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Sample records for antibiotic molecules bypassing

  1. High-throughput identification and rational design of synergistic small-molecule pairs for combating and bypassing antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambaugh, Morgan A; Shakya, Viplendra P S; Lewis, Adam J; Mulvey, Matthew A; Brown, Jessica C S

    2017-06-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infections kill approximately 23,000 people and cost $20,000,000,000 each year in the United States alone despite the widespread use of small-molecule antimicrobial combination therapy. Antibiotic combinations typically have an additive effect: the efficacy of the combination matches the sum of the efficacies of each antibiotic when used alone. Small molecules can also act synergistically when the efficacy of the combination is greater than the additive efficacy. However, synergistic combinations are rare and have been historically difficult to identify. High-throughput identification of synergistic pairs is limited by the scale of potential combinations: a modest collection of 1,000 small molecules involves 1 million pairwise combinations. Here, we describe a high-throughput method for rapid identification of synergistic small-molecule pairs, the overlap2 method (O2M). O2M extracts patterns from chemical-genetic datasets, which are created when a collection of mutants is grown in the presence of hundreds of different small molecules, producing a precise set of phenotypes induced by each small molecule across the mutant set. The identification of mutants that show the same phenotype when treated with known synergistic molecules allows us to pinpoint additional molecule combinations that also act synergistically. As a proof of concept, we focus on combinations with the antibiotics trimethoprim and sulfamethizole, which had been standard treatment against urinary tract infections until widespread resistance decreased efficacy. Using O2M, we screened a library of 2,000 small molecules and identified several that synergize with the antibiotic trimethoprim and/or sulfamethizole. The most potent of these synergistic interactions is with the antiviral drug azidothymidine (AZT). We then demonstrate that understanding the molecular mechanism underlying small-molecule synergistic interactions allows the rational design of additional combinations that

  2. High-throughput identification and rational design of synergistic small-molecule pairs for combating and bypassing antibiotic resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan A Wambaugh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant infections kill approximately 23,000 people and cost $20,000,000,000 each year in the United States alone despite the widespread use of small-molecule antimicrobial combination therapy. Antibiotic combinations typically have an additive effect: the efficacy of the combination matches the sum of the efficacies of each antibiotic when used alone. Small molecules can also act synergistically when the efficacy of the combination is greater than the additive efficacy. However, synergistic combinations are rare and have been historically difficult to identify. High-throughput identification of synergistic pairs is limited by the scale of potential combinations: a modest collection of 1,000 small molecules involves 1 million pairwise combinations. Here, we describe a high-throughput method for rapid identification of synergistic small-molecule pairs, the overlap2 method (O2M. O2M extracts patterns from chemical-genetic datasets, which are created when a collection of mutants is grown in the presence of hundreds of different small molecules, producing a precise set of phenotypes induced by each small molecule across the mutant set. The identification of mutants that show the same phenotype when treated with known synergistic molecules allows us to pinpoint additional molecule combinations that also act synergistically. As a proof of concept, we focus on combinations with the antibiotics trimethoprim and sulfamethizole, which had been standard treatment against urinary tract infections until widespread resistance decreased efficacy. Using O2M, we screened a library of 2,000 small molecules and identified several that synergize with the antibiotic trimethoprim and/or sulfamethizole. The most potent of these synergistic interactions is with the antiviral drug azidothymidine (AZT. We then demonstrate that understanding the molecular mechanism underlying small-molecule synergistic interactions allows the rational design of additional

  3. In silico screening for antibiotic escort molecules to overcome efflux.

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    Rahman, Sheikh S; Simovic, Ivana; Gibbons, Simon; Zloh, Mire

    2011-11-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is a growing problem worldwide and occurs in part due to the overexpression of efflux pumps responsible for the removal of antibiotics from bacterial cells. The current study examines complex formation between efflux pump substrates and escort molecules as a criterion for an in silico screening method for molecules that are able to potentiate antibiotic activities. Initially, the SUPERDRUG database was queried to select molecules that were similar to known multidrug resistance (MDR) modulators. Molecular interaction fields generated by GRID and the docking module GLUE were used to calculate the interaction energies between the selected molecules and the antibiotic norfloxacin. Ten compounds forming the most stable complexes with favourable changes to the norfloxacin molecular properties were tested for their potentiation ability by efflux pump modulation assays. Encouragingly, two molecules were proven to act as efflux pump modulators, and hence provide evidence that complex formation between a substrate and a drug can be used for in silico screening for novel escort molecules.

  4. Dosing antibiotic prophylaxis during cardiopulmonary bypass-a higher level of complexity? A structured review.

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    Paruk, Fathima; Sime, Fekade B; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2017-04-01

    In highly invasive procedures such as open heart surgery, the risk of post-operative infection is particularly high due to exposure of the surgical field to multiple foreign devices. Adequate antibiotic prophylaxis is an essential intervention to minimise post-operative morbidity and mortality. However, there is a lack of clear understanding on the adequacy of traditional prophylactic dosing regimens, which are rarely supported by data. The aim of this structured review is to describe the relevant pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) considerations for optimal antibiotic prophylaxis for major cardiac surgery including cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A structured review of the relevant published literature was performed and 45 relevant studies describing antibiotic pharmacokinetics in patients receiving extracorporeal CPB as part of major cardiac surgery were identified. Some of the studies suggested marked PK alterations in the peri-operative period with increases in volume of distribution (V d ) by up to 58% and altered drug clearances of up to 20%. Mechanisms proposed as causing the PK changes included haemodilution, hypothermia, retention of the antibiotic within the extracorporeal circuit, altered physiology related to a systemic inflammatory response, and maldistribution of blood flow. Of note, some studies reported no or minimal impact of the CPB procedure on antibiotic pharmacokinetics. Given the inconsistent data, ongoing research should focus on clarifying the influence of CPB procedure and related clinical covariates on the pharmacokinetics of different antibiotics during cardiac surgery. Traditional prophylactic dosing regimens may need to be re-assessed to ensure sufficient drug exposures that will minimise the risk of surgical site infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  5. Implementation of an antibiotic nomogram improves postoperative antibiotic utilization and safety in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann James P

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Routine, initial, empiric vancomycin dosing by clinicians in postoperative coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG patients was identified as a potential patient safety issue in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU because the rate of postoperative acute renal insufficiency (ARI and average patient Body Mass Index (BMI > 35 kg/m2 were significantly higher in our institution than those of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS database. A vancomycin dosing nomogram was derived from the local patient population in the attempt to improve patient safety by convincing clinicians to use an evidence-based approach to vancomycin prescription. Methods We analyzed two different treatment strategies that were applied consecutively to an intensive care unit population. CABG patients dosed empirically with vancomycin (group 1, pre-nomogram were compared with CABG patients dosed using a vancomycin dosing nomogram (group 2, post-nomogram derived from the hospital population using an Internet program that facilitated creation of a local nomogram. The two groups were analyzed as to age, sex, body mass index, creatinine clearance, and vancomycin dosage using logistic regression and testing for continuous and categorical variables. Results Nomogram use decreased the number of patients receiving the customary dose of one gram every 12 hours in those group 2 patients with diminished CrCl as compared with those in group 1 with diminished CrCl (group 2, 2/21 vs. group 1, 14/21, p Conclusion Implementation of the nomogram resulted in a more appropriate antibiotic utilization, regardless of creatinine clearance, that decreased costs without increasing infection rates.

  6. Identification of a small molecule that simultaneously suppresses virulence and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Guo, Qiaoyun; Wei, Yu; Xia, Bin; Jin, Yongxin; Liu, Chang; Pan, Xiaolei; Shi, Jing; Zhu, Feng; Li, Jinlong; Qian, Lei; Liu, Xinqi; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Lin, Jianping; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-11

    The rising antibiotic resistance of bacteria imposes a severe threat on human health. Inhibition of bacterial virulence is an alternative approach to develop new antimicrobials. Molecules targeting antibiotic resistant enzymes have been used in combination with cognate antibiotics. It might be ideal that a molecule can simultaneously suppress virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here we combined genetic and computer-aided inhibitor screening to search for such molecules against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To identify target proteins that control both virulence and antibiotic resistance, we screened for mutants with defective cytotoxicity and biofilm formation from 93 transposon insertion mutants previously reported with increased antibiotic susceptibility. A pyrD mutant displayed defects in cytotoxicity, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence in an acute mouse pneumonia model. Next, we employed a computer-aided screening to identify potential inhibitors of the PyrD protein, a dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase) involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. One of the predicted inhibitors was able to suppress the enzymatic activity of PyrD as well as bacterial cytotoxicity, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. A single administration of the compound reduced the bacterial colonization in the acute mouse pneumonia model. Therefore, we have developed a strategy to identify novel treatment targets and antimicrobial molecules.

  7. A quorum sensing small volatile molecule promotes antibiotic tolerance in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yok-Ai Que

    Full Text Available Bacteria can be refractory to antibiotics due to a sub-population of dormant cells, called persisters that are highly tolerant to antibiotic exposure. The low frequency and transience of the antibiotic tolerant "persister" trait has complicated elucidation of the mechanism that controls antibiotic tolerance. In this study, we show that 2' Amino-acetophenone (2-AA, a poorly studied but diagnostically important small, volatile molecule produced by the recalcitrant gram-negative human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, promotes antibiotic tolerance in response to quorum-sensing (QS signaling. Our results show that 2-AA mediated persister cell accumulation occurs via alteration of the expression of genes involved in the translational capacity of the cell, including almost all ribosomal protein genes and other translation-related factors. That 2-AA promotes persisters formation also in other emerging multi-drug resistant pathogens, including the non 2-AA producer Acinetobacter baumannii implies that 2-AA may play an important role in the ability of gram-negative bacteria to tolerate antibiotic treatments in polymicrobial infections. Given that the synthesis, excretion and uptake of QS small molecules is a common hallmark of prokaryotes, together with the fact that the translational machinery is highly conserved, we posit that modulation of the translational capacity of the cell via QS molecules, may be a general, widely distributed mechanism that promotes antibiotic tolerance among prokaryotes.

  8. Biomass-derived molecules modulate the behavior of Streptomyces coelicolor for antibiotic production

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Lee, Bo-Rahm; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Song, Hun Seok; Kim, Junyoung; Jeon, Jong-Min; Yoon, Jeong-Jun; Ahn, Jungoh; Park, Kyungmoon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Various chemicals, i.e., furfural, vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and acetate produced during the pretreatment of biomass affect microbial fermentation. In this study, effect of vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and acetate on antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor is investigated. IC 50 value of vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and acetate was recorded as 5, 11.3 and 115?mM, respectively. Vanillin was found as a very effective molecule, and it completely abolished antibiotic (undecyl...

  9. Improving the representation of peptide-like inhibitor and antibiotic molecules in the Protein Data Bank.

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    Dutta, Shuchismita; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Feng, Zukang; Persikova, Irina; Sen, Sanchayita; Shao, Chenghua; Westbrook, John; Young, Jasmine; Zhuravleva, Marina A; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Berman, Helen M

    2014-06-01

    With the accumulation of a large number and variety of molecules in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) comes the need on occasion to review and improve their representation. The Worldwide PDB (wwPDB) partners have periodically updated various aspects of structural data representation to improve the integrity and consistency of the archive. The remediation effort described here was focused on improving the representation of peptide-like inhibitor and antibiotic molecules so that they can be easily identified and analyzed. Peptide-like inhibitors or antibiotics were identified in over 1000 PDB entries, systematically reviewed and represented either as peptides with polymer sequence or as single components. For the majority of the single-component molecules, their peptide-like composition was captured in a new representation, called the subcomponent sequence. A novel concept called "group" was developed for representing complex peptide-like antibiotics and inhibitors that are composed of multiple polymer and nonpolymer components. In addition, a reference dictionary was developed with detailed information about these peptide-like molecules to aid in their annotation, identification and analysis. Based on the experience gained in this remediation, guidelines, procedures, and tools were developed to annotate new depositions containing peptide-like inhibitors and antibiotics accurately and consistently. © 2013 The Authors Biopolymers Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Expression of adhesion and activation molecules on lymphocytes during open-heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine; Zülow, I

    1997-01-01

    -heart surgery and eight with abdominal surgery were studied. The adhesion molecules CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1_, CD11c/CD18 and CD44 and the activation molecules CD25, CD69, CD71 and MHCII were measured, using monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. Lymphocytopenia was observed during CPB and for some hours after both...... open-heart and abdominal surgery. The proportion of CD11a/CD18-positive lymphocytes rose from 67.6 +/- 8% to 86.4 +/- 3% after aortic declamping (p ... was associated with increased expression of the adhesion molecule CD11a/CD18 on lymphocytes, while the expression of activation molecules on lymphocytes was unchanged....

  11. Biomass-derived molecules modulate the behavior of Streptomyces coelicolor for antibiotic production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Lee, Bo-Rahm; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Song, Hun Seok; Kim, Junyoung; Jeon, Jong-Min; Yoon, Jeong-Jun; Ahn, Jungoh; Park, Kyungmoon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2016-12-01

    Various chemicals, i.e., furfural, vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and acetate produced during the pretreatment of biomass affect microbial fermentation. In this study, effect of vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and acetate on antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor is investigated. IC 50 value of vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and acetate was recorded as 5, 11.3 and 115 mM, respectively. Vanillin was found as a very effective molecule, and it completely abolished antibiotic (undecylprodigiosin and actinorhodin) production at 1 mM concentration, while 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and acetate have little effect. Microscopic analysis with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) showed that addition of vanillin inhibits mycelia formation and increases differentiation of S. coelicolor cells. Vanillin increases expression of genes responsible for sporulation (ssgA) and decreases expression of antibiotic transcriptional regulator (redD and actII-orf4), while it has no effect on genes related to the mycelia formation (bldA and bldN) and quorum sensing (scbA and scbR). Vanillin does not affect the glycolysis process, but may affect acetate and pyruvate accumulation which leads to increase in fatty acid accumulation. The production of antibiotics using biomass hydrolysates can be quite complex due to the presence of exogenous chemicals such as furfural and vanillin, and needs further detailed study.

  12. Small-molecule inhibition of bacterial two-component systems to combat antibiotic resistance and virulence.

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    Worthington, Roberta J; Blackledge, Meghan S; Melander, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are a considerable and increasing global problem. The development of new antibiotics is not keeping pace with the rapid evolution of resistance to almost all clinically available drugs, and novel strategies are required to fight bacterial infections. One such strategy is the control of pathogenic behaviors, as opposed to simply killing bacteria. Bacterial two-component system (TCS) signal transduction pathways control many pathogenic bacterial behaviors, such as virulence, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance and are, therefore, an attractive target for the development of new drugs. This review presents an overview of TCS that are potential targets for such a strategy, describes small-molecules inhibitors of TCS identified to date and discusses assays for the identification of novel inhibitors. The future perspective for the identification and use of inhibitors of TCS to potentially provide new therapeutic options for the treatment of drug-resistant bacterial infections is discussed.

  13. Antibiotics

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    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  14. Manipulation of metabolic pathways controlled by signaling molecules, inducers of antibiotic production, for genome mining in Streptomyces spp.

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    Arakawa, Kenji

    2018-02-23

    Streptomyces is well characterized by an ability to produce a wide variety of secondary metabolites including antibiotics, whose expression is strictly controlled by small diffusible signaling molecules at nano-molar concentrations. The signaling molecules identified to date are classified into three skeletons; γ-butyrolactones, furans, and γ-butenolides. Accumulated data suggest the structural diversity of the signaling molecules in Streptomyces species and their potential in activating cryptic secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways. Several genome mining approaches to activate silent biosynthetic gene clusters have been reported for natural product discovery. This review updates recent examples on genetic manipulation including blockage of metabolic pathways together with inactivation of transcriptional repressor genes.

  15. A novel protocol for antibiotic prophylaxis based on preoperative kidney function in patients undergoing open heart surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass.

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    Odaka, Mizuho; Minakata, Kenji; Toyokuni, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Kazuhiro; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Sakata, Ryuzo; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to develop and assess the effectiveness of a protocol for antibiotic prophylaxis based on preoperative kidney function in patients undergoing open heart surgery. We established a protocol for antibiotic prophylaxis based on preoperative kidney function in patients undergoing open heart surgery. This novel protocol was assessed by comparing patients undergoing open heart surgery before (control group; n = 30) and after its implementation (protocol group; n = 31) at Kyoto University Hospital between July 2012 and January 2013. Surgical site infections (SSIs) were observed in 4 control group patients (13.3 %), whereas no SSIs were observed in the protocol group patients (P protocol group (P protocol significantly decreased the total antibiotic dose used in the perioperative period (P protocol group patients required this additional change in the antibiotic regimen (P protocol based on preoperative kidney function effectively prevents SSIs in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

  16. Changes in adhesion molecule expression and oxidative burst activity of granulocytes and monocytes during open-heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass compared with abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Nielsen, C H; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine

    1998-01-01

    Cardiac and major abdominal surgery are associated with granulocytosis in peripheral blood. The purpose of the present study was to describe the granulocyte and monocyte oxidative burst and the expression of adhesion molecules following cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and abdominal...... surgery, 1, 5, 10 and 20 min after aortic clamping, and then 1, 5, 10 and 20 min and 1, 2 and 3 h after declamping. Samples from eight patients undergoing abdominal surgery were taken before surgery, at the end of surgery, and 2 and 3 h post-operatively. A decrease in number of granulocytes and monocytes...... surgery. The ability to respond with an oxidative burst was measured by means of flow cytometry using 123-dihydrorhodamine. The adhesion molecules CD11a/CD18, CD11c/CD18, CD44 were measured using monoclonal antibodies. Blood samples from eight patients undergoing open-heart surgery were taken before...

  17. A novel antibiotic-delivery system by using ovotransferrin as targeting molecule.

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    Ibrahim, Hisham R; Tatsumoto, Sayuri; Ono, Hajime; Van Immerseel, Filip; Raspoet, Ruth; Miyata, Takeshi

    2015-01-23

    Synthetic antibiotics and antimicrobial agents, such as sulfonamide and triclosan (TCS), have provided new avenues in the treatment of bacterial infections, as they target lethal intracellular pathways. Sulfonamide antibiotics block synthesis of folic acid by inhibiting dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) while TCS block fatty acid synthesis through inhibition of enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI). They are water-insoluble agents and high doses are toxic, limiting their therapeutic efficiency. In this study, an antibiotic drug-targeting strategy based on utilizing ovotransferrin (OTf) as a carrier to allow specific targeting of the drug to microbial or mammalian cells via the transferrin receptor (TfR) is explored, with potential to alleviate insolubility and toxicity problems. Complexation, through non-covalent interaction, with OTf turned sulfa antibiotics or TCS into completely soluble in aqueous solution. OTf complexes showed superior bactericidal activity against several bacterial strains compared to the activity of free agents. Strikingly, a multi-drug resistant Salmonella strain become susceptible to antibiotics-OTf complexes while a tolC-knockout mutant strain become susceptible to OTf and more sensitive to the complexes. The antibiotic bound to OTf was, thus exported through the multi-drug efflux pump TolC in Salmonella wild-type strain. Further, antibiotics-OTf complexes were able to efficiently kill intracellular pathogens after infecting human colon carcinoma cells (HCT-116). The results demonstrate, for the first time, that the TfR mediated endocytosis of OTf can be utilized to specifically target drugs directly to pathogens or intracellularly infected cells and highlights the potency of the antibiotic-OTf complex for the treatment of infectious diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Daptomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis diverts the antibiotic molecule from the division septum and remodels cell membrane phospholipids.

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    Tran, Truc T; Panesso, Diana; Mishra, Nagendra N; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Guan, Ziqianq; Munita, Jose M; Reyes, Jinnethe; Diaz, Lorena; Weinstock, George M; Murray, Barbara E; Shamoo, Yousif; Dowhan, William; Bayer, Arnold S; Arias, Cesar A

    2013-07-23

    . Understanding the mechanisms of resistance is of crucial importance to develop new strategies to combat multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are one of the most recalcitrant hospital-associated pathogens against which new therapies are urgently needed. Daptomycin (DAP) is a calcium-decorated antimicrobial lipopeptide whose target is the bacterial cell membrane. A current paradigm suggests that Gram-positive bacteria become resistant to cationic antimicrobial peptides via an electrostatic repulsion of the antibiotic molecule from a more positively charged cell surface. In this work, we provide evidence that VRE use a novel strategy to avoid DAP-elicited killing. Instead of "repelling" the antibiotic from the cell surface, VRE diverts the antibiotic molecule from the septum and "traps" it in distinct membrane regions. We provide genetic and biochemical bases responsible for the mechanism of resistance and disclose new targets for potential antimicrobial development.

  19. Antibiotic Resistance and Regulation of the Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Barrier by Host Innate Immune Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel I. Miller

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative outer membrane is an important barrier that provides protection against toxic compounds, which include antibiotics and host innate immune molecules such as cationic antimicrobial peptides. Recently, significant research progress has been made in understanding the biogenesis, regulation, and functioning of the outer membrane, including a recent paper from the laboratory of Dr. Brett Finlay at the University of British Columbia (J. van der Heijden et al., mBio 7:e01238-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01541-16. These investigators demonstrate that toxic oxygen radicals, such as those found in host tissues, regulate outer membrane permeability by altering the outer membrane porin protein channels to regulate the influx of oxygen radicals as well as β-lactam antibiotics. This commentary provides context about this interesting paper and discusses the prospects of utilizing increased knowledge of outer membrane biology to develop new antibiotics for antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

  20. Antibiotics.

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    Hariprasad, Seenu M; Mieler, William F

    2016-01-01

    The Endophthalmitis Vitrectomy Study (EVS) provided ophthalmologists with evidence-based management strategies to deal with endophthalmitis for the first time. However, since the completion of the EVS, numerous unresolved issues remain. The use of oral antibiotics has important implications for the ophthalmologist, particularly in the prophylaxis and/or management of postoperative, posttraumatic, or bleb-associated bacterial endophthalmitis. One can reasonably conclude that significant intraocular penetration of an antibiotic after oral administration may be a property unique to the newer-generation fluoroquinolones. Prophylactic use of mupirocin nasal ointment resulted in significant reduction of conjunctival flora with or without preoperative topical 5% povidone-iodine preparation. Ocular fungal infections have traditionally been very difficult to treat due to limited therapeutic options both systemically and intravitreally. Because of its broad spectrum of coverage, low MIC90 levels for the organisms of concern, good tolerability, and excellent bioavailability, voriconazole through various routes of administration may be useful to the ophthalmologist in the primary treatment of or as an adjunct to the current management of ocular fungal infections. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Auto Poisoning of the Respiratory Chain by a Quorum Sensing Regulated Molecule Favors Biofilm Formation and Antibiotic Tolerance

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    Hazan, Ronen; Que, Yok Ai; Maura, Damien; Strobel, Benjamin; Majcherczyk, Paul Anthony; Hopper, Laura Rose; Wilbur, David J.; Hreha, Teri N.; Barquera, Blanca; Rahme, Laurence G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacterial programmed cell death and quorum sensing are direct examples of prokaryote group behaviors, wherein cells coordinate their actions to function cooperatively like one organism for the benefit of the whole culture. We demonstrate here that 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), a Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing -regulated low-molecular-weight excreted molecule, and triggers autolysis by self-perturbing the electron transfer reactions of the cytochrome bc1 complex. HQNO induces specific self-poisoning by disrupting the flow of electrons through the respiratory chain at the cytochrome bc1 complex, causing a leak of reducing equivalents to O2 whereby electrons that would normally be passed to cytochrome c are donated directly to O2. The subsequent mass production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduces membrane potential and disrupts membrane integrity, causing bacterial cell autolysis and DNA release. DNA subsequently promotes biofilm formation and increases antibiotic tolerance to beta-lactams, suggesting that HQNO-dependent cell autolysis is advantageous to the bacterial populations. These data both identify a new programmed cell death system, and a novel role for HQNO as a critical-inducer of biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance. This newly identified pathway suggests intriguing mechanistic similarities with the initial mitochondrial-mediated steps of eukaryotic apoptosis. PMID:26776731

  2. Simple molecular model for the binding of antibiotic molecules to bacterial ion channels

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    Mafé, Salvador; Ramírez, Patricio; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2003-10-01

    A molecular model aimed at explaining recent experimental data by Nestorovich et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 9789 (2002)] on the interaction of ampicillin molecules with the constriction zone in a channel of the general bacterial porin, OmpF (outer membrane protein F), is presented. The model extends T. L. Hill's theory for intermolecular interactions in a pair of binding sites [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 78, 3330 (1956)] by incorporating two binding ions and two pairs of interacting sites. The results provide new physical insights on the role of the complementary pattern of the charge distributions in the ampicillin molecule and the narrowest part of the channel pore. Charge matching of interacting sites facilitates drug binding. The dependence of the number of ampicillin binding events per second with the solution pH and salt concentration is explained qualitatively using a reduced number of fundamental concepts.

  3. Assessing Specific Oligonucleotides and Small Molecule Antibiotics for the Ability to Inhibit the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Dana; Lee, Chow H.

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Coding Region Determinant-Binding Protein (CRD-BP) and its orthologs have confirmed their functional role in mRNA stability and localization. CRD-BP is present in extremely low levels in normal adult tissues, but it is over-expressed in many types of aggressive human cancers and in neonatal tissues. Although the exact role of CRD-BP in tumour progression is unclear, cumulative evidence suggests that its ability to physically associate with target mRNAs is an important criterion for its oncogenic role. CRD-BP has high affinity for the 3′UTR of the oncogenic CD44 mRNA and depletion of CRD-BP in cells led to destabilization of CD44 mRNA, decreased CD44 expression, reduced adhesion and disruption of invadopodia formation. Here, we further characterize the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction and assess specific antisense oligonucleotides and small molecule antibiotics for their ability to inhibit the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction. CRD-BP has a high affinity for binding to CD44 RNA nts 2862–3055 with a Kd of 645 nM. Out of ten antisense oligonucleotides spanning nts 2862–3055, only three antisense oligonucleotides (DD4, DD7 and DD10) were effective in competing with CRD-BP for binding to 32P-labeled CD44 RNA. The potency of DD4, DD7 and DD10 in inhibiting the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction in vitro correlated with their ability to specifically reduce the steady-state level of CD44 mRNA in cells. The aminoglycoside antibiotics neomycin, paramomycin, kanamycin and streptomycin effectively inhibited the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction in vitro. Assessing the potential inhibitory effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics including neomycin on the CRD-BP-CD44 mRNA interaction in cells proved difficult, likely due to their propensity to non-specifically bind nucleic acids. Our results have important implications for future studies in finding small molecules and nucleic acid-based inhibitors that interfere with protein-RNA interactions. PMID:24622399

  4. A Chemoinformatics Approach to the Discovery of Lead-Like Molecules from Marine and Microbial Sources En Route to Antitumor and Antibiotic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Florbela; Latino, Diogo A. R. S.; Gaudêncio, Susana P.

    2014-01-01

    The comprehensive information of small molecules and their biological activities in the PubChem database allows chemoinformatic researchers to access and make use of large-scale biological activity data to improve the precision of drug profiling. A Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship approach, for classification, was used for the prediction of active/inactive compounds relatively to overall biological activity, antitumor and antibiotic activities using a data set of 1804 compounds from PubChem. Using the best classification models for antibiotic and antitumor activities a data set of marine and microbial natural products from the AntiMarin database were screened—57 and 16 new lead compounds for antibiotic and antitumor drug design were proposed, respectively. All compounds proposed by our approach are classified as non-antibiotic and non-antitumor compounds in the AntiMarin database. Recently several of the lead-like compounds proposed by us were reported as being active in the literature. PMID:24473174

  5. A novel STK1-targeted small-molecule as an "antibiotic resistance breaker" against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Sashi; Asthana, Shailendra; Missiakas, Dominique; Pancholi, Vijay

    2017-07-11

    Ser/Thr protein kinase (STK1) plays a critical role in cell wall biosynthesis of and drug resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA strains lacking STK1 become susceptible to failing cephalosporins, such as Ceftriaxone and Cefotaxime. STK1, despite being nonessential protein for MRSA survival, it can serve as an important therapeutic agent for combination therapy. Here, we report a novel small molecule quinazoline compound, Inh2-B1, which specifically inhibits STK1 activity by directly binding to its ATP-binding catalytic domain. Functional analyses encompassing in vitro growth inhibition of MRSA, and in vivo protection studies in mice against the lethal MRSA challenge indicated that at high concentration neither Inh2-B1 nor Ceftriaxone or Cefotaxime alone was able to inhibit the growth of bacteria or protect the challenged mice. However, the growth of MRSA was inhibited, and a significant protection in mice against the bacterial challenge was observed at a micromolar concentration of Ceftriaxone or Cefotaxime in the presence of Inh2-B1. Cell-dependent minimal to no toxicity of Inh2-B1, and its abilities to down-regulate cell wall hydrolase genes and disrupt the biofilm formation of MRSA clearly indicated that Inh2-B1 serves as a therapeutically important "antibiotic-resistance-breaker," which enhances the bactericidal activity of Ceftriaxone/Cefotaxime against highly pathogenic MRSA infection.

  6. Heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits selectively deplete the pattern recognition molecule ficolin-2 of the lectin complement pathway in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Munthe-Fog, L; Thiara, A S

    2015-01-01

    randomized into two groups using different coatings of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits, Phisio® (phosphorylcholine polymer coating) and Bioline® (albumin-heparin coating). Concentrations of MBL, ficolin-1, -2 and -3 and soluble C3a and terminal complement complex (TCC) in plasma samples were measured....... Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was evaluated with C4, C3 and TCC as output. There was no significant difference between the two circuit materials regarding MBL, ficolin-1 and -3. In the Bioline® group the ficolin-2 levels decreased significantly after initiation of surgery (P ....0001) and remained reduced throughout the sampling period. This was not seen for Phisio®-coated circuits. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was reduced significantly in both groups after start of operation (P TCC in the samples were increased (P

  7. Changes in adhesion molecule expression and oxidative burst activity of granulocytes and monocytes during open-heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass compared with abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Nielsen, C H; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine

    1998-01-01

    surgery. The ability to respond with an oxidative burst was measured by means of flow cytometry using 123-dihydrorhodamine. The adhesion molecules CD11a/CD18, CD11c/CD18, CD44 were measured using monoclonal antibodies. Blood samples from eight patients undergoing open-heart surgery were taken before...

  8. MHC class I molecules with superenhanced CD8 binding properties bypass the requirement for cognate TCR recognition and nonspecifically activate CTLs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Wooldridge (Linda); M. Clement (Mathew); A. Lissina (Anna); E.S.J. Edwards (Emily); K. Ladell (Kristin); J. Ekeruche (Julia); R.E. Hewitt (Rachel); B. Laugel (Bruno); E. Gostick (Emma); D.K. Cole (David); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); J.J. Miles (John); S.R. Burrows (Scott); D.A. Price (David); A.K. Sewell (Andrew)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCD8+CTLs are essential for effective immune defense against intracellular microbes and neoplasia. CTLs recognize short peptide fragments presented in association with MHC class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected or dysregulated cells. Ag recognition involves the binding of

  9. Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs Resources for You Information for Consumers (Drugs) Buying & Using Medicine Safely Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotics ... Antibiotic Resistance and Protect Public Health The White House Blog FDA’s Take on the Executive Order and ...

  10. Threading the Needle: Small-Molecule Targeting of a Xenobiotic Receptor to Ablate Escherichia coli Polysaccharide Capsule Expression Without Altering Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Mehreen; Goller, Carlos C; Pilla, Danielle; Schoenen, Frank J; Seed, Patrick C

    2016-04-15

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a leading cause of urinary tract and invasive infections worldwide, is rapidly acquiring multidrug resistance, hastening the need for selective new anti-infective agents. Here we demonstrate the molecular target of DU011, our previously discovered potent, nontoxic, small-molecule inhibitor of UPEC polysaccharide capsule biogenesis and virulence. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and a target-overexpression drug-suppressor screen were used to localize the putative inhibitor target. A thermal shift assay quantified interactions between the target protein and the inhibitor, and a novel DNase protection assay measured chemical inhibition of protein-DNA interactions. Virulence of a regulatory target mutant was assessed in a murine sepsis model. MprA, a MarR family transcriptional repressor, was identified as the putative target of the DU011 inhibitor. Thermal shift measurements indicated the formation of a stable DU011-MprA complex, and DU011 abrogated MprA binding to its DNA promoter site. Knockout of mprA had effects similar to that of DU011 treatment of wild-type bacteria: a loss of encapsulation and complete attenuation in a murine sepsis model, without any negative change in antibiotic resistance. MprA regulates UPEC polysaccharide encapsulation, is essential for UPEC virulence, and can be targeted without inducing antibiotic resistance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Antibiotic allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimmi, S; Caimmi, D; Lombardi, E; Crisafulli, G; Franceschini, F; Ricci, G; Marseglia, G L

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics are commonly injected during the perioperative period and are responsible of 15 percent of the anaphylactic reactions. Anaphylaxis triggered by antibiotics primarily involves penicillin and cephalosporin. The management of patients with histories of allergic reactions to antibiotics is a common situation in clinical practice. The confirmation or invalidation of the allergic nature of the reported reaction is not based on in vitro tests, but on a rigorous allergological work-up based on detailed analysis of clinical history, skin tests and drug provocation test. Considering a possible cross-reactivity between penicillins, once an immediate penicillin allergy has been diagnosed, skin testing with the alternative molecule (cephalosporin, carbapenem, aztreonam) is mandatory and, if negative, the relevant drug should be given in an appropriate setting at increasing doses.

  12. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...

  13. Structure of polysaccharide antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matutano, L.

    1966-01-01

    Study of the structure of antibiotics having two or several sugars in their molecule. One may distinguish: the polysaccharide antibiotics themselves, made up of two or several sugars either with or without nitrogen, such as streptomycin, neomycins, paromomycine, kanamycin, chalcomycin; the hetero-polysaccharide antibiotics made up of one saccharide part linked to an aglycone of various type through a glucoside: macrolide, pigment, pyrimidine purine. Amongst these latter are: erythromycin, magnamycin, spiramycin, oleandomycin, cinerubin and amicetin. The sugars can either play a direct role in biochemical reactions or act as a dissolving agent, as far as the anti-microbe power of these antibiotics is concerned. (author) [fr

  14. Vascular homograft use in a femoropopliteal rare bacterial infection bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainese, Luca; Saccu, Claudio; Zoli, Stefano; Trabattoni, Piero; Guarino, Anna; Cavallero, Annalisa; Spirito, Rita

    2012-12-01

    We report on a patient with a femoropopliteal bypass infected by Kytococcus sedentarius. Treatment consisted of resection of the infected prosthesis with homograft substitution and antibiotic therapy started postoperatively. At 6 months followup, the patient showed no signs of infection and results of laboratory findings were normal.

  15. Cardiopulmonary bypass and hemostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsman, Leon

    1992-01-01

    In chapter 1, we recalled that intracardiac defects can only be corrected when cardiopulmonary circulation is maintained by extracorporeal criculation and ventilation. To prevent clot formation in this artificial circuit, the socalled cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), we completely depend on the

  16. Arterial bypass leg - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100155.htm Arterial bypass leg - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Overview The arteries which supply blood to the leg originate from the aorta and iliac vessels. Review ...

  17. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung bypass machine is used during this procedure. Robot-assisted technique. This type of procedure allows for ... driving after 3 to 8 weeks. Returning to work after 6 weeks is common unless your job ...

  18. A QSAR approach for virtual screening of lead-like molecules en route to antitumor and antibiotic drugs from marine and microbial natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florbela Pereira

    2014-05-01

    Figure 1. The unreported 15 lead antibiotic MNPs and MbNPs from AntiMarin database, using the best Rfs antibiotic model with a probability of being antibiotic greater than or equal to 0.8. Figure 2. The selected 4 lead antitumor MNPs and MbNPs from the AntiMarin database, using the best Rfs antitumor model with a probability of being antitumor greater than or equal to 0.8. The present work corroborates by one side the results of our previous work6 and enables the presentation of a new set of possible lead like bioactive compounds. Additionally, it is shown the usefulness of quantum-chemical descriptors in the discrimination of biological active and inactive compounds. The use of the εHOMO quantum-chemical descriptor in the discrimination of large scale data sets of lead-like or drug-like compounds has never been reported. This approach results in the reduction, in great extent, of the number of compounds used in real screens, and it reinforces the results of our previous work. Furthermore, besides the virtual screening, the computational methods can be very useful to build appropriate databases, allowing for effective shortcuts of NP extracts dereplication procedures, which will certainly result in increasing the efficiency of drug discovery.

  19. Antibiotic policy

    OpenAIRE

    Gyssens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    There is a clear association between antibiotic use and resistance both on individual and population levels. In the European Union, countries with large antibiotic consumption have higher resistance rates. Antibiotic resistance leads to failed treatments, prolonged hospitalisations, increased costs and deaths. With few new antibiotics in the Research & Development pipeline, prudent antibiotic use is the only option to delay the development of resistance. Antibiotic policy consists of prescrib...

  20. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati eSengupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic-resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic-resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in subinhibitory concentrations acting as signalling molecules supporting quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host-parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell and so on. The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behaviour of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and genes that confer resistance to antibiotics in

  1. The Best Bypass Surgery Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christian H; Jensen, Birte Østergaard; Gluud, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Recent trials suggest that off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) reduces the risk of mortality and morbidity compared with conventional coronary artery bypass grafting (CCAB) using cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients with a moderate- to high-risk of complications after CCAB may have addit...

  2. Heart bypass surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trouble with short-term memory or feel confused ("fuzzy-headed") Be tired or not have much energy ... or a fever over 101°F (38.3°C). Alternative Names Off-pump coronary artery bypass - discharge; ...

  3. Gastric bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Buchwald H, ed. Buchwald's Atlas of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgical Techniques and Procedures . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 5. Halperin F, Ding SA, Simonson DC, et al. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery or lifestyle with intensive medical management in patients ...

  4. Partial Ileal Bypass Undone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beynen, A.C.; Schouten, J.A.; Hoitsma, H.F.W.

    1984-01-01

    Partial ileal bypass (PIB) for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia was introduced 20 years ago. About 110 cases have been described. We know of only 1 case of restoration of intestinal continuity; no details were given. We report here the second case of PIB in the Netherlands; the operation

  5. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). ...

  6. Direct identification of antibiotic resistance genes on single plasmid molecules using CRISPR/Cas9 in combination with optical DNA mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Vilhelm; Rajer, Fredrika; Frykholm, Karolin; Nyberg, Lena K.; Quaderi, Saair; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Sandegren, Linus; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extensively involved in the rapid global spread of antibiotic resistance. We here present an assay, based on optical DNA mapping of single plasmids in nanofluidic channels, which provides detailed information about the plasmids present in a bacterial isolate. In a single experiment, we obtain the number of different plasmids in the sample, the size of each plasmid, an optical barcode that can be used to identify and trace the plasmid of interest and information about which plasmid that carries a specific resistance gene. Gene identification is done using CRISPR/Cas9 loaded with a guide-RNA (gRNA) complementary to the gene of interest that linearizes the circular plasmids at a specific location that is identified using the optical DNA maps. We demonstrate the principle on clinically relevant extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing isolates. We discuss how the gRNA sequence can be varied to obtain the desired information. The gRNA can either be very specific to identify a homogeneous group of genes or general to detect several groups of genes at the same time. Finally, we demonstrate an example where we use a combination of two gRNA sequences to identify carbapenemase-encoding genes in two previously not characterized clinical bacterial samples.

  7. History of Antibiotics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    . Whenever a new antibiotic reached the market it did not take long until scientists observed the first resistant germs. Since the marketing of the first antibiotic there is a neck-on-neck race between scientists who discover natural or develop semisynthetic and synthetic bioactive molecules and bacteria, which have developed resistance mechanisms. The emphasis of this chapter is to give an overview of the history of antibiotics research. The situation within the pre-antibiotic era as well as in the early antibiotic era will be described until the Golden Age of Antibiotics will conclude this time travel. The most important antibiotic classes, information about their discovery, activity spectrum, mode of action, resistance mechanisms, and current application will be presented.

  8. Antibiotic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Superbugs and Drugs" Home | Contact Us General Background: Antibiotic Agents What is an antibacterial and how are ... with the growth and reproduction of bacteria. While antibiotics and antibacterials both attack bacteria, these terms have ...

  9. Axillobifemoral bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidović Lazar B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Axillo-femoral bypass (AxF means connecting the axillar and femoral artery with the graft that is placed subcutaneously [1]. Usually, this graft is connected with contralateral femoral artery via one accessory subcutaneous graft, and this connection is known as axillobifemoral bypass (AxFF. This extra-anatomic procedure is an alternative method to the standard reconstruction of aortoiliac region when there are contraindications for general or local reasons. OBJECTIVE The objective of this paper is to show early and late results of AxFF bypass grafting as well as to show the indications for AxFF bypass. METHODS The sample consisted of 37 patients. The procedure was performed in 28 patients who suffered from aortoiliac occlusive disease and who were at high risk due to the comorbidity- in one patient with the rupture of juxtarenal aneurysm of abdominal aorta; in five patients with aortoenteric fistula, in two patients with iatrogenic lesion of abdominal aorta and in one female patient with anus preternaturalis definitivus who was treated for rectovaginal fistula. Donor's right axillary artery was used in 26 cases (70.3%, and donor's left axillary artery was used in 9 cases (29.7%. Dacron graft was used in 34 patients and Polytetrafluo-roethlylene graft was used in three patients. Simultaneously, profundo-plastic was done in four patients and femoro-popliteal bypass was performed in three patients. In five patients who suffered from aortoenteric fistula, simultaneous intervention of gastrointerstinal system has been done, x2 test was used for statistical evaluation and life table method was used for verification of late graft patency. RESULTS The rate of early postoperative mortality was 13.5%. The causes of death were: sepsis -1, MOFS - 3, and infarct myocardium -1. The mean follow up period was 40.1 months, ranging from six months to 17 years. During the follow up period, an early graft thrombosis was identified in two and late graft

  10. Cardiopulmonary bypass in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mukul Chandra Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac surgery carried out on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a pregnant woman is associated with poor neonatal outcomes although maternal outcomes are similar to cardiac surgery in non-pregnant women. Most adverse maternal and fetal outcomes from cardiac surgery during pregnancy are attributed to effects of CPB. The CPB is associated with utero-placental hypoperfusion due to a number of factors, which may translate into low fetal cardiac output, hypoxia and even death. Better maternal and f...

  11. Stagnant loop syndrome resulting from small-bowel irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swan, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    Stagnant or blind-loop syndrome includes vitamin B12 malabsorption, steatorrhea, and bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. A case is presented to demonstrate this syndrome occurring after small-bowel irradiation injury with exaggeration postenterocolic by-pass. Alteration of normal small-bowel flora is basic to development of the stagnant-loop syndrome. Certain strains of bacteria as Bacteriodes and E. coli are capable of producing a malabsorption state. Definitive therapy for this syndrome developing after severe irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass includes antibiotics. Rapid symptomatic relief from diarrhea and improved malabsorption studies usually follow appropriate antibiotic therapy. Recolonization of the loop(s) with the offending bacterial species may produce exacerbation of symptoms. Since antibiotics are effective, recognition of this syndrome is important. Foul diarrheal stools should not be considered a necessary consequence of irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass

  12. Natural Product Screening Reveals Naphthoquinone Complex I Bypass Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott B Vafai

    Full Text Available Deficiency of mitochondrial complex I is encountered in both rare and common diseases, but we have limited therapeutic options to treat this lesion to the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS. Idebenone and menadione are redox-active molecules capable of rescuing OXPHOS activity by engaging complex I-independent pathways of entry, often referred to as "complex I bypass." In the present study, we created a cellular model of complex I deficiency by using CRISPR genome editing to knock out Ndufa9 in mouse myoblasts, and utilized this cell line to develop a high-throughput screening platform for novel complex I bypass factors. We screened a library of ~40,000 natural product extracts and performed bioassay-guided fractionation on a subset of the top scoring hits. We isolated four plant-derived 1,4-naphthoquinone complex I bypass factors with structural similarity to menadione: chimaphilin and 3-chloro-chimaphilin from Chimaphila umbellata and dehydro-α-lapachone and dehydroiso-α-lapachone from Stereospermum euphoroides. We also tested a small number of structurally related naphthoquinones from commercial sources and identified two additional compounds with complex I bypass activity: 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4,-naphthoquinone. The six novel complex I bypass factors reported here expand this class of molecules and will be useful as tool compounds for investigating complex I disease biology.

  13. Antibiotics in late clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Martens, Evan

    2017-06-01

    Most pharmaceutical companies have stopped or have severely limited investments to discover and develop new antibiotics to treat the increasing prevalence of infections caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, because the return on investment has been mostly negative for antibiotics that received marketing approved in the last few decades. In contrast, a few small companies have taken on this challenge and are developing new antibiotics. This review describes those antibiotics in late-stage clinical development. Most of them belong to existing antibiotic classes and a few with a narrow spectrum of activity are novel compounds directed against novel targets. The reasons for some of the past failures to find new molecules and a path forward to help attract investments to fund discovery of new antibiotics are described. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Haemodynamics in axillobifemoral bypass grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H. Wittens

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is based on four publications on the subject of graft configuration and haemodynamics in axillobifemoral bypass grafts: 1. A clinical evaluation of 17 patients with axillobifemoral bypass graft operations, performed for various indications. Two important observations were

  15. Spiritual Bypass: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Glosoff, Harriet L.; Hammond, Cheree

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of spiritual bypass has received limited attention in the transpersonal psychology and counseling literature and has not been subjected to empirical inquiry. This study examines the phenomenon of spiritual bypass by considering how spirituality, mindfulness, alexithymia (emotional restrictiveness), and narcissism work together to…

  16. Prescribing Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Jepsen, Kim Sune

    2018-01-01

    The medical professions will lose an indispensable tool in clinical practice if even simple infections cannot be cured because antibiotics have lost effectiveness. This article presents results from an exploratory enquiry into “good doctoring” in the case of antibiotic prescribing at a time when...

  17. Forgotten antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, Céline; Bush, Karen; Craig, William A

    2012-01-01

    In view of the alarming spread of antimicrobial resistance in the absence of new antibiotics, this study aimed at assessing the availability of potentially useful older antibiotics. A survey was performed in 38 countries among experts including hospital pharmacists, microbiologists, and infectious...

  18. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Hoffmann, Tammy C; McCullough, Amanda R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous opportunities are available in primary care for alleviating the crisis of increasing antibiotic resistance. Preventing patients from developing an acute respiratory infection (ARI) will obviate any need for antibiotic use downstream. Hygiene measures such as physical barriers and hand...... will greatly improve the use of antibiotics for ARIs. However, used in concert, combinations are likely to enable clinicians and health care systems to implement the strategies that will reduce antimicrobial resistance in the future....... antibiotic prescribing are a major factor in the prescribing for ARIs. Professional interventions with educational components are effective, although they have modest effects, and are expensive. GPs' perceptions - that mistakenly assume as a default that patients want antibiotics for their ARIs - are often...

  19. Cardiopulmonary bypass in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Mukul Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac surgery carried out on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a pregnant woman is associated with poor neonatal outcomes although maternal outcomes are similar to cardiac surgery in non-pregnant women. Most adverse maternal and fetal outcomes from cardiac surgery during pregnancy are attributed to effects of CPB. The CPB is associated with utero-placental hypoperfusion due to a number of factors, which may translate into low fetal cardiac output, hypoxia and even death. Better maternal and fetal outcomes may be achieved by early pre-operative optimization of maternal cardiovascular status, use of perioperative fetal monitoring, optimization of CPB, delivery of a viable fetus before the operation and scheduling cardiac surgery on an elective basis during the second trimester.

  20. Cardiopulmonary bypass in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Chandra Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery carried out on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB in a pregnant woman is associated with poor neonatal outcomes although maternal outcomes are similar to cardiac surgery in non-pregnant women. Most adverse maternal and fetal outcomes from cardiac surgery during pregnancy are attributed to effects of CPB. The CPB is associated with utero-placental hypoperfusion due to a number of factors, which may translate into low fetal cardiac output, hypoxia and even death. Better maternal and fetal outcomes may be achieved by early pre-operative optimization of maternal cardiovascular status, use of perioperative fetal monitoring, optimization of CPB, delivery of a viable fetus before the operation and scheduling cardiac surgery on an elective basis during the second trimester.

  1. Overcoming resistance to β-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Roberta J; Melander, Christian

    2013-05-03

    β-Lactam antibiotics are one of the most important antibiotic classes but are plagued by problems of resistance, and the development of new β-lactam antibiotics through side-chain modification of existing β-lactam classes is not keeping pace with resistance development. In this JOCSynopsis, we summarize small molecule strategies to overcome resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. These approaches include the development of β-lactamase inhibitors and compounds that interfere with the ability of the bacteria to sense an antibiotic threat and activate their resistance mechanisms.

  2. Antibiotic Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antibiotics www.healthsci.tufts.edu Georgia-Pacific Health Smart Institute www.gphealthsmart.com Special thanks to Rhonda ... effectiveness of other medications such as birth control pills? 7. Are there any possible adverse reactions if ...

  3. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiby, N.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Givskov, M.

    2010-01-01

    A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and DNA. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and disinfectant chemicals as well as resisting phagocytosis...... to antibiotics. Biofilm growth is associated with an increased level of mutations as well as with quorum-sensing-regulated mechanisms. Conventional resistance mechanisms such as chromosomal beta-lactamase, upregulated efflux pumps and mutations in antibiotic target molecules in bacteria also contribute...... to the survival of biofilms. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. A promising strategy may be the use of enzymes that can dissolve the biofilm matrix (e.g. DNase and alginate lyase) as well as quorum...

  4. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is a very stable and inert molecule due to the formation of a triple bond between the two atoms. Surpris- ingly isoelectronic molecules are quite reactive making dinitrogen very useful and unique. Dinitrogen (N. 2. ) is such an innocuous molecule that you might not think it worthy of special attention. We take this molecule for.

  5. Current peripheral bypass surgery: various clinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaa, Alexander te

    2011-01-01

    Substantial post-operative edema occurs in the majority of patients who undergo peripheral bypass surgery due to severe peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The pathophysiological mechanisms that underlay edema formation following peripheral bypass surgery include hyperemia, an increased capillary

  6. Gluteopopliteal bypass for a compromised groin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aukema, Tjeerd S.; Legemate, Dink A.

    2009-01-01

    Extra-anatomic arterial reconstruction is indicated in patients with a compromised groin. Surgical options include obturator or transosseous bypass. We present a case of a patient with a necrotic radiation ulcer in the groin treated with a gluteopopliteal bypass

  7. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... invasive direct coronary artery bypass - discharge; MIDCAB - discharge; Robot assisted coronary artery bypass - discharge; RACAB - discharge; Keyhole ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  8. Secondary and College LD Bypass Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    The author describes the Developmental By-Pass (DBP) Instructional technology for teaching secondary and college learning disabled (LD) students by allowing students to bypass ordering and organizational deficits. (SB)

  9. Collins' bypass for the main ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, S.

    1982-01-01

    Design of the bypass for the main ring at Fermilab is discussed. Specific design features discussed include space, path length, geometric closure, matching of betatron functions, and external dispersion. Bypass parameters are given

  10. Controversy surrounding 'mini' gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawar, Kamal K; Carr, William R J; Balupuri, Shlok; Small, Peter K

    2014-02-01

    Mini gastric bypass is a modification of Mason loop gastric bypass with a longer lesser curvature-based pouch. Though it has been around for more than 15 years, its uptake by the bariatric community has been relatively slow, and the procedure has been mired in controversy right from its early days. Lately, there seems to be a surge in the interest in this procedure, and there is now published experience with more than 5,000 procedures globally. This review examines the major controversial aspects of this procedure against the available scientific literature. Surgeons performing this procedure need to be aware of these controversies and counsel their patients appropriately.

  11. Hydrid Antibiotics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Běhal, Vladislav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2003), s. 17-25 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/01/1004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : hydrid * antibiotics Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.857, year: 2003

  12. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Farm Animals FDA: Cutting-Edge Technology Sheds Light on Antibiotic Resistance For More Information Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antimicrobial Resistance Information for Consumers and Health Professionals CDC: Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work More in Consumer Updates ...

  13. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  14. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    of antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I......Bacteria can avoid extinction during antimicrobial exposure by becoming resistant. They achieve this either via adaptive mutations or horizontally acquired resistance genes. If resistance emerges in clinical relevant species, it can lead to treatment failure and ultimately result in increasing...... morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources...

  15. Antibiotic Capture by Bacterial Lipocalins Uncovers an Extracellular Mechanism of Intrinsic Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Klett, Javier; Ingram, Rebecca J; Loutet, Slade A; Murphy, Michael E P; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Valvano, Miguel A

    2017-03-14

    The potential for microbes to overcome antibiotics of different classes before they reach bacterial cells is largely unexplored. Here we show that a soluble bacterial lipocalin produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia upon exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations increases resistance to diverse antibiotics in vitro and in vivo These phenotypes were recapitulated by heterologous expression in B. cenocepacia of lipocalin genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Mycobacterium tuberculosis , and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Purified lipocalin bound different classes of bactericidal antibiotics and contributed to bacterial survival in vivo Experimental and X-ray crystal structure-guided computational studies revealed that lipocalins counteract antibiotic action by capturing antibiotics in the extracellular space. We also demonstrated that fat-soluble vitamins prevent antibiotic capture by binding bacterial lipocalin with higher affinity than antibiotics. Therefore, bacterial lipocalins contribute to antimicrobial resistance by capturing diverse antibiotics in the extracellular space at the site of infection, which can be counteracted by known vitamins. IMPORTANCE Current research on antibiotic action and resistance focuses on targeting essential functions within bacterial cells. We discovered a previously unrecognized mode of general bacterial antibiotic resistance operating in the extracellular space, which depends on bacterial protein molecules called lipocalins. These molecules are highly conserved in most bacteria and have the ability to capture different classes of antibiotics outside bacterial cells. We also discovered that liposoluble vitamins, such as vitamin E, overcome in vitro and in vivo antibiotic resistance mediated by bacterial lipocalins, providing an unexpected new alternative to combat resistance by using this vitamin or its derivatives as antibiotic adjuvants. Copyright © 2017 El-Halfawy et al.

  16. Bypass materials in vascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willich, Stephan N.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arteriosclerotic changes can lead to circulatory disturbances in various areas of the human vascular system. In addition to pharmacological therapy and the management of risk factors (e. g. hypertension, diabetes, lipid metabolism disorders, and lifestyle, surgical interventions also play an important role in the treatment of arteriosclerosis. Long-segment arterial occlusions, in particular, can be treated successfully with bypass sur-gery. A number of different materials are available for this type of operation, such as autologous vein or pros-thetic grafts comprised of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Dacron®. Prosthetic materials are used especially in the treatment of peripheral artery disease, such as in aortoiliac or femoropopliteal bypass surgery. The present report will thus focus on this area in order to examine the effectiveness of different bypass materials. Among the efforts being made to refine the newly introduced DRG system in Germany, analysing the different bypass materials used in vascular surgery is particularly important. Indeed, in its current version the German DRG system does not distinguish between bypass materials in terms of reimbursement rates. Differences in cost structures are thus of especial interest to hospitals in their budget calculations, whereas both private and statutory health insurance funds are primarily interested in long-term results and their costs. Objectives: The goal of this HTA is to compare the different bypass materials used in vascular surgery in terms of their medical efficiency and cost-effectiveness, as well as with regard to their ethical, social and legal implications. In addition, this report aims to point out the areas in which further medical, epidemiological and health economic research is still needed. Methods: Relevant publications were identified by means of a structured search of databases accessed through the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information

  17. Hybrid antibiotics - clinical progress and novel designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Alastair L; Yule, Ian A

    2016-07-01

    There is a growing need for new antibacterial agents, but success in development of antibiotics in recent years has been limited. This has led researchers to investigate novel approaches to finding compounds that are effective against multi-drug resistant bacteria, and that delay onset of resistance. One such strategy has been to link antibiotics to produce hybrids designed to overcome resistance mechanisms. The concept of dual-acting hybrid antibiotics was introduced and reviewed in this journal in 2010. In the present review the authors sought to discover how clinical candidates described had progressed, and to examine how the field has developed. In three sections the authors cover the clinical progress of hybrid antibiotics, novel agents produced from hybridisation of two or more small-molecule antibiotics, and novel agents produced from hybridisation of antibiotics with small-molecules that have complementary activity. Many key questions regarding dual-acting hybrid antibiotics remain to be answered, and the proposed benefits of this approach are yet to be demonstrated. While Cadazolid in particular continues to progress in the clinic, suggesting that there is promise in hybridisation through covalent linkage, it may be that properties other than antibacterial activity are key when choosing a partner molecule.

  18. Intestinal perforation caused by insertion of a nasogastric tube late after gastric bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dinter, Thomas G.; John, Lijo; Guileyardo, Joseph M.; John S., Fordtran

    2013-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman, who had undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery 9 years earlier, was admitted to the intensive care unit because of pneumonia. Despite antibiotic therapy, she died 40 days later, apparently because of sepsis and organ failure related to the pneumonia. However, the patient's family requested an autopsy, which revealed that her death was due to perforation of the Roux limb of her gastric bypass, which had resulted in severe peritonitis. The perforation was caused by a nasogastric tube inserted for enteral nutrition. We discuss ways nasogastric tubes might be inserted more safely after gastric bypass, the response of Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas to this complication, and the role of autopsy in improving the quality of hospital care. PMID:23382601

  19. Gut hormones and gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens J.

    2016-01-01

    Gut hormone secretion in response to nutrient ingestion appears to depend on membrane proteins expressed by the enteroendocrine cells. These include transporters (glucose and amino acid transporters), and, in this case, hormone secretion depends on metabolic and electrophysiological events elicited...... that determines hormone responses. It follows that operations that change intestinal exposure to and absorption of nutrients, such as gastric bypass operations, also change hormone secretion. This results in exaggerated increases in the secretion of particularly the distal small intestinal hormones, GLP-1, GLP-2......, oxyntomodulin, neurotensin and peptide YY (PYY). However, some proximal hormones also show changes probably reflecting that the distribution of these hormones is not restricted to the bypassed segments of the gut. Thus, cholecystokinin responses are increased, whereas gastric inhibitory polypeptide responses...

  20. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  1. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  2. Antibiotic Adjuvants: Rescuing Antibiotics from Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gerard D

    2016-11-01

    Rooted in the mechanism of action of antibiotics and subject to bacterial evolution, antibiotic resistance is difficult and perhaps impossible to overcome. Nevertheless, strategies can be used to minimize the emergence and impact of resistance. Antibiotic adjuvants offer one such approach. These are compounds that have little or no antibiotic activity themselves but act to block resistance or otherwise enhance antibiotic action. Antibiotic adjuvants are therefore delivered in combination with antibiotics and can be divided into two groups: Class I agents that act on the pathogen, and Class II agents that act on the host. Adjuvants offer a means to both suppress the emergence of resistance and rescue the activity of existing drugs, offering an orthogonal strategy complimentary to new antibiotic discovery VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biosynthesis of Tetrahydroisoquinoline Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gong-Li; Tang, Man-Cheng; Song, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    The tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ) alkaloids are naturally occurring antibiotics isolated from a variety of microorganisms and marine invertebrates. This family of natural products exhibit broad spectrum antimicrobial and strong antitumor activities, and the potency of clinical application has been validated by the marketing of ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743) as anticancer drug. In the past 20 years, the biosynthetic gene cluster of six THIQ antibiotics has been characterized including saframycin Mx1 from Myxococcus xanthus, safracin-B from Pseudomonas fluorescens, saframycin A, naphthyridinomycin, and quinocarcin from Streptomyces, as well as ET-743 from Ecteinascidia turbinata. This review gives a brief summary of the current status in understanding the molecular logic for the biosynthesis of these natural products, which provides new insights on the biosynthetic machinery involved in the nonribosomal peptide synthetase system. The proposal of the THIQ biosynthetic pathway not only shows nature's route to generate such complex molecules, but also set the stage to develop a different process for production of ET-743 by synthetic biology.

  4. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  5. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  6. Coronary Artery Bypass in Octogenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yen Chien

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD has increased with the expansion of life span among the elderly population in the world. Hence, the issue of the coronary artery bypass in octogenarians has attracted more attention. Recent literature about the topic revealed nearly the same excellent results as those in the younger population under the newly developed operative techniques and improving concept in perioperative management and postoperative care. In this article, we review the current status of the procedure that was thought to be dangerous in the earlier era, including its risk factors, result, and benefit.

  7. Membrane-active macromolecules kill antibiotic-tolerant bacteria and potentiate antibiotics towards Gram-negative bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakara S S M Uppu

    Full Text Available Chronic bacterial biofilms place a massive burden on healthcare due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant dormant bacteria. Some of the conventional antibiotics such as erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin etc. are inherently ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly in their biofilms. Here, we report membrane-active macromolecules that kill slow dividing stationary-phase and antibiotic tolerant cells of Gram-negative bacteria. More importantly, these molecules potentiate antibiotics (erythromycin and rifampicin to biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria. These molecules eliminate planktonic bacteria that are liberated after dispersion of biofilms (dispersed cells. The membrane-active mechanism of these molecules forms the key for potentiating the established antibiotics. Further, we demonstrate that the combination of macromolecules and antibiotics significantly reduces bacterial burden in mouse burn and surgical wound infection models caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC clinical isolate respectively. Colistin, a well-known antibiotic targeting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS of Gram-negative bacteria fails to kill antibiotic tolerant cells and dispersed cells (from biofilms and bacteria develop resistance to it. On the contrary, these macromolecules prevent or delay the development of bacterial resistance to known antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the potential of targeting the bacterial membrane in antibiotic potentiation for disruption of biofilms and suggest a promising strategy towards developing therapies for topical treatment of Gram-negative infections.

  8. Membrane-active macromolecules kill antibiotic-tolerant bacteria and potentiate antibiotics towards Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Sarkar, Paramita; Samaddar, Sandip; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Farias-Junior, Celio; Krishnamoorthy, Paramanandam; Shome, Bibek R; Franco, Octávio L; Haldar, Jayanta

    2017-01-01

    Chronic bacterial biofilms place a massive burden on healthcare due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant dormant bacteria. Some of the conventional antibiotics such as erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin etc. are inherently ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly in their biofilms. Here, we report membrane-active macromolecules that kill slow dividing stationary-phase and antibiotic tolerant cells of Gram-negative bacteria. More importantly, these molecules potentiate antibiotics (erythromycin and rifampicin) to biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria. These molecules eliminate planktonic bacteria that are liberated after dispersion of biofilms (dispersed cells). The membrane-active mechanism of these molecules forms the key for potentiating the established antibiotics. Further, we demonstrate that the combination of macromolecules and antibiotics significantly reduces bacterial burden in mouse burn and surgical wound infection models caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC) clinical isolate respectively. Colistin, a well-known antibiotic targeting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria fails to kill antibiotic tolerant cells and dispersed cells (from biofilms) and bacteria develop resistance to it. On the contrary, these macromolecules prevent or delay the development of bacterial resistance to known antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the potential of targeting the bacterial membrane in antibiotic potentiation for disruption of biofilms and suggest a promising strategy towards developing therapies for topical treatment of Gram-negative infections.

  9. 'Closed' in Situ Vein Infrainguinal Bypass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. van Dijk (Lukas)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe autologous greater saphenous vein is considered to be the best bypass material for below knee femoropopliteal and femorocnual arterial reconstructions . . The history of the greater saphenous vein arterial bypass in humans started in 1949, with its first introduction by Kunlin. Upto

  10. The ionising radiation effect on reactivation of antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikij, I.L.; Manskij, A.A.; Krasnopyorova, A.P.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of gamma-radiation on the molecular structure of antibiotics was studied with a view to extending their useful life beyond the current expiration period. The following antibiotics were examined: penicillin, bicillin-3,5, streptomycine, and ampioxe. The samples were irradiated by Co-60 gamma-radiation from a research irradiator. Doses of 0.1, 1, 5, 7, and 10 Gy were applied. The processes were elucidated using the classical method of 2-divisible serial dilutions and IR-spectroscopy. All the measurements were carried out at 300 K. The IR-spectra revealed that the chemical structure of new and old antibiotics is identical; the change in the antibiotic activity is generally a result of deformation of the molecule or change in its conformation; the reactivation process returns the molecule to its previous state and the activity of antibiotic after reactivation meets established standards. Hence, this method can be used for the reactivation of expired antibiotics

  11. [Should doses of antibiotics be adjusted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lastours, V

    2018-03-01

    While we are confronted with the major increase in antibiotic resistance, the preservation of existing antibiotics has become an absolute necessity both to achieve therapeutic success and to limit the risks of the emergence of resistance. The optimization of antibiotic use and dosages must have a threefold objective: guarantee antibacterial efficacy, limit toxicities and limit emergence of resistant strains. However, with the increase in the number of multipathological patients, particularly those with renal or hepatic impairment, the increase in the number of patients with extreme weights and the use of antibiotics with narrower therapeutic margins, the adaptation of antibiotic dosages is becoming increasingly important. By reminding some principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics (PK/PD), the necessary objectives for clinical effectiveness of most antibiotic classes are reviewed and several examples of situations where dosage adjustments are necessary will be given. In particular, adjustment of antibiotic dosages in obese patients will be discussed. Adaptation is not limited to the adaptation of the total daily dose. The PK/PD parameters also tell us that the mode of administration (intermittent versus continuous, number of injections per day, etc.) is also an essential point to consider. By taking examples concerning some molecules, infections and difficult clinical situations, we review situations in which dosage adjustments appear necessary. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Biotechnology of polyketides: new breath of life for the novel antibiotic genetic pathways discovery through metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Soares Gomes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms (e.g., penicillin in 1928 and the beginning of their industrial application (1940 opened new doors to what has been the main medication source for the treatment of infectious diseases and tumors. In fact, approximately 80 years after the discovery of the first antibiotic compound, and despite all of the warnings about the failure of the "goose that laid the golden egg," the potential of this wealth is still inexorable: simply adjust the focus from "micro" to "nano", that means changing the look from microorganisms to nanograms of DNA. Then, the search for new drugs, driven by genetic engineering combined with metagenomic strategies, shows us a way to bypass the barriers imposed by methodologies limited to isolation and culturing. However, we are far from solving the problem of supplying new molecules that are effective against the plasticity of multi- or pan-drug-resistant pathogens. Although the first advances in genetic engineering date back to 1990, there is still a lack of high-throughput methods to speed up the screening of new genes and design new molecules by recombination of pathways. In addition, it is necessary an increase in the variety of heterologous hosts and improvements throughout the full drug discovery pipeline. Among numerous studies focused on this subject, those on polyketide antibiotics stand out for the large technical-scientific efforts that established novel solutions for the transfer/engineering of major metabolic pathways using transposons and other episomes, overcoming one of the main methodological constraints for the heterologous expression of major pathways. In silico prediction analysis of three-dimensional enzymatic structures and advances in sequencing technologies have expanded access to the metabolic potential of microorganisms.

  13. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  14. Antibiotics and the burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravat, François; Le-Floch, Ronan; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Ainaud, Pierre; Bertin-Maghit, Marc; Carsin, Hervé; Perro, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Infection is a major problem in burn care and especially when it is due to bacteria with hospital-acquired multi-resistance to antibiotics. Moreover, when these bacteria are Gram-negative organisms, the most effective molecules are 20 years old and there is little hope of any new product available even in the distant future. Therefore, it is obvious that currently available antibiotics should not be misused. With this aim in mind, the following review was conducted by a group of experts from the French Society for Burn Injuries (SFETB). It examined key points addressing the management of antibiotics for burn patients: when to use or not, time of onset, bactericidia, combination, adaptation, de-escalation, treatment duration and regimen based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of these compounds. The authors also considered antibioprophylaxis and some other key points such as: infection diagnosis criteria, bacterial inoculae and local treatment. French guidelines for the use of antibiotics in burn patients have been designed up from this work. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. New antibiotic development: barriers and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercole Concia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance represents a serious threat to public health worldwide, leading to increased healthcare costs, prolonged hospital stays, treatment failures and deaths. To address the emergency of multidrug-resistance, the major international societies of infectious diseases and public health have developed strategies and guidelines to reduce unnecessary antimicrobial use as well as to incite the development of new antibiotics targeting multidrug-resistant pathogens. Even though pharmaceutical companies have been developing new antibiotics since 2010, the global situation is still worrisome. Indeed, the currently available data regarding new antibiotics are limited to microbiological activity and pharmacokinetic profile and their use for the treatment of life-threatening infections (i.e., sepsis is often off-label. The aim of this article is to present the antibiotic molecules recently commercialized and with which clinicians will deal quite often in next years. We describe ceftolozane/tazobactam, ceftazidime/avibactam, eravacycline, plazomicin, dalbavancin, oritavancin and tedizolid in terms of mechanism of action, antimicrobial spectrum, trials behind the approval and possible indications for the future. In last few years, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA approved many new antibiotic molecules but, unfortunately, they lack in biological innovation and in wide clinical indications. These agents show appealing properties for off-label use, as we propose in the article, but caution is still needed considering that high-quality clinical data are limited.

  16. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  17. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 5. Molecule Matters - N-Heterocyclic Carbenes - The Stable Form of R2 C: Anil J Elias. Feature Article Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 456-467. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. In situ bypass og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V; Lorentzen, J E

    1993-01-01

    decreased survival rate was found in diabetics (p treatment of critical ischaemia of the lower limb in diabetic patients. The overall results in diabetic patients, whether insulin-dependent or not, were equal to those in non-diabetic......From 1986 through to 1990 a total of 483 in situ bypass procedures were performed in 444 patients. Preoperative risk-factors were equally distributed among diabetic (DM) and non-diabetic (NDM) patients, except for smoking habits (DM:48%, NDM:64%, p = 0.002) and cardiac disease (DM:45%, NDM:29%, p...... = 0.005). Critical limb-ischaemia was more often present in diabetic than non-diabetic patients (DM:57%, NDM:36%, p = 0.0002). Diabetic patients had a significantly lower distal anastomosis than non-diabetic patients (p = 0.00001). There were no differences among diabetic and non-diabetic patients...

  20. Better living through chemistry: Addressing emerging antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coussens, Nathan P; Molinaro, Ashley L; Culbertson, Kayla J; Peryea, Tyler; Zahoránszky-Köhalmi, Gergely; Hall, Matthew D; Daines, Dayle A

    2018-03-01

    The increasing emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is recognized as a major threat to human health worldwide. While the use of small molecule antibiotics has enabled many modern medical advances, it has also facilitated the development of resistant organisms. This minireview provides an overview of current small molecule drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in humans, the unintended consequences of antibiotic use, and the mechanisms that underlie the development of drug resistance. Promising new approaches and strategies to counter antibiotic-resistant bacteria with small molecules are highlighted. However, continued public investment in this area is critical to maintain an edge in our evolutionary "arms race" against antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. Impact statement The alarming increase in antibiotic-resistant microorganisms is a rapidly emerging threat to human health throughout the world. Historically, small molecule drugs have played a major role in controlling bacterial infections and they continue to offer tremendous potential in countering resistant organisms. This minireview provides a broad overview of the relevant issues, including the diversity of FDA-approved small molecule drugs and mechanisms of drug resistance, unintended consequences of antibiotic use, the current state of development for small molecule antibacterials and financial challenges that impact progress towards novel therapies. The content will be informative to diverse stakeholders, including clinicians, basic scientists, translational scientists and policy makers, and may be used as a bridge between these key players to advance the development of much-needed therapeutics.

  1. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class II...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood perfusing...

  3. Molecular Regulation of Antibiotic Biosynthesis in Streptomyces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes. PMID:23471619

  4. Coronary Bypass Surgery in a 105-Year-Old Patient with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temucin Noyan Ogus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery bypass grafting is one of the routine daily surgical procedures in the current era. Parallel to the increasing life expectancy, cardiac surgery is commonly performed in octogenarians. However, literature consists of only seldom reports of coronary artery bypass grafting in patients above 90 years of age. In this report, we present our management strategy in a 105-year-old patient who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting at our institution.

  5. Antibiotic resistance and virulence: Understanding the link and its consequences for prophylaxis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, Thomas; Pons, Stéphanie; Roux, Damien; Pier, Gerald B; Skurnik, David

    2016-07-01

    "Antibiotic resistance is usually associated with a fitness cost" is frequently accepted as common knowledge in the field of infectious diseases. However, with the advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing that allows for a comprehensive analysis of bacterial pathogenesis at the genome scale, including antibiotic resistance genes, it appears that this paradigm might not be as solid as previously thought. Recent studies indicate that antibiotic resistance is able to enhance bacterial fitness in vivo with a concomitant increase in virulence during infections. As a consequence, strategies to minimize antibiotic resistance turn out to be not as simple as initially believed. Indeed, decreased antibiotic use may not be sufficient to let susceptible strains outcompete the resistant ones. Here, we put in perspective these findings and review alternative approaches, such as preventive and therapeutic anti-bacterial immunotherapies that have the potential to by-pass the classic antibiotics. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section Coronary ...

  7. [Plasma ionized magnesium concentration following cardiopulmonary bypass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Fukui, Michihiko; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Kooguchi, Kunihiko; Shimosato, Goshun

    2002-06-01

    We performed a retrospective study to analyze plasma ionized magnesium concentration following cardiopulmonary bypass. Severe decrease of ionized magnesium concentration associated with frequent abnormal ECG sign was found in a patient with magnesium-free cardioplegia. Cardioplegia containing 16 mmol.l-1 of magnesium ion maintained ionized magnesium concentration within normal ranges without postoperative magnesium loading. Use of cardioplegia containing magnesium or adequate magnesium supplement is thought to be essential for patients receiving cardiopulmonary bypass.

  8. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Seung Bum [Palo Alto, CA; Kim, Taeseok [San Jose, CA; Smith, David D [Campbell, CA; Cousins, Peter J [Menlo Park, CA

    2012-03-13

    Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

  9. Monsanto may bypass NIH in microbe test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Marjorie

    1985-01-11

    The Monsanto Company is planning to ask the Environmental Protection Agency for clearance to field test a genetically engineered microbial pesticide, bypassing the traditional approval process of the National Institutes of Health. Although only federally funded institutions are required to obtain NIH approval for genetic engineering tests, Monsanto is the first company to bypass the NIH regulatory process, which has become mired in a lawsuit brought by Jeremy Rifkin.

  10. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Threat Gonorrhea has progressively developed resistance to the antibiotic drugs prescribed to treat it. Following the spread ...

  11. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Work Contact Us ABOUT THE ISSUE What is Antibiotic Resistance? General Background Science of Resistance Glossary References ... for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance Project (ROAR) INTERNATIONAL CHAPTERS APUA Chapter Network ...

  12. [Simplified laparoscopic gastric bypass. Initial experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Miguelena, Luis; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Ríos-Cruz, Daniel; Marín-Domínguez, Raúl; Castillo-González, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Obesity surgery includes various gastrointestinal procedures. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the prototype of mixed procedures being the most practiced worldwide. A similar and novel technique has been adopted by Dr. Almino Cardoso Ramos and Dr. Manoel Galvao called "simplified bypass," which has been accepted due to the greater ease and very similar results to the conventional technique. The aim of this study is to describe the results of the simplified gastric bypass for treatment of morbid obesity in our institution. We performed a descriptive, retrospective study of all patients undergoing simplified gastric bypass from January 2008 to July 2012 in the obesity clinic of a private hospital in Mexico City. A total of 90 patients diagnosed with morbid obesity underwent simplified gastric bypass. Complications occurred in 10% of patients; these were more frequent bleeding and internal hernia. Mortality in the study period was 0%. The average weight loss at 12 months was 72.7%. Simplified gastric bypass surgery is safe with good mid-term results and a loss of adequate weight in 71% of cases.

  13. Know When Antibiotics Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-15

    This podcast provides a brief background about antibiotics and quick tips to help prevent antibiotic resistance.  Created: 4/15/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  14. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibiotic-associated colitis, which can occur after the antibiotic therapy upsets the balance of good and bad bacteria in your intestinal tract. Besides loose stools, C. difficile infection can ... and symptoms of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. These signs and symptoms are common ...

  15. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Sory Diarra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics in feed (growth promoters need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2,600 regulated chicken producers. There are several antibiotics approved as feed additives available for poultry farmers. Feed recipes and mixtures greatly vary geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While sporadic reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno

  16. BIOSYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF ANTIBIOTIC BATUMIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Klochko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Biosynthesis of antistaphylococcal antibiotic batumin under periodic conditions of Pseudomonas batumici growth has been studied. Antibiotic synthesis in fermenter occurred across the culture growth and achieved its maximal value after 50–55 hours. The active oxygen utilization by the producing strain was observed during 20–55 hours of fermentation with maximum after 40–45 hours. Antibiotic yield was 175–180 mg/l and depended on intensity of aeration. contrast to «freshly isolated» antibiotic after fermentation the long-term kept batumin has shown two identical by molecular mass peaks according to the chromato-mass spectrometric analysis. Taking into account of batumin molecule structure the conclusion has been made that the most probable isomerization type is keto-enolic tautomerism. At the same time batumin is diastereoisomer of kalimantacin A which has the same chemical structure. The optic rotation angle is [α]d25 = +56.3° for kalimantacin and [α]d25 = –13.5° for batumin. The simultaneous P. batumici growth and antibiotic biosynthesis and the ability of this molecule to optical isomerisation and keto-enolic forms formation allow us to suppose that batumin plays a certain role in metabolism of the producing strain.

  17. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Nikolaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given.

  18. Discovery and preclinical development of new antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Diarmaid; Karlén, Anders

    2014-05-01

    Antibiotics are the medical wonder of our age, but an increasing frequency of resistance among key pathogens is rendering them less effective. If this trend continues the consequences for cancer patients, organ transplant patients, and indeed the general community could be disastrous. The problem is complex, involving abuse and overuse of antibiotics (selecting for an increasing frequency of resistant bacteria), together with a lack of investment in discovery and development (resulting in an almost dry drug development pipeline). Remedial approaches to the problem should include taking measures to reduce the selective pressures for resistance development, and taking measures to incentivize renewed investment in antibiotic discovery and development. Bringing new antibiotics to the clinic is critical because this is currently the only realistic therapy that can ensure the level of infection control required for many medical procedures. Here we outline the complex process involved in taking a potential novel antibiotic from the initial discovery of a hit molecule, through lead and candidate drug development, up to its entry into phase I clinical trials. The stringent criteria that a successful drug must meet, balancing high efficacy in vivo against a broad spectrum of pathogens, with minimal liabilities against human targets, explain why even with sufficient investment this process is prone to a high failure rate. This emphasizes the need to create a well-funded antibiotic discovery and development pipeline that can sustain the continuous delivery of novel candidate drugs into clinical trials, to ensure the maintenance of the advanced medical procedures we currently take for granted.

  19. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  20. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty of Peripheral Bypass Stenoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoksbergen, Arjan W.J.; Legemate, Dink A.; Reekers, Jim A.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Jacobs, Michael J.H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the success of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in treating peripheral bypass stenoses. Methods: Patients who received a femoropopliteal or femorocrural bypass graft for limb ischemia were included in a duplex surveillance program. If duplex ultrasound revealed a short (<2 cm) severe (peak systolic velocity ratio ≥ 4.5) stenosis, patients were scheduled for arteriography and PTA. Fifty-eight peripheral bypass stenoses in 39 grafts in 37 patients were treated with PTA. The cumulative primary patency of treated stenoses was calculated. Results: During the first year after PTA 31 (53%) treated lesions remained patent, 15 (26%) lesions restenosed at a median interval of 5.0 (range 1-12) months and 4 (7%) bypasses occluded. The cumulative primary patency of 58 treated graft stenoses at 1 year was 60% [95% confidence interval (CI) 46%-74%] and 55% (95% CI 41%-70%) at 2 years. Graft body stenoses showed a better 2-year cumulative primary patency (86%; 95% CI 68%-100%) compared with juxta-anastomotic lesions (45%; 95% CI 29%-62%; p < 0.05). Conclusion: PTA is justifiable as the initial treatment of peripheral bypass stenoses. Nevertheless, the restenosis rate is rather high, especially in juxta-anastomotic lesions. Continuation of duplex surveillance after PTA and timely reintervention is recommended

  1. Doppler spectral characteristics of infrainguinal vein bypasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina G; von Jessen, F; Sillesen, H

    1993-01-01

    of arteriovenous fistulas the initially antegrade diastolic velocity was replaced by a retrograde flow within 3 months, whereas a forward flow in diastole was sustained in grafts with patent fistulas. Abnormal Duplex findings in 31 patients led to angiography and revision in 13 cases. Four revised grafts failed......, while nine remained patent at follow-up 1-12 months later. Ten (56%) of 18 non-revised bypasses with abnormal Duplex findings failed within 9 months compared to 1 (1%) of 76 bypasses with a normal velocity profile (p ... valuable information concerning haemodynamics of infrainguinal vein bypasses and identifies grafts at risk of thrombosis. Inclusion of low resistance index (detection of stenoses appears to improve the sensitivity of Duplex scanning....

  2. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Bypassing BDD Construction for Reliability Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Poul Frederick; Nikolskaia, Macha; Rauzy, Antoine

    2000-01-01

    In this note, we propose a Boolean Expression Diagram (BED)-based algorithm to compute the minimal p-cuts of boolean reliability models such as fault trees. BEDs make it possible to bypass the Binary Decision Diagram (BDD) construction, which is the main cost of fault tree assessment.......In this note, we propose a Boolean Expression Diagram (BED)-based algorithm to compute the minimal p-cuts of boolean reliability models such as fault trees. BEDs make it possible to bypass the Binary Decision Diagram (BDD) construction, which is the main cost of fault tree assessment....

  4. Bearing/Bypass Material-Testing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, John H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    System developed to test specimens in compression as well as tension while maintaining constant bearing/bypass ration. Test specimen with centrally located hole is clamped between two bearing-guide plates using one bolt. Bearing-guide plates then secured to two bearing-load cells. Test specimen independently loaded at both ends, using two separate control systems identified as applied and bypass. If two end loads unequal, difference between them reacted as bolt-bearing load on specimen. Throughout test, two control systems synchronized by common input signal (increasing voltage). As result, loads remain proportional as they increase.

  5. Demographics of antibiotic persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel; Steiner, Ulrich

    Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch...... cultures, rather than the individual level. Here, we used individual level bacteria data to confirm previous studies in how fast cells switch into a persistence stage, but our results challenge the fundamental idea that persistence comes with major costs of reduced growth (cell elongation) and division due...... even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed....

  6. [Antibiotic treatments in urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussade, H; Sunder, S; Bernard, L; Coloby, P; Guy, L; Karsenty, G; Bastide, C; Bruyère, F

    2013-11-01

    To define prescription modalities for the use of antibiotics in urology. A bibliographic research was performed using the MEDLINE database concerning all the antibiotics usable in urology. Treatments were classified by families; modes of action, indications in urology and adverse events have been detailed. Administrative files for commercial use have been consulted and associated with literature analysis. About 8 classes of antibiotics are usable in urology in a routine use. How they work, indications in urology and adverse events are discussed. Knowing that bacterial resistance to quinilones is increasing dramatically, it seems imperative to control the use of 8 classes of antibiotics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Antibiotics: Miracle Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-16

    The overuse of antibiotics has led to the development of resistance among bacteria, making antibiotics ineffective in treating certain conditions. This podcast discusses the importance of talking to your healthcare professional about whether or not antibiotics will be beneficial if you’ve been diagnosed with an infectious disease.  Created: 4/16/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  8. Variable volume combustor with an air bypass system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Ostebee, Heath Michael; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-02-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with flow of fuel and a flow of air in a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within a liner and an air bypass system position about the liner. The air bypass system variably allows a bypass portion of the flow of air to bypass the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  9. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to flow...

  10. Outcomes after off-pump coronary bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Diederik van

    2002-01-01

    The complications associated with in coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have led to a renewed interest in coronary bypass surgery on the beating heart. The primary objective of the Octopus Study was to compare cognitive outcome between patients randomized to

  11. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood or...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870.4250 Section 870.4250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4300 - Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit. 870.4300... bypass gas control unit. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit is a device used to control and measure the flow of gas into the oxygenator. The device is calibrated for a specific...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow. The...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545 Ventricular bypass (assist) device. (a) Identification. A ventricular bypass (assist) device is a device that assists...

  16. Handling Time-dependent Variables : Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Price, L. Silvia; Frencken, Jos F.; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods,

  17. A Survey of Cache Bypassing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparsh Mittal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With increasing core-count, the cache demand of modern processors has also increased. However, due to strict area/power budgets and presence of poor data-locality workloads, blindly scaling cache capacity is both infeasible and ineffective. Cache bypassing is a promising technique to increase effective cache capacity without incurring power/area costs of a larger sized cache. However, injudicious use of cache bypassing can lead to bandwidth congestion and increased miss-rate and hence, intelligent techniques are required to harness its full potential. This paper presents a survey of cache bypassing techniques for CPUs, GPUs and CPU-GPU heterogeneous systems, and for caches designed with SRAM, non-volatile memory (NVM and die-stacked DRAM. By classifying the techniques based on key parameters, it underscores their differences and similarities. We hope that this paper will provide insights into cache bypassing techniques and associated tradeoffs and will be useful for computer architects, system designers and other researchers.

  18. Analgesic Treatment in Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    This review aimed to present an overview of the randomized controlled trials investigating analgesic regimens used in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery. Literature search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE databases in August 2013 in accordance to PRISMA guidelines...... analgesic treatment in LRYGB surgery....

  19. Planetary science: Bypassing the habitable zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2017-08-01

    In our own solar system, Venus is too hot, Mars is too cold and Earth is just right. Simulations show that making an icy planet habitable is not as simple as melting its ice: many icy bodies swing from too cold to too hot, bypassing just right.

  20. Post-Bypass Extensive Ascites due to Splanchnic Bypass and the Effectiveness of Hyperalimentation Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel Temizkan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Reperfusion edema may develop in the early periods of chronic ischemic tissue reperfusion. Reperfusion edema may be represented after the splanchnic bypass with ascites, abdominal distension, and liver and kidney function impairment. In this article, we are reporting the hyperalimentation treatment and its results for the common ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, after a coeliac and superior mesenteric artery bypass. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(2.000: 124-128

  1. Antibiotic bonding to polytetrafluoroethylene with tridodecylmethylammonium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, R.A.; Alcid, D.V.; Greco, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) treated with the cationic surfactant, triodecylmethylammonium chloride (TDMAC), binds 14 C-penicillin (1.5 to 2 mg antibiotic/cm graft), whereas untreated PTFE or PTFE treated with anionic detergents shows little binding of antibiotic. TDMAC-treated PTFE concomitantly binds penicillin and heparin, generating a surface that potentially can resist both infection and thrombosis. The retention of these biologically active molecules is not due to passive entrapment in the PTFE but reflects an ionic interaction between the anionic ligands and surface-bound TDMAC. Penicillin bound to PTFE is not removed by exhaustive washing in aqueous buffers but is slowly released in the presence of plasma or when the PTFE is placed in a muscle pouch in the rat. Muscle tissue adjacent to the treated PTFE shows elevated levels of antibiotic following implantation. PTFE treated with TDMAC and placed in a muscle pouch binds 14 C-penicillin when it is locally irrigated with antibiotic or when penicillin is administered intravenously. Thus, the TDMAC surface treated either in vitro or in vivo with penicillin provides an effective in situ source for the timed release of antibiotic

  2. The future of antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to spread even as society is experiencing a market failure of new antibiotic research and development (R&D). Scientific, economic, and regulatory barriers all contribute to the antibiotic market failure. Scientific solutions to rekindle R&D include finding new screening strategies to identify novel antibiotic scaffolds and transforming the way we think about treating infections, such that the goal is to disarm the pathogen without killing it or modulate the host response to the organism without targeting the organism for destruction. Future economic strategies are likely to focus on ‘push’ incentives offered by public-private partnerships as well as increasing pricing by focusing development on areas of high unmet need. Such strategies can also help protect new antibiotics from overuse after marketing. Regulatory reform is needed to re-establish feasible and meaningful traditional antibiotic pathways, to create novel limited-use pathways that focus on highly resistant infections, and to harmonize regulatory standards across nations. We need new antibiotics with which to treat our patients. But we also need to protect those new antibiotics from misuse when they become available. If we want to break the cycle of resistance and change the current landscape, disruptive approaches that challenge long-standing dogma will be needed. PMID:25043962

  3. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  4. Actinomycetes: still a source of novel antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genilloud, Olga

    2017-10-18

    Covering: 2006 to 2017Actinomycetes have been, for decades, one of the most important sources for the discovery of new antibiotics with an important number of drugs and analogs successfully introduced in the market and still used today in clinical practice. The intensive antibacterial discovery effort that generated the large number of highly potent broad-spectrum antibiotics, has seen a dramatic decline in the large pharma industry in the last two decades resulting in a lack of new classes of antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action reaching the clinic. Whereas the decline in the number of new chemical scaffolds and the rediscovery problem of old known molecules has become a hurdle for industrial natural products discovery programs, new actinomycetes compounds and leads have continued to be discovered and developed to the preclinical stages. Actinomycetes are still one of the most important sources of chemical diversity and a reservoir to mine for novel structures that is requiring the integration of diverse disciplines. These can range from novel strategies to isolate species previously not cultivated, innovative whole cell screening approaches and on-site analytical detection and dereplication tools for novel compounds, to in silico biosynthetic predictions from whole gene sequences and novel engineered heterologous expression, that have inspired the isolation of new NPs and shown their potential application in the discovery of novel antibiotics. This review will address the discovery of antibiotics from actinomycetes from two different perspectives including: (1) an update of the most important antibiotics that have only reached the clinical development in the recent years despite their early discovery, and (2) an overview of the most recent classes of antibiotics described from 2006 to 2017 in the framework of the different strategies employed to untap novel compounds previously overlooked with traditional approaches.

  5. Novel TPP-riboswitch activators bypass metabolic enzyme dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lünse, Christina E; Scott, Fraser J; Suckling, Colin J; Mayer, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Riboswitches are conserved regions within mRNA molecules that bind specific metabolites and regulate gene expression. TPP-riboswitches, which respond to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), are involved in the regulation of thiamine metabolism in numerous bacteria. As these regulatory RNAs are often modulating essential biosynthesis pathways they have become increasingly interesting as promising antibacterial targets. Here, we describe thiamine analogs containing a central 1,2,3-triazole group to induce repression of thiM-riboswitch dependent gene expression in different E. coli strains. Additionally, we show that compound activation is dependent on proteins involved in the metabolic pathways of thiamine uptake and synthesis. The most promising molecule, triazolethiamine (TT), shows concentration dependent reporter gene repression that is dependent on the presence of thiamine kinase ThiK, whereas the effect of pyrithiamine (PT), a known TPP-riboswitch modulator, is ThiK independent. We further show that this dependence can be bypassed by triazolethiamine-derivatives that bear phosphate-mimicking moieties. As triazolethiamine reveals superior activity compared to pyrithiamine, it represents a very promising starting point for developing novel antibacterial compounds that target TPP-riboswitches. Riboswitch-targeting compounds engage diverse endogenous mechanisms to attain in vivo activity. These findings are of importance for the understanding of compounds that require metabolic activation to achieve effective riboswitch modulation and they enable the design of novel compound generations that are independent of endogenous activation mechanisms.

  6. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Basic Information Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea: An Overview Antibiotic resistance is the ...

  7. Appropriate Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Michael G; Heil, Emily L; Hayes, Bryan D

    2017-02-01

    Prescribing antibiotics is an essential component of initial therapy in sepsis. Early antibiotics are an important component of therapy, but speed of administration should not overshadow the patient-specific characteristics that determine the optimal breadth of antimicrobial therapy. Cultures should be drawn before antibiotic therapy if it does not significantly delay administration. Combination antibiotic therapy against gram-negative infections is not routinely required, and combination therapy involving vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam is associated with an increase in acute kidney injury. Emergency practitioners should be aware of special considerations in the administration and dosing of antibiotics in order to deliver optimal care to septic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Audiometric changes after coronary artery bypass graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorsandi M T

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hearing is one of the most significant senses; There fore, any defect can be frightening. The incidence of sever hearing loss following coronary artery bypass surgery has been estimated as one per thousand. This Prospective study carried out to determine hearing effects of coronary artery bypass surgery."nMethods: age, audiometric changes before and after surgery (hearing levels at multiple frequencies, speech reception threshold and speech discrimination score, minimum blood pressure during the operation, and the time on bypass, measured on One hundred consecutive patients who candidate for coronary artery bypass surgery and the results analysed."nResults: One hundred patients completed the tests. Based on hearing changes found on pre- and post-operative tests, the patients were divided into 3 groups: Those with no change (47 patients according to their audiometric results; those with slight changes ≤10 db (43 patients; and those having average deficits of more than 10 db (10 patients. All the patients were male. None of the patients had complete or severe sensorineural hearing loss. The third group had more prolonged pumping duration when compared with the others groups (p=0.002. Furthermore, 90 percent of patients with a sensorineural hearing loss more than 10 db had diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia as risk factors."nConclusion: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a sequela in patients who undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery; however, it was usually mild and asymptomatic. Pumping time during the operation is a significant factor in occurring of this complication. With proper treatment of underlying diseases and eliminating the risk factors with improvement of our cardiopulmonary pumps we probably can get better hearing results.

  9. Opportunities for synthetic biology in antibiotics: expanding glycopeptide chemical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaker, Maulik N; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-03-20

    Synthetic biology offers a new path for the exploitation and improvement of natural products to address the growing crisis in antibiotic resistance. All antibiotics in clinical use are facing eventual obsolesce as a result of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms, yet there are few new drug leads forthcoming from the pharmaceutical sector. Natural products of microbial origin have proven over the past 70 years to be the wellspring of antimicrobial drugs. Harnessing synthetic biology thinking and strategies can provide new molecules and expand chemical diversity of known antibiotic scaffolds to provide much needed new drug leads. The glycopeptide antibiotics offer paradigmatic scaffolds suitable for such an approach. We review these strategies here using the glycopeptides as an example and demonstrate how synthetic biology can expand antibiotic chemical diversity to help address the growing resistance crisis.

  10. Natural and engineered biosynthesis of nucleoside antibiotics in Actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenqing; Qi, Jianzhao; Wu, Pan; Wan, Dan; Liu, Jin; Feng, Xuan; Deng, Zixin

    2016-03-01

    Nucleoside antibiotics constitute an important family of microbial natural products bearing diverse bioactivities and unusual structural features. Their biosynthetic logics are unique with involvement of complex multi-enzymatic reactions leading to the intricate molecules from simple building blocks. Understanding how nature builds this family of antibiotics in post-genomic era sets the stage for rational enhancement of their production, and also paves the way for targeted persuasion of the cell factories to make artificial designer nucleoside drugs and leads via synthetic biology approaches. In this review, we discuss the recent progress and perspectives on the natural and engineered biosynthesis of nucleoside antibiotics.

  11. Antibiotic interaction with phospholipid monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambinossi, F.; Mecheri, B.; Caminati, G.; Nocentini, M.; Puggelli, M.; Gabrielli, G

    2002-12-01

    We studied the interactions of tetracycline (TC) antibiotic molecules with phospholipid monolayers with the two-fold aim of elucidating the mechanism of action and providing a first step for the realization of bio-mimetic sensors for such drugs by means of the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. We examined spreading monolayers of three phospholipids in the presence of tetracycline in the subphase by means of surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms as a function of bulk pH. We selected phospholipids with hydrophobic chains of the same length but polar head groups differing either in dimensions and protonation equilibria, i.e. dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) and dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid (DPPA). The interaction of tetracycline with the three phospholipids was found to be highly dependent on the electric charge of the antibiotic and on the ionization state of the lipid. Significant interactions are established between the negatively charged form of dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid and the zwitterionic form of tetracycline. The drug was found to migrate at the interface where it is adsorbed underneath or/and among the head groups, depending on the surface pressure of the film, whereas penetration through the hydrophobic layer was excluded for all the three phospholipids.

  12. Solving the Antibiotic Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gerard D

    2015-02-13

    Antibiotics are essential for both treating and preventing infectious diseases. Paradoxically, despite their importance as pillars of modern medicine, we are in danger of losing antibiotics because of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms throughout all pathogenic microbes. This fact, coupled with an inability to bring new drugs to market at a pace that matches resistance, has resulted in a crisis of global proportion. Solving this crisis requires the actions of many stakeholders, but chemists, chemical biologists, and microbiologists must drive the scientific innovation that is required to maintain our antibiotic arsenal. This innovation requires (1) a deep understanding of the evolution and reservoirs of resistance; (2) full knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic action and resistance; (3) the discovery of chemical and genetic probes of antibiotic action and resistance; (4) the integration of systems biology into antibiotic discovery; and (5) the discovery of new antimicrobial chemical matter. Addressing these pressing scientific gaps will ensure that we can meet the antibiotic crisis with creativity and purpose.

  13. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  15. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  16. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This

  17. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  18. Waking up the gastric bypass patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, D A

    1997-08-01

    Waking up the gastric bypass patient in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) is a continual challenge. From January 1992 to November 1996, 961 gastric bypasses (GBP) have been performed at Columbia St Mark's Hospital. Of the 961 patients, 957 came to the PACU. Four patients went directly to ICU because of respiratory status requiring mechanical ventilation. There have been no deaths and no respiratory arrests in PACU. Continuous bedside monitoring of the patient's respiratory status coupled with pain management contributed to positive care of the GBP patient. Methods of care for the GBP patient include the use of O2 masks and cannulas, coughing and deep breathing, administering i.v. narcotics until patient controlled analgesia pumps are initiated, encouragement and emotional support, ongoing assessment of patients' status, and treating problems/needs appropriately.

  19. Antibiotics for uncomplicated diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel M; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Diverticulitis is an inflammatory complication to the very common condition diverticulosis. Uncomplicated diverticulitis has traditionally been treated with antibiotics with reference to the microbiology, extrapolation from trials on complicated intra-abdominal infections and clinical experience....

  20. High Antibiotic Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; José Rabanaque, María; Feja, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    as their exposure to antibiotics. Data on outpatient prescribing of antimicrobials (ATC J01) in 2010 were obtained from a prescription database covering Aragón (northeastern Spain). The antimicrobial consumption at the individual level was analysed both according to the volume of DDD and the number of packages...... purchased per year. Heavy antibiotic users were identified according to Lorenz curves and characterized by age, gender, and their antimicrobial prescription profile. Lorenz curves demonstrated substantial differences in the individual use of antimicrobials. Heavy antibiotic users (5% of individuals...... with highest consumption) were responsible for 21% of the total DDD consumed and received ≥6 packages per year. Elderly adults (≥60 years) and small children (0-9 years) were those exposed to the highest volume of antibiotics and with the most frequent exposure, respectively. Heavy users received a high...

  1. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really ...

  2. Hypothenar hammer syndrome and basilic bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, R K; Phair, J; Oza, P; Patel, M; Balar, N

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of hypothenar hammer syndrome. The case presents necessary diagnostic measures and discusses the etiology of this syndrome. Additionally, the case reviews treatments, which culminated in the eventual use of ulnar artery bypass with autogenous basilica vein to treat and resolve the ischemic fingers of the patient. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Interposition vein cuff in infrainguinal prosthetic bypasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, V; Biancari, F; Catania, A; Di Matteo, F M; Sorrenti, S; Spyrou, M; Dibra, A; Foti, N; Ortensi, A

    1999-01-01

    The Authors describe the interposition vein cuff technique as an adjuvant method to infrainguinal prosthetic bypass grafts. The haemodynamic, mechanical and humoral factors thought to be involved in the beneficial effects of the vein cuff are herein discussed. The results of the main series suggest the use of this method particularly in patients without any available autologous vein conduit requiring a below-knee popliteal or crural reconstruction.

  4. Perception of acceptable antibiotic stewardship strategies in outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauffrey, V; Kivits, J; Pulcini, C; Boivin, J M

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are still often inappropriately prescribed in France despite specific measures being taken for over 10years. The 25% decrease in antibiotic prescription advocated in the 2011-2016 National Antibiotic Plan seems difficult to achieve. One of the strategies currently considered in France is the use of a specific prescription form dedicated to antibiotics, with an educational message for patients. We aimed to evaluate the acceptability - by primary care prescribers - of this measure and to evaluate their perception of other antibiotic stewardship strategies. Qualitative study conducted among family physicians, pediatricians, dermatologists, dentists, and ENT specialists using semi-structured interviews. A thematic and framework analysis was then performed. Thirty prescribing physicians practicing in a specific region of France were included in the study. The dedicated prescription form for antibiotics was deemed excessive and questionable. Other measures, not directly targeting prescribers, were rather well perceived: the unit sales of antibiotics, the restricted reporting of susceptibility tests, or the limitation of the number of molecules available in outpatient settings. The results of this exploratory study may guide the national antibiotic stewardship policy in France. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  5. [Hemorheological changes during mammary coronary bypass grafting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Iu A; Roĭtman, E V; Charnaia, M A

    2004-01-01

    Hemorheological studies were performed in 44 patients subjected to mammary coronary bypass surgery during induction of anesthesia, at initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass, at the end of operation, on the 1(st) and 2(nd) or 3(rd) postoperative day. Methods included determination of whole blood and plasma viscosity with estimation of suspension stability and calculation of Caisson viscosity and fluidity limit. Rigidometry was used for assessment times of linear (T(1)) and three dimensional (T(2)) aggregates formation, final aggregates dimensions, total hydrodynamic strength of aggregates (beta), index of strength of especially large aggregates. Indexes of aggregation and deformation of erythrocytes were also calculated. Cardiopulmonary bypass was associated with lengthening of T(1) and shortening of T(2), increase of aggregates dimension and their hydrodynamic strength beta and lowering deformability of erythrocytes. By the end of operation increase of difference between Caisson and asymptotic viscosity was noted. Postoperative period was characterized by improvement of deformability of erythrocytes, prolongation of T(2), increases of aggregates dimension, their hydrodynamic strength beta, and fluidity limit. Thus measures of intensive therapy should be directed at correction of disturbances of rheological properties of blood with consideration of their changes specific for cardiosurgical patients.

  6. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hee Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST, clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care, the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing. The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  7. Synthetic biology era: Improving antibiotic's world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Trampe, Silvia; Ceapa, Corina D; Manzo-Ruiz, Monserrat; Sánchez, Sergio

    2017-06-15

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogen microorganisms is problematic in the context of the current spectrum of available medication. The poor specificity and the high toxicity of some available molecules have made imperative the search for new strategies to improve the specificity and to pursue the discovery of novel compounds with increased bioactivity. Using living cells as platforms, synthetic biology has counteracted this problem by offering novel pathways to create synthetic systems with improved and desired functions. Among many other biotechnological approaches, the advances in synthetic biology have made it possible to design and construct novel biological systems in order to look for new drugs with increased bioactivity. Advancements have also been made in the redesigning of RNA and DNA molecules in order to engineer antibiotic clusters for antibiotic overexpression. As for the production of these antibacterial compounds, yeasts and filamentous fungi as well as gene therapy are utilized to enhance protein solubility. Specific delivery is achieved by creating chimeras using plant genes into bacterial hosts. Some of these synthetic systems are currently in clinical trials, proving the proficiency of synthetic biology in terms of both pharmacological activities as well as an increase in the biosafety of treatments. It is possible that we may just be seeing the tip of the iceberg, and synthetic biology applications will overpass expectations beyond our present knowledge. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Building and Application of Cardiopulmonary Bypass Model in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To build a cardiopulmonary bypass model in rats, and research the feasibility. Method Cardiopulmonary bypass was built in 10 adult male SD rats of clean grade through intubation in jugular vein, caudal artery, and femoral artery, and bypass was sustained for 60 min at the flow rate of 100ml/(kg•min to monitor heart rate, blood pressure, blood gas, and electrolyte. Result Puncture succeeded in all the 20 rats, and cardiopulmonary bypass was finished under given conditions. Conclusion The model has the following advantages, economical efficiency, simplicity, minimal invasion, cardiopulmonary bypass parameter setting similar to that of clinical trail, high rate of success. Thus, it is reliable for researching pathological and physiological changes after cardiopulmonary bypass and evaluating therapeutic strategy.

  9. Renal tubular acidosis secondary to jejunoileal bypass for morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B; Ladefoged, Jens; Thorup, Jørgen Mogens

    1985-01-01

    Renal handling of acid and base was studied in patients with persistent metabolic acidosis 3-9 years after jejunoileal bypass for morbid obesity. Excretion of acid was studied before and after intravenous infusion of NH4Cl and excretion of bicarbonate after infusion of NaHCO3. Bypass patients...... groups. Fractional loss of bicarbonate in urine was higher in controls than in bypass patients. The renal impairment is classified as distal renal tubular acidosis....

  10. Renal tubular acidosis secondary to jejunoileal bypass for morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B; Ladefoged, Jens; Thorup, Jørgen Mogens

    1985-01-01

    Renal handling of acid and base was studied in patients with persistent metabolic acidosis 3-9 years after jejunoileal bypass for morbid obesity. Excretion of acid was studied before and after intravenous infusion of NH4Cl and excretion of bicarbonate after infusion of NaHCO3. Bypass patients sho...... groups. Fractional loss of bicarbonate in urine was higher in controls than in bypass patients. The renal impairment is classified as distal renal tubular acidosis....

  11. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    RESONANCE. February 2015. GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule ..... Resonance Energy. Transfer (FRET) is an elegant technique to measure the distance between a donor and an acceptor molecule. FRET refers to the.

  12. Molecule of the Month.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. Corannulene - A Bucky Bowl. H Surya Prakash Rao. The structure, properties and synthesis of a bowl shaped molecule, which resembles a fragment of fullerene, are described here. Chemistry of aromatic molecules has a long history. Many molecules made up of multiple benzene-like rings have ...

  13. Heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    A heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The bypass system operates to pass strong solution from the generator around the heat exchanger to the absorber of the absorption refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator above a selected level indicative of solidification of strong solution in the heat exchanger or other such blockage. The bypass system includes a bypass line with a gooseneck located in the generator for controlling flow of strong solution into the bypass line and for preventing refrigerant vapor in the generator from entering the bypass line during normal operation of the refrigeration system. Also, the bypass line includes a trap section filled with liquid for providing a barrier to maintain the normal pressure difference between the generator and the absorber even when the gooseneck of the bypass line is exposed to refrigerant vapor in the generator. Strong solution, which may accumulate in the trap section of the bypass line, is diluted, to prevent solidification, by supplying weak solution to the trap section from a purge system for the absorption refrigeration system.

  14. Bypassing the Kohn-Sham equations with machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockherde, Felix; Vogt, Leslie; Li, Li; Tuckerman, Mark E; Burke, Kieron; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2017-10-11

    Last year, at least 30,000 scientific papers used the Kohn-Sham scheme of density functional theory to solve electronic structure problems in a wide variety of scientific fields. Machine learning holds the promise of learning the energy functional via examples, bypassing the need to solve the Kohn-Sham equations. This should yield substantial savings in computer time, allowing larger systems and/or longer time-scales to be tackled, but attempts to machine-learn this functional have been limited by the need to find its derivative. The present work overcomes this difficulty by directly learning the density-potential and energy-density maps for test systems and various molecules. We perform the first molecular dynamics simulation with a machine-learned density functional on malonaldehyde and are able to capture the intramolecular proton transfer process. Learning density models now allows the construction of accurate density functionals for realistic molecular systems.Machine learning allows electronic structure calculations to access larger system sizes and, in dynamical simulations, longer time scales. Here, the authors perform such a simulation using a machine-learned density functional that avoids direct solution of the Kohn-Sham equations.

  15. How to discover new antibiotics: harvesting the parvome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Julian

    2011-02-01

    There is a dire need for new antibiotics; commercial discovery programs have essentially dried up and there is talk of 'a return to the pre-antibiotic era'. Natural products are an inexhaustible source of bioactive compounds (antibiotics among them), and recent technical advances such as DNA sequencing and bioinformatics offer new approaches to small molecule discovery. Given that nucleotide sequence studies of actinomycetes genomes reveal the presence of 20 or more pathways for the synthesis of bioactive compounds, 'mining' these sequences offers the potential of expanding the repertoire of antibiotics and other drugs. Combined with advanced chemical separation and characterization techniques, the construction of large chemically diverse libraries of bioactive compounds for therapeutic applications is a realistic near-term goal. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  17. Indications and Outcomes of Prophylactic and Therapeutic Extracranial-to-intracranial Arterial Bypass for Cerebral Revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Gazyakan, MD, MSc

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: The collaboration of neurosurgeons and plastic surgeons in performing EC-IC bypass can result in excellent outcomes with a high bypass patency rate and few complications, particularly for prophylactic EC-IC bypass.

  18. Impossible Airway Requiring Venovenous Bypass for Tracheostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnathan Gardes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The elective surgical airway is the definitive management for a tracheal stenotic lesion that is not a candidate for tracheal resection, or who has failed multiple-tracheal dilations. This case report details the management of a patient who has failed an elective awake tracheostomy secondary to the inability to be intubated as well as severe scar tissue at the surgical site. A combination of regional anesthesia and venovenous bypass is used to facilitate the surgical airway management of this patient. Cerebral oximetry and a multidisciplinary team approach aid in early detection of an oxygenation issue, as well as the emergent intervention that preserved this patient’s life.

  19. Work on the Geneva motorway bypass

    CERN Multimedia

    État de Genève, DCTI, Direction du génie civil

    2006-01-01

    Work on the airport section of the Geneva motorway bypass is continuing and will require the temporary closure of two sliproads allowing traffic to make a U-turn near the airport and the Palexpo exhibition centre. The sliproads on the French and Lausanne sides will be closed until autumn 2006. U-turns will still be possible via clearly marked deviations. For further information: www.autoroute-aeroport.ch We would like to thank you in advance for your understanding. Civil Engineering Department, DCTI, State of Geneva

  20. Biosynthetic Genes for the Tetrodecamycin Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gverzdys, Tomas; Nodwell, Justin R

    2016-07-15

    We recently described 13-deoxytetrodecamycin, a new member of the tetrodecamycin family of antibiotics. A defining feature of these molecules is the presence of a five-membered lactone called a tetronate ring. By sequencing the genome of a producer strain, Streptomyces sp. strain WAC04657, and searching for a gene previously implicated in tetronate ring formation, we identified the biosynthetic genes responsible for producing 13-deoxytetrodecamycin (the ted genes). Using the ted cluster in WAC04657 as a reference, we found related clusters in three other organisms: Streptomyces atroolivaceus ATCC 19725, Streptomyces globisporus NRRL B-2293, and Streptomyces sp. strain LaPpAH-202. Comparing the four clusters allowed us to identify the cluster boundaries. Genetic manipulation of the cluster confirmed the involvement of the ted genes in 13-deoxytetrodecamycin biosynthesis and revealed several additional molecules produced through the ted biosynthetic pathway, including tetrodecamycin, dihydrotetrodecamycin, and another, W5.9, a novel molecule. Comparison of the bioactivities of these four molecules suggests that they may act through the covalent modification of their target(s). The tetrodecamycins are a distinct subgroup of the tetronate family of secondary metabolites. Little is known about their biosynthesis or mechanisms of action, making them an attractive subject for investigation. In this paper we present the biosynthetic gene cluster for 13-deoxytetrodecamycin in Streptomyces sp. strain WAC04657. We identify related clusters in several other organisms and show that they produce related molecules. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons are summarized. A brief history of the subject is given, and a few good candidates are discussed. Some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states are studied. It is shown that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches. A few more recent molecule candidates which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures are also discussed. (author). 50 refs

  2. Coupling of mRNA Structure Rearrangement to Ribosome Movement during Bypassing of Non-coding Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Coakley, Arthur; O'Connor, Michelle; Petrov, Alexey; O'Leary, Seán E; Atkins, John F; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2015-11-19

    Nearly half of the ribosomes translating a particular bacteriophage T4 mRNA bypass a region of 50 nt, resuming translation 3' of this gap. How this large-scale, specific hop occurs and what determines whether a ribosome bypasses remain unclear. We apply single-molecule fluorescence with zero-mode waveguides to track individual Escherichia coli ribosomes during translation of T4's gene 60 mRNA. Ribosomes that bypass are characterized by a 10- to 20-fold longer pause in a non-canonical rotated state at the take-off codon. During the pause, mRNA secondary structure rearrangements are coupled to ribosome forward movement, facilitated by nascent peptide interactions that disengage the ribosome anticodon-codon interactions for slippage. Close to the landing site, the ribosome then scans mRNA in search of optimal base-pairing interactions. Our results provide a mechanistic and conformational framework for bypassing, highlighting a non-canonical ribosomal state to allow for mRNA structure refolding to drive large-scale ribosome movements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Improving antibiotic use in daily hospital practice : The antibiotic checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daalen, F.V.

    2018-01-01

    Better use of current antibiotic agents is necessary to help control antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) are introduced to coordinate activities to measure and improve appropriate antibiotic use in daily hospital practice. This thesis shows how the introduction of

  4. Dacron or PTFE for above-knee femoropopliteal bypass. a multicenter randomised study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L P; Lepäntalo, M; Fossdal, J E

    2007-01-01

    To compare polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and polyester grafts (Dacron) for above knee femoropopliteal bypass.......To compare polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and polyester grafts (Dacron) for above knee femoropopliteal bypass....

  5. A Case of Severe Accidental Hypothermia Successfully Treated with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erfun M. Hatam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After missing for seven days, a 34-year-old female was found with a rectal temperature of 19.8oC. Instead of attempting aggressive rewarming in the emergency department she was directly transferred to the operating room for extracorporeal rewarming. She received cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB for 66 minutes at an initial warming rate of 12oC/ hour and warmed to 36.2oC. Her postoperative course was complicated by sepsis, which eventually led to bilateral below-knee amputations after refusing antibiotics. She was discharged 22 days after admission, with full neurologic recovery. This remarkable case highlights the emerging role of CPB as the definitive therapy for severe accidental hypothermia.

  6. Reverse bias protected solar array with integrated bypass battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for protecting the photovoltaic cells in a photovoltaic (PV) array from reverse bias damage by utilizing a rechargeable battery for bypassing current from a shaded photovoltaic cell or group of cells, avoiding the need for a bypass diode. Further, the method mitigates the voltage degradation of a PV array caused by shaded cells.

  7. The laparoscopic banded gastric bypass – operation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Küsters

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The banded Roux-en-Y gastric bypass can be used as a primary or revisionary bariatric procedure. This article describesthe operation technique including materials, size and placement of the banding and gives an overview con cerningevolution and indications of the operation. A video of a primary banded Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is presented.

  8. Diagnostic tools for post-gastric bypass hypoglycaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emous, M.; Ubels, F. L.; van Beek, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of its evident success, several late complications can occur after gastric bypass surgery. One of these is post-gastric bypass hypoglycaemia. No evidence-based guidelines exist in the literature on how to confirm the presence of this syndrome. This study aims to describe and compare the

  9. Outcomes of coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Louise Hawkes

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Anna Louise Hawkes1,3, Madeleine Nowak1, Benjamin Bidstrup2, Richard Speare11School of Public Health, Tropical, Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia (3Currently Queensland Cancer Fund; 2John Flynn Hospital, Gold Coast, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: This review article summarizes the major studies that have investigated the outcomes of coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG. The article includes a review of the literature in the areas of: history of CABG; indications for CABG; and measurement of quality of life following CABG, including prolongation of life, physical functioning (ie, relief from angina and dyspnea, physical activity, as well as complications of surgery and re-hospitalization, psychological functioning, and social functioning. Overall, the literature demonstrates that the outcomes of CABG have historically been measured in terms of mortality and morbidity; however, it has now been well recognized that adjustment to CABG is a multidimensional phenomenon that is not fully explained by medical factors. Therefore, in addition to studying mortality and morbidity outcomes following CABG, many recent studies have identified that it is important to investigate various physical, psychological, and social variables that have a significant impact on post-operative adjustment to CABG. Keywords: coronary artery bypass graft surgery, outcomes, quality of life, recovery

  10. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  11. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have emerged not only in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic “attack” is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. “Survival of the fittest” is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  12. Antibiotic resistance in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vo, A.T.T.

    2007-01-01

    Immediately after their introduction in the beginning of the fourties of the previous century, the agents used to combat infectious diseases caused by bacteria were regarded with suspicion, but not long thereafter antibiotics had the status of miracle drugs. For decades mankind has lived under the

  13. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from environmental

  14. Antibiotics in laboratory medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lorian, Victor

    2005-01-01

    ... in critical articles and reviews. Materials appearing in this book prepared by individuals as part of their official duties as U.S. government employees are not covered by the above-mentioned copyright. Printed in the USA Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Antibiotics in laboratory medicine / [edited by] Victor Lorian. - 5th ed...

  15. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibiotic therapy of cholera*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbaum, John; Greenough, William B.; Islam, M. R.

    1967-01-01

    Recent clinical trials having established the value of tetracycline as an adjunct to fluid and electrolyte replacement in cholera treatment, a controlled trial of antibiotic therapy was conducted in Dacca on 318 adults hospitalized for cholera. The effects of 4 antibiotics orally administered in varying dosage schedules were studied. Cholera therapy with tetracycline or chloramphenicol caused a highly significant reduction in the duration of diarrhoea and of positive culture, in stool volume, and in intravenous fluid requirement as compared with the results in controls who received intravenous fluid therapy only. Streptomycin was also effective, but to a lesser degree; paromomycin was of little value. The severity of dehydration on admission was significantly related to subsequent duration of diarrhoea regardless of whether antibiotics were given. Increasing age was associated with more prolonged purging in patients receiving antibiotics. Increasing the dose of tetracycline to 2 to 3 times that usually administered, or prolonging treatment from 2 to 4 days, did not enhance the therapeutic results. The effect of tetracycline was apparent within a few hours of administration. Bacteriological relapses were seen after discontinuation of therapy in all treatment groups, but were not due to the development of resistant bacteria. PMID:4865453

  17. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from

  18. Antibiotic Resistance in Foodborne Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Ciara; Duffy, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Wide-spread antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens is now a serious public health issue and multi-antibiotic resistance has been reported in many foodborne pathogens including Salmonella and E. coli. A study to determine antibiotic resistance profiles of a range of Salmonella and Verocytotoxigenic E.coli (VTEC) isolated from Irish foods revealed significant levels of antibiotic resistance in the strains. S. typhimurium DT104 were multiantibiotic resistant with 97% resistant to 7 anti...

  19. Obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in women following gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berlac, Janne Foss; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Lidegaard, Ojvind

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in women following gastric bypass, compared with adipose women without surgery and with a normal weight control population. DESIGN: Historical controlled cohort study. SETTING: Denmark. POPULATION: All women undergoing gastric bypass during...... the period 1996-2011, and subsequently giving birth. METHODS AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in women without gastric bypass matched on age, parity, plurality, year, and body mass index, and normal weight women. RESULTS: In 415 women giving birth after gastric bypass we found...... more admissions to neonatal intensive care unit compared with newborn of normal weight mothers; RR = 1.5 (1.1-2.0). CONCLUSIONS: Gastric bypass may reduce the risk of preeclampsia, emergency cesarean section, and perinatal asphyxia, compared with adipose women without surgery. Compared with normal...

  20. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126 ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  1. When and How to Take Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us General Background: When & How to take Antibiotics When should you take antibiotics? What is the proper dosage? How safe are antibiotics? How does a physician decide which antibiotic to ...

  2. Antibiotics for leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett-Major, David M; Coldren, Rodney

    2012-02-15

    Leptospirosis has a wide-ranging clinical and public health impact. Leptospira are globally distributed. Case attack rates are as high as 1:4 to 2:5 persons in exposed populations. In some settings mortality has exceeded 10% of infected people. The benefit of antibiotic therapy in the disease has been unclear. We sought to characterise the risks and benefits associated with use of antibiotic therapy in the management of leptospirosis. We searched the The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded regardless of study language. This was augmented by a manual search. The last date of search was November, 2011. To be included in assessment of benefits, trials had to specifically assess the use of antibiotics in a randomised clinical trial. A broad range of study types were incorporated to seek potential harms. Included trials were systematically abstracted, as were excluded studies for the purposes of assessing harms. Analyses were conducted in accordance with The Cochrane Handbook and practices of The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group. Seven randomised trials were included.  Four trials with 403 patients compared an antibiotic with placebo or no intervention. Three trials compared at least one antibiotic regimen with another antibiotic regimen. The trials all had high risk of bias. The trials varied in the severity of leptospirosis among trial patients. The ability to group data for meta-analysis was limited. While all four trials that compared antibiotics with placebo reported mortality and used parenteral penicillin, there were no deaths in two of them. Since odds ratio calculations cannot employ zero-event trials, only two trials contributed to this estimate. The number of deaths were 16/200 (8.0%) in the antibiotic arm versus 11/203 (5.4%) in the placebo arm giving a fixed-effect OR 1.56 (95% CI 0.70 to 3.46). The

  3. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule spectroscopy. (SMS), confocal microscopy,. FCS, sm-FRET, FLIM. 1 High-resolution spectrum re- fers to a spectrum consisting of very sharp lines. The sharp lines clearly display transitions to ...

  4. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre-, and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm, and virulence), and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment.

  5. Antibiotic Alternatives: The Substitution of Antibiotics in Animal Husbandry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyue eCheng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could relly replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre- and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm and virulence, and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment.

  6. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-05-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed.

  7. Environmental pollution by antibiotics and by antibiotic resistance determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Jose Luis

    2009-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most successful drugs used for human therapy. However, since they can challenge microbial populations, they must be considered as important pollutants as well. Besides being used for human therapy, antibiotics are extensively used for animal farming and for agricultural purposes. Residues from human environments and from farms may contain antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes that can contaminate natural environments. The clearest consequence of antibiotic release in natural environments is the selection of resistant bacteria. The same resistance genes found at clinical settings are currently disseminated among pristine ecosystems without any record of antibiotic contamination. Nevertheless, the effect of antibiotics on the biosphere is wider than this and can impact the structure and activity of environmental microbiota. Along the article, we review the impact that pollution by antibiotics or by antibiotic resistance genes may have for both human health and for the evolution of environmental microbial populations. - The article reviews the current knowledge on the effects that pollution by antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes may have for the microbiosphere.

  8. Environmental pollution by antibiotics and by antibiotic resistance determinants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jose Luis, E-mail: jlmtnez@cnb.csic.e [Departamento de Biotecnologia Microbiana, Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, and CIBERESP (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    Antibiotics are among the most successful drugs used for human therapy. However, since they can challenge microbial populations, they must be considered as important pollutants as well. Besides being used for human therapy, antibiotics are extensively used for animal farming and for agricultural purposes. Residues from human environments and from farms may contain antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes that can contaminate natural environments. The clearest consequence of antibiotic release in natural environments is the selection of resistant bacteria. The same resistance genes found at clinical settings are currently disseminated among pristine ecosystems without any record of antibiotic contamination. Nevertheless, the effect of antibiotics on the biosphere is wider than this and can impact the structure and activity of environmental microbiota. Along the article, we review the impact that pollution by antibiotics or by antibiotic resistance genes may have for both human health and for the evolution of environmental microbial populations. - The article reviews the current knowledge on the effects that pollution by antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes may have for the microbiosphere.

  9. Putrescine reduces antibiotic-induced oxidative stress as a mechanism of modulation of antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Valvano, Miguel A

    2014-07-01

    Communication of antibiotic resistance among bacteria via small molecules is implicated in transient reduction of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics, which could lead to therapeutic failures aggravating the problem of antibiotic resistance. Released putrescine from the extremely antibiotic-resistant bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia protects less-resistant cells from different species against the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B (PmB). Exposure of B. cenocepacia to sublethal concentrations of PmB and other bactericidal antibiotics induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and expression of the oxidative stress response regulator OxyR. We evaluated whether putrescine alleviates antibiotic-induced oxidative stress. The accumulation of intracellular ROS, such as superoxide ion and hydrogen peroxide, was assessed fluorometrically with dichlorofluorescein diacetate, while the expression of OxyR and putrescine synthesis enzymes was determined in luciferase assays using chromosomal promoter-lux reporter system fusions. We evaluated wild-type and isogenic deletion mutant strains with defects in putrescine biosynthesis after exposure to sublethal concentrations of PmB and other bactericidal antibiotics. Exogenous putrescine protected against oxidative stress induced by PmB and other antibiotics, whereas reduced putrescine synthesis resulted in increased ROS generation and a parallel increased sensitivity to PmB. Of the 3 B. cenocepacia putrescine-synthesizing enzymes, PmB induced only BCAL2641, an ornithine decarboxylase. This study reveals BCAL2641 as a critical component of the putrescine-mediated communication of antibiotic resistance and as a plausible target for designing inhibitors that would block the communication of such resistance among different bacteria, ultimately reducing the window of therapeutic failure in treating bacterial infections. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Colistin: Revival of an Old Polymyxin Antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkmans, Anneke C; Wilms, Erik B; Kamerling, Ingrid M C; Birkhoff, Willem; Ortiz-Zacarías, Natalia V; van Nieuwkoop, Cees; Verbrugh, Henri A; Touw, Daan J

    2015-08-01

    Colistin (polymyxin E) is a positively charged deca-peptide antibiotic that disrupts the integrity of the outer membrane of the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria by binding to the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharides, resulting in cell death. The endotoxic activity of lipopolysaccharides is simultaneously inhibited. Colistin is increasingly being prescribed as rescue treatment for infections with multidrug-resistant bacilli. Nephrotoxicity and, to a lesser degree, neurotoxicity occur often during systemic colistin therapy, and have severely limited its application in the past. However, these side effects are largely reversible and can be managed through close monitoring. The prodrug colistimethate sodium (CMS) is less toxic and is, therefore, the preferred formulation for parenteral administration. Importantly, resistance to colistin seems to emerge often unless it is combined with another antibiotic, but further studies into this phenomenon are necessary. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties have received little attention, partly because of the physicochemical peculiarities of polymyxin antibiotics, especially their propensity to stick to other molecules and surfaces. The ratio between the area under the curve of free colistin and the pathogen's Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) best predicts microbiological and clinical responses, but more studies are needed in this area. Likewise, further standardization is needed in production and labeling of colistin formulations, and in the way the susceptibility of bacteria to colistin is determined.

  11. Mycobacterium infection from a cardiopulmonary bypass heater-cooler unit in a patient with steroid-induced immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Landolfo, Kevin; Renew, Johnathan R

    2017-05-01

    To present a case of mycobacterium infection transmitted through a heater-cooler unit during cardiac bypass surgery. A 63-yr-old woman with a past medical history of aortic coarctation repair in 1963 and a mechanical aortic valve replacement in 2010 was prescribed antibiotics and steroids at an outpatient care facility in September 2015 for symptoms of an upper respiratory tract infection. Four months later, she developed malaise and intermittent fever with anemia and acute kidney dysfunction. Extensive evaluation revealed negative blood cultures but was suggestive of amyloidosis. The patient was therefore started on systemic steroids prior to being referred to us.At our institution, transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging revealed a normal mechanical aortic prosthesis with an aortic root abscess. The patient was started on empiric antibiotics for endocarditis. Renal biopsy revealed interstitial nephritis with one granuloma for which she was again started on high-dose steroids. The patient continued to deteriorate, with worsening renal function and pancytopenia that required daily red blood cell and platelet transfusions.Three weeks into this hospitalization, her blood cultures were reported to be positive for Mycobacterium chimera, and she was started on a four-drug regimen of rifampin, rifabutin, ethambutol, and clarithromycin, with dramatic clinical improvement. Heater-cooler units manufactured by LivaNova prior to September 2014 and used during cardiopulmonary bypass have been linked to M. chimera, which causes a latent infection that may be activated and become disseminated in cases of immunosuppression related to steroid use.

  12. Making Pure Science and Pure Politics: On the Expertise of Bypass and the Bypass of Expertise

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konopásek, Z.; Stöckelová, Tereza; Zamykalová, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2008), s. 529-553 ISSN 0162-2439 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OK459 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505; CEZ:AV0Z90090514 Keywords : expertise * politics * highway bypass Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 1.926, year: 2008 http:// sth .sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/33/4/529

  13. Antibiotic use and microbiome function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Manuel; Méndez-García, Celia; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Moya, Andrés

    2017-06-15

    Our microbiome should be understood as one of the most complex components of the human body. The use of β-lactam antibiotics is one of the microbiome covariates that influence its composition. The extent to which our microbiota changes after an antibiotic intervention depends not only on the chemical nature of the antibiotic or cocktail of antibiotics used to treat specific infections, but also on the type of administration, duration and dose, as well as the level of resistance that each microbiota develops. We have begun to appreciate that not all bacteria within our microbiota are vulnerable or reactive to different antibiotic interventions, and that their influence on both microbial composition and metabolism may differ. Antibiotics are being used worldwide on a huge scale and the prescription of antibiotics is continuing to rise; however, their effects on our microbiota have been reported for only a limited number of them. This article presents a critical review of the antibiotics or antibiotic cocktails whose use in humans has been linked to changes in the composition of our microbial communities, with a particular focus on the gut, oral, respiratory, skin and vaginal microbiota, and on their molecular agents (genes, proteins and metabolites). We review the state of the art as of June 2016, and cover a total of circa 68 different antibiotics. The data herein are the first to compile information about the bacteria, fungi, archaea and viruses most influenced by the main antibiotic treatments prescribed nowadays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Comprehensive Antibiotic Resistance Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Andrew G.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Nizam, Fazmin; Yan, Austin; Azad, Marisa A.; Baylay, Alison J.; Bhullar, Kirandeep; Canova, Marc J.; De Pascale, Gianfranco; Ejim, Linda; Kalan, Lindsay; King, Andrew M.; Koteva, Kalinka; Morar, Mariya; Mulvey, Michael R.; O'Brien, Jonathan S.; Pawlowski, Andrew C.; Piddock, Laura J. V.; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Sutherland, Arlene D.; Tang, Irene; Taylor, Patricia L.; Thaker, Maulik; Wang, Wenliang; Yan, Marie; Yu, Tennison

    2013-01-01

    The field of antibiotic drug discovery and the monitoring of new antibiotic resistance elements have yet to fully exploit the power of the genome revolution. Despite the fact that the first genomes sequenced of free living organisms were those of bacteria, there have been few specialized bioinformatic tools developed to mine the growing amount of genomic data associated with pathogens. In particular, there are few tools to study the genetics and genomics of antibiotic resistance and how it impacts bacterial populations, ecology, and the clinic. We have initiated development of such tools in the form of the Comprehensive Antibiotic Research Database (CARD; http://arpcard.mcmaster.ca). The CARD integrates disparate molecular and sequence data, provides a unique organizing principle in the form of the Antibiotic Resistance Ontology (ARO), and can quickly identify putative antibiotic resistance genes in new unannotated genome sequences. This unique platform provides an informatic tool that bridges antibiotic resistance concerns in health care, agriculture, and the environment. PMID:23650175

  15. Prescribing antibiotics in general practice:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    Objectives The majority of antibiotics are prescribed from general practice. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. In spite of guidelines aiming to minimize the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics we see an increase...... in the use of these agents. The overall aim of the project is to explore factors influencing the decision process and the prescribing behaviour of the GPs when prescribing antibiotics. We will study the impact of microbiological testing on the choice of antibiotic. Furthermore the project will explore how......) and the Danish Microbiology Database (performed microbiological testing). We will assess and quantify the use of microbiological testing prior to antibiotic prescription. Furthermore we will investigate associations between GP characteristics, use of microbiological investigations and description patterns...

  16. Pregnancy outcomes after gastric-bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Tuoc; Kuhn, Joseph; Ehmer, Dale; Fisher, Tammy; McCarty, Todd

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare outcomes of patients who become pregnant within the first year after surgery and those who delayed pregnancy until after 1 year after surgery. A retrospective review was performed to identify patients who became pregnant after their gastric-bypass surgery from 2001 to 2004. Endpoints included pregnancy complications, fetal birth weight and outcome, delivery method, weight change during pregnancy, and nutrition. Of 2,423 patients who had undergone bariatric surgery from 2001 to 2004, 21 patients became pregnant within the first year after surgery and 13 became pregnant after 1 year. Similar outcomes were seen between the 2 groups regarding fetal weight, term pregnancy, and complications. Pregnancy outcomes within the first year after weight-loss surgery revealed no significant episodes of malnutrition, adverse fetal outcomes, or pregnancy complications. Anxiety over poor outcomes of pregnancy during the first year after bariatric surgery can be allayed.

  17. Transient Diabetes Insipidus Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekim, Meral; Ekim, Hasan; Yilmaz, Yunus Keser; Bolat, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) results from inadequate output of Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH) from the pituitary gland (central DI) or the inability of the kidney tubules to respond to ADH (nephrogenic DI). ADH is an octapeptide produced in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland. Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB) has been shown to cause a six-fold increased circulating ADH levels 12 hours after surgery. However, in some cases, ADH release may be transiently suppressed due to cardioplegia (cardiac standstill) or CPB leading to DI. We present the postoperative course of a 60-year-old man who developed transient DI after CPB. He was successfully treated by applying nasal desmopressin therapy. Relevant biochemical parameters should be monitored closely in patients who produce excessive urine after open heart surgery.

  18. Factor V Leiden and Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Victor; Rosin, Mark; Marcoux, Jo-Anne; Olson, Marnie; Bezaire, Jennifer; Dalshaug, Gregory

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a patient with factor V Leiden with an antithrombin III activity of 67% who received a successful aortic valve replacement supported by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A safe level of anticoagulation was achieved by monitoring activated clotting time (ACT) and heparin concentration ensuring adequate anticoagulation throughout the procedure. Results from ACT, heparin dose response, heparin protamine titration, and thrombelastography are given. Factor V Leiden patients can be safely anti-coagulated using heparin for CPB procedures when monitored with ACT, heparin protamine titration, and thrombelastography. Postoperative chest tube losses were 360 mL, less than half our institutional average. Anticoagulation for the pre-and post-operative phase is also discussed.

  19. Emergent cardiopulmonary bypass during pectus excavatum repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Craner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectus excavatum is a chest wall deformity that produces significant cardiopulmonary disability and is typically seen in younger patients. Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum or Nuss procedure has become a widely accepted technique for adult and pediatric patients. Although it is carried out through a thoracoscopic approach, the procedure is associated with a number of potential intraoperative and post-operative complications. We present a case of cardiac perforation requiring emergent cardiopulmonary bypass in a 29-year-old male with Marfan syndrome and previous mitral valve repair undergoing a Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum. This case illustrates the importance of vigilance and preparation by the surgeons, anesthesia providers as well as the institution to be prepared with resources to handle the possible complications. This includes available cardiac surgical backup, perfusionist support and adequate blood product availability.

  20. Laparoscopic Conversion of One Anastomosis Gastric Bypass to a Standard Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Imed Ben; Petrucciani, Niccolo; Kassir, Radwan; Al Munifi, Abdullah; Piche, Thierry; Debs, Tarek; Gugenheim, Jean

    2017-05-01

    One anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB) demonstrated results similar to traditional Roux-en-Y procedures [1-3], in terms of weight loss and resolution of obesity-related comorbidities. The main controversy regarding OAGB is the concern for an association between biliary alkaline gastritis and esophageal or gastric cancer raised by some studies [4]. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman with a BMI of 41 kg/m2 who underwent a laparoscopic OAGB in 2014. One year later, she consulted for recurrent heartburns. An upper GI endoscopy showed pouchitis and bile reflux in the esophagus. Medical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease was ineffective. We decided to convert the OAGB to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). In this video, we show how to revise an OAGB to treat chronic bile reflux, by converting the procedure to a standard RYGB. The intervention starts by restoring the normal anatomy of the small bowel, with the resection of the gastrojejunal anastomosis, which was located at 250-cm du Treitz's ligament. Then, the gastric pouch is created. A standard Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is performed. The resection of the gastrojejunal anastomosis allows fashioning the Roux-en-Y limb with the classical measures. This technique allows a conversion to a standard RYGB and is effective in treating the biliary reflux.

  1. ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS ON ESTOMATOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Alfaro, Miguel; Responsable de la cátedra de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Burga Sánchez, Jonny; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Chumpitaz Cerrate, Víctor; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Varas Hilario, Roberto; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Guerra Sanguinetti, Jaime; Cirujano Dentista de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; López Bellido, Roger; Bachiller de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Zegarra Cuya, Juan; Interno de la Facultad de OdontoIogia UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis consists in the use of an antimicrobial drug in a preventive way, that must be active against microorganisms that in high frequency causes posterior infections of our surgical wounds and maintain effective tissue concentrations along the surgery procedure and the posterior time when appears the bacteremia. To reach a successful treatment is necessary to have the knowledge of the resident bactemial flora and the pathogenous flora that infects our surgical wounds...

  2. Antibiotics as intermicrobial signaling agents instead of weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, J F; Gustafsson, I; Baquero, F; Martinez, J L

    2006-12-19

    It has been widely assumed that the ecological function of antibiotics in nature is fighting against competitors. This made them a good example of the Darwinian struggle-for-life in the microbial world. Based on this idea, it also has been believed that antibiotics, even at subinhibitory concentrations, reduce virulence of bacterial pathogens. Herein, using a combination of genomic and functional assays, we demonstrate that specific antibiotics (namely tobramycin, tetracycline, and norfloxacin) at subinhibitory concentrations trigger expression of determinants influencing the virulence of the major opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All three antibiotics induce biofilm formation; tobramycin increases bacterial motility, and tetracycline triggers expression of P. aeruginosa type III secretion system and consequently bacterial cytotoxicity. Besides their relevance in the infection process, those determinants are relevant for the ecological behavior of this bacterial species in natural, nonclinical environments, either by favoring colonization of surfaces (biofilm, motility) or for fighting against eukaryotic predators (cytotoxicity). Our results support the notion that antibiotics are not only bacterial weapons for fighting competitors but also signaling molecules that may regulate the homeostasis of microbial communities. At low concentrations, they can even be beneficial for the behavior of susceptible bacteria in natural environments. This is a complete change on our vision on the ecological function of antibiotics with clear implications both for the treatment of infectious diseases and for the understanding of the microbial relationships in the biosphere.

  3. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alan P.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance involves the collection and analysis of data for the detection and monitoring of threats to public health. Surveillance should also inform as to the epidemiology of the threat and its burden in the population. A further key component of surveillance is the timely feedback of data to stakeholders with a view to generating action aimed at reducing or preventing the public health threat being monitored. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance involves the collection of antibiotic susceptibility test results undertaken by microbiology laboratories on bacteria isolated from clinical samples sent for investigation. Correlation of these data with demographic and clinical data for the patient populations from whom the pathogens were isolated gives insight into the underlying epidemiology and facilitates the formulation of rational interventions aimed at reducing the burden of resistance. This article describes a range of surveillance activities that have been undertaken in the UK over a number of years, together with current interventions being implemented. These activities are not only of national importance but form part of the international response to the global threat posed by antibiotic resistance. PMID:25918439

  4. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  5. Genetic bypass of essential RNA repair enzymes in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Patrick D; White, Laura K; York, Kerri; Hesselberth, Jay R

    2018-03-01

    RNA repair enzymes catalyze rejoining of an RNA molecule after cleavage of phosphodiester linkages. RNA repair in budding yeast is catalyzed by two separate enzymes that process tRNA exons during their splicing and HAC1 mRNA exons during activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The RNA ligase Trl1 joins 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl RNA fragments, creating a phosphodiester linkage with a 2'-phosphate at the junction. The 2'-phosphate is removed by the 2'-phosphotransferase Tpt1. We bypassed the essential functions of TRL1 and TPT1 in budding yeast by expressing "prespliced," intronless versions of the 10 normally intron-containing tRNAs, indicating this repair pathway does not have additional essential functions. Consistent with previous studies, expression of intronless tRNAs failed to rescue the growth of cells with deletions in components of the SEN complex, implying an additional essential role for the splicing endonuclease. The trl1 Δ and tpt1 Δ mutants accumulate tRNA and HAC1 splicing intermediates indicative of RNA repair defects and are hypersensitive to drugs that inhibit translation. Failure to induce the unfolded protein response in trl1 Δ cells grown with tunicamycin is lethal owing to their inability to ligate HAC1 after its cleavage by Ire1. In contrast, tpt1 Δ mutants grow in the presence of tunicamycin despite reduced accumulation of spliced HAC1 mRNA. We optimized a PCR-based method to detect RNA 2'-phosphate modifications and show they are present on ligated HAC1 mRNA. These RNA repair mutants enable new studies of the role of RNA repair in cellular physiology. © 2018 Cherry et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  6. Asendan Desendan Aortic Bypass: Atan Kalpte Mediyan Sternotomi Yoluyla Onarim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Akyuz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 9-month-old patient presenting for redo aortic arch surgery because of recoarctation. In present case, ascending-to-descending aortic bypass via median sternotomy was performed without cardiopulmonary bypass with good result. In spite of the fact that the different surgical and intervention treatment options of aortic coarctation are quite satisfactory, a certain group of patients need reoperation because of recoarctation. The recoarctation repair of the aorta with the extra-anatomic aortic bypass is considered a low-risk procedure with high success rate.

  7. Sulfated fucan as support for antibiotic immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. Araújo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Xylofucoglucuronan from Spatoglossum schröederi algae was tested as a support for antibiotic immobilization. The polysaccharide (20 mg in 6 ml was first activated using carbodiimide, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylamino-propylcarbodiimide methiodide (20 mg in 2 ml, under stirring for 1 h at 25ºC and pH from 4.5 to 5.0. After adjusting the pH to 8.0, either gentamicin or amikacin (62.5 mg in 1.25 ml was then immobilized on this chemically modified polysaccharide with shaking for 24 h in a cold room. Infrared spectra of the activated carbodiimide xylofucoglucuronan showed two bands to carbonyl (C = O at 1647.9 and 1700.7 cm-1 and to amide (CÝ-NH2 groups (1662.8 and 1714.0 cm-1. Microbial characterization of the derivatives was carried out by the disk diffusion method using Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae incorporated in Müller Hinton medium. Inhibition halos of bacterial growth were observed for the antibiotics immobilized on this sulfated heteropolysaccharide before and after dialysis. However, the halos resulting from the samples after dialysis were much smaller, suggesting that dialysis removed either non-covalently bound antibiotic or other small molecules. In contrast, bacterial growth was not inhibited by either xylofucoglucuronan or its activated form or by gentamicin or amikacin after dialysis. An additional experiment was carried out which demonstrated that the sulfated heteropolysaccharide was hydrolyzed by the microorganism. Therefore, the antibiotic immobilized on xylofucoglucuronan can be proposed as a controlled drug delivery system. Furthermore, this sulfated heteropolysaccharide can be extracted easily from sea algae Spatoglossum schröederi.

  8. Inhibition of photosynthesis by a fluoroquinolone antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristilde, Ludmilla; Melis, Anastasios; Sposito, Garrison

    2010-02-15

    Recent microcosm studies have revealed that fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics can have ecotoxicological impacts on photosynthetic organisms, but little is known about the mechanisms of toxicity. We employed a combination of modeling and experimental techniques to explore how FQs may have these unintended secondary toxic effects. Structure-activity analysis revealed that the quinolone ring and secondary amino group typically present in FQ antibiotics may mediate their action as quinone site inhibitors in photosystem II (PS-II), a key enzyme in photosynthetic electron transport. Follow-up molecular simulations involving nalidixic acid (Naldx), a nonfluorinated quinolone with a demonstrated adverse impact on photosynthesis, and ciprofloxacin (Cipro), the most commonly used FQ antibiotic, showed that both may interfere stereochemically with the catalytic activity of reaction center II (RC-II), the pheophytin-quinone-type center present in PS-II. Naldx can occupy the same binding site as the secondary quinone acceptor (Q(B)) in RC-II and interact with amino acid residues required for the enzymatic reduction of Q(B). Cipro binds in a somewhat different manner, suggesting a different mechanism of interference. Fluorescence induction kinetics, a common method of screening for PS-II inhibition, recorded for photoexcited thylakoid membranes isolated from Cipro-exposed spinach chloroplasts, indicated that Cipro interferes with the transfer of energy from excited antenna chlorophyll molecules to the reaction center in RC-II ([Cipro] >or= 5 microM in vitro and >or=10 microM in vivo) and thus delays the kinetics of photoreduction of the primary quinone acceptor (Q(A); [Cipro] >or= 0.6 microM in vitro). Spinach plants exposed to Cipro exhibited severe growth inhibition characterized by a decrease in both the synthesis of leaves and growth of the roots ([Cipro] >or= 0.5 microM in vivo). Our results thus demonstrate that Cipro and related FQ antibiotics may interfere with

  9. Off-pump versus on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting for ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christian H; Penninga, Luit; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is performed both without and with cardiopulmonary bypass, referred to as off-pump and on-pump CABG respectively. However, the preferable technique is unclear.......Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is performed both without and with cardiopulmonary bypass, referred to as off-pump and on-pump CABG respectively. However, the preferable technique is unclear....

  10. Intraoperative echocardiographic imaging of coronary arteries and graft anastomoses during coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Y; Takamoto, S; Ohtsuka, T

    2001-12-01

    No accepted approach exists for the intraoperative evaluation of the quality of coronary arteries and the technical adequacy of graft anastomoses during coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass. We assessed the accuracy of high-frequency epicardial echocardiography and power Doppler imaging in evaluating coronary arteries during coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass. To validate measurements of coronary arteries and graft anastomoses by high-frequency epicardial echocardiography and power Doppler imaging, we compared luminal diameters determined by these methods with diameters determined histologically in a study of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting in 20 dogs. Technical errors were deliberately created in 10 grafts (stenosis group). The results of these animal validation studies showed that the maximum luminal diameters of coronary arteries and graft anastomoses measured by high-frequency epicardial echocardiography (HEE) and power Doppler imaging (PDI) correlated well with the histologic measurements: HEE = 1.027 x Histologic measurements + 0.005 (P anastomoses were examined intraoperatively by high-frequency epicardial echocardiography and power Doppler imaging, and luminal diameters determined by power Doppler imaging were compared with those determined by postoperative coronary angiography. The results demonstrated that graft anastomosis by power Doppler imaging correlated well with the angiographic measurements: PDI = 1.018 x Angiographic measurements - 0.106 (P anastomoses and can detect technical errors and inadequacies during coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass.

  11. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f o (1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures. (Author)

  12. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies....... This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should...... be reported and taken into account when interpreting results. Data on emergence of resistance (whether in the body reservoirs or in the bacteria causing infection) are important outcomes. Emergence of resistance should be taken into account when interpreting the evidence on antibiotic treatment in randomized...

  13. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0005 Ultracold Polar Molecules Jeremy Hutson UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report 04/01/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-Jan-2010 to 14-Jul-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report on Grant FA8655-10-1-3033 on Ultracold Polar Molecules 5a...formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging

  14. Suppression of antibiotic resistance acquisition by combined use of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shingo; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the effect of combinatorial use of antibiotics with a trade-off relationship of resistance, i.e., resistance acquisition to one drug causes susceptibility to the other drug, and vice versa, on the evolution of antibiotic resistance. We demonstrated that this combinatorial use of antibiotics significantly suppressed the acquisition of resistance. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rationalizing antibiotic use to limit antibiotic resistance in India+

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, a global concern, is particularly pressing in developing nations, including India, where the burden of infectious disease is high and healthcare spending is low. The Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership (GARP) was established to develop actionable policy recommendations specifically relevant to low- and middle-income countries where suboptimal access to antibiotics - not a major concern in high-income countries - is possibly as severe a problem as is the spread of resistant organisms. This report summarizes the situation as it is known regarding antibiotic use and growing resistance in India and recommends short and long term actions. Recommendations aim at (i) reducing the need for antibiotics; (ii) lowering resistance-enhancing drug pressure through improved antibiotic targeting, and (iii) eliminating antibiotic use for growth promotion in agriculture. The highest priority needs to be given to (i) national surveillance of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic use - better information to underpin decisions on standard treatment guidelines, education and other actions, as well as to monitor changes over time; (ii) increasing the use of diagnostic tests, which necessitates behavioural changes and improvements in microbiology laboratory capacity; (iii) setting up and/or strengthening infection control committees in hospitals; and (iv) restricting the use of antibiotics for non-therapeutic uses in agriculture. These interventions should help to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance, improve public health directly, benefit the populace and reduce pressure on the healthcare system. Finally, increasing the types and coverage of childhood vaccines offered by the government would reduce the disease burden enormously and spare antibiotics. PMID:21985810

  16. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D)> HBr (0.83 D) > HI (0.45 D) [8]. Hence, these molecules can and do induce a dipole moment in the rare gas atoms when the two interact. The induced dipole moment is proportional to the inducing field E and the proportionality constant is the polariz- ability, i.e., μ i. = αE. However, as mentioned above, dispersion.

  17. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  18. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes from antibiotic producers to pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinglin; Ellabaan, Mostafa M Hashim; Charusanti, Pep

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that some antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) found in pathogenic bacteria derive from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria. Here we provide bioinformatic and experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. We identify genes in proteobacteria, including some pathogens......, that appear to be closely related to actinobacterial ARGs known to confer resistance against clinically important antibiotics. Furthermore, we identify two potential examples of recent horizontal transfer of actinobacterial ARGs to proteobacterial pathogens. Based on this bioinformatic evidence, we propose...... results support the existence of ancient and, possibly, recent transfers of ARGs from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria to proteobacteria, and provide evidence for a defined mechanism....

  19. Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - January 2003 Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence R. Zirker; James E. Francfort

    2003-01-01

    This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

  20. Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - First Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zirker, L.R.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-31

    This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

  1. Changes in the vessels following aorto-coronary bypass operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, N.; Pfluger, N.; Speiser, K.; Turina, M.; Rothlin, M.; Zurich Univ.; Zurich Univ.

    1983-01-01

    In a prospective study (238 men, mean age 53 years) the changes of the native vessels were studied 3 months after a-c-bypass operation and 5 months after preop. angiography. Progression was defined as increase of stenoses of at least 20% or new total occlusion. Progression was significantly more frequent in vessels with than without bypass and was located proximally to the anastomoses in most cases, less frequently at the anastomoses and very rarely distally to the anastomoses. Proximal progression was significantly more frequent with patent than with occluded bypasses. Stenoses at the anastomoses were significantly more frequent with occluded than with patent bypasses. Stenoses of higher degrees hat a stonger tendency for progression than slighter stenoses. Regression was rare and nearly always caused by surgery. (orig.) [de

  2. Prolonged successful therapy for hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia after gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myint, K S; Greenfield, J R; Farooqi, I S

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia following gastric bypass surgery (GBS) is increasingly recognised. However, its pathophysiology remains unclear. Some patients require pancreatectomy. Medical therapy with calcium channel blockers, acarbose and diazoxide has been reported to be beneficial...

  3. Severe hypoglycaemia post-gastric bypass requiring partial pancreatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patti, M E; McMahon, G; Mun, E C

    2005-01-01

    was assessed in all three patients. RESULTS: All three patients had evidence of severe postprandial hyperinsulinaemia and hypoglycaemia. In one patient, reversal of gastric bypass was ineffective in reversing hypoglycaemia. All three patients ultimately required partial pancreatectomy for control...

  4. Antiplatelet therapy at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kremke, Michael; Tang, Mariann; Bak, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this multicentre cohort study was to examine the relationship between antiplatelet therapy (APT) at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and postoperative bleeding complications, transfusion requirements and adverse cardiovascular events. METHODS: A matche...

  5. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eRuscito

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012 notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  6. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscito, Annamaria; DeRosa, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012) notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  7. Antibiotics and Bacterial Resistance in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Richard J; Tor, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Dangerous, antibiotic resistant bacteria have been observed with increasing frequency over the past several decades. In this review the factors that have been linked to this phenomenon are addressed. Profiles of bacterial species that are deemed to be particularly concerning at the present time are illustrated. Factors including economic impact, intrinsic and acquired drug resistance, morbidity and mortality rates, and means of infection are taken into account. Synchronously with the waxing of bacterial resistance there has been waning antibiotic development. The approaches that scientists are employing in the pursuit of new antibacterial agents are briefly described. The standings of established antibiotic classes as well as potentially emerging classes are assessed with an emphasis on molecules that have been clinically approved or are in advanced stages of development. Historical perspectives, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum of activity, and preeminent members of each class are discussed. PMID:25232278

  8. The macrolide antibiotic renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinos, George P

    2017-09-01

    Macrolides represent a large family of protein synthesis inhibitors of great clinical interest due to their applicability to human medicine. Macrolides are composed of a macrocyclic lactone of different ring sizes, to which one or more deoxy-sugar or amino sugar residues are attached. Macrolides act as antibiotics by binding to bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit and interfering with protein synthesis. The high affinity of macrolides for bacterial ribosomes, together with the highly conserved structure of ribosomes across virtually all of the bacterial species, is consistent with their broad-spectrum activity. Since the discovery of the progenitor macrolide, erythromycin, in 1950, many derivatives have been synthesised, leading to compounds with better bioavailability and acid stability and improved pharmacokinetics. These efforts led to the second generation of macrolides, including well-known members such as azithromycin and clarithromycin. Subsequently, in order to address increasing antibiotic resistance, a third generation of macrolides displaying improved activity against many macrolide resistant strains was developed. However, these improvements were accompanied with serious side effects, leading to disappointment and causing many researchers to stop working on macrolide derivatives, assuming that this procedure had reached the end. In contrast, a recent published breakthrough introduced a new chemical platform for synthesis and discovery of a wide range of diverse macrolide antibiotics. This chemical synthesis revolution, in combination with reduction in the side effects, namely, 'Ketek effects', has led to a macrolide renaissance, increasing the hope for novel and safe therapeutic agents to combat serious human infectious diseases. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Transfusion requirements in elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Praleene; Bäck, Anne Caroline; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye

    2017-01-01

    Managing haemostasis in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery remains a challenge. There is no established laboratory test to predict transfusion requirements in cardiac surgery. We investigated whether preoperative Thromboelastography (TEG) with Platelet Mapping Assay (PMA......) or Multiple Electrode Aggrometry (MEA) could predict transfusion requirements in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or combined CABG with aortic or mitral valve replacement. We prospectively investigated 199 patients undergoing elective CABG or combined procedures. PMA and MEA...

  10. Crohn’s disease after gastric bypass surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Janczewska, Izabella; Nekzada, Qayium; Kapraali, Marjo

    2011-01-01

    Bariatric surgery for the treatment of severe obesity has increased dramatically in recent years in the USA and parts of Western Europe. The most commonly used technique is the Roux-en Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). Several nutritional and gastrointestinal complications after bariatric surgery have been described during the last 10 years. The authors present two patients with diarrhoea and malnutrition; one after RYGBP and the other after jejunoileal bypass surgery. These patients were subsequentl...

  11. Combined coronary artery bypass surgery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Black, J J; Desai, J B

    1995-01-01

    The proper management of patients with asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms and significant coexistent coronary artery disease is still debatable. The most common approach has been to perform the coronary artery bypass surgery some weeks before the abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the hope of reducing the cardiac morbidity and mortality. We report our initial experience of three consecutive elective cases where the coronary artery bypass surgery and the abdominal aortic aneurysm repair ...

  12. Robotically assisted totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Mick, Stephanie; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Nair, Ravi; Bonatti, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Robotically assisted totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass surgery has emerged as a feasible and efficient alternative to conventional full sternotomy coronary artery bypass graft surgery in selected patients. This minimally invasive approach using the daVinci robotic system allows fine intrathoracic maneuvers and excellent view of the coronary arteries. Both on-pump and off-pump operations can be performed to treat single and multivessel disease. Hybrid approaches have the potential of o...

  13. Cardiopulmonary bypass: development of John Gibbon's heart-lung machine

    OpenAIRE

    Passaroni, Andréia Cristina; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti

    2015-01-01

    AbstractObjective:To provide a brief review of the development of cardiopulmonary bypass.Methods:A review of the literature on the development of extracorporeal circulation techniques, their essential role in cardiovascular surgery, and the complications associated with their use, including hemolysis and inflammation.Results:The advancement of extracorporeal circulation techniques has played an essential role in minimizing the complications of cardiopulmonary bypass, which can range from vari...

  14. Ultrathin antibiotic walled microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khopade, Ajay J; Arulsudar, N; Khopade, Surekha A; Hartmann, J

    2005-01-01

    Ultrathin microcapsules comprised of anionic polyelectrolytes (PE) and a polycationic aminoglycoside (AmG) antibiotic drug were prepared by depositing PE/AmG multilayers on zinc oxide (ZnO) colloid particles using the layer-by-layer self-assembly technique and subsequently dissolving the ZnO templated cores. The polyelectrolytes, dextran sulfate sodium (DxS) and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS), were selected owing to their different backbone structure. An aminoglycoside, tobramycin sulfate (TbS), was used for studying DxS/TbS or PSS/TbS multilayer films. The multilayer growth on ZnO cores was characterized by alternating zeta potential values that were different for the DxS/TbS and PSS/TbS multilayers due to the PE chemistry and its interaction with Zn(2+) ions. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy provide evidence of PE/TbS multilayer coating on ZnO core particles. The slow acid-decomposition of the ZnO cores using weak organic acids and the presence of sufficient quantity of Zn(2+) in the dispersion were required to produce antibiotic multilayer capsules. There was no difference in the morphological characteristics of the two types of capsules; although, the yield for [PSS/TbS](5) capsules was significantly higher than for [DxS/TbS](5) capsules which was related to the physicochemical properties of DxS/TbS/Zn(2+) and PSS/TbS/Zn(2+) complexes forming the capsule wall. The TbS quantity in the multilayer films was determined using a quartz crystal microbalance and high performance liquid chromatography techniques which showed less TbS loading in both, capsules and multilayers on planar gold substrate, than the theoretical DxS:TbS or PSS:TbS stoichiometric ratio. The decomposition of the [PE/TbS](6) multilayers was fastest in physiological buffer followed by mannitol and water. The decomposition rate of the [PSS/TbS](6) multilayers was slower than [DxS/TbS](6) monolayers. The incomplete decomposition of DxS/TbS under saline conditions suggests the major role of

  15. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Korp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism.

  16. Predictive factors for better bypass patency and limb salvage after prosthetic above-knee bypass reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhoefer, Eric; Bergert, Hendrik; Kersting, Stephan; Ludwig, Stefan; Weiss, Norbert; Schönleben, Frank; Grützmann, Robert; Gäbel, Gabor

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is one of the most underestimated diseases because of its high prevalence and unfavorable prognosis. Many PAD patients without suitable autologous veins or options for endovascular treatment receive prosthetic above-knee femoropopliteal bypass (PAKB). Until now predictors of prosthetic bypass failure and of increased amputation risk remain indistinct. This study aimed to identify predictive factors associated with better bypass patency and limb salvage to achieve a more favorable outcome after PAKB reconstruction. Pre-, intra-, and postoperative data of 244 PAKB procedures performed at a German university medical center were collected and analyzed using univariate and multivariate methods. To our knowledge this 12-year experience is the largest retrospective study to identify predictors for patency and limb salvage after PAKB reconstruction. Of the PAD patients 94% (229/244) were followed for an average of 34.9 months. Patient cohorts characteristics were: mean age, 66.1 years, 181 men (74%), claudication (64%), rest pain (16%), ischemic lesions (20%), arterial hypertension (92%), smoking (79%), hyperlipidemia (65%) and type 2 diabetes (43%). Cumulative primary 1- and 3-year graft patency rates were 60.8% and 50.7%, respectively, and cumulative 1- and 3-year limb salvage rates were 89.3% and 86.1%, respectively. One hundred seven bypasses (43.9%) failed, 26 patients (10.7%) required a major and seven patients (2.9%) required a minor amputation. Overall survival rates of PAD patients after 1- and 3-years were 94.4% and 82.9%, respectively. Subjective symptom improvement was found to be the most important prognostic follow-up factor for graft patency and limb salvage. Patients with recurrent symptoms in the follow-up had an increased risk of emerging bypass failure compared with patients with subjective symptom improvement (patency at 1 year: 40.8% vs 100% and at 3 years: 26% vs 100%; P limb salvage at 1 year: 100% vs 79% and

  17. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  18. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclo bu tadiene (1) has been one of the most popular molecules for experimentalists and theoreticians. This molecule is unstable as . it is antiaromatic ( 4,n electrons in a cyclic array). Even though some highly substituted cyclobutadienes, for example, compound 2 and the Fe(CO)3 complex of cyclobutadiene (3) are ...

  19. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Algebraic theory of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Iachello, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The Wave Mechanics of Diatomic Molecules. 2. Summary of Elements of Algebraic Theory. 3. Mechanics of Molecules. 4. Three-Body Algebraic Theory. 5. Four-Body Algebraic Theory. 6. Classical Limit and Coordinate Representation. 8. Prologue to the Future. Appendices. Properties of Lie Algebras; Coupling of Algebras; Hamiltonian Parameters

  1. Molecule of the Month.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    described here. Chemistry of aromatic molecules has a long history. Many molecules made up of multiple benzene-like rings have been isolated or made in the laboratory over the years. These are called polycondensed aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH for short). ... a bowl like symmetric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon of the.

  2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! ... Author Affiliations. Kankan Bhattacharyya1. Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 India.

  3. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    “What are electrons doing in molecules?” This is a deceptively simple question that scientists have been trying to answer for more than eighty years. With the advent of quantum mechanics in 1926, it became clear that we must understand the dynamics of electronic motion in atoms, molecules and solids in order to explain ...

  4. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  5. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nature is an excellent synthetic organic chemist. Using mild reaction conditions and a few elemental combinations, a large variety of complex molecules are made in and around us. The atoms are put together in precise arrangements to enable the molecules to carry out different tasks with remarkable specificity.

  6. Small molecule annotation for the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sanchayita; Young, Jasmine; Berrisford, John M; Chen, Minyu; Conroy, Matthew J; Dutta, Shuchismita; Di Costanzo, Luigi; Gao, Guanghua; Ghosh, Sutapa; Hudson, Brian P; Igarashi, Reiko; Kengaku, Yumiko; Liang, Yuhe; Peisach, Ezra; Persikova, Irina; Mukhopadhyay, Abhik; Narayanan, Buvaneswari Coimbatore; Sahni, Gaurav; Sato, Junko; Sekharan, Monica; Shao, Chenghua; Tan, Lihua; Zhuravleva, Marina A

    2014-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the single global repository for three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules and their complexes, and its more than 100,000 structures contain more than 20,000 distinct ligands or small molecules bound to proteins and nucleic acids. Information about these small molecules and their interactions with proteins and nucleic acids is crucial for our understanding of biochemical processes and vital for structure-based drug design. Small molecules present in a deposited structure may be attached to a polymer or may occur as a separate, non-covalently linked ligand. During curation of a newly deposited structure by wwPDB annotation staff, each molecule is cross-referenced to the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary (CCD). If the molecule is new to the PDB, a dictionary description is created for it. The information about all small molecule components found in the PDB is distributed via the ftp archive as an external reference file. Small molecule annotation in the PDB also includes information about ligand-binding sites and about covalent and other linkages between ligands and macromolecules. During the remediation of the peptide-like antibiotics and inhibitors present in the PDB archive in 2011, it became clear that additional annotation was required for consistent representation of these molecules, which are quite often composed of several sequential subcomponents including modified amino acids and other chemical groups. The connectivity information of the modified amino acids is necessary for correct representation of these biologically interesting molecules. The combined information is made available via a new resource called the Biologically Interesting molecules Reference Dictionary, which is complementary to the CCD and is now routinely used for annotation of peptide-like antibiotics and inhibitors. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Antibiotic Resistance in Nephrological Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Taran

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of antibiotic resistance is a serious threat to the global public health and requires action by both the state and the public. The World Health Organization identified 15 most dangerous and prevalent superbugs, which it ranked based on three levels of threat they present to the public health. At the heart of the fight against antibiotic resistance lies the increased awareness of the health professionals and general public that incorrect and excessive use of antibiotics amid poor practices in infection prevention and control contributes to the acceleration of antibiotic resistance.

  8. Antibiotics and Pregnancy: What's Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of antibiotics during pregnancy and risk of spontaneous abortion. CMAJ. 2017;189:625. American College of Obstetricians ... Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved.

  9. Cerebroprotective effect of piracetam in patients undergoing coronary bypass burgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holinski, Sebastian; Claus, Benjamin; Alaaraj, Nour; Dohmen, Pascal Maria; Kirilova, Kremena; Neumann, Konrad; Uebelhack, Ralf; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2008-11-01

    Reduction of cognitive function is a possible side effect after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass. We investigated the cerebroprotective effect of piracetam on cognitive performance in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients scheduled for elective, primary and isolated coronary bypass surgery were randomised either to piracetam or placebo group. The study was performed in a double blind fashion. Patients received either 12 g piracetam or placebo at the beginning of the operation. Six neuropsychological subtests from the Syndrom Kurz Test and the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale were performed preoperatively and on the third postoperative day. To assess the overall cognitive function and the degree of cognitive decline across all tests after surgery we combined the six test-scores by principal component analysis. A total number of 120 patients were enrolled into the study. Preoperative overall cognitive function were not significantly different between the groups. The postoperative combined score of the neuropsychological tests showed a deterioration of cognitive function in both groups (placebo-pre: -0.06+/-0.99 vs placebo-post: -1.38+/-1.11; ppiracetam-pre: 0.06+/-1.02 vs piracetam-post: -0.65+/-0.93; ppiracetam patients performed significantly better compared to the placebo patients after the operation and had a less decline of overall cognitive function (pPiracetam has a cerebroprotective effect in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. It reduces an early postoperative substantial decline of neuropsychological abilities.

  10. Cardiac compression of lung lower lobes after coronary artery bypass graft with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio H Neves

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atelectasis is a major cause of hypoxemia after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG and is commonly ascribed to general anesthesia, high inspiratory oxygen concentration and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of heart-induced pulmonary compression after CABG with CPB. METHODS: Seventeen patients without pre-operative cardiac failure who were scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft underwent pre- and postoperative thoracic computed tomography. The cardiac mass, the pressure exerted on the lungs by the right and left heart and the fraction of collapsed lower lobe segments below and outside of the heart limits were evaluated on a computed tomography section 1 cm above the diaphragmatic cupola. RESULTS: In the postoperative period, cardiac mass increased by 32% (117±31 g versus 155±35 g, p<0.001, leading to an increase in the pressure that was exerted on the lungs by the right (2.2±0.6 g.cm(-2 versus 3.2±1.2 g.cm(-2, p<0.05 and left heart (2.4±0.7 g.cm(-2 versus 4.2±1.8 g.cm(-2, p<0.001. The proportion of collapsed lung segments beneath the heart markedly increased [from 6.7% to 32.9% on the right side (p<0.001 and from 6.2% to 29% on the left side (p<0.001], whereas the proportion of collapsed lung segments outside of the heart limits slightly increased [from 0.7% to 10.8% on the right side (p<0.001 and from 1.5% to 12.6% on the left side (p<0.001]. CONCLUSION: The pressure that is exerted by the heart on the lungs increased postoperatively and contributed to the collapse of subjacent pulmonary segments.

  11. Antibiotic uptake by plants from manure-amended soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassil, Rani J; Bashour, Isam I; Sleiman, Fawwak T; Abou-Jawdeh, Youssef A

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are extensively given to livestock to promote growth and reduce diseases. Therefore, animal manure often contains antibiotics. Once manure is applied to agricultural land to improve soil productivity, crops would be exposed to antibiotics which may persist in soils from a few to several hundred days. The objective of this study was to evaluate the uptake of gentamicin and streptomycin by carrot (Daucus carota), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and radish (Rhaphanus sativus) from manure-amended soil. The treatments were 0, 0.5 and 1 mg of antibiotic kg⁻¹ of soil. Two pot experiments were carried out in the greenhouse. The first was conducted on the three crops and the second exclusively on radish. In radish, the increase in the concentrations of gentamicin was significant between the 0 and both of 0.5 and 1.0 mg kg⁻¹ treatments, but not significant between the 0.5 and 1.0 mg kg⁻¹. The average values were 35.5, 60.0 and 57.4 μg kg⁻¹ for the 0, 0.5 and 1 mg kg⁻¹ rates, respectively. However, the increase in streptomycin concentration in radish was not significant between the three treatments, and the average values were, 12.1, 15.2 and 17.4 μg kg⁻¹ for the 0, 0.5 and 1 mg kg⁻¹ rates, respectively. In carrot roots and lettuce leaves no significant increase in the concentrations of gentamicin or streptomycin was observed between the treatments. The three crops absorbed relatively higher amounts of gentamicin (small molecule) than streptomycin (large molecule). Generally the levels of antibiotics in plant tissue increased with increasing the antibiotic concentration in the manure (1 mg kg⁻¹ > 0.5 mg kg⁻¹).

  12. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  13. Postoperative abdominal complications after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Guohua

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic experiences on the patients who suffered abdominal complications after cardiovascular surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass(CPB. Methods A total of 2349 consecutive patients submitted to cardiovascular surgery with CPB in our hospital from Jan 2004 to Dec 2010 were involved. The clinical data of any abdominal complication, including its incidence, characters, relative risks, diagnostic measures, medical or surgical management and mortality, was retrospectively analyzed. Results Of all the patients, 33(1.4% developed abdominal complications postoperatively, including 11(33.3% cases of paralytic ileus, 9(27.3% of gastrointestinal haemorrhage, 2(6.1% of gastroduodenal ulcer perforation, 2(6.1% of acute calculus cholecystitis, 3(9.1% of acute acalculus cholecystitis, 4(12.1% of hepatic dysfunction and 2(6.1% of ischemia bowel diseases. Of the 33 patients, 26 (78.8% accepted medical treatment and 7 (21.2% underwent subsequent surgical intervention. There were 5(15.2% deaths in this series, which was significantly higher than the overall mortality (2.7%. Positive history of peptic ulcer, advanced ages, bad heart function, preoperative IABP support, prolonged CPB time, low cardiac output and prolonged mechanical ventilation are the risk factors of abdominal complications. Conclusions Abdominal complications after cardiovascular surgery with CPB have a low incidence but a higher mortality. Early detection and prompt appropriate intervention are essential for the outcome of the patients.

  14. Current status of mini-gastric bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal K Mahawar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mini-gastric bypass (MGP is a promising bariatric procedure. Tens of thousands of this procedure have been performed throughout the world since Rutledge performed the first procedure in the United States of America in 1997. Several thousands of these have even been documented in the published scientific literature. Despite a proven track record over nearly two decades, this operation continues to polarise the bariatric community. A large number of surgeons across the world have strong objections to this procedure and do not perform it. The risk of symptomatic (bile reflux, marginal ulceration, severe malnutrition, and long-term risk of gastric and oesophageal cancers are some of the commonly voiced concerns. Despite these expressed fears, several advantages such as technical simplicity, shorter learning curve, ease of revision and reversal, non-inferior weight loss and comorbidity resolution outcomes have prompted some surgeons to advocate a wider adoption of this procedure. This review examines the current status of these controversial aspects in the light of the published academic literature in English.

  15. Right atrial bypass model in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, P H; Isserles, S A

    1995-02-01

    In gas exchange studies addressing the storage and transport of CO2 in dogs, a model in which cardiac output (QT) can be precisely controlled and measured would be beneficial. We identified problems with described extracorporeal circuits and implemented right atrial bypass (RAB) in dogs. In 6 anesthetized (chloralose and urethane), heparinized dogs (mean +/- SD, 24 +/- 4 kg) with open thorax, cannulas were inserted in both vena cavas to drain venous blood return to a reservoir (anaerobic bag or bubble oxygenator). A roller pump then drove blood through a heat exchanger back to the right atrial appendage. After 1.8 +/- 1.4 hour of RAB, physiologic variables remained within reference limits for dogs (QT, 1.5 +/- 0.3 L/min; blood pressure, 92 +/- 25 mm of Hg; arterial PCO2, 35 +/- 4 mm of Hg; PO2, 513 +/- 39 mm of Hg; pH, 7.39 +/- 0.08; and tissue CO2 production, 126 +/- 56 ml/min). To permit study of gas exchange, venous return (and thus, QT) and venous PCO2 and PO2 could be accurately regulated and measured over a wide range. Maintenance of native pulsatile lung perfusion and cardiogenic oscillations minimizes mismatching of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion and facilitates studies addressing pulmonary gas exchange. This RAB model is designed so that investigators can establish the preparation in a few hours.

  16. Structure of polysaccharide antibiotics; Structure des antibiotiques polysaccharidiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matutano, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    Study of the structure of antibiotics having two or several sugars in their molecule. One may distinguish: the polysaccharide antibiotics themselves, made up of two or several sugars either with or without nitrogen, such as streptomycin, neomycins, paromomycine, kanamycin, chalcomycin; the hetero-polysaccharide antibiotics made up of one saccharide part linked to an aglycone of various type through a glucoside: macrolide, pigment, pyrimidine purine. Amongst these latter are: erythromycin, magnamycin, spiramycin, oleandomycin, cinerubin and amicetin. The sugars can either play a direct role in biochemical reactions or act as a dissolving agent, as far as the anti-microbe power of these antibiotics is concerned. (author) [French] Etude de la structure des antibiotiques qui possedent dans leur molecule deux ou plusieurs sucres. On distingue: les antibiotiques polysaccharidiques proprement dits, constitues de deux eu plusieurs sucres azotes ou non, tels que streptomycines, neomycines, paromomycines, kanamycine, chalcomycine; les antibiotiques heteropolysaccharidiques formes d'une partie saccharidique liee glycosidiquement a un aglycone de nature diverse: macrolide - pigment - purine pyrimidine. On compte parmi ceux-ci: erythroraycine rnagnamycine, spiromycine, oleandomycine, cinerubine et amicetine. Dans le pouvoir antimicrobien de ces antibiotiques les sucres peuvent jouer soit un role direct dans les reactions biochimiques, soit agir comme solubilisant. (auteur)

  17. Cardiac surgery antibiotic prophylaxis and calculated empiric antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Armin; Hamouda, Khaled; Özkur, Mehmet; Leistner, Markus; Sommer, Sebastian-Patrick; Leyh, Rainer; Schimmer, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    Ongoing debate exists concerning the optimal choice and duration of antibiotic prophylaxis as well as the reasonable calculated empiric antibiotic therapy for hospital-acquired infections in critically ill cardiac surgery patients. A nationwide questionnaire was distributed to all German heart surgery centers concerning antibiotic prophylaxis and the calculated empiric antibiotic therapy. The response to the questionnaire was 87.3%. All clinics that responded use antibiotic prophylaxis, 79% perform it not longer than 24 h (single-shot: 23%; 2 doses: 29%; 3 doses: 27%; 4 doses: 13%; and >5 doses: 8%). Cephalosporin was used in 89% of clinics (46% second-generation, 43% first-generation cephalosporin). If sepsis is suspected, the following diagnostics are performed routinely: wound inspection 100%; white blood cell count 100%; radiography 99%; C-reactive protein 97%; microbiological testing of urine 91%, blood 81%, and bronchial secretion 81%; procalcitonin 74%; and echocardiography 75%. The calculated empiric antibiotic therapy (depending on the suspected focus) consists of a multidrug combination with broad-spectrum agents. This survey shows that existing national guidelines and recommendations concerning perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis and calculated empiric antibiotic therapy are well applied in almost all German heart centers. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Van Duijn, Pleun J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to

  19. Antibiotic resistance in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Mary D; Pratt, Rachael; Hart, Wendy S

    2003-01-01

    There is currently no systematic surveillance or monitoring of antibiotic resistance in Australian animals. Registration of antibiotics for use in animals is tightly controlled and has been very conservative. Fluoroquinolones have not been registered for use in food producing animals and other products have been removed from the market because of human health concerns. In the late 1970s, the Animal Health Committee coordinated a survey of resistance in Salmonella and Escherichia coli isolates from cattle, pigs and poultry and in bovine Staphylococcus aureus. Some additional information is available from published case reports. In samples collected prior to the withdrawal of avoparcin from the market, no vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium or Enterococcus faecalis were detected in samples collected from pigs, whereas some vanA enterococci, including E. faecium and E. faecalis, were found in chickens. No vanB enterococci were detected in either species. Virginiamycin resistance was common in both pig and poultry isolates. Multiple resistance was common in E. coli and salmonellae isolates. No fluoroquinolone resistance was found in salmonellae, E. coli or Campylobacter. Beta-lactamase production is common in isolates from bovine mastitis, but no methicillin resistance has been detected. However, methicillin resistance has been reported in canine isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius and extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing E. coli has been found in dogs.

  20. Bacterial meningitis antibiotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, R; Raymond, J; Hees, L; Pinquier, D; Grimprel, E; Levy, C

    2017-12-01

    The implementation of pneumococal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) 7 then 13 valent (Prevenar13 ®) in 2010-2011 has significantly changed the profile of pneumococcal meningitis. Since 3 years, the National Pediatric Meningitis Network of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Group (GPIP) and the National Reference Centre of Pneumococci have reported no cases of meningitis due to pneumococcus resistant to third-generation cephalosporins (3GC): cefotaxime or ceftriaxone. In the light of these new data, vancomycin should no longer be prescribed at the initial phase of pneumococcal meningitis treatment (confirmed or only suspected) and this antibiotic should only be added when 3GC minimum inhibitory concentration of the strain isolated is greater than 0.5mg/L. For meningococcal meningitis, nearly 20% of strains have decreased susceptibility to penicillin and amoxicillin, but all remain susceptible to 3GC. The National Pediatric Meningitis Network is a valuable tool because it has been sufficiently exhaustive and sustainable over 15 years. Maintaining this epidemiologic surveillance will allow us to adapt, if necessary, new regimens for subsequent changes that could be induced by vaccination and/or antibiotic uses. © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.

  1. Mechanistic Studies with DNA Polymerases Reveal Complex Outcomes following Bypass of DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Eoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is a chemically reactive molecule that is subject to many different covalent modifications from sources that are both endogenous and exogenous in origin. The inherent instability of DNA is a major obstacle to genomic maintenance and contributes in varying degrees to cellular dysfunction and disease in multi-cellular organisms. Investigations into the chemical and biological aspects of DNA damage have identified multi-tiered and overlapping cellular systems that have evolved as a means of stabilizing the genome. One of these pathways supports DNA replication events by in a sense adopting the mantra that one must “make the best of a bad situation” and tolerating covalent modification to DNA through less accurate copying of the damaged region. Part of this so-called DNA damage tolerance pathway involves the recruitment of specialized DNA polymerases to sites of stalled or collapsed replication forks. These enzymes have unique structural and functional attributes that often allow bypass of adducted template DNA and successful completion of genomic replication. What follows is a selective description of the salient structural features and bypass properties of specialized DNA polymerases with an emphasis on Y-family members.

  2. Fate of antibiotics from hospital and domestic sources in a sewage network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quoc Tuc, Dinh; Elodie, Moreau-Guigon; Pierre, Labadie; Fabrice, Alliot; Marie-Jeanne, Teil; Martine, Blanchard; Joelle, Eurin; Marc, Chevreuil

    2017-01-01

    Investigation of domestic and hospital effluents in a sewage system of an elementary watershed showed that antibiotics belonging to eight classes were present with concentrations ranging from norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin). Antibiotic concentrations in the hospital effluent (from 0.04 to 17.9μgL -1 ) were ten times higher than those measured in the domestic effluent (from 0.03 to 1.75μgL -1 ), contributing to 90% of the antibiotic inputs to the WWTP. Some molecules such as sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin and trimethoprim displayed higher concentrations after wastewater treatment due to deconjugation of their metabolites, which restores the parent molecules. For other compounds, the antibiotic elimination showed discrepancies depending on their physicochemical properties. For fluoroquinolones, the apparent removal processes were mainly based on adsorption mechanisms, followed by settling, leading to sludge contamination (from 13 to 18,800μgkg -1 dry weight). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enediyne antibiotics and their models: new potential of acetylene chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maretina, Irina A; Trofimov, Boris A

    2006-01-01

    Structures and chemical properties of enediynes, viz., compounds comprising a system of conjugated double and triple bonds, are surveyed. The presence of this system in the molecules of enediyne antitumour antibiotics ensures their high activity. The mechanism of biological action of enediynes is discussed based on cycloaromatisation of the enediyne chromophore resulting in highly active benzenoid 1,4-diradicals, which selectively cleave DNA. The key strategies of enediyne synthesis are analysed.

  4. Antibiotic adjuvants - A strategy to unlock bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bello, Concepción

    2017-09-15

    Resistance to available antibiotics in pathogenic bacteria is currently a global challenge since the number of strains that are resistant to multiple types of antibiotics has increased dramatically each year and has spread worldwide. To unlock this problem, the use of an 'antibiotic adjuvant' in combination with an antibiotic is now being exploited. This approach enables us to prolong the lifespan of these life-saving drugs. This digests review provides an overview of the main types of antibiotic adjuvants, the basis of their operation and the remaining issues to be tackled in this field. Particular emphasis is placed on those compounds that are already in clinical development, namely β-lactamase inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-slice spiral CT of aortocoronary grafts and internal mammary artery bypasses: Assessment of bypasses and their anastomoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, S.; Wagner, M.; Schmitt, R.; Christopoulos, G.; Coblenz, G.; Brunn, J.; Mueller, M.; Kerber, S.; Urbanski, P.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess aortocoronary grafts and internal mammary artery bypasses by means of EKG-triggered contrast-enhanced multi-slice spiral CT, and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of this new imaging modality. Material and methods: 59 patients with up to 5 aortocoronary grafts and/or internal mammary artery bypasses per patient were examined with regard to bypass morphology, the free passage, and the proximal as well as the distal anastomoses using multi-slice computed tomography. Axial source images were calculated by means of retrospective triggering at different diastolic delay times, and were postprocessed in several planes with the multiplanar volume reconstruction (MPVR) software. Results: On the pre-condition that data sets were acquired at sinus rhythm and at a heart rate lower than 65/min, aortocoronary grafts and internal mammary artery bypasses could be depicted in adequate diagnostic quality in about 80% of all cases with contrast-enhanced multi-slice spiral CT. Both, the free passage of the bypasses as well as the morphology of the proximal anastomoses were sufficiently assessed with multiplanar volume reconstruction (MPVR), whereas the distal anastomoses couldn't be depicted sufficiently in 20% of all cases. Conclusion: As a non-invasive method, contrast-enhanced and ECG-triggered multi-slice spiral computed tomography has gained diagnostic potential for the accurate visualization of aortocoronary grafts and the internal mammary artery bypasses. (orig.) [de

  6. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  7. Amphipathic beta-strand mimics as potential membrane disruptive antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jessica L; Gillies, Elizabeth R

    2009-08-21

    In recent years, there have been increasing numbers of bacterial strains emerging that are resistant to the currently available antibiotics. In the search for new antibiotics, attention has been focused on natural antimicrobial peptides that act by selectively disrupting the membranes of bacterial cells, a mechanism that is thought to be nonconducive to the development of resistance. It is desirable to mimic the structures and activities of these peptides while introducing properties such as resistance to proteolytic degradation, which make molecules more ideal for development as drugs. Described here is the design and synthesis of beta-strand mimetic oligomers based on alternating alpha-amino acids and azacyclohexenone units that segregate cationic lysine and hydrophobic valine side chains on opposite faces of the beta-strand. (1)H NMR dilution studies demonstrated that despite the incorporation of alternating d- and l-amino acids in order to obtain facial amphiphilicity, these oligomers are capable of dimerizing to beta-sheet mimics in a manner similar to the oligomers containing all l-amino acids. The ability of the molecules to disrupt phospholipid vesicles mimicking the membranes of both bacterial and mammalian cells was investigated using a fluorescent dye leakage assay. Several of the oligomers were found to exhibit activity and selectivity for the bacterial over mammalian membranes. Overall, these studies demonstrate the promise of this class of molecules for the development of new potential antibiotics and provide information on the structural features that are important for activity.

  8. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  9. Urinary tract infection (UTI) multi-bacteria multi-antibiotic testing using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Kastanos, Evdokia; Pitris, Costas

    2013-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major health care problem mostly caused by the inappropriate use of antibiotics. At the root of the problem lies the current method for determination of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics which requires overnight cultures. Physicians suspecting an infection usually prescribe an antibiotic without waiting for the results. This practice aggravates the problem of bacterial resistance. In this work, a rapid method of diagnosis and antibiogram for a bacterial infection was developed using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) with silver nanoparticles. SERS spectra of three species of gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, Proteus spp., and Klebsiella spp. were obtained after 0 and 4 hour exposure to the seven different antibiotics. Even though the concentration of bacteria was low (2x105 cfu/ml), species classification was achieved with 94% accuracy using spectra obtained at 0 hours. Sensitivity or resistance to antibiotics was predicted with 81%-100% accuracy from spectra obtained after 4 hours of exposure to the different antibiotics. With the enhancement provided by SERS, the technique can be applied directly to urine or blood samples, bypassing the need for overnight cultures. This technology can lead to the development of rapid methods of diagnosis and antibiogram for a variety of bacterial infections.

  10. [When the antibiotic miracle turns into a nightmare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trémolières, François

    2010-11-01

    Antibiotics have been a true miracle. Would it end in a nightmare? Possibly. Since 1941, the antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections has been a revolution. The golden age lasted half a century, a period during which infectious diseases were considered definitely defeated. And although from the beginning some kind of bacterial resistance was observed, a strong long-lasting belief was that continuous innovation and invention of new molecules would keep providing a step ahead in the war waged between the human and microbes. For twenty years the resistances became each year a greater concern. Having first hit the hospital, they now affect the community. New effective antibiotics are scarce, and innovation once thought endless, stopped. Today, to escape the nightmare of a return to the pre-antibiotic era, we must find a way to curb the spread of resistant bacteria, change radically our irresponsible squander of antibiotics, and give ways to new treatments effective against future resistant pathogens. These topics are developed in the present paper dealing with the real risk that these 20th century wonder of the medical science, become an object of memory.

  11. Incentivizing Antibiotic Research and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Scandlen-Finken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic Resistance is an international threat, killing thousands and infecting millions. Although certain populations may be at an increased risk for infections, anyone can find themselves compromised with a multi-drug resistant infection. Treatments are becoming more complicated as the bacteria becomes more elusive. Cures are becoming less certain, and the future antibiotic arsenal is looking thin. Although there are many talented scientists and capable drug development entities, the funding and returns on investment are not sufficient to entice antibiotic research and development. This paper explores the current situation regarding antibiotic resistance and its casualties, as well as the mechanisms being employed to overcome the increase in resistance, and decrease in antibiotic effectiveness. Through analysis of antibiotic research, development, and regulation, this paper adds to the discussion by filling in the current gaps regarding the procurement of sustainable funding via an insurance model framework. By incentivizing the pharmaceutical industry to invest in antibiotic research, and by guaranteeing returns on investment, a global solution to the current antibiotic resistance problem can be contained.   Type: Student Project

  12. EAMJ Antibiotic May 2010.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-05-01

    May 1, 2010 ... of E. coli, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp and antibiotic resistance genes from these bacteria may be co-transferred to humans (4,5). The shedding of pathogens by asymptomatic animals is increasing concern as a source, distribution of food borne diseases. (FBDs) and antibiotic resistance (6-8).

  13. The Antibiotic Resistance Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The term "antibiotic" was first proposed by Vuillemin in 1889 but was first used in the current sense by Walksman in 1941. An antibiotic is defined as a "derivative produced by the metabolism of microorganisms that possess antibacterial activity at low concentrations and is not toxic to the host." In this article, the author describes how…

  14. Monitoring antibiotic residues in honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Cristina Cara,

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Next to the beta-lactam antibiotics in veterinary medicine, streptomycin is one of the mostly used antibiotics. High concentration of streptomycin could lead to ototoxic and nephrotoxic effects. Low concentration – as found in food – may cause allergies, destroy the intestinal flora and favor immunity to some pathogenic microorganisms. In 1948 chlortetracycline was isolated by Duggan as a metabolite and this was the first antibiotic substance of the group of tetracyclines. In the present paper there are presented the monitoring of the antibiotic residues in honey from Timis County. The residues of tetracycline and streptomycin in honey were determined by the method ELISA – a quantitative method of detection. The microtitre wells are coated with tetracycline and anti-streptomycin antibodies. Free antibiotic and immobilized antibiotic compete with the added antibiotic antibody (competitive immunoassay reaction. Any unbound antibody is then removed in a washing step. Bound conjugate enzymes convert the colorless chromogen into a blue product. The addition ofthe stop reagent leads to a color change from blue to yellow. The measurement is made photometrically at 450 nm. The absorption is inversely proportional to the antibiotic concentration in the sample.

  15. Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. M Brand, D Bisoz. Abstract. Background. Antibiotic prophylaxis for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is controversial. We set out to assess the current antibiotic prescribing practice among ...

  16. Bowel habits after gastric bypass versus the duodenal switch operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserberg, Nir; Hamoui, Nahid; Petrone, Patrizio; Crookes, Peter F; Kaufman, Howard S

    2008-12-01

    One of the perceived disadvantages of the biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch operation is diarrhea. The aim of this study was to compare the bowel habits of patients after duodenal switch operation or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. A prospective comparative case series design was used. Forty-six patients who underwent duodenal switch (n=28) or gastric bypass (n=18) were asked to complete a daily diary for 14 days after losing least 50% of their excess body weight. Data were collected on number of bowel episodes, incontinence, urgency, stool consistency, and awakening from sleep to defecate. Background variables were recorded from the medical files. The duodenal switch group was heavier (body mass index 53.5 vs 47.0 kg/m(2), p=0.03) and older (47.5 vs 41.0 years, p=NS) than the gastric bypass group. Median time to 50% excess body weight loss was 22 months in the duodenal switch group compared to 10.0 months in the gastric bypass group (p=0.001). Patients after duodenal switch surgery reported a median of 23.5 bowel episodes over the 14-day study period compared to 16.5 in the gastric bypass group (p=NS). There was no between-group differences in any of the other bowel parameters studied. Although duodenal switch is associated with more bowel episodes than gastric bypass, the difference is not statistically significant. Bowel habits are similar in patients who achieve 50% estimated body weight loss with duodenal switch surgery or gastric bypass.

  17. Molecular and crystal structure of the antibiotic enniatin B, a secondary microbial metabolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukhlistova, N.E.; Tishchenko, G.N.; Tolstykh, I.V.; Zenkova, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    Single crystals of the secondary microbial metabolite C 33 H 57 N 3 O 9 ·1(2/3)H 2 O with the known molecular weight were studied by the method of X-ray diffraction analysis, where a=b=15.102(3) A, c=14.548(3) A, sp. gr.R3, R=0.057. In the course of the structure determination, it was established that the substance is a natural antibiotic, namely, enniatin B. The conformation of its molecule is similar to that of the known synthetic antibiotic. The main difference between the natural and synthesized forms reduces to the different numbers of water molecules and their arrangement in the cavity of the antibiotic molecule

  18. Antibiotics for acute maxillary sinusitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahovuo-Saloranta, Anneli; Borisenko, Oleg V; Kovanen, Niina

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Expert opinions vary on the appropriate role of antibiotics for sinusitis, one of the most commonly diagnosed conditions among adults in ambulatory care. OBJECTIVES: We examined whether antibiotics are effective in treating acute sinusitis, and if so, which antibiotic classes...... are the most effective. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2007, Issue 3); MEDLINE (1950 to May 2007) and EMBASE (1974 to June 2007). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antibiotics with placebo...... or antibiotics from different classes for acute maxillary sinusitis in adults. We included trials with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, whether or not confirmed by radiography or bacterial culture. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least two review authors independently screened search results, extracted...

  19. The Prehistory of Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Julie; Waglechner, Nicholas; Wright, Gerard

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global problem that is reaching crisis levels. The global collection of resistance genes in clinical and environmental samples is the antibiotic "resistome," and is subject to the selective pressure of human activity. The origin of many modern resistance genes in pathogens is likely environmental bacteria, including antibiotic producing organisms that have existed for millennia. Recent work has uncovered resistance in ancient permafrost, isolated caves, and in human specimens preserved for hundreds of years. Together with bioinformatic analyses on modern-day sequences, these studies predict an ancient origin of resistance that long precedes the use of antibiotics in the clinic. Understanding the history of antibiotic resistance is important in predicting its future evolution. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. Antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Macià, María D.

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with a wide range of infections, from those related to exogenous devices, such as catheters or prosthetic joints, to chronic tissue infections such as those occurring in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Biofilms are recalcitrant to antibiotic treatment due...... to multiple tolerance mechanisms (phenotypic resistance). This causes persistence of biofilm infections in spite of antibiotic exposure which predisposes to antibiotic resistance development (genetic resistance). Understanding the interplay between phenotypic and genetic resistance mechanisms acting...... on biofilms, as well as appreciating the diversity of environmental conditions of biofilm infections which influence the effect of antibiotics are required in order to optimize the antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections. Here, we review the current knowledge on phenotypic and genetic resistance...

  1. Antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute bronchitis is a self-limiting infectious disease characterized by acute cough with or without sputum but without signs of pneumonia. About 90% of cases are caused by viruses. AREAS COVERED: Antibiotics for acute bronchitis have been associated with an approximately half......-day reduction in duration of cough. However, at follow-up there are no significant differences in overall clinical improvement inpatients treated with antibiotics compared with those receiving placebo. Despite this, antibiotics are administered to approximately two thirds of these patients. This review...... discusses the reason for this antibiotic overprescription. Other therapies targeted to control symptoms have also demonstrated a marginal or no effect. EXPERT COMMENTARY: Clinicians should be aware of the marginal effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. Some strategies like the use of rapid tests, delayed...

  2. Antibiotic tolerance and microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We study the dynamics of antibiotic action within hydrodynamic flow chamber biofilms of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using isogenic mutants and fluorescent gene...... expression reporters and we address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. The dynamics of microbial killing is monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Our work shows that the apparent increased antibiotic tolerance is due to the formation...... of antibiotic tolerant subpopulations within the biofilm. The formation of these subpopulations is highly variable and dependent on the antibiotic used, the biofilm structural organization and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms....

  3. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  4. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  5. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  6. Urinary tract infection diagnosis and response to antibiotics using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastanos, Evdokia; Kyriakides, Alexandros; Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Pitris, Constantinos

    2009-02-01

    Urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram require a 48 hour waiting period using conventional methods. This results in ineffective treatments, increased costs and most importantly in increased resistance to antibiotics. In this work, a novel method for classifying bacteria and determining their sensitivity to an antibiotic using Raman spectroscopy is described. Raman spectra of three species of gram negative Enterobacteria, most commonly responsible for urinary tract infections, were collected. The study included 25 samples each of E.coli, Klebsiella p. and Proteus spp. A novel algorithm based on spectral ratios followed by discriminant analysis resulted in classification with over 94% accuracy. Sensitivity and specificity for the three types of bacteria ranged from 88-100%. For the development of an antibiogram, bacterial samples were treated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin to which they were all sensitive. Sensitivity to the antibiotic was evident after analysis of the Raman signatures of bacteria treated or not treated with this antibiotic as early as two hours after exposure. This technique can lead to the development of new technology for urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram with same day results, bypassing urine cultures and avoiding all undesirable consequences of current practice.

  7. Enteropathogens and antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Torralba, Ana; García-Esteban, Coral; Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2018-01-01

    Infectious gastroenteritis remains a public health problem. The most severe cases are of bacterial origin. In Spain, Campylobacter and Salmonella are the most prevalent bacterial genus, while Yersinia and Shigella are much less frequent. Most cases are usually self-limiting and antibiotic therapy is not generally indicated, unless patients have risk factors for severe infection and shigellosis. Ciprofloxacin, third generation cephalosporins, azithromycin, ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and doxycycline are the most recommended drugs. The susceptibility pattern of the different bacteria determines the choice of the most appropriate treatment. The aim of this review is to analyse the current situation, developments, and evolution of resistance and multidrug resistance in these 4 enteric pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Annular MHD Physics for Turbojet Energy Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The use of annular Hall type MHD generator/accelerator ducts for turbojet energy bypass is evaluated assuming weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges. The equations for a 1-D, axisymmetric MHD generator/accelerator are derived and numerically integrated to determine the generator/accelerator performance characteristics. The concept offers a shockless means of interacting with high speed inlet flows and potentially offers variable inlet geometry performance without the complexity of moving parts simply by varying the generator loading parameter. The cycle analysis conducted iteratively with a spike inlet and turbojet flying at M = 7 at 30 km altitude is estimated to have a positive thrust per unit mass flow of 185 N-s/kg. The turbojet allowable combustor temperature is set at an aggressive 2200 deg K. The annular MHD Hall generator/accelerator is L = 3 m in length with a B(sub r) = 5 Tesla magnetic field and a conductivity of sigma = 5 mho/m for the generator and sigma= 1.0 mho/m for the accelerator. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the generator is eta(sub sg) = 84 percent at an enthalpy extraction ratio, eta(sub Ng) = 0.63. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the accelerator is eta(sub sa) = 81 percent at an enthalpy addition ratio, eta(sub Na) = 0.62. An assessment of the ionization fraction necessary to achieve a conductivity of sigma = 1.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 1.90 X 10(exp -6), and for sigma = 5.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 9.52 X 10(exp -6).

  9. Non-genetic mechanisms communicating antibiotic resistance: rethinking strategies for antimicrobial drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Valvano, Miguel A

    2012-10-01

    Infections by multidrug-resistant bacteria are of great concern worldwide. In many cases, resistance is not due to the presence of specific antibiotic-modifying enzymes, but rather associated with a general impermeability of the bacterial cell envelope. The molecular bases of this intrinsic resistance are not completely understood. Moreover, horizontal gene transfers cannot solely explain the spread of intrinsic resistance among bacterial strains. This review focuses on the increased intrinsic antibiotic resistance mediated by small molecules. These small molecules can either be secreted from bacterial cells of the same or different species (e.g., indole, polyamines, ammonia, and the Pseudomonas quinolone signal) or be present in the bacterial cell milieu, whether in the environment, such as indole acetic acid and other plant hormones, or in human tissues and body fluids, such as polyamines. These molecules are metabolic byproducts that act as infochemicals and modulate bacterial responses toward antibiotics leading to increasing or decreasing resistance levels. The non-genetic mechanisms of antibiotic response modulation and communication discussed in this review should reorient our thinking of the mechanisms of intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and its spread across bacterial cell populations. The identification of chemical signals mediating increased intrinsic antibiotic resistance will expose novel critical targets for the development of new antimicrobial strategies.

  10. Nonmammalian Vertebrate Antibiotic Peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Petr; Trebichavský, Ilja; Sigler, Karel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2003), s. 709-724 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/01/0917; GA ČR GA301/02/1232; GA AV ČR IBS5020202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : immunoglobulin * t-cell receptors * molecules mhc Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.857, year: 2003

  11. New approach to use of polyene antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimova, V.Kh.; Aliyeva, I.N.; Aliyev, D.I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: This work deals with comparative analysis of physicochemical characteristics of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and polyene antibiotics (PA), their separate and combined effects on the membrane permeability. Radioprotective and antitumor properties of DMSO-PA complex and the prospects of its use in medicine are discussed. Our data show that DMSO has certain radioprotective properties. A single intraperitoneal injection of 0,01 ml DMSO to mice of 18-20 g body weight 30 min prior to irradiation increased the viability of animals. Thus, the survival of experimental animals by the twelfth day after irradiation was 29 %, whereas the animals of the control group died. Radioprotective properties of DMSO are enhanced upon its combination with PA. The latter was injected intraperitoneally to mice from mother liquor (1 mg antibiotic per 1 ml DMSO) in a dosage of 0.01 mg/kg animal body weight, 30 min before irradiation to 7 Gy. Among the PA studied, the most efficient were levorin and methylated levorin complexed with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The viability of experimental animals by the twelfth after irradiation was 100 %, versus only 33.3 % in control.The enhancement of radioprotective properties of DMSO complexed with PA is, probably, due to the fact that owing to the existence in PA molecules of a conjugated double bonds, a significant part of the energy of ionizing radiation can be absorbed by this system

  12. WITHDRAWN. Antibiotics for treating leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidugli, Fábio; Castro, Aldemar A; Atallah, Alvaro N; Araújo, Maurício G

    2010-01-20

    Leptospirosis is a parasitic disease transmitted by animals. Severe leptospirosis may result in hospitalisation and about five per cent of the patients die. In clinical practice, penicillin is widely used for treating leptospirosis. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of antibiotics versus placebo or other antibiotic regimens in treating leptospirosis. We addressed the following clinical questions: a) Are treatment regimens with antibiotics more efficient than placebo for leptospirosis? b) Are treatment regimens with antibiotics safe when compared to placebo for leptospirosis? c) Which antibiotic regimen is the most efficient and safest in treating leptospirosis? Electronic searches and searches of the identified articles were combined. Randomised clinical trials in which antibiotics were used as treatment for leptospirosis. Language, date, or other restrictions were not applied. Patients with clinical manifestations of leptospirosis. Any antibiotic regimen compared with a control group (placebo or another antibiotic regimen). Data and methodological quality of each trial were independently extracted and assessed by two reviewers. The random effects model was used irrespective of significant statistical heterogeneity. Three trials met inclusion criteria. Allocation concealment and double blind methods were not clearly described in two. Of the patients enrolled, 75 were treated with placebo and 75 with antibiotics: 61 (81.3%) penicillin and 14 (18.6%) doxycycline. The patients assigned to antibiotics compared to placebo showed: a) Mortality: 1% (1/75) versus 4% (3/75); risk difference -2%, 95% confidence interval -8% to 4%. b) Duration of hospital stay (days): weighted mean difference 0.30, 95% confidence interval -1.26 to 1.86. c) Prolonged hospital stay (> seven days): 30% (7/23) versus 74% (14/19); risk difference -43%, 95% confidence interval -70% to -16%. Number needed-to-treat 3, 95% confidence interval 2 to 7. d) Period of disappearance of fever (days

  13. Double endoscopic bypass for gastric outlet obstruction and biliary obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer Gutierrez, Olaya I.; Nieto, Jose; Irani, Shayan; James, Theodore; Pieratti Bueno, Renata; Chen, Yen-I; Bukhari, Majidah; Sanaei, Omid; Kumbhari, Vivek; Singh, Vikesh K.; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Baron, Todd H.; Khashab, Mouen A.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims  Double endoscopic bypass entails EUS-guided gastroenterostomy (EUS-GE) and EUS-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) in patients who present with gastric outlet and biliary obstruction. We report a multicenter experience with double endoscopic bypass. Patients and methods  Retrospective, multicenter series involving 3 US centers. Patients who underwent double endoscopic bypass for malignant gastric and biliary obstruction from 1/2015 to 12/2016 were included. Primary outcome was clinical success defined as tolerance of oral intake and resolution of cholestasis. Secondary outcomes included technical success, re-interventions and adverse events (AE). Results  Seven patients with pancreatic head cancer (57.1 % females; mean age 64.6 ± 12.5 years) underwent double endoscopic bypass. Four patients had EUS-GE and EUS-BD performed during the same session with a mean procedure time of 70 ± 20.4 minutes. EUS-GE and EUS-BD were technically successful in all patients, all of whom were able to tolerate oral intake with resolution of cholestasis in 6 (87.5 %). One patient had a repeat EUS-BD with normalization of bilirubin. There were no adverse events. Conclusions  Double endoscopic bypass is feasible and effective when performed by experienced operators. Studies comparing this novel concept to existing techniques are warranted. PMID:28924596

  14. The influence of core bypass flow during SBLOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maselj, A.; Jurkovic, M.

    1996-01-01

    Many parameters affect the behaviour of a NPP during a Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). The bypass flow between the core side and the downcomer is one of them. Different PWRs have different values of core bypass flow. In spite of the complexity of the real situation in the primary system during SBLOCA, some fundamental details of the phenomena can be explained with simplified mathematical models, which relate on basic parameters of the primary coolant. These models define the conditions for loop seal clearance and final results are confirmed with measured values. The analysis presented in the paper refers to Bethsy Test 9.1.b SB LOCA scenario, with variation of core bypass flow. Basic RELAP5 input model calculation results show very good agreement with the experimental data. The core liquid level depression before loop seal clearance is lower in case of smaller core bypass flow. This affects the fuel clad temperature because of different heat transfer mechanisms. Time of loop seal clearance is delayed with larger core bypass flow and consequently lower differential pressure between downcomer and core. (author)

  15. Curing bacteria of antibiotic resistance: reverse antibiotics, a novel class of antibiotics in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Morimoto, Yuh; Baba, Tadashi; Umekita, Maya; Akamatsu, Yuzuru

    2012-06-01

    By screening cultures of soil bacteria, we re-discovered an old antibiotic (nybomycin) as an antibiotic with a novel feature. Nybomycin is active against quinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with mutated gyrA genes but not against those with intact gyrA genes against which quinolone antibiotics are effective. Nybomycin-resistant mutant strains were generated from a quinolone-resistant, nybomycin-susceptible, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain Mu 50. The mutants, occurring at an extremely low rate (generation), were found to have their gyrA genes back-mutated and to have lost quinolone resistance. Here we describe nybomycin as the first member of a novel class of antibiotics designated 'reverse antibiotics'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  16. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2013-07-31

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  17. Inhibiting scrapie neuroinvasion by polyene antibiotic treatment of SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringue, V; Lasmézas, C I; Adjou, K T; Demaimay, R; Lamoury, F; Deslys, J P; Seman, M; Dormont, D

    1999-07-01

    The polyene antibiotic MS-8209 is currently one of the most effective drugs in the treatment of experimental scrapie. However, its mechanism of action and its site of intervention in the pathogenetical process of scrapie infection are largely unknown. It has been shown previously that the infection of immunodeficient SCID mice by the peripheral route provides a reliable model for direct scrapie neuroinvasion, bypassing the lymphoreticular system. Indeed, a proportion of SCID mice develop scrapie after a similar time to immunocompetent mice, despite their severe immune impairment. This model is now used to clarify the targets of MS-8209. In SCID mice, MS-8209 treatment protected against infection but did not prolong survival time. In SCID mice immunologically reconstituted prior to inoculation, the drug delayed the disease without an effect on the attack rate. These findings strongly suggest that MS-8209 acts by hampering the first step of the neuroinvasion process, i.e. the uptake of the infectious agent by peripheral nerve endings. The mechanism leading to the inhibition of agent propagation to nervous cells is discussed with regard to the properties of polyene antibiotics.

  18. Antibiotics and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Maria Lia; Prantera, Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by an altered composition of gut microbiota (dysbiosis) that may contribute to their development. Antibiotics can alter the bacterial flora, and a link between antibiotic use and onset of Crohn's disease (CD), but not ulcerative colitis, has been reported. The hypothesis that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) could be an etiologic agent of CD has not been confirmed by a large study on patients treated by an association of antibiotics active against MAP. The observations supporting a role of intestinal microbiota in CD pathogenesis provide the rationale for a therapeutic manipulation of the intestinal flora through the employment of antibiotics. However, current data do not strongly support a therapeutic benefit from antibiotics, and there is still controversy regarding their use as primary therapy for treatment of acute flares of CD, and for postoperative recurrence prevention. Nevertheless, clinical practice and some studies suggest that a subgroup of patients with colonic involvement, early disease, and abnormal laboratory test of inflammation may respond better to antibiotic treatment. Since their long-term use is frequently complicated by a high rate of side effects, the use of antibiotics that work locally appears to be promising.

  19. Antibiotics and the resistant microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Morten; Dantas, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery and clinical application of antibiotics, pathogens and the human microbiota have faced a near continuous exposure to these selective agents. A well-established consequence of this exposure is the evolution of multidrug-resistant pathogens, which can become virtually untreatable....... Less appreciated are the concomitant changes in the human microbiome in response to these assaults and their contribution to clinical resistance problems. Studies have shown that pervasive changes to the human microbiota result from antibiotic treatment and that resistant strains can persist for years...... expand our understanding of the interplay between antibiotics and the microbiome....

  20. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP, can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy.

  1. Antibiotics as CECs: An Overview of the Hazards Posed by Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Ivan Scott

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTMonitoring programs have traditionally monitored legacy contaminants but are shifting focus to Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs. CECs present many challenges for monitoring and assessment, because measurement methods don't always exist nor have toxicological studies been fully conducted to place results in proper context. Also some CECs affect metabolic pathways to produce adverse outcomes that are not assessed through traditional toxicological evaluations. Antibiotics are CECs that pose significant environmental risks including development of both toxic effects at high doses and antibiotic resistance at doses well below the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC which kill bacteria and have been found in nearly half of all sites monitored in the US. Antimicrobial resistance has generally been attributed to the use of antibiotics in medicine for humans and livestock as well as aquaculture operations. The objective of this study was to assess the extent and magnitude of antibiotics in the environment and estimate their potential hazards in the environment. Antibiotics concentrations were measured in a number of monitoring studies which included Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTP effluent, surface waters, sediments and biota. A number of studies reported levels of Antibiotic Resistant Microbes (ARM in surface waters and some studies found specific ARM genes (e.g. the blaM-1 gene in E. coli which may pose additional environmental risk. High levels of this gene were found to survive WWTP disinfection and accumulated in sediment at levels 100-1000 times higher than in the sewerage effluent, posing potential risks for gene transfer to other bacteria.in aquatic and marine ecosystems. Antibiotic risk assessment approaches were developed based on the use of MICs and MIC Ratios [High (Antibiotic Resistant/Low (Antibiotic Sensitive MIC] for each antibiotic indicating the range of bacterial adaptability to each antibiotic to help define the No

  2. Robotically assisted totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Mick, Stephanie; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Nair, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Robotically assisted totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass surgery has emerged as a feasible and efficient alternative to conventional full sternotomy coronary artery bypass graft surgery in selected patients. This minimally invasive approach using the daVinci robotic system allows fine intrathoracic maneuvers and excellent view of the coronary arteries. Both on-pump and off-pump operations can be performed to treat single and multivessel disease. Hybrid approaches have the potential of offering complete revascularization with the “best of both worlds” from surgery (internal mammary artery anastomosis in less invasive fashion) and percutaneous coronary intervention (least invasive approach). In this article we review the indications, techniques, short and long term results, as well as current developments in totally endoscopic robotic coronary artery bypass operations. PMID:24251021

  3. Right ventricle contractility during early postoperative period after coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Е. Баутин

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Emphasis in this research was placed on contractility of the right ventricle with regard to its relationship with systemic hemodynamics in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. The study included 25 patients (14 males, 11 females, mean age was 587 years admitted to ICU after CABG under CPB. All patients required inotropic therapy. The criterion for prescribing inotropic support in the postoperative period was a drop of the stroke volume index of the left ventricle below 35 ml/m 2 provided that the values of this indicator were normal before the perfusion period. Patients with previous pathology of the right ventricle or right coronary artery were excluded from the study. To evaluate the right ventricular function and systemic hemodynamics indicators, use was made of the PiCCO plus system and VoLEF addon device. It was found out that reduced contractility of the right ventricle may cause the reduction in stroke volume of the left ventricle with normal contractility. It was also observed that the increase of preload in patients with right ventricular ejection fraction less than 30% does not improve its function but leads to the increase of its end-diastolic volume. In 68% of cases, the need in inotropic agents in the early postoperative period after CABG was associated with the drop in right ventricle contractility, in 40% - with isolated right ven-tricular dysfunction. Patients with isolated reduction in right ventricle contractility required a longer period of inotropic support and ICU stay as compared with those with left ventricular failure.

  4. Diabetes resolution after one anastomosis gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Abeid, Adam; Lessing, Yonatan; Pencovich, Niv; Dayan, Danit; Klausner, Joseph M; Abu-Abeid, Subhi

    2018-02-01

    Diabetes and other obesity-related diseases are a worldwide pandemic that transcends geographic borders as well as socioeconomic levels. Currently, it is well known that medical treatment alone is insufficient to ensure adequate and sustainable weight loss and co-morbidity resolution. It has been well proven that bariatric surgery can produce almost immediate resolution of diabetes and other co-morbidities as well as long-term weight loss. Here, we present our experience with the one anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB) in terms of weight loss and diabetes resolution with 1 year of follow-up. Large, metropolitan, tertiary, university hospital. A retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent OAGB between March 2015 and March 2016 was performed. Patient demographic characteristics, co-morbidities, operative and postoperative data, as well as first year outcomes were collected and analyzed. There were 407 patients who underwent OAGB (254 females, average age 41.8 ± 12.05 yr, body mass index = 41.7 ± 5.77 kg/m 2 ). Of patients, 102 (25.1%) had diabetes with average glycosylated hemoglobin of 8.64 ± 1.94 g%, 93 (22.8%) had hypertension, 123 (28.8%) had hyperlipidemia, and 35 patients (8.6%) had obstructive sleep apnea. The average length of hospital stay was 2.2 ± .84 days (range, 2-10 d). The average excess weight loss 1 year after surgery was 88.9 ± 27.3. After 1 year, follow-up data were available for more than 85% of the study's general population. Of 102 diabetic patients, only 8 (7.8%) were still considered diabetic and taking antidiabetic medication, with an average glycosylated hemoglobin of 5.4 ± 0.6. OAGB may be performed safely and with promising efficacy as both a primary and a revisional bariatric surgery, and it offers excellent resolution of diabetes. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic medical record interventions and recurrent perioperative antibiotic administration: a before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincker, Alexander; Ben Abdallah, Arbi; Avidan, Michael; Candelario, Penka; Helsten, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Perioperative antibiotics decrease rates of surgical-site infections. Numerous interventions have improved administration of the first antibiotic dose; however, failures in the administration of subsequent doses frequently occur. We hypothesized that modifications to the electronic medical record (EMR) would improve the administration of the second antibiotic dose and that such improvements would be sustained over time. This historical cohort before-and-after study of multipronged alerts in the EMR analyzed 1,348 operations on adult patients. The operations lasted ≥ 240 min, utilized cefazolin as the perioperative antibiotic-constituting 1,348 second and 182 third intraoperative antibiotic doses-and did not involve cardiopulmonary bypass. A decision support intervention provided dosing recommendations when clinicians documented antibiotics. The reminder intervention displayed a continuous bar in the EMR, starting at the time the antibiotics were dosed and ending 15 min before subsequent doses were indicated. The primary endpoints of the study were the change in the proportion of correctly administered second dose of cefazolin, given in accordance with hospital guidelines in the month after implementing the intervention, and whether any improvements declined by three to seven months after implementation. Pre-intervention, 51.4% of second doses of cefazolin were correctly administered. In the immediate post-intervention period, 68.5% were correctly administered, representing a significant absolute improvement of 17.1% (95% confidence interval, 8.1 to 26.1; P pre-intervention). These inexpensive nonintrusive interventions to the EMR provided modest lasting improvements in proper administration of repeated doses of cefazolin. The fact that only approximately 70% compliance was reached highlights the difficulty in addressing this deficiency.

  6. Prophylactic antibiotics versus post- operative antibiotics in herniorraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedulla Khan Kayamkani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative surgical site infections are a major source of illness.  Infection results in longer hospital stay and higher costs.  Uses of preoperative antibiotics have been standardized and are being used routinely in most clinical surgeries and include controversial areas like breast surgery and herniorraphy. Objective of the study is to find out the benefit of prophylactic use of antibiotics in the management of herniorraphy.This project was carried out in a multispeciality tertiary care teaching hospital from 1st-30th April in 2002. Group 1 patients were treated prophylactically half an hour before surgery with single dose of I.V. antibiotics (injection.  Ampicillin 1gm + injection.  Gentamicin 80mg. Group 2 patients were treated post surgery with capsule. Ampicillin 500mg 4 times a day for 7 days and injection. Gentamicin twice a day for first 4 days. In case of group 1 patients only one out of 20 patients (5% was infected.  Whereas in-group 2 patients 5 out of 20 patients (25% were infected. The cost of prophylactic antibiotic treatment was Rs. 25.56 per patient.  The postoperative antibiotic treatment cost was Rs. 220.4 per patient.  That means postoperative treatment is around 8.62 times costlier than prophylactic treatment.             From this study it is evident that prophylactic (preoperative treatment is better than postoperative treatment with antibiotics.

  7. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should be reported and taken into account when interpreting results. Data on emergence of resistance (whether in the body reservoirs or in the bacteria causing infection) are important outcomes. Emergence of resistance should be taken into account when interpreting the evidence on antibiotic treatment in randomized controlled trials or systematic reviews. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Autopsy findings following gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinek, Judy; Livingston, Edward; Cortina, Galen; Fishbein, Michael C

    2002-09-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, currently the most frequently performed surgical procedure for morbid obesity, has a low but significant mortality rate. There are limited data documenting the findings at necropsy in patients who have died following this procedure. To determine cause of death and pathologic processes present in obese subjects dying after gastric bypass surgery. We studied 10 patients who underwent autopsy following gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity between the years 1994 and 2000. There were 6 men and 4 women. The mean age of the patients was 48 years (range, 28-62 years). The mean preoperative weight was 162 kg (range, 112-245 kg), and the mean body mass index was 54 kg/m(2) (range, 39-76 kg/m(2)), similar to all patients undergoing gastric bypass at our institution during the same period. Five deaths were directly attributable to technical complications. Five deaths were attributed to underlying comorbid conditions. One patient died of cirrhosis and one of pulmonary hemorrhage. Three patients died from pulmonary embolism. However, 8 of 10 patients had microscopic evidence of pulmonary emboli, despite prophylaxis for deep vein thrombosis. Most patients had some degree of steatohepatitis and hepatic fibrosis (80% and 70%, respectively). There were no deaths from primary cardiac events. In patients who die after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, half die due to technical complications, whereas the other half die of complications of their obesity. Clinically, only 20% of patients were suspected to have pulmonary emboli, yet at autopsy, 80% of patients had pulmonary emboli. In morbidly obese patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, there is an unexpectedly high rate of clinically silent pulmonary emboli contributing to morbidity and mortality.

  9. Implantable endoscopic gastric bypass - device and experimental procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Marc Oliver; Ho, Chi-Nghia; Rieber, Fabian; Fleisch, Christine; Coscarella, Giorgio; Tognoni, Valeria; Di Lorenzo, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    Malabsorptive bariatric surgery is an effective treatment option for morbid obesity, but may be associated with complications and side effects. We have developed a new experimental approach to creating a gastric bypass through an intraluminal access. The goal is to reduce postoperative complications and to reduce mid-term side-effects of malabsorptive bypass food passage and to allow easy reversion of the procedure. The new procedure is based on an implantable gastric bypass device, installed by combined transoral flexible and minimally invasive abdominal access. The newly developed device and procedure were studied in a pilot experimental trial in the porcine animal model (n=8). Endpoints were the feasibility of the technical procedure, the ability of the animal to eat and digest food, the implant functionality over the survival period and the absence of major complications over a short-term follow-up (one week). The procedure was technically successful in all eight animals. Animals were able to take in food and water till sacrifice. Four animals had major complications (one abdominal wall dehiscence, one invagination ileus of the small bowel, one dehiscence of the gastro-jejunal anastomosis and one myocardial infarction) and did not complete follow-up. In two cases migration of the device into the stomach was observed. The difference between our experimental technique and the gold standard surgical methods for gastric bypass consists of the endoluminal approach by implanting an intraluminal gastric bypass device. This concept avoids gastric transsection and an additional anastomosis and enables an adjustable food passage between the bypass and the natural duodenal passage. Further long-term follow-up studies are required.

  10. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  11. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  12. MOLECULES IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO + , HCN, HNC, and N 2 H + , and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13 CO and H 13 CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (∼100 km s –1 ), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO + do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13 C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  13. Reduced complement activation during cardiopulmonary bypass does not affect the postoperative acute phase response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Goor, J.; Nieuwland, R.; van den Brink, A.; van Oeveren, W.; Rutten, 27818; Tijssen, J.; Eijsman, L.; Rutten, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: In the present study the relationship was evaluated between perioperative inflammation and the postoperative acute phase response in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) assisted by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). CPB circuits contained either non-coated-

  14. A Bypass Program of Supportive Instruction for Secondary Students with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Robert J.

    1979-01-01

    The developmental bypass teaching technique (which provides students an opportunity to bypass their learning deficits) was studied with regard to social studies achievement and classroom behaviors in 50 learning disabled junior high school students. (Author/PHR)

  15. Exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy in evaluating aortocoronary bypass surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Haaz, W.; Segal, B.L.; Kane, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty patients with recurrent symptoms after aortocoronary bypass graft surgery underwent angiography as well as exercise thallium 201 imaging. Exercise imaging has been shown to be highly specific (100 percent in our study) in evaluating patients after bypass surgery. Patients with complete revascularization have normal thallium 201 images. Similarly, exercise-induced defects are seen only in the presence of incomplete revascularization. There are patients, however, with incomplete revascularization with normal exercise images, but these generally limited to the right coronary artery or the diagonal vessels or their grafts

  16. Construct exploit constraint in crash analysis by bypassing canary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Huang, Shuguang; Huang, Hui; Chang, Chao

    2017-08-01

    Selective symbolic execution is a common program testing technology. Developed on the basis of it, some crash analysis systems are often used to test the fragility of the program by constructing exploit constraints, such as CRAX. From the study of crash analysis based on symbolic execution, this paper find that this technology cannot bypass the canary stack protection mechanisms. This paper makes the improvement uses the API hook in Linux. Experimental results show that the use of API hook can effectively solve the problem that crash analysis cannot bypass the canary protection.

  17. Antibiotic Cycling and Antibiotic Mixing: Which One Best Mitigates Antibiotic Resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Miller, Rafael; Gori, Fabio; Iredell, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Can we exploit our burgeoning understanding of molecular evolution to slow the progress of drug resistance? One role of an infection clinician is exactly that: to foresee trajectories to resistance during antibiotic treatment and to hinder that evolutionary course. But can this be done at a hospital-wide scale? Clinicians and theoreticians tried to when they proposed two conflicting behavioral strategies that are expected to curb resistance evolution in the clinic, these are known as “antibiotic cycling” and “antibiotic mixing.” However, the accumulated data from clinical trials, now approaching 4 million patient days of treatment, is too variable for cycling or mixing to be deemed successful. The former implements the restriction and prioritization of different antibiotics at different times in hospitals in a manner said to “cycle” between them. In antibiotic mixing, appropriate antibiotics are allocated to patients but randomly. Mixing results in no correlation, in time or across patients, in the drugs used for treatment which is why theorists saw this as an optimal behavioral strategy. So while cycling and mixing were proposed as ways of controlling evolution, we show there is good reason why clinical datasets cannot choose between them: by re-examining the theoretical literature we show prior support for the theoretical optimality of mixing was misplaced. Our analysis is consistent with a pattern emerging in data: neither cycling or mixing is a priori better than the other at mitigating selection for antibiotic resistance in the clinic. Key words: antibiotic cycling, antibiotic mixing, optimal control, stochastic models. PMID:28096304

  18. Antibiotic Cycling and Antibiotic Mixing: Which One Best Mitigates Antibiotic Resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardmore, Robert Eric; Peña-Miller, Rafael; Gori, Fabio; Iredell, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Can we exploit our burgeoning understanding of molecular evolution to slow the progress of drug resistance? One role of an infection clinician is exactly that: to foresee trajectories to resistance during antibiotic treatment and to hinder that evolutionary course. But can this be done at a hospital-wide scale? Clinicians and theoreticians tried to when they proposed two conflicting behavioral strategies that are expected to curb resistance evolution in the clinic, these are known as "antibiotic cycling" and "antibiotic mixing." However, the accumulated data from clinical trials, now approaching 4 million patient days of treatment, is too variable for cycling or mixing to be deemed successful. The former implements the restriction and prioritization of different antibiotics at different times in hospitals in a manner said to "cycle" between them. In antibiotic mixing, appropriate antibiotics are allocated to patients but randomly. Mixing results in no correlation, in time or across patients, in the drugs used for treatment which is why theorists saw this as an optimal behavioral strategy. So while cycling and mixing were proposed as ways of controlling evolution, we show there is good reason why clinical datasets cannot choose between them: by re-examining the theoretical literature we show prior support for the theoretical optimality of mixing was misplaced. Our analysis is consistent with a pattern emerging in data: neither cycling or mixing is a priori better than the other at mitigating selection for antibiotic resistance in the clinic. : antibiotic cycling, antibiotic mixing, optimal control, stochastic models. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Hadron Molecules Revisted

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longacre, R. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Hadron Molecules are particles made out of hadrons that are held together by self interactions. In this report we discuss seven such molecules and their self interactions. The f0(980), a0(980), f1(1400), ΔN(2150) and π1(1400) molecular structure is given. We predict that two more states the $K\\bar{K}K$(1500) and a1(1400) should be found.

  20. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  1. Utilisation of radiolabeled antibiotic for the diagnosis of infectious foci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khammassi, Sabrine; Gharbi, Sabrine

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear imaging is a non-invasive exploration technique, used for rapid diagnostic of infectious disease .Thus, for osteoarticular infection scintigraphic techniques were proposed to ameliorate the diagnostic sensibility and the use of radiolabeled antibiotics as imaging agents of infectious loci become more and more recognized. In this work, a new sulfanil amid derivative, the N sulfanilamide-ferrocene-carboxamide was chemically synthesized then labeled with technetium-99m, with a radiochemical yield, 87 pour cent. In in-vitro studies were done with E.coli. first , the up-take of labeled molecule was estimated as 40 pour cent. Then, the bacteriostatic al effect of the molecule was de terminated by considering the Optical Density at 600 nm. The obtained results, encourage us to do more, with biodistribution on normal and infected mice; with Staphylococcus aureus. Then to carry out scintigraphic imaging with gamma camera to check out the potentiality of the molecule as an infectious imaging agent. (Author)

  2. [Self-medication with antibiotics in Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olczak, A.; Grzesiowski, P.; Hryniewicz, W.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, the important public health threat, depends on antibiotic overuse/misuse. Self-medication with antibiotics is of serious medical concern. The aim of the study, as a part of SAR project (Self-medication with antibiotic in Europe) was to survey the incidence of this phenomenon.

  3. Antibiotic utilisation for hospitalised paediatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luinge, K; Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    Antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in paediatrics. Because of an overall rise in health care costs, lack of uniformity in drug prescribing and the emergence of antibiotic resistance, monitoring and control of antibiotic use is of growing concern and strict antibiotic policies

  4. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Beatriz Espinosa; Altagracia Martínez, Marina; Sánchez Rodríguez, Martha A; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2009-01-01

    The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community. To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem. We conducted a MedLine search using the key words "determinants", "antibiotic", and "antibiotic resistance" to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded. The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance. Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals.

  5. Assessment of antibiotic susceptibilities, genotypic characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibilities, genotypic characteristics and biofilm formation abilities of antibiotic-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus KACC 13236 (SAS), multiple antibiotic-resistant S. aureus CCARM 3080 (SAR), antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253 (STS) and ...

  6. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Antibiotics Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, Cecilia; Tertis, Mihaela; Galatus, Ramona

    2017-05-24

    Widespread use of antibiotics has led to pollution of waterways, potentially creating resistance among freshwater bacterial communities. Microorganisms resistant to commonly prescribed antibiotics (superbug) have dramatically increased over the last decades. The presence of antibiotics in waters, in food and beverages in both their un-metabolized and metabolized forms are of interest for humans. This is due to daily exposure in small quantities, that, when accumulated, could lead to development of drug resistance to antibiotics, or multiply the risk of allergic reaction. Conventional analytical methods used to quantify antibiotics are relatively expensive and generally require long analysis time associated with the difficulties to perform field analyses. In this context, electrochemical and optical based sensing devices are of interest, offering great potentials for a broad range of analytical applications. This review will focus on the application of magnetic nanoparticles in the design of different analytical methods, mainly sensors, used for the detection of antibiotics in different matrices (human fluids, the environmental, food and beverages samples).

  7. Expedient antibiotics production: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Byers, C.H.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-05-01

    The literature on the manufacture, separation and purification, and clinical uses of antibiotics was reviewed, and a bibliography of the pertinent material was completed. Five antimicrobial drugs, penicillin V and G, (and amoxicillin with clavulanic acid), Cephalexin (a cephalosporin), tetracycline and oxytetracycline, Bacitracin (topical), and sulfonamide (chemically produced) were identified for emergency production. Plants that manufacture antibiotics in the continental United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico have been identified along with potential alternate sites such as those where SCP, enzyme, and fermentation ethanol are produced. Detailed process flow sheets and process descriptions have been derived from the literature and documented. This investigation revealed that a typical antibiotic-manufacturing facility is composed of two main sections: (1) a highly specialized, but generic, fermentation unit and (2) a multistep, complex separation and purification unit which is specific to a particular antibiotic product. The fermentation section requires specialized equipment for operation in a sterile environment which is not usually available in other industries. The emergency production of antibiotics under austere conditions will be feasible only if a substantial reduction in the complexity and degree of separation and purity normally required can be realized. Detailed instructions were developed to assist state and federal officials who would be directing the resumption of antibiotic production after a nuclear attack. 182 refs., 54 figs., 26 tabs.

  8. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electronic absorption spectrum of a molecule often depends on the solvent used. The change in position (and, sometimes, intensity) of the UV/Vis band accompanying a change in the polarity of the medium is called solvatochromism. The phenomenon has its origins in intermolecular solute–solvent interactions, such as ...

  9. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. A Dicopper (II) Complex Hydrolyzes the Phosphate Diester Bond! R N Mukherjee is with the Department of. Chemistry at Indian. Institute of Technology,. Kanpur. 1 DNA: Deoxyribonucleic Acid;. RNA: Ribonucleic Acid; HPNP: 2-Hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate; Phosphodiester: Di- ester of ...

  11. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The design of molecule-based magnets has also been extended to the design of poly-functional molecular magnets, such as those exhibiting second-order optical nonlinearity, liquid crystallinity, or chirality simultaneously with long-range magnetic order. Solubility, low density and biocompatibility are attractive features of ...

  12. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Faraday opened up a new chapter in chemistry when he isolated benzene from the distillate of coal tar. The deceptively simple molecule with the formula C6H6 has triggered many experiments and theoretical proposals. The correct ring struc- ture, shown in 1 (see Figure 1), was assigned by Kekule after his.

  13. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1232-1237. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coordination polymers and molecular systems in which metal ions serve as the source of the ... cobalt, nickel and gadolinium which are themselves ferromagnetic in their bulk state (Box 1). ... their complexes, organic free and ion radicals and molecules such as 02 and NO are good examples of paramagnetic systems.

  15. Excitons: Molecules in flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Forming molecules from atoms is commonplace in dense atomic gases. But it now seems that some two-dimensional materials provide a suitable environment for creating complex molecular states from the hydrogen-like electron-hole pairs that form in semiconductors.

  16. Quantum Interference of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    C60, the third allotropic form of carbon was discovered in 1985 by Kroto and colleagues. These carbon mole- cules have a structure of a truncated icosahedron (see. Figure 5). The truncated icosahedron has 12 pentagon and 20 hexagon rings and has 60 vertices { the shape of a soccer ball. These molecules have been ...

  17. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 5. Molecules to Materials Liquid Crystals and Molecular Conductors. T P Radhakrishnan. Series Article Volume 3 Issue 5 May 1998 pp 6-23. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  20. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms, Molecules and Radiation' will be held at the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore from December 8 to 20. 2014. The Course is primarily aimed at teachers teaching quantum mechanics and/ or atomic and molecular physics at the UG / PG level.

  1. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  2. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 9. Molecule of the Month Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 9 September 1996 pp 66-71. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - A Stable Dibismuthene - A Compound with a Bi-Bi Double Bond. V Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 ... Author Affiliations. V Chandrasekhar1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India.

  4. The Biofilm-Specific Antibiotic Resistance Gene ndvB Is Important for Expression of Ethanol Oxidation Genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Beaudoin, Trevor; Zhang, Li; Hinz, Aaron J.; Parr, Christopher J.; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms are responsible for a large number of persistent infections and are often more resistant to antibiotics than are free-floating bacteria. In a previous study, we identified a Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene, ndvB, which is important for the formation of periplasmic glucans. We established that these glucans function in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance by sequestering antibiotic molecules away from their cellular targets. In this study, we investigate another func...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood through...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through the...

  7. On-pump versus off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlind, Kim Christian; Kjeldsen, Bo Juul; Madsen, Susanne Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    Conventional coronary artery bypass grafting performed with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass is a well-validated treatment for patients with ischemic heart disease. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) has been suggested to reduce the number of perioperative complications, especially...... in elderly patients....

  8. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter nonbiologic...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class II...

  10. Fabrication of nanofiber non-wovens on the melt blowing die with air by-passes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Ting; Yang Kang; Wu Li-Li

    2016-01-01

    The air flow field of the melt blowing die with air by-passes is simulated. The results show that fibers fabricated on the die with air by-passes are much finer than those without air by-passes, which indicates an energy-saving approach to fabricating nanofibers on the melt blowing equipment.

  11. Fabrication of nanofiber non-wovens on the melt blowing die with air by-passes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ting

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The air flow field of the melt blowing die with air by-passes is simulated. The results show that fibers fabricated on the die with air by-passes are much finer than those without air by-passes, which indicates an energy-saving approach to fabricating nanofibers on the melt blowing equipment.

  12. [Mechanism of action of antibiotics:some examples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel-Briand, Y

    1978-01-01

    Antibiotics are very commonly used substances to eradicate bacterial infections by bacteriostatic or even bactericid effect. They act at a very specific stage (target), although other less important or secondary interactions can occur. We studied the interaction of three antibiotic families (beta-lactamins, aminosides, rifampicin) with bacterial cell. Penicillin disturbs the cell wall synthesis and more accurately the glycopeptide (or murein) formation, a substance giving rigidity or shape to bacteria. It acts in the late phase of murein-biosynthesis, when N-acetyl glucosamin -- N-acetyl muramic acid L ala -D glu M-DAP (L lys) -D ala -D ala are linked together by the peptide part, under the effect of several enzymes, particularly transpeptidase and DD-carboxy-peptidase. It would appear that beta-lactame-thiazolidine rings have a steric analogy with dipeptide D-alanyl D-alanine. The result would be that the enzyme would act on the antibiotic instead of peptide: the consequence would be inhibition of the peptidic link, giving an abnormal murein, and an incomplete cell wall i.e. fragile bacteria. Aminosides, particularly Streptomycin, link themselves to 30 S subunit of bacterial ribosome. In this case, it seems that it is a 3''OH function which reacts with lysine (from S 12 protein part of 30 S subunit). The consequence is an alteration in the RNA messager lecture, and a false traduction and consequently protein biosynthesis stops with a decrease of polyribosomes and of the formation of inert 70 S ribosome. Rifamycins, and particularly Rifampicin act by inhibition of RNA messager synthesis. One molecule of antibiotic links itself to one molecule of RNA messager : hydroxyl and cetone function in C1 Cs C21 C23 and "ansa" bridge link to beta subunit of RNA polymerase. This linkage gives a conformational change to the RNA polymerase-DNA complex, inhibiting the catalytic action of this enzyme, and consequently stopping RNA messager and protein synthesis. The study of the

  13. Plasma-potentiated small molecules—possible alternative to antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaka, Kateryna; Bazaka, Olha; Levchenko, Igor; Xu, Shuyan; Ivanova, Elena P.; Keidar, Michael; (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy of the existing arsenal of antibiotics is continuously compromised by their indiscriminative and often excessive use. The antibiotic arsenal can be expanded with agents that have different mechanisms of activity to conventional drugs, such as plant-derived natural antimicrobial small molecules, yet these often lack sufficient activity and selectivity to fulfill the antibiotics requirements and conventional thermochemical methods of their transient activation may not be compatible with biomedical applications. Here, non-equilibrium conditions of atmospheric-pressure plasma are used for rapid, single-step potentiation of activity of select terpenes without the use of chemicals or heating. Substantial potentiation of activity against Staphylococcus aureus cells in planktonic and biofilm states is observed in both inherently antibacterial terpenes, e.g. terpinen-4-ol, and compounds generally considered to have limited effect against S. aureus, e.g. γ-terpinene. The improved biological activity may arise, at least in part, from the changes in the physico–chemical properties of the terpenes induced by plasma-generated chemical species and physical effects, such as electric fields and UV irradiation. This activation approach is generic, and thus can potentially be applied to other molecules and their mixtures in an effort to expand the range of effective antimicrobial agents for deactivation of pathogenic organisms in hygiene, medical and food applications.

  14. [Endoscopic placement of a "plug" made of acellular biomaterial: a new technique for the repair of gastric leak after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf-Filho, Fauze; Lima, Marcelo Simas de; Hondo, Fabio; Giordano-Nappi, José Humberto; Garrido, Teresa; Sakai, Paulo

    2008-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is one of the most commonly performed bariatric surgeries in Brazil. Gastric leaks are relatively uncommon and potentially dangerous complications. The initial management of gastric leaks consists in adequate drainage, nutritional support, antibiotics and acid suppression. In almost 30% of the cases the fistula will become chronic. A novel peroral endoscopic treatment of gastric leaks in Roux-en-Y gastric bypassed patients is presented. An acellular biomaterial was endoscopically placed in the fistulous orifice in order to promote healing and avoid surgery in 25 patients. The time between fistula diagnosis and endoscopic treatment varied from 4 to 25 weeks (median: 7 weeks). Endoscopic treatment was successful in 20 (80%) patients. Fistula closure was obtained after one, two and three sessions in 6 (30%), 11 (55%) and 3 (15%) patients, respectively. No procedure related complications were observed. Endoscopic repair of gastric leak after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass by using an acellular biomaterial is safe and effective. However two or three endoscopic sessions are usually needed.

  15. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  16. Dielectrophoretic assay of bacterial resistance to antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johari, Juliana; Huebner, Yvonne; Hull, Judith C; Dale, Jeremy W; Hughes, Michael P

    2003-01-01

    The dielectrophoretic collection spectra of antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis have been determined. These indicate that in the absence of antibiotic treatment there is a strong similarity between the dielectric properties of sensitive and resistant strains, and that there is a significant difference between the sensitive strains before and after treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin after 24 h exposure. This method offers possibilities for the assessment of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. (note)

  17. Macrolide antibiotics and the airway: antibiotic or non-antibiotic effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, D M

    2010-03-01

    The macrolides are a class of antibiotics widely prescribed in infectious disease. More recently, there has been considerable interest in potential indications for these agents, in addition to their simple antibacterial indications, in a number of lung pathophysiologies.

  18. Antibiotic treatment for Helicobacter pylori: Is the end coming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Young; Choi, Duck Joo; Chung, Jun-Won

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been associated with gastro-duodenal disease and the importance of H. pylori eradication is underscored by its designation as a group I carcinogen. The standard triple therapy consists of a proton pump inhibitor, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, although many other regimens are used, including quadruple, sequential and concomitant therapy regimens supplemented with metronidazole, clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Despite these efforts, current therapeutic regimens lack efficacy in eradication due to antibiotic resistance, drug compliance and antibiotic degradation by the acidic stomach environment. Antibiotic resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole is particularly problematic and several approaches have been proposed to overcome this issue, such as complementary probiotic therapy with Lactobacillus. Other studies have identified novel molecules with an anti-H. pylori effect, as well as tailored therapy and nanotechnology as viable alternative eradication strategies. This review discusses current antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections, limitations of this type of therapy and predicts the availability of newly developed therapies for H. pylori eradication. PMID:26558152

  19. Predicting the need for blood during cardiopulmonary bypass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    ness of autologous blood transfusions during open heart surgery. AR Coetzee, JF Coetzee. Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. Abstract. Background: Haematocrit (Hct) values <18%-20% during cardiopulmonary bypass ...

  20. Emergency bypass post percutaneous atrial ablation: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hargrove, M

    2010-11-01

    A 34-year-old male undergoing percutaneous atrial ablation procedure for paroxysmal fibrillation required emergency sternotomy for cardiac tamponade. The patient had been anticoagulated and had received plavix and aspirin prior to and during the ablation procedure. Seven units of red cell concentrate had been transfused in the cardiac catherisation laboratory. On arrival in theatre, the patient was hypotensive, but was awake on induction of anaesthesia. No recordable blood pressure with non-invasive monitoring was observed. A sternotomy was immediately performed and, on evacuation of the pericardium, a bleeding site was not visible. The patient was commenced on cardiopulmonary bypass. Bleeding site was identified and the defect closed. The patient was weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass with minimal inotropic support and made an uneventful recovery. Bypass time was 38 minutes. A literature review showed a 1% incidence of post-ablation bleeding(1). The incidence of reverting to bypass for such an event has not been reported previously. During these procedures, it might be wise to have the cardiothoracic team notified while atrial ablation procedures are being performed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  1. Changes in Hematology and Calcium Metabolism After Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Dorte; Madsbad, Sten; Kristiansen, Viggo B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concerns regarding nutritional deficiencies have recently emerged after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). METHODS: A total of 835 subjects underwent RYGB, age 43.3 years, body mass index (BMI) 47.2 kg/m(2). Hematological and calcium metabolic variables were measured before, 6, 12, and 24...

  2. Recovery from circulatory depression after coronary artery bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); R.W. Brower (Ronald); H.J. ten Katen (Harald); G.T. Meester (Geert)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe direct traumatic effects of coronary artery bypass surgery may counter-balance the expected improvement of myocardial function in the early postoperative period. In 55 patients, the regional shortening fraction was measured over 12 months using radiopaque epicardial markers pairs

  3. The effect of bypass protein supplementation on the reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Short paper and poster abstracts: 38th Congress of the South African Society of Animal Science. The South African Journal of Animal Science is available online at http://www.sasas.co.za/Sajas.html. 60. The effect of bypass protein supplementation on the reproductive performance of. Merino sheep grazing mixed karoo veld.

  4. Using skeletonised grafts for coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawany, Faizan Imran; Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Khan, Asadullah; Kazi, Abdul Nafey; Naeem, Muhammed

    2014-05-01

    Coronary artery bypass graft surgery relieves angina symptoms and reduces mortality among ischaemic heart disease patients. It remains the gold standard for the treatment of multi-vessel and left main coronary artery disease. It is a well-known fact that internal mammary artery conduits have excellent and long-lasting patency when used for coronary artery bypass grafting. Its supremacy is largely because it prevents atherosclerosis. The old-style internal mammary artery bypass grafting, classically known as pedicle grafting, includes a circular rim of tissue around the graft. Bilateral pedicled internal mammary arteries, especially among diabetic patients, have been reported to cause complications in the sternum like sternal osteomyelitis. In many studies it has been reported that dissection of pedicled internal mammary artery can lead to sternal devascularisation which can lead to higher incidence of infections. Considering the higher incidence of deep sternal infections in patients with double pedicled arterial grafts, dissection of internal mammary artery in skeletonised manner was proposed. In this review, we outline the advantages of skeletonised grafting with respect to incidence of sternal infection, patency rates, blood flow, post-coronary artery bypass graft pain and the length of the graft.

  5. Combined Open-Heart Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CASE DETAILS: A 54-year-old woman suffering from dyspnea, chest pain and decreased left ventricular function (EF=40%) was diagnosed with coronary artery disease (3 vessel disease) and became candidate for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Also, she had multinodular goiter with normal thyroid function test.

  6. Esophageal bypass after failed chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matono, Satoru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Mori, Naoki; Nagano, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiromasa; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal stenosis and/or fistula often occur after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for unresectable esophageal cancer. In such patients, an esophageal stent can help achieve oral intake. However an esophageal stent cannot be inserted where there is complete stenosis or where the tumor is located. In such cases, esophageal bypass surgery may be necessary. Here, we investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients who underwent esophageal bypass surgery in our institution. We reviewed 10 cases of esophageal bypass surgery (gastric tube in 8 cases, colon in 2 cases) after CRT for unresectable esophageal cancer, between 2001 and 2009. There were 5 of stenosis-only cases, 4 fistula-only cases, and 1 case of stenosis and fistula. There were postoperative complications in 5 cases (50%), and all these were treated conservatively and healed. The median survival from surgery to peroral intake was 20 days (range 9-90 days), and the median survival after starting peroral intake was 130 days (range 48-293 days). Esophageal bypass surgery can achieve good performance status and improve peroral intake. (author)

  7. Delayed antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurling, Geoffrey Kp; Del Mar, Chris B; Dooley, Liz; Foxlee, Ruth; Farley, Rebecca

    2017-09-07

    Concerns exist regarding antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) owing to adverse reactions, cost, and antibacterial resistance. One proposed strategy to reduce antibiotic prescribing is to provide prescriptions, but to advise delay in antibiotic use with the expectation that symptoms will resolve first. This is an update of a Cochrane Review originally published in 2007, and updated in 2010 and 2013. To evaluate the effects on clinical outcomes, antibiotic use, antibiotic resistance, and patient satisfaction of advising a delayed prescription of antibiotics in respiratory tract infections. For this 2017 update we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2017), which includes the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infection Group's Specialised Register; Ovid MEDLINE (2013 to 25 May 2017); Ovid Embase (2013 to 2017 Week 21); EBSCO CINAHL Plus (1984 to 25 May 2017); Web of Science (2013 to 25 May 2017); WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (1 September 2017); and ClinicalTrials.gov (1 September 2017). Randomised controlled trials involving participants of all ages defined as having an RTI, where delayed antibiotics were compared to immediate antibiotics or no antibiotics. We defined a delayed antibiotic as advice to delay the filling of an antibiotic prescription by at least 48 hours. We considered all RTIs regardless of whether antibiotics were recommended or not. We used standard Cochrane methodological procedures. Three review authors independently extracted and collated data. We assessed the risk of bias of all included trials. We contacted trial authors to obtain missing information. For this 2017 update we added one new trial involving 405 participants with uncomplicated acute respiratory infection. Overall, this review included 11 studies with a total of 3555 participants. These 11 studies involved acute respiratory infections including acute otitis media (three studies

  8. The fate of inhaled antibiotics after deposition in cystic fibrosis: How to get drug to the bug?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Aukje C; Passé, Kimberly M; Mouton, Johan W; Janssens, Hettie M; Tiddens, Harm A W M

    2017-01-01

    Chronic airway infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are most often treated with inhaled antibiotics of which deposition patterns have been extensively studied. However, the journey of aerosol particles does not end after deposition within the bronchial tree. To review how local conditions affect the clinical efficacy of antibiotic aerosol particles after deposition in the airways of patients with CF. Electronic databases were searched from inception to September 2015. Original studies describing the effect of CF sputum or bacterial factors on antibiotic efficacy and formulations to increase efficacy were included. 35 articles were included which mostly described in vitro studies and mainly investigated aminoglycosides. After deposition, diffusion through the mucus layer was reduced for aminoglycosides, β-lactam antibiotics and fluoroquinolones. Within CF mucus, low oxygen tension adversely affected aminoglycosides, β-lactam antibiotics, and chloramphenicol; and molecules inactivated aminoglycosides but not β-lactam antibiotics. Finally, the alginate layer surrounding Pseudomonas aeruginosa was an important factor in the resistance against all antibiotics. After deposition in the airways, the local efficacy of inhaled antibiotics can be reduced by molecules within CF mucus and the alginate layer surrounding P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Challenge of Efflux-Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The global emergence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a growing threat to antibiotic therapy. The chromosomally encoded drug efflux mechanisms that are ubiquitous in these bacteria greatly contribute to antibiotic resistance and present a major challenge for antibiotic development. Multidrug pumps, particularly those represented by the clinically relevant AcrAB-TolC and Mex pumps of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) superfamily, not only mediate intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) but also are involved in other functions, including the bacterial stress response and pathogenicity. Additionally, efflux pumps interact synergistically with other resistance mechanisms (e.g., with the outer membrane permeability barrier) to increase resistance levels. Since the discovery of RND pumps in the early 1990s, remarkable scientific and technological advances have allowed for an in-depth understanding of the structural and biochemical basis, substrate profiles, molecular regulation, and inhibition of MDR pumps. However, the development of clinically useful efflux pump inhibitors and/or new antibiotics that can bypass pump effects continues to be a challenge. Plasmid-borne efflux pump genes (including those for RND pumps) have increasingly been identified. This article highlights the recent progress obtained for organisms of clinical significance, together with methodological considerations for the characterization of MDR pumps. PMID:25788514

  10. Management Options For Reducing The Release Of Antibiotics And Antibiotic Resistance Genes To The Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water - 77 environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. 78 Objective: To identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and 79 antibiotic resist...

  11. Background antibiotic resistance patterns in antibiotic-free pastured poultry production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a significant public health issue, and agroecosystems are often viewed as major environmental sources of antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens. While the use of antibiotics in agroecosystems can potentially increase AR, appropriate background resistance levels in th...

  12. [Treatment of aorto-coronary saphenous vein bypass lesions: pros and cons of angioplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacq, L; Deleuze, P; Bical, O; Lardoux, H

    2000-08-01

    Heart patients who have undergone a coronary bypass may present with renewed myocardial ischemia, often connected with bypass dysfunction. The saphenous bypass is the most frequently implicated, and palliative revascularization may be envisaged, either by further bypass surgery, or by angioplasty. The latter approach has been developed since the beginning of the 1980s, and since that time there has been considerable technical and pharmacological progress in performing this type of graft. However the indications for angioplasty and its comparison with reoperation remain controversial. In the present study, it therefore seemed pertinent to include the respective opinions of two experts in the field of angioplasty and coronary bypass surgery.

  13. Intraoperative Evaluation of Reverse Bypass Using a Naturally Formed "Bonnet" Superficial Temporal Artery: Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagm, Alhusain; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Takatoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In reverse bypass that used a naturally formed "bonnet" superficial temporal artery, intraoperative volume flow measurement quantifies flow augmentation after revascularization, confirms flow preservation, and identifies inadvertent vessel compromise. A 75-year-old man presented with transient ischemic attacks attributed to right internal carotid artery stenosis. He underwent successful reverse bypass via a naturally formed "bonnet" superficial temporal artery middle cerebral artery bypass. As the result of proper intraoperative volume flow evaluation, a successful reverse bypass was achieved. Modification of the intraoperative stroke risk and prediction of the long-term patency after reverse bypass can be achieved by meticulous intraoperative blood flow evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cancer in the gastric remnant after gastric bypass: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khitin, Lev; Roses, Robert E; Birkett, Desmond H

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer in the gastric stump after a Bilroth II subtotal gastrectomy is a well-recognized entity. However, gastric cancer in the bypassed gastric remnant after a gastric bypass operation for morbid obesity has not been well described, and only 2 such cases have been reported in the English literature. This case report presents a patient who developed gastric cancer in the defunctionalized, bypassed stomach 22 years after undergoing an open gastric bypass with a Roux-en-Y gastro-jejunostomy for morbid obesity. The problems of monitoring the defunctionalized bypassed stomach after gastric stapling and gastro-jejunostomy are discussed.

  15. Single-Molecule Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2010-04-01

    Single-molecule magnets straddle the classical and quantum mechanical worlds, displaying many fascinating phenomena. They may have important technological applications in information storage and quantum computation. We review the physical properties of two prototypical molecular nanomagnets, Mn12-acetate and Fe8: Each behaves as a rigid, spin-10 object and exhibits tunneling between up and down directions. As temperature is lowered, the spin-reversal process evolves from thermal activation to pure quantum tunneling. At low temperatures, magnetic avalanches occur in which the magnetization of an entire sample rapidly reverses. We discuss the important role that symmetry-breaking fields play in driving tunneling and in producing Berry-phase interference. Recent experimental advances indicate that quantum coherence can be maintained on timescales sufficient to allow a meaningful number of quantum computing operations to be performed. Efforts are under way to create monolayers and to address and manipulate individual molecules.

  16. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  17. Rapid electrochemical phenotypic profiling of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besant, Justin D; Sargent, Edward H; Kelley, Shana O

    2015-07-07

    Rapid phenotyping of bacteria to identify drug-resistant strains is an important capability for the treatment and management of infectious disease. At present, the rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility is hindered by the requirement that, in existing devices, bacteria must be pre-cultured for 2-3 days to reach detectable levels. Here we report a novel electrochemical approach that achieves rapid readout of the antibiotic susceptibility profile of a bacterial infection within one hour. The electrochemical reduction of a redox-active molecule is monitored that reports on levels of metabolically-active bacteria. Bacteria are captured in miniaturized wells, incubated with antimicrobials and monitored for resistance. This electrochemical phenotyping approach is effective with clinically-relevant levels of bacteria, and provides results comparable to culture-based analysis. Results, however, are delivered on a much faster timescale, with resistance profiles available after a one hour incubation period.

  18. Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity Of Antibiotics Mixed With Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    Current producers of antimicrobial technology have a long lasting, environmentally safe, non-leaching, water soluble solution that will eventually replace all poisons and heavy metals. The transition metal ions inevitably exist as metal complexes in biological systems by interaction with the numerous molecules possessing groupings capable of complexation or chelation. Nanoparticles of metal oxides offer a wide variety of potential applications in medicine due to the unprecedented advances in nanobiotechnology research. the bacterial action of antibiotics like penicillin, erythryomycin, ampicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin etc. and that of a mixture of antibiotics and metal and metal oxide nanoparticles like zinc oxide, zirconium, silver and gold on microbes was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units (CFU) and turbidimetry.

  19. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  20. Antibiotic resistance: the Iowa experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nancy

    2002-11-01

    In the past 10 years, the number of strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and other common respiratory pathogens that are resistant to penicillin has increased. The Iowa Department of Public Health convened a multidisciplinary task force in January 1998 to develop strategies to combat antibiotic resistance in the state because they were alarmed by these reports. Within 18 months, the task force implemented statewide surveillance of resistant organisms and posted information about the surveillance on the Internet, distributed a public health guide on judicious antibiotic use and infection control measures to 7500 healthcare providers, and held a press conference to inform the public about antibiotic resistance. The task force collaborated with several major insurers in the state to profile the top prescribers of antibiotic agents in their plan. The profiling and educational interventions led to a substantial decrease in both overall antibiotic prescribing and drug costs. Other states may want to undertake similar programs to help protect their citizens from infections caused by resistant pathogens.

  1. [Antibiotic resistance: A global crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of antibiotics into clinical practice represented one of the most important interventions for the control of infectious diseases. Antibiotics have saved millions of lives and have also brought a revolution in medicine. However, an increasing threat has deteriorated the effectiveness of these drugs, that of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, which is defined here as the ability of bacteria to survive in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit/kill others of the same species. In this review some recent and important examples of resistance in pathogens of concern for mankind are mentioned. It is explained, according to present knowledge, the process that led to the current situation in a short time, evolutionarily speaking. It begins with the resistance genes, continues with clones and genetic elements involved in the maintenance and dissemination, and ends with other factors that contribute to its spread. Possible responses to the problem are also reviewed, with special reference to the development of new antibiotics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. [New antibiotics - standstill or progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademacher, J; Welte, T

    2017-04-01

    The development of resistance to antibiotics has been ignored for a long time. But nowadays, increasing resistance is an important topic. For a decade no new antibiotics had been developed and it is not possible to quickly close this gap of new resistance and no new drugs. This work presents six new antibiotics (ceftaroline, ceftobiprole, solithromycin, tedizolid, ceftolozane/tazobactam, ceftazidime/avibactam). In part, only expert opinions are given due to lack of study results.The two 5th generation cephalosporins ceftaroline and ceftobiprole have beside their equivalent efficacy to ceftriaxone (ceftaroline) and cefipim (ceftobiprole) high activity against MRSA. The fluoroketolide solithromycin should help against macrolide-resistant pathogens and has been shown to be noninferior to the fluorochinolones. The oxazolidinone tedizolid is effective against linezolid-resistant MRSA. The two cephalosporins ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam are not only effective against gram-negative pathogens, but they have a very broad spectrum. Due to the efficacy against extended-spectrum β‑lactamases, they can relieve the selection pressure of the carbapenems. We benefit from all new antibiotics which can take the selection pressure from other often used antibiotics. The increasing number of resistant gram-negative pathogens worldwide is alarming. Thus, focusing on the development of new drugs is extremely important.

  3. Antibiotic Resistance in Modern World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article brings up the topic not only vital and urgent for further development of modern medical science, but also affecting the interests of mankind as a whole and of every inhabitant of the Earth in particular: that is the irrational use of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance which rate is growing rapidly. We investigate the reasons for the epidemic of antibiotic resistance and discuss in detail all the necessary measures in order to cope with this problem. The shocking data on the almost universal irrational use of antibiotics by both medical workers and parents is provided. We demonstrate the microbiome changes that follow antibacterial drugs application resulting in the development of severe chronic pediatric diseases which cause severe disability or life-threatening conditions in children with long-term results in adult age. In conclusion, we summarize the evidence-based research in phytomedicine that present the phytopreparations as a serious alternative to antibiotics in a number of clinical settings. 

  4. Detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Abdul; Kashif, Natasha; Kifayat, Nasira; Ahmad, Shabeer

    2016-09-01

    The antibiotic residues in poultry meat can pose certain hazards to human health among them are sensitivity to antibiotics, allergic reactions, mutation in cells, imbalance of intestinal micro biota and bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The purpose of the present paper was to detect antibiotic residue in poultry meat. During the present study a total of 80 poultry kidney and liver samples were collected and tested for detection of different antibiotic residues at different pH levels Eschericha coli at pH 6, 7 and Staphyloccocus aureus at pH 8 & 9. Out of 80 samples only 4 samples were positive for antibiotic residues. The highest concentrations of antibiotic residue found in these tissues were tetracycline (8%) followed by ampicilin (4%), streptomycine (2%) and aminoglycosides (1%) as compared to other antibiotics like sulfonamides, neomycine and gentamycine. It was concluded that these microorganism at these pH levels could be effectively used for detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

  5. Adverse consequences of neonatal antibiotic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotten, Charles M

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics have not only saved lives and improved outcomes, but they also influence the evolving microbiome. This review summarizes reports on neonatal infections and variation in antibiotic utilization, discusses the emergence of resistant organisms, and presents data from human neonates and animal models demonstrating the impact of antibiotics on the microbiome, and how microbiome alterations impact health. The importance of antibiotic stewardship is also discussed. Infections increase neonatal morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the clinical presentation of infections can be subtle, prompting clinicians to empirically start antibiotics when infection is a possibility. Antibiotic-resistant infections are a growing problem. Cohort studies have identified extensive center variations in antibiotic usage and associations between antibiotic exposures and outcomes. Studies of antibiotic-induced microbiome alterations and downstream effects on the developing immune system have increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the associations between antibiotics and adverse outcomes. The emergence of resistant microorganisms and recent evidence linking antibiotic practice variations with health outcomes has led to the initiation of antibiotic stewardship programs. The review encourages practitioners to assess local antibiotic use with regard to local microbiology, and to adopt steps to reduce infections and use antibiotics wisely.

  6. Predictive compound accumulation rules yield a broad-spectrum antibiotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Michelle F.; Drown, Bryon S.; Riley, Andrew P.; Garcia, Alfredo; Shirai, Tomohiro; Svec, Riley L.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2017-05-01

    Most small molecules are unable to rapidly traverse the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and accumulate inside these cells, making the discovery of much-needed drugs against these pathogens challenging. Current understanding of the physicochemical properties that dictate small-molecule accumulation in Gram-negative bacteria is largely based on retrospective analyses of antibacterial agents, which suggest that polarity and molecular weight are key factors. Here we assess the ability of over 180 diverse compounds to accumulate in Escherichia coli. Computational analysis of the results reveals major differences from the retrospective studies, namely that the small molecules that are most likely to accumulate contain an amine, are amphiphilic and rigid, and have low globularity. These guidelines were then applied to convert deoxynybomycin, a natural product that is active only against Gram-positive organisms, into an antibiotic with activity against a diverse panel of multi-drug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. We anticipate that these findings will aid in the discovery and development of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. Prophylactic low-energy shock wave therapy improves wound healing after vein harvesting for coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a prospective, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumfarth, Julia; Zimpfer, Daniel; Vögele-Kadletz, Margit; Holfeld, Johannes; Sihorsch, Florian; Schaden, Wolfgang; Czerny, Martin; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Wolner, Ernst; Grimm, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Wound healing disorders after vein harvesting for coronary artery bypass graft surgery increase morbidity and lower patient satisfaction. Low-energy shock wave therapy (SWT) reportedly improves healing of diabetic and vascular ulcers by overexpression of vascular endothelial growth fractor and downregulation of necrosis factor kappaB. In this study, we investigate whether prophylactic low-energy SWT improves wound healing after vein harvesting for coronary artery bypass graft surgery. One hundred consecutive patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery were randomly assigned to either prophylactic low-energy SWT (n = 50) or control (n = 50). Low-energy SWT was applied to the site of vein harvesting after wound closure under sterile conditions using a commercially available SWT system (Dermagold; Tissue Regeneration Technologies, Woodstock, GA). A total of 25 impulses (0.1 mJ/mm(2); 5 Hz) were applied per centimeter wound length. Wound healing was evaluated and quantified using the ASEPSIS score. (ASEPSIS stands for Additional treatment, presence of Serous discharge, Erythema, Purulent exudate, Separation of the deep tissue, Isolation of bacteria, and duration of inpatient Stay). Patient demographics, operative data, and postoperative adverse events were monitored. Patient characteristics and operative data including wound length (SWT 39 +/- 13 cm versus control 37 +/- 11 cm, p = 0.342) were comparable between the two groups. We observed lower ASEPSIS scores indicating improved wound healing in the SWT group (4.4 +/- 5.3) compared with the control group (11.6 +/- 8.3, p = 0.0001). Interestingly, we observed a higher incidence of wound healing disorders necessitating antibiotic treatment in the control group (22%) as compared with the SWT group (4%, p = 0.015). No SWT-associated adverse events were observed in the treatment group. As shown in this prospective randomized study, prophylactic application of low-energy SWT improves wound healing after vein

  8. Design of dual action antibiotics as an approach to search for new promising drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tevyashova, A N; Olsufyeva, E N; Preobrazhenskaya, M N

    2015-01-01

    The review is devoted to the latest achievements in the design of dual action antibiotics — heterodimeric (chimeric) structures based on antibacterial agents of different classes (fluoroquinolones, anthracyclines, oxazolidines, macrolides and so on). Covalent binding can make the pharmacokinetic characteristics of these molecules more predictable and improve the penetration of each component into the cell. Consequently, not only does the drug efficacy increase owing to inhibition of two targets but also the resistance to one or both antibiotics can be overcome. The theoretical grounds of elaboration, design principles and methods for the synthesis of dual action antibiotics are considered. The structures are classified according to the type of covalent spacer (cleavable or not) connecting the moieties of two agents. Dual action antibiotics with a spacer that can be cleaved in a living cell are considered as dual action prodrugs. Data on the biological action of heterodimeric compounds are presented and structure–activity relationships are analyzed. The bibliography includes 225 references

  9. Insights into novel antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes from soil metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alinne P Castro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a major worldwide problem has arisen with regard to infectious diseases caused by resistant bacteria. Resistant pathogens are related to high mortality and also to enormous healthcare costs. In this field, cultured microorganisms have been commonly focused in attempts to isolate antibiotic resistance genes or to identify antimicrobial compounds. Although this strategy has been successful in many cases, most of the microbial diversity and related antimicrobial molecules have been completely lost. As an alternative, metagenomics has been used as a reliable approach to reveal the prospective reservoir of antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes in the uncultured microbial community that inhabits a number of environments. In this context, this review will focus on resistance genes as well as on novel antibiotics revealed by a metagenomics approach from the soil environment. Biotechnology prospects are also discussed, opening new frontiers for antibiotic development.

  10. Diverse modulation of spa transcription by cell wall active antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Roggenbuck, Michael; Haaber, Jakob Krause

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various classes of clinically relevant antibiotics at sub-lethal concentrations on virulence gene expression and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. FINDINGS: LacZ promoter fusions of genes related...... to staphylococcal virulence were used to monitor the effects of antibiotics on gene expression in a disc diffusion assay. The selected genes were hla and spa encoding alpha-hemolysin and Protein A, respectively and RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. The results were confirmed...... by quantitative real-time PCR. Additionally, we monitored the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics on the ability of S. aureus to form biofilm in a microtiter plate assay. The results show that sub-lethal antibiotic concentrations diversely modulate expression of RNAIII, hla and spa. Consistently...

  11. Antibiotic prophylaxis in genitourinary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, S J; Wood, P D; Kosola, J W

    1981-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery, particularly genitourinary surgery, has been controversial for years. At best, the results have been more testimonial than scientific because of the failure to observe proper experimental design. A survey of the literature indicates that antibiotic prophylaxis in genitourinary surgery probably has little influence on postoperative fever; it appears to favorably affect the incidence of postoperative bacteriuria and bacteremia in the short term without encouraging nosocomial or resistant infections. The regimen for prophylaxis must be perioperative and continued for no longer than 24 hours postoperatively. Given that antibiotic prophylaxis in elective genitourinary surgery has merit, a comparison between cefazolin and cefotaxime was undertaken. Of 160 evaluable cases, a total of 23 patients had positive cultures within the first nine days; only two occurred within the first five days. When cefazolin and cefotaxime were administered in the same dosage regimen, the infection rate for cefazolin was 19% compared with 10% for cefotaxime.

  12. Antibiotic prevention of postcataract endophthalmitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Flesner, Per; Andresen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    of 485 surgeries when intracameral antibiotics were not used. The relative risk (95% CI) of endophthalmitis was reduced to 0.12 (0.08; 0.18) when intracameral antibiotics were used. The difference was highly significant (p preventing......Endophthalmitis is one of the most feared complications after cataract surgery. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of intracameral and topical antibiotics on the prevention of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. A systematic literature review in the MEDLINE, CINAHL...... randomized trial and one observational study. The quality and design of the included studies were analysed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The quality of the evidence was evaluated using the GRADE approach. We found high-to-moderate quality evidence for a marked reduction in the risk of endophthalmitis...

  13. Peptide Antibiotics for ESKAPE Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thomas Thyge

    Multi-drug resistance to antibiotics represents a global health challenge that results in increased morbidity and mortality rates. The annual death-toll is >700.000 people world-wide, rising to ~10 million by 2050. New antibiotics are lacking, and few are under development as return on investment...... is considered poor compared to medicines for lifestyle diseases. According to the WHO we could be moving towards a post-antibiotic era in which previously treatable infections become fatal. Of special importance are multidrug resistant bacteria from the ESKAPE group (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus...... and toxicity by utilizing of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a whole animal model. This was carried out by testing of antimicrobial peptides targeting Gram-positive bacteria exemplified by the important human pathogen methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The peptide BP214 was developed from...

  14. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Antibiotic Policies in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nese Saltoglu

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial management of patients in the Intensive Care Units are complex. Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem. Effective strategies for the prevention of antimicrobial resistance in ICUs have focused on limiting the unnecessary use of antibiotics and increasing compliance with infection control practices. Antibiotic policies have been implemented to modify antibiotic use, including national or regional formulary manipulations, antibiotic restriction forms, care plans, antibiotic cycling and computer assigned antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, infectious diseases consultation is a simple way to limit antibiotic use in ICU units. To improve rational antimicrobial using a multidisiplinary approach is suggested. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 299-309

  16. Mathematical analysis of multi-antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-09-15

    Multi-antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections is a growing threat to public health. Some experiments were carried out to study the multi-antibiotic resistance. The changes of the multi-antibiotic resistance with time were achieved by numerical simulations and the mathematical models, with the calculated temperature field, velocity field, and the antibiotic concentration field. The computed results and experimental results are compared. Both numerical simulations and the analytic models suggest that minor low concentrations of antibiotics could induce antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Adsorption of antibiotics on microplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Kaina; Zhang, Hua

    2018-03-03

    Microplastics and antibiotics are two classes of emerging contaminants with proposed negative impacts to aqueous ecosystems. Adsorption of antibiotics on microplastics may result in their long-range transport and may cause compound combination effects. In this study, we investigated the adsorption of 5 antibiotics [sulfadiazine (SDZ), amoxicillin (AMX), tetracycline (TC), ciprofloxacin (CIP), and trimethoprim (TMP)] on 5 types of microplastics [polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), polyamide (PA), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)] in the freshwater and seawater systems. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis revealed that microplastics have different surface characterizes and various degrees of crystalline. Adsorption isotherms demonstrated that PA had the strongest adsorption capacity for antibiotics with distribution coefficient (K d ) values ranged from 7.36 ± 0.257 to 756 ± 48.0 L kg -1 in the freshwater system, which can be attributed to its porous structure and hydrogen bonding. Relatively low adsorption capacity was observed on other four microplastics. The adsorption amounts of 5 antibiotics on PS, PE, PP, and PVC decreased in the order of CIP > AMX > TMP > SDZ > TC with K f correlated positively with octanol-water partition coefficients (Log K ow ). Comparing to freshwater system, adsorption capacity in seawater decreased significantly and no adsorption was observed for CIP and AMX. Our results indicated that commonly observed polyamide particles can serve as a carrier of antibiotics in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibiotics for whooping cough (pertussis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunaiji, S; Kukuruzovic, R; Curtis, N; Massie, J

    2007-07-18

    Whooping cough is a highly contagious disease. Infants are at highest risk of severe disease and death. Erythromycin for 14 days is currently recommended for treatment and contact prophylaxis, but is of uncertain benefit. To study the benefits and risks of antibiotic treatment of and contact prophylaxis against whooping cough. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2007); MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2007); EMBASE (January 1974 to March 2007). All randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of antibiotics for treatment of, and contact prophylaxis against, whooping cough. Three to four review authors independently extracted data and assessed the quality of each trial. Thirteen trials with 2197 participants met the inclusion criteria: 11 trials investigated treatment regimens; 2 investigated prophylaxis regimens. The quality of the trials was variable.Short-term antibiotics (azithromycin for three to five days, or clarithromycin or erythromycin for seven days) were as effective as long-term (erythromycin for 10 to 14 days) in eradicating Bordetella pertussis (B. pertussis) from the nasopharynx (relative risk (RR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98 to 1.05), but had fewer side effects (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.83). Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole for seven days was also effective. Nor were there differences in clinical outcomes or microbiological relapse between short and long-term antibiotics. Contact prophylaxis of contacts older than six months of age with antibiotics did not significantly improve clinical symptoms or the number of cases developing culture-positive B. pertussis. Although antibiotics were effective in eliminating B. pertussis, they did not alter the subsequent clinical course of the illness. There is insufficient evidence to determine the benefit of prophylactic treatment of pertussis contacts.

  19. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, LG.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules are discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to hot molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules (electron affinity), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies

  20. Kinetics of mycolactone in human subcutaneous tissue during antibiotic therapy for Mycobacterium ulcerans disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfo, Fred S; Phillips, Richard O; Zhang, Jihui; Abass, Mohammed K; Abotsi, Justice; Amoako, Yaw A; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Robinson, Clive; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark H

    2014-04-15

    Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans) causes a devastating necrotising infection of skin tissue leading to progressive ulceration. M. ulcerans is the only human pathogen that secretes mycolactone, a polyketide molecule with potent cytotoxic and immunomodulatory properties. These unique features make mycolactone an attractive biomarker for M. ulcerans disease. We sought to measure the concentration of mycolactone within lesions of patients with Buruli ulcer before, during and after antibiotic treatment to evaluate its association with the clinical and bacteriological response to therapy. Biopsies of M. ulcerans infected skin lesions were obtained from patients before, during and after antibiotic therapy. Lipids were extracted from the biopsies and concentration of mycolactone was assayed by mass spectrometry and a cytotoxicity assay and correlated with clinical and bacteriological response to therapy. Baseline concentration of mycolactone measured by mass spectrometry predicted time to complete healing of small nodules and ulcers. Even though intra-lesional concentrations of mycolactone declined with antibiotic treatment, the toxin was still present after antibiotic treatment for 6 weeks and also 4 weeks after the end of treatment for 8 weeks in a subgroup of patients with slowly healing lesions. Additionally viable bacilli were detected in a proportion of these slowly healing lesions during and after treatment. Our findings indicate that baseline intra-lesional mycolactone concentration and its kinetics with antibiotic therapy are important prognostic determinants of clinical and bacteriological response to antibiotic treatment for Mycobacterium ulcerans disease. Mycolactone may be a useful biomarker with potential utility in optimising antibiotic therapy.

  1. Antibiotic resistance differentiates Echinacea purpurea endophytic bacterial communities with respect to plant organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoni, Alessio; Maida, Isabel; Chiellini, Carolina; Emiliani, Giovanni; Mocali, Stefano; Fabiani, Arturo; Fondi, Marco; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Fani, Renato

    2014-10-01

    Recent findings have shown that antibiotic resistance is widespread in multiple environments and multicellular organisms, as plants, harboring rich and complex bacterial communities, could be hot spot for emergence of antibiotic resistances as a response to bioactive molecules production by members of the same community. Here, we investigated a panel of 137 bacterial isolates present in different organs of the medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea, aiming to evaluate if different plant organs harbor strains with different antibiotic resistance profiles, implying then the presence of different biological interactions in the communities inhabiting different plant organs. Data obtained showed a large antibiotic resistance variability among strains, which was strongly related to the different plant organs (26% of total variance, P antibiotic resistance pattern was present also when a single genus (Pseudomonas), ubiquitous in all organs, was analyzed and no correlation of antibiotic resistance pattern with genomic relatedness among strains was found. In conclusion, we speculate that antibiotic resistance patterns are tightly linked to the type of plant organ under investigation, suggesting the presence of differential forms of biological interaction in stem/leaves, roots and rhizosphere. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. WITHDRAWN: Antibiotics for preventing leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidugli, Fábio; Castro, Aldemar A; Atallah, Alvaro N

    2009-07-08

    Leptospirosis is an infectious disease transmitted by animals. Death occurs in about five per cent of the patients. In clinical practice, doxycycline is widely used for prevention. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of any antibiotic regimen versus placebo or other antibiotic regimens in the prophylaxis of leptospirosis. The sources used were: EMBASE, LILACS, MEDLINE, SCISEARCH, The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, bibliographies of published papers, and personal communication with authors. There were no language or date restrictions in any of the searches. All randomised clinical trials in which antibiotics were used as prophylactic regimen for leptospirosis. People potentially exposed to leptospirosis, such as people in endemic areas during the rainy season, health professionals and other professionals with high risk of infection. Any antibiotic regimen compared with a control group (placebo or another antibiotic regimen). Infection (primary outcome) and adverse events (secondary outcome). Data were independently extracted and methodological quality of each trial was assessed by two reviewers as well as cross-checked. Details of the randomisation (generation and concealment), blinding, and the number of patients lost to follow-up were recorded. The results of each trial were summarised on an intention-to-treat basis in 2 x 2 tables for each outcome. Two trials comparing doxycycline with placebo met the inclusion criteria. We did not find trials comparing doxycycline versus other antibiotics, or other antibiotics versus placebo. One of the trials had excellent methodological quality. In the other trial, the allocation concealment process, generation of allocation sequence, and blinding methods were not described.Of the 1022 participants enrolled, 509 were treated with doxycycline and 513 with placebo. Of these, 940 participants were soldiers included in one trial. The patients assigned to the

  3. The Pharmacodynamics of Antibiotic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Mudassar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We derive models of the effects of periodic, discrete dosing or constant dosing of antibiotics on a bacterial population whose growth is checked by nutrient-limitation and possibly by host defenses. Mathematically rigorous results providing sufficient conditions for treatment success, i.e. the elimination of the bacteria, as well as for treatment failure, are obtained. Our models can exhibit bi-stability where the infection-free state and an infection-state are locally stable when antibiotic dosing is marginal. In this case, treatment success may occur only for sub-threshold level infections.

  4. Recent updates of carbapenem antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Brahim, Imen; Hisham, Noorhan; Aladdin, Rand; Mohammed, Haneen; Bahaaeldin, Amany

    2017-05-05

    Carbapenems are among the most commonly used and the most efficient antibiotics since they are relatively resistant to hydrolysis by most β-lactamases, they target penicillin-binding proteins, and generally have broad-spectrum antibacterial effect. In this review, we described the initial discovery and development of carbapenems, chemical characteristics, in vitro/in vivo activities, resistance studies, and clinical investigations for traditional carbapenem antibiotics in the market; imipenem-cilastatin, meropenem, ertapenem, doripenem, biapenem, panipenem/betamipron in addition to newer carbapenems such as razupenem, tebipenem, tomopenem, and sanfetrinem. We focused on the literature published from 2010 to 2016. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Anesthetic implications of subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Murali; Veerappa, Muralimanohar; Jawali, Vivek; Pandya, Nischal; Krishnamoorthy, Jayaprakash; Muniraju, Geetha; George, Antony; Baishya, Jitumoni

    2016-01-01

    Minimal invasive surgeries are carried out to benefit the patient with less pain, blood loss, mechanical ventilation and hospital stay; a smaller scar is not the aim. Minimal invasive cardiac surgeries are carried out via small sternotomy, small thoracotomy and via robotic arms. Subxiphoid route is a novel method and avoids sternotomy. This case series is an attempt to understand the anesthetic modifications required. Secondly, whether it is feasible to carry out subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery. Elective patients scheduled to undergo subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery were chosen. The surgeries were conducted under general anesthesia with left lung isolation via either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker. We conducted ten (seven males and 3 females) coronary artery bypass graft surgeries via subxiphoid technique. The mean EuroSCORE was 1.7 and the mean ejection fraction was 53.6. Eight patients underwent surgery via endobronchial tube, while, in the remaining two lung isolation was obtained using bronchial blocker. Mean blood loss intraoperatively was 300 ± 42 ml and postoperatively 2000 ± 95 ml. The pain score on the postoperative day '0' was 4.3 ± 0.6 and 2.3 ± 0.7 on the day of discharge. Length of stay in the hospital was 4.8 ± 0.9 days. There were no complications, blood transfusions, conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. The modifications in the anesthetic and surgical techniques are, use of left lung isolation using either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker, increased duration for conduit harvesting, grafting, requirement of transesophageal echocardiography monitoring in addition to hemodynamic monitoring. Other minor requirements are transcutaneous pacing and defibrillator pads, a wedge under the chest to 'lift' up the chest, sparing right femoral artery and vein (to serve as vascular access) for an unlikely event of conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. Any anesthesiologist wishing to start this technique must be aware of

  6. Anesthetic implications of subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Chakravarthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimal invasive surgeries are carried out to benefit the patient with less pain, blood loss, mechanical ventilation and hospital stay; a smaller scar is not the aim. Minimal invasive cardiac surgeries are carried out via small sternotomy, small thoracotomy and via robotic arms. Subxiphoid route is a novel method and avoids sternotomy. Aim: This case series is an attempt to understand the anesthetic modifications required. Secondly, whether it is feasible to carry out subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery. Methods: Elective patients scheduled to undergo subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery were chosen. The surgeries were conducted under general anesthesia with left lung isolation via either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker. Results: We conducted ten (seven males and 3 females coronary artery bypass graft surgeries via subxiphoid technique. The mean EuroSCORE was 1.7 and the mean ejection fraction was 53.6. Eight patients underwent surgery via endobronchial tube, while, in the remaining two lung isolation was obtained using bronchial blocker. Mean blood loss intraoperatively was 300 ± 42 ml and postoperatively 2000 ± 95 ml. The pain score on the postoperative day ′0′ was 4.3 ± 0.6 and 2.3 ± 0.7 on the day of discharge. Length of stay in the hospital was 4.8 ± 0.9 days. There were no complications, blood transfusions, conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. The modifications in the anesthetic and surgical techniques are, use of left lung isolation using either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker, increased duration for conduit harvesting, grafting, requirement of transesophageal echocardiography monitoring in addition to hemodynamic monitoring. Other minor requirements are transcutaneous pacing and defibrillator pads, a wedge under the chest to ′lift′ up the chest, sparing right femoral artery and vein (to serve as vascular access for an unlikely event of conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. Any

  7. EARLY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN ROUX-EN-Y GASTRIC BYPASS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Aluisio; Rosin, Leandro; Dias, Mariana Fernandes; Marquiotti, Bruna; Gugelmin, Giovana; Stoll, Gabriela Fanezzi

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is one of the most common bariatric surgery and leads to considerable weight loss in the first months. To quantify the main early postoperative complications in patients submitted to the gastric bypass. Observational retrospective cohort. Data of 1051 patients with class II obesity associated with comorbidities or class III obesity submitted to the gastric bypass with 30 days of follow-up starting from the date of the surgery. The age average was 36 years with a predominance of females (81.1%). The mean preoperative body mass index was 43 kg/m². The major complication was fistula (2.3%), followed by intestinal obstruction (0.5%) and pulmonary embolism (0.5%). Death occurred in 0.6% of the cases. In the period of 30 days after surgery the overall complication rate was 3.8%; reoperation was necessary in 2.6% and death occurred in 0.6%. Fistula was the main complication and the leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit, reoperation and death. Bypass gástrico em Y-de-Roux é uma das operações bariátricas mais comuns e leva a perdas consideráveis de peso já nos primeiros meses. Quantificar as principais complicações pós-operatórias precoces em pacientes submetidos ao bypass gástrico. Coorte retrospectiva observacional. Amostra de 1051 pacientes portadores de obesidade grau II associada à comorbidades ou grau III submetidos ao bypass gástrico com acompanhamento de 30 dias a partir da data da operação. A idade média dos pacientes foi de 36 anos com predominância de mulheres (81,1%). O índice de massa corporal pré-operatório médio foi de 43 kg/m². A principal complicação foi fístula (2,3%), seguida de obstrução intestinal (0,5%) e tromboembolismo pulmonar (0,5%). Óbito ocorreu em 0,6% dos casos. No período de 30 dias de pós-operatório a taxa geral de complicações foi de 3,8%; a de reoperação de 2,6% e óbito em 0,6%. A fístula foi a principal complicação e a principal causa de internamento em

  8. [Evolution of antibiotic consumption in an intensive care burn department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Lamia; Bousselmi, Kamel; Oueslati, Salima; Memmi, Monia; Ben Redjeb, Saida; Messadi, Amen Allah

    2007-12-01

    The increasing consumption of antibiotics in hospitals and the economic implications of this increase lead to survey this consumption in the various hospital units. Our study proposes to measure the annual antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance in an intensive care Burn department in order to manage the control measures. The study was conducted during a 5 year period (1 January 2000 to 31 December 2004). The average number of admissions was 204/year and the mean number of hospitalisation was 4036/year. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method. Susceptibility testing data were stored in a laboratory data base using whonet 5.3 software. The consumption of following antibiotics: imipenem, ceftazidime, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam was measured by antimicrobial density (AD) witch takes into account the quantity of antibiotics in Grams converted to daily defined dose (DDD) and number of hospitalization days. The daily defined dose (DDD) was proposed by WHO. The calculation of the AD for each molecule was carried out according to the following formula: [AD = Quantity consumed in grams for the particular antimicrobial X 1000]/[DDD for that antimicrobial X number of days hospitalizations]. There was statistically significant relationship between increasing use of ceftazidime and ceftazidime resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (rs=0.93; p=0.02). The use of ceftazidime was not significantly associated with resistance to this molecule in P. aeruginosa (rs=0.76 ; p=0.13). Concerning the fluoroquinolones, there was statistically significant relation ship between increasing use of ciprofloxacin and rate ciprofloxacin resistant P. aeruginosa (rs=0.89,P=0.043). Furthermore, the consumption of ciprofloxacin was significantly correlated to imipenem resistance in P. aeruginosa (rs=0.87, p=0.05 ). However, the consumption of imipenem was not significantly correlated to resistance of this drug in P. aeruginosa (rs=0.45; P=0

  9. Watching single molecules dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  10. Antibiotics prescription in Nigerian dental healthcare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, C C; Ojehanon, P I

    2014-09-01

    Inappropriate antibiotics prescription in dental healthcare delivery that may result in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, is a worldwide concern. The objective of the study was to determine the antibiotics knowledge and prescription patterns among dentists in Nigeria. A total of 160 questionnaires were distributed to dentists attending continuing education courses organized by two organizations in Southern and Northern parts of Nigeria. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0. A total of 146 questionnaires were returned, properly filled, out of 160 questionnaires, giving an overall response rate 91.3%. The clinical factors predominantly influenced the choice of therapeutic antibiotics among the respondents. In this study, the most commonly prescribed antibiotics among the respondents was a combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole. Of the respondents, 136 (93.2%) of them considered antibiotic resistance as a major problem in Nigeria and 102 (69.9%) have experienced antibiotics resistance in dental practice. The major reported conditions for prophylactic antibiotics among the respondents were diabetic mellitus, HIV/AIDS, history of rheumatic fever, other heart anomalies presenting with heart murmur and presence of prosthetic hip. The knowledge of adverse effects of antibiotics was greatest for tooth discoloration which is related to tetracycline. Data from this study revealed the most commonly prescribed antibiotics as a combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole. There existed gaps in prophylactic antibiotic prescription, consideration in the choice of therapeutic antibiotics and knowledge of adverse effects of antibiotics among the studied dentists.

  11. Probiotic approach to prevent antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; Forssten, Sofia; Hibberd, Ashley A; Lyra, Anna; Stahl, Buffy

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, mainly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although also strain of other species are commercialized, that have a beneficial effect on the host. From the perspective of antibiotic use, probiotics have been observed to reduce the risk of certain infectious disease such as certain types of diarrhea and respiratory tract infection. This may be accompanied with a reduced need of antibiotics for secondary infections. Antibiotics tend to be effective against most common diseases, but increasingly resistance is being observed among pathogens. Probiotics are specifically selected to not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and not carry transferable antibiotic resistance. Concomitant use of probiotics with antibiotics has been observed to reduce the incidence, duration and/or severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This contributes to better adherence to the antibiotic prescription and thereby reduces the evolution of resistance. To what extent probiotics directly reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance is still much under investigation; but maintaining a balanced microbiota during antibiotic use may certainly provide opportunities for reducing the spread of resistances. Key messages Probiotics may reduce the risk for certain infectious diseases and thereby reduce the need for antibiotics. Probiotics may reduce the risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhea Probiotics do not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and may even reduce it.

  12. Ultra-cold molecule production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled

  13. Effects of ultraviolet disinfection on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli from wastewater: inactivation, antibiotic resistance profiles and antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong-Miao; Xu, Li-Mei; Wang, Xiaochang C; Zhuang, Kai; Liu, Qiang-Qiang

    2017-04-29

    To evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) disinfection on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli). Antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains were isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and subjected to UV disinfection. The effect of UV disinfection on the antibiotic resistance profiles and the antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of antibiotic-resistant E. coli was evaluated by a combination of antibiotic susceptibility analysis and molecular methods. Results indicated that multiple-antibiotic-resistant (MAR) E. coli were more resistant at low UV doses and required a higher UV dose (20 mJ cm -2 ) to enter the tailing phase compared with those of antibiotic-sensitive E. coli (8 mJ cm -2 ). UV disinfection caused a selective change in the inhibition zone diameters of surviving antibiotic-resistant E. coli and a slight damage to ARGs. The inhibition zone diameters of the strains resistant to antibiotics were more difficult to alter than those susceptible to antibiotics because of the existence and persistence of corresponding ARGs. The resistance of MAR bacteria to UV disinfection at low UV doses and the changes in inhibition zone diameters could potentially contribute to the selection of ARB in wastewater treatment after UV disinfection. The risk of spread of antibiotic resistance still exists owing to the persistence of ARGs. Our study highlights the acquisition of other methods to control the spread of ARGs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Changes in Reward after Gastric Bypass: the Advantages and Disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Samantha; Goldstone, Anthony P; le Roux, Carel W

    2015-10-01

    Gastric bypass surgery is an effective long-term weight loss intervention. Key to its success appears a putative shift in food preference away from high-energy-density foods associated with a reduced appetitive drive and loss of neural reactivity in the reward system of the brain towards food. Post-prandial exaggerated satiety gut hormone responses have been implicated as mediators. Whilst the positive impact of bariatric surgery on both physical and psychological outcomes for many patients is clearly evident, a subset of patients appear to be detrimentally affected by this loss of reward from food and by a lack of alternative strategies for regulating affect after surgery. Mindfulness training has emerged as a potential tool in reducing the need for immediate reward that underpins much of eating behaviour. Further research is needed to help identify patients who may be more vulnerable after gastric bypass and which forms of support may be most beneficial.

  15. Management of broken instrument by file bypass technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Parveen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Different devices and techniques have been developed to retrieve fractured instruments during the endodontic procedures. This case report describes the management of a broken instrument, which was accidentally broken during cleaning and shaping of the root canal in right 2nd molar tooth. A # 25 stainless steel K-file was separated in mesiobuccal canal of the treated tooth. At first, a radiograph was taken to confirm the level of separation of the instrument. The instrument was found to be separated at the apical 3rd of the mesial canal and then file bypass technique was performed. Calcium hydroxide dressing was given for 7 days followed by obturation with guttapercha cone and zinc oxide eugenol sealer in lateral condensation technique. It can be concluded that bypass technique can be considered as simple and effective technique for the management of broken instrument into the root canal.

  16. Aorto-aortic intrathoracic bypass in surgical treatment of aortic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Perez, F.; Duran Reyes, A.; Bigalli, D.; Filgueira Berobide, J.

    1998-01-01

    The prevalence of coarctation of the aorta is 6.5 percent of all congenital heart defects, according to national and international data. There is a restenosis rate of patients after surgery. Factors that influence this evolution depends on the age at which patients underwent surgery for the first time the anatomy of the aortic arch and type of surgical technique. Several procedures can be used to correct the coarctation, which include surgery and balloon catheter dilation. We present here a case of a patient of 22 years old, with a recurrent coarctation of the aorta studied by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent surgery a third time. We used an anterior approach (median sternotomy) and performed an aortic bypass graft, intrathoracic, under cardiopulmonary bypass. Evolved favorably and was discharged on the sixth day of post operative day (Author) [es

  17. In situ saphenous vein bypass surgery in diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L P; Schroeder, T V; Lorentzen, J E

    1992-01-01

    .005). Indication for surgery was gangrene or ulceration in 57% of diabetics, as opposed to 36% in non-diabetic patients (p = 0.0002). A femoro-popliteal bypass was performed in 18% of patients, whereas 82% received an infrapopliteal procedure, of which 42% were to the distal third of the calf or foot. Diabetic......From 1986 through to 1990 a total of 483 consecutive in situ infra-inguinal vein bypass procedures were performed in 444 patients, of whom 112 (25%) were diabetics (57 insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and 55 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). Based on a prospective vascular data registry...... this material was analysed to determine the influence of diabetes on the outcome. Preoperative risk factors were equally distributed among diabetic and non-diabetic patients, except for smoking habits (diabetics: 48%; non-diabetics: 64%, p = 0.002) and cardiac disease (diabetics: 45%; non-diabetics: 29%, p = 0...

  18. Pharmacological Bypass of Cockayne Syndrome B Function in Neuronal Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuming Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by growth abnormalities, premature aging, and photosensitivity. Mutation of Cockayne syndrome B (CSB affects neuronal gene expression and differentiation, so we attempted to bypass its function by expressing downstream target genes. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of Synaptotagmin 9 (SYT9, a key component of the machinery controlling neurotrophin release, bypasses the need for CSB in neuritogenesis. Importantly, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a neurotrophin implicated in neuronal differentiation and synaptic modulation, and pharmacological mimics such as 7,8-dihydroxyflavone and amitriptyline can compensate for CSB deficiency in cell models of neuronal differentiation as well. SYT9 and BDNF are downregulated in CS patient brain tissue, further indicating that sub-optimal neurotrophin signaling underlies neurological defects in CS. In addition to shedding light on cellular mechanisms underlying CS and pointing to future avenues for pharmacological intervention, these data suggest an important role for SYT9 in neuronal differentiation.

  19. Transfusion practice in coronary artery bypass surgery in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan J.; Westen, Mikkel; Pallesen, Peter Appel

    2007-01-01

    Transfusion rates in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) continue to vary substantially, although guidelines for allogeneic transfusion have been developed. In order to evaluate ongoing transfusion practices, we performed a multicenter audit in four Danish hospitals regarding the use of alloge......Transfusion rates in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) continue to vary substantially, although guidelines for allogeneic transfusion have been developed. In order to evaluate ongoing transfusion practices, we performed a multicenter audit in four Danish hospitals regarding the use......-related factors. Interesting differences in transfusion rates exists in Danish hospitals and these differences may reflect true variations in transfusion practices. Audits create a basis for educational efforts among surgeons and anesthesiologists to standardize transfusion practices...

  20. Concomitant Thoracic Aortobifemoral Bypass With Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishawi, Muath; Shah, Asad A; McCann, Richard L; Milano, Carmelo A

    2016-11-01

    Improved quality of life for patients after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation can be greatly limited by peripheral vascular disease even if heart failure symptoms are resolved by LVAD support. We present a case of concomitant thoracic aortobifemoral bypass and LVAD implantation in a patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy, severe peripheral vascular disease, and multiple previous failed revascularization attempts. In this patient, we used the LVAD outflow to provide the inflow to the femoral artery bypass graft. This graft has remained patent at a 2-year follow-up, without claudication symptoms. Performing concomitant major vascular operations safely and successfully is feasible in patients with LVADs. Quality of life after ventricular assist device placement can be limited by vascular disease, but it can be markedly improved after vascular surgical intervention. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Playing with molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Recent philosophy of science has seen a number of attempts to understand scientific models by looking to theories of fiction. In previous work, I have offered an account of models that draws on Kendall Walton's 'make-believe' theory of art. According to this account, models function as 'props' in games of make-believe, like children's dolls or toy trucks. In this paper, I assess the make-believe view through an empirical study of molecular models. I suggest that the view gains support when we look at the way that these models are used and the attitude that users take towards them. Users' interaction with molecular models suggests that they do imagine the models to be molecules, in much the same way that children imagine a doll to be a baby. Furthermore, I argue, users of molecular models imagine themselves viewing and manipulating molecules, just as children playing with a doll might imagine themselves looking at a baby or feeding it. Recognising this 'participation' in modelling, I suggest, points towards a new account of how models are used to learn about the world, and helps us to understand the value that scientists sometimes place on three-dimensional, physical models over other forms of representation.

  2. Collective antibiotic tolerance: mechanisms, dynamics and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Hannah R; Srimani, Jaydeep K; Lee, Anna J; Lopatkin, Allison J; You, Lingchong

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria have developed resistance against every antibiotic at a rate that is alarming considering the timescale at which new antibiotics are developed. Thus, there is a critical need to use antibiotics more effectively, extend the shelf life of existing antibiotics and minimize their side effects. This requires understanding the mechanisms underlying bacterial drug responses. Past studies have focused on survival in the presence of antibiotics by individual cells, as genetic mutants or persisters. Also important, however, is the fact that a population of bacterial cells can collectively survive antibiotic treatments lethal to individual cells. This tolerance can arise by diverse mechanisms, including resistance-conferring enzyme production, titration-mediated bistable growth inhibition, swarming and interpopulation interactions. These strategies can enable rapid population recovery after antibiotic treatment and provide a time window during which otherwise susceptible bacteria can acquire inheritable genetic resistance. Here, we emphasize the potential for targeting collective antibiotic tolerance behaviors as an antibacterial treatment strategy.

  3. Antibiotic and Antimicrobial Resistance: Threat Report 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Role What CDC is Doing: AR Solutions Initiative Investing in States: Map Antibiotic Resistance Lab Network Antibiotic ... CDC and Partners Tackle Drug-Resistant TB in India Newly Reported Gene, mcr -1, Threatens Last-Resort ...

  4. Antibiotic Prescription in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov

    2016-01-01

    will explore how the GPs prescription behaviour is influenced by selected factors. Antibiotics are essential when treating potentially lethal infections. An increasing development of resistant bacteria is considered one of the primary threats to public health. The majority of antibiotics (90%) are prescribed...... from general practice. The prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics can cause unnecessary side effects for the individual and increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. Both the prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics and the level of resistant bacteria......1. Background & Aim The overall aim of the project is to describe antibiotic consumption in Danish general practice with emphasis on specific types of antibiotics. The project will shed light on the impact of microbiological diagnostic methods (MDM) on the choice of antibiotic and the project...

  5. Antibiotic Resistance in Human Chronic Periodontitis Microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E.; Degener, John E.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.

    Background: Patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) may yield multiple species of putative periodontal bacterial pathogens that vary in their antibiotic drug susceptibility. This study determines the occurrence of in vitro antibiotic resistance among selected subgingival periodontal pathogens in

  6. PREVALENCE AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9 mars 2015 ... strategy to prevent the spread of this resistance. Keywords: Staphylococci; Staphylococcus aureus; Oxacillin; Antibiotic resistance; Disc diffusion. Author Correspondence, e-mail: mn.boukhatem@yahoo.fr. ICID: 1142924. Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences. ISSN 1112-9867. Available online at.

  7. Use of Antibiotics in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Broe, Anne; Aabenhus, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to describe the use of systemic antibiotics among children in Denmark. Methods: National data on drug use in Denmark were extracted from the Danish National Prescription Database. We used prescription data for all children in Denmark aged 0 to 11 years from January 1, 2000...

  8. Abiotic degradation of antibiotic ionophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn, Pernille; Bak, Søren A; Björklund, Erland

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolytic and photolytic degradation were investigated for the ionophore antibiotics lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin, and narasin. The hydrolysis study was carried out by dissolving the ionophores in solutions of pH 4, 7, and 9, followed by incubation at three temperatures of 6, 22, and 28 °C f...

  9. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eGueimonde

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue.

  10. Endophytes as sources of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Klimova, Elena; Rodríguez-Peña, Karol; Sánchez, Sergio

    2017-06-15

    Until a viable alternative can be accessible, the emergence of resistance to antimicrobials requires the constant development of new antibiotics. Recent scientific efforts have been aimed at the bioprospecting of microorganisms' secondary metabolites, with special emphasis on the search for antimicrobial natural products derived from endophytes. Endophytes are microorganisms that inhabit the internal tissues of plants without causing apparent harm to the plant. The present review article compiles recent (2006-2016) literature to provide an update on endophyte research aimed at finding metabolites with antibiotic activities. We have included exclusively information on endophytes that produce metabolites capable of inhibiting the growth of bacterial, fungal and protozoan pathogens of humans, animals and plants. Where available, the identified metabolites have been listed. In this review, we have also compiled a list of the bacterial and fungal phyla that have been isolated as endophytes as well as the plant families from which the endophytes were isolated. The majority of endophytes that produce antibiotic metabolites belong to either phylum Ascomycota (kingdom Fungi) or to phylum Actinobacteria (superkingdom Bacteria). Endophytes that produce antibiotic metabolites were predominant, but certainly not exclusively, from the plant families Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, Asteraceae and Araceae, suggesting that endophytes that produce antimicrobial metabolites are not restricted to a reduced number of plant families. The locations where plants (and inhabiting endophytes) were collected from, according to the literature, have been mapped, showing that endophytes that produce bioactive compounds have been collected globally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A study of antibiotic prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, L.; Radzeviciene-Jurgute, R.; Jurgutis, A.

    2012-01-01

    clinically or pharmacologically. Methods. 22 Lithuanian and 29 Russian GPs participated in five focus group discussions. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results. We identified four main thematic categories: patients' faith in antibiotics as medication for upper respiratory tract infections...

  12. Prophylactic Antibiotics and Wound Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Elbur, Abubaker Ibrahim; M.A., Yousif; El-Sayed, Ahmed S.A.; Abdel-Rahman, Manar E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infections account for 14%-25% of all nosocomial infections. The main aims of this study were to audit the use of prophylactic antibiotic, to quantify the rate of post-operative wound infection, and to identify risk factors for its occurrence in general surgery.

  13. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases.

  14. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  15. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  16. Achalasia 5 years following Roux-en-y gastric bypass

    OpenAIRE

    Torghabeh, Mehyar Hefazi; Afaneh, Cheguevara; Saif, Taha; Dakin, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    Oesophageal achalasia is a rare, but serious condition in which the motility of the lower oesophageal sphincter (LES) is inhibited. This disorder of idiopathic aetiology complicates the peristaltic function and relaxation of the LES that may cause symptoms such as dysphagia, epigastric pain, and regurgitation of an obstructed food. The following case describes achalasia in a patient 5 years following a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). The patient underwent a laparoscopic Heller m...

  17. Protective effect of dexmedetomidine in coronary artery bypass grafting surgery

    OpenAIRE

    REN, JIANJUN; ZHANG, HUIJUN; HUANG, LINING; LIU, YUE; LIU, FENGQIN; DONG, ZHENMING

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the impact of dexmedetomidine on postoperative myocardial injury in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) grafting. One hundred and sixty-two patients who were undergoing OPCAB surgery were randomly divided into control and dexmedetomidine groups (groups C and Dex, respectively). Following the first vascular anastomosis grafting, the patients in group Dex received a continuous intravenous infusion of 0.2?0.5 ?g/kg/h dexmedetomidine, u...

  18. Evaluation of a primary care paramedic STEMI bypass guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Jonathan L; Ross, Garry; Turner, Linda; Olynyk, Chris; Cheskes, Sheldon; Thurston, Adam; Verbeek, P Richard

    2017-11-20

    Limited evidence supports primary care paramedic (PCP) direct transport of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The goal of this study was to evaluate an urban-based PCP STEMI bypass guideline. We reviewed consecutive Toronto Paramedic Services call reports between April 7, 2015, and May 31, 2016, regarding STEMI patients identified by PCPs. The primary outcome was patient assignment (stable versus unstable) according to guideline criteria. Secondary outcomes were the proportion of PCP-transported patients who had an indication for an advanced care intervention (ACI) or who received an ACI when PCPs rendezvoused with an advanced care paramedic (ACP). Lastly, we reviewed prehospital outcomes of cardiac arrest patients and calculated the difference in transport intervals between direct PCP bypass and a PCI-centre and predicted transport interval to the closest emergency department (ED). Of 361 patients, 232 were PCP transports and 129 were ACP-rendezvous transports. There was a significant difference in the distribution of stable and unstable patients between PCPs and ACPs (p<0.001). For PCP patients, 21/232 (9.1%) had indications for an ACI, whereas 34/129 (26.4%) ACP patients received an ACI. Eleven patients experienced cardiac arrest; 10 were successfully resuscitated (5 of these by PCPs). The median difference between direct PCP bypass and a PCI-centre versus transport to the closest ED was 5.53 minutes (IQR=6.71). We found a significant difference in the distribution of stable and unstable patients and fewer patients with indications for an ACI in PCP patients. This PCP STEMI bypass guideline appears feasible.

  19. Constitutive modeling of coronary artery bypass graft with incorporated torsion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horný, L.; Chlup, Hynek; Žitný, R.; Adámek, T.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2009), s. 273-277 ISSN 0543-5846 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/08/0557 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : coronary artery bypass graft * constitutive model * digital image correlation Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2009 http://web.tuke.sk/sjf-kamam/mmams2009/contents.pdf

  20. Tuberculosis after jejuno-ileal bypass for morbid obesity.

    OpenAIRE

    Werbin, N.

    1981-01-01

    A patient contracted tuberculosis after 2 operations for morbid obesity. The difficulty in diagnosis and treatment is described. Jejuno-ileal bypass is a non-physiological operation, with many reported complications and side effects. Following this short experience the author and his colleagues have now abandoned this operation. Patients suffering from malnutrition as a result of slimming operations should be carefully monitored for tuberculosis.

  1. Small-molecule-hosting nanocomposite films with multiple bacteria-triggered responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlukhina, Svetlana; Zhuk, Iryna; Mentbayeva, Almagul; Rautenberg, Emily; Chang, Wei; Yu, Xiaojun; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    We report pH/bacteria-responsive nanocomposite coatings with multiple mechanisms of antibacterial protection that include the permanent retention of antimicrobials, bacteria-triggered release of antibiotics and bacteria-induced film swelling. A novel small-molecule-hosting film was constructed using

  2. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Espinosa Franco

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Beatriz Espinosa Franco1, Marina Altagracia Martínez2, Martha A Sánchez Rodríguez1, Albert I Wertheimer31Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza (UNAM, Mexico; 2Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Xochimilco, Mexico; 3Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USABackground: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community.Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem.Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded.Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance.Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals.Keywords: antibiotic drug resistance

  3. Response to "Antibiotic Use and Resistance"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; Rabanaque, María José; Feja, Christina

    2014-01-01

    As mentioned, antibiotic consumption in heavy users, especially in children, is really striking. Certainly, our results revealed an antibiotic use in this age group higher than published in previous studies, and in line with different reports repeatedly presenting the high antibiotic consumption...... of antibiotics, as observed in heavy users, could also be due to factors related to the GP, patient and parents' expectations or the influence exerted by the pharmaceutical industry (2). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  4. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to elucidate the clearance mechanisms of Tc-99m labeled quinolone antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahinejad, M.; Mirshojaei, S.F.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to establish molecular modeling methods for predicting the liver and kidney uptakes of Tc-99m labeled quinolone antibiotics. Some three-dimensional quantitative-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) models were developed using comparative molecular field analysis and grid-independent descriptors procedures. As a first report on 3D-QSAR modeling, the predicted liver and kidney uptakes for quinolone antibiotics were in good agreement with the experimental values. The obtained results confirm the importance of hydrophobic interactions, size and steric hindrance of antibiotic molecules in their liver uptakes, while the electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding ability have impressive effects on their kidney uptakes. (author)

  5. Experiences with the Montgomery Salivary Bypass Tube (MSBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lörken, A; Krampert, J; Kau, R J; Arnold, W

    1997-01-01

    Patients with hypopharyngeal and cervical esophageal strictures and fistulas caused by advanced malignancy, ingestion of caustic material, or following surgery or radiation therapy often suffer from marked dysphagia. In such cases the implantation of a Montgomery Salivary Bypass Tube (MSBT) can be an effective therapeutic option to bridge the fistulous tract or bypass a stenosis. Being able to eat and drink without the need for intravenous supplementation or nasogastric or gastrostomy tube feeding in general greatly improves the patient's quality of life. Since 1981 we have successfully inserted the MSBT in 44 cases suffering from dysphagia of different etiology. Our experiences with the indications for implantation, insertion techniques, and postoperative results are presented. Three selected cases of progressive dysphagia in which the MSBT is demonstrated to be the treatment of choice are described in more detail. In one case, a tracheoesophageal fistula and in another a stricture of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) were bypassed so that oral intake of soft food became possible again. The third patient suffered from a disturbance of the esophageal motility after resection of a Hippel-Lindau tumor in the spinal cord and syringe drainage; even swallowing saliva was impeded. After insertion of a MSBT, uncomplicated soft food intake became possible again.

  6. Augmented reality-assisted bypass surgery: embracing minimal invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, Ivan; Schaller, Karl; Bijlenga, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The overlay of virtual images on the surgical field, defined as augmented reality, has been used for image guidance during various neurosurgical procedures. Although this technology could conceivably address certain inherent problems of extracranial-to-intracranial bypass procedures, this potential has not been explored to date. We evaluate the usefulness of an augmented reality-based setup, which could help in harvesting donor vessels through their precise localization in real-time, in performing tailored craniotomies, and in identifying preoperatively selected recipient vessels for the purpose of anastomosis. Our method was applied to 3 patients with Moya-Moya disease who underwent superficial temporal artery-to-middle cerebral artery anastomoses and 1 patient who underwent an occipital artery-to-posteroinferior cerebellar artery bypass because of a dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery. Patients' heads, skulls, and extracranial and intracranial vessels were segmented preoperatively from 3-dimensional image data sets (3-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, angio-magnetic resonance imaging, angio-computed tomography), and injected intraoperatively into the operating microscope's eyepiece for image guidance. In each case, the described setup helped in precisely localizing donor and recipient vessels and in tailoring craniotomies to the injected images. The presented system based on augmented reality can optimize the workflow of extracranial-to-intracranial bypass procedures by providing essential anatomical information, entirely integrated to the surgical field, and help to perform minimally invasive procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reducing family stress during and after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, C L

    1984-03-01

    Based on the findings of this study of couples after coronary artery bypass surgery, there are numerous stresses and unmet needs that might be addressed by hospital-based nurses. The study demonstrated that, as a group, the spouses of the bypass patients report higher levels of stress than the patients did while in the hospital. Together, patients and spouses reported high levels of marital conflict, dissatisfaction, and discord during the first 6 months after the surgery. Many indicated that they were unprepared for these experiences. Further, they found it difficult to maintain continuity with a provider who could answer their questions about recovery. As a result of these findings a program of nursing care that focuses on the family during and after coronary artery bypass surgery has been proposed. The model program consists of preparation for surgery, preparation for discharge, and continuous contact with the family after discharge, at least through the first follow-up appointment with the surgeon at 6 weeks. For each phase it is necessary to consider content that is appropriate to the individual patient, but it is essential to include content aimed at reducing the stresses and risk experienced by the family as well. By doing so hospital-based nurses are treating the family as well as nursing the patient through this episode of acute illness.

  8. Carotid disease in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Abid, A.R.; Dar, M.A.; Noeman, A.; Amin, S.; Azhar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the severity of carotid artery disease in diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: From January to June 2008, 379 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery were preoperatively evaluated for the presence of carotid stenoses by duplex scanning. Patients were divided into two groups, Group I, 156 (41.2%) diabetic patients and Group II, 223 (58.8%) non-diabetic patients. Results: There were 314 (82.8%) males and 65 (17.2%) females with a mean age of 57.2+-9.1 years. In diabetic group there were 125 (80.1%) males and 31 (19.9%) females with a mean age of 56.3+-8.9 years. Left main stem stenosis was present in 59 (37.8%) diabetics and 45 (20.2%) non-diabetics (p 70% stenosis was present in 20 (5.3%) with 13 (8.3%) diabetics and 7 (3.1%) non-diabetics (p<0.025). Stenosis of 50-70% was observed in 30 (7.9%) of which 17 (10.9%) were diabetics and 13 (5.8%) were non-diabetics. Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus is associated with diffuse coronary artery disease and significant carotid artery disease in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. (author)

  9. Empiric antibiotic prescription among febrile under-five Children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    limiting viral infection and therefore, would not require antibiotics. Over prescription of antibiotics increases antibiotics exposure and development of resistance among patients. There is need to evaluate empiric antibiotic prescription in order to limit ...

  10. Trends in Antibiotic Prescribing in Adults in Dutch General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. Haeseker (Michiel); N.H.T.M. Dukers-Muijrers (Nicole); C.J.P.A. Hoebe (Christian); C.A. Bruggeman (Cathrien); J.W.L. Cals (Jochen); A. Verbon (Annelies)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Antibiotic consumption is associated with adverse drug events (ADE) and increasing antibiotic resistance. Detailed information of antibiotic prescribing in different age categories is scarce, but necessary to develop strategies for prudent antibiotic use. The aim of this

  11. Shift in antibiotic prescribing patterns in relation to antibiotic expenditure in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    In paediatrics, antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs. Because of an overall rise in health care costs, lack of uniformity in drug prescribing and the emergence of antibiotic resistance, monitoring and control of antibiotic use is of growing concern and strict antibiotic policies

  12. Implementation of an antibiotic checklist increased appropriate antibiotic use in the hospital on Aruba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daalen, Frederike Vera; Lagerburg, Anouk; de Kort, Jaclyn; Sànchez Rivas, Elena; Geerlings, Suzanne Eugenie

    2017-01-01

    No interventions have yet been implemented to improve antibiotic use on Aruba. In the Netherlands, the introduction of an antibiotic checklist resulted in more appropriate antibiotic use in nine hospitals. The aim of this study was to introduce the antibiotic checklist on Aruba, test its

  13. [Antibiotic therapy in patients with renal insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckhaupt, H; Rose, K G

    1985-06-01

    For the otolaryngologist (ENT specialist), too, antibiotics are among the most frequently prescribed drugs. This article gives the essential fundamentals for the antibiotic treatment of patients with restricted kidney functions, as well as advice for antibiotic therapy in clinics and in medical practice.

  14. Overcoming the current deadlock in antibiotic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäberle, Till F; Hack, Ingrid M

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on the rise, making it harder to treat bacterial infections. The situation is aggravated by the shrinking of the antibiotic development pipeline. To finance urgently needed incentives for antibiotic research, creative financing solutions are needed. Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are a successful model for moving forward. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New business models for antibiotic innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Anthony D; Shah, Tejen A

    2014-05-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance and the dearth of novel antibiotics have become a growing concern among policy-makers. A combination of financial, scientific, and regulatory challenges poses barriers to antibiotic innovation. However, each of these three challenges provides an opportunity to develop pathways for new business models to bring novel antibiotics to market. Pull-incentives that pay for the outputs of research and development (R&D) and push-incentives that pay for the inputs of R&D can be used to increase innovation for antibiotics. Financial incentives might be structured to promote delinkage of a company's return on investment from revenues of antibiotics. This delinkage strategy might not only increase innovation, but also reinforce rational use of antibiotics. Regulatory approval, however, should not and need not compromise safety and efficacy standards to bring antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action to market. Instead regulatory agencies could encourage development of companion diagnostics, test antibiotic combinations in parallel, and pool and make transparent clinical trial data to lower R&D costs. A tax on non-human use of antibiotics might also create a disincentive for non-therapeutic use of these drugs. Finally, the new business model for antibiotic innovation should apply the 3Rs strategy for encouraging collaborative approaches to R&D in innovating novel antibiotics: sharing resources, risks, and rewards.

  16. Antibiotic use: how to improve it?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, M.E.J.L.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotics are an extremely important weapon in the fight against infections. However, antimicrobial resistance is a growing problem. That is why the appropriate use of antibiotics is of great importance. A proper analysis of factors influencing appropriate antibiotic use is at the heart of an

  17. Antibiotic prescribing patterns among healthcare professionals at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Countries have come to place heavy reliance on antibiotics, a phenomena that has contributed to widespread resistant bacteria. Unless antibiotic prescribing patterns are kept in check, the spread of resistant bacteria will lead to a proliferation of dreadful diseases. In this study, antibiotic prescribing patterns at Van Velden ...

  18. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of oral pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veloo, A. C. M.; Seme, K.; Raangs, Gerwin; Rurenga, P.; Singadji, Z.; Wekema - Mulder, G.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a bacterial disease that can be treated with systemic antibiotics. The aim of this study was to establish the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of five periodontal pathogens to six commonly used antibiotics in periodontics. A total of 247 periodontal bacterial isolates were tested

  19. Can over-the-counter antibiotics coerce people for self-medication with antibiotics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamapada Mandal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The current communication, based upon the previous published papers in various scientific web-based journals, states the scenario of over-the-counter sales of antibiotics, including many other factors, that enhance people practice antibiotic self-medication world-wide, which in the developed countries the situation is little different having some resolution with the antibiotic self-medication problems. This paper also states about the prudent use of antibiotics through medical supervision and prescription in order to combat the unwanted antibiotic side effects including emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria from antibiotic misusage.

  20. Molecules in the Spotlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  1. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  2. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  3. Comparative Energetics of Carbon Storage Molecules in Green Algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurens, Lieve M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McKie-Krisberg, Zaid M. [City University of New York; Huang, Andy [City University of New York; Polle, Jurgen E. W. [City University of New York

    2018-02-28

    Several members of the green algae possess the ability to produce lipids and/or high value compounds in significant quantities. While for several of these green algal species induction of increased lipid production has been shown, and cultivation of species for high value molecules occurs at production scale, the molecular mechanisms governing over-accumulation of molecules synthesized from isoprenoid precursors, carotenoids, for example, have received far less attention. Here, we present a calculation of the required ATP equivalencies per carbon atom and reducing power equivalencies as NADH/NADPH (NAD(P)H) per carbon atom for the isoprenoid molecules ..beta..-carotene (C40), astaxanthin (C40), and squalene (C30). We compared energetic requirements of carbohydrates, triacylglycerol, and isoprenoid molecules under a gradient of conditions of cellular stress. Our calculations revealed slightly less ATP and NAD(P)H equivalency per carbon atom between triacylglycerol and the three isoprenoid molecules. Based on our results, we propose that the driving force for differences in accumulation patterns of carotenoids vs. triacylglycerols in algal cells under stress is largely dependent on the presence and regulation of bypass mechanisms at metabolic junction bottlenecks, like pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), within particular species. We provide a discussion of several molecular mechanisms that may influence carbon partitioning within different groups of green algae, including metabolic inhibition through accumulation of specific substrates related to ATP and reducing equivalent production (NAD(P)H) as well as cellular compartmentalization. This work contributes to the ongoing discussion of cellular homeostatic regulation during stress, as well as the potential mechanisms driving long-term carbon storage as it relates to energy and redox states within the algal cell.

  4. Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T V; Suleimanov, Yu V; Aquilanti, V; Krems, R V

    2009-01-01

    We present an accurate quantum mechanical study of molecule-molecule collisions in the presence of a magnetic field. The work focuses on the analysis of elastic scattering and spin relaxation in collisions of O 2 ( 3 Σ g - ) molecules at cold (∼0.1 K) and ultracold (∼10 -6 K) temperatures. Our calculations show that magnetic spin relaxation in molecule-molecule collisions is extremely efficient except at magnetic fields below 1 mT. The rate constant for spin relaxation at T=0.1 K and a magnetic field of 0.1 T is found to be as large as 6.1x10 -11 cm -3 s -1 . The magnetic field dependence of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections at ultracold temperatures is dominated by a manifold of Feshbach resonances with the density of ∼100 resonances per Tesla for collisions of molecules in the absolute ground state. This suggests that the scattering length of ultracold molecules in the absolute ground state can be effectively tuned in a very wide range of magnetic fields. Our calculations demonstrate that the number and properties of the magnetic Feshbach resonances are dramatically different for molecules in the absolute ground and excited spin states. The density of Feshbach resonances for molecule-molecule scattering in the low-field-seeking Zeeman state is reduced by a factor of 10.

  5. Bacterial Enzymes and Antibiotic Resistance- Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Lauren [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β-lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes.

  6. Antibiotics from bacillus subtilis AECL90 - effect of trace elements and carbohydrates on antibiotic production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, M.A.; Shaukat, G.A.; Ahmed, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    Three types of antibiotics S, X and F characteristically bioactive against staphylococcic, xanthomonas and fungi are elaborated by Bacillus Subtilis AECL 69 when grown in molasses peptone malt extract sucrose. No antibiotic production was observed when molasses was omitted from the growth medium. A mineral salt mixture was devised that could replace molasses and restore the production of antibiotics. Influence of various carbohydrates on the production of antibiotics was also studied. Mannose and mannitol had inhibitory effect on the antibiotic production. (author)

  7. Assessment of antibiotic resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae exposed to sequential in vitro antibiotic treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeongjin; Jo, Ara; Chukeatirote, Ekachai; Ahn, Juhee

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacteria treated with different classes of antibiotics exhibit changes in susceptibility to successive antibiotic treatments. This study was designed to evaluate the influence of sequential antibiotic treatments on the development of antibiotic resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae associated with ?-lactamase and efflux pump activities. Methods The antibiotic susceptibility, ?-lactamase activity, and efflux activity were determined in K. pneumoniae grown at 37??C by adding initial (0...

  8. Screening Of Antibiotic Producing Microorganism From Rhizoshphere Soil, Their Antibiotic Production And Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Vishwambhar V. Bhandare; Sandip Mahadev Chavre

    2011-01-01

    Rhizosphere soil samples were preferred as it contains most of the prospective antibiotic producers. In an attempt to screen out new potent antibiotic producers from soil, the Rhizobium species was isolated. Antibiotic produced by shake flask culture is found to be effective against both gram positive and gram negative organisms. This product was found to be a very promising antibiotic when assayed biologically. UV treatment showed positive effect on antibiotic production. The molecular struc...

  9. Perioperative risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy in women undergoing coronary artery bypass graft with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra S Faritous

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prolonged mechanical ventilation is an important recognized complication occurring during cardiovascular surgery procedures. This study was done to assess the perioperative risk factors related to postoperative pulmonary complications and tracheostomy in women undergoing coronary artery bypass graft with cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods: It was a retrospective study on 5,497 patients, including 31 patients with prolonged ventilatory support and 5,466 patients without it; from the latter group, 350 patients with normal condition (extubated in 6-8 hours without any complication were selected randomly. Possible perioperative risk factors were compared between the two groups using a binary logistic regression model. Results: Among the 5,497 women undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG, 31 women needed prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV, and 15 underwent tracheostomy. After logistic regression, 7 factors were determined as being independent perioperative risk factors for PMV. Discussion: Age ≥70 years old, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≤30%, preexisting respiratory or renal disease, emergency or re-do operation and use of preoperative inotropic agents are the main risk factors determined in this study on women undergoing CABG.

  10. A comparison of low vs conventional-dose heparin for minimal cardiopulmonary bypass in coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromes, Y; Daghildjian, K; Caumartin, L; Fischer, M; Rouquette, I; Deleuze, P; Bical, O M

    2011-06-01

    The biocompatibility of minimal extracorporeal circuits has improved; however, anticoagulation is still required. We compared standard high-dose anticoagulation with a low-dose heparin regimen in a retrospective study of patients who underwent coronary bypass surgery using minimal cardiopulmonary bypass. One hundred patients who received 300 IU.kg(-1) heparin were compared with 68 patients who received heparin according to an individually adjusted activated coagulation time target of 300 s, resulting in a mean (SD) heparin dose of 145 (30) IU.kg(-1) . There were no thromboembolic events in either group; however, patients in the low-dose group had lower 24-hour mean (SD) postoperative blood loss than the conventional group (545 (61) vs 680 (88) ml, p=0.001) and a reduced rate of transfusion of allogeneic blood (15% patients transfused vs 32%, p=0.01). An individually tailored low-dose heparin regimen for minimal cardiopulmonary bypass is safe and may be associated with reduced bleeding and lower transfusion requirements. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Implantation of transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis through the ascending aorta concomitant with coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, João Carlos Ferreira; Avanci, Luis Ernesto; Abelaira Filho, Achilles; Almeida, Thiago Faria; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    Introdution The transcatheter aortic valve implantation in the treatment of high-risk symptomatic aortic stenosis has increased the number of implants every year. The learning curve for transcatheter aortic valve implantation has improved since the last 12 years, allowing access alternatives. Objective The aim of this study is to approach the implantation of transcatheter aortic valve through transaortic via associated with off-pump cardiopulmonary bypass surgery in a 67-year-old man, with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, arterial hypertension and kidney transplant. Methods Off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery was performed and the valve in the aortic position was released successfully. Results There were no complications in the intraoperative and postoperative period. Gradient reduction, effective orifice increasing of the prosthesis and absence of valvular regurgitation after implantation were observed by transesophageal echocardiography. Conclusion Procedural success demonstrates that implantation of transcatheter aortic valve through the ascending aorta associated with coronary artery bypass surgery without CPB is a new option for these patients. PMID:25714221

  12. The role of long-term antibiotics in the prevention of infection in postoperative cardiac surgeries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, U.; Arain, M.A.; Dar, M.I.; Khan, A.B.; Aftab, S.; Manan, A.U.

    2007-01-01

    To compare the effect of long-term (7 days) versus short-term (2 days) postoperative antibiotics in preventing postoperative infective complications in patients who have undergone open-heart surgeries. Cardiac patients (n=42), operated for valvular disease (36%), coronary artery bypass grafting (50%), or septal repair (14%), were included in our study. Patients were prospectively randomized into two groups. Group A (n=21) patients received oral antibiotics for 7 days, whereas group B (n=21) patients were given the same for 2 days postoperative. Pre-operative and intraoperative variables were equal in both groups. Total leukocyte count and temperature were monitored daily until the patients were discharged. The chest and leg wounds were inspected daily for any signs of infection. Sputum and urine cultures were sent for selected patients in case of respiratory tract infection or urinary tract infection, respectively. Each patient was followed until the next routine visit in outpatient department. In group A, 3 patients (14%), developed infection postoperatively, whereas in group B, 13 patients (62%) (p =0.001) had to be started on oral or intravenous antibiotics as a result of developing either wound infection, a positive sputum culture, a positive urine culture or a localized infection elsewhere. Mean ward stay in group A was 4.8 +- 4.5 days and in group B 6.5 +- 4.1 days (p =0.011). In this series, there was a significantly higher frequency of infection and longer hospital stay in patients who received antibiotics for 2 days postoperatively as compared to those who received antibiotics for 7 days. (author)

  13. Novel blood sampling method of an artificial endocrine pancreas via the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Shinji; Higuchi, Seiichi; Mita, Naoji; Kitagawa, Tetsuya; Kitahata, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    We tried to perform continuous blood glucose monitoring during cardiovascular surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass using an artificial endocrine pancreas (STG-22 or -55; Nikkiso, Tokyo, Japan); however, we often encountered problems during these procedures because insufficient blood was obtained for monitoring. Thus, we started performing the blood sampling via the venous side of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. As a result, continuous blood glucose monitoring using an artificial endocrine pancreas was proven to be stable and reliable during cardiovascular surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass.

  14. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce [Pullman, WA; Burke, Charles Cullen [Moscow, ID

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  15. Practical Management of Antibiotic Hypersensitivity in 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Eric; Romano, Antonino; Khan, David

    Antibiotics are the most common class of medications that individuals report allergy or intolerance to. Adverse reactions are reported at a predictable rate with all antibiotic use that vary by antibiotic. Antibiotic allergy incidence rates are sex dependent, higher in females than in males. Most of these events are not reproducible or immunologically mediated. Antibiotic allergy prevalence increases with increasing age and is more common in hospitalized populations and in populations that use more antibiotics. Determining potential mechanisms for the observed symptoms of the adverse reactions is the starting point for effective management of antibiotic hypersensitivity. Skin testing and direct challenges are the primary tools used to determine acute tolerance in 2017. Commercially available in vitro testing is not currently clinically useful in determining antibiotic hypersensitivity, with rare exceptions. Desensitization can be used when acute-onset immunologically mediated hypersensitivity is confirmed to safely administer a needed antibiotic. Desensitization is not possible when clinically significant T-cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity is present. Effective management of antibiotic allergy is an important part of a comprehensive antibiotic stewardship program. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  17. The occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes in tap water - a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecka, Agata

    2018-02-01

    The study presents a review of the occurrence of genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance in tap water. The aim of this study was also to compare the applied methods for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) investigations in tap water. As the concentration of ARGs in treated, drinking water is expected to be very low and may cause problems in a standard isolation procedure, the special emphasis is placed on the applied procedures of DNA extraction and their efficiency. The study presents the first attempts to obtain DNA directly from tap water. Further efforts must be put to determine the final amount of obtained DNA and the presence of chosen ARGs among the molecules.

  18. Bacterial biofilms and antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Caldas-Arias

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms give to bacteria micro-environmental benefits; confers protection against antimicrobials. Bacteria have antibiotic resistance by conventional and unusual mechanisms leading to delayed wound healing, to increase recurrent chronic infections and nosocomial contamination of medical devices. Objective: This narrative review aims to introduce the characteristics of Bacteria-biofilms, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and potential alternatives for prevention and control of its formation. Methods: Search strategy was performed on records: PubMed / Medline, Lilacs, Redalyc; with suppliers such as EBSCO and thesaurus MeSH and DeCS. Conclusions: Knowledge and research performance of biofilm bacteria are relevant in the search of technology for detection and measuring sensitivity to antibiotics. The identification of Bacterial-biofilms needs no-traditional microbiological diagnosis.

  19. A Case Report of Coronary-Subclavian Steal Syndrome Treated with Carotid to Axillary Artery Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissam Al-Jundi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary-subclavian steal syndrome results from atherosclerotic disease of the proximal subclavian artery causing reversal of flow in an internal mammary artery used as conduit for coronary artery bypass. This rare complication of cardiac revascularisation leads to recurrence of myocardial ischaemia. When feasible, subclavian angioplasty and/or stent placement can provide acceptable result for these patients. Vascular reconstruction through carotid to subclavian artery bypass has been the standard procedure of choice. Other interventions in literature include axilloaxillary bypass and subclavian carotid transposition. This case report describes the use of carotid axillary artery bypass for the treatment of coronary-subclavian steal syndrome.

  20. Rural Bypass of Critical Access Hospitals in Iowa: Do Visiting Surgical Specialists Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Paula A M; Ullrich, Fred; Ward, Marcia M

    2018-02-01

    Rural bypass for elective surgical procedures is a challenge for critical access hospitals, yet there are opportunities for rural hospitals to improve local retention of surgical candidates through alternative approaches to developing surgery lines of business. In this study we examine the effect of visiting surgical specialists on the odds of rural bypass. Discharge data from the 2011 State Inpatient Databases and State Ambulatory Surgery Databases for Iowa were linked to outreach data from the Office of Statewide Clinical Education Programs and Iowa Physician Information System to model the effect of surgeon specialist supply on rural patients' decision to bypass rural critical access hospitals. Patients in rural communities with a local general surgeon were more likely to be retained in a community than to bypass. Those in communities with visiting general surgeons were more likely to bypass, as were those in communities with visiting urologists and obstetricians. Patients in communities with visiting ophthalmologists and orthopedic surgeons were at higher odds of being retained for their elective surgeries. In addition to known patient and local hospital factors that have an influence on bypass behavior among rural patients seeking elective surgery, availability of surgeon specialists also plays an important role in whether patients bypass or not. Visiting ophthalmologists and orthopedic surgeons were associated with less bypass, as was having local general surgeons. Visiting general surgeons, urologists, and obstetricians were associated with greater odds of bypass. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.