneal LPS provoked significant local vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release as did the process of AIO. In vitro, LPS induced significant interleukin-(IL)-6 release from isolated mast cells. Intraperitoneal administration of rBPI to CD-1 mice early after AIO markedly attenuated subsequent adhesion formation (P=.0003). Peritoneal adhesion formation is exacerbated by peritoneal contamination due to

  7. Antagonistic activity of antibiotic producing Streptomyces sp. against fish and human pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmul Hossain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to isolate Streptomyces sp. from soil samples of two different regions of Bangladesh and evaluate their antagonistic activity against fish and human pathogenic bacteria. A total of 10 isolates were identified as Streptomyces sp. based on several morphological, physiological and biochemical tests. Cross streak method was used to observe the antagonistic activity of the Streptomyces sp. isolates against different fish pathogens belonging to the genus Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and Edwardsiella and human clinical isolates belonging to the genus Klebsiella, Salmonella and Streptococcus. Seven Streptomyces sp. isolates showed antagonism against both fish and human pathogenic bacteria. Four isolates viz., N24, N26, N28 and N47 showed broad spectrum of antagonistic activity (80-100% against all genera of fish and human pathogenic bacteria. The isolate N49 exhibited highest spectrum of antagonism against all fish pathogens (90-100% but comparatively lower degree of antagonism against human pathogens (50-60%. Rest of the two isolates (N21 and N23 showed variability in their antagonism. Results showed that broad spectrum antibiotic(s could be developed from the isolates N24, N26, N28 and N47against several human and fish pathogens. The isolate N49 could be a potential source of antibiotic, especially for fish pathogenic bacteria.

  8. Reprogrammable microbial cell-based therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Young; Koh, Elvin; Kim, Hye Rim; Yew, Wen Shan; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of antimicrobial drugs and their subsequent use has offered an effective treatment option for bacterial infections, reducing morbidity and mortality over the past 60 years. However, the indiscriminate use of antimicrobials in the clinical, community and agricultural settings has resulted in selection for multidrug-resistant bacteria, which has led to the prediction of possible re-entrance to the pre-antibiotic era. The situation is further exacerbated by significantly reduced antimicrobial drug discovery efforts by large pharmaceutical companies, resulting in a steady decline in the number of new antimicrobial agents brought to the market in the past several decades. Consequently, there is a pressing need for new antimicrobial therapies that can be readily designed and implemented. Recently, it has become clear that the administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics can lead to collateral damage to the human commensal microbiota, which plays several key roles in host health. Advances in genetic engineering have opened the possibility of reprogramming commensal bacteria that are in symbiotic existence throughout the human body to implement antimicrobial drugs with high versatility and efficacy against pathogenic bacteria. In this review, we discuss recent advances and potentialities of engineered bacteria in providing a novel antimicrobial strategy against antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Antibiotic resistance in bacteria Staphylococcus spp. isolated from samples of raw sheep's milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Vasiľ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available From samples of raw sheep's milk were determined results of bacteriological examination from two herds in region of Eastern Slovakia in three years lasting study. The occurrence of Staphylococcus spp. 41.6% (124 was determined from 298 samples. The seven species of staphylococci were on a regular basis isolated: S. epidermidis (34, S. chromogenes (26, S. aureus (16. Alternately have been recorded S. warneri (16, S. schleiferi (15, S. haemolyticus (9 and S. xylosus (8. All isolated pathogens were tested by in vitro test on Mueller-Hinton agar by disc methods on resistance to 10 types of antibiotics.  Highest value of resistance was determined to Penicilin 21.0%, Neomycin 10.5% and Novobiocin 9.7%. Lower resistance was in to Oxacilin 7.2% and Amoxicilin 6.5%. Minimal resistance was founded to Cefoxitin 0.8%, Linkomycin 2.4%, Erytromycin, and Streptomycin 3.2%. Was founded total resistance (21.0% to all antibiotics in S. epidermidis (34 during the three years, S. chromogenes (26 showed resistance to 8 types of antibiotics (12.9%, S. aureus (16 to 6 antibiotics (10.5% and S. warneri (16 to 4 antibiotics (5.6%. It was confirmed that sheep's milk remains a major source of staphylococci. Bacteria in comparison with isolates from cows' raw milk, showed lower values of resistance, but were resistant to more than two antibiotics. Recorded occurrence of resistance in staphylococci may be connected with a minimum use of antibiotics in the treatment of mastitis and other diseases in sheep herds. Reported resistance to the tested antibiotics became the basis for the recommendation to use preparations to treat mastitis in sheep principally by the detection of resistance to antibiotics contained.

  10. Molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in cultivable multidrug-resistant bacteria from livestock manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingxiang; Tian, Tiantian; Niu, Tianqi; Wang, Panliang

    2017-10-01

    Diverse antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) are frequently reported to have high prevalence in veterinary manure samples due to extensive use of antibiotics in farm animals. However, the characteristics of the distribution and transmission of ARGs among bacteria, especially among different species of multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria (MARB), have not been well explored. By applying high-throughput sequencing methods, our study uncovered a vast MARB reservoir in livestock manure. The genera Escherichia, Myroides, Acinetobacter, Proteus, Ignatzschineria, Alcaligenes, Providencia and Enterococcus were the predominant cultivable MARB, with compositions of 40.6%-85.7%. From chicken manure isolates, 33 MARB were selected for investigation of the molecular characteristics of antibiotic resistance. A total of 61 ARGs and 18 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) were investigated. We found that 47 ARGs were widely distributed among the 33 MARB isolates. Each isolate carried 27-36 genes responsible for resistance to eight classes of antibiotics frequently used in clinic or veterinary settings. ARGs to the six classes of antibiotics other than streptogramins and vancomycin were present in all 33 MARB isolates with a prevalence of 80%-100%. A total of 12 MGEs were widely distributed among the 33 MARB, with intI1, IS26, ISaba1, and ISEcp1 simultaneously present in 100% of isolates. In addition, 9 gene cassettes within integrons and ISCR1 were detected among MARB isolates encoding resistance to different antibiotic classes. This is the first report revealing the general co-presence of multiple ARGs, various MGEs and ARG cassettes in different species of individual MARB isolates in chicken manure. The results highlight a much higher risk of ARGs spreading through livestock manure to humans than we expected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Screening of antibiotic susceptibility to β-lactam-induced elongation of Gram-negative bacteria based on dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Cheng-Che; Cheng, I-Fang; Chen, Hung-Mo; Kan, Heng-Chuan; Yang, Wen-Horng; Chang, Hsien-Chang

    2012-04-03

    We demonstrate a rapid antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) based on the changes in dielectrophoretic (DEP) behaviors related to the β-lactam-induced elongation of Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) on a quadruple electrode array (QEA). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) can be determined within 2 h by observing the changes in the positive-DEP frequency (pdf) and cell length of GNB under the cefazolin (CEZ) treatment. Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and the CEZ are used as the sample bacteria and antibiotic respectively. The bacteria became filamentous due to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis and cell division and cell lysis occurred for the higher antibiotic dose. According to the results, the pdfs of wild type bacteria decrease to hundreds of kHz and the cell length is more than 10 μm when the bacterial growth is inhibited by the CEZ treatment. In addition, the growth of wild type bacteria and drug resistant bacteria differ significantly. There is an obvious decrease in the number of wild type bacteria but not in the number of drug resistant bacteria. Thus, the drug resistance of GNB to β-lactam antibiotics can be rapidly assessed. Furthermore, the MIC determined using dielectrophoresis-based AST (d-AST) was consistent with the results of the broth dilution method. Utilizing this approach could reduce the time needed for bacteria growth from days to hours, help physicians to administer appropriate antibiotic dosages, and reduce the possibility of the occurrence of multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria.

  12. Occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes in culturable bacteria isolated from Turkish trout farms and their local aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capkin, Erol; Terzi, Ertugrul; Altinok, Ilhan

    2015-05-21

    Antibiotic resistance and presence of the resistance genes were investigated in the bacteria isolated from water, sediment, and fish in trout farms. A total of 9 bacterial species, particularly Escherichia coli, were isolated from the water and sediment samples, and 12 species were isolated from fish. The antimicrobial test indicated the highest resistance against sulfamethoxazole and ampicillin in coliform bacteria, and against sulfamethoxazole, imipenem, and aztreonam in known pathogenic bacteria isolated from fish. The most effective antibiotics were rifampicin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline. The multiple antibiotic resistance index was above the critical limit for almost all of the bacteria isolated. The most common antibiotic resistance gene was ampC, followed by tetA, sul2, blaCTX-M1, and blaTEM in the coliform bacteria. At least one resistance gene was found in 70.8% of the bacteria, and 66.6% of the bacteria had 2 or more resistance genes. Approximately 36.54% of the bacteria that contain plasmids were able to transfer them to other bacteria. The plasmid-mediated transferable resistance genes were ampC, blaCTX-M1, tetA, sul2, and blaTEM. These results indicate that the aquatic environment could play an important role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the dissemination of resistance genes among bacteria.

  13. A new approach for the discovery of antibiotics by targeting non-multiplying bacteria: a novel topical antibiotic for staphylococcal infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmin Hu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In a clinical infection, multiplying and non-multiplying bacteria co-exist. Antibiotics kill multiplying bacteria, but they are very inefficient at killing non-multipliers which leads to slow or partial death of the total target population of microbes in an infected tissue. This prolongs the duration of therapy, increases the emergence of resistance and so contributes to the short life span of antibiotics after they reach the market. Targeting non-multiplying bacteria from the onset of an antibiotic development program is a new concept. This paper describes the proof of principle for this concept, which has resulted in the development of the first antibiotic using this approach. The antibiotic, called HT61, is a small quinolone-derived compound with a molecular mass of about 400 Daltons, and is active against non-multiplying bacteria, including methicillin sensitive and resistant, as well as Panton-Valentine leukocidin-carrying Staphylococcus aureus. It also kills mupirocin resistant MRSA. The mechanism of action of the drug is depolarisation of the cell membrane and destruction of the cell wall. The speed of kill is within two hours. In comparison to the conventional antibiotics, HT61 kills non-multiplying cells more effectively, 6 logs versus less than one log for major marketed antibiotics. HT61 kills methicillin sensitive and resistant S. aureus in the murine skin bacterial colonization and infection models. No resistant phenotype was produced during 50 serial cultures over a one year period. The antibiotic caused no adverse affects after application to the skin of minipigs. Targeting non-multiplying bacteria using this method should be able to yield many new classes of antibiotic. These antibiotics may be able to reduce the rate of emergence of resistance, shorten the duration of therapy, and reduce relapse rates.

  14. Reusing Treated Wastewater: Consideration of the Safety Aspects Associated with Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ying Hong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available As more countries engage in water reuse, either intended or de facto, there is an urgent need to more comprehensively evaluate resulting environmental and public health concerns. While antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs are increasingly coming under the spotlight, as emerging contaminants, existing water reuse regulations and guidelines do not adequately address these concerns. This perspectives paper seeks to frame the various challenges that need to be resolved to identify meaningful and realistic target types and levels of antibiotic resistance benchmarks for water reuse. First, there is the need for standardized and agreed-upon methodologies to identify and quantify ARB and ARGs. Second, even if methodologies are available, identifying which ARB and ARGs to monitor that would best relate to the occurrence of disease burden remains unknown. Third, a framework tailored to assessing the risks associated with ARB and ARGs during reuse is urgently needed. Fourth, similar to protecting drinking water sources, strategies to prevent dissemination of ARB and ARGs via wastewater treatment and reuse are required to ensure that appropriate barriers are emplaced. Finally, current wastewater treatment technologies could benefit from modification or retrofit to more effectively remove ARB and ARGs while also producing a high quality product for water and resource recovery. This perspectives paper highlights the need to consider ARB and ARGs when evaluating the overall safety aspects of water reuse and ways by which this may be accomplished.

  15. Reusing Treated Wastewater: Consideration of the Safety Aspects Associated with Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2018-02-27

    As more countries engage in water reuse, either intended or de facto, there is an urgent need to more comprehensively evaluate resulting environmental and public health concerns. While antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are increasingly coming under the spotlight, as emerging contaminants, existing water reuse regulations and guidelines do not adequately address these concerns. This perspectives paper seeks to frame the various challenges that need to be resolved to identify meaningful and realistic target types and levels of antibiotic resistance benchmarks for water reuse. First, there is the need for standardized and agreed-upon methodologies to identify and quantify ARB and ARGs. Second, even if methodologies are available, identifying which ARB and ARGs to monitor that would best relate to the occurrence of disease burden remains unknown. Third, a framework tailored to assessing the risks associated with ARB and ARGs during reuse is urgently needed. Fourth, similar to protecting drinking water sources, strategies to prevent dissemination of ARB and ARGs via wastewater treatment and reuse are required to ensure that appropriate barriers are emplaced. Finally, current wastewater treatment technologies could benefit from modification or retrofit to more effectively remove ARB and ARGs while also producing a high quality product for water and resource recovery. This perspectives paper highlights the need to consider ARB and ARGs when evaluating the overall safety aspects of water reuse and ways by which this may be accomplished.

  16. PCR targeting of antibiotic resistant bacteria in public drinking water of Lahore metropolitan, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, Zahoor Qadir; Naseem, Mariam; Khan, Sumaria Javed; Dar, Nadia; Athar, Muhammad Amin

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the prevalence of kanamycin (kan) and ampicillin (amp) resistant bacteria in public drinking water. Bacteria containing kan and amp resistant genes were amplified by PCR and further characterized by colony hybridization and transformation studies. The genus of kan and amp resistant bacteria was determined with standard methods. Among the 625 drinking water samples, 400 contained kan and amp resistant bacteria and the percentage was 42.5% and 57.5%, respectively, which was further confirmed by the amplification of a 810 bp kan resistant gene and a 850 bp amp resistant gene. Of the 170 kan resistant bacteria, 90 were Gram negative and 80 were Gram positive. Of the 230 amp resistant bacteria, 160 were Gram negative while 70 were Gram positive. Salmonella, Shigella, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and E.coli were detected as 13%, 11%, 17%, 30%, and 29%, respectively. Bacterial strain DH5alpha transformed with plasmids isolated from kan and amp resistant bacteria confirmed that the antibiotic resistant genes were mediated by plasmids. Drinking water is contaminated with kan and amp resistant bacteria due to poor sanitary conditions.

  17. Exogenous alanine and/or glucose plus kanamycin kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Su, Yu-Bin; Li, Hui; Han, Yi; Guo, Chang; Tian, Yao-Mei; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2015-02-03

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious threat to human and animal health. However, novel drugs that can manage infections by multidrug-resistant bacteria have proved elusive. Here we show that glucose and alanine abundances are greatly suppressed in kanamycin-resistant Edwardsiella tarda by GC-MS-based metabolomics. Exogenous alanine or glucose restores susceptibility of multidrug-resistant E. tarda to killing by kanamycin, demonstrating an approach to killing multidrug-resistant bacteria. The mechanism underlying this approach is that exogenous glucose or alanine promotes the TCA cycle by substrate activation, which in turn increases production of NADH and proton motive force and stimulates uptake of antibiotic. Similar results are obtained with other Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive bacterium (Staphylococcus aureus), and the results are also reproduced in a mouse model for urinary tract infection. This study establishes a functional metabolomics-based strategy to manage infection by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional gold nanoclusters as antimicrobial agents for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Lin, Ju-Yu; Chen, Wei-Jen; Luo, Liyang; Wei-Guang Diau, Eric; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2010-07-01

    Our aim was to demonstrate that lysozyme-directed generation of gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) are potential antimicrobial agents for antibiotic-resistant bacteria and broad labeling agents for pathogenic bacteria. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is capable of hydrolyzing the cell walls of bacteria. In this study, we demonstrated the generation of functional Au NCs by using lysozyme as the sequester and the reducing agent for Au precursors at 40 degrees C. In addition, to shorten the reaction time, the reaction was conducted under microwave irradiation within a short period of time for the first time. The bioactivity of the lysozyme on the Au NCs was retained. Therefore, the as-prepared lysozyme-Au NCs with desirable fluorescence feature were successfully employed to be broad-band labeling agents for pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that the lysozyme-Au NCs can be used to effectively inhibit the cell growth of notorious antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including pan-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis. The potential of employing the lysozyme-Au NCs for bacterial labeling and as antimicrobial agents is expected.

  19. Method of Selection of Bacteria Antibiotic Resistance Genes Based on Clustering of Similar Nucleotide Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, I S; Naumov, V A; Borovikov, P I; Gordeev, A B; Dubodelov, D V; Lyubasovskaya, L A; Rodchenko, Yu V; Bystritskii, A A; Aleksandrova, N V; Trofimov, D Yu; Priputnevich, T V

    2017-10-01

    A new method for selection of bacterium antibiotic resistance genes is proposed and tested for solving the problems related to selection of primers for PCR assay. The method implies clustering of similar nucleotide sequences and selection of group primers for all genes of each cluster. Clustering of resistance genes for six groups of antibiotics (aminoglycosides, β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, glycopeptides, macrolides and lincosamides, and fusidic acid) was performed. The method was tested for 81 strains of bacteria of different genera isolated from patients (K. pneumoniae, Staphylococcus spp., S. agalactiae, E. faecalis, E. coli, and G. vaginalis). The results obtained by us are comparable to those in the selection of individual genes; this allows reducing the number of primers necessary for maximum coverage of the known antibiotic resistance genes during PCR analysis.

  20. Bridging the gap between viable but non-culturable and antibiotic persistent bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrapetyan, Mesrop; Williams, Tiffany C; Oliver, James D

    2015-01-01

    Microbial dormancy is a widespread phenomenon employed by bacteria to evade environmental threats including antibiotics. This intrinsic mechanism of antibiotic tolerance has drawn special attention to the role of dormancy in human disease, particularly in regards to recurrent infections. Two dormancy states, the viable but non-culturable state and bacterial persistence, both produce antibiotic-tolerant populations capable of withstanding prolonged lethal treatment. Currently described as two distinct forms of dormancy, they are rarely discussed in the same context. We argue here that these two dormant states are closely related phenomena which are part of a shared 'dormancy continuum'. This discussion is intended to stimulate discourse about these seemingly different but very similar dormant states. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. High-throughput screening of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in picodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Painter, R E; Enesa, K; Holmes, D; Whyte, G; Garlisi, C G; Monsma, F J; Rehak, M; Craig, F F; Smith, C A

    2016-04-26

    The prevalence of clinically-relevant bacterial strains resistant to current antibiotic therapies is increasing and has been recognized as a major health threat. For example, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are of global concern. Novel methodologies are needed to identify new targets or novel compounds unaffected by pre-existing resistance mechanisms. Recently, water-in-oil picodroplets have been used as an alternative to conventional high-throughput methods, especially for phenotypic screening. Here we demonstrate a novel microfluidic-based picodroplet platform which enables high-throughput assessment and isolation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a label-free manner. As a proof-of-concept, the system was used to isolate fusidic acid-resistant mutants and estimate the frequency of resistance among a population of Escherichia coli (strain HS151). This approach can be used for rapid screening of rare antibiotic-resistant mutants to help identify novel compound/target pairs.

  2. Antibiotic prophylaxis for endoscopic retrograde chlangiopancreatography increases the detection rate of drug-resistant bacteria in bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Tamito; Serikawa, Masahiro; Ishigaki, Takashi; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2014-09-01

    No consensus has yet been reached regarding the utility of antibiotic prophylaxis for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). However, there has been little discussion of potential adverse effects of antibiotic use. This study investigated the impact of antibiotic prophylaxis on overall levels of bacterial infiltration of the biliary tract and the prevalence of drug-resistance among that population. Ninety-three patients, from whom intraoperative bile samples were collected after performing ERCP, were assigned to either an antibiotic-prophylaxis group (AP, n = 58) or a no-antibiotic-prophylaxis group (NAP, n = 35). Detection rates of biliary bacteria and antibiotic resistance were determined for each group. Multivariate analysis was also performed to identify risk factors for the development of drug-resistant biliary bacteria. The bile contamination rate was 37.1% for the NAP group and 55.2% for the AP group (P = 0.09). Drug-resistant bacteria were found in 5.7% of the NAP group and 29.3% of the AP group (P = 0.006). Biliary drainage and antibiotic prophylaxis for ERCP were identified as risk factors for the presence of drug-resistant bacteria. Administration of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to ERCP can be a risk factor for the selection of drug-resistant bacteria in the biliary tract. © 2014 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  3. Single-cell protein induction dynamics reveals a period of vulnerability to antibiotics in persister bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Gefen, Orit; Gabay, Chana; Mumcuoglu, Michael; Engel, Giora; Balaban, Nathalie Q.

    2008-01-01

    Phenotypic variability in populations of cells has been linked to evolutionary robustness to stressful conditions. A remarkable example of the importance of cell-to-cell variability is found in bacterial persistence, where subpopulations of dormant bacteria, termed persisters, were shown to be responsible for the persistence of the population to antibiotic treatments. Here, we use microfluidic devices to monitor the induction of fluorescent proteins under synthetic promoters and characterize ...

  4. ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF DIFFERENT BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH VENTILATOR ASSOCIATED PNEUMONIA (VAP)

    OpenAIRE

    Alqurashi, Abdulrahman M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is a frequent complication of mechanical ventilation (MV) and it is a leading cause of death in MV patients. The development of VAP has been demonstrated as being due to aspiration of oropharyngeal secretion, ventilator tubing condensate, or gastric contents that are colonized with pathogenic microorganisms. The aim of the present study is to isolate and identify bacteria that cause VAP and to study antibiotic susceptibility. Material and Metho...

  5. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from drinking well water available in Guinea-Bissau (West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, A; Bordalo, A A

    2014-08-01

    The dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the spread of antibiotic resistance genes are a major public health concern worldwide, being even proposed as emerging contaminants. The aquatic environment is a recognized reservoir of antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes have been recently detected in drinking water. In this study, the water quality and the prevalence of antibiotic resistance of heterotrophic culturable bacteria were characterized seasonally in wells that serve the population of Guinea-Bissau (West Africa) as the sole source of water for drinking and other domestic proposes. The results revealed that well water was unfit for human consumption independently of the season, owing to high acidity and heavy fecal contamination. Moreover, potentially pathogenic bacteria, which showed resistance to the most prescribed antibiotics in Guinea-Bissau, were isolated from well water, posing an additional health risk. Our results suggest that well water not only fosters the transmission of potential pathogenic bacteria, but also represents an important reservoir for the proliferation of antibiotic resistant bacteria, that can aggravate the potential to cause disease in a very vulnerable population that has no other alternative but to consume such water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antiseptics: a forgotten weapon in the control of antibiotic resistant bacteria in hospital and community settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, D N; Gibson, S A; Lewis, R

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the activity of a selection of widely-used antiseptic/disinfectant agents against antibiotic resistant bacteria and strains isolated from patients infected with clinically significant species. Four antiseptic agents (Dettol, Dettol Hospital Concentrate, Savlon and Betadine) were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Enterococcus hirae, Vancomicin Resistant Enterococcus sp (VRE), Escherichia coli and E. coli 0157. The antiseptics were applied at recommended use dilutions and at a half and a quarter of those concentrations in a standard suspension test (EST). Organic material was added to mimic the presence of blood, protein and other such contaminants to be found in the clinical situation. All antiseptics tested were effective against both the antibiotic sensitive and antibiotic resistant strains of S. aureus and E. hirae as well as normal and clinical strains of E. coli at recommended concentrations. All but Betadine were also effective against the antibiotic resistant bacteria at a half and a quarter of normal concentration. The iodine containing antiseptic, however, failed the test against MRSA at a half normal concentration and showed virtually no activity against MRSA at a quarter normal concentration.

  7. Anaerobic bacteria and antibiotics: What kind of unexpected resistance could I find in my laboratory tomorrow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, L; Odou, M F

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to set out some important considerations on the main emerging antibiotic resistance patterns among anaerobic bacteria. The first point concerns the Bacteroides fragilis group and its resistance to the combination of β-lactam+β-lactamase inhibitor. When there is overproduction of cephalosporinase, it results in increased resistance to the β-lactams while maintaining susceptibility to β-lactams/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations. However, if another resistance mechanism is added, such as a loss of porin, resistances to β-lactam+β-lactamase inhibitor combinations may occur. The second point is resistance to metronidazole occurring due to nim genes. PCR detection of nim genes alone is not sufficient for predicting resistance to metronidazole; actual MIC determinations are required. Therefore, it can be assumed that other resistance mechanisms can also be involved. Although metronidazole resistance remains rare for the B. fragilis group, it has nevertheless been detected worldwide and also been observed spreading to other species. In some cases where there is only a decreased susceptibility, clinical failures may occur. The last point concerns resistance of Clostridium species to glycopeptides and lipopeptides. Low levels of resistance have been detected with these antibiotics. Van genes have been detected not only in clostridia but also in other species. In conclusion, antibiotic resistance involves different mechanisms and affects many anaerobic species and is spreading worldwide. This demonstrates the need to continue with antibiotic resistance testing and surveys in anaerobic bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Colonization Dynamics of Cefotaxime Resistant Bacteria in Beef Cattle Raised Without Cephalosporin Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raies A. Mir

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of infections caused by antimicrobial resistant microorganisms (ARMs is currently one of the most important challenges to public health and medicine. Though speculated to originate at least partially from the overuse of antibiotics during food animal production, we hypothesized that cattle are exposed to ARMs in the environment. In this cohort study, a herd of beef calves with no previous exposure to antibiotics was followed during the first year of life in order to investigate the rate of colonization by bacteria resistant to the third-generation cephalosporin cefotaxime. Fecal samples were collected from the recto anal junction of cattle at the age of ~3, 6, 9, and 12 months and tested for cefotaxime resistant bacteria (CRB and the presence of extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs. The colonization dynamics of CRB in calves (n = 188 was evaluated with samples collected from four periods using longitudinal statistical analyses. Colonization by CRB was a dynamic process with over 92% of the calves testing positive for CRB at least once during the first year of life. All isolates subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility test were resistant to at least four different antibiotics and carried multiple variants of the blaCTX-M genes. Metagenomic analysis revealed significant differences in microbiota of the calves with and without CRB colonization at different ages. This study provides evidence that colonization of beef calves by ARMs is a dynamic process that can occur in the absence of veterinary or agricultural use of antibiotics.

  9. The Challenge of Efflux-Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The global emergence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a growing threat to antibiotic therapy. The chromosomally encoded drug efflux mechanisms that are ubiquitous in these bacteria greatly contribute to antibiotic resistance and present a major challenge for antibiotic development. Multidrug pumps, particularly those represented by the clinically relevant AcrAB-TolC and Mex pumps of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) superfamily, not only mediate intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) but also are involved in other functions, including the bacterial stress response and pathogenicity. Additionally, efflux pumps interact synergistically with other resistance mechanisms (e.g., with the outer membrane permeability barrier) to increase resistance levels. Since the discovery of RND pumps in the early 1990s, remarkable scientific and technological advances have allowed for an in-depth understanding of the structural and biochemical basis, substrate profiles, molecular regulation, and inhibition of MDR pumps. However, the development of clinically useful efflux pump inhibitors and/or new antibiotics that can bypass pump effects continues to be a challenge. Plasmid-borne efflux pump genes (including those for RND pumps) have increasingly been identified. This article highlights the recent progress obtained for organisms of clinical significance, together with methodological considerations for the characterization of MDR pumps. PMID:25788514

  10. Coevolution of antibiotic production and counter-resistance in soil bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskaris, Paris; Tolba, Sahar; Calvo-Bado, Leo; Wellington, Elizabeth M; Wellington, Liz

    2010-03-01

    We present evidence for the coexistence and coevolution of antibiotic resistance and biosynthesis genes in soil bacteria. The distribution of the streptomycin (strA) and viomycin (vph) resistance genes was examined in Streptomyces isolates. strA and vph were found either within a biosynthetic gene cluster or independently. Streptomyces griseus strains possessing the streptomycin cluster formed part of a clonal complex. All S. griseus strains possessing solely strA belonged to two clades; both were closely related to the streptomycin producers. Other more distantly related S. griseus strains did not contain strA. S. griseus strains with only vph also formed two clades, but they were more distantly related to the producers and to one another. The expression of the strA gene was constitutive in a resistance-only strain whereas streptomycin producers showed peak strA expression in late log phase that correlates with the switch on of streptomycin biosynthesis. While there is evidence that antibiotics have diverse roles in nature, our data clearly support the coevolution of resistance in the presence of antibiotic biosynthetic capability within closely related soil dwelling bacteria. This reinforces the view that, for some antibiotics at least, the primary role is one of antibiosis during competition in soil for resources.

  11. Viability of multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria in distribution lines of treated sewage effluent used for irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahry, S N; Mahmoud, I Y; Al-Khaifi, A; Elshafie, A E; Al-Harthy, A

    2009-01-01

    Viability of multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria (MARB) in tertiary treated sewage effluent (TTSE) used for irrigation, was investigated at the Sultan Qaboos University sewage treatment plant (STP). This water recycle system is used here as a model for the systems commonly used throughout Oman and the Gulf region. Samples of TTSE were collected weekly from four sites, 1.5 km from each other. Chlorine levels declined gradually at the three sites with increasing distance from the STP. Viable bacteria, coliforms and nitrate concentrations increased significantly while biological oxygen demand (BOD) declined after STP chlorination. Mean values of turbidity changed slightly. Trace elements values were insignificant. A total of 336 bacteria from 8 genera revealed that the dominant isolates were Enterobacter spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Aeromonas spp. Among the isolates 59.8% were multiply resistant to several antibiotics. Resistance was higher to ampicillin followed by sulphamethoxazole, carbenicillin, streptomycine and minocycline. Frequency of resistance to the 14 antibiotics varied among the isolates. The present system related to the viability of MARB in TTSE used for irrigation may have serious implications for public health and wildlife. Results of this investigation will be of value in modifying current STPs systems and thus avoiding serious health issues.

  12. The antibiotic pipeline for multi-drug resistant gram negative bacteria: what can we expect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagas, Matthew E; Mavroudis, Andreas D; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z

    2016-08-01

    A real concern in the medical community is the increasing resistance of bacteria, especially that of Gram-negative types. New antibiotics are currently under clinical development, promising to tackle severe infections caused, especially, by multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria and broaden the armamentarium of clinicians. We searched PUBMED and GOOGLE databases. Combinations of already approved β-lactams or monobactams with new β-lactamase inhibitors [imipenem-cilastatin/MK-7655 (relebactam), meropenem/RPX7009 (vaborbactam), ceftaroline/avibactam, aztreonam/avibactam], new β-lactams (S-649266, BAL30072), aminoglycosides (plazomicin), quinolones (finafloxacin) and tetracyclines (eravacycline) were included in the review. Expert commentary: For the majority of the upcoming antibiotics the currently available data is limited to their microbiology and pharmacokinetics. Their effectiveness and safety against infections due to MDR bacteria remain to be proved. Significant issues are also the impact of these antibiotics on the human intestinal microbiota and their possible co-administration with already-known antimicrobial agents in difficult-to-treat-infections; further studies should be conducted for these objectives.

  13. Prevalence of antibiotic resistant coliform bacteria, Enterococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. in wastewater sewerage biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lépesová, Kristína; Kraková, Lucia; Pangallo, Domenico; Medveďová, Alžbeta; Olejníková, Petra; Mackuľak, Tomáš; Tichý, Jozef; Grabic, Roman; Birošová, Lucia

    2018-03-28

    Urban wastewater contains different micropollutants and high number of different microorganisms. Some bacteria in wastewater can attach to the surfaces and form biofilm, which gives bacteria advantage in fight against environmental stress. This work is focused on bacterial community analysis in biofilms isolated from influent and effluent sewerage of wastewater treatment plant in Bratislava. Biofilm microbiota detection was performed by culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches. Composition of bacterial strains was detected by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting coupled with the construction of 16S rRNA clone libraries. The biofilm collected at the inlet point was characterized primarily by the presence of Pseudomonas sp., Acinetobacter sp. and Janthinobacterium sp. clones, while in the biofilm isolated at outflow of wastewater treatment plant members of Pseudomonas genus were largely detected. Beside this analysis prevalence of antibiotics and resistant coliforms, Enterococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. in sewerage was studied. In influent wastewater were dominant antibiotics like azithromycin, clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin. Removal efficiency of these antibiotics notably azithromycin and clarithromycin were 30% in most cases. The highest number of resistant bacteria with predominance of coliforms was detected in sample of effluent biofilm. Multidrug resistant strains in effluent biofilm showed very good ability to form biofilm. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Exploring Post-Treatment Reversion of Antimicrobial Resistance in Enteric Bacteria of Food Animals as a Resistance Mitigation Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Victoriya V; KuKanich, Butch; Riviere, Jim E

    2016-11-01

    Antimicrobial drug use in food animals is associated with an elevation in relative abundance of bacteria resistant to the drug among the animal enteric bacteria. Some of these bacteria are potential foodborne pathogens. Evidence suggests that at least in the enteric nontype-specific Escherichia coli, after treatment the resistance abundance reverts to the background pre-treatment levels, without further interventions. We hypothesize that it is possible to define the distribution of the time period after treatment within which resistance to the administered drug, and possibly other drugs in case of coselection, in fecal bacteria of the treated animals returns to the background pre-treatment levels. Furthermore, it is possible that a novel resistance mitigation strategy for microbiological food safety could be developed based on this resistance reversion phenomenon. The strategy would be conceptually similar to existing antimicrobial drug withdrawal periods, which is a well-established and accepted mitigation strategy for avoiding violative drug residues in the edible products from the treated animals. For developing resistance-relevant withdrawals, a mathematical framework can be used to join the necessary pharmacological, microbiological, and animal production components to project the distributions of the post-treatment resistance reversion periods in the production animal populations for major antimicrobial drug classes in use. The framework can also help guide design of empirical studies into the resistance-relevant withdrawal periods and development of mitigation approaches to reduce the treatment-associated elevation of resistance in animal enteric bacteria. We outline this framework, schematically and through exemplar equations, and how its components could be formulated.

  15. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H; Novak, John T; Knocke, William R; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1-a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10-a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457-0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130-0.486, P = 0.075-0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene

  16. Survival of antibiotic resistant bacteria and horizontal gene transfer control antibiotic resistance gene content in anaerobic digesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hafer Miller

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB versus their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1- a Pseudomonas sp. and thermophilic (Iso T10- a Bacillus sp. anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate (tet(G remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O, tet(W, and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457 to 0.829, P<0.05 with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O or tet(W ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130 to 0.486, P = 0.075 to 0.612. However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O and tet(W ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and

  17. ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM FERMENTED DAIRY PRODUCTS AND BOZA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Başbülbül

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the resistance of 83 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Turkish cheese, yogurt, kefir and boza samples to 6 antibiotics (gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, vancomycin and ciprofloxacin was evaluated. The 83 isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and according to BLAST comparisons with sequences in the data banks, those strains showing the highest similarities with the isolates were Enterococcus faecium (10, Lactococcus lactis subsp. Lactis (10, Lactobacillus fermentum (6, Lactobacillus plantarum (6, Lactobacillus coryniformis (7, Lactobacillus casei (13, Leuconostoc mesenteroides (14, Pediococcus pentosaceus (10, Weisella confusa (7. Antimicrobial resistance of strains to 6 antibiotics was determined using the agar dilution method. The antibiotic resistance among all the isolates was detected against chloramphenicol (31,3 % of the isolates, tetracycline (30,1 %, erythromycin (2,4 %, ciprofloxacin (2,41%, vancomycin (73,5 %, intrinsic resistance. Overall 19,3 % of the isolates showed resistance against multiple antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance genes were studied by PCR and the following genes were detected; tet(M gene in Lactobacillus fermentum (1, Lactobacillus plantarum (1, Pediococcus pentosaceus (5, Enterococcus faecium (2, Weisella confusa (4 and the vancomycin resistance gene van(A in one Weisella confusa strain.

  18. Interplay Between Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence During Disease Promoted by Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisinger, Edward; Isberg, Ralph R

    2017-02-15

    Diseases caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals are the outcome of complex relationships between several dynamic factors, including bacterial pathogenicity, the fitness costs of resistance in the human host, and selective forces resulting from interventions such as antibiotic therapy. The emergence and fate of mutations that drive antibiotic resistance are governed by these interactions. In this review, we will examine how different forms of antibiotic resistance modulate bacterial fitness and virulence potential, thus influencing the ability of pathogens to evolve in the context of nosocomial infections. We will focus on 3 important multidrug-resistant pathogens that are notoriously problematic in hospitals: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus. An understanding of how antibiotic resistance mutations shape the pathobiology of multidrug-resistant infections has the potential to drive novel strategies that can control the development and spread of drug resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Levels and treatment options for enteric and antibiotic resistant bacteria in sewage from Sisimiut, Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Gunnarsdottir, Ragnhildur; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    . Conventional treatment is challenging and expensive to implement in Arctic communities due to the cold climate and scattered population. In addition, advanced removal of nutrients may in many cases be overstated due to the low population density and large receiving water bodies. In this work we investigated...

  20. Characterization of Bacteria in Nigerian Yogurt as Promising Alternative to Antibiotics in Gastrointestinal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayeni, Anthony Opeyemi; Ruppitsch, Werner; Ayeni, Funmilola Abidemi

    2018-03-14

    Gastrointestinal infections are endemic in Nigeria and several factors contribute to their continual survival, including bacterial resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Nigerian yogurts do not include probiotics, and limited information is available about the antimicrobial properties of the fermenters in the yogurt against gastrointestinal pathogens. Therefore, the antimicrobial potentials of bacteria in Nigeria-produced yogurts against intestinal pathogens were investigated in this study. Viable counts of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in 15 brands of yogurt were enumerated and the bacteria identified by partial sequencing of 16S rRNA gene. Susceptibility of the gastrointestinal pathogens (Salmonella, Shigella and E. coli ) to antibiotics by disc diffusion method, to viable LAB by the agar overlay method, and to the cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) of the LAB were investigated. Co-culture analysis of LAB and pathogens were also done. Viable counts of 1.5 × 10 11 cfu/ml were observed in some yogurt samples. Two genera were identified: Lactobacillus (70.7%) and Acetobacter (29.3%). The Lactobacillus species reduced multidrug-resistant gastrointestinal pathogens by 4 to 5 log while the zones of inhibition ranged between 11 and 23. The Lactobacillus and Acetobacter strains examined displayed good activities against the multidrug-resistant tested pathogens. This is the first report of antimicrobial activities of acetic acid bacteria isolated from yogurt in Nigeria.

  1. Effect of manure application rate and rainfall timing on the leaching of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study we investigate the effect of application rate and timing of liquid swine slurry on leaching of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) and their antibiotic-resistance genes (ARG) through soil columns. Swine slurry was added to laboratory soil columns at rates of 5,000 or 30,000 gallons acr...

  2. Occurrence and distribution of multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria of Enterobacteriaceae family in waters of Veraval coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Maloo, A.; Borade, S.; Dhawde, R.; Gajbhiye, S.N.; Dastager, S.G.

    . Quant. Microbiol. 2: 55–68. Ghafur A.K. 2010. An obituary – on the death of antibiotics. J. Assoc. Physicians I: 58. Gunaseelan C., Ruban P. 2011. Antibiotic resistance of bacteria from Krishna Godavari Basin, Bay of Bengal, India. Environ. Exp. Biol...

  3. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria from acute and chronic wounds in Malaysian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Shin Yee; Manikam, Rishya; Muniandy, Sekaran

    2015-09-27

    Chronic wounds represent a major health burden worldwide. It has been hypothesized that the polymicrobial nature of wounds plays an important role in their healing process. Thus, a review of pathogen frequency and susceptibility patterns in wounds is necessary to provide appropriate guidelines for antimicrobial usage. In this study, microbiota and antimicrobial resistance in both acute and chronic wound patients treated at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia, were compared. Wound swabs from 84 patients with acute wounds and 84 patients with chronic wounds were collected. The specimens were cultured using standard microbiological techniques. Isolates were then tested for antibiotic sensitivity with the broth microdilution method. Of 210 pathogenic bacteria isolates, Staphylococcus aureus (49; 23.3%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (31; 14.8%) were the most prevalent bacteria found in wounds. Staphylococcus aureus was found significantly more often in patients with chronic wounds (41; 48.8%) than in patients with acute wounds (8; 9.5%), while Staphylococcus epidermidis was found predominantly in acute wounds (15; 17.9%). At the time of study, patients with chronic wounds (58.3%) had received more antibiotic treatments in the past previous 12 months compared with patients with acute wounds (16.7%). In the antibiotic susceptibility test, Staphylococcus spp. revealed highest resistance towards penicillin and ampicillin. Isolates showed no decrease in susceptibility against a number of newly developed antibiotics (linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline). Our finding showed that bacteria diversity and antimicrobial-resistant strains are more frequently found in chronic wounds than in acute wounds.

  4. Removal of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes Affected by Varying Degrees of Fouling on Anaerobic Microfiltration Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hong; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2017-11-07

    An anaerobic membrane bioreactor was retrofitted with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration membrane units, each of which was fouled to a different extent. The membranes with different degrees of fouling were evaluated for their efficiencies in removing three antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), namely, bla NDM-1 -positive Escherichia coli PI-7, bla CTX-M-15 -positive Klebsiella pneumoniae L7, and bla OXA-48 -positive E. coli UPEC-RIY-4, as well as their associated plasmid-borne antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). The results showed that the log removal values (LRVs) of ARGs correlated positively with the extent of membrane fouling and ranged from 1.9 to 3.9. New membranes with a minimal foulant layer could remove more than 5 log units of ARB. However, as the membranes progressed to subcritical fouling, the LRVs of ARB decreased at increasing operating transmembrane pressures (TMPs). The LRV recovered back to 5 when the membrane was critically fouled, and the achieved LRV remained stable at different operating TMPs. Furthermore, characterization of the surface attributed the removal of both the ARB and ARGs to adsorption, which was facilitated by an increasing hydrophobicity and a decreasing surface ζ potential as the membranes fouled. Our results indicate that both the TMP and the foulant layer synergistically affected ARB removal, but the foulant layer was the main factor that contributed to ARG removal.

  5. Removal of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes affected by varying degrees of fouling on anaerobic microfiltration membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Hong

    2017-09-28

    An anaerobic membrane bioreactor was retrofitted with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration membrane units, each of which was fouled to a different extent. The membranes with different degrees of fouling were evaluated for their efficiencies in removing three antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), namely, blaNDM-1-positive Escherichia coli PI-7, blaCTX-M-15-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae L7, and blaOXA-48-positive E. coli UPEC-RIY-4, as well as their associated plasmid-borne antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). The results showed that the log removal values (LRVs) of ARGs correlated positively with the extent of membrane fouling and ranged from 1.9 to 3.9. New membranes with a minimal foulant layer could remove more than 5 log units of ARB. However, as the membranes progressed to subcritical fouling, the LRVs of ARB decreased at increasing operating transmembrane pressures (TMPs). The LRV recovered back to 5 when the membrane was critically fouled, and the achieved LRV remained stable at different operating TMPs. Furthermore, characterization of the surface attributed the removal of both the ARB and ARGs to adsorption, which was facilitated by an increasing hydrophobicity and a decreasing surface ζ potential as the membranes fouled. Our results indicate that both the TMP and the foulant layer synergistically affected ARB removal, but the foulant layer was the main factor that contributed to ARG removal.

  6. Lysozyme Counteracts β-Lactam Antibiotics by Promoting the Emergence of L-Form Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yoshikazu; Mickiewicz, Katarzyna; Errington, Jeff

    2018-02-22

    β-lactam antibiotics inhibit bacterial cell wall assembly and, under classical microbiological culture conditions that are generally hypotonic, induce explosive cell death. Here, we show that under more physiological, osmoprotective conditions, for various Gram-positive bacteria, lysis is delayed or abolished, apparently because inhibition of class A penicillin-binding protein leads to a block in autolytic activity. Although these cells still then die by other mechanisms, exogenous lytic enzymes, such as lysozyme, can rescue viability by enabling the escape of cell wall-deficient "L-form" bacteria. This protective L-form conversion was also observed in macrophages and in an animal model, presumably due to the production of host lytic activities, including lysozyme. Our results demonstrate the potential for L-form switching in the host environment and highlight the unexpected effects of innate immune effectors, such as lysozyme, on antibiotic activity. Unlike previously described dormant persisters, L-forms can continue to proliferate in the presence of antibiotic. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Conjugation Inhibitors and Their Potential Use to Prevent Dissemination of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Cabezón

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance has become one of the most challenging problems in health care. Bacteria conjugation is one of the main mechanisms whereby bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. Therefore, the search for specific conjugation inhibitors (COINs is of interest in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistances in a variety of laboratory and natural environments. Several compounds, discovered as COINs, are promising candidates in the fight against plasmid dissemination. In this review, we survey the effectiveness and toxicity of the most relevant compounds. Particular emphasis has been placed on unsaturated fatty acid derivatives, as they have been shown to be efficient in preventing plasmid invasiveness in bacterial populations. Biochemical and structural studies have provided insights concerning their potential molecular targets and inhibitory mechanisms. These findings open a new avenue in the search of new and more effective synthetic inhibitors. In this pursuit, the use of structure-based drug design methods will be of great importance for the screening of ligands and binding sites of putative targets.

  8. Conjugation Inhibitors and Their Potential Use to Prevent Dissemination of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezón, Elena; de la Cruz, Fernando; Arechaga, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become one of the most challenging problems in health care. Bacteria conjugation is one of the main mechanisms whereby bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. Therefore, the search for specific conjugation inhibitors (COINs) is of interest in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistances in a variety of laboratory and natural environments. Several compounds, discovered as COINs, are promising candidates in the fight against plasmid dissemination. In this review, we survey the effectiveness and toxicity of the most relevant compounds. Particular emphasis has been placed on unsaturated fatty acid derivatives, as they have been shown to be efficient in preventing plasmid invasiveness in bacterial populations. Biochemical and structural studies have provided insights concerning their potential molecular targets and inhibitory mechanisms. These findings open a new avenue in the search of new and more effective synthetic inhibitors. In this pursuit, the use of structure-based drug design methods will be of great importance for the screening of ligands and binding sites of putative targets.

  9. Concentration of facultative pathogenic bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes during sewage treatment and in receiving rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heß, Stefanie; Lüddeke, Frauke; Gallert, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Whereas the hygienic condition of drinking and bathing water by law must be monitored by culture-based methods, for quantification of microbes and antibiotic resistance in soil or the aquatic environment, often molecular genetic assays are used. For comparison of both methods, knowledge of their correlation is necessary. Therefore the population of total bacteria, Escherichia coli, enterococci and staphylococci during sewage treatment and in receiving river water was compared by agar plating and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. In parallel, all samples were investigated for clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes. Whereas plating and qPCR data for total bacteria correlated well in sewage after primary treatment, qPCR data of river water indicated higher cell numbers for E. coli. It is unknown if these cells are 'only' not growing under standard conditions or if they are dead. Corresponding to the amount of non-culturable cells, the 'breakpoints' for monitoring water quality should be adapted. The abundances of clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes in river water were in the same order of magnitude or even higher than in treated sewage. For estimation of the health risk it is important to investigate which species carry respective genes and whether these genes are disseminated via gene transfer.

  10. Synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptide DP7 combined with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Li, Zhan; Li, Xiaolu; Tian, Yaomei; Fan, Yingzi; Yu, Chaoheng; Zhou, Bailing; Liu, Yi; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria present a great threat to public health. In this study, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and antibiotics on several multidrug-resistant bacterial strains were studied, and their synergistic effects on azithromycin (AZT)-resistance genes were analyzed to determine the relationships between antimicrobial resistance and these synergistic effects. A checkerboard method was used to evaluate the synergistic effects of AMPs (DP7 and CLS001) and several antibiotics (gentamicin, vancomycin [VAN], AZT, and amoxicillin) on clinical bacterial strains ( Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii , and Escherichia coli ). The AZT-resistance genes ( ermA, ermB, ermC, mefA , and msrA ) were identified in the resistant strains using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. For all the clinical isolates tested that were resistant to different antibiotics, DP7 had high antimicrobial activity (≤32 mg/L). When DP7 was combined with VAN or AZT, the effect was most frequently synergistic. When we studied the resistance genes of the AZT-resistant isolates, the synergistic effect of DP7-AZT occurred most frequently in highly resistant strains or strains carrying more than two AZT-resistance genes. A transmission electron microscopic analysis of the S. aureus strain synergistically affected by DP7-AZT showed no noteworthy morphological changes, suggesting that a molecular-level mechanism plays an important role in the synergistic action of DP7-AZT. AMP DP7 plus the antibiotic AZT or VAN is more effective, especially against highly antibiotic-resistant strains.

  11. Rationalizing the permeation of polar antibiotics into Gram-negative bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Acosta-Gutierrez, Silvia; Benkerrou, Dehbia; D’Agostino, Tommaso; Malloci, Giuliano; Samanta, Susruta; Bodrenko, Igor; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    The increasing level of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, together with the lack of new potential drug scaffolds in the pipeline, make the problem of infectious diseases a global challenge for modern medicine. The main reason that Gram-negative bacteria are particularly challenging is the presence of an outer cell-protecting membrane, which is not present in Gram-positive species. Such an asymmetric bilayer is a highly effective barrier for polar molecules. Several protein systems are expressed in the outer membrane to control the internal concentration of both nutrients and noxious species, in particular: (i) water-filled channels that modulate the permeation of polar molecules and ions according to concentration gradients, and (ii) efflux pumps to actively expel toxic compounds. Thus, besides expressing specific enzymes for drugs degradation, Gram-negative bacteria can also resist by modulating the influx and efflux of antibiotics, keeping the internal concentration low. However, there are no direct and robust experimental methods capable of measuring the permeability of small molecules, thus severely limiting our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that ultimately control the permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane. This is the innovation gap to be filled for Gram-negative bacteria. This review is focused on the permeation of small molecules through porins, considered the main path for the entry of polar antibiotics into Gram-negative bacteria. A fundamental understanding of how these proteins are able to filter small molecules is a prerequisite to design/optimize antibacterials with improved permeation. The level of sophistication of modern molecular modeling algorithms and the advances in new computer hardware has made the simulation of such complex processes possible at the molecular level. In this work we aim to share our experience and perspectives in the context of a multidisciplinary extended collaboration within the IMI

  12. Rationalizing the permeation of polar antibiotics into Gram-negative bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Acosta-Gutierrez, Silvia; Benkerrou, Dehbia; D'Agostino, Tommaso; Malloci, Giuliano; Samanta, Susruta; Bodrenko, Igor; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2017-03-01

    The increasing level of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, together with the lack of new potential drug scaffolds in the pipeline, make the problem of infectious diseases a global challenge for modern medicine. The main reason that Gram-negative bacteria are particularly challenging is the presence of an outer cell-protecting membrane, which is not present in Gram-positive species. Such an asymmetric bilayer is a highly effective barrier for polar molecules. Several protein systems are expressed in the outer membrane to control the internal concentration of both nutrients and noxious species, in particular: (i) water-filled channels that modulate the permeation of polar molecules and ions according to concentration gradients, and (ii) efflux pumps to actively expel toxic compounds. Thus, besides expressing specific enzymes for drugs degradation, Gram-negative bacteria can also resist by modulating the influx and efflux of antibiotics, keeping the internal concentration low. However, there are no direct and robust experimental methods capable of measuring the permeability of small molecules, thus severely limiting our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that ultimately control the permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane. This is the innovation gap to be filled for Gram-negative bacteria. This review is focused on the permeation of small molecules through porins, considered the main path for the entry of polar antibiotics into Gram-negative bacteria. A fundamental understanding of how these proteins are able to filter small molecules is a prerequisite to design/optimize antibacterials with improved permeation. The level of sophistication of modern molecular modeling algorithms and the advances in new computer hardware has made the simulation of such complex processes possible at the molecular level. In this work we aim to share our experience and perspectives in the context of a multidisciplinary extended collaboration within the IMI

  13. Occurrence of yeasts, pseudomonads and enteric bacteria in the oral cavity of patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elerson Gaetti-Jardim Júnior

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of yeasts, pseudomonads and enteric bacteria in the oral cavity of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT for treatment of head and neck cancer. Fifty patients receiving RT were examined before, during and 30 days after RT. Saliva, mucosa, and biofilm samples were collected and microorganisms were detected by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The most prevalent yeasts in patients submitted to RT were Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis. Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Klebsiella, Proteus, and Pseudomonas were the most frequently cultivated bacteria. Before RT, targeted bacteria were cultivated from 22.2% of edentulous patients and 16.6% of dentate patients; 30 days after RT, these microorganisms were recovered from 77.8% edentulous and 46.8% dentate patients. By PCR, these microorganisms were detected from all edentulous patients, 78.1% of dentate patients. The presence of Gram-negative enteric roads and fungi was particularly frequent in patients presenting mucositis level III or IV. Modifications in the oral environment due to RT treatment seem to facilitate the colonization of oral cavity by members of family Enterobacteriaceae, genera Enterococcus and Candida.

  14. Re-sensitizing drug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics by designing Antisense Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Colleen; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    ``Super-bugs'' or ``multi-drug resistant organisms'' are a serious international health problem, with devastating consequences to patient health care. The Center for Disease Control has identified antibiotic resistance as one of the world's most pressing public health problems as a significant fraction of bacterial infections contracted are drug resistant. Typically, antibiotic resistance is encoded by ``resistance-genes'' which express proteins that carryout the resistance causing functions inside the bacterium. We present a RNA based therapeutic strategy for designing antimicrobials capable of re-sensitizing resistant bacteria to antibiotics by targeting labile regions of messenger RNAs encoding for resistance-causing proteins. We perform in silico RNA secondary structure modeling to identify labile target regions in an mRNA of interest. A synthetic biology approach is then used to administer antisense nucleic acids to our model system of ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli. Our results show a prolonged lag phase and decrease in viability of drug-resistant E. colitreated with antisense molecules. The antisense strategy can be applied to alter expression of other genes in antibiotic resistance pathways or other pathways of interest.

  15. A Multifunctional Subphthalocyanine Nanosphere for Targeting, Labeling, and Killing of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Indranil; Shetty, Dinesh; Hota, Raghunandan; Baek, Kangkyun; Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Chulhong; Kappert, Sandro; Kim, Kimoon

    2015-12-07

    Developing a material that can combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria, a major global health threat, is an urgent requirement. To tackle this challenge, we synthesized a multifunctional subphthalocyanine (SubPc) polymer nanosphere that has the ability to target, label, and photoinactivate antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a single treatment with more than 99 % efficiency, even with a dose as low as 4.2 J cm(-2) and a loading concentration of 10 nM. The positively charged nanosphere shell composed of covalently linked SubPc units can increase the local concentration of photosensitizers at therapeutic sites. The nanosphere shows superior performance compared to corresponding monomers presumably because of their enhanced water dispersibility, higher efficiency of singlet-oxygen generation, and phototoxicity. In addition, this material is useful in fluorescence labeling of living cells and shows promise in photoacoustic imaging of bacteria in vivo. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Quantitative relationship between antibiotic exposure and the acquisition and transmission of resistance in bacteria in the laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Händel, N.

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide emergence and spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria represent a major threat to human health care as the chance of therapy failure and costs for treatment increase. To curb the continuous rise of drug resistant bacteria worldwide, new strategies are urgently needed that counteract

  17. Synergistic Antibacterial Effects of Chitosan-Caffeic Acid Conjugate against Antibiotic-Resistant Acne-Related Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hoon Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to discover an alternative therapeutic agent with fewer side effects against acne vulgaris, one of the most common skin diseases. Acne vulgaris is often associated with acne-related bacteria such as Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Some of these bacteria exhibit a resistance against commercial antibiotics that have been used in the treatment of acne vulgaris (tetracycline, erythromycin, and lincomycin. In the current study, we tested in vitro antibacterial effect of chitosan-phytochemical conjugates on acne-related bacteria. Three chitosan-phytochemical conjugates used in this study exhibited stronger antibacterial activity than that of chitosan (unmodified control. Chitosan-caffeic acid conjugate (CCA showed the highest antibacterial effect on acne-related bacteria along with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC; 8 to 256 μg/mL. Additionally, the MIC values of antibiotics against antibiotic-resistant P. acnes and P. aeruginosa strains were dramatically reduced in combination with CCA, suggesting that CCA would restore the antibacterial activity of the antibiotics. The analysis of fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC indices clearly revealed a synergistic antibacterial effect of CCA with antibiotics. Thus, the median sum of FIC (∑FIC values against the antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains ranged from 0.375 to 0.533 in the combination mode of CCA and antibiotics. The results of the present study suggested a potential possibility of chitosan-phytochemical conjugates in the control of infections related to acne vulgaris.

  18. Synergistic Antibacterial Effects of Chitosan-Caffeic Acid Conjugate against Antibiotic-Resistant Acne-Related Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Yu, Daeung; Eom, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Song-Hee; Oh, Junghwan; Jung, Won-Kyo; Kim, Young-Mog

    2017-06-08

    The object of this study was to discover an alternative therapeutic agent with fewer side effects against acne vulgaris, one of the most common skin diseases. Acne vulgaris is often associated with acne-related bacteria such as Propionibacterium acnes , Staphylococcus epidermidis , Staphylococcus aureus , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa . Some of these bacteria exhibit a resistance against commercial antibiotics that have been used in the treatment of acne vulgaris (tetracycline, erythromycin, and lincomycin). In the current study, we tested in vitro antibacterial effect of chitosan-phytochemical conjugates on acne-related bacteria. Three chitosan-phytochemical conjugates used in this study exhibited stronger antibacterial activity than that of chitosan (unmodified control). Chitosan-caffeic acid conjugate (CCA) showed the highest antibacterial effect on acne-related bacteria along with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC; 8 to 256 μg/mL). Additionally, the MIC values of antibiotics against antibiotic-resistant P. acnes and P. aeruginosa strains were dramatically reduced in combination with CCA, suggesting that CCA would restore the antibacterial activity of the antibiotics. The analysis of fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) indices clearly revealed a synergistic antibacterial effect of CCA with antibiotics. Thus, the median sum of FIC (∑FIC) values against the antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains ranged from 0.375 to 0.533 in the combination mode of CCA and antibiotics. The results of the present study suggested a potential possibility of chitosan-phytochemical conjugates in the control of infections related to acne vulgaris.

  19. Motuporamine Derivatives as Antimicrobial Agents and Antibiotic Enhancers against Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borselli, Diane; Blanchet, Marine; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Muth, Aaron; Skruber, Kristen; Phanstiel, Otto; Brunel, Jean Michel

    2017-02-01

    Dihydromotuporamine C and its derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activities and antibiotic enhancement properties against Gram-negative bacteria and clinical isolates. The mechanism of action of one of these derivatives, MOTU-N44, was investigated against Enterobacter aerogenes by using fluorescent dyes to evaluate outer-membrane depolarization and permeabilization. Its efficiency correlated with inhibition of dye transport, thus suggesting that these molecules inhibit drug transporters by de-energization of the efflux pump rather than by direct interaction of the molecule with the pump. This suggests that depowering the efflux pump provides another strategy to address antibiotic resistance. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  20. Microbiological air quality in some kindergartens and antibiotic resistance of bacteria of the Staphylococcus spp. genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Kubera

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microbiological contamination of the air and the acquisition of the antibiotic resistance by pathogenic bacteria is a growing phenomenon that has a substantial impact on the quality of our health. This problem applies mainly to public areas where we spend a large part of our lives. This study was focused on the microbiological analysis of the air in some kindergartens and antibiotic resistance of bacteria of the Stephylococcus spp. genus. The identification of the isolated mould fungi has been also made. Material and Methods: Air samples were collected from classrooms in the seasonal cycle in the mornings and afternoons using 2 methods, sedimentation and impact. Air samples collected outside the kindergartens served as controls. Air quality assessments were based on the groups of indicator microorganisms, according to Polish standards. The susceptibility of isolated staphylococci was assessed with the disc-diffusion method, using 8 different classes of antibiotics, in line with the recommendations of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST. Results: The analyses show that, regardless of the method, the total number of heterothropic bacteria and staphylococci in the air of the analyzed kindergartens exceeded the allowable limits. There was no air pollution with the fungal infection. Based on the antibiogram, it was found that Staphylococcus spp. strains showed the highest sensitivity to chloramphenicol and the lowest to penicillin and gentamicin. Among the fungi moulds of the genus Cladosporium predominated. Conclusions: The results of the analyses highlight the need for regular health checks and further research to help identify biological factors that may significantly affect the quality of health of people living in public spaces. Med Pr 2015;66(1:49–56

  1. Frequency of common bacteria and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern in diabetics presenting with foot ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, F.; Ishfaq, M.; Rahman, S.U.; Afridi, A.K.

    2016-01-01

    Foot ulcers are one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus and often lead to lower limb amputation. Diabetic foot ulcers are susceptible to infection. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of common bacteria infecting these ulcers and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed in the Departments of Medicine and Surgery, Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar from April, 2011 to February, 2012. Specimens collected from ulcers of 131 patients were inoculated on Blood Agar and MacConkey Agar, and antibiotic sensitivity was tested using standard disc diffusion method. Results: Out of 131, specimens from 120 patients yielded 176 bacteria. Sixty-six patients had monomicrobial infection while polymicrobial growth was obtained in 54 patients. Overall, Staphylococcus aureus (38.6%) was the most common isolate followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (27.3%). Staphylococcus aureus was most often sensitive to Moxifloxacin, Imipenem/Meropenem, Vancomycin and Linezolid while it showed varying sensitivity to Penicillins and Cephalosporins. 47.1% isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were resistant to Methicillin. Most of the gram negative rods were sensitive to Imipenem/Meropenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam and Ticarcillin-Clavulanate. Majority of gram negative bacteria were found resistant to Cephalosporins and Moxifloxacin except Pseudomonas which showed variable sensitivity to Ceftriaxone, Ceftazidime and Moxifloxacin. Conclusions: Majority of isolates were found resistant to the commonly used antibiotics. Most commonly isolated bacterium, Staphylococcus aureus was most often sensitive to Moxifloxacin, Imipenem/Meropenem, Vancomycin and Linezolid, while majority isolated gram negative rods were sensitive to Imipenem/Meropenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam and Ticarcillin-Clavulanate. (author)

  2. Human recreational exposure to antibiotic resistant bacteria in coastal bathing waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Anne F C; Zhang, Lihong; Balfour, Andrew J; Garside, Ruth; Gaze, William H

    2015-09-01

    Infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) are associated with poor health outcomes and are recognised globally as a serious health problem. Much research has been conducted on the transmission of ARB to humans. Yet the role the natural environment plays in the spread of ARB and antibiotic resistance genes is not well understood. Antibiotic resistant bacteria have been detected in natural aquatic environments, and ingestion of seawater during water sports is one route by which many people could be directly exposed. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of resistance to one clinically important class of antibiotics (third-generation cephalosporins (3GCs)) amongst Escherichia coli in coastal surface waters in England and Wales. Prevalence data was used to quantify ingestion of 3GC-resistant E. coli (3GCREC) by people participating in water sports in designated coastal bathing waters. A further aim was to use this value to derive a population-level estimate of exposure to these bacteria during recreational use of coastal waters in 2012. The prevalence of 3GC-resistance amongst E. coli isolated from coastal surface waters was estimated using culture-based methods. This was combined with the density of E. coli reported in designated coastal bathing waters along with estimations of the volumes of water ingested during various water sports reported in the literature to calculate the mean number of 3GCREC ingested during different water sports. 0.12% of E. coli isolated from surface waters were resistant to 3GCs. This value was used to estimate that in England and Wales over 6.3 million water sport sessions occurred in 2012 that resulted in the ingestion of at least one 3GCREC. Despite the low prevalence of resistance to 3GCs amongst E. coli in surface waters, there is an identifiable human exposure risk for water users, which varies with the type of water sport undertaken. The relative importance of this exposure is likely to be greater in areas where a

  3. Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria As Bio-Indicator Of Polluted Effluent In The Green Turtles, In Oman

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Bahry, Saif N.; Mahmoud, Ibrahim Y.; Al-Zadjali, Maheera; Elshafie, Abdulkader; Al-Harthy, Asila; Al-Alawi, Wafaa

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Antibiotic resistant bacteria were studied as bio-indicators of marine polluted effluents during egg-laying in green turtles. A non-invasive procedure for sampling oviductal fluid was used to test for exposure of turtles to pollution in Ras Al-Hadd, Oman, which is one of the most important nesting beaches in the world. Each sample was obtained by inserting a 15 cm sterile swab gently into the cloacal vent as the sphincter muscle is relaxed and the cloacal lining is unfolde...

  4. The ability of selected plant essential oils to enhance the action of recommended antibiotics against pathogenic wound bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Monika; Łysakowska, Monika; Kowalczyk, Edward; Szymańska, Grażyna; Kochan, Ewa; Krukowska, Jolanta; Olszewski, Jurek; Zielińska-Bliźniewska, Hanna

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the ability of essential oils to support antibiotics against pathogenic bacteria in wounds. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria obtained from wound infections were identified according to standard microbiological methods. Essential oils were analysed by GC-FID-MS. The susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics, essential oils and their combination was assessed using the disc-diffusion method. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration of the essential oils were established by the micro-dilution broth method. Although cinnamon, clove, thyme and lavender essential oils were found to have the greatest antibacterial activity when used alone, the greatest additive and synergistic effects against pathogenic wound bacteria in combination with recommended antibiotics were demonstrated by basil, clary sage and rosemary oils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Combinations of maggot excretions/secretions and antibiotics are effective against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms and the bacteria derived therefrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Plas, Mariena J A; Dambrot, Cheryl; Dogterom-Ballering, Heleen C M

    2010-01-01

    the effect of combinations of ES and antibiotics on S. aureus biofilms and on the survival of the bacteria released from the biofilms. METHODS: Effects of ES, antibiotics (vancomycin, daptomycin or clindamycin) and combinations thereof on S. aureus ATCC 29 213 biofilms and bacterial viability were determined...... using microtitre plates and in vitro killing assays. RESULTS: Vancomycin and daptomycin dose-dependently enhanced biofilm formation, whereas clindamycin reduced S. aureus biofilm size. Adding ES to antibiotic incubations caused a complete biofilm breakdown. After a lag time the bacteria derived from...... biofilms became susceptible to vancomycin and clindamycin, provided that the medium was refreshed. Daptomycin dose-dependently eliminated the biofilm-derived bacteria immediately. Furthermore, it was significantly more effective against bacteria derived from ES-exposed biofilms than those from control...

  6. Impact of Manure Fertilization on the Abundance of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria and Frequency of Detection of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Soil and on Vegetables at Harvest

    OpenAIRE

    Marti, Romain; Scott, Andrew; Tien, Yuan-Ching; Murray, Roger; Sabourin, Lyne; Zhang, Yun; Topp, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of vegetables represents a route of direct human exposure to bacteria found in soil. The present study evaluated the complement of bacteria resistant to various antibiotics on vegetables often eaten raw (tomato, cucumber, pepper, carrot, radish, lettuce) and how this might vary with growth in soil fertilized inorganically or with dairy or swine manure. Vegetables were sown into field plots immediately following fertilization and harvested when of marketable quality. Vegetable and ...

  7. Synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptide DP7 combined with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu X

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaozhe Wu,1 Zhan Li,1 Xiaolu Li,2,3 Yaomei Tian,1 Yingzi Fan,1 Chaoheng Yu,1 Bailing Zhou,1 Yi Liu,4 Rong Xiang,5 Li Yang1 1State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy/Collaborative Innovation Center of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 2International Center for Translational Chinese Medicine, Sichuan Academy of Chinese Medicine Sciences, Chengdu, 3Department of Plastic and Burn Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Luzhou, 4Department of Microbial Examination, Sichuan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Chengdu, 5Nankai University School of Medicine, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria present a great threat to public health. In this study, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and antibiotics on several multidrug-resistant bacterial strains were studied, and their synergistic effects on azithromycin (AZT-resistance genes were analyzed to determine the relationships between antimicrobial resistance and these synergistic effects. A checkerboard method was used to evaluate the synergistic effects of AMPs (DP7 and CLS001 and several antibiotics (gentamicin, vancomycin [VAN], AZT, and amoxicillin on clinical bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Escherichia coli. The AZT-resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, mefA, and msrA were identified in the resistant strains using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. For all the clinical isolates tested that were resistant to different antibiotics, DP7 had high antimicrobial activity (≤32 mg/L. When DP7 was combined with VAN or AZT, the effect was most frequently synergistic. When we studied the resistance genes of the AZT-resistant isolates, the synergistic effect of DP7–AZT occurred most frequently in highly resistant strains or strains carrying more than two AZT-resistance genes. A transmission electron microscopic analysis of the S. aureus

  8. MULTI-DRUG RESISTANCE PATTERNS OF ENTERIC BACTERIA IN TWO POPULATIONS OF FREE-RANGING EASTERN BOX TURTLES (TERRAPENE CAROLINA CAROLINA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Cari; Allender, Matthew C; Phillips, Christopher A; Byrd, John; Lloyd, Terrell; Maddox, Carol

    2017-09-01

    Gram-negative isolates (n = 84) from 71% of free-ranging Eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) in Illinois and Tennessee, United States, demonstrated resistance to at least one antibiotic while 30% of isolates demonstrated resistance to two or more antibiotics. Resistance was observed against cefoxitin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefazolin, ampicillin, ticarcillin, cefovecin, and ceftiofur. Gram-positive bacteria were isolated from 49 turtles, and all were observed to be resistant to two or more antibiotics. Gram-positive isolate resistance was observed to penicillin, cefoxitin, oxacillin, clindamycin, amikacin, enrofloxacin, cefovecin, ceftiofur, cefazolin, marbofloxacin, gentamicin, erythromycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol. Health parameters including packed cell volume, total white blood cell count (WBC), total solids (TS), and weight were not significantly different based on antibiotic resistance patterns; however, decreasing WBC and TS were observed when the number of antibiotic-resistant detections in Gram-positive bacteria increased.

  9. Multi-bacteria multi-antibiotic testing using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for urinary tract infection (UTI) diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Kastanos, Evdokia; Pitris, Costas

    2013-06-01

    The inappropriate use of antibiotics leads to antibiotic resistance, which is a major health care problem. The current method for determination of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics requires overnight cultures. However most of the infections cannot wait for the results to receive treatment, so physicians administer general spectrum antibiotics. This results in ineffective treatments and aggravates the rising problem of antibiotic resistance. In this work, a rapid method for diagnosis and antibiogram for a bacterial infection was developed using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) with silver nanoparticles. The advantages of this novel method include its rapidness and efficiency which will potentially allow doctors to prescribe the most appropriate antibiotic for an infection. SERS spectra of three species of gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, Proteus spp., and Klebsiella spp. were obtained after 0 and 4 hour exposure to the seven different antibiotics. Bacterial strains were diluted in order to reach the concentration of (2x105 cfu/ml), cells/ml which is equivalent to the minimum concentration found in urine samples from UTIs. Even though the concentration of bacteria was low, species classification was achieved with 94% accuracy using spectra obtained at 0 hours. Sensitivity or resistance to antibiotics was predicted with 81%-100% accuracy from spectra obtained after 4 hours of exposure to the different antibiotics. This technique can be applied directly to urine samples, and with the enhancement provided by SERS, this method has the potential to be developed into a rapid method for same day UTI diagnosis and antibiogram.

  10. [Susceptibility to antibiotics of bacteria from genera Micrococcus, Kocuria, Nesterenkonia, Kytococcus and Dermacoccus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczerba, Izabela

    2003-01-01

    Two hundred and nineteen strains from genera Micrococcus, Kocuria, Nesterenkonia, Kytococcus and Dermacoccus isolated from different sources, such as saliva, skin of palm and forearm and from vestibule of nose were tested. The susceptibility to doxycycline, cetriaxone, cefuroxyme, amikacyne, amoksycillin with clavulanic acid, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, penicillin and erythromycin were estimated. In general, bacteria from these genera are sensitive to most of selected antibiotics. Most of the strains showed resistance to ampicillin and erythromycin. None of these strains produced beta-lactamases. In infectious caused by bacteria from genera Micrococcus, Kocuria, Nesterenkonia, Kytococcus and Dermacoccus in clinical treatment should be used amoksycillin with clavulanic acid, doxycycline, cetriaxone, cefuroxyme, or amikacine because, with one's own range of activity embrace highest percentage of investigated strains.

  11. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Lavandula coronopifolia essential oil against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Said, L; Zahlane, K; Ghalbane, I; El Messoussi, S; Romane, A; Cavaleiro, C; Salgueiro, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the composition of the essential oil (EO) of Lavandula coronopifolia from Morocco and to evaluate its in vitro antibacterial activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from clinical infections. The antimicrobial activity was assessed by a broth micro-well dilution method using multiresistant clinical isolates of 11 pathogenic bacteria: Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae, Klebsiella ornithinolytica, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Providencia rettgeri, Citrobacter freundii, Hafnia alvei, Salmonella spp., Acinetobacter baumannii and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The main compounds of the oil were carvacrol (48.9%), E-caryophyllene (10.8%) and caryophyllene oxide (7.7%). The oil showed activity against all tested strains with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging between 1% and 4%. For most of the strains, the MIC value was equivalent to the minimal bactericidal concentration value, indicating a clear bactericidal effect of L. coronopifolia EO.

  12. Reversal of resistance in bacteria underlies synergistic effect of essential oils with conventional antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmar, Aida; Bedoui, Ahmed; Mokdad-Bzeouich, Imen; Dhaouifi, Zaineb; Kalboussi, Zahar; Cheraif, Imed; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2017-05-01

    The pervasive of bacterial resistance earnestly threaten the prevention and the treatment of infectious diseases. Therefore, scientific communities take precedence over development of new antimicrobial agents. The aim of the study was to determine antimicrobial potency of three North-African essential oils Pituranthos chloranthus, Teucruim ramosissimum and Pistacia lentiscus individually, and in combination with antibiotics, to inhibit the growth of highly resistant clinical pathogen. Bacteria clinically isolated from patients, subsequently, challenged to a panel of drugs to determine the antibiotic-resistance profiles. Drugs displaying clinically irrelevant CMI were subjected to further studies in order to rescue antibiotic actions. Singular activity of essential oils and activity when combined with an antibiotic was hence elucidated. The results obtained highlighted the occurrence of strong antibacterial potential of essential oils when administrated alone. In the interactive experiment essential oils were found highly effective in reducing the resistance of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to amoxicillin, tetracycline, piperacillin, ofloxacin and oxacillin and resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to amoxicillin and to ofloxacin in interactive manner. Furthermore, the results proved synergism among essential oils and both antibiotics ofloxacin and novobiocin against the Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase producing E. coli (ESBL). Time kill kinetics was performed with a combination of sub-inhibitory concentrations to confirm the efficiency and killing rate of the combination over time. Further, the hypothetical toxicity of essential oils against human keratinocytes HaCat and murine spleenocytes were examined. The chemical composition of essential oils was assessed by GC/MS analysis and the major constituents found were sabinene, limonene, terpinen-4-ol, and β-eudesmol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transferable and non-transferable drug resistance in enteric bacteria from hospital and from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, JK; Bak, AL; Bülow, P

    1976-01-01

    Drug resistance to 8 different antibiotics in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from different hospitals and two groups of general practitioners was studied. Escherichia coli dominated among the 632 strains investigated. Drug resistance was found in 62% of the 512 hospital strains and in 38% of the 120...... strains from general practice. Multiple resistance was common especially in strains from hospital. R factors was found in 23% of the 317 drug-resistant strains from hospital and in 11% of the 46 drug-resistant strains from general practice. Resistance to streptomycin, sulphonamide and tetracycline either...

  14. Bacteriophages: The Enemies of Bad Bacteria Are Our Friends!

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Fernández, Lucía; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Some bacteria can enter the human body and make people ill. Usually, these diseases can be cured by antibiotics, but sometimes bacteria are resistant to them, meaning that the antibiotics do not kill the bacteria. In these cases, bacteria become very dangerous. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria but are harmless to humans. To reproduce, they get into a bacterium, where they multiply, and finally they break the bacterial cell open to release the new viruses. Therefore, bacteriopha...

  15. Relationship between antibiotic residues and occurrence of resistant bacteria in Nile tilapia (Oreochromisniloticus) cultured in cage-farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Sérgio H; Garcia, Fabiana; Gozi, Kátia S; Romera, Daiane M; Francisco, Jeane G; Moura-Andrade, Graziela C R; Tornisielo, Valdemar L

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between antibiotic residues found in the muscle of cage-farm-raised Nile tilapia (Oreochromisniloticus), the occurrence of resistant bacteria, and the sanitary practices adopted by farmers in Ilha Solteira reservoir, Brazil. Nine fish (three small fish, 40-200 g; three medium-sized fish, 200-500 g; and three large fish, 500-800 g) were collected from four cage farms every three months from April 2013 to January 2014. Ten antibiotic residues were determined using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and bacteria were isolated and tested for antibiotic resistance to determine the multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) index. Only three antibiotics (oxytetracycline, tetracycline, and florfenicol) were detected in the muscle of Nile tilapia, and their residues were the highest in small fish; however, the MAR index was higher in large fish. In addition, a direct positive relationship between the MAR index and the concentration of antibiotic residues in Nile tilapia was found. Overall, the adoption of prophylactic management practices improved the sanitary status of cage farms, reducing bacterial infections and hampering the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  16. Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria And Their Associated Resistance Genes in a Conventional Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant

    KAUST Repository

    Aljassim, Nada I.

    2013-12-01

    With water scarcity as a pressing issue in Saudi Arabia and other Middle Eastern countries, the treatment and reuse of municipal wastewater is increasingly being used as an alternative water source to supplement country water needs. Standards are in place to ensure a safe treated wastewater quality, however they do not regulate pathogenic bacteria and emerging contaminants. Information is lacking on the levels of risk to public health associated with these factors, the efficiency of conventional treatment strategies in removing them, and on wastewater treatment in Saudi Arabia in general. In this study, a municipal wastewater treatment plant in Saudi Arabia is investigated to assess the efficiency of conventional treatment in meeting regulations and removing pathogens and emerging contaminants. The study found pathogenic bacterial genera, antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotic resistant bacteria, many of which were multi-resistant in plant discharges. It was found that although the treatments are able to meet traditional quality guidelines, there remains a risk from the discussed contaminants with wastewater reuse. A deeper understanding of this risk, and suggestions for more thorough guidelines and monitoring are needed.

  17. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with retail aquaculture products from Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Lu, Zhang; Li, Xinhui; Shi, Lei; Huang, Ying; Wang, Hua H

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant (ART) bacteria and representative antibiotic resistance (AR)-encoding genes associated with several aquaculture products from retail markets in Guangzhou, China. ART commensal bacteria were found in 100% of the products examined. Among 505 multidrug-resistant isolates examined, close to one-fourth contained intI and sul1 genes: 15% contained sul2 and 5% contained tet (E). Incidences of β-lactamase-encoding genes bla(TEM), bla(CMY) and erythromycin resistance determinants ermB and ermC were 4.5, 1.7, 1.3, and 0.3%, respectively. Most of the ART isolates identified from the rinse water were Aeromonas spp.; those from intestines belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae. Plasmid-associated intI and AR-encoding genes were identified in several ART isolates by Southern hybridization. Three multidrug resistance-encoding plasmids were transferred into Escherichia coli DH5 a by chemical transformation and led to acquired AR in the transformants. In addition, the AR traits in many isolates were quite stable, even in the absence of selective pressure. Further studies are needed to reveal risk factors associated with the aquaculture production chain for targeted AR mitigation.

  18. Antibiotic management of lung infections in cystic fibrosis. II. Nontuberculous mycobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, James F; Aksamit, Timothy R; Chotirmall, Sanjay H; Dasenbrook, Elliott C; Elborn, J Stuart; LiPuma, John J; Ranganathan, Sarath C; Waters, Valerie J; Ratjen, Felix A

    2014-10-01

    Airway infections are a key component of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Whereas the approach to common pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa is guided by a significant body of evidence, other infections often pose a considerable challenge to treating physicians. In Part I of this series on the antibiotic management of difficult lung infections, we discussed bacterial organisms including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative bacterial infections, and treatment of multiple bacterial pathogens. Here, we summarize the approach to infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, and fungi. Nontuberculous mycobacteria can significantly impact the course of lung disease in patients with CF, but differentiation between colonization and infection is difficult clinically as coinfection with other micro-organisms is common. Treatment consists of different classes of antibiotics, varies in intensity, and is best guided by a team of specialized clinicians and microbiologists. The ability of anaerobic bacteria to contribute to CF lung disease is less clear, even though clinical relevance has been reported in individual patients. Anaerobes detected in CF sputum are often resistant to multiple drugs, and treatment has not yet been shown to positively affect patient outcome. Fungi have gained significant interest as potential CF pathogens. Although the role of Candida is largely unclear, there is mounting evidence that Scedosporium species and Aspergillus fumigatus, beyond the classical presentation of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, can be relevant in patients with CF and treatment should be considered. At present, however there remains limited information on how best to select patients who could benefit from antifungal therapy.

  19. Frequency of interaction-mediated triggering of antibiotic production among soil bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf eTyc

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Certain bacterial species produce antimicrobial compounds only in the presence of a competing species. However little is known on the frequency of interaction-mediated induction of antibiotic compound production in natural communities of soil bacteria. Here we developed a high-throughput method to screen for the production of antimicrobial activity by monocultures and pair-wise combinations of 146 phylogenetically different bacteria isolated from similar soil habitats. Growth responses of two human pathogenic model organisms, Escherichia coli WA321 and Staphylococcus aureus 533R4, were used to monitor antimicrobial activity. From all isolates, 33% showed antimicrobial activity only in monoculture and 42% showed activity only when tested in interactions. More bacterial isolates were active against S. aureus than against E. coli. The frequency of interaction-mediated induction of antimicrobial activity was 6% (154 interactions out of 2798 indicating that only a limited set of species combinations showed such activity. The screening revealed also interaction-mediated suppression of antimicrobial activity for 22% of all combinations tested. Whereas all patterns of antimicrobial activity (non-induced production, induced production and suppression were seen for various bacterial classes, interaction-mediated induction of antimicrobial activity was more frequent for combinations of Flavobacteria and alpha- Proteobacteria. The results of our study give a first indication on the frequency of interference competitive interactions in natural soil bacterial communities which may forms a basis for selection of bacterial groups that are promising for the discovery of novel, cryptic antibiotics.

  20. Characterization and Antibiotic Sensitivity Profile of Bacteria in Orofacial Abscesses of Odontogenic Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadish Chandra, H; Sripathi Rao, B H; Muhammed Manzoor, A P; Arun, A B

    2017-12-01

    Odontogenic infections range from peripheral abscess to superficial and deep infections leading to severe infections in head and neck region. This study was aimed to assess bacterial isolates responsible for orofacial infection of odontogenic origin and their drug susceptibility patterns so as to provide better perceptive for the management of odontogenic infections. The study was made in a selected cohort of patients, irrespective of age and gender having moderate and severe orofacial infections of odontogenic origin admitted to Yenepoya University Hospital. Pus samples were collected and identification of bacteria was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. A total of 37 study subjects were included, with bacterial isolation rate of 31 (83.7 %). The mean age presented of all patients was 40.62. Of all, 24 (64.9 %) were males. Staphylococcus aureus , Enterobacter claocae subsp. dissolvens , Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae , Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius and Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae were the most prevalent isolates. Result showed that 58.6 % of the isolates were resistant to gentamicin, 52.5 % for ampicillin, 51.3 % for piperacillin; least resistant being 18.9 % for azithromycin. High prevalence of bacterial isolates was found, Staphylococcus aureus being the dominant. Most of the bacteria were resistant to different classes of antibiotics. Appropriate antibiotics should be given based on the bacterial isolates, culture sensitivity and clinical course of the disease.

  1. Bacteriophage and lytic enzymes - can they help us in the war with antibiotic resistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trudil, D.; Rainina, E.

    2009-01-01

    Drug-resistant pathogens are a growing menace to all people, regardless of age, or socioeconomic background. They endanger people industrial societies like the United States, as well as in less developed nations and are even causing problems in military field hospitals. From Streptococcus pneumoniae to Staphylococcus, C. difficile, and multidrug-resistant TB, the list is growing. The threat of engineered microorganisms further complicates the interaction between man and Mother Nature. Additionally, although antibiotics were specifically designed for treating human health emergencies, their use for raising livestock animals has expanded. In the US, large amounts of antibiotics are routinely mixed into feed in order to promote growth rather than combat disease and as prophylactic treatment to offset unnatural diets and unhealthy living conditions. U.S.-raised animals in the 1950s received 2 million pounds per year of antibiotics in their feed compared to 50 million pounds today-a 2,500-percent increase. A large percentage of these drugs pass into the environment. In fact, prior to 1995, when fluoroquinolones were first approved to treat poultry, very few fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter were found in people with foodborne diseases in the United States. After the approval, however, many more fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria were found in humans and in poultry from slaughter plants and retail stores. The threat to our food supply becomes a threat to security. What can be done? One approach is to treat bacterial diseases by the use of bacteriophages. Phages are very small viruses that destroy by lysing select bacteria. The idea of using phage as a therapy for infectious bacterial diseases was first proposed by d'Herelle around World War I and over 80 years bacteriophage has been a key tool of healthcare professionals within Eastern Europe. More recently professionals in the USA and Western Europe have isolated and developed specific lytic components which have

  2. Antibiotic resistance and antibacterial activity in heterotrophic bacteria of mineral water origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messi, Patrizia; Guerrieri, Elisa; Bondi, Moreno

    2005-06-15

    Antibiotic resistance and antibacterial activity were determined on heterotrophic bacteria isolated from mineral waters. Of the 120 isolates Pseudomonas spp. (55.8%) was the predominant group followed by Acinetobacter spp. (14.17%), Flavobacterium spp. (10.83%), Achromobacter spp. (10%), Burkholderia cepacia (3.3%), Agrobacterium/radiobacter (2.5%), Moraxella spp. (1.7%), Aeromonas hydrophila (1.7%). Over 80% of the isolates were resistant to one or more antibiotics and the highest resistance was found for chloramphenicol, ampicillin, colistin and sulfamethizole (60%, 55%, 50% and 47.5%, respectively). Strains with multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) represented 55% of isolates and the most resistant organism belonged to the genus Pseudomonas. Of 40 randomly selected strains, 27 (67.5%) had antibacterial activity towards one or more indicators. This activity, found in a high percentage in the genus Pseudomonas (92%), emerged mainly against closely related microorganisms. Several producers were active also against Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Forty-six percent of the isolates harboured 1 to 5 plasmids with molecular weights ranging from 2.1 to 41.5 MDa.

  3. Understanding the Patterns of Antibiotic Susceptibility of Bacteria Causing Urinary Tract Infection in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunayana eSaha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common infectious diseases at the community level. In order to assess the adequacy of empirical therapy, the susceptibility of antibiotics and resistance pattern of bacteria responsible for UTI in West Bengal, India, were evaluated throughout the period of 2008-2013. The infection reports belonging to all age groups and both sexes were considered. E. coli was the most abundant uropathogen with a prevalence rate of 67.1%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (22% and Pseudomonas spp. (6%. Penicillin was least effective against UTI-causing E. coli and maximum susceptibility was recorded for the drugs belonging to fourth generation cephalosporins. Other abundant uropathogens, Klebsiella spp., were maximally resistant to broad-spectrum penicillin, followed by aminoglycosides and third generation cephalosporin. The antibiotic resistance pattern of two principal UTI pathogens, E. coli and Klebsiella spp. in West Bengal, appears in general to be similar to that found in other parts of the Globe. Higher than 50% resistance were observed for broad-spectrum penicillin. Fourth generation cephalosporin and macrolides seems to be the choice of drug in treating UTIs in Eastern India. Furthermore, improved maintenance of infection incident logs is needed in Eastern Indian hospitals in order to facilitate regular surveillance of the occurrence of antibiotic resistance patterns, since such levels continue to change.

  4. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of bacteria from diabetic foot infections Haji Adam Malik central general hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulolo, B. A.; Pase, M. A.; Ginting, F.

    2018-03-01

    Increasing rate of Diabetic Foot Infections (DFIs) caused by multi-drug-resistance pathogens plays a huge role in the duration of hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality of diabetic patients. The aim of the study is to assess the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of bacteria in DFIs and causative microorganisms. Using cross-sectional retrospective study, data were collected from medical records of DFIs patients previously hospitalized atHaji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan from January to July 2017. 33 patients met the criteria and got enrolled in the study. The classification of DFIs was evaluated according to Wagner’s Classification. Evaluation of antibiotic sensitivity and identification of causative microorganisms were performed in standard microbiologic methods. The most common grade of DFIs was Grade-4 (48.5%), followed by Grade-3 (39.4%) and Grade-5 (9.1%). A total of 12 pathogens were identified. The most common infecting microorganism isolated on pus cultures was Klebsiella pneumonia (33.3%), followed by Escherichia coli (24.2%), Acinetobacter baumanni (12.1%), and Staphylococcus aureus (9.1%). Frequent susceptible antibiotics were Amikacin (88.8%), Imipenem (87%), Meropenem (84.6%), Erythromycin (75%), and Cefoperazone/Sulbactam (68.9%). DFIs are polymicrobial infections in this study K. pneumonia was the most common cause microorganism.

  5. Functional gold nanoparticle-based antibacterial agents for nosocomial and antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yen-Ling; Wang, Sin-Ge; Wu, Ching-Yi; Lee, Kai-Chieh; Jao, Chan-Jung; Chou, Shiu-Huey; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-10-01

    Medical treatments for bacterial-infections have become challenging because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Thus, new therapeutics and antibiotics must be developed. Arginine and tryptophan can target negatively-charged bacteria and penetrate bacterial cell membrane, respectively. Synthetic-peptides containing arginine, tryptophan and cysteine termini, in other words, (DVFLG)2REEW4C and (DVFLG)2REEW2C, as starting materials were mixed with aqueous tetrachloroauric acid to generate peptide-immobilized gold nanoparticles (i.e., [DVFLG]2REEW4C-AuNPs and [DVFLG]2REEW2C-AuNPs) through one-pot reactions. The peptide immobilized AuNPs exhibit targeting capacity and antibacterial activity. Furthermore, (DVFLG)2REEW4C-AuNPs immobilized with a higher number of tryptophan molecules possess more effective antibacterial capacity than (DVFLG)2REEW2C-AuNPs. Nevertheless, they are not harmful for animal cells. The feasibility of using the peptide-AuNPs to inhibit the cell growth of bacterium-infected macrophages was demonstrated. These results suggested that the proposed antibacterial AuNPs are effective antibacterial agents for Staphylococci, Enterococci and antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. [Formula: see text].

  6. Antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria isolated from infections in cats and dogs throughout Europe (2002-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroemer, Stéphane; El Garch, Farid; Galland, Delphine; Petit, Jean-Luc; Woehrle, Frédérique; Boulouis, Henri-Jean

    2014-03-01

    A monitoring program of the pre-treatment susceptibility of clinical isolates of bacteria from diseased dogs and cats was active between the years 2002 and 2009. Susceptibility of each isolated strain to a panel of nine antibiotics (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ampicillin, penicillin, clindamycin, doxycycline, enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin, trimethoprim and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) was assessed. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of marbofloxacin was also determined by a standardized microdilution technique following CLSI recommendations. In total, 1857 bacterial strains were collected throughout Europe from cases of otitis, respiratory, urinary and dermatological infections. Although bacterial susceptibility varied for each of the antibiotics within the panel, patterns of susceptibility were similar to those described in the literature for comparable time periods and geographical areas. With a clinical resistance varying from 0 to 14.48% against the isolated strains, marbofloxacin susceptibility was very high and remains an effective antibiotic for the treatment of otitis, urinary, respiratory and dermatological infections in companion animals. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Modulation of the Interaction of Enteric Bacteria with Intestinal Mucosa by Stress-Related Catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Stress associated with parturition, transport or mixing has long been correlated with enhanced faecal excretion of diarrhoeal zoonotic pathogens in animals such as Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. It may also predispose humans to infection and/or be associated with more severe outcomes. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is the ability of enteric bacterial pathogens to sense and respond to host stress-related catecholamines. This article reviews evidence of the ability of catecholamine hormones to modulate interactions between Gram-negative diarrhoeal pathogens and intestinal mucosa, as well as the molecular mechanisms that may be at work.

  8. Copper-resistant enteric bacteria from United Kingdom and Australian piggeries.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J R; Morgan, A G; Rouch, D A; Brown, N L; Lee, B T

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-three enteric isolates from Australian (Escherichia coli only) and United Kingdom (U.K.) (Salmonella sp., Citrobacter spp., and E. coli) piggeries were characterized with respect to their copper resistance. The copper resistance phenotypes of four new Australian E. coli isolates were comparable with that of the previously studied E. coli K-12 strain ED8739(pRJ1004), in that the resistance level in rich media was high (up to 18 mM CuSO4) and resistance was inducible. Copper resistance w...

  9. Detection of emerging antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from subclinical mastitis in cattle in West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Das

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this work was to detect antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from subclinical mastitis in cattle in West Bengal. Materials and Methods: The milk samples were collected from the cattle suffering with subclinical mastitis in West Bengal. The milk samples were inoculated into the nutrient broth and incubated at 37°C. On the next day, the growth was transferred into nutrient agar and MacConkey agar. All the pure cultures obtained from nutrient agar slant were subjected to Gram-staining and standard biochemical tests. All the bacterial isolates were tested in vitro for their sensitivity to different antibiotics commonly used in veterinary practices. All Gram-negative isolates including positive control were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR for detection of blaCTX-M, blaTEM, blaSHV, blaVIM, tetA, tetB, tetC, and tetM genes considered for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL, metallo-β-lactamase, and tetracycline resistance. Results: In total, 50 Gram-negative organisms (Escherichia coli, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, and Enterobacter were isolated from milk samples of subclinical mastitis infected cattle. Among these Gram-negative isolates, 48% (24/50 were found either ESBL producing or tetracycline resistant. Out of total 50 Gram-negative isolates, blaCTX-M was detected in 18 (36% isolates, and 6 (12% harbored blaTEM genes in PCR. None of the isolates carried blaSHV genes. Further, in this study, 5 (10% isolates harbored tet(A gene, and 8 (16% isolates carried tet(B gene. No tet(C gene was detected from the isolates. Conclusion: This study showed emerging trend of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria associated with subclinical mastitis in cattle in West Bengal, India.

  10. Selective grazing from protist over enteric bacteria in an aquatic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, M. S.; Escalante, A. H.; Folabella, A. M.; Zamora, A. S.

    2009-07-01

    Its very clear that the grazing from protozoan can be an important source of mortality for the suspended bacteria, both in marine and freshwater environments. Considering that the presence of fecal contamination its a frequent phenomenon in this environments, and that Escherichia coli and members of Enterococcus genera are indicators of microbiology water quality, we analyze the effect of grazing from protozoan over E. coli and Enterococcus faecalis in de Los Padres Lagoon waters (Buenos Aires, Argentina) 37 degree centigrade 56'30'' S, 57 degree centigrade 44'30'' W). (Author)

  11. Low antibiotic resistance among anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria in periodontitis 5 years following metronidazole therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, G; Preus, H R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess antibiotic susceptibility among predominant Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontitis patients who 5 years prior had been subject to mechanical therapy with or without adjunctive metronidazole. One pooled sample was taken from the 5 deepest sites of each of 161 patients that completed the 5 year follow-up after therapy. The samples were analyzed by culture. A total number of 85 anaerobic strains were isolated from the predominant subgingival flora of 65/161 patient samples, identified, and tested for antibiotic susceptibility by MIC determination. E-tests against metronidazole, penicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid and clindamycin were employed. The 73/85 strains were Gram-negative rods (21 Porphyromonas spp., 22 Prevotella/Bacteroides spp., 23 Fusobacterium/Filifactor spp., 3 Campylobacter spp. and 4 Tannerella forsythia). These were all isolated from the treated patients irrespective of therapy procedures (+/-metronidazole) 5 years prior. Three strains (Bifidobacterium spp., Propionibacterium propionicum, Parvimonas micra) showed MIC values for metronidazole over the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing break point of >4 μg/mL. All Porphyromonas and Tannerella strains were highly susceptible. Metronidazole resistant Gram-negative strains were not found, while a few showed resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. In this population of 161 patients who had been subject to mechanical periodontal therapy with or without adjunct metronidazole 5 years prior, no cultivable antibiotic resistant anaerobes were found in the predominant subgingival microbiota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ciprofloxacin residue and antibiotic-resistant biofilm bacteria in hospital effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory, Jérôme; Bricheux, Geneviève; Togola, Anne; Bonnet, Jean Louis; Donnadieu-Bernard, Florence; Nakusi, Laurence; Forestier, Christiane; Traore, Ousmane

    2016-07-01

    Discharge of antimicrobial residues and resistant bacteria in hospital effluents is supposed to have strong impacts on the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment. This study aimed to characterize the effluents of the Gabriel Montpied teaching hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France, by simultaneously measuring the concentration of ciprofloxacin and of biological indicators resistant to this molecule in biofilms formed in the hospital effluent and by comparing these data to ciprofloxacin consumption and resistant bacterial isolates of the hospital. Determination of the measured environmental concentration of ciprofloxacin by spot sampling and polar organic chemical integrative (POCIS) sampling over 2 weeks, and comparison with predicted environmental concentrations produced a hazard quotient >1, indicating a potential ecotoxicological risk. A negative impact was also observed with whole hospital effluent samples using the Tetrahymena pyriformis biological model. During the same period, biofilms were formed within the hospital effluent, and analysis of ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates indicated that Gamma-Proteobacteria were numerous, predominantly Aeromonadaceae (69.56%) and Enterobacteriaceae (22.61%). Among the 115 isolates collected, plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone-resistant genes were detected, with mostly aac(6')-lb-cr and qnrS. In addition, 60% of the isolates were resistant to up to six antibiotics, including molecules mostly used in the hospital (aminosides and third-generation cephalosporins). In parallel, 1247 bacteria isolated from hospitalized patients and resistant to at least one of the fluoroquinolones were collected. Only 5 of the 14 species identified in the effluent biofilm were also found in the clinical isolates, but PFGE typing of the Gram-negative isolates found in both compartments showed there was no clonality among the strains. Altogether, these data confirm the role of hospital loads as sources of pollution for wastewater

  13. Microbiological and biochemical studies on certain antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from certain clinical specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nada, H.M.AL.M.

    2008-01-01

    Infection is a dynamic process involving invasion of the body by pathogenic microorganisms and reactions of the tissues to microorganisms and their toxins. Pathogenic microorganisms isolated from clinical samples are of great threat to human health.The outcome of an infection depends on the virulence of the pathogen and the relative degree of resistance or susceptibility to antimicrobial chemotherapy. Antimicrobial agents interfere with specific processes that are essential for growth and division.Development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a problem of great concern. The high prevalence of resistant bacteria seems to be related to uncontrolled usage of antibiotics. B-lactamases are the most common cause of bacterial resistance to B-lactam antimicrobial agents, and it is one of the most important reason for increasing the resistance in pathogenic bacteria against some antibiotics especially those acting on inhibition of cell wall synthesis. One hundred and seven clinical samples and specimens were collected from public, private hospitals and National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Cairo, Egypt. Out of them 72 cases positive for microbial infection. Twelve cases were showed mixed infection. Eighty four isolates of pathogenic bacteria and yeast were collected from single and mixed culture. Susceptibilities of the isolates to 20 different antimicrobial agents were determined according to Kirby-Bauer method. Nine multi-drug resistant gram-negative bacterial strains were identified by (Micro Scan WalkAway 96 SI System). Six of them urine isolates, 2 wound (pus) isolates and one sputum isolate. The identified strains were exposed to in-vitro gamma irradiation at dose level of 24.4 Gy, which is biologically equivalent to the fractionated multiple therapeutic dose used in the protocol of cancer treatment of some patients. The antimicrobial susceptibility of the nine multi-drug resistant strains were carried out by disk diffusion method before and after irradiation

  14. Tracking acquired antibiotic resistance in commensal bacteria of Galápagos land iguanas: no man, no resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, Maria Cristina; Migliore, Luciana; Marquez, Cruz; Tapia, Washington; Cedeño, Virna; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Gentile, Gabriele

    2010-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance, evolving and spreading among bacterial pathogens, poses a serious threat to human health. Antibiotic use for clinical, veterinary and agricultural practices provides the major selective pressure for emergence and persistence of acquired resistance determinants. However, resistance has also been found in the absence of antibiotic exposure, such as in bacteria from wildlife, raising a question about the mechanisms of emergence and persistence of resistant strains under similar conditions, and the implications for resistance control strategies. Since previous studies yielded some contrasting results, possibly due to differences in the ecological landscapes of the studied wildlife, we further investigated this issue in wildlife from a remote setting of the Galapagos archipelago. Screening for acquired antibiotic resistance was carried out in commensal enterobacteria from Conolophus pallidus, the terrestrial iguana of Isla Santa Fe, where: i) the abiotic conditions ensure to microbes good survival possibilities in the environment; ii) the animal density and their habits favour microbial circulation between individuals; and iii) there is no history of antibiotic exposure and the impact of humans and introduced animal species is minimal except for restricted areas. Results revealed that acquired antibiotic resistance traits were exceedingly rare among bacteria, occurring only as non-dominant strains from an area of minor human impact. Where both the exposure to antibiotics and the anthropic pressure are minimal, acquired antibiotic resistance traits are not normally found in bacteria from wildlife, even if the ecological landscape is highly favourable to bacterial circulation among animals. Monitoring antibiotic resistance in wildlife from remote areas could also be a useful tool to evaluate the impact of anthropic pressure.

  15. Tracking acquired antibiotic resistance in commensal bacteria of Galápagos land iguanas: no man, no resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Thaller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistance, evolving and spreading among bacterial pathogens, poses a serious threat to human health. Antibiotic use for clinical, veterinary and agricultural practices provides the major selective pressure for emergence and persistence of acquired resistance determinants. However, resistance has also been found in the absence of antibiotic exposure, such as in bacteria from wildlife, raising a question about the mechanisms of emergence and persistence of resistant strains under similar conditions, and the implications for resistance control strategies. Since previous studies yielded some contrasting results, possibly due to differences in the ecological landscapes of the studied wildlife, we further investigated this issue in wildlife from a remote setting of the Galapagos archipelago. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Screening for acquired antibiotic resistance was carried out in commensal enterobacteria from Conolophus pallidus, the terrestrial iguana of Isla Santa Fe, where: i the abiotic conditions ensure to microbes good survival possibilities in the environment; ii the animal density and their habits favour microbial circulation between individuals; and iii there is no history of antibiotic exposure and the impact of humans and introduced animal species is minimal except for restricted areas. Results revealed that acquired antibiotic resistance traits were exceedingly rare among bacteria, occurring only as non-dominant strains from an area of minor human impact. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Where both the exposure to antibiotics and the anthropic pressure are minimal, acquired antibiotic resistance traits are not normally found in bacteria from wildlife, even if the ecological landscape is highly favourable to bacterial circulation among animals. Monitoring antibiotic resistance in wildlife from remote areas could also be a useful tool to evaluate the impact of anthropic pressure.

  16. Identification of antibiotic resistant bacteria community and a GeoChip based study of resistome in urban watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Adrian; Ng, Charmaine; He, Jianzhong

    2016-12-01

    Urban watersheds from point sources are potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). However, few studies have investigated urban watersheds of non-point sources. To understand the type of ARGs and bacteria that might carry such genes, we investigated two non-point source urban watersheds with different land-use profiles. Antibiotic resistance levels of two watersheds (R1, R3) were examined using heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) as a culturing method to obtain counts of bacteria resistant to seven antibiotics belonging to different classes (erythromycin, kanamycin, lincomycin, norfloxacin, sulfanilamide, tetracycline and trimethoprim). From the HPC study, 239 antibiotic resistant bacteria were characterized for resistance to more antibiotics. Furthermore, ARGs and antimicrobial biosynthesis genes were identified using GeoChip version 5.0 to elucidate the resistomes of surface waters in watersheds R1 and R3. The HPC study showed that water samples from R1 had significantly higher counts of bacteria resistant to erythromycin, kanamycin, norfloxacin, sulfanilamide, tetracycline and trimethoprim than those from R3 (Analysis of Similarity (ANOSIM), R = 0.557, p antibiotics tested, lincomycin and trimethoprim resistant bacteria are greater in abundances. The 239 antibiotic resistant isolates represent a subset of resistant bacterial populations, including bacteria not previously known for resistance. Majority of the isolates had resistance to ampicillin, vancomycin, lincomycin and trimethoprim. GeoChip revealed similar ARGs in both watersheds, but with significantly higher intensities for tetX and β-lactamase B genes in R1 than R3. The genes with the highest average normalized intensities in R1 and R3 were tetracycline (tet) and fosfomycin (fosA) resistance genes, respectively. The higher abundance of tetX genes in R1 is congruent with the higher abundance of tetracycline resistant HPC observed in R1 samples. Strong correlations (r ≥ 0.8) of efflux

  17. Utilization of Fenton-like reaction for antibiotics and resistant bacteria elimination in different parts of WWTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackuľak, Tomáš; Nagyová, Kristína; Faberová, Milota; Grabic, Roman; Koba, Olga; Gál, Miroslav; Birošová, Lucia

    2015-09-01

    Utilization of relatively low-cost modification of Fenton reaction for the elimination of selected antibiotics and resistant coliforms in different part of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was studied. The concentration of antibiotics and occurrence of resistant gems in different stages of WWTP in the capital city of Slovakia - Bratislava was analyzed by LC-MS/MS technique. Consequently, Fenton-like reaction was applied for the elimination of chemical and biological contaminants. Comparative study with classical Fenton reaction was also done. Very high concentrations of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin and azithromycin in influent water were found. Coliform bacteria were predominantly resistant to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. After the mechanical stage, the concentration of antibiotics in water was significantly decreased because of the sorption during this step. Biological step degraded 12 types of antibiotics. Analyses of effluent water showed very bad elimination of azithromycin (919ng/L) and clarithromycin (684ng/L). Contrary, ciprofloxacin was removed with very high efficiency (95%). The number of resistant bacteria was also significantly decreased in effluent water. In the case of Escherichia coli only ampicillin and gentamicin resistance bacteria were detected. Our results show that antibiotics as well as resistant bacteria were eliminated by the modification of classical Fenton reaction with high efficiency. The modification of the Fenton reaction can decrease the process wages, environmental impact. Moreover, the degradation process was easily controlled, monitored and tuned. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Urinary tract infection (UTI) multi-bacteria multi-antibiotic testing using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Kastanos, Evdokia; Pitris, Costas

    2013-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major health care problem mostly caused by the inappropriate use of antibiotics. At the root of the problem lies the current method for determination of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics which requires overnight cultures. Physicians suspecting an infection usually prescribe an antibiotic without waiting for the results. This practice aggravates the problem of bacterial resistance. In this work, a rapid method of diagnosis and antibiogram for a bacterial infection was developed using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) with silver nanoparticles. SERS spectra of three species of gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, Proteus spp., and Klebsiella spp. were obtained after 0 and 4 hour exposure to the seven different antibiotics. Even though the concentration of bacteria was low (2x105 cfu/ml), species classification was achieved with 94% accuracy using spectra obtained at 0 hours. Sensitivity or resistance to antibiotics was predicted with 81%-100% accuracy from spectra obtained after 4 hours of exposure to the different antibiotics. With the enhancement provided by SERS, the technique can be applied directly to urine or blood samples, bypassing the need for overnight cultures. This technology can lead to the development of rapid methods of diagnosis and antibiogram for a variety of bacterial infections.

  19. Effect of subtherapeutic administration of antibiotics on the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli bacteria in feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, T W; Yanke, L J; Topp, E; Olson, M E; Read, R R; Morck, D W; McAllister, T A

    2008-07-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in 300 feedlot steers receiving subtherapeutic levels of antibiotics was investigated through the collection of 3,300 fecal samples over a 314-day period. Antibiotics were selected based on the commonality of use in the industry and included chlortetracycline plus sulfamethazine (TET-SUL), chlortetracycline (TET), virginiamycin, monensin, tylosin, or no antibiotic supplementation (control). Steers were initially fed a barley silage-based diet, followed by transition to a barley grain-based diet. Despite not being administered antibiotics prior to arrival at the feedlot, the prevalences of steers shedding TET- and ampicillin (AMP)-resistant E. coli were >40 and combination with sulfamethazine increased the prevalence of tetracycline- and AMP-resistant E. coli in cattle. However, resistance to antibiotics may be related to additional environmental factors such as diet.

  20. Analysis of bile bacteria culture and their antibiotic sensitivity in patients with varying degrees of acute cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Huifang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo profile the types of bacteria in bile culture and study their antibiotic sensitivity pattern in patients with varying degrees of acute cholangitis and to provide data guidance for the prevention and treatment of bacterial infection. MethodsThe clinical data of 230 patients with acute cholangitis who were admitted to our hospital from April 2010 to April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Classification of pathogenic bacteria and the antibiotic sensitivity test in bile cultures were performed using VITEK 2 Compact Biomerieux microbiological system. ResultsWithin the 230 patients, 172 tested positive for biliary bacteria, and the positive rate was 74.78% (172/230. There were 237 strains of pathogenic bacteria, including 135 strains of Gram-positive bacteria (56.96%, comprised mainly of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus aureus, 96 strains of Gram-negative bacteria (40.51%, comprised mainly of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumonia, and 6 strains of fungi (2.53%, comprised mainly of yeast. Significant difference in the positive rate of bacteria was detected between patients with mild and severe cholangitis (χ2 = 4.58, P = 0.028. Gram-negative bacteria were the predominant isolates in patients with mild and moderate acute cholangitis, while multiple bacterial infection was more common in patients with severe cholangitis. Biliary bacteria had a higher rate of susceptibility to vancomycin, imipenem, and amikacin compared with other antibiotics. ConclusionGram-positive bacteria are the predominant pathogens in acute cholangitis. Early detection, immediate intervention, and accurate drug susceptibility test should be implemented at regular intervals to direct effective clinical therapy.

  1. Antibiotic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Superbugs and Drugs" Home | Contact Us General Background: Antibiotic Agents What is an antibacterial and how are ... with the growth and reproduction of bacteria. While antibiotics and antibacterials both attack bacteria, these terms have ...

  2. Two class II D-tagatose-bisphosphate aldolases from enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkkötter, Andreas; Shakeri-Garakani, Ansiah; Lengeler, Joseph W

    2002-05-01

    Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Klebsiella pneumoniaeand Klebsiella oxytocawere found to contain two D-tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate (TagBP)-specific aldolases involved in catabolism of galactitol (genes gatY gatZ) and of N-acetyl-galactosamine and D-galactosamine (genes kbaY kbaZ,also called agaY agaZ). The two aldolases were closely related (> or = 53.8% identical amino acids) and could substitute for each other in vivo. The catalytic subunits GatY or KbaY alone were sufficient to show aldolase activity. Although substantially shorter than other aldolases (285 amino acids, instead of 358 and 349 amino acids), these subunits contained most or all of the residues that have been identified as essential in substrate/product recognition and catalysis for class II aldolases. In contrast to these, both aldolases required subunits GatZ or KbaZ (420 amino acids) for full activity and for good in vivo and in vitro stability. The Z subunits alone did not show any aldolase activity. Close relatives of these new TagBP aldolases were found in several gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, e.g., Streptomyces coelicolor.

  3. Host and geographical factors influence the thermal niche of enteric bacteria isolated from native Australian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, S; Gordon, D M

    2001-10-01

    The thermal profiles of 118 bacterial strains, representing six species of the family Enterobacteriaceae, isolated from a variety of native Australian mammals were determined under in vitro conditions. Each of the bacterial species had a unique thermal profile and differed in their minimum or maximum temperature for growth and in their response to changing temperatures. The taxonomic classification of the host from which the bacterial strains were isolated explained a significant amount of the variation in thermal profile among strains of a species. Host effects were detected at all taxonomic levels: order, family, genus, and species. The locality (State or Territory) or climate zone from which the strain was collected explained a significant amount of the variation in the thermal profile of Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains. Genetically similar strains, as determined by allozyme profiles, had similar thermal profiles for the bacterial species Hafnia alvei and Escherichia coli. The results of this study indicate that there are potentially many aspects of host biology that may determine the thermal profile of these bacteria.

  4. Why Do Fast-Growing Bacteria Enter Overflow Metabolism? Testing the Membrane Real Estate Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szenk, Mariola; Dill, Ken A; de Graff, Adam M R

    2017-08-23

    Bacteria and other cells show a puzzling behavior. At high growth rates, E. coli switch from respiration (which is ATP-efficient) to using fermentation for additional ATP (which is inefficient). This overflow metabolism results in a several-fold decrease in ATP produced per glucose molecule provided as food. By integrating diverse types of experimental data into a simple biophysical model, we give evidence that this onset is the result of the membrane real estate hypothesis: Fast growth drives cells to be bigger, reducing their surface-to-volume ratios. This decreases the membrane area available for respiratory proteins despite growing demand, causing increased crowding. Only when respiratory proteins reach their crowding limit does the cell activate fermentation, since fermentation allows faster ATP production per unit membrane area. Surface limitation thus creates a Pareto trade-off between membrane efficiency and ATP yield that links metabolic choice to the size and shape of a bacterial cell. By exploring the predictions that emerge from this trade-off, we show how consideration of molecular structures, energetics, rates, and equilibria can provide important insight into cellular behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Antiseptic and antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria causing urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, D J; Thomas, B

    1980-01-01

    A collection of 802 isolates of Gram-negative bacteria causing urinary tract infections was made from general practice, antenatal clinics, and local hospitals. The organisms were tested for their sensitivity to chlorhexidine, cetrimide, glutaraldehyde, phenyl mercuric nitrate, a phenolic formulation, and a proprietary antiseptic containing a mixture of picloxydine, octyl phenoxy polyethoxyethanol, and benzalkonium chloride. Escherichia coli, the major species isolated, proved to be uniformly sensitive to these agents. Approximately 10% of the total number of isolates, however, exhibited a degree of resistance to the cationic agents. These resistant organisms were members of the genera Proteus, Providencia, and Pseudomonas; they were also generally resistant to five, six, or seven antibiotics. It is proposed therefore that an antiseptic policy which involves the intensive use of cationic antiseptics might lead to the selection of a flora of notoriously drug-resistant species. PMID:6769972

  6. Evaluation of new antibiotic cocktails against contaminating bacteria found in allograft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Agnese; Riello, Erika; Trojan, Diletta; Cogliati, Elisa; Palù, Giorgio; Manganelli, Riccardo; Paolin, Adolfo

    2016-12-01

    Contamination of retrieved tissues is a major problem for allograft safety. Consequently, tissue banks have implemented decontamination protocols to eliminate microorganisms from tissues. Despite the widespread adoption of these protocols, few comprehensive studies validating such methods have been published. In this manuscript we compare the bactericidal activity of different antibiotic cocktails at different temperatures against a panel of bacterial species frequently isolated in allograft tissues collected at the Treviso Tissue Bank Foundation, a reference organization of the Veneto Region in Italy that was instituted to select, recover, process, store and distribute human tissues. We were able to identify at least two different formulations capable of killing most of the bacteria during prolonged incubation at 4 °C.

  7. Copper-resistant enteric bacteria from United Kingdom and Australian piggeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J R; Morgan, A G; Rouch, D A; Brown, N L; Lee, B T

    1993-08-01

    Thirty-three enteric isolates from Australian (Escherichia coli only) and United Kingdom (U.K.) (Salmonella sp., Citrobacter spp., and E. coli) piggeries were characterized with respect to their copper resistance. The copper resistance phenotypes of four new Australian E. coli isolates were comparable with that of the previously studied E. coli K-12 strain ED8739(pRJ1004), in that the resistance level in rich media was high (up to 18 mM CuSO4) and resistance was inducible. Copper resistance was transferable by conjugation from the new Australian isolates to E. coli K-12 recipients. DNA similarity between the new Australian isolates and the pco copper resistance determinant located on plasmid pRJ1004 was strong as measured by DNA-DNA hybridization; however, the copper resistance plasmids were nonidentical as indicated by the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphisms between the plasmids. DNA-DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated DNA homology between the pco determinant and DNA from the U.K.E. coli, Salmonella sp., and Citrobacter freundii isolates. However, the copper resistance level and inducibility were variable among the U.K. strains. Of the U.K. E. coli isolates, 1 demonstrated a high level of copper resistance, 4 exhibited intermediate resistance, and 16 showed a low level of copper resistance; all of these resistances were expressed constitutively. A single U.K. C. freundii isolate, had a high level of copper resistance, inducible by subtoxic levels of copper. Transconjugants from one E. coli and one C. freundii donor, with E. coli K-12 strain UB1637 as a recipient, showed copper resistance levels and inducibility of resistance which differed from that expressed from plasmid pRJ1004.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Secular trends in nosocomial bloodstream infections: antibiotic-resistant bacteria increase the total burden of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerlaan, H S M; Harbarth, S; Buiting, A G M; Crook, D W; Fitzpatrick, F; Hanberger, H; Herwaldt, L A; van Keulen, P H J; Kluytmans, J A J W; Kola, A; Kuchenbecker, R S; Lingaas, E; Meessen, N; Morris-Downes, M M; Pottinger, J M; Rohner, P; dos Santos, R P; Seifert, H; Wisplinghoff, H; Ziesing, S; Walker, A S; Bonten, M J M

    2013-03-01

    It is unknown whether rising incidence rates of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) replace antibiotic-susceptible bacteria (ASB), leaving the total BSI rate unaffected. We investigated temporal trends in annual incidence densities (events per 100 000 patient-days) of nosocomial BSIs caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), ARB other than MRSA, and ASB in 7 ARB-endemic and 7 ARB-nonendemic hospitals between 1998 and 2007. 33 130 nosocomial BSIs (14% caused by ARB) yielded 36 679 microorganisms. From 1998 to 2007, the MRSA incidence density increased from 0.2 to 0.7 (annual increase, 22%) in ARB-nonendemic hospitals, and from 3.1 to 11.7 (annual increase, 10%) in ARB-endemic hospitals (P = .2), increasing the incidence density difference between ARB-endemic and ARB-nonendemic hospitals from 2.9 to 11.0. The non-MRSA ARB incidence density increased from 2.8 to 4.1 (annual increase, 5%) in ARB-nonendemic hospitals, and from 1.5 to 17.4 (annual increase, 22%) in ARB-endemic hospitals (P nosocomial BSIs in ARB-nonendemic and ARB-endemic hospitals, respectively (P nosocomial BSI rates due to ARB occur in addition to infections caused by ASB, increasing the total burden of disease. Hospitals with high ARB infection rates in 2005 had an excess burden of BSI of 20.6 per 100 000 patient-days in a 10-year period, mainly caused by infections with ARB.

  9. Correlation between antibiotic consumption and resistance of bloodstream bacteria in a University Hospital in North Eastern Italy, 2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarello, Marta; Simonetti, Omar; Knezevich, Anna; Carniel, Ludovica Ilaria; Monticelli, Jacopo; Busetti, Marina; Schincariol, Paolo; Torelli, Lucio; Luzzati, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria is a worrisome problem worldwide. This study investigated the correlation between antibiotic consumption and antimicrobial resistance trends of the most important bacteria causing bacteremia at the University hospital of Trieste, Italy, from 2008 to 2014. Antibiotic consumption (Defined Daily Dose-DDD-per 100 patient/days) and antibiotic resistance (percentage of antibiotic intermediate o resistant isolates) were analyzed independently with linear correlation by year. Potential correlations between antibiotic consumption and bacteria resistance rates were investigated through the Pearson's correlation. The overall consumption of antibiotic grew from 80 to 97 DDD 100 patient/days (p = 0.005) during the study period. The increased consumption of amoxicillin/clavulanate and piperacillin/tazobactam was associated with the reduction of MRSA rate from 48.5 to 25.9% (p = 0.007 and p = 0.04, respectively). The increased consumption of piperacillin/tazobactam was associated with the reduction of ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae rate from 28.9 to 20.9% (p = 0.01). The increased consumption of carbapenems was associated with the increased rate of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii from 0 to 96.4% (p = 0.03). No carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates were reported. The consumption of vancomycin grew significantly (p = 0.005). A dramatic spread of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium occurred in 2014. The consumption of fluoroquinolones and extended-spectrum cephalosporins remained stable. An antibiotic stewardship program targeted to limit the consumption of extended-spectrum cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones in favor of amoxicillin/clavulanate and piperacillin/tazobactam correlates with a decreasing rate of MRSA and ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae. The analysis of correlations between antibiotic consumption and bacterial resistance rates is a useful tool to orient antimicrobial stewardship

  10. Antimicrobial and Herbal Drug Resistance in Enteric Bacteria Isolated from Faecal Droppings of Common House Lizard/Gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhoj R. Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From 194 faecal dropping samples of common house geckos collected from offices (60, houses (88, integrated farm units (IFS,18 and hostels, guest houses, and dining rooms of different canteen/mess (HGM, 28, 326 bacterial isolates of enteric bacteria belonging to 17 genera and 34 species were detected. Escherichia coli were the most frequently (39 isolated followed by Citrobacter freundii (33, Klebsiella pneumonia (27, Salmonella indica (12, Enterobacter gergoviae (12, and Ent. agglomerans (11. Other important bacteria isolated from gecko droppings were Listonella damsela (2, Raoultella terrigena (3, S. salamae (2, S. houtenae (3, Edwardsiella tarda (4, Edwardsiella hoshinae (1, and Klebsiella oxytoca (2. Of the 223 isolates tested for antimicrobial drug sensitivity, 27 (12.1% had multiple drug resistance (MDR. None of the salmonellae or edwardsiellae had MDR however, MDR strains were significantly more common among Escherichia spp. (P=1.9×10-5 and isolates from IFS units (P=3.58×10-23. The most effective herbal drug, Ageratum conyzoides extract, inhibited growth of only 27.8% of strains tested followed by ethanolic extract of Zanthoxylum rhetsa (13.9%, eucalyptus oil (5.4%, patchouli oil (5.4%, lemongrass oil (3.6%, and sandalwood oil (3.1%, and Artemisia vulgaris essential oil (3.1%.

  11. Effects of reducing beta-lactam antibiotic pressure on intestinal colonization of antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Nijssen (Saskia); A.C. Fluit (Ad); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); J. Top (Janetta); R.J.L. Willems (Rob); M.J.M. Bonten (Marc)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We determined the effects of two antibiotic policies (predominance of either β-lactam antibiotics or fluroquinolones) on acquisition with third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and fluoroquinolone-resistant CRE (FCRE) in two ICUs, with monitoring of

  12. Evaluation of post-antibiotic effect in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Tavella

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the postantibiotic effect (PAE is a well recognized phenomenon, the mechanism by which it is induced has not fully elucidated yet. It has been suggested that PAE is the time required by bacteria to synthesize proteins or mRNA characterized by a short half-life that are consumed during antibiotic treatment.This phenomenon is widely studied on Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative rods, while information about Gram-positive rods and Gram-negative cocci are scanty.To gain new insights on the PAE, this study was addressed to evaluated the time required by Moraxella catarrhalis and Lactobacillus planctarum to resume their physiological growth rate after exposure to various antibiotics. Methods PAE was estimated in accordance with the method of Craig and Gudmundsson using the following drugs: penicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefalotin, ceftazidime, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, gentamycin and azithromycin. Log-phase bacteria were exposed to drug at a concentration corresponding to 4 times the MIC value for 1h.The drug was inactivated by 1:1000 dilution. Bacterial counts were determined at time zero, immediately after drug dilution, and at each hour after removal for 6 - 7h by a pour-plate technique. The PAE was defined as the difference in time required by test and control cultures to increase by 1 log in CFU number. Results All drugs tested induced a PAE on the strains studied. M. catarrhalis registered PAE values ranging between 0,5 (gentamycin and 2 (ceftazidime, imipenem and azithromycin.With respect to L. plantarum a PAE between 0,8 (cefalotin and 3 hours (ciprofloxacin were detected. Conclusion. These findings demonstrated that all the drugs tested were able to induce a PAE on the strains tested.This observation differs from that observed on Gram-negative rods characterised by negative PAE values induced by penicillins and cephalosporins.This results might reflect the different target of these compounds on these Gram-positive rods or the

  13. The mechanism of action of Russian propolis ethanol extracts against two antibiotic-resistant biofilm-forming bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, J; Redden, P; Traba, C

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic-sensitive Escherichia coli biofilm-forming bacteria and Russian propolis ethanol extracts was evaluated. In this study, bacterial cell death occurred when the cell membranes of bacteria interacted specifically with the antibacterial compounds found in propolis. In order to understand the Russian propolis ethanol extract mechanism of action, microscopy and bacterial lysis studies were conducted. Results uncovered from these experiments imply that the mechanism of action of Russian propolis ethanol extracts is structural rather than functional. The results obtained throughout this study demonstrate cell membrane damage, resulting in cell lysis and eventually bacterial death. Most strains of bacteria and subsequently biofilms, have evolved and have altered their chemical composition in an attempt to protect themselves from antibiotics. The resistant nature of bacteria stems from the chemical rather than the physical means of inactivation of antibiotics. The results uncovered in this work demonstrate the potential application of Russian propolis ethanol extracts as a very efficient and effective method for bacterial and biofilm inactivation. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Multicentre investigation of pathogenic bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in Chinese patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiuqing; Cui, Junchang; Wang, Jing; Chang, Yan; Fang, Qiuhong; Bai, Changqing; Zhou, Xiumei; Zhou, Hong; Feng, Huasong; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Weiguo; Wen, Zhongguang; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yi; Yu, Ling; Li, Chunsun; Chen, Liangan

    2015-10-01

    A prospective observational study to investigate the distribution and antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic bacteria in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) in Beijing, China. Patients with AECOPD were recruited from 11 general hospitals. Sputum specimens were cultured and bacteria identified. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined for each isolate, and presence of antibiotic resistance genes was evaluated using polymerase chain reaction. Pathogenic bacteria were isolated from 109/318 patients (34.28%); 124 isolates of 22 pathogenic bacterial species were identified, including Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.94%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16.94%), Acinetobacter baumannii (11.29%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (8.87%), and Staphylococcus aureus (7.26%). S. aureus was sensitive to tigecycline, teicoplanin, vancomycin and linezolid but resistant to penicillin and levofloxacin. K.pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii and E. coli were susceptible to amikacin and cefoperazone. K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa are the most common pathogenic bacteria in AECOPD cases in Beijing, China. Our antibiotic resistance findings may be helpful in selecting antibiotic therapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Cultivation and qPCR detection of pathogenic and antibiotic resistant bacteria establishment in naive broiler houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Conventional commercial broiler production involves the rearing of more than 20,000 broilers in a single confined space, atop bedding material such as pine shavings or rice hulls, for approximately 6.5 weeks. This environment is known for harboring pathogens and antibiotic resistant bacteria, but ...

  16. Antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria isolated from indwelling Foley catheters following tube cystostomy in goats with obstructive urolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigerwe, Munashe; Mavangira, Vengai; Byrne, Barbara A; Angelos, John A

    2017-05-01

    Tube cystostomy is a surgical method used for managing obstructive urolithiasis and involves placement of a Foley catheter into the urinary bladder. We identified and evaluated the antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria isolated from indwelling Foley catheters following tube cystostomy in goats with obstructive urolithiasis. Urine samples collected over a 10-y period from catheter tips at the time of removal were submitted for bacteriologic culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Resistance patterns to antibiotics, trends in the resistance patterns over the study period, and the probability of a bacterial isolate being resistant as a function of the identity of the isolate and antibiotic tested were determined. A total of 103 urine samples from 103 male goats with obstructive urolithiasis managed surgically with tube cystostomy were included in the study. Aerococcus (36.9%) and Enterococcus (30.1%) were isolated most frequently. The susceptibility patterns of all bacteria isolated did not change over the study period ( p > 0.05). Proportions of isolates resistant to 1, 2, and ≥3 antibiotics were 36.9%, 18.5%, and 23.3%, respectively. Thus, 41.8% of bacterial isolates were resistant to 2 or more antibiotics tested. The probability of Aerococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates to be resistant to ampicillin, ceftiofur, erythromycin, penicillin, or tetracycline ranged from 0.59 to 0.76.

  17. Co-selection of Mercury and Multiple Antibiotic Resistances in Bacteria Exposed to Mercury in the Fundulus heteroclitus Gut Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Nicole A; Janssen, Sarah E; Reinfelder, John R; Barkay, Tamar

    2016-12-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria is currently one of the most serious challenges to human health. To combat this problem, it is critical to understand the processes and pathways that result in the creation of antibiotic resistance gene pools in the environment. In this study, we examined the effects of mercury (Hg) exposure on the co-selection of Hg and antibiotic-resistant bacteria that colonize the gastrointestinal tract of the mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), a small, estuarine fish. We examined this connection in two experimental systems: (i) a short-term laboratory exposure study where fish were fed Hg-laced food for 15 days and (ii) an examination of environmental populations from two sites with very different levels of Hg contamination. In the lab exposure study, fish muscle tissue accumulation of Hg was proportional to food Hg concentration (R 2  = 0.99; P antibiotics was more common in Hg-resistant as compared to Hg-sensitive bacterial colonies that were isolated from fish ingesta (P antibiotic resistances. Together, our results highlight the possibility for the creation of antibiotic resistance gene pools as a result of exposure to Hg in contaminated environments.

  18. [Sensitivity to antibiotics uropathogens bacteria in Nouakchott - Mauritania].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailaji, N S M; Ould Salem, M L; Ghaber, S M

    2016-05-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a frequent pathology in outpatients and admitted patients as well. In recent years, there has been an increase in the resistance of germs responsible for UTI to tested antibiotics, particularly because of the emergence of Enterobacteria secreting extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). The aim of this work was to study the epidemiology of germs responsible for urinary tract infections and their antibiotic sensitivity at three clinical laboratories in the city of Nouakchott (Mauritania) in all patients presenting to these laboratories for urine culture during a period of six months. This is a prospective study conducted at three clinical laboratories in Nouakchott, over a period of six months from January 1st to June 30th 2014 for all patients coming to these laboratories for urinalysis test during this period. The culture was performed according to the usual techniques, and the antibiogram was done according to the recommendations of the Antibiogram Committee of the French Society of Microbiology. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS Statistics 20. From 3082 urine exam, 568 were positive, which means 18.4%. These infections were for hospitalized patients (17.8%) and outpatients in particular (82.2%). Sex ratio F/M was 1.6. The epidemiology of urinary tract infections in these three medical analysis laboratories is comparable to the past studies data regarding age, sex, and the bacteria, the most frequently responsible (Escherichia coli 64.4%). But differences in the resistance of E. coli are observed: higher resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, the quinolones, the fluoroquinolones, and cotrimoxazol. UTI was common in patients with urinary catheter (64.9%), diabetics (52.4%), hospitalized patients (49.3%) and pregnant women (38.7%). The prevalence of urinary tract infections caused by Enterobacteria ESBL in our study was 12.8%, of all urinary tract infections caused by Enterobacteria; 10.4 and 20.4% of the E

  19. HB&L System: rapid determination of antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria isolated from blood cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Barocci

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Blood culture is an important method to detect microbial pathogens on blood, very useful for diagnosing bacterial infections. Unfortunately, classical diagnostic protocols cannot directly identify bacteria responsible for sepsis and accordingly their antimicrobial profiles. This problem causes a delay of almost two days in the availability of a specific antimicrobial profile. Objective. Among the main causes of death, sepsis have a relevant importance. For this reason it is important both to identify pathogens and to perform an antimicrobial susceptibility test in the shortest time as possible. For this purpose, the main aim of this study is the evaluation of the performances of an antimicrobial susceptibility determination directly performed on positive blood cultures. Materials and methods. This study has been performed on 70 positive blood cultures, during the period from January to July 2009. A number of 35 blood cultures were positive for Gram negative bacteria, and 35 were positive for Gram positive bacteria. From these positive blood cultures, after a short sample preparation, it has been possible to directly determine antimicrobial susceptibility profiles by using the HB&L (formerly URO-QUICK instrument. Results. The HB&L system results showed a very good correlation with both the classical disk diffusion method and VITEK 2 automatic system.The performances between the methods carried out in this study were equivalent. Conclusions. From data reported, thanks to the rapidity and simplicity of the method used, we can assert that the direct susceptibility test available with the HB&L system, is useful for a rapid and early choice of the antibiotic treatment.

  20. Occurrence and antibiotic susceptibility of fish bacteria isolated from Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia and Clarias gariepinus (African catfish in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Wamala

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The intention of this study was to identify the bacterial pathogens infecting Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia and Clarias gariepinus (African catfish, and to establish the antibiotic susceptibility of fish bacteria in Uganda. A total of 288 fish samples from 40 fish farms (ponds, cages, and tanks and 8 wild water sites were aseptically collected and bacteria isolated from the head kidney, liver, brain and spleen. The isolates were identified by their morphological characteristics, conventional biochemical tests and Analytical Profile Index test kits. Antibiotic susceptibility of selected bacteria was determined by the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The following well-known fish pathogens were identified at a farm prevalence of; Aeromonas hydrophila (43.8%, Aeromonas sobria (20.8%, Edwardsiella tarda (8.3%, Flavobacterium spp. (4.2% and Streptococcus spp. (6.3%. Other bacteria with varying significance as fish pathogens were also identified including Plesiomonas shigelloides (25.0%, Chryseobacterium indoligenes (12.5%, Pseudomonas fluorescens (10.4%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (4.2%, Pseudomonas stutzeri (2.1%, Vibrio cholerae (10.4%, Proteus spp. (6.3%, Citrobacter spp. (4.2%, Klebsiella spp. (4.2% Serratia marcescens (4.2%, Burkholderia cepacia (2.1%, Comamonas testosteroni (8.3% and Ralstonia picketti (2.1%. Aeromonas spp., Edwardsiella tarda and Streptococcus spp. were commonly isolated from diseased fish. Aeromonas spp. (n = 82 and Plesiomonas shigelloides (n = 73 were evaluated for antibiotic susceptibility. All isolates tested were susceptible to at-least ten (10 of the fourteen antibiotics evaluated. High levels of resistance were however expressed by all isolates to penicillin, oxacillin and ampicillin. This observed resistance is most probably intrinsic to those bacteria, suggesting minimal levels of acquired antibiotic resistance in fish bacteria from the study area. To our knowledge, this is the first study to

  1. Soil-borne reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are established following therapeutic treatment of dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinxin; Zhao, Zhe; Orfe, Lisa; Subbiah, Murugan; Call, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    We determined if antibiotics residues that are excreted from treated animals can contribute to persistence of resistant bacteria in agricultural environments. Administration of ceftiofur, a third-generation cephalosporin, resulted in a ∼ 3 log increase in ceftiofur-resistant Escherichia coli found in the faeces and pen soils by day 10 (P = 0.005). This resistant population quickly subsided in faeces, but was sustained in the pen soil (∼ 4.5 log bacteria g(-1)) throughout the trial (1 month). Florfenicol treatment resulted in a similar pattern although the loss of florfenicol-resistant E. coli was slower for faeces and remained stable at ∼ 6 log bacteria g(-1) in the soil. Calves were treated in pens where eGFP-labelled E. coli were present in the bedding (∼ 2 log g(-1)) resulting in amplification of the eGFP E. coli population ∼ 2.1 log more than eGFP E. coli populations in pens with untreated calves (day 4; P 10-fold greater contribution to the bedding reservoir compared with shedding of resistant bacteria in faeces. Treatment with therapeutic doses of ceftiofur or florfenicol resulted in 2-3 log g(-1) more bacteria than the estimated ID50 (2.83 CFU g(-1)), consistent with a soil-borne reservoir emerging after antibiotic treatment that can contribute to the long-term persistence of antibiotic resistance in animal agriculture. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from breeding dogs housed in kennels with differing neonatal mortality and use of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, C; Corrò, M; Drigo, M; Rota, A

    2012-10-01

    This work examines the antimicrobial resistance of potentially pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Streptococcus canis, Escherichia coli) found in the vaginal tract in prepartum mammary secretions and postpartum milk of bitches housed in breeding kennels (N = 20; 92 bitches). The kennels were divided into three categories: no routine antimicrobial administration around parturition (category 1); routine administration of one antibiotic around parturition (category 2); routine administration of multiple antimicrobials around parturition (category 3). Bacteriological cultures and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed on vaginal specimens, prepartum mammary secretions, and postpartum milk. Stillbirths and neonatal deaths were recorded for each whelping and analyzed as "within-litter stillbirths" and "within-litter neonatal deaths" according to kennel category, by Pearson χ(2) test and the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test, respectively. The frequency of isolation and antimicrobial resistance of bacteria were analyzed according to kennel category by Pearson χ(2) test. Kennel category was not significantly associated with differing numbers of stillbirths or neonatal death events, nor was the frequency of isolation of potentially pathogenic bacteria in the three kennel categories significantly different. Kennel category 3 had a significantly higher frequency of isolation of multiresistant gram-positive bacterial strains. Our results show that intense administration of antibiotics to breeding bitches does not effectively reduce neonatal mortality; on the contrary, it induces multiresistance in potentially pathogenic bacteria. Breeders and veterinarians should be aware of the risk of selecting pathogenic bacteria by uncontrolled treatment in prepartum bitches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of Hydrogen Peroxide, Lactic Acid, and Surfactants from Vaginal Lactobacilli on the Antibiotic Sensitivity of Opportunistic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgibnev, Andrey; Kremleva, Elena

    2017-06-01

    We studied as hydrogen peroxide, lactic acid, or surfactants from clinical isolates of vaginal lactobacilli and cell-free supernatants from probiotic strain LCR35 can influence on the sensitivity of opportunistic bacteria to antibiotics. We found that the most effective in increasing sensitivity to antibiotics were hydrogen peroxide and surfactants or their combination but no lactic acid. In some cases, the effect of the composition of hydrogen peroxide and surfactants was clearly higher than the sum of effects of these substances alone. With using of the supernatant of LCR35 was shown that the combination of surfactant and lactate has greater effect compared with surfactants alone. In concluding, metabolites of vaginal lactobacilli are suitable for the role of "antibiotic assistants" and it can help solve the problems the antibiotic resistance.

  4. Bacterial fitness shapes the population dynamics of antibiotic-resistant and -susceptible bacteria in a model of combined antibiotic and anti-virulence treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternent, Lucy; Dyson, Rosemary J.; Krachler, Anne-Marie; Jabbari, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotic treatment is a huge concern: introduction of any new antibiotic is shortly followed by the emergence of resistant bacterial isolates in the clinic. This issue is compounded by a severe lack of new antibiotics reaching the market. The significant rise in clinical resistance to antibiotics is especially problematic in nosocomial infections, where already vulnerable patients may fail to respond to treatment, causing even greater health concern. A recent focus has been on the development of anti-virulence drugs as a second line of defence in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. This treatment, which weakens bacteria by reducing their virulence rather than killing them, should allow infections to be cleared through the body׳s natural defence mechanisms. In this way there should be little to no selective pressure exerted on the organism and, as such, a predominantly resistant population should be less likely to emerge. However, before the likelihood of resistance to these novel drugs emerging can be predicted, we must first establish whether such drugs can actually be effective. Many believe that anti-virulence drugs would not be powerful enough to clear existing infections, restricting their potential application to prophylaxis. We have developed a mathematical model that provides a theoretical framework to reveal the circumstances under which anti-virulence drugs may or may not be successful. We demonstrate that by harnessing and combining the advantages of antibiotics with those provided by anti-virulence drugs, given infection-specific parameters, it is possible to identify treatment strategies that would efficiently clear bacterial infections, while preventing the emergence of antibiotic-resistant subpopulations. Our findings strongly support the continuation of research into anti-virulence drugs and demonstrate that their applicability may reach beyond infection prevention. PMID:25701634

  5. Bacterial fitness shapes the population dynamics of antibiotic-resistant and -susceptible bacteria in a model of combined antibiotic and anti-virulence treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternent, Lucy; Dyson, Rosemary J; Krachler, Anne-Marie; Jabbari, Sara

    2015-05-07

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotic treatment is a huge concern: introduction of any new antibiotic is shortly followed by the emergence of resistant bacterial isolates in the clinic. This issue is compounded by a severe lack of new antibiotics reaching the market. The significant rise in clinical resistance to antibiotics is especially problematic in nosocomial infections, where already vulnerable patients may fail to respond to treatment, causing even greater health concern. A recent focus has been on the development of anti-virulence drugs as a second line of defence in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. This treatment, which weakens bacteria by reducing their virulence rather than killing them, should allow infections to be cleared through the body׳s natural defence mechanisms. In this way there should be little to no selective pressure exerted on the organism and, as such, a predominantly resistant population should be less likely to emerge. However, before the likelihood of resistance to these novel drugs emerging can be predicted, we must first establish whether such drugs can actually be effective. Many believe that anti-virulence drugs would not be powerful enough to clear existing infections, restricting their potential application to prophylaxis. We have developed a mathematical model that provides a theoretical framework to reveal the circumstances under which anti-virulence drugs may or may not be successful. We demonstrate that by harnessing and combining the advantages of antibiotics with those provided by anti-virulence drugs, given infection-specific parameters, it is possible to identify treatment strategies that would efficiently clear bacterial infections, while preventing the emergence of antibiotic-resistant subpopulations. Our findings strongly support the continuation of research into anti-virulence drugs and demonstrate that their applicability may reach beyond infection prevention. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by

  6. Effects of dietary copper, zinc, and ractopamine hydrochloride on finishing pig growth performance, carcass characteristics, and antimicrobial susceptibility of enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldpausch, J A; Amachawadi, R G; Tokach, M D; Scott, H M; Nagaraja, T G; Dritz, S S; Goodband, R D; Woodworth, J C; DeRouchey, J M

    2016-08-01

    A total of 480 pigs (PIC 327 × 1050; initially 48.7 ± 2.3 kg) were used to determine the interactive effects of supplemental Cu, Zn, and ractopamine HCl (RAC) on finishing pig growth performance, carcass characteristics, and antimicrobial susceptibility of enteric bacteria. Treatments were arranged in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial with the main effects of added Cu (CuSO; 0 vs. 125 mg/kg Cu), Zn (ZnO; 0 vs. 150 mg/kg Zn), and RAC (0 vs. 10 mg/kg during the last 28 d prior to marketing). All diets contained 11 mg/kg Cu and 73 mg/kg Zn from the trace mineral premix. Pens of pigs were balanced and blocked on initial BW and then randomly allotted to 1 of the 4 mineral treatment diets. At 28 d prior to marketing, pens within each block and mineral treatment were randomly assigned to receive either 0 or 10 mg/kg RAC in addition to the mineral treatment. Adding either Cu or Zn alone did not improve ADG or ADFI yet resulted in numerical improvements in overall G:F and caloric efficiencies, but improvements were not additive (Cu × Zn, = 0.057, = 0.068, and = 0.064 for G:F and caloric efficiency on a ME and NE basis, respectively). Ractopamine improved ( Ractopamine also increased ( combination in RAC diets (Cu × Zn × RAC, = 0.011 and = 0.018 for yield and HCW G:F, respectively). Fecal samples were collected on d 0 and at the conclusion of the finishing period (d 90) for bacterial isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility determinations according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute minimal inhibitory concentrations breakpoints. spp. and isolates displayed varying levels of resistance to certain antibiotics prior to initiation of treatments on d 0. Resistance to most antibiotics decreased ( < 0.05) over time or was stable for those that had a low baseline percentage of resistance. Neither Zn nor RAC adversely affected antimicrobial resistance. However, extended feeding of 125 mg/kg Cu throughout the finishing period seems to decrease enterococcal susceptability to

  7. Potential use of Bacillus thuringiensis bacteriocins to control antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with mastitis in dairy goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Chávez, A J; Martínez-Ortega, E A; Valencia-Posadas, M; León-Galván, M F; de la Fuente-Salcido, N M; Bideshi, D K; Barboza-Corona, J E

    2016-01-01

    Mastitis caused by microbial infections in dairy goats reduces milk yield, modifies milk composition, and potentially contributes to morbidity in herds and consumers of dairy products. Microorganisms associated with mastitis in dairy goats are commonly controlled with antibiotics, but it is known that continued use of these chemical agents promotes antibiotic resistance among bacterial populations. Recently, it has been shown that bacteriocins of Bacillus thuringiensis inhibit growth of food-borne pathogens and also bacteria associated with bovine mastitis. However, there is no report on their ability to inhibit microorganisms linked to mastitis in dairy goats. In this study, using 16S rDNA and ITS regions of rDNA, we identified nine bacterial isolates and an encapsulated yeast associated with mastitis in dairy goats. Enterococcus durans, Brevibacillus sp., and Staphylococcus epidermidis 2 were resistant to, respectively, 75, ~67, ~42, and ~42 % of the antibiotics screened. In addition, 60 % of the bacterial isolates were resistant to penicillin, ampicillin, vancomycin, and dicloxacillin. Importantly, 60 % of the isolates were inhibited by the bacteriocins, but S. epidermidis 1, Enterobacter sp., Escherichia vulneris, and Cryptococcus neoformans were not susceptible to these antimicrobial peptides. Using Brevibacillus sp. and Staphylococcus chromogenes as indicator bacteria, we show that peptides of ~10 kDa that correspond to the molecular mass of bacteriocins used in this study are responsible for the inhibitory activity. Our results demonstrate that multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with subclinical mastitis in dairy goats from Guanajuato, Mexico, are susceptible to bacteriocins produced by B. thuringiensis.

  8. Occurrence of heavy metals and antibiotic resistance in bacteria from internal organs of american bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana raised in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SW Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 40 bacteria have been successfully isolated from internal organs of the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana raised in Malaysia, namely, eight isolates of Aeromonas spp., 21 of Edwardsiella spp., six of Flavobacterium spp. and five of Vibrio spp. In terms of antibiotic susceptibility testing, each isolate was tested against 21 antibiotics, resulting in 482 (57.3% cases of sensitivity and 61 (7.3% cases of partial sensitivity. Meanwhile, 297 (35.4% bacterial isolates were registered as resistant. The multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR index of each bacterial species indicated that bacteria from raised bullfrogs have been exposed to tested antibiotics with results ranging from 0.27 to 0.39. Additionally, high percentages of heavy metal resistance among these isolates were observed, with values ranging from 85.0 to 100.0%. The current results provided us information on bacterial levels of locally farmed bullfrogs exposed to copper, cadmium, chromium as well as 21 types of antibiotics.

  9. Antibiotic combinatorial approach utilized against extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL bacteria isolates from Enugu, South Eastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. Afunwa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antibiotic options in the treatment of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producing bacteria are very limited. The purpose of this study was to analyze several commonly applied antibiotics in quite various novel combinations for use against ESBL-producing bacteria isolates.Methods: Total of 460 samples of urine, throat and anal swab were collected from volunteers and patients from nursery, primary and secondary schools and from other individuals in the community. Hospital and community isolates comprised of 65% and 35% respectively. The identification and characterization of the isolates were done by standard culturing and in vitro antibiotic sensitivity procedures.Results: The antibiotic combination studies showed that the combination of gentamicin with the other antibiotics had predominantly synergistic effects. The percentage synergistic effect for the combinations of gentamicin/pefloxacin was 69%, gentamicin/[Amoxicillin and clavulanic acid] 72%, gentamicin/ceftriaxone 68%, gentamicin/cefuroxime 81.9%, and gentamicin/ciprofloxacin 80.6%, against the community and hospital derived ESBL producing organisms of both Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas species.Conclusion: Good antimicrobial monitoring exercise and corresponding antimicrobial screening activities should work towards a dynamic approach to generate effective treatment options using combination therapy.

  10. Diversity and dynamics of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in cheese as determined by PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Mayo, Baltasar

    2015-12-02

    This work reports the composition and succession of tetracycline- and erythromycin-resistant bacterial communities in a model cheese, monitored by polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were examined using this technique to detect structural changes in the cheese microbiota over manufacturing and ripening. Total bacterial genomic DNA, used as a template, was extracted from cultivable bacteria grown without and with tetracycline or erythromycin (both at 25 μg ml(-1)) on a non-selective medium used for enumeration of total and viable cells (Plate Count agar with Milk; PCA-M), and from those grown on selective and/or differential agar media used for counting various bacterial groups; i.e., lactic acid bacteria (de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe agar; MRSA), micrococci and staphylococci (Baird-Parker agar; BPA), and enterobacteria (Violet Red Bile Glucose agar; VRBGA). Large numbers of tetracycline- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria were detected in cheese samples at all stages of ripening. Counts of antibiotic-resistant bacteria varied widely depending on the microbial group and the point of sampling. In general, resistant bacteria were 0.5-1.0 Log10 units fewer in number than the corresponding susceptible bacteria. The PCR-DGGE profiles obtained with DNA isolated from the plates for total bacteria and the different bacterial groups suggested Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus spp. as the microbial types resistant to both antibiotics tested. This study shows the suitability of the PCR-DGGE technique for rapidly identifying and tracking antibiotic resistant populations in cheese and, by extension, in other foods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibiotic resistant bacteria in urban sewage: Role of full-scale wastewater treatment plants on environmental spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turolla, A; Cattaneo, M; Marazzi, F; Mezzanotte, V; Antonelli, M

    2018-01-01

    The presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) in wastewater was investigated and the role of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in promoting or limiting antibiotic resistance was assessed. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and total heterotrophic bacteria (THB) resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline was monitored in three WWTPs located in Milan urban area (Italy), differing among them for the operating parameters of biological process, for the disinfection processes (based on sodium hypochlorite, UV radiation, peracetic acid) and for the discharge limits to be met. Wastewater was collected from three sampling points along the treatment sequence (WWTP influent, effluent from sand filtration, WWTP effluent). Antibiotic resistance to ampicillin was observed both for E. coli and for THB. Ampicillin resistant bacteria in the WWTP influents were 20-47% of E. coli and 16-25% of THB counts. A limited resistance to chloramphenicol was observed only for E. coli, while neither for E. coli nor for THB tetracycline resistance was observed. The biological treatment and sand filtration led to a decrease in the maximum percentage of ampicillin-resistant bacteria (20-29% for E. coli, 11-21% for THB). However, the conventionally adopted parameters did not seem adequate to support an interpretation of WWTP role in ARB spread. Peracetic acid was effective in selectively acting on antibiotic resistant THB, unlike UV radiation and sodium hypochlorite. The low counts of E. coli in WWTP final effluents in case of agricultural reuse did not allow to compare the effect of the different disinfection processes on antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation of some bacteria isolated from sediment, water and fish farms in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faja, Orooba Meteab; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2018-04-01

    A total of 90 isolates of bacteria were isolated, from sediment (10) samples, water (10) samples and fish (12) samples (Sea bass, Snapper, Grouper and Tilapia). These include 22 isolates of bacteria from sediment, 28 isolates from water and 40 isolates from fish. All the isolates were tested for sensitivity to 13 antibiotics using disc diffusion method. The isolates showed high resistance to some antibiotics based on samples source. Isolates from sediment showed highest resistance toward novobiocin, kanamycin, ampicillin and streptomycin while isolates from water showed highest resistance against vancomycin, penicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline, in contrast, in fish sample showed highest resistance toward vancomycin, ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline. Most of the isolates showed biofilm formation ability with different degrees. Out of 22 bacteria isolates from water, two isolates were weak biofilm formers, six isolates moderate biofilm formers and fourteen isolates strong biofilm formers. While, out of 28 bacteria isolates from water one isolate was weak biofilm former, five isolates moderate biofilm formers and 22 strong biofilm formers Fish isolate showed three isolates (8%) moderate biofilm formers and 27 isolates strong biofilm formers. Biofilm formation was one of the factors that lead to antibiotic resistance of the bacterial isolates from these samples.

  13. Relatively high antibiotic resistance among heterotrophic bacteria from arctic fjord sediments than water - Evidence towards better selection pressure in the fjord sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatha, A. A. Mohamed; Neethu, C. S.; Nikhil, S. M.; Rahiman, K. M. Mujeeb; Krishnan, K. P.; Saramma, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance among aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and coliform bacteria from water and sediment of Kongsfjord. The study was based on the assumption that arctic fjord environments are relatively pristine and offer very little selection pressure for drug resistant mutants. In order to test the hypothesis, 200 isolates belonging to aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and 114 isolates belonging to coliforms were tested against 15 antibiotics belonging to 5 different classes such as beta lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, sulpha drugs and tetracyclines. Resistance to beta lactam and extended spectrum beta lactam (ESBL) antibiotics was considerably high and they found to vary significantly (p coliform bacteria. Though the coliforms showed significantly high level of antibiotic resistance against ESBL's extent and diversity of antibiotic resistance (as revealed by multiple antibiotic resistance index and resistance patterns), was high in the aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. Most striking observation was that isolates from fjord sediments (both heterotrophic bacteria and coliforms) in general showed relatively high prevalence of antibiotic resistance against most of the antibiotics tested, indicating to better selection pressure for drug resistance mutants in the fjord sediments.

  14. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Antibiotic-Induced Cell Death in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Acker, Heleen; Gielis, Jan; Acke, Marloes; Cools, Freya; Cos, Paul; Coenye, Tom

    2016-01-01

    It was recently proposed that bactericidal antibiotics, besides through specific drug-target interactions, kill bacteria by a common mechanism involving the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, this mechanism involving the production of hydroxyl radicals has become the subject of a lot of debate. Since the contribution of ROS to antibiotic mediated killing most likely depends on the conditions, differences in experimental procedures are expected to be at the basis of the conflicting results. In the present study different methods (ROS specific stainings, gene-expression analyses, electron paramagnetic resonance, genetic and phenotypic experiments, detection of protein carbonylation and DNA oxidation) to measure the production of ROS upon antibiotic treatment in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria were compared. Different classes of antibiotics (tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, meropenem) were included, and both planktonic and biofilm cultures were studied. Our results indicate that some of the methods investigated were not sensitive enough to measure antibiotic induced production of ROS, including the spectrophotometric detection of protein carbonylation. Secondly, other methods were found to be useful only in specific conditions. For example, an increase in the expression of OxyR was measured in Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 after treatment with ciprofloxacin or meropenem (both in biofilms and planktonic cultures) but not after treatment with tobramycin. In addition results vary with the experimental conditions and the species tested. Nevertheless our data strongly suggest that ROS contribute to antibiotic mediated killing in Bcc species and that enhancing ROS production or interfering with the protection against ROS may form a novel strategy to improve antibiotic treatment.

  15. Occurrences and Characterization of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria and Genetic Determinants of Hospital Wastewater in a Tropical Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thai-Hoang; Ng, Charmaine; Chen, Hongjie; Yi, Xin Zhu; Koh, Tse Hsien; Barkham, Timothy Mark Sebastian; Zhou, Zhi; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2016-12-01

    Wastewater discharged from clinical isolation and general wards at two hospitals in Singapore was examined to determine the emerging trends of antibiotic resistance (AR). We quantified the concentrations of 12 antibiotic compounds by analysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), the class 1 integrase gene (intI1), and 16 antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) that confer resistance to 10 different clinically relevant antibiotics. A subset of 119 antibiotic-resistant isolates were phylogenetically classified and tested for the presence of ARGs encoding resistance to β-lactam antibiotics (bla NDM , bla KPC , bla SHV , bla CTX-M ), amikacin [aac(6')-Ib], co-trimoxazole (sul1, sul2, dfrA), ciprofloxacin (qnrA, qnrB), and the intI1 gene. Among these resistant isolates, 80.7% were detected with intI1 and 66.4% were found to carry at least 1 of the tested ARGs. Among 3 sampled locations, the clinical isolation ward had the highest concentrations of ARB and the highest levels of ARGs linked to resistance to β-lactam (bla KPC ), co-trimoxazole (sul1, sul2, dfrA), amikacin [aac(6')-Ib], ciprofloxacin (qnrA), and intI1 We found strong positive correlations (P bacteria resistant to meropenem, ceftazidime, amikacin, co-trimoxazole, and ciprofloxacin and abundances of bla KPC , aac(6')-Ib, sul1, sul2, dfrA, qnrA, and intI1 genes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria in a river impacted by both an antibiotic production plant and urban treated discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidrach-Cardona, Ricardo; Hijosa-Valsero, María; Marti, Elisabet; Balcázar, José Luis; Becares, Eloy

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the abundance and spatial dynamics of antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria (Escherichia coli, total coliforms and Enterococcus spp.) were determined in water and sediment samples from a river impacted by both antibiotic production plant (APP) and urban wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharges. Agar dilution and disk diffusion methods were also used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Two antimicrobial agents, cephalexin (25 μg/ml) and amoxicillin (50 μg/ml), were evaluated using the agar dilution method for E. coli, total coliforms (TC) and Enterococcus spp., whereas the degree of sensitivity or resistance of E. coli isolates to penicillin (10 U), ampicillin (10 μg), doxycycline (30 μg), tetracycline (30 μg), erythromycin (15 μg), azithromycin (15 μg) and streptomycin (10 μg) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Real-time PCR assays were used to determine the prevalence of three antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs). The agar dilution method showed that most E. coli isolates and TC were resistant to amoxicillin, especially after receiving the APP discharges. Antibiotic resistances to amoxicillin and cephalexin were higher after the APP discharge point than after the WWTP effluent. The disk diffusion method revealed that 100% of bacterial isolates were resistant to penicillin and erythromycin. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected and showed a higher proportion at the WWTP discharge point than those in the APP. Highly multidrug-resistant bacteria (resistance to more than 4 antibiotics) were also detected, reaching mean values of 41.6% in water samples and 50.1% in sediments. The relative abundance of the blaTEM, blaCTX-M and blaSHV genes was higher in samples from the treatment plants than in those collected upstream from the discharges, especially for water samples collected at the APP discharge point. These results clearly demonstrate that both the APP and the WWTP contribute to the emergence and spread of antibiotic

  17. Multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria on fluted pumpkin leaves, a herb of therapeutic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbeneghu, Oluwatoyin A; Abdu, Abdulrasheed B

    2014-06-01

    Fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis) is a minimally-processed green leafy vegetable traditionally used for its antianaemic properties in the form of leaf juice without a heating or inactivation step before consumption. The aim of the study was to assess the presence of surface microbiota on T. occidentalis leaves and also to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated organisms. Bacterial contaminants on 50 samples of T. occidentalis leaves were isolated and characterized using standard biochemical methods and the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated organisms was determined using the antibiotic disc diffusion assay. The results obtained show that the leaves of T. occidentalis is contaminated with organisms which included Enterobacter agglomerans (25.9%), Proteus vulgaris (24.9%), Klebsiella spp. (2.6%), and Serratia liquefaciens (2.1%). Other bacterial isolates recovered in order of frequency included: Staphylococcus spp. (33.7%), Bacillus spp. (8.3%), and Pseudomonas fluorescens (2.6%). Of the 193 bacterial isolates from the leaves of T. occidentalis samples tested for antimicrobial resistance, all (100%) were found to be resistant to ampicillin, cloxacillin, augmentin, erythromycin, and tetracycline while 96% of the isolates were resistant to cephalothin. Resistance to trimethoprim (93%) and gentamicin (83%) was also observed. Approximately, 22% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin; however, only 11 (5.8%) were resistant to ofloxacin. Thus, uncooked T. occidentalis is a potential source of highly-resistant epiphytic bacteria which could be opportunistic pathogens in consumers.

  18. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of different bacteria isolated from patients with ventilator associated pneumonia (vap).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqurashi, Abdulrahman M

    2005-09-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is a frequent complication of mechanical ventilation (MV) and it is a leading cause of death in MV patients. The development of VAP has been demonstrated as being due to aspiration of oropharyngeal secretion, ventilator tubing condensate, or gastric contents that are colonized with pathogenic microorganisms. The aim of the present study is to isolate and identify bacteria that cause VAP and to study antibiotic susceptibility. This study was carried out on 95 patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for VAP. Quantitative cultures of endotracheal aspirates (EA) using a cut-off point of 10(6) cfu/ml was done. The microbiological results revealed that gram negative bacilli were the most common bacterial agents responsible for VAP and accounted for 78.8% of all the causative agents. The most common isolated organisms were Klebsiella pnemouniae (30.9 %) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22.5%), Staphylococcus aureus (21.2%), Eschericia coli (12.8 %), Proteus spp. (9.8%), and Citrobacter spp. (2.8%). Blood cultures were positive in 25.9% of patients with Klebsiella pnemouniae in about 33.3%. From this study, it can be concluded that VAP is an important nosocomial infection. EA is a simple procedure to obtain respiratory samples and perform sensitivity testing in patients with VAP. Also, the commonest cause of VAP is gram negative bacilli.

  19. Co-selection of antibiotic and metal(loid) resistance in gram-negative epiphytic bacteria from contaminated salt marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Isabel; Tacão, Marta; Leite, Laura; Fidalgo, Cátia; Araújo, Susana; Oliveira, Cláudia; Alves, Artur

    2016-08-15

    The goal of this study was to investigate co-selection of antibiotic resistance in gram-negative epiphytic bacteria. Halimione portulacoides samples were collected from metal(loid)-contaminated and non-contaminated salt marshes. Bacterial isolates (n=137) affiliated with Vibrio, Pseudomonas, Shewanella, Comamonas, Aeromonas and with Enterobacteriaceae. Vibrio isolates were more frequent in control site while Pseudomonas was common in contaminated sites. Metal(loid) and antibiotic resistance phenotypes varied significantly according to site contamination, and multiresistance was more frequent in contaminated sites. However, differences among sites were not observed in terms of prevalence or diversity of acquired antibiotic resistance genes, integrons and plasmids. Gene merA, encoding mercury resistance, was only detected in isolates from contaminated sites, most of which were multiresistant to antibiotics. Results indicate that metal(loid) contamination selects for antibiotic resistance in plant surfaces. In salt marshes, antibiotic resistance may be subsequently transferred to other environmental compartments, such as estuarine water or animals, with potential human health risks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Urban wastewater treatment plants as hotspots for antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes spread into the environment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, L; Manaia, C; Merlin, C; Schwartz, T; Dagot, C; Ploy, M C; Michael, I; Fatta-Kassinos, D

    2013-03-01

    Urban wastewater treatment plants (UWTPs) are among the main sources of antibiotics' release into the environment. The occurrence of antibiotics may promote the selection of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB), which shade health risks to humans and animals. In this paper the fate of ARB and ARGs in UWTPs, focusing on different processes/technologies (i.e., biological processes, advanced treatment technologies and disinfection), was critically reviewed. The mechanisms by which biological processes influence the development/selection of ARB and ARGs transfer are still poorly understood. Advanced treatment technologies and disinfection process are regarded as a major tool to control the spread of ARB into the environment. In spite of intense efforts made over the last years to bring solutions to control antibiotic resistance spread in the environment, there are still important gaps to fill in. In particular, it is important to: (i) improve risk assessment studies in order to allow accurate estimates about the maximal abundance of ARB in UWTPs effluents that would not pose risks for human and environmental health; (ii) understand the factors and mechanisms that drive antibiotic resistance maintenance and selection in wastewater habitats. The final objective is to implement wastewater treatment technologies capable of assuring the production of UWTPs effluents with an acceptable level of ARB. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metal and antibiotic-resistance in psychrotrophic bacteria from Antarctic marine waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    in 68% of the isolates. Depending on the antibiotics the isolates showed different percentage of resistance. Multiple drug and metal-resistance were observed. High incidence of resistance to both antibiotics and metals were common among the pigmented...

  2. Detection of 140 clinically relevant antibiotic-resistance genes in the plasmid metagenome of wastewater treatment plant bacteria showing reduced susceptibility to selected antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanowski, Rafael; Linke, Burkhard; Krahn, Irene; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Gützkow, Tim; Eichler, Wolfgang; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    To detect plasmid-borne antibiotic-resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bacteria, 192 resistance-gene-specific PCR primer pairs were designed and synthesized. Subsequent PCR analyses on total plasmid DNA preparations obtained from bacteria of activated sludge or the WWTP's final effluents led to the identification of, respectively, 140 and 123 different resistance-gene-specific amplicons. The genes detected included aminoglycoside, beta-lactam, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolone, macrolide, rifampicin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfonamide resistance genes as well as multidrug efflux and small multidrug resistance genes. Some of these genes were only recently described from clinical isolates, demonstrating genetic exchange between clinical and WWTP bacteria. Sequencing of selected resistance-gene-specific amplicons confirmed their identity or revealed that the amplicon nucleotide sequence is very similar to a gene closely related to the reference gene used for primer design. These results demonstrate that WWTP bacteria are a reservoir for various resistance genes. Moreover, detection of about 64 % of the 192 reference resistance genes in bacteria obtained from the WWTP's final effluents indicates that these resistance determinants might be further disseminated in habitats downstream of the sewage plant.

  3. Antibiotics and heavy metals resistance patterns of Enterococcus faecalis and faecium bacteria isolated from the human and the livestock sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Sharifi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterococci have emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections and within this group, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium cause the majority of human and livestock enterococcal infections. In this article, we tried to determine antibiotics and metals resistance patterns of E. faecalis and E. faecium strains. Methods: One hundred sixty different strains of E. faecalis and E. faecium were collected from livestock sewage and the human fecal waste during 15 months. Then bacterial antibiotics sensitivity tests were carried out using the Agar disc diffusion method. Results: Generally, 100% of E. faecalis strains separated from human and livestock sources (i.e. sheep showed penicillin (P/ kanamycin (K/ nitrofurantoin (N/ loracarbef (L/ Ciprofloxacin (Cc/ ampicillin (AN/ nalidixic acid (NA/ sulfamethoxazole (S antibiotics resistance patterns. In addition, 55% of isolated E. faecium showed P/S/AN/NA antibiotics resistance patterns. Each strain showed a resistance to at least two aminoglycoside antibiotics. However, E. faecalis strains from human and the livestock sources showed 94% and 100% of resistance to nitrofurantoin, respectively. The effects of different metal concentrations was evaluated in both strains. The agar dilution method was applied in this stage. Hg at 0.05 mmol/L of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC showed toxicity to both the human and livestock Enterococcus strains. Cadmium at 1 mmol/L and 0.5 mmol/L concentrations had the most toxicity to E. faecalis and E. faecium strains, respectively. Obviously, toxicity to bacteria is less than other metals. As a result, Zn/Ni/Cu/Co resistance pattern is suggested for both strains. Finally, antibiotics and heavy metals resistance patterns were monitored simultaneously. Conclusion: Almost all E. faecalis strains isolated from humans and livestock showed antibiotics and heavy metals resistance patterns of P/K/L/Cc/S/AN/NA/Zn/Cu/Co simultaneously. Moreover, 55% of E

  4. Antibiotics supplemented culture media can eliminate non-specific bacteria from human semen during sperm preparation for intra uterine insemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. A. B. Dissanayake

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Bacterial flora can be isolated from many semen samples of subfertile males. Bacteriospermia can compromise the outcome of intra uterine insemination (IUI by contaminating the post-processed sperm sample. Objectives: The objective of the present study is to determine the efficacy of penicillin and streptomycin in eliminating the bacteria from semen samples in the sperm processing procedure, and to assess the effects of antibiotics on sperm motility, survivability, and pregnancy rates. Design and Settings: A prospectively controlled study was carried out using couples undergoing IUI with their informed consent. Intervention: Sperm processing using the swim-up technique in penicillin and streptomycin supplemented culture medium. Subjects And Methods: Couples were consecutively allocated in two groups for sperm processing (a Group AB+ (antibiotics supplemented culture medium, n = 33 and (b Group AB− (antibiotic free culture medium, n = 33. Semen culture was performed before and after sperm processing. Sperm motility was assessed immediately after processing and after 24 h of incubation. Results: Bacterial isolates were found in 20 (60.6% and 22 (66.1% of samples before processing in Groups AB+ and AB− respectively. Addition of antibiotics resulted in completely eliminating non-specific bacteria from semen samples without affecting sperm motility. In vitro survival rate of sperm enhanced in AB+ group compared with AB− group (motile sperm after 24 h, 62.21% (standard deviation [SD]: 37.27 versus 41.36% (SD: 30.78, P = 0.012. Pregnancy rate, was comparable between two groups (9% in Group AB+ vs. 6% in Group AB−, P = 0.45. Conclusion: Penicillin streptomycin combination could completely eliminate non-specific bacteria from semen samples during sperm processing in this population. The types of antibiotics and dosage used did not seem to have any harmful effects on human sperm.

  5. Enhanced antibiotic multi-resistance in nasal and faecal bacteria after agricultural use of streptomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Alexandre; Vogt, Hans-Rudolf; Vilei, Edy M; Frey, Joachim; Perreten, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Streptomycin is used in arboriculture to control fire blight. Using sheep as a model, multidrug-resistant bacteria in mammals were found to be selected after the intentional release of streptomycin into the environment. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from the faeces and nasal cavities, respectively, of sheep grazing on a field sprayed with streptomycin at concentrations used in orchards (test group) and on a field without streptomycin (control group). Before the application of streptomycin, the percentage of streptomycin-resistant E. coli isolates in faeces was 15.8% in the control group and 14.7% in the test group. After the application of streptomycin, the overall number of streptomycin-resistant E. coli isolates was significantly higher in the test group (39.9%) than in the control group (22.3%). Streptomycin-resistant Staphylococcus isolates were only detected after the application of streptomycin. Streptomycin resistance was frequently associated with resistance to sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol and less frequently to cefotaxime in E. coli, and to tetracycline, fusidic acid and tiamulin in Staphylococcus spp. This study shows that the application of low concentrations of streptomycin on grass, as occurs during the spraying of orchards, selects for multidrug-resistant nasal and enteric bacterial flora, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E. coli. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Screening of extracts of algae from Baja California Sur, Mexico as reversers of the antibiotic resistance of some pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Riosmena Rodríguez, Rafael; Martínez Díaz, Sergio Francisco; Zermeño Cervantes, Lina Angélica; Murillo-Álvarez, Jesús Iván; Muñoz Ochoa, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    Sixty ethanol extracts of marine flora of Baja California Sur (Mexico) were screened to evaluate the reversing effect of the bacterial resistance to antibiotics in combination with a sublethal concentration of ampicillin or erythromycin. The activity was assayed by using a modification of the classical agar-diffusion method against 3 resistant, pathogenic bacteria; Escherichia coli (ATCC BAA196), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC BAA42), and Streptococcus pyogenes (ATCC BAA946). From the 60 ethanol...

  7. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Kailong; Tang, Junying; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Xu, Ke; Ren, Hongqiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera cons...

  8. The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) in waters of the Lower Ballona Creek Watershed, Los Angeles County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawecki, Stephanie; Kuleck, Gary; Dorsey, John H; Leary, Christopher; Lum, Michelle

    2017-06-01

    Screening for the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) was done at the Ballona Creek and Wetlands, an urban-impacted wetland system in Los Angeles, California. The goals were (1) to assess the overall prevalence of ARB, and (2) compare differences in ARB abundance and the types of antibiotic resistance (AR) among the following sample types: lagoon water from Del Rey Lagoon, urban runoff from Ballona Creek, and water from the Ballona Wetlands (tidal water flooding in from the adjacent estuary, and ebbing out from the salt marsh). Antibiotic resistance distributions were analyzed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to develop the cumulative frequency of bacteria having resistance of up to eight antibiotics. Distributions from the environmental water samples were compared to unchlorinated secondary effluent from the Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant that was used as comparator samples likely to have an abundance of ARB. As expected, densities of total and ARB were highest in secondary effluent, followed by urban runoff. Samples of water flooding into the wetlands showed similar results to urban runoff; however, a reduction in densities of total and ARB occurred in water ebbing out of the wetlands. During preliminary work to identify ARB species, several bacterial species of relevance to human illness (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus hirae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aeromonas veronii, Enterobacter cancerogenus, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, and Staphylococcus intermedius) were isolated from sampled waters. If wetlands are a sink for ARB, construction and restoration of wetlands can help in the mediation of this human and environmental health concern.

  9. Isolation of Environmental Bacteria from Surface and Drinking Water in Mafikeng, South Africa, and Characterization Using Their Antibiotic Resistance Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma George Mulamattathil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to isolate and identify environmental bacteria from various raw water sources as well as the drinking water distributions system in Mafikeng, South Africa, and to determine their antibiotic resistance profiles. Water samples from five different sites (raw and drinking water were analysed for the presence of faecal indicator bacteria as well as Aeromonas and Pseudomonas species. Faecal and total coliforms were detected in summer in the treated water samples from the Modimola dam and in the mixed water samples, with Pseudomonas spp. being the most prevalent organism. The most prevalent multiple antibiotic resistance phenotype observed was KF-AP-C-E-OT-K-TM-A. All organisms tested were resistant to erythromycin, trimethoprim, and amoxicillin. All isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and faecal coliforms and Pseudomonas spp. to neomycin and streptomycin. Cluster analysis based on inhibition zone diameter data suggests that the isolates had similar chemical exposure histories. Isolates were identified using gyrB, toxA, ecfX, aerA, and hylH gene fragments and gyrB, ecfX, and hylH fragments were amplified. These results demonstrate that (i the drinking water from Mafikeng contains various bacterial species and at times faecal and total coliforms. (ii The various bacteria are resistant to various classes of antibiotics.

  10. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria: prevalence in food and inactivation by food-compatible compounds and plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel

    2015-04-22

    Foodborne antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria such as Campylobacter jejuni, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae, and Vibrio parahemolyticus can adversely affect animal and human health, but a better understanding of the factors involved in their pathogenesis is needed. To help meet this need, this overview surveys and interprets much of our current knowledge of antibiotic (multidrug)-resistant bacteria in the food chain and the implications for microbial food safety and animal and human health. Topics covered include the origin and prevalence of resistant bacteria in the food chain (dairy, meat, poultry, seafood, and herbal products, produce, and eggs), their inactivation by different classes of compounds and plant extracts and by the use of chlorine and physicochemical methods (heat, UV light, pulsed electric fields, and high pressure), the synergistic antimicrobial effects of combinations of natural antimicrobials with medicinal antibiotics, and mechanisms of antimicrobial activities and resistant effects. Possible areas for future research are suggested. Plant-derived and other safe natural antimicrobial compounds have the potential to control the prevalence of both susceptible and resistant pathogens in various environments. The collated information and suggested research will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of approaches that could be used to minimize the presence of resistant pathogens in animal feed and human food, thus reducing adverse effects, improving microbial food safety, and helping to prevent or treat animal and human infections.

  11. Impact of Fertilizing with Raw or Anaerobically Digested Sewage Sludge on the Abundance of Antibiotic-Resistant Coliforms, Antibiotic Resistance Genes, and Pathogenic Bacteria in Soil and on Vegetables at Harvest

    OpenAIRE

    Rahube, Teddie O.; Marti, Romain; Scott, Andrew; Tien, Yuan-Ching; Murray, Roger; Sabourin, Lyne; Zhang, Yun; Duenk, Peter; Lapen, David R.; Topp, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of crops fertilized with human waste represents a potential route of exposure to antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria. The present study evaluated the abundance of bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes by using both culture-dependent and molecular methods. Various vegetables (lettuce, carrots, radish, and tomatoes) were sown into field plots fertilized inorganically or with class B biosolids or untreated municipal sewage sludge and harvested when of marketable quality. Analy...

  12. Antibiotic-resistant heterotrophic plate count bacteria and amoeba-resistant bacteria in aquifers of the Mooi River, North West province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Alewyn; Bartie, Catheleen; Dennis, Rainier; Bezuidenhout, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater in the Mooi River catchment is prone to mining, agricultural, municipal and septic tank pollution. In this study physico-chemical and microbiological parameters were determined using appropriate methods. Bacterial isolates were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing (heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria and amoeba-resistant bacteria (ARB)) and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (Escherichia coli). Antibiotic resistance tests were also performed. Physico-chemical parameters were generally within target water quality ranges for drinking water. HPC bacteria ranged between 10(5) and 10(7) colony-forming units (cfu)/ml. E. coli were enumerated from Trimpark, School and Cemetery. The Blaauwbank borehole was negative for faecal streptococci. Pseudomonas spp. were most abundant in the bulk water. Opportunistic pathogens isolated included Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Alcaligenes, Flavobacterium, Bacillus cereus and Mycobacterium spp. Varying patterns of antibiotic resistance were observed. Most HPC bacterial isolates were resistant to cephalothin and/or amoxicillin and a few were resistant to erythromycin and streptomycin. Pseudomonas spp. was also the most abundant ARB. Other ARBs included Alcaligenes faecalis, Ochrobactrum sp. and Achromobacter sp. ARBs were resistant to streptomycin, chloramphenicol, cephalothin, and/or amoxicillin compared to HPCs. The presence of E. coli and ARB in these groundwater sources indicates potential human health risks. These risks should be further investigated and quantified, and groundwater should be treated before use.

  13. Antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from enteral diets in a public hospital of Minas Gerais Resistência a antibióticos de Staphylococcus aureus isolados de dietas enterais em um hospital público de Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélio José de Andrade

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Enteral diets constitute an excellent means for microbial growth due to its composition rich in nutrients and its time of exposure to room temperature during application. Among the pathogenic bacteria there is the Staphylococcus aureus that is an opportunist microorganism found in the humans’ mucous membrane (buccal, nasal and oral. Samples of enteral diet after application as well as of the environment used for the preparation of the diets, were collected in a public hospital in Minas Gerais and analyzed for the presence of S. aureus. The contamination by S. aureus was evidenced in 83% of the enteral diet samples. As for the environment, the values found were in conformity with APHA recommendation. The isolated strains were submitted to the evaluation of the resistance to different antibiotics. Resistance was observed for tetracycline (100%, erythromycin (90,9%, chloramphenicol (59,1%, estreptomycin (22,72%, penicillin 18,8%, vancomycin (13,63%, ampicillin (13,63%, amoxilin (9,09% and gentamicin (4,54%. Due to the versatility in the resistance development to several antibiotics the S. aureus survives in hospital environments and can be diffused among patients. Dietas enterais constituem um excelente meio para crescimento microbiano, devido à sua composição rica em nutrientes e ao tempo de exposição à temperatura ambiente durante a administração. Dentre as bactérias patogênicas que podem ser encontradas nessas dietas, cita-se o Staphylococcus aureus, microrganismo oportunista encontrado na microbiota da membrana mucosa (bucal, nasal e oral em seres humanos. Amostras de dieta enteral pós-administração e do ambiente utilizado para o seu preparo foram coletadas em um hospital público e analisadas quanto à presença de S. aureus. A contaminação foi evidenciada em 83% das amostras de dietas enterais, e, quanto ao ambiente, os valores encontrados se apresentam de acordo com a recomendação da APHA. As cepas isoladas foram

  14. N2Gas Flushing Limits the Rise of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria in Bovine Raw Milk during Cold Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch-Alatossava, Patricia; Jääskeläinen, Susanna; Alatossava, Tapani; Gauchi, Jean-Pierrre

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has been noted to be a major and increasing human health issue. Cold storage of raw milk promotes the thriving of psychrotrophic/psychrotolerant bacteria, which are well known for their ability to produce enzymes that are frequently heat stable. However, these bacteria also carry antibiotic resistance (AR) features. In places, where no cold chain facilities are available and despite existing recommendations numerous adulterants, including antibiotics, are added to raw milk. Previously, N 2 gas flushing showed real potential for hindering bacterial growth in raw milk at a storage temperature ranging from 6 to 25°C. Here, the ability of N 2 gas (N) to tackle antibiotic- resistant bacteria was tested and compared to that of the activated lactoperoxidase system (HT) for three raw milk samples that were stored at 6°C for 7 days. To that end, the mesophiles and psychrotrophs that were resistant to gentamycin (G), ceftazidime (Ce), levofloxacin (L), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TS) were enumerated. For the log 10 ratio (which is defined as the bacterial counts from a certain condition divided by the counts on the corresponding control), classical Analyses of Variance (ANOVA) was performed, followed by a mean comparison with the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple range test (REGWQ). If the storage "time" factor was the major determinant of the recorded effects, cold storage alone or in combination with HT or with N promoted a sample-dependent response in consideration of the AR levels. The efficiency of N in limiting the increase in AR was highest for fresh raw milk and was judged to be equivalent to that of HT for one sample and superior to that of HT for the two other samples; moreover, compared to HT, N seemed to favor a more diverse community at 6°C that was less heavily loaded with antibiotic multi-resistance features. Our results imply that N 2 gas flushing could strengthen cold storage of raw milk by tackling the bacterial spoilage

  15. LiF Reduces MICs of Antibiotics against Clinical Isolates of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Syed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem yet the development of new antibiotics has slowed to a trickle, giving rise to the use of combination therapy to eradicate infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the combined inhibitory effect of lithium fluoride (LiF and commonly used antimicrobials on the growth of the following bacteria: Enterococcus faecalis, Staphyloccoccus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The in vitro activities of ceftazidime, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, streptomycin, erythromycin, amoxicillin, and ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, alone or combined with LiF were performed by microdilution method. MICs were determined visually following 18–20 h of incubation at 37°C. We observed reduced MICs of antibiotics associated with LiF ranging from two-fold to sixteen-fold. The strongest decreases of MICs observed were for streptomycin and erythromycin associated with LiF against Acinetobacter baumannii and Streptococcus pneumoniae. An eight-fold reduction was recorded for streptomycin against S. pneumoniae whereas an eight-fold and a sixteen-fold reduction were obtained for erythromycin against A. baumannii and S. pneumoniae. This suggests that LiF exhibits a synergistic effect with a wide range of antibiotics and is indicative of its potential as an adjuvant in antibiotic therapy.

  16. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AMONG ENTERIC BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM HUMAN AND ANIMAL WASTES AND IMPACTED SURFACE WATERS: COMPARISON WITH NARMS FINDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human infection with bacteria exhibiting mono or multiple antimicrobial resistance (MAR) has been a growing problem in the US, and studies have implicated livestock as a source of MAR bacteria primarily through foodborne transmission routes. However, waterborne transmission of...

  17. The combination of ultrasound with antibiotics released from bone cement decreases the viability of planktonic and biofilm bacteria : an in vitro study with clinical strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, Geert T.; Neut, Danielle; Horn, Jim R. van; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Antibiotic-loaded bone cements are used for the permanent fixation of joint prostheses. Antibiotic-loaded cements significantly decrease the incidence of infection. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the viability of bacteria derived from patients with a

  18. [Investigation of Antibiotic Resistance of Indigenous Bacteria and Abundance of Class I Integron in Matrix of Constructed Wetlands of Different Configurations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Xiao-bei; Tao, Ran; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Min; Lin, Jian-hua; Man, Ying

    2015-05-01

    Environmental indigenous bacteria (Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas) were isolated from 9 different constructed wetlands (CWs) in summer and winter. The antibiotic resistance analysis of the isolated bacteria was conducted by Kirby-Bauer disc agar diffusion method. And the quantitative PCR assay was used to quantify the abundance of class I integron (int1) in the matrix of CWs. The results indicated that over 84% of isolates among the 522 Staphylococcus strains and 543 Pseudomonas strains had antibiotic resistance and above 68% of isolates had multi-antibiotic resistance, the average of MRI index was 0.22. Antibiotic resistance of indigenous bacteria in CWs was at the same resistance level of human or animal bacteria in certain environment, indicating that indigenous bacteria from constructed wetlands had relatively high level of resistance. Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas strains had higher resistances to Ampicillin (AMP) and Sulfamethoxazole (SXT), and extremely low resistance rates of lower than 3% to Tetracycline (TE), Gentamicin (CN) and Ciprofloxacin (CIP). To Ceftazidime (CAZ) and Chloramphenicol (C), the two kinds of indigenous bacteria showed distinctly different resistances. Quantitative PCR revealed that the abundance of intl in CWs was 1.14 x 10(5)-5.66 x 10(5) copies · g(-1), and its relative abundance was 0.54%-3.68%. Both of season and wetland type had important impact on antibiotic resistance and abundance of int1. The antibiotic resistance rate and the multiple resistance index (MRI) for the indigenous bacteria and the abundance of int1 in summer were higher than those in winter. Among three types of CWs, the antibiotic resistance rate and the MRI value were the highest in the downward vertical flow, while the int1 abundance was the highest in the sub-surface flow. The research indicated that indigenous bacteria acquired antibiotic resistance due to long term exposure to antibiotics of certain concentrations and antibiotic-resistant intestinal

  19. Antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from freshwater aquacultures and prediction of the persistence and toxicity of antimicrobials in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seung J; Jang, Eunhee; Lee, Sang-Hun; Yoo, Byeong-Hak; Kim, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Tak-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from freshwater aquaculture effluents was investigated. The bacterial strains were collected from four different freshwater aquaculture effluents (catfish, trout, eel, and loach). Based on sequence of 16S rRNA, a total of 20 bacterial strains was isolated and one half of the isolated bacteria were Aeromonas sp. The antimicrobial sensitivity test was performed using the disc diffusion method. Individual antibiotic-resistant bacteria to antimicrobials were 41.7% and multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria were 58.3%. The disinfection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by electron beam (E-beam) irradiation was carried out using an electron accelerator. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were effectively disinfected by E-beam irradiation. The isolated bacteria were completely disinfected at a dose of less than 2 kGy. The persistence and toxicity of each antimicrobial in the aquatic environment was estimated due to the human health and ecosystems. In order to estimate the persistence and toxicity of antimicrobials in the aquatic environment, two quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models were used. The persistence and toxicity of each antimicrobial were influenced on its hydrophobicity. In addition, QSAR models showed that isoelectric point and hydrogen bonding acceptor are key parameters to estimate the persistence and toxicity of antimicrobials in the aquatic environment.

  20. Antibiotic- and heavy-metal resistance in bacteria isolated from deep subsurface in El Callao region, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Lina Rojas Pirela

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Título en ingles: Antibiotic- and heavy-metal resistance in bacteria isolated from deep subsurface in El Callao region, Venezuela Título corto: Antibiotic and metal resistance in bacteria from deep subsurface Título en español: Resistencia a antibioticos y metals pesados en bacterias aisladas de subsuelo en la región El Callao, Venezuela Resumen:  Se investigó el efecto de la contaminación con mercurio (Hg en las comunidades bacterianas del subsuelo profundo en la región de El Callao (Estado Bolívar, Venezuela. Se estudiaron comunidades bacterianas de dos niveles de profundidad (-288 m y -388 m en una mina de oro con el propósito de describir las características más relevantes de las bacterias indígenas cultivables que colonizaban esta mina. Se evaluaron los patrones de resistencia a antibióticos y metales pesados, presencia del gen merA y plásmidos en aislados resistentes. Se encontró una elevada frecuencia de bacterias indígenas resistentes al Hg y otros metales pesados. De 76 aislados Hg-resistentes probados 73.7 % fueron adicionalmente resistentes a ampicilina; 86.8 % a cloranfenicol; 67.1 % a tetraciclina; 56.6 % a estreptomicina y 51.3 % a kanamicina. Además, se encontró que 40.74 % (-328 m y 26.53 % (-388 m de las bacterias Hg-resistentes fueron simultáneamente resistentes tanto a cuatro como a cinco de estos antibióticos. Se detectó la presencia de plásmidos de alto y bajo peso molecular y, a pesar de que los aislados mostraban resistencia a compuestos mercuriales, la presencia del gen merA fue detectada solo en 71.05 % de los cepas. Estos resultados sugieren que la exposición a Hg podría ser una presión selectiva en la proliferación de bacterias resistentes a antibióticos y promover el mantenimiento y propagación de estos genes de resistencia. Sin embargo, la existencia de tales resistencias a estas profundidades podría también apoyar la idea de que la resistencia a antibióticos en estas bacterias es

  1. Screening of extracts of algae from Baja California sur, Mexico as reversers of the antibiotic resistance of some pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Ochoa, M; Murillo-Alvarez, J I; Zermeño-Cervantes, L A; Martínez-Diaz, S; Rodríguez-Riosmena, R

    2010-09-01

    Sixty ethanol extracts of marine flora of Baja California Sur (Mexico) were screened to evaluate the reversing effect of the bacterial resistance to antibiotics in combination with a sublethal concentration of ampicillin or erythromycin. The activity was assayed by using a modification of the classical agar-diffusion method against 3 resistant, pathogenic bacteria; Escherichia coil (ATCC BAA196), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC BAA42), and Streptococcus pyogenes (ATCC BAA946). From the 60 ethanolic extracts, 12 (20%) of them in combination with ampicillin were able to reverse the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus and 8 (13%) with erythromycin yielded the same reversal with Streptococcus pyogenes. An extract from Sargassum horridum was the only one that reversed the resistance to antibiotics against both Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. Our findings suggest that some algae may be source of compounds with the potential to reverse the antibiotic resistance of some bacteria. In addition, of the assayed extracts, 35 (57%) showed inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus, 48 (78%) were active against Streptococcus pyogenes, but none was active against Escherichia coil. The most active extracts were from Laurencia spp., Gelidium robustum, Chnoospora implexa, Padina mexicana, Gracilaria subsecundata, and Dictyopteris undulata.

  2. Evaluation of antibiotics as a methodological procedure to inhibit free-living and biofilm bacteria in marine zooplankton culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa O. Agostini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a problem with keeping culture medium completely or partially free from bacteria. The use of prokaryotic metabolic inhibitors, such as antibiotics, is suggested as an alternative solution, although such substances should not harm non-target organisms. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of antibiotic treatments in inhibiting free-living and biofilm bacteria and their half-life in artificial marine environment using the copepod Acartia tonsa as bioindicador of non-harmful antibiotic combinations. Regarding to results, the application of 0.025 g L-1 penicillin G potassium + 0.08 g L-1 streptomycin sulphate + 0.04 g L-1 neomycin sulphate showed great potential for use in marine cultures and scientific experiments without lethal effects to non-target organisms. The effect of this combination starts within the first six hours of exposure and reduces up to 93 % the bacterial density, but the half-life is short, requiring replacement. No adverse changes in water quality were observed within 168 hours of exposure. As a conclusion, we can infer that this treatment was an effective procedure for zooplankton cultures and scientific experiments with the aim of measuring the role of free-living and biofilm in the marine community.

  3. Effect of biochar amendment on the control of soil sulfonamides, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and gene enrichment in lettuce tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Mao; Sun, Mingming; Feng, Yanfang; Wan, Jinzhong; Xie, Shanni; Tian, Da; Zhao, Yu; Wu, Jun; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin; Jiang, Xin

    2016-05-15

    Considering the potential threat of vegetables growing in antibiotic-polluted soil with high abundance of antibiotic-resistant genes (ARGs) against human health through the food chain, it is thus urgent to develop novel control technology to ensure vegetable safety. In the present work, pot experiments were conducted in lettuce cultivation to assess the impedance effect of biochar amendment on soil sulfonamides (SAs), antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), and ARG enrichment in lettuce tissues. After 100 days of cultivation, lettuce cultivation with biochar amendment exhibited the greatest soil SA dissipation as well as the significant improvement of lettuce growth indices, with residual soil SAs mainly existing as the tightly bound fraction. Moreover, the SA contents in roots and new/old leaves were reduced by one to two orders of magnitude compared to those without biochar amendment. In addition, isolate counts for SA-resistant bacterial endophytes in old leaves and sul gene abundances in roots and old leaves also decreased significantly after biochar application. However, neither SA resistant bacteria nor sul genes were detected in new leaves. It was the first study to demonstrate that biochar amendment can be a practical strategy to protect lettuce safety growing in SA-polluted soil with rich ARB and ARGs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacteria isolated from natural sources of water from rural areas of East Sikkim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubra Poonia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contamination of water, food, and environment with antibiotic-resistant bacteria poses a serious public health issue. Objective: The objective was to study the bacterial pollution of the natural sources of water in east Sikkim and to determine the antimicrobial profile of the bacterial isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 225 samples, 75 each during winter, summer, and monsoon season were collected from the same source in every season for bacteriological analysis by membrane filtration method. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using standard disc diffusion method. Results: A total of 19 bacterial species of the genera Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus, Salmonella, Shigella, Enterobacter, Citrobacter, Morganella, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Flavobacterium, and Serratia were isolated and their antimicrobial sensitivity tested. Generally, most bacterial isolates except Salmonella and Shigella species were found resistant to commonly used antibiotics such as ampicillin (57.5%, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxaole (39.1%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (37.4%, cefixime (34.5%, tetracycline (29.1%, ceftazidime (26.3%, ofloxacin (25.9%, amikacin (8.7%, and gentamicin (2.7% but sensitive to imipenem and piperacillin/tazobactam. Conclusion: Natural sources of water in east Sikkim are grossly contaminated with bacteria including enteropathogens. The consumption of untreated water from these sources might pose health risk to consumers.

  5. An unusual class of anthracyclines potentiate Gram-positive antibiotics in intrinsically resistant Gram-negative bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Georgina; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives An orthogonal approach taken towards novel antibacterial drug discovery involves the identification of small molecules that potentiate or enhance the activity of existing antibacterial agents. This study aimed to identify natural-product rifampicin adjuvants in the intrinsically resistant organism Escherichia coli. Methods E. coli BW25113 was screened against 1120 actinomycete fermentation extracts in the presence of subinhibitory (2 mg/L) concentrations of rifampicin. The active molecule exhibiting the greatest rifampicin potentiation was isolated using activity-guided methods and identified using mass and NMR spectroscopy. Susceptibility testing and biochemical assays were used to determine the mechanism of antibiotic potentiation. Results The anthracycline Antibiotic 301A1 was isolated from the fermentation broth of a strain of Streptomyces (WAC450); the molecule was shown to be highly synergistic with rifampicin (fractional inhibitory concentration index = 0.156) and moderately synergistic with linezolid (FIC index = 0.25) in both E. coli and Acinetobacter baumannii. Activity was associated with inhibition of efflux and the synergistic phenotype was lost when tested against E. coli harbouring mutations within the rpoB gene. Structure–activity relationship studies revealed that other anthracyclines do not synergize with rifampicin and removal of the sugar moiety of Antibiotic 301A1 abolishes activity. Conclusions Screening only a subsection of our natural product library identified a small-molecule antibiotic adjuvant capable of sensitizing Gram-negative bacteria to antibiotics to which they are ordinarily intrinsically resistant. This result demonstrates the great potential of this approach in expanding antibiotic effectiveness in the face of the growing challenge of resistance in Gram-negatives. PMID:24627312

  6. Detecting bacteria and Determining Their Susceptibility to Antibiotics by Stochastic Confinement in Nanoliter Droplets using Plug-Based Microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boedicker, J.; Li, L; Kline, T; Ismagilov, R

    2008-01-01

    This article describes plug-based microfluidic technology that enables rapid detection and drug susceptibility screening of bacteria in samples, including complex biological matrices, without pre-incubation. Unlike conventional bacterial culture and detection methods, which rely on incubation of a sample to increase the concentration of bacteria to detectable levels, this method confines individual bacteria into droplets nanoliters in volume. When single cells are confined into plugs of small volume such that the loading is less than one bacterium per plug, the detection time is proportional to plug volume. Confinement increases cell density and allows released molecules to accumulate around the cell, eliminating the pre-incubation step and reducing the time required to detect the bacteria. We refer to this approach as stochastic confinement. Using the microfluidic hybrid method, this technology was used to determine the antibiogram - or chart of antibiotic sensitivity - of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to many antibiotics in a single experiment and to measure the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug cefoxitin (CFX) against this strain. In addition, this technology was used to distinguish between sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus in samples of human blood plasma. High-throughput microfluidic techniques combined with single-cell measurements also enable multiple tests to be performed simultaneously on a single sample containing bacteria. This technology may provide a method of rapid and effective patient-specific treatment of bacterial infections and could be extended to a variety of applications that require multiple functional tests of bacterial samples on reduced timescales.

  7. The soil resistome: a critical review on antibiotic resistance origins, ecology and dissemination potential in telluric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesme, Joseph; Simonet, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    Soil is a large reservoir of microbial diversity and the majority of antimicrobial compounds used today in human and veterinary health care have been isolated from soil microorganisms. The Darwinian hypothesis of an 'arms-shields race' between antibiotic producers and resistant strains is often cited to explain antibiotic resistance gene determinants (ARGD) origins and diversity. ARGD abundance and antibiotic molecule exposure are, however, not systematically linked, and many other factors can contribute to resistance gene emergence, selection and dissemination in the environment. Soil is a heterogeneous habitat and represents a broad spectrum of different ecological niches. Soil harbours a large genetic diversity at small spatial scale, favouring exchange of genetic materials by means of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) that will contribute to ARGD dissemination between bacteria and eventually acquisition by pathogen genomes, therefore threatening antibiotic therapies. Our current knowledge on the extent of the soil resistome abundance and diversity has been greatly enhanced since the metagenomic revolution and help of high-throughput sequencing technologies. Different ecological hypotheses explaining their high prevalence in soil and questioning their transfer rate to pathogens, in respect to these recent experimental results, will be discussed in the present review. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Rapid Detection of Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria Through Assessment of Changes in Cellular Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Fátima; Santiso, Rebeca; Tamayo, Maria; Fernández, José Luis; Bou, Germán; Lepe, José Antonio; McConnell, Michael J; Gosálvez, Jaime; Cisneros, José Miguel

    2017-03-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing has the potential to improve patient outcomes and reduce healthcare-associated costs. In this study, a novel assay based on bacterial cell elongation after exposure to an antibiotic (ceftazidime) was evaluated for its ability to rapidly detect resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. The assay was used to detect resistance in a large collection of strains containing 320 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii, 171 clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and 212 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the results were compared to those obtained using standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods. The assay identified ceftazidime-resistant strains with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for A. baumannii, 100% sensitivity and 97.2% specificity for K. pneumoniae, and with 82.3% sensitivity and 100% specificity for P. aeruginosa. Importantly, results were obtained in 1 hour 15 minutes from exponentially growing cultures. This study demonstrates that changes in cell length are highly correlated with phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility determined using standard susceptibility testing methods. This study therefore provides proof-of-concept that changes in cell morphology can be used as the basis for rapid detection of antibiotic resistance and provides the basis for the development of novel rapid diagnostics for the detection of antibiotic resistance.

  9. Bacteria isolated from pristine high altitude environments in the Argentinean Andean wetlands: plasmid profile and multiple antibiotic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dib, J.R.; Martinez, M.A.; Sineriz, F.; Farias, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Andean wetlands, placed in the North-Western Argentine at 4,600 m altitude, are attractive for both, environmental and biotechnology studies. Most of these wetlands are completely remote and inaccessible, having a high salinity and metal contents, a wide range of daily temperature changes, and an important intensity of solar UV-B radiation. Bacteria isolated from these environments were identified by 16SrDNA sequence and resulted in Gram-positive colored bacteria. Interesting features, to our knowledge never reported so far from bacteria isolates from these pristine high altitude lake-environments, such as similar plasmids profiles and multiple antibiotic resistances are the focus of this work. At least two plasmids were found in all isolates studied by using modifications of the alkaline Iysis method. Their preliminary characterization in this work includes size, incompatibility group through PCR, genetic transference to suitable hosts by transformation and conjugation, and studies of possible relationships of them with antibiotic resistances. (author)

  10. Antibiotic resistance and extended-spectrum β-lactamases in isolated bacteria from seawater of Algiers beaches (Algeria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alouache, Souhila; Kada, Mohamed; Messai, Yamina; Estepa, Vanesa; Torres, Carmen; Bakour, Rabah

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate bacterial antibiotic resistance in seawater from four beaches in Algiers. The most significant resistance rates were observed for amoxicillin and ticarcillin, whereas they were relatively low for ceftazidime, cefotaxime and imipenem. According to sampling sites, the highest resistance rates were recorded for 2 sites subjected to chemical and microbiological inputs (amoxicillin, 43% and 52%; ticarcillin, 19.6% and 47.7%), and for 2 sites relatively preserved from anthropogenic influence, resistance rates were lowest (amoxicillin, 1.5% and 16%; ticarcillin, 0.8% and 2.6%). Thirty-four bacteria resistant to imipenem (n=14) or cefotaxime (n=20) were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=15), Pseudomonas fluorescens (7), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (4), Burkholderia cepacia (2), Bordetella sp. (1), Pantoea sp. (1), Acinetobacter baumannii (1), Chryseomonas luteola (1), Ochrobactrum anthropi (1) and Escherichia coli (1). Screening for extended spectrum β-lactamase showed the presence of CTX-M-15 β-lactamase in the E. coli isolate, and the encoding gene was transferable in association with the IncI1 plasmid of about 50 kbp. Insertion sequence ISEcp1B was located upstream of the CTX-M-15 gene. This work showed a significant level of resistance to antibiotics, mainly among environmental saprophytic bacteria. Transmissible CTX-M-15 was detected in E. coli; this may mean that contamination of the environment by resistant bacteria may cause the spread of resistance genes.

  11. Could bacteriophages transfer antibiotic resistance genes from environmental bacteria to human-body associated bacterial populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniesa, Maite; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Environments without any contact with anthropogenic antibiotics show a great abundance of antibiotic resistance genes that use to be chromosomal and are part of the core genes of the species that harbor them. Some of these genes are shared with human pathogens where they appear in mobile genetic elements. Diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in non-contaminated environments is much greater than in human and animal pathogens, and in environments contaminated with antibiotic from anthropogenic activities. This suggests the existence of some bottleneck effect for the mobilization of antibiotic resistance genes among different biomes. Bacteriophages have characteristics that make them suitable vectors between different biomes, and as well for transferring genes from biome to biome. Recent metagenomic studies and detection of bacterial genes by genomic techniques in the bacteriophage fraction of different microbiota provide indirect evidences that the mobilization of genes mediated by phages, including antibiotic resistance genes, is far more relevant than previously thought. Our hypothesis is that bacteriophages might be of critical importance for evading one of the bottlenecks, the lack of ecological connectivity that modulates the pass of antibiotic resistance genes from natural environments such as waters and soils, to animal and human microbiomes. This commentary concentrates on the potential importance of bacteriophages in transferring resistance genes from the environment to human and animal body microbiomes, but there is no doubt that transduction occurs also in body microbiomes.

  12. Isolation of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic and potentially pathogenic bacteria from carpets of mosques in Tripoli, Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Rahouma

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Isolation of potentially pathogenic bacteria from carpets in hospitals has been reported earlier, but not from carpets in mosques. The aim of the present study is to determine the pathogenic and potentially pathogenic bacteria that may exist on the carpets of mosques in Tripoli, Libya. Methods: Dust samples from carpets were collected from 57 mosques in Tripoli. Samples were examined for pathogenic bacteria using standard bacteriological procedures. Susceptibility of isolated bacteria to antimicrobial agents was determined by the disc-diffusion method. Results: Of dust samples examined, Salmonella spp. was detected in two samples (3.5%, 1 in group B and 1 in group C1, Escherichia coli in 16 samples (28.1%, Aeromonas spp. in one sample (1.8%, and Staphylococcus aureus in 12 samples (21.1%. Multiple drug resistance was observed in >16.7% of E. coli and in 25% of S. aureus. Conclusion: Contamination of carpets in mosques of Tripoli with antibiotic-resistant pathogenic and potentially pathogenic bacteria may pose a health risk to worshipers, particularly, the very young, the old and the immunecompromised. Worshipers are encouraged to use personal praying mats when praying in mosques.

  13. Antibacterial activity of GUAVA, Psidium guajava Linnaeus, leaf extracts on diarrhea-causing enteric bacteria isolated from Seabob shrimp, Xiphopenaeus kroyeri (Heller).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Flávia A; Andrade Neto, Manoel; Bezerra, José N S; Macrae, Andrew; Sousa, Oscarina Viana de; Fonteles-Filho, Antonio A; Vieira, Regine H S F

    2008-01-01

    Guava leaf tea of Psidium guajava Linnaeus is commonly used as a medicine against gastroenteritis and child diarrhea by those who cannot afford or do not have access to antibiotics. This study screened the antimicrobial effect of essential oils and methanol, hexane, ethyl acetate extracts from guava leaves. The extracts were tested against diarrhea-causing bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli. Strains that were screened included isolates from seabob shrimp, Xiphopenaeus kroyeri (Heller) and laboratory-type strains. Of the bacteria tested, Staphylococcus aureus strains were most inhibited by the extracts. The methanol extract showed greatest bacterial inhibition. No statistically significant differences were observed between the tested extract concentrations and their effect. The essential oil extract showed inhibitory activity against S. aureus and Salmonella spp. The strains isolated from the shrimp showed some resistance to commercially available antibiotics. These data support the use of guava leaf-made medicines in diarrhea cases where access to commercial antibiotics is restricted. In conclusion, guava leaf extracts and essential oil are very active against S. aureus, thus making up important potential sources of new antimicrobial compounds.

  14. Using a sequential regimen to eliminate bacteria at sublethal antibiotic dosages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayari Fuentes-Hernandez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We need to find ways of enhancing the potency of existing antibiotics, and, with this in mind, we begin with an unusual question: how low can antibiotic dosages be and yet bacterial clearance still be observed? Seeking to optimise the simultaneous use of two antibiotics, we use the minimal dose at which clearance is observed in an in vitro experimental model of antibiotic treatment as a criterion to distinguish the best and worst treatments of a bacterium, Escherichia coli. Our aim is to compare a combination treatment consisting of two synergistic antibiotics to so-called sequential treatments in which the choice of antibiotic to administer can change with each round of treatment. Using mathematical predictions validated by the E. coli treatment model, we show that clearance of the bacterium can be achieved using sequential treatments at antibiotic dosages so low that the equivalent two-drug combination treatments are ineffective. Seeking to treat the bacterium in testing circumstances, we purposefully study an E. coli strain that has a multidrug pump encoded in its chromosome that effluxes both antibiotics. Genomic amplifications that increase the number of pumps expressed per cell can cause the failure of high-dose combination treatments, yet, as we show, sequentially treated populations can still collapse. However, dual resistance due to the pump means that the antibiotics must be carefully deployed and not all sublethal sequential treatments succeed. A screen of 136 96-h-long sequential treatments determined five of these that could clear the bacterium at sublethal dosages in all replicate populations, even though none had done so by 24 h. These successes can be attributed to a collateral sensitivity whereby cross-resistance due to the duplicated pump proves insufficient to stop a reduction in E. coli growth rate following drug exchanges, a reduction that proves large enough for appropriately chosen drug switches to clear the bacterium.

  15. Evaluation of antibiotic resistant bacteria in underground drinking water and transfer of their resistant character to normal flora of the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mehboob; Khan, Naqab; Rehman, Khurram; Khan, Samiullah; Niazi, Zahid Rasul; Shah, Kifayatullah; Baloch, Natasha; Khan, Barkat Ali

    2018-03-01

    The untreated surface water for drinking and domestic use is an alarming situation to public health especially in prevalence of antibiotics resistant bacteria. This investigation aimed to isolate and identify the antibiotic resistance bacteria in underground water samples in district Dera Ismail Khan, Pakistan. The underground water samples were collected from four different places using hand pumps (Khyber town, riverside, Gomal University and united town). Cultured on nutrient agar media, identified by Gam staining and biochemical tests. There after antibiotic resistance assay were performed by measuring zone of inhibition of different antibiotics by disc diffusion method. Six different bacterial colonies were isolated and identified as Enterobacteriaceae, Serriata specie, Proteues, Pseudomonas, all these bacterial colonies were 33% resistant to chloramphenicol with and 100% resistant to amoxicillin. Some colonies were also considered as resistant, according to the criteria of National Committee for Clinical Records (NCCL) that less than 10mm zone of inhibition are considered as resistant. Subsequently, the chloramphenicol resistance bacteria were analyzed for their ability to transfer resistant gene to sensitive bacteria. In in-vitro method, an isolate M1b (resistant) was found capable to transfer resistance gene to M1a isolate (sensitive) in nutrient rich environment. It was concluded that antibiotics resistance bacteria found in underground water, moreover capable of transferring the antibiotic resistant character to suitable recipient i.e. normal flora of the body or to other pathogens by conjugation.

  16. Fate of antibiotic resistance bacteria and genes during enhanced anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge by microwave pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Juan; Liu, Jibao; Zheng, Xiang; Zhang, Junya; Ni, Xiaotang; Chen, Meixue; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-10-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) were investigated during the sludge anaerobic digestion (AD) with microwave-acid (MW-H), microwave (MW) and microwave-H2O2-alkaline (MW-H2O2) pretreatments. Results showed that combined MW pretreatment especially for the MW-H pretreatment could efficiently reduce the ARB concentration, and most ARG concentrations tended to attenuate during the pretreatment. The subsequent AD showed evident removal of the ARB, but most ARGs were enriched after AD. Only the concentration of tetX kept continuous declination during the whole sludge treatment. The total ARGs concentration showed significant correlation with 16S rRNA during the pretreatment and AD. Compared with unpretreated sludge, the AD of MW and MW-H2O2 pretreated sludge presented slightly better ARB and ARGs reduction efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. European and Russian physician awareness of best management approaches for infections due to antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Paurus; Salimi, Tehseen; Epstein, Robert; Leone-Perkins, Megan; Aubert, Ronald; Khalid, Mona; Epstein, Emma; Teagarden, J Russell

    2017-08-01

    The rapid spread of infections due to antibiotic-resistant, Gram-negative bacteria in Europe and surrounding regions requires a heightened level of awareness among physicians within their practice settings. We surveyed 800 physicians who treat these infections across France, Germany, Spain, Italy, and Russia to assess their awareness of best management approaches. We found that more than two-thirds do not consider themselves highly aware of best management practices. The respondents are facing these resistant infections as evidenced by the antibiotics they report using and their stated interest in newer agents. Respondents indicated that precious time is lost waiting for culture results, but also said they will need more information about accuracy, use, and costs for adopting rapid molecular testing. The survey further identified the need for treatment guidelines and clinical decision support tools that can be applied at the bedside.

  18. Incidence of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from eels and aquaculture ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mao; Wu, Xiaomei; Yan, Qingpi; Ma, Ying; Huang, Lixing; Qin, Yingxue; Xu, Xiaojin

    2016-07-07

    The overuse of antimicrobials in aquaculture has promoted the selection of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. Here we investigated the abundance of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in 108 strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from eels and aquaculture ponds in China. Conventional PCR was implemented to examine common antibiotic-resistance genes, integrons, and their gene cassette arrays. The results showed that the antibiotic-resistance genes blaTEM, tetC, sulI, aadA, floR, and qnrB were detected at high percentages, as were a number of other resistance genes. Class I integrons were present in 79.63% of the strains, and 10 out of 108 isolates carried class II integrons. Class III integrons were not detected. Three strains carried both class I and class II integrons, and 73.26% of the class I integron-positive isolates contained the qacEΔ1/sul1 gene. Fourteen types of integron cassette arrays were found among class I integron-positive isolates. A new array, dfrB4-catB3-blaOXA-10-aadA1, was discovered in this study. The gene cassette array dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 was the most widely distributed. In summary, 23 different gene cassettes encoding resistance to 8 classes of antibiotics were identified in the class I integrons, and the main cassettes contained genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides (aad) and trimethoprim (dfr). All class II integron-positive strains had only a single gene cassette array, viz. dfrA1-catB2-sat2-aadA1. High levels of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in eels and auqauculture ponds suggest that the overuse of antimicrobials should be strictly controlled and that the levels of bacterial antimicrobial-resistance genes in aquaculture should be monitored.

  19. Bacteria etiological agents causing respiratory tract infections in children and their resistance patterns to a panel of ten antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nweze EI

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the bacteria etiological agents of respiratory tract infection among 280 school children in South East Nigeria, and to determine their antimicrobial resistance patterns to a panel of ten antibiotics. Methods: Throat swabs (280 were collected from students in four boarding schools located in Enugu and Onitsha metropolis. Standard microbiological procedures were used to screen these swabs to determine the prevalence of respiratory pathogens while the disc diffusion test was used to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns of the recovered isolates. Results: Of the 280 samples screened, 57.1% were positive. Haemophilus influenzae was the most prevalent (16.1%, followed by Streptococcus pyogenes (13.9%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (12.5%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (6.8%, Staphylococcus aureus (5.4% and Corynebacterium diphtheriae (2.5%. More isolates were recovered in the two male schools investigated. However, there was no significant difference in the overall prevalence of isolates according to sex or school location of the subjects. Greater number of isolates (56% was recovered from those aged 11-14 years. This was statistically significant (P<0.05, compared to the other two age groups (15-18 years and 19-23 years. The pattern of resistance varied according to the bacteria species. There were multi-resistant isolates. Since these students stand the risk of contracting respiratory tract infection particularly from reservoirs among them, there is need to increase surveillance and develop better strategies to curb the increasing prevalence of respiratory tract infection in this and other similar regions of Africa. Conclusions: The spectrum of bacteria causing respiratory tract infection is still wide in Nigeria. Many isolates showed appreciable levels of antibiotic resistance apparently due to antibiotic abuse. Development of new strategies to curb this increasing prevalence of respiratory tract infection is warranted.

  20. Induction of changes in antibiotic susceptibility of certain Bacteria using gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, Z.S.; El-Hefnawy, H.N.; Roushdy, H.

    1998-01-01

    Antibiotic sensitivity tests of cultures isolated from environment of high radiation intensity of the facility were studied. Standard strains of ATCC, NTCC and those from air of clean area in the vicinity of the facility were used for comparison. The following isolated cultures from the environment of the radiation facility were studied in the present work B. Cereus, B. Licheniformis and Staph Aureus. Antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed before and after exposure to radiation doses in the range from 0.1 kGy to 2.5 kGy depending on the radiation resistance of the studied strain. The obtained results showed changes in the antibiotic sensitivities of the studied isolates after their exposure to certain doses of gamma radiation. These induced changes were found to have similar trend for all strains except in the case of Staph Aureus with the antibiotic tetracycline

  1. Medical-grade honey kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria in vitro and eradicates skin colonization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; van den Akker, Johannes P. C.; Güçlü, Ahmet; Aslami, Hamid; Binnekade, Jan M.; de Boer, Leonie; Boszhard, Laura; Paulus, Frederique; Middelhoek, Pauline; te Velde, Anje A.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistance among microbes urgently necessitates the development of novel antimicrobial agents. Since ancient times, honey has been used successfully for treatment of infected wounds, because of its antibacterial activity. However, large variations in the in vitro antibacterial

  2. The effects of low-level ionizing radiation and copper exposure on the incidence of antibiotic resistance in lentic biofilm bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, J Vaun; Dicks, Christian A; Bryan, A Lawrence; Tuckfield, R Cary

    2017-09-01

    Environmental reservoirs of antibiotic resistant bacteria are poorly understood. Understanding how the environment selects for resistance traits in the absence of antibiotics is critical in developing strategies to mitigate this growing menace. Indirect or co-selection of resistance by environmental pollution has been shown to increase antibiotic resistance. However no attention has been given to the effects of low-level ionizing radiation or the interactions between radiation and heavy metals on the maintenance or selection for antibiotic resistance (AR) traits. Here we explore the effect of radiation and copper on antibiotic resistance. Bacteria were collected from biofilms in two ponds - one impacted by low-level radiocesium and the other an abandoned farm pond. Through laboratory controlled experiments we examined the effects of increasing concentrations of copper on the incidence of antibiotic resistance. Differences were detected in the resistance profiles of the controls from each pond. Low levels (0.01 mM) of copper sulfate increased resistance but 0.5 mM concentrations of copper sulfate depressed the AR response in both ponds. A similar pattern was observed for levels of multiple antibiotic resistance per isolate. The first principal component response of isolate exposure to multiple antibiotics showed significant differences among the six isolate treatment combinations. These differences were clearly visualized through a discriminant function analysis, which showed distinct antibiotic resistance response patterns based on the six treatment groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Odontogenic bacteria in periodontal disease and resistance patterns to common antibiotics used as treatment and prophylaxis in odontology in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, J R; Bascones, A; Sánchez, P; Matesanz, P; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Giménez, M J; Pérez-Balcabao, I; Granizo, J J; Prieto, J

    2007-03-01

    Resistance in streptococci or Gram-negative bacteria is associated with antibiotic consumption. Scarce information exists on the antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial isolates from patients with periodontitis in countries with high antibiotic consumption, as this is an area in which microbiological testing is not performed in daily practice. The present study was undertaken to explore the susceptibility of bacterial isolates in periodontitis to antibiotics prescribed in odontology in Spain as treatment for local infections or prophylaxis for distant focal infections. Periodontal samples were prospectively collected in 48 patients classified by pocket depth of or=4 mm. Species were identified by culture, selecting the five most frequent morphotypes per sample, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Susceptibility was determined by E-test. A total of 261 isolates were identified: 72.9% patients had Streptococcus oralis; 70.8% Streptococcus mitis; 60.4% Prevotella buccae; 39.6% Prevotella denticola; 37.5% Fusobacterium nucleatum; 35.4% Prevotella intermedia; 25% Capnocytophaga spp.; 23% Veillonella spp.; 22.9% Prevotella melaninogenica and Streptococcus sanguis; and <20% other species. Streptococcus viridans resistance rates were 0% for amoxicillin, approximately 10% for clindamycin, 9-22% for tetracycline, and for azithromycin ranged from 18.2% for S. sanguis to 47.7% for S. mitis. Prevotella isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, with amoxicillin resistance ranging from 17.1% in P. buccae to 26.3% in P. denticola. Metronidazole resistance was <6% in all Prevotella species, while clindamycin resistance ranged from 0 to 21.1%. beta-Lactamase production was positive in 54.1% Prevotella spp., 38.9% F. nucleatum, 30% Capnocytophaga spp., and 10% Veillonella spp. In this study, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was the most active antibiotic against all species tested, followed by metronidazole in the case of anaerobes.

  4. Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariprasad, Seenu M; Mieler, William F

    2016-01-01

    The Endophthalmitis Vitrectomy Study (EVS) provided ophthalmologists with evidence-based management strategies to deal with endophthalmitis for the first time. However, since the completion of the EVS, numerous unresolved issues remain. The use of oral antibiotics has important implications for the ophthalmologist, particularly in the prophylaxis and/or management of postoperative, posttraumatic, or bleb-associated bacterial endophthalmitis. One can reasonably conclude that significant intraocular penetration of an antibiotic after oral administration may be a property unique to the newer-generation fluoroquinolones. Prophylactic use of mupirocin nasal ointment resulted in significant reduction of conjunctival flora with or without preoperative topical 5% povidone-iodine preparation. Ocular fungal infections have traditionally been very difficult to treat due to limited therapeutic options both systemically and intravitreally. Because of its broad spectrum of coverage, low MIC90 levels for the organisms of concern, good tolerability, and excellent bioavailability, voriconazole through various routes of administration may be useful to the ophthalmologist in the primary treatment of or as an adjunct to the current management of ocular fungal infections. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Antibiotics susceptibility patterns of bacteria isolated from American and German cockroaches as potential vectors of microbial pathogens in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Fakoorziba

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the cockroach species, their bacterial flora and antibiotics susceptibility patterns of these bacteria in Shiraz. Methods: In the present descriptive study, only two species of cockroaches were recognized. The washing solutions from the digestion systems and surfaces of 156 American and German cockroaches were cultured. The latter was found to be the commonest (89.7% in all places. Results: Overall, 18 species of bacteria were isolated and identified by standard culture methods. The most frequent bacterium isolated from both species of cockroaches in all places was Pseudomonas (41.7%. The second and third commonest bacteria were Enterobacter (39.7% and Klebsiella (32.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The antibiogram profiles showed full (100% resistance of Klebsiella, Citrobacter, Acinetobacter and Proteus to amoxicillin and ampicillin at both hospitals, while Pseudomonas showed resistance (95.7% to cephalothin. Thus it is concluded that German and American cockroaches carry multidrug resistant bacteria in two hospitals which raises alarm for stricter control measures.

  6. Antibiotic resistance profile of bacteria isolated from raw milk samples of cattle and buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahlina Tanzin

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Two different species of bacteria i.e., S. aureus and E. coli are contaminating with milk samples. The pathogenic bacteria can be controlled effectively by using Ciprofloxacin and Levofloxacin in the case of mastitis in cattle and buffaloes in Bangladesh. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(1.000: 62-67

  7. In vitro synergistic effect of the CM11 antimicrobial peptide in combination with common antibiotics against clinical isolates of six species of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amani, Jafar; Barjini, Kamal A; Moghaddam, Mehrdad M; Asadi, Asadollah

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, increase of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria has been considered as a global concern. Therefore, it is important to find new antimicrobial agents and/or therapeutic strategies. In previous studies we investigated antibacterial activity of the CM11 peptide against multiple drug resistant clinical isolates of six bacteria species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. In this study, in order to reduce treatment costs and the cytotoxic effect of CM11 peptide, was analyzed its synergic interaction with selected antibiotics. In this reason, specific antibiotics for each bacterium were selected considering the guidelines of the "Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute". Based on the results , using a checkerboard procedure through the broth microdilution method, MICs of antibiotic agents alone and in combination with the peptide were determined. In most cases, synergistic effects between CM11 peptide and selected antibiotics against six bacteria species were observed as partial synergy. However, for S. aureus and P. aeruginosaa synergic interaction between peptide and selective antibiotics was observed with penicillin and ceftazidime, respectively. For K. pneumoniae, synergic effect was observed when CM11 peptide was used in combination with norfloxacin and also the combination of peptide with norfloxacin showed synergic effect against A. baumannii. Combination between the CM11 peptide and ciprofloxacin showed synergic effect on E. coli while only partial synergy was observed for S. typhimurium in combination with cefotaxime and ceftazidime. These results suggest that when selected antibiotic used in combination with the CM11 peptide, the dose of some antibiotics, especially the dose independent antibiotics, may be reduced for eliminating drug resistant bacteria.

  8. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Aqueous Extracts of Onion and some Antibiotics on a Number of Important Bacteria in Terms of Food Hygiene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzabi Younes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of edible onion plant and a number of common antibiotics in the case of some important bacteria regarding food hygiene. Materials and Methods: The sensitivity or resistance of standard strains of 9 important species of transmissible pathogenic bacteria, through food in laboratory Mueller Hinton agar medium and using blank paper discs containing onion extract, 9 standard synthetic chemicals, and antibiotics by agar disk diffusion method (disk diffusion agar, were investigated. Results: The findings of this study showed that, of the 9 species of bacteria tested, the aqueous extract of onion only has relatively small antibacterial activity on the 2 species of Staphylococcus aureus and clostridium perfringens. Statistical analysis of the results also indicated that there was no significant relationship among the different antibiotics used and the edible onion aqueous extract, and the resistance or susceptibility of isolates. Moreover, there was a difference between different antibiotics tested in this study and aqueous extract of onion, regarding the number of resistant bacteria, and intermediate and moderate susceptibility, and susceptibility to the antibacterial compounds. Conclusion: It seems that the aqueous extract of onions cannot be used as an alternative to commonly used antibiotics to fight important bacteria in terms food hygiene.

  9. Effect of medicinal plants, Heavy metals and antibiotics against pathogenic bacteria isolated from raw, Boiled and pasteurized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nazish Mazhar; Sarwar, Khadija; Mazhar, Syed Abdullah; Liaqat, Iram; Andleeb, Saiqa; Mazhar, Bushra; Kalim, Bushra

    2017-11-01

    Present study has been undertaken to isolate and identify the bacterial flora in raw, boiled and pasteurized milk. Agar disc diffusion method was used to determine their sensitivity using medicinal plants, antibiotics and heavy metals. Methylene blue reduction test was used to test the quality of milk samples. Total 10 pathogenic strains were isolated, five strains were isolated from raw milk, three from boiled milk and 2 two from pasteurized milk. To determine optimum conditions for growth, these pathogenic microorganisms were incubated at various temperatures and pH. Gram's staining and biochemical tests revealed that these pathogenic bacteria include Lactobacillus sp., E. coli, Salmonella sp., Pseudomonas sp., Streptococcus sp. and Staphylococcus. Ribotyping revealed S2 as Pseudomonas fluorescens, S5 as Lactococcus lactis and S9 as Lactobacillus acidophilus. Prevalence of pathogenic organisms provided the evidence that contamination of milk arises during milking, transportation and storage of milk. Raw milk is more contaminated than other two types of milk because it contains highest percentage of pathogenic organisms and pasteurized milk was found to be of best quality among three types. So it is recommended to drink milk after proper boiling or pasteurization. Proper pasteurization and hygienic packing of milk is essential to minimize contamination in milk which can save human beings from many milk borne diseases. Our study suggests that antimicrobial use in animal husbandry should be minimized to reduce the hazard of antibiotic resistance. Plant extracts are better alternative against pathogenic bacteria in milk.

  10. Effects of biochar on reducing the abundance of oxytetracycline, antibiotic resistance genes, and human pathogenic bacteria in soil and lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Manli; Li, Haichao; Gu, Jie; Tuo, Xiaxia; Sun, Wei; Qian, Xun; Wang, Xiaojuan

    2017-05-01

    Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in soil can affect human health via the food chain. Biochar is a soil amendment but its impacts on ARGs and the microbial communities associated with soil and vegetables are unclear. Therefore, we established three lettuce pot culture experiments, i.e., O300: 300 mg/kg oxytetracycline (OTC), BO300: 300 mg/kg OTC + 2% biochar, and a control without OTC or biochar. We found that under BO300, the relative abundances of ARGs were reduced by 51.8%, 43.4%, and 44.1% in lettuce leaves, roots, and soil, respectively, compared with O300. intI1 was highly abundant in soil and lettuce, and it co-occurred with some ARGs (tetW, ermF, and sul1). Redundancy analysis and network analysis indicated that the bacterial community succession was the main mechanism that affected the variations in ARGs and intI1. The reduction of Firmicutes due to the biochar treatment of soil and lettuce was the main factor responsible for the removal of tetracycline resistance genes in leaves. Biochar application led to the disappearance of human pathogenic bacteria (HPB), which was significantly correlated with the abundances of ermF and ermX. In summary, biochar is an effective farmland amendment for reducing the abundances of antibiotics, ARGs, and HPB in order to ensure the safety of vegetables and protect human health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The frequency of resistance to antibiotics of most frequently isolated bacteria from blood cultures during the period 1997-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirović Veljko

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of resistance to antibiotics of the most frequently isolated bacteria from blood cultures of hospitalized patients during the period 1997-2002. The resistance to antibiotics was determined by disk diffusion method according to National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards procedures. The majority of staphylococci isolates were resistant to methicillin, and the proportion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was stable (76.8-81.6%, during the follow-up period. None of the staphylococci isolates were resistant to vancomycin, but there was a very high incidence of high-level resistance of enterococci to aminoglycosides (47.2-72.2%. In 1998, only one strain among enterococci was resistant to vancomycin (Enterococcus faecium, VanA fenotype. Enterococcus spp isolates expressed variable frequency of resistance to ampicillin (15-40.1% during the follow-up period. Among Enterobacteriaceae there were no isolates resistant to imipenem, but dramatic increase of the resistance to ceftriaxone was found from 35.9% in 1997 to 95.9% in 2002 (p<0.001. Extended spectrum beta-lactamases production was found in all the species of enterobacteria isolates. Resistance to imipenem was observed in Acinetobacter spp isolates in 2002 for the first time. Pseudomonas spp isolates expressed high and very variable resistance to all antibiotics tested during the follow-up period.

  12. Effect of biochar amendment on the control of soil sulfonamides, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and gene enrichment in lettuce tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Mao [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Sun, Mingming [Soil Ecology Lab, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Feng, Yanfang, E-mail: fengyanfang@163.com [Institute of Agricultural Resources and Environment, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing 210014 (China); Wan, Jinzhong [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection of China, Nanjing 210042 (China); Xie, Shanni; Tian, Da [Soil Ecology Lab, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Zhao, Yu [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, Jun; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin [Soil Ecology Lab, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Jiang, Xin, E-mail: Jiangxin@issas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Biochar can prevent soil sulfonamides from accumulating in lettuce tissues. • ARB enrichment in lettuce tissues decreased significantly after biochar amendment. • Impedance effect of biochar addition on soil ARGs was also quite effective. • Biochar application can be a practical strategy to protect vegetable safety. - Abstract: Considering the potential threat of vegetables growing in antibiotic-polluted soil with high abundance of antibiotic-resistant genes (ARGs) against human health through the food chain, it is thus urgent to develop novel control technology to ensure vegetable safety. In the present work, pot experiments were conducted in lettuce cultivation to assess the impedance effect of biochar amendment on soil sulfonamides (SAs), antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), and ARG enrichment in lettuce tissues. After 100 days of cultivation, lettuce cultivation with biochar amendment exhibited the greatest soil SA dissipation as well as the significant improvement of lettuce growth indices, with residual soil SAs mainly existing as the tightly bound fraction. Moreover, the SA contents in roots and new/old leaves were reduced by one to two orders of magnitude compared to those without biochar amendment. In addition, isolate counts for SA-resistant bacterial endophytes in old leaves and sul gene abundances in roots and old leaves also decreased significantly after biochar application. However, neither SA resistant bacteria nor sul genes were detected in new leaves. It was the first study to demonstrate that biochar amendment can be a practical strategy to protect lettuce safety growing in SA-polluted soil with rich ARB and ARGs.

  13. Effect of biochar amendment on the control of soil sulfonamides, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and gene enrichment in lettuce tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Mao; Sun, Mingming; Feng, Yanfang; Wan, Jinzhong; Xie, Shanni; Tian, Da; Zhao, Yu; Wu, Jun; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin; Jiang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biochar can prevent soil sulfonamides from accumulating in lettuce tissues. • ARB enrichment in lettuce tissues decreased significantly after biochar amendment. • Impedance effect of biochar addition on soil ARGs was also quite effective. • Biochar application can be a practical strategy to protect vegetable safety. - Abstract: Considering the potential threat of vegetables growing in antibiotic-polluted soil with high abundance of antibiotic-resistant genes (ARGs) against human health through the food chain, it is thus urgent to develop novel control technology to ensure vegetable safety. In the present work, pot experiments were conducted in lettuce cultivation to assess the impedance effect of biochar amendment on soil sulfonamides (SAs), antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), and ARG enrichment in lettuce tissues. After 100 days of cultivation, lettuce cultivation with biochar amendment exhibited the greatest soil SA dissipation as well as the significant improvement of lettuce growth indices, with residual soil SAs mainly existing as the tightly bound fraction. Moreover, the SA contents in roots and new/old leaves were reduced by one to two orders of magnitude compared to those without biochar amendment. In addition, isolate counts for SA-resistant bacterial endophytes in old leaves and sul gene abundances in roots and old leaves also decreased significantly after biochar application. However, neither SA resistant bacteria nor sul genes were detected in new leaves. It was the first study to demonstrate that biochar amendment can be a practical strategy to protect lettuce safety growing in SA-polluted soil with rich ARB and ARGs.

  14. CIEF separation, UV detection, and quantification of ampholytic antibiotics and bacteria from different matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horká, Marie; Vykydalová, Marie; Růžička, F.; Šalplachta, Jiří; Holá, V.; Dvořáčková, M.; Kubesová, Anna; Šlais, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 406, č. 25 (2014), s. 6285-6296 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20112015021 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : capillary isoelectric focusing with UV detection * ampholytic antibiotics * Staphylococcus epidermidis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014 http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0236550

  15. Antibiotic resistance of bacteria responsible of acute respiratory tract infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhtar Camara

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis are the most common causative agents of acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs. The objective of this study was to assess their susceptibility to several antibiotics.Materials and methods. A total of 58 strains (16 S. pneumoniae, 19 H. influenzae and 23 M. catarrhalis were isolated from samples collected in two paediatric centres, and their susceptibility to commonly used antibiotics tested by E-test. Results. Among H. influenzae isolates, 10.5% were resistant to ampicillin (all β-lactamase-positive, and 88.9% were susceptible to cefaclor. High β-lactam resistance rates (penicillin: 31.3% and cephalosporins: 18.7 to 31.3% had been observed among S. pneumonia strains. Only 50% of isolates were susceptible to azithromycine. 91.3% of M. catarrhalis isolates β-lactamases producers were resistant to ampicillin while susceptible to the most tested antibiotics. Conclusions. Except M. catarrhalis β-lactamases producing strains, frequency of antibiotic resistance was mainly observed among S. pneumoniae, and to a lesser extent among H. influenzae clinical isolates, suggesting the need for continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance patterns in the management of RTIs.

  16. Resolving Bacterial Contamination of Fuel Ethanol Fermentations with Beneficial Bacteria – an Alternative to Antibiotic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel ethanol fermentations are not performed under aseptic conditions and microbial contamination reduces yields and can lead to costly “stuck fermentations.” Antibiotics are commonly used to combat contaminants, but these may persist in the distillers grains co-product. Among contaminants, it is kn...

  17. CIEF separation, UV detection, and quantification of ampholytic antibiotics and bacteria from different matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horká, Marie; Vykydalová, Marie; Růžička, F.; Šalplachta, Jiří; Holá, V.; Dvořáčková, M.; Kubesová, Anna; Šlais, Karel

    Roč. 406 , č. 25 (2014), s. 6285-6296 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20112015021 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : capillary isoelectric focusing with UV detection * ampholytic antibiotics * Staphylococcus epidermidis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014 http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0236550

  18. Antibiotic resistance genes in anaerobic bacteria isolated from primary dental root canal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2012-12-01

    Fourty-one bacterial strains isolated from infected dental root canals and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence were screened for the presence of 14 genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, tetracycline and macrolides. Thirteen isolates (32%) were positive for at least one of the target antibiotic resistance genes. These strains carrying at least one antibiotic resistance gene belonged to 11 of the 26 (42%) infected root canals sampled. Two of these positive cases had two strains carrying resistance genes. Six out of 7 Fusobacterium strains harbored at least one of the target resistance genes. One Dialister invisus strain was positive for 3 resistance genes, and 4 other strains carried two of the target genes. Of the 6 antibiotic resistance genes detected in root canal strains, the most prevalent were blaTEM (17% of the strains), tetW (10%), and ermC (10%). Some as-yet-uncharacterized Fusobacterium and Prevotella isolates were positive for blaTEM, cfxA and tetM. Findings demonstrated that an unexpectedly large proportion of dental root canal isolates, including as-yet-uncharacterized strains previously regarded as uncultivated phylotypes, can carry antibiotic resistance genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Epilobi Hirsuti Herba Extracts Influence the In Vitro Activity of Common Antibiotics on Standard Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirvu Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilobium genus has been confirmed as an effective source of natural antimicrobials. However, the influence of Epilobi hirsuti herba derived products on usual antibiotics activity has not been studied. In this study, several standardized Epilobi hirsuti herba extracts (EHE were evaluated in order to asses their potential effects on usual antibiotics tested on standard Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains in vitro. The results emphasized that the bacterial strains ranged from sensitive (MIC values between 50–200 μg GAE mL-1 (S. epidermidis ATCC 12228 to very resistant (E. coli strains, E. faecalis ATCC 29212 being practically immune to EHE. In terms of synergistic interaction, Tetracycline and Ampicillin combinations lead to the most important stimulatory effects, the diameters of the inhibition zone being even 60% bigger compared to the antibiotic alone. Synergistic effects between myricetin(galloyl derivates and Tetracycline were also revealed on P. aeruginosa and E. coli strains. Together, it clearly demonstrated not only EHE’s own antimicrobial properties, but also their capacity to influence the antimicrobial potency of some common antibiotics. These results could be useful for the area of herbal medicines and as potential candidates in managing microbial resistance, but also for physicians and pharmacists using combined antibacterial therapy.

  20. Resistance of uropathogenic bacteria to first-line antibiotics in mexico city: A multicenter susceptibility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo-García, José Luis; Soriano-Becerril, Diana; Solórzano-Santos, Fortino; Arbo-Sosa, Antonio; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Arzate-Barbosa, Patricia

    2007-03-01

    Abstract. Growing antibiotic resistance demands the constant reassessment of antimicrobial efficacy, particularly in countries with wide antibiotic abuse, where higher resistance prevalence is often found. Knowledge of resistance trends is particularly important when prescribing antibiotics empirically, as is usually the case for urinary tract infections (UTIs). Currently, in Mexico City, ampicillin, cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole), and ciprofloxacin are used as "first-line" antibiotic treatment for UTI. The aim of this study was to analyze the resistance of bacterial isolates to antibiotics, with a focus on first-line antibiotics, in Mexican pediatric patients and sexually active or pregnant female outpatients. In this multicenter susceptibility analysis, bacterial isolates from urine samples collected from pediatric patients and sexually-active or pregnant female outpatients presenting with acute, uncomplicated UTIs in Mexico City from January 2006 through June 2006, were included in the study. Samples were tested for susceptibility to 10 antibiotics by the disk-diffusion method. Four-hundred and seventeen bacterial isolates were derived from sexually active or pregnant female outpatients (324 Escherichia coli) and pediatric patients (93 Klebsiella pneumoniae). We found a high prevalence of resistance towards the drugs used as "first-line" when treating UTIs: ampicillin, cotrimoxazole, and ciprofloxacin (79%, 60%, and 24% resistance, respectively). Ninety-eight percent of K pneumoniae isolates were resistant to ampicillin, whereas 66% of the E coli isolates were resistant to cotrimoxazole. Resistance towards third-generation cephalosporins was also high (6%-8% of E coli and 10%-28% of K pneumoniae). This was possibly caused by chromosomal β-lactamases, as 30% of all isolates were also resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanate. In contrast, 98% of the E coli isolates and 84% of the K pneumoniae strains (96% of all isolates) were found to be susceptible

  1. Effects of different antibiotic classes on airway bacteria in stable COPD using culture and molecular techniques: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Simon E; Law, Martin; El-Emir, Ethaar; Allinson, James P; James, Phillip; Maddox, Victoria; Donaldson, Gavin C; McHugh, Timothy D; Cookson, William O; Moffatt, Miriam F; Nazareth, Irwin; Hurst, John R; Calverley, Peter M A; Sweeting, Michael J; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term antibiotic therapy is used to prevent exacerbations of COPD but there is uncertainty over whether this reduces airway bacteria. The optimum antibiotic choice remains unknown. We conducted an exploratory trial in stable patients with COPD comparing three antibiotic regimens against placebo. Methods This was a single-centre, single-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial. Patients aged ≥45 years with COPD, FEV1<80% predicted and chronic productive cough were randomised to receive either moxifloxacin 400 mg daily for 5 days every 4 weeks, doxycycline 100 mg/day, azithromycin 250 mg 3 times a week or one placebo tablet daily for 13 weeks. The primary outcome was the change in total cultured bacterial load in sputum from baseline; secondary outcomes included bacterial load by 16S quantitative PCR (qPCR), sputum inflammation and antibiotic resistance. Results 99 patients were randomised; 86 completed follow-up, were able to expectorate sputum and were analysed. After adjustment, there was a non-significant reduction in bacterial load of 0.42 log10 cfu/mL (95% CI −0.08 to 0.91, p=0.10) with moxifloxacin, 0.11 (−0.33 to 0.55, p=0.62) with doxycycline and 0.08 (−0.38 to 0.54, p=0.73) with azithromycin from placebo, respectively. There were also no significant changes in bacterial load measured by 16S qPCR or in airway inflammation. More treatment-related adverse events occurred with moxifloxacin. Of note, mean inhibitory concentrations of cultured isolates increased by at least three times over placebo in all treatment arms. Conclusions Total airway bacterial load did not decrease significantly after 3 months of antibiotic therapy. Large increases in antibiotic resistance were seen in all treatment groups and this has important implications for future studies. Trial registration number clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01398072). PMID:26179246

  2. Longitudinal nasopharyngeal carriage and antibiotic resistance of respiratory bacteria in indigenous Australian and Alaska native children with bronchiectasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim M Hare

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Indigenous children in Australia and Alaska have very high rates of chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD/bronchiectasis. Antibiotics, including frequent or long-term azithromycin in Australia and short-term beta-lactam therapy in both countries, are often prescribed to treat these patients. In the Bronchiectasis Observational Study we examined over several years the nasopharyngeal carriage and antibiotic resistance of respiratory bacteria in these two PCV7-vaccinated populations. METHODS: Indigenous children aged 0.5-8.9 years with CSLD/bronchiectasis from remote Australia (n = 79 and Alaska (n = 41 were enrolled in a prospective cohort study during 2004-8. At scheduled study visits until 2010 antibiotic use in the preceding 2-weeks was recorded and nasopharyngeal swabs collected for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Analysis of respiratory bacterial carriage and antibiotic resistance was by baseline and final swabs, and total swabs by year. RESULTS: Streptococcus pneumoniae carriage changed little over time. In contrast, carriage of Haemophilus influenzae declined and Staphylococcus aureus increased (from 0% in 2005-6 to 23% in 2010 in Alaskan children; these changes were associated with increasing age. Moraxella catarrhalis carriage declined significantly in Australian, but not Alaskan, children (from 64% in 2004-6 to 11% in 2010. While beta-lactam antibiotic use was similar in the two cohorts, Australian children received more azithromycin. Macrolide resistance was significantly higher in Australian compared to Alaskan children, while H. influenzae beta-lactam resistance was higher in Alaskan children. Azithromycin use coincided significantly with reduced carriage of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis, but increased carriage of S. aureus and macrolide-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae and S. aureus (proportion of carriers and all swabs, in a 'cumulative dose-response' relationship

  3. Interactions between bacteria and the intestinal mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on epithelium cells influence mucosal colonization or infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mechanisms governing the ability of bacteria to adhere to and colonize human and animal hosts in health and disease are still incompletely understood. Throughout the extensive mucosal surfaces of the body that are in contact with the external environment, epithelial cells represent the first po...

  4. Different Behavior of Enteric Bacteria and Viruses in Clay and Sandy Soils after Biofertilization with Swine Digestate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongaro, Gislaine; García-González, María C.; Hernández, Marta; Kunz, Airton; Barardi, Célia R. M.; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2017-01-01

    Enteric pathogens from biofertilizer can accumulate in the soil, subsequently contaminating water and crops. We evaluated the survival, percolation and leaching of model enteric pathogens in clay and sandy soils after biofertilization with swine digestate: PhiX-174, mengovirus (vMC0), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 were used as biomarkers. The survival of vMC0 and PhiX-174 in clay soil was significantly lower than in sandy soil (iT90 values of 10.520 ± 0.600 vs. 21.270 ± 1.100 and 12.040 ± 0.010 vs. 43.470 ± 1.300, respectively) and PhiX-174 showed faster percolation and leaching in sandy soil than clay soil (iT90 values of 0.46 and 2.43, respectively). S. enterica Typhimurium was percolated and inactivated more slowly than E. coli O157:H7 (iT90 values of 9.340 ± 0.200 vs. 6.620 ± 0.500 and 11.900 ± 0.900 vs. 10.750 ± 0.900 in clay and sandy soils, respectively), such that E. coli O157:H7 was transferred more quickly to the deeper layers of both soils evaluated (percolation). Our findings suggest that E. coli O157:H7 may serve as a useful microbial biomarker of depth contamination and leaching in clay and sandy soil and that bacteriophage could be used as an indicator of enteric pathogen persistence. Our study contributes to development of predictive models for enteric pathogen behavior in soils, and for potential water and food contamination associated with biofertilization, useful for risk management and mitigation in swine digestate recycling. PMID:28197137

  5. Microbiological quality of ready-to-eat salads: an underestimated vehicle of bacteria and clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Joana; Mourão, Joana; Pestana, Nazaré; Peixe, Luísa; Novais, Carla; Antunes, Patrícia

    2013-09-16

    The increase demand for fresh vegetables is causing an expansion of the market for minimally processed vegetables along with new recognized food safety problems. To gain further insight on this topic we analyzed the microbiological quality of Portuguese ready-to-eat salads (RTS) and their role in the spread of bacteria carrying acquired antibiotic resistance genes, food products scarcely considered in surveillance studies. A total of 50 RTS (7 brands; split or mixed leaves, carrot, corn) were collected in 5 national supermarket chains in Porto region (2010). They were tested for aerobic mesophilic counts, coliforms and Escherichia coli counts as well as for the presence of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. Samples were also plated in different selective media with/without antibiotics before and after enrichment. The E. coli, other coliforms and Enterococcus recovered were characterized for antibiotic resistance profiles and clonality with phenotypic and genetic approaches. A high number of RTS presented poor microbiological quality (86%--aerobic mesophilic counts, 74%--coliforms, 4%--E. coli), despite the absence of screened pathogens. In addition, a high diversity of bacteria (species and clones) and antibiotic resistance backgrounds (phenotypes and genotypes) were observed, mostly with enrichment and antibiotic selective media. E. coli was detected in 13 samples (n=78; all types and 4 brands; phylogenetic groups A, B1 and D; none STEC) with resistance to tetracycline [72%; tet(A) and/or tet(B)], streptomycin (58%; aadA and/or strA-strB), sulfamethoxazole (50%; sul1 and/or sul2), trimethoprim (50%; dfrA1 or dfrA12), ampicillin (49%; blaTEM), nalidixic acid (36%), ciprofloxacin (5%) or chloramphenicol (3%; catA). E. coli clones, including the widespread group D/ST69, were detected in different samples from the same brand or different brands pointing out to a potential cross-contamination. Other clinically relevant resistance genes were detected in 2 Raoultella

  6. Coselection for resistance to multiple late-generation human therapeutic antibiotics encoded on tetracycline resistance plasmids captured from uncultivated stream and soil bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, J B; Haynes, R; Heringa, S; Brooks, J M; Sobota, L T

    2014-08-01

    Transmissible plasmids captured from stream and soil bacteria conferring resistance to tetracycline in Pseudomonas were evaluated for linked resistance to antibiotics used in the treatment of human infections. Cells released from stream sediments and soils were conjugated with a rifampicin-resistant, plasmid-free Pseudomonas putida recipient and selected on tetracycline and rifampicin. Each transconjugant contained a single 50-80 kb plasmid. Resistance to 11 antibiotics, in addition to tetracycline, was determined for the stream transconjugants using a modification of the Stokes disc diffusion antibiotic susceptibility assay. Nearly half of plasmids conferred resistance to six or more antibiotics. Resistance to streptomycin, gentamicin, and/or ticarcillin was conferred by a majority of the plasmids, and resistance to additional human clinical use antibiotics such as piperacillin/tazobactam, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam was observed. MICs of 16 antibiotics for representative sediment and soil transconjugants revealed large increases, relative to the Ps. putida recipient, for 11 of 16 antibiotics tested, including the expanded spectrum antibiotics cefotaxime and ceftazidime, as well as piperacillin/tazobactam, lomefloxacin and levofloxacin. Resistance to multiple antibiotics-including those typically used in clinical Pseudomonas and enterobacterial infections-can be conferred by transmissible plasmids in streams and soils. Selective pressure exerted by the use of one antibiotic, such as the common agricultural antibiotic tetracycline, may result in the persistence of linked genes conferring resistance to important human clinical antibiotics. This may impact the spread of resistance to human use antibiotics even in the absence of direct selection. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Synergistic antibacterial activity of the combination of the alkaloid sanguinarine with EDTA and the antibiotic streptomycin against multidrug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamoud, Razan; Reichling, Jürgen; Wink, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Drug combinations consisting of the DNA intercalating benzophenanthridine alkaloid sanguinarine, the chelator EDTA with the antibiotic streptomycin were tested against several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multi-resistant clinical isolates. Microdilution, checkerboard and time kill curve methods were used to investigate the antibacterial activity of the individual drugs and the potential synergistic activity of combinations. Sanguinarine demonstrated a strong activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (minimum inhibitory concentrations, MIC = 0.5-128 μg/ml), while streptomycin was active against Gram-negative strains (MIC = 2-128 μg/ml). EDTA showed only bacteriostatic activity. Indifference to synergistic activity was seen in the two-drug combinations sanguinarine + EDTA and sanguinarine + streptomycin (fractional inhibitory concentration index = 0.1-1.5), while the three-drug combination of sanguinarine + EDTA + streptomycin showed synergistic activity against almost all the strains (except methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), as well as a strong reduction in the effective doses (dose reduction index = 2-16 times) of sanguinarine, EDTA and streptomycin. In time kill studies, a substantial synergistic interaction of the three-drug combination was detected against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The combination of drugs, which interfere with different molecular targets, can be an important strategy to combat multidrug resistant bacteria. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. Antibacterial and antibiotic resistance modulatory activities of leaves and bark extracts of Recinodindron heudelotii (Euphorbiaceae) against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fankam, Aimé Gabriel; Kuiate, Jules-Roger; Kuete, Victor

    2017-03-24

    Recinodindron heudelotii (Euphorbiaceae) is a plant used in Africa, particularly in Cameroon to treat various ailments including bacterial infections. In this study, we evaluated the extracts of the leaves (RHL) and bark (RHB) of R. heudelotii for their antibacterial and antibiotic resistance modulating activities against 29 Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotypes. The broth micro-dilution assay was used to evaluate the antibacterial activity, and the antibiotic resistance modulating effects of the plant extracts. RHL displayed the most important spectrum of activity with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) values ranging from 256 to 1024 μg/mL against 75.86% of the 29 tested bacteria strains while RHB was not active. RHL also showed killing effects with minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) ranging from 256 to 1024 μg/mL. The activities of tetracycline and kanamycin associated with RHL were improved on 88.89% and 77.78% of the tested MDR bacteria, at MIC/2 at MIC/4 respectively, with 2 to 16-folds decreasing of MIC. This suggests the antibiotic resistance modulating effects of these antibiotics. The present study provides data indicating a possible use of the leaves extract of Recinodindron heudelotii alone or in association with common antibiotics in the fight against bacterial infections including those involving MDR bacteria.

  9. Array based detection of antibiotic resistance genes in Gram negative bacteria isolated from retail poultry meat in the UK and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, Grainne; Naughton, Violetta; Woodward, Martin J; Dooley, James S G; Naughton, Patrick J

    2014-06-02

    The use of antibiotics in birds and animals intended for human consumption within the European Union (EU) and elsewhere has been subject to regulation prohibiting the use of antimicrobials as growth promoters and the use of last resort antibiotics in an attempt to reduce the spread of multi-resistant Gram negative bacteria. Given the inexorable spread of antibiotic resistance there is an increasing need for improved monitoring of our food. Using selective media, Gram negative bacteria were isolated from retail chicken of UK-Intensively reared (n=27), Irish-Intensively reared (n=19) and UK-Free range (n=30) origin and subjected to an oligonucleotide based array system for the detection of 47 clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and two integrase genes. High incidences of β-lactamase genes were noted in all sample types, acc (67%), cmy (80%), fox (55%) and tem (40%) while chloramphenicol resistant determinants were detected in bacteria from the UK poultry portions and were absent in bacteria from the Irish samples. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to qualitatively analyse the Gram negative population in the samples and showed the expected diversity based on band stabbing and DNA sequencing. The array system proved to be a quick method for the detection of antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) burden within a mixed Gram negative bacterial population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional synergy of α-helical antimicrobial peptides and traditional antibiotics against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Q; Huang, Y; Chen, M; Li, G; Chen, Y

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the antimicrobial activities based on the synergistic effects of traditional antibiotics (imipenem, cefepime, levofloxacin hydrochloride and vancomycin) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs; PL-5, PL-31, PL-32, PL-18, PL-29 and PL-26), alone or in combination, against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and three Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) were investigated. In addition, the antimicrobial activity that was based on the synergistic effects of levofloxacin hydrochloride and PL-5 against Staphylococcus aureus in vivo was explored in a mouse infection model. Traditional antibiotics and AMPs showed significant synergistic effects on the antibacterial activities against the different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in vitro. A strong synergistic effect in the PL-5 and levofloxacin hydrochloride combination against Staphylococcus aureus was observed in the mouse infection model in vivo. The mechanism of synergistic action was due to the different targets of AMPs and traditional antibiotics. The combination of AMPs and traditional antibiotics can dramatically enhance antimicrobial activity and may help prevent or delay the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Thus, this combination therapy could be a promising approach to treat bacterial infections, particularly mixed infections and multi-antibiotic-resistant infections, in the clinics.

  11. Designation of pathogenic resistant bacteria in the Sparusaurata sea collected in Tunisia coastlines: Correlation with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouiten, Amina; Mehri, Ines; Beltifa, Asma; Ghorbel, Asma; Sire, Olivier; Van Loco, Joris; Abdenaceur, Hassen; Reyns, Tim; Ben Mansour, Hedi

    2017-05-01

    Vibrio is characterized by a large number of species and some of them are human pathogens causing gastro intestinal and wound infections through the ingestion or manipulation of contaminated fishes including Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio alginolyticus. In this study, we reported the phenotypic and molecular characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio alginolyticus strains isolated from wild and farm sea bream (Sparus aurata L.) along the Tunisian coast from December 2015 to April 2016. Therefore, the antibiograms indicate a difference between farmed and wild fish. Resistance against amoxicillin antibiotic appears for the bacteria isolated from wild fish, while those from aquaculture farming presented sensitivity to amoxicillin and resistance to antibiotics colistin and fusidic acid. The chloramphenicol antibiotic exhibited a high sensitivity in all isolated bacteria. In fact, traces of amoxicillin in the organs of the fish from Hergla farm were detected by UPLC-MS/MS analysis during December 2016 to April 2016. In addition, antibiotics were detected in January 2014 with high concentration of norfloxacin 2262 ng/g in fish from Hergla coast. The results obtained in this work indicated that the use and presence of antibiotics in water impacts on the occurrence of resistant bacteria and the detection of antibiotic in fish. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. H2O2and/or TiO2photocatalysis under UV irradiation for the removal of antibiotic resistant bacteria and their antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Changsheng; Wang, Kai; Hou, Song; Wan, Li; Lv, Jiapei; Zhang, Yuan; Qu, Xiaodong; Chen, Shuyi; Xu, Jian

    2017-02-05

    Inactivating antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and removing antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are very important to prevent their spread into the environment. Previous efforts have been taken to eliminate ARB and ARGs from aqueous solution and sludges, however, few satisfying results have been obtained. This study investigated whether photocatalysis by TiO 2 was able to reduce the two ARGs, mecA and ampC, within the host ARB, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively. The addition of H 2 O 2 and matrix effect on the removal of ARB and ARGs were also studied. TiO 2 thin films showed great effect on both ARB inactivation and ARGs removal. Approximately 4.5-5.0 and 5.5-5.8 log ARB reductions were achieved by TiO 2 under 6 and 12mJ/cm 2 UV 254 fluence dose, respectively. For ARGs, 5.8 log mecA reduction and 4.7 log ampC reduction were achieved under 120mJ/cm 2 UV 254 fluence dose in the presence of TiO 2 . Increasing dosage of H 2 O 2 enhanced the removal efficiencies of ARB and ARGs. The results also demonstrated that photocatalysis by TiO 2 was capable of removing both intracellular and extracellular forms of ARGs. This study provided a potential alternative method for the removal of ARB and ARGs from aqueous solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. H2O2 and/or TiO2 photocatalysis under UV irradiation for the removal of antibiotic resistant bacteria and their antibiotic resistance genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Changsheng; Wang, Kai; Hou, Song; Wan, Li; Lv, Jiapei; Zhang, Yuan; Qu, Xiaodong; Chen, Shuyi; Xu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • TiO 2 thin film was successfully synthesized for treating ARB and ARGs from water. • More than 5.5 log units of ARB reduction was achieved by TiO 2 under UV irradiation. • With TiO 2 , ARGs were reduced by more than 5 log units under UV irradiation. • TiO 2 could remove both intracellular and extracellular forms of ARGs. - Abstract: Inactivating antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and removing antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are very important to prevent their spread into the environment. Previous efforts have been taken to eliminate ARB and ARGs from aqueous solution and sludges, however, few satisfying results have been obtained. This study investigated whether photocatalysis by TiO 2 was able to reduce the two ARGs, mecA and ampC, within the host ARB, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively. The addition of H 2 O 2 and matrix effect on the removal of ARB and ARGs were also studied. TiO 2 thin films showed great effect on both ARB inactivation and ARGs removal. Approximately 4.5-5.0 and 5.5–5.8 log ARB reductions were achieved by TiO 2 under 6 and 12 mJ/cm 2 UV 254 fluence dose, respectively. For ARGs, 5.8 log mecA reduction and 4.7 log ampC reduction were achieved under 120 mJ/cm 2 UV 254 fluence dose in the presence of TiO 2 . Increasing dosage of H 2 O 2 enhanced the removal efficiencies of ARB and ARGs. The results also demonstrated that photocatalysis by TiO 2 was capable of removing both intracellular and extracellular forms of ARGs. This study provided a potential alternative method for the removal of ARB and ARGs from aqueous solution.

  14. Bactérias gram negativas resistentes a antimicrobianos em alimentos Gram-negative bacteria resistant to antibiotics in foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cavalcante de Albuquerque Ribeiro Dias

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de 154 espécimens de alimentos, representados por hortaliças (alface, leite e merenda escolar, obteve-se o isolamento e identificação de 400 amostras de bacilos Gram negativos. Esta amostragem se distribuiu em 339 enterobactérias (Escherichia, Shigella, Citrobacter, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Serratia e Proteus e 61 de gêneros afins (Acinetobacter, Flavobacterium, Aeromonas e Pseudomonas. Submetendo-se as culturas aos antimicrobianos: sulfadiazina (Su, estreptomicina (Sm, tetraciclina (Tc, cloranfenicol (Cm, canamicina (Km, ampicilina (Ap, ácido nalidíxico (Nal e gentamicina (Gm, observou-se apenas seis estirpes sensíveis a todas as drogas e sensibilidade absoluta à Gm. A predominância dos modelos Su (27,6% e Su-Ap (39,6% incidiu nas enterobactérias, enquanto que, 18,0% para Ap e 9,8% para Su-Ap foram detectados nos gêneros afins. Para caracterização da resistência foram realizados testes de conjugação e a totalidade das culturas não revelou transferência para o gene que confere resistência ao ácido nalidíxico. Relevantes são as taxas de amostras R+ observadas nos bacilos entéricos, oscilando em torno de 90% (leite e merenda escolar e alface, em torno de 70%From 154 food samples, including vegetables (lettuce, milk and meals served at school it was possible to isolate and identify 400 Gram negative bacilli distributed among 339 enteric bacteria (Escherichia, Shigella, Citrobacter, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Serratia and Proteus and other 61 non enteric bacilli (Acinetobacter, Flavobacterium, Aeromonas and Pseudomonas. Submitting this cultures to the drugs sulfadiazine (Su, streptomycin (Sm, tetracycline (Tc, chloramphenicol (Cm, kanamycin (Km, ampicillin (Ap, nalidixic acid (Nal and gentamycin (Gm it was observed only six stocks susceptible to all drugs and total sensibility to Gm. Among enteric bacteria the profiles Su (27,6% and Su-Ap (39,6% predominated, while for the non enteric bacilli percentages of 18.0 for

  15. Recovery of metallo-tolerant and antibiotic resistant psychrophilic bacteria from Siachen glacier, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rafiq

    Full Text Available Cultureable bacterial diversity of previously unexplored Siachen glacier, Pakistan, was studied. Out of 50 isolates 33 (66% were Gram negative and 17 (34% Gram positive. About half of the isolates were pigment producers and were able to grow at 4-37°C. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed Gram negative bacteria dominated by Proteobacteria (especially γ-proteobacteria and β-proteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The genus Pseudomonas (51.51%, 17 was dominant among γ- proteobacteria. β-proteobacteria constituted 4 (12.12% Alcaligenes and 4 (12.12% Janthinobacterium strains. Among Gram positive bacteria, phylum Actinobacteria, Rhodococcus (23.52%, 4 and Arthrobacter (23.52%, 4 were the dominating genra. Other bacteria belonged to Phylum Firmicutes with representative genus Carnobacterium (11.76%, 2 and 4 isolates represented 4 genera Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Staphylococcus and Planomicrobium. Most of the Gram negative bacteria were moderate halophiles, while most of the Gram positives were extreme halophiles and were able to grow up to 6.12 M of NaCl. More than 2/3 of the isolates showed antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant S. aureus, E. coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Enterococcus faecium, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus fumigatus and ATCC strains. Gram positive bacteria (94.11% were more resistant to heavy metals as compared to Gram negative (78.79% and showed maximum tolerance against iron and least tolerance against mercury.

  16. Biliary bacteria, antibiotic use, and wound infection in surgery of the gallbladder and common bile duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R T; Goodall, R G; Marien, B; Park, M; Lloyd-Smith, W; Wiegand, F M

    1987-01-01

    That clinical risk groups predict postoperative infection in biliary operations has recently been challenged. To reevaluate the risk of infection, we studied 215 patients stratified by clinical risk factors. Of 100 patients having simple "low-risk" cholecystectomy, 11 had positive bile cultures (90% pure), and one with sterile bile got a staphylococcal wound infection (WI). Among 92 "high-risk" patients with acute cholecystitis, obstructive jaundice, or choledochal stones, 42 had positive bile cultures (44% pure, 12% anaerobes). One of 52 patients who received preoperative cefazolin got a staphylococcal WI, but ten of 40 patients without antibiotic therapy developed WIs, nine caused by organisms that also grew from the bile. Of 23 patients with obstructive cholangitis, 22 had positive bile cultures (88% mixed, 23% anaerobes). Despite antibiotic therapy, four developed WIs caused by these organisms. The concept of clinical risk factors is validated.

  17. Inactivation and regrowth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by PAA disinfection in the secondary effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing Jing; Xi, Jing Ying; Hu, Hong Ying; Tang, Fang; Pang, Yu Chen

    2013-10-01

    Inactivation and microbial regrowth of penicillin-, ampicillin-, cefalexin-, tetracycline-, chloramphenicol-, and rifampicin-resistant bacteria were studied to explore risks associated with selection and regrowth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria after PAA disinfection. The results showed that after exposure to 20 mg/L PAA for 10 min, inactivation of ampicillin-resistant bacteria reached 2.3-log, which was significantly higher than that of total heterotrophic bacteria with a decrease of 2.0-log. In contrast, inactivation of tetracycline- resistant bacteria was significantly less efficient, reaching only 1.1-log. Chloramphenicol-and tetracycline-resistant bacteria, as well as total heterotrophic bacteria regrew more than 10 fold compared to those in the untreated wastewater sample with 22 h stilling culture after exposure to 2 or 5 mg/L PAA as for 10 min. Selection and potential regrowth of tetracycline-and chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria are potential risks when utilizing PAA disinfection, which may induce the spread of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria in reclaimed water.

  18. Isolation and characterization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from pharmaceutical industrial wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahrani, Leyla; Soufi, Leila; Mehri, Ines; Najjari, Afef; Hassan, Abdenaceur; Van Loco, Joris; Reyns, Tim; Cherif, Ameur; Ben Mansour, Hedi

    2015-12-01

    Contamination of surface waters in underdeveloped countries is a great concern. Treated and untreated wastewaters have been discharged into rivers and streams, leading to possible waterborne infection outbreaks which may represent a significant dissemination mechanism of antibiotic resistance genes among pathogenic bacterial populations. The present study aims to determine the multi-drug resistance patterns among isolated and identified bacterial strains in a pharmaceutical wastewater effluent in north Tunisia. Fourteen isolates were obtained and seven of them were identified. These isolates belong to different genera namely, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Exiguobacterium, Delftia and Morganella. Susceptibility patterns of these isolates were studied toward commonly used antibiotics in Tunisia. All the identified isolates were found to have 100% susceptibility against colistin sulfate and 100% resistance against amoxicillin. Among the 11 antibiotics tested, six patterns of multi-drug resistance were obtained. The potential of the examined wastewater effluent in spreading multi-drug resistance and the associated public health implications are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Marine Pseudomonas putida: a potential source of antimicrobial substances against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palloma Rodrigues Marinho

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria isolated from marine sponges found off the coast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were screened for the production of antimicrobial substances. We report a new Pseudomonas putida strain (designated P. putida Mm3 isolated from the sponge Mycale microsigmatosa that produces a powerful antimicrobial substance active against multidrug-resistant bacteria. P. putida Mm3 was identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic tests. Molecular typing for Mm3 was performed by RAPD-PCR and comparison of the results to other Pseudomonas strains. Our results contribute to the search for new antimicrobial agents, an important strategy for developing alternative therapies to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  20. Vesicle-Mediated Transfer of Virulence Genes from Escherichia coli O157:H7 to Other Enteric Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Yaron, Sima; Kolling, Glynis L.; Simon, Lee; Matthews, Karl R.

    2000-01-01

    Membrane vesicles are released from the surfaces of many gram-negative bacteria during growth. Vesicles consist of proteins, lipopolysaccharide, phospholipids, RNA, and DNA. Results of the present study demonstrate that membrane vesicles isolated from the food-borne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 facilitate the transfer of genes, which are then expressed by recipient Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis or E. coli JM109. Electron micrographs of purified DNA from E. coli O157:H7 vesicles...

  1. Influence of Antibiotics on the Detection of Bacteria by Culture-Based and Culture-Independent Diagnostic Tests in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Aaron M; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Williams, Derek J; Anderson, Evan J; Grijalva, Carlos G; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Winchell, Jonas M; Hicks, Lauri A

    2017-01-01

    Specimens collected after antibiotic exposure may reduce culture-based bacterial detections. The impact on culture-independent diagnostic tests is unclear. We assessed the effect of antibiotic exposure on both of these test results among patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Culture-based bacterial testing included blood cultures and high-quality sputum or endotracheal tube (ET) aspirates; culture-independent testing included urinary antigen testing (adults) for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swabs for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae . The proportion of bacterial detections was compared between specimens collected before and after either any antibiotic exposure (prehospital and/or inpatient) or only prehospital antibiotics and increasing time after initiation of inpatient antibiotics. Of 4678 CAP patients, 4383 (94%) received antibiotics: 3712 (85%) only inpatient, 642 (15%) both inpatient and prehospital, and 29 (<1%) only prehospital. There were more bacterial detections in specimens collected before antibiotics for blood cultures (5.2% vs 2.6%; P < .01) and sputum/ET cultures (50.0% vs 26.8%; P < .01) but not urine antigen (7.0% vs 5.7%; P = .53) or NP/OP PCR (6.7% vs 5.4%; P = .31). For all diagnostic testing, bacterial detections declined with increasing time between inpatient antibiotic administration and specimen collection. Bacteria were less frequently detected in culture-based tests collected after antibiotics and in culture-independent tests that had longer intervals between antibiotic exposure and specimen collection. Bacterial yield could improve if specimens were collected promptly, preferably before antibiotics, providing data for improved antibiotic selection.

  2. Battacin (Octapeptin B5), a new cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic from Paenibacillus tianmuensis active against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chao-Dong; Wu, Xue-Chang; Teng, Yi; Zhao, Wen-Peng; Li, Ou; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Huang, Zhao-Hui; Gao, Hai-Chun

    2012-03-01

    Hospital-acquired infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria are a significant challenge to patient safety. Numerous clinical isolates resistant to almost all commercially available antibiotics have emerged. Thus, novel antimicrobial agents, specifically those for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, are urgently needed. In the current study, we report the isolation, structure elucidation, and preliminary biological characterization of a new cationic lipopeptide antibiotic, battacin or octapeptin B5, produced from a Paenibacillus tianmuensis soil isolate. Battacin kills bacteria in vitro and has potent activity against Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant and extremely drug-resistant clinical isolates. Hospital strains of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the pathogens most sensitive to battacin, with MICs of 2 to 4 μg/ml. The ability of battacin to disrupt the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is comparable to that of polymyxin B, the last-line therapy for infections caused by antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. However, the capacity of battacin to permeate bacterial plasma membranes is less extensive than that of polymyxin B. The bactericidal kinetics of battacin correlate with the depolarization of the cell membrane, suggesting that battacin kills bacteria by disrupting the cytoplasmic membrane. Other studies indicate that battacin is less acutely toxic than polymyxin B and has potent in vivo biological activity against E. coli. Based on the findings of the current study, battacin may be considered a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

  3. The frontline antibiotic vancomycin induces a zinc starvation response in bacteria by binding to Zn(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkan, Ashraf; Macklyne, Heather-Rose; Truman, Andrew W.; Hesketh, Andrew R.; Hong, Hee-Jeon

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin is a front-line antibiotic used for the treatment of nosocomial infections, particularly those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Despite its clinical importance the global effects of vancomycin exposure on bacterial physiology are poorly understood. In a previous transcriptomic analysis we identified a number of Zur regulon genes which were highly but transiently up-regulated by vancomycin in Streptomyces coelicolor. Here, we show that vancomycin also induces similar zinc homeostasis systems in a range of other bacteria and demonstrate that vancomycin binds to Zn(II) in vitro. This implies that vancomycin treatment sequesters zinc from bacterial cells thereby triggering a Zur-dependent zinc starvation response. The Kd value of the binding between vancomycin and Zn(II) was calculated using a novel fluorometric assay, and NMR was used to identify the binding site. These findings highlight a new biologically relevant aspect of the chemical property of vancomycin as a zinc chelator. PMID:26797186

  4. Substrate specificity of the OqxAB multidrug resistance pump in Escherichia coli and selected enteric bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Sørensen, Heidi Iskou

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: A plasmid-encoded multidrug eff lux pump, OqxAB, identified in Escherichia coli of porcine origin, was tested for substrate specificity against selected antibiotics, detergents and disinfectants. The ability of horizontal transfer to food-borne pathogens of the Enterobacteriaceae family......, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera sp. and Enterobacter aerogrenes was investigated. The effect of the presence of the OqxAB pump on susceptibility for selected compounds was investigated using broth dilution assays. Results: The OqxAB pump conferred antimicrobial resistance or reduced susceptibility towards...... a variety of substrates in E. coli. These included animal growth promoters, antimicrobials, disinfectants and detergents. pOLA52 could readily be transferred to enterobacterial pathogens. Transconjugants showed reduced susceptibility towards chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin and olaquindox. Conclusions...

  5. New evidence showing that the destruction of gut bacteria by antibiotic treatment could increase the honey bee's vulnerability to Nosema infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang Hong; Evans, Jay D; Li, Wen Feng; Zhao, Ya Zhou; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Huang, Shao Kang; Li, Zhi Guo; Hamilton, Michele; Chen, Yan Ping

    2017-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that gut bacteria play vital roles in the development, nutrition, immunity, and overall fitness of their eukaryotic hosts. We conducted the present study to investigate the effects of gut microbiota disruption on the honey bee's immune responses to infection by the microsporidian parasite Nosema ceranae. Newly emerged adult workers were collected and divided into four groups: Group I-no treatment; Group II-inoculated with N. ceranae, Group III-antibiotic treatment, and Group IV-antibiotic treatment after inoculation with N. ceranae. Our study showed that Nosema infection did not cause obvious disruption of the gut bacterial community as there was no significant difference in the density and composition of gut bacteria between Group I and Group II. However, the elimination of gut bacteria by antibiotic (Groups III and IV) negatively impacted the functioning of the honey bees' immune system as evidenced by the expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides abaecin, defensin1, and hymenoptaecin that showed the following ranking: Group I > Group II > Group III > Group IV. In addition, significantly higher Nosema levels were observed in Group IV than in Group II, suggesting that eliminating gut bacteria weakened immune function and made honey bees more susceptible to Nosema infection. Based on Group IV having displayed the highest mortality rate among the four experimental groups indicates that antibiotic treatment in combination with stress, associated with Nosema infection, significantly and negatively impacts honey bee survival. The present study adds new evidence that antibiotic treatment not only leads to the complex problem of antibiotic resistance but can impact honey bee disease resistance. Further studies aimed at specific components of the gut bacterial community will provide new insights into the roles of specific bacteria and possibly new approaches to improving bee health.

  6. New evidence showing that the destruction of gut bacteria by antibiotic treatment could increase the honey bee's vulnerability to Nosema infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hong Li

    Full Text Available It has become increasingly clear that gut bacteria play vital roles in the development, nutrition, immunity, and overall fitness of their eukaryotic hosts. We conducted the present study to investigate the effects of gut microbiota disruption on the honey bee's immune responses to infection by the microsporidian parasite Nosema ceranae. Newly emerged adult workers were collected and divided into four groups: Group I-no treatment; Group II-inoculated with N. ceranae, Group III-antibiotic treatment, and Group IV-antibiotic treatment after inoculation with N. ceranae. Our study showed that Nosema infection did not cause obvious disruption of the gut bacterial community as there was no significant difference in the density and composition of gut bacteria between Group I and Group II. However, the elimination of gut bacteria by antibiotic (Groups III and IV negatively impacted the functioning of the honey bees' immune system as evidenced by the expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides abaecin, defensin1, and hymenoptaecin that showed the following ranking: Group I > Group II > Group III > Group IV. In addition, significantly higher Nosema levels were observed in Group IV than in Group II, suggesting that eliminating gut bacteria weakened immune function and made honey bees more susceptible to Nosema infection. Based on Group IV having displayed the highest mortality rate among the four experimental groups indicates that antibiotic treatment in combination with stress, associated with Nosema infection, significantly and negatively impacts honey bee survival. The present study adds new evidence that antibiotic treatment not only leads to the complex problem of antibiotic resistance but can impact honey bee disease resistance. Further studies aimed at specific components of the gut bacterial community will provide new insights into the roles of specific bacteria and possibly new approaches to improving bee health.

  7. What happens in hospitals does not stay in hospitals: antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospital wastewater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocquet, D; Muller, A; Bertrand, X

    2016-08-01

    Hospitals are hotspots for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB) and play a major role in both their emergence and spread. Large numbers of these ARB will be ejected from hospitals via wastewater systems. In this review, we present quantitative and qualitative data of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli, vancomycin-resistant enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospital wastewaters compared to community wastewaters. We also discuss the fate of these ARB in wastewater treatment plants and in the downstream environment. Published studies have shown that hospital effluents contain ARB, the burden of these bacteria being dependent on their local prevalence. The large amounts of antimicrobials rejected in wastewater exert a continuous selective pressure. Only a few countries recommend the primary treatment of hospital effluents before their discharge into the main wastewater flow for treatment in municipal wastewater treatment plants. Despite the lack of conclusive data, some studies suggest that treatment could favour the ARB, notably ESBL-producing E. coli. Moreover, treatment plants are described as hotspots for the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes between bacterial species. Consequently, large amounts of ARB are released in the environment, but it is unclear whether this release contributes to the global epidemiology of these pathogens. It is reasonable, nevertheless, to postulate that it plays a role in the worldwide progression of antibiotic resistance. Antimicrobial resistance should now be seen as an 'environmental pollutant', and new wastewater treatment processes must be assessed for their capability in eliminating ARB, especially from hospital effluents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. How Often Are Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Said to "Evolve" in the News?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nina; Sit, Matthew T; Chung, Deanna M; Lopez, Ana A; Weerackoon, Ranil; Yeh, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Media plays an important role in informing the general public about scientific ideas. We examine whether the word "evolve," sometimes considered controversial by the general public, is frequently used in the popular press. Specifically, we ask how often articles discussing antibiotic resistance use the word "evolve" (or its lexemes) as opposed to alternative terms such as "emerge" or "develop." We chose the topic of antibiotic resistance because it is a medically important issue; bacterial evolution is a central player in human morbidity and mortality. We focused on the most widely-distributed newspapers written in English in the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, India, and Australia. We examined all articles that focused primarily on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, were published in 2014 or earlier, and were accessible in online archives, for a total of 1639 articles. The total years examined per newspaper ranged from 5 to 37 years with a median of 27 years, and the overall range was 1978-2014. We quantified how many articles included the term "evolve" and analyzed how this varied with newspaper, country, and time. We found that an overall rate of 18% of articles used the term "evolve" but with significant variation among countries. Newspapers in the United Kingdom had the highest rate (24%), more than double of those in India (9%), the country with the lowest rate. These frequencies were lower than those found in scientific papers from both evolutionary journals and biomedical journals. There were no statistically significant changes in frequency and no trends when "evolve" usage was compared against variables such as newspaper circulation, liberal/conservative bias, time, and state evolution acceptance in U.S. newspapers. This study highlights the globally low usage of the word "evolve" in the popular press. We suggest this low usage may affect public understanding and acceptance of evolutionary concepts.

  9. How Often Are Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Said to “Evolve” in the News?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nina; Sit, Matthew T.; Chung, Deanna M.; Lopez, Ana A.; Weerackoon, Ranil; Yeh, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Media plays an important role in informing the general public about scientific ideas. We examine whether the word “evolve,” sometimes considered controversial by the general public, is frequently used in the popular press. Specifically, we ask how often articles discussing antibiotic resistance use the word “evolve” (or its lexemes) as opposed to alternative terms such as “emerge” or “develop.” We chose the topic of antibiotic resistance because it is a medically important issue; bacterial evolution is a central player in human morbidity and mortality. We focused on the most widely-distributed newspapers written in English in the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, India, and Australia. We examined all articles that focused primarily on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, were published in 2014 or earlier, and were accessible in online archives, for a total of 1639 articles. The total years examined per newspaper ranged from 5 to 37 years with a median of 27 years, and the overall range was 1978–2014. We quantified how many articles included the term “evolve” and analyzed how this varied with newspaper, country, and time. We found that an overall rate of 18% of articles used the term “evolve” but with significant variation among countries. Newspapers in the United Kingdom had the highest rate (24%), more than double of those in India (9%), the country with the lowest rate. These frequencies were lower than those found in scientific papers from both evolutionary journals and biomedical journals. There were no statistically significant changes in frequency and no trends when “evolve” usage was compared against variables such as newspaper circulation, liberal/conservative bias, time, and state evolution acceptance in U.S. newspapers. This study highlights the globally low usage of the word “evolve” in the popular press. We suggest this low usage may affect public understanding and acceptance of evolutionary concepts. PMID

  10. Mannitol enhances antibiotic sensitivity of persister bacteria in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Barraud

    Full Text Available The failure of antibiotic therapies to clear Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the key mortality factor for cystic fibrosis (CF patients, is partly attributed to the high tolerance of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Mannitol has previously been found to restore aminoglycoside sensitivity in Escherichia coli by generating a proton-motive force (PMF, suggesting a potential new strategy to improve antibiotic therapy and reduce disease progression in CF. Here, we used the commonly prescribed aminoglycoside tobramycin to select for P. aeruginosa persister cells during biofilm growth. Incubation with mannitol (10-40 mM increased tobramycin sensitivity of persister cells up to 1,000-fold. Addition of mannitol to pre-grown biofilms was able to revert the persister phenotype and improve the efficacy of tobramycin. This effect was blocked by the addition of a PMF inhibitor or in a P. aeruginosa mutant strain unable to metabolise mannitol. Addition of glucose and NaCl at high osmolarity also improved the efficacy of tobramycin although to a lesser extent compared to mannitol. Therefore, the primary effect of mannitol in reverting biofilm associated persister cells appears to be an active, physiological response, associated with a minor contribution of osmotic stress. Mannitol was tested against clinically relevant strains, showing that biofilms containing a subpopulation of persister cells are better killed in the presence of mannitol, but a clinical strain with a high resistance to tobramycin was not affected by mannitol. Overall, these results suggest that in addition to improvements in lung function by facilitating mucus clearance in CF, mannitol also affects antibiotic sensitivity in biofilms and does so through an active, physiological response.

  11. Chemistry, Antimicrobial Mechanisms, and Antibiotic Activities of Cinnamaldehyde against Pathogenic Bacteria in Animal Feeds and Human Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel

    2017-12-06

    Cinnamaldehyde is a major constituent of cinnamon essential oils produced by aromatic cinnamon plants. This compound has been reported to exhibit antimicrobial properties in vitro in laboratory media and in animal feeds and human foods contaminated with disease-causing bacteria including Bacillus cereus, Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica. This integrated review surveys and interprets our current knowledge of the chemistry, analysis, safety, mechanism of action, and antibiotic activities of cinnamaldehyde in food animal (cattle, lambs, calves, pigs, poultry) diets and in widely consumed liquid (apple, carrot, tomato, and watermelon juices, milk) and solid foods. Solid foods include various fruits (bayberries, blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries), vegetables (carrots, celery, lettuce, spinach, cucumbers, and tomatoes), meats (beef, ham, pork, and frankfurters), poultry (chickens and turkeys), seafood (oysters and shrimp), bread, cheese, eggs, infant formula, and peanut paste. The described findings are not only of fundamental interest but also have practical implications for food safety, nutrition, and animal and human health. The collated information and suggested research needs will hopefully facilitate and guide further studies needed to optimize the use of cinnamaldehyde alone and in combination with other natural antimicrobials and medicinal antibiotics to help prevent and treat food animal and human diseases.

  12. Quantamatrix Multiplexed Assay Platform system for direct detection of bacteria and antibiotic resistance determinants in positive blood culture bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H Y; Uh, Y; Kim, S; Lee, H

    2017-05-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of the causative pathogens of bloodstream infections (BSIs) is crucial for initiating appropriate antimicrobial therapy, which decreases the related morbidity and mortality rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a newly developed multiplexed, bead-based bioassay system, the Quantamatrix Multiplexed Assay Platform (QMAP) system, obtained directly from blood culture bottles, to simultaneously detect the presence of bacteria and identify the genes for antibiotic resistance. The QMAP system was used to evaluate 619 blood culture bottles from patients with BSIs and to compare the results of conventional culture methods. Using conventional bacterial cultures as the reference standard, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the QMAP system for detection of bacterial pathogens in positive blood culture (PBC) samples were 99.8% (n=592, 95% CI 0.9852-1.000, p antibiotic resistance were 99.4% (n=158, 95% CI 0.9617-0.9999, p <0.009) and 99.6% (95% CI 0.9763-0.9999, p <0.0001), respectively. Obtaining results using the QMAP system takes about 3 hr, while culture methods can take 48-72 hr. Therefore, analysis using the QMAP system is rapid and reliable for characterizing causative pathogens in BSIs. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kailong; Tang, Junying; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Xu, Ke; Ren, Hongqiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera consisting of Sulfuritalea, Armatimonas, Prosthecobacter, Hyphomicrobium, Azonexus, Longilinea, Paracoccus, Novosphingobium and Rhodobacter were identified as potential TRB in the sludge. Results of qPCR, molecular cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that tetracycline treatment could increase both the abundance and diversity of the tet genes, but decreased the occurrence and diversity of non-tetracycline ARG, especially sulfonamide resistance gene sul2. Cluster analysis showed that tetracycline treatment at subinhibitory concentrations (5 mg/L) was found to pose greater effects on the bacterial community composition, which may be responsible for the variations of the ARGs abundance. This study indicated that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing can be effectively used to explore ARB and ARGs in the environment, and future studies should include an in-depth investigation of the relationship between microbial community, ARGs and antibiotics in sewage treatment plant (STP) sludge. PMID:24905407

  14. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailong Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera consisting of Sulfuritalea, Armatimonas, Prosthecobacter, Hyphomicrobium, Azonexus, Longilinea, Paracoccus, Novosphingobium and Rhodobacter were identified as potential TRB in the sludge. Results of qPCR, molecular cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that tetracycline treatment could increase both the abundance and diversity of the tet genes, but decreased the occurrence and diversity of non-tetracycline ARG, especially sulfonamide resistance gene sul2. Cluster analysis showed that tetracycline treatment at subinhibitory concentrations (5 mg/L was found to pose greater effects on the bacterial community composition, which may be responsible for the variations of the ARGs abundance. This study indicated that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing can be effectively used to explore ARB and ARGs in the environment, and future studies should include an in-depth investigation of the relationship between microbial community, ARGs and antibiotics in sewage treatment plant (STP sludge.

  15. A comprehensive insight into tetracycline resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in activated sludge using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kailong; Tang, Junying; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Xu, Ke; Ren, Hongqiang

    2014-06-05

    In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera consisting of Sulfuritalea, Armatimonas, Prosthecobacter, Hyphomicrobium, Azonexus, Longilinea, Paracoccus, Novosphingobium and Rhodobacter were identified as potential TRB in the sludge. Results of qPCR, molecular cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that tetracycline treatment could increase both the abundance and diversity of the tet genes, but decreased the occurrence and diversity of non-tetracycline ARG, especially sulfonamide resistance gene sul2. Cluster analysis showed that tetracycline treatment at subinhibitory concentrations (5 mg/L) was found to pose greater effects on the bacterial community composition, which may be responsible for the variations of the ARGs abundance. This study indicated that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing can be effectively used to explore ARB and ARGs in the environment, and future studies should include an in-depth investigation of the relationship between microbial community, ARGs and antibiotics in sewage treatment plant (STP) sludge.

  16. Decellularized human amniotic membrane: more is needed for an efficient dressing for protection of burns against antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipourmalekabadi, M; Bandehpour, M; Mozafari, M; Hashemi, A; Ghanbarian, H; Sameni, M; Salimi, M; Gholami, M; Samadikuchaksaraei, A

    2015-11-01

    Human amniotic membranes (HAMs) have attracted the attention of burn surgeons for decades due to favorable properties such as their antibacterial activity and promising support of cell proliferation. On the other hand, as a major implication in the health of burn patients, the prevalence of bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics is increasing due to overuse of antibiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate whether HAMs (both fresh and acellular) are an effective antibacterial agent against antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from burn patients. Therefore, a HAM was decellularized and tested for its antibacterial activity. Decellularization of the tissue was confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. In addition, the cyto-biocompatibility of the acellular HAM was proven by the cell viability test (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide, MTT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The resistant bacteria were isolated from burns, identified, and tested for their susceptibility to antibiotics using both the antibiogram and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. Among the isolated bacteria, three blaIMP gene-positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were chosen for their high resistance to the tested antibiotics. The antibacterial activity of the HAM was also tested for Klebsiella pneumoniae (American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 700603) as a resistant ATCC bacterium; Staphylococcus aureus (mecA positive); and three standard strains of ATCC bacteria including Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27833), and S. aureus (ATCC 25923). Antibacterial assay revealed that only the latter three bacteria were susceptible to the HAM. All the data obtained from this study suggest that an alternative strategy is required to complement HAM grafting in order to fully protect burns from nosocomial infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of fertilizing with raw or anaerobically digested sewage sludge on the abundance of antibiotic-resistant coliforms, antibiotic resistance genes, and pathogenic bacteria in soil and on vegetables at harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahube, Teddie O; Marti, Romain; Scott, Andrew; Tien, Yuan-Ching; Murray, Roger; Sabourin, Lyne; Zhang, Yun; Duenk, Peter; Lapen, David R; Topp, Edward

    2014-11-01

    The consumption of crops fertilized with human waste represents a potential route of exposure to antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria. The present study evaluated the abundance of bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes by using both culture-dependent and molecular methods. Various vegetables (lettuce, carrots, radish, and tomatoes) were sown into field plots fertilized inorganically or with class B biosolids or untreated municipal sewage sludge and harvested when of marketable quality. Analysis of viable pathogenic bacteria or antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria by plate counts did not reveal significant treatment effects of fertilization with class B biosolids or untreated sewage sludge on the vegetables. Numerous targeted genes associated with antibiotic resistance and mobile genetic elements were detected by PCR in soil and on vegetables at harvest from plots that received no organic amendment. However, in the season of application, vegetables harvested from plots treated with either material carried gene targets not detected in the absence of amendment. Several gene targets evaluated by using quantitative PCR (qPCR) were considerably more abundant on vegetables harvested from sewage sludge-treated plots than on vegetables from control plots in the season of application, whereas vegetables harvested the following year revealed no treatment effect. Overall, the results of the present study suggest that producing vegetable crops in ground fertilized with human waste without appropriate delay or pretreatment will result in an additional burden of antibiotic resistance genes on harvested crops. Managing human exposure to antibiotic resistance genes carried in human waste must be undertaken through judicious agricultural practice. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Impact of Fertilizing with Raw or Anaerobically Digested Sewage Sludge on the Abundance of Antibiotic-Resistant Coliforms, Antibiotic Resistance Genes, and Pathogenic Bacteria in Soil and on Vegetables at Harvest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahube, Teddie O.; Marti, Romain; Scott, Andrew; Tien, Yuan-Ching; Murray, Roger; Sabourin, Lyne; Zhang, Yun; Duenk, Peter; Lapen, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of crops fertilized with human waste represents a potential route of exposure to antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria. The present study evaluated the abundance of bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes by using both culture-dependent and molecular methods. Various vegetables (lettuce, carrots, radish, and tomatoes) were sown into field plots fertilized inorganically or with class B biosolids or untreated municipal sewage sludge and harvested when of marketable quality. Analysis of viable pathogenic bacteria or antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria by plate counts did not reveal significant treatment effects of fertilization with class B biosolids or untreated sewage sludge on the vegetables. Numerous targeted genes associated with antibiotic resistance and mobile genetic elements were detected by PCR in soil and on vegetables at harvest from plots that received no organic amendment. However, in the season of application, vegetables harvested from plots treated with either material carried gene targets not detected in the absence of amendment. Several gene targets evaluated by using quantitative PCR (qPCR) were considerably more abundant on vegetables harvested from sewage sludge-treated plots than on vegetables from control plots in the season of application, whereas vegetables harvested the following year revealed no treatment effect. Overall, the results of the present study suggest that producing vegetable crops in ground fertilized with human waste without appropriate delay or pretreatment will result in an additional burden of antibiotic resistance genes on harvested crops. Managing human exposure to antibiotic resistance genes carried in human waste must be undertaken through judicious agricultural practice. PMID:25172864

  19. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides: potential therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyi; Tailhades, Julien; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Separovic, Frances; Otvos, Laszlo; Hossain, M Akhter; Wade, John D

    2014-10-01

    The increasing resistance of pathogens to antibiotics causes a huge clinical burden that places great demands on academic researchers and the pharmaceutical industry for resolution. Antimicrobial peptides, part of native host defense, have emerged as novel potential antibiotic alternatives. Among the different classes of antimicrobial peptides, proline-rich antimicrobial peptides, predominantly sourced from insects, have been extensively investigated to study their specific modes of action. In this review, we focus on recent developments in these peptides. They show a variety of modes of actions, including mechanism shift at high concentration, non-lytic mechanisms, as well as possessing different intracellular targets and lipopolysaccharide binding activity. Furthermore, proline-rich antimicrobial peptides display the ability to not only modulate the immune system via cytokine activity or angiogenesis but also possess properties of penetrating cell membranes and crossing the blood brain barrier suggesting a role as potential novel carriers. Ongoing studies of these peptides will likely lead to the development of more potent antimicrobial peptides that may serve as important additions to the armoury of agents against bacterial infection and drug delivery.

  20. Occurrence of antibiotic and metal resistance in bacteria from organs of river fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, S.P.; Gopal, K.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial populations in some organs, viz., liver, spleen, kidney, gill, and arborescent organ of the catfish Clarias batrachus were enumerated followed by determination of resistance for antibiotics and metals. The total viable counts in these organs, observed, were 2.24x10 4 , 2.08x10 4 , 1.44x10 4 , 1.23x10 4 , and 6.40x10 3 colony-forming units/mL, respectively. The random bacterial isolates from these fish organs showed resistance in decreasing order for colistin (98%), ampicillin (82%), gentamycin (34%), carbenicillin (28%), tetracyline (20%), streptomycin (12%), and ciprofloxacin (02%). Most of the isolates exhibited an increasing order of tolerance for the metals (μg/mL) copper (100), lead (200), manganese (400), cadmium (200), and chromium (50), with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranging from <50 to 1600 μg/mL. These observations indicate that the significant occurrence of bacterial population in organs of fish with high incidence of resistance for antibiotics and metals may pose risk to fish fauna and public health

  1. Enhanced antibiotic multi-resistance in nasal and faecal bacteria after agricultural use of streptomycin

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, Alexandre; Vogt, Hans-Rudolf; Vilei, Edy M; Frey, Joachim; Perreten, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Streptomycin is used in arboriculture to control fire blight. Using sheep as a model, multidrug-resistant bacteria in mammals were found to be selected after the intentional release of streptomycin into the environment. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from the faeces and nasal cavities, respectively, of sheep grazing on a field sprayed with streptomycin at concentrations used in orchards (test group) and on a field without streptomycin (control group). Before the applic...

  2. Studies of Antibiotic Resistance of Beta-Lactamase Bacteria under Different Nutrition Limitations at the Single-Cell Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Ran, Min; Wang, Jun; Ouyang, Qi; Luo, Chunxiong

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance involves many biological processes, including cell growth, cell communication, and cell cooperation. In the last few decades, bacterial drug resistance studies have made substantial progress. However, a major limitation of the traditional resistance study still exists: most of the studies have concentrated on the average behavior of enormous amounts of cells rather than surveying single cells with different phenotypes or genotypes. Here, we report our study of beta-lactamase bacterial drug resistance in a well-designed microfluidic device, which allows us to conduct more controllable experiments, such as controlling the nutrient concentration, switching the culture media, performing parallel experiments, observing single cells, and acquiring time-lapse images. By using GFP as a beta-lactamase indicator and acquiring time-lapse images at the single-cell level, we observed correlations between the bacterial heterogeneous phenotypes and their behavior in different culture media. The feedback loop between the growth rate and the beta-lactamase production suggests that the beta-lactamase bacteria are more resistant in a rich medium than in a relatively poor medium. In the poorest medium, the proportion of dormant cells may increase, which causes a lower death rate in the same generation. Our work may contribute to assaying the antibiotic resistance of pathogenic bacteria in heterogeneous complex media.

  3. Studies of Antibiotic Resistance of Beta-Lactamase Bacteria under Different Nutrition Limitations at the Single-Cell Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available Drug resistance involves many biological processes, including cell growth, cell communication, and cell cooperation. In the last few decades, bacterial drug resistance studies have made substantial progress. However, a major limitation of the traditional resistance study still exists: most of the studies have concentrated on the average behavior of enormous amounts of cells rather than surveying single cells with different phenotypes or genotypes. Here, we report our study of beta-lactamase bacterial drug resistance in a well-designed microfluidic device, which allows us to conduct more controllable experiments, such as controlling the nutrient concentration, switching the culture media, performing parallel experiments, observing single cells, and acquiring time-lapse images. By using GFP as a beta-lactamase indicator and acquiring time-lapse images at the single-cell level, we observed correlations between the bacterial heterogeneous phenotypes and their behavior in different culture media. The feedback loop between the growth rate and the beta-lactamase production suggests that the beta-lactamase bacteria are more resistant in a rich medium than in a relatively poor medium. In the poorest medium, the proportion of dormant cells may increase, which causes a lower death rate in the same generation. Our work may contribute to assaying the antibiotic resistance of pathogenic bacteria in heterogeneous complex media.

  4. Antimicrobial Activity of Ephedra pachyclada Methanol Extract on Some Enteric Gram Negative Bacteria Which Causes Nosocomial Infections by Agar Dilution Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Sadeghi Dosari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Past history indicates that plants were served as an important source of medicine. Otherwise, in developing countries people use medicinal plants against infectious disease because they cannot afford expensive drugs. Due to increasing rate of drug-resistant diseases, there is an urgent need to detect novel antimicrobial compounds from medicinal plants. Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine Antimicrobial activity of Ephedra pachyclada methanol extract on some enteric Gram-negative bacteria which causes nosocomial infections by agar dilution method. Methods In this cross-sectional study, in order to examine the antimicrobial effects of Ephedra pachyclada extract on intestinal Gram-negative bacteria, we exposed them to 0/128, 0/25, 0/5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/mL of the extract. Ephedra pachyclada was collected from Jiroft Heights and methanolic extract was prepared with maceration method, during which, 50 gr powder of Ephedra pachyclada was dissolved in 300 mL of 80% methanol. Results In this study, the antibacterial