WorldWideScience

Sample records for antibiotic drug targets

  1. Bacterial carbonic anhydrases as drug targets: towards novel antibiotics ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ClaudiuT.Supuran

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1 are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the a-, b-, and/or g-CA families. In the last decade, the a-CAs from Neisseria spp. and Helicobacter pylori as well as the b-class enzymes from Escherichia coli, H. pylori, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Brucella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica and Haemophilus influenzae have been cloned and characterized in detail. For some of these enzymes the X-ray crystal structures were determined, and in vitro and in vivo inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates reported. Although efficient inhibitors have been reported for many such enzymes, only for Nessseria spp., H. pylori, B. suis and S. pneumoniae enzymes it has been possible to evidence inhibition of bacterial growth in vivo. Thus, bacterial CAs represent promising targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems of the clinically used such agents but further studies are needed to validate these and other less investigated enzymes as novel drug targets

  2. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellat, Mathieu F; Raguž, Luka; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human-pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last-resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled "Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow" triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  3. Impact of a pharmacist/physician cooperative target drug monitoring program on prophylactic antibiotic prescribing in obstetrics and gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, K A; Henderson, P L; Newman, R B; Blackwelder, E N; Caldwell, R D

    1992-03-01

    The pharmacist's role in promoting rational, cost-effective use of drugs has been described in the literature. In a target drug monitoring program (TDMP), a single agent or group of agents becomes targeted for review. Antibiotics have been the primary focus of TDMP because of their therapeutic impact and cost considerations. The objectives of this project were to assess the prophylactic antibiotic prescribing habits of OB/GYN physicians and to evaluate the impact of a pharmacist/physician cooperative TDMP on prophylactic antibiotic prescribing and cost. The study was conducted in three phases: 1) a retrospective chart review of 150 patients, 2) an in-service education session, and 3) a concurrent chart review of 107 patients. Patient selection, timing of preoperative dose, and use of single dose prophylaxis were according to criteria in greater than 90% of patients both before and after the in-service training. Compliance with recommended regimens increased from 45 to 73% after the in-service training. A cost savings was not realized because the physicians wished to use a regimen with anti-anaerobic coverage (i.e., cefotetan) rather than a less expensive agent. However, the cost of selection of resistant organisms must be considered when discouraging the use of multiple broad spectrum agents. Active involvement of the medical staff in a pharmacy-based TDMP produces a cooperative atmosphere in which to educate clinicians and promote rational prescribing habits. PMID:10116721

  4. Antibiotics: Miracle Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-16

    The overuse of antibiotics has led to the development of resistance among bacteria, making antibiotics ineffective in treating certain conditions. This podcast discusses the importance of talking to your healthcare professional about whether or not antibiotics will be beneficial if you’ve been diagnosed with an infectious disease.  Created: 4/16/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  5. Antibiotics in development targeting protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, Joyce A

    2011-12-01

    The resolution of antibiotic-ribosomal subunit complexes and antibacterial-protein complexes at the atomic level has provided new insights into modifications of clinically relevant antimicrobials and provided new classes that target the protein cellular apparatus. New chemistry platforms that use fragment-based drug design or allow novel modifications in known structural classes are being used to design new antibiotics that overcome known resistance mechanisms and extend spectrum and potency by circumventing ubiquitous efflux pumps. This review provides details on seven antibiotics in development for treatment of moderate-to-severe community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and/or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: solithromycin, cethromycin, omadacycline, CEM-102, GSK1322322, radezolid, and tedizolid. Two antibiotics of the oxazolidinone class, PF-02341272 and AZD5847, are being developed as antituberculosis agents. Only three antibiotics that target the protein cellular machinery, TP-434, GSK2251052, and plazomicin, have a spectrum that encompasses multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. These compounds provide hope for treating key pathogens that cause serious disease in both the community and the hospital. PMID:22191530

  6. Lipid II as a target for antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breukink, Eefjan; de Kruijff, Ben

    2006-04-01

    Lipid II is a membrane-anchored cell-wall precursor that is essential for bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis. The effectiveness of targeting Lipid II as an antibacterial strategy is highlighted by the fact that it is the target for at least four different classes of antibiotic, including the clinically important glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin. However, the growing problem of bacterial resistance to many current drugs, including vancomycin, has led to increasing interest in the therapeutic potential of other classes of compound that target Lipid II. Here, we review progress in understanding of the antibacterial activities of these compounds, which include lantibiotics, mannopeptimycins and ramoplanin, and consider factors that will be important in exploiting their potential as new treatments for bacterial infections. PMID:16531990

  7. Chemical Genetic Analysis and Functional Characterization of Staphylococcal Wall Teichoic Acid 2-Epimerases Reveals Unconventional Antibiotic Drug Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Paul A.; Müller, Anna; Wolff, Kerstin A.; Fischmann, Thierry; Wang, Hao; Reed, Patricia; Hou, Yan; Li, Wenjin; Müller, Christa E.; Xiao, Jianying; Murgolo, Nicholas; Sher, Xinwei; Mayhood, Todd; Sheth, Payal R.; Mirza, Asra; Labroli, Marc; Xiao, Li; McCoy, Mark; Gill, Charles J.; Pinho, Mariana G.; Schneider, Tanja; Roemer, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a chemical biology strategy performed in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to identify MnaA, a 2-epimerase that we demonstrate interconverts UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAc to modulate substrate levels of TarO and TarA wall teichoic acid (WTA) biosynthesis enzymes. Genetic inactivation of mnaA results in complete loss of WTA and dramatic in vitro β-lactam hypersensitivity in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and S. epidermidis (MRSE). Likewise, the β-lactam antibiotic imipenem exhibits restored bactericidal activity against mnaA mutants in vitro and concomitant efficacy against 2-epimerase defective strains in a mouse thigh model of MRSA and MRSE infection. Interestingly, whereas MnaA serves as the sole 2-epimerase required for WTA biosynthesis in S. epidermidis, MnaA and Cap5P provide compensatory WTA functional roles in S. aureus. We also demonstrate that MnaA and other enzymes of WTA biosynthesis are required for biofilm formation in MRSA and MRSE. We further determine the 1.9Å crystal structure of S. aureus MnaA and identify critical residues for enzymatic dimerization, stability, and substrate binding. Finally, the natural product antibiotic tunicamycin is shown to physically bind MnaA and Cap5P and inhibit 2-epimerase activity, demonstrating that it inhibits a previously unanticipated step in WTA biosynthesis. In summary, MnaA serves as a new Staphylococcal antibiotic target with cognate inhibitors predicted to possess dual therapeutic benefit: as combination agents to restore β-lactam efficacy against MRSA and MRSE and as non-bioactive prophylactic agents to prevent Staphylococcal biofilm formation. PMID:27144276

  8. Ecology and Evolution as Targets: the Need for Novel Eco-Evo Drugs and Strategies To Fight Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Baquero, F.; Coque, T. M.; de la Cruz, F

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the explosive spread of antibiotic resistance determinants among pathogenic, commensal, and environmental bacteria has reached a global dimension. Classical measures trying to contain or slow locally the progress of antibiotic resistance in patients on the basis of better antibiotic prescribing policies have clearly become insufficient at the global level. Urgent measures are needed to directly confront the processes influencing antibiotic resistance pollution in the microbio...

  9. Targeting antibiotics to households for trachoma control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobel M Blake

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mass drug administration (MDA is part of the current trachoma control strategy, but it can be costly and results in many uninfected individuals receiving treatment. Here we explore whether alternative, targeted approaches are effective antibiotic-sparing strategies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed data on the prevalence of ocular infection with Chlamydia trachomatis and of active trachoma disease among 4,436 individuals from two communities in The Gambia (West Africa and two communities in Tanzania (East Africa. An age- and household-structured mathematical model of transmission was fitted to these data using maximum likelihood. The presence of active inflammatory disease as a marker of infection in a household was, in general, significantly more sensitive (between 79% [95%CI: 60%-92%] and 86% [71%-95%] across the four communities than as a marker of infection in an individual (24% [16%-33%]-66% [56%-76%]. Model simulations, under the best fit models for each community, showed that targeting treatment to households has the potential to be as effective as and significantly more cost-effective than mass treatment when antibiotics are not donated. The cost (2007US$ per incident infection averted ranged from 1.5 to 3.1 for MDA, from 1.0 to 1.7 for household-targeted treatment assuming equivalent coverage, and from 0.4 to 1.7 if household visits increased treatment coverage to 100% in selected households. Assuming antibiotics were donated, MDA was predicted to be more cost-effective unless opportunity costs incurred by individuals collecting antibiotics were included or household visits improved treatment uptake. Limiting MDA to children was not as effective in reducing infection as the other aforementioned distribution strategies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our model suggests that targeting antibiotics to households with active trachoma has the potential to be a cost-effective trachoma control measure, but further work is

  10. Antibiotics in Animal Feed Contribute to Drug-Resistant Germs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158316.html Antibiotics in Animal Feed Contribute to Drug-Resistant Germs: Study Individual farm ... HealthDay News) -- Use of antibiotics in farm animal feed is helping drive the worldwide increase in antibiotic- ...

  11. GWAS and drug targets

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Chen; Moult, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed a large number of links between genome variation and complex disease. Among other benefits, it is expected that these insights will lead to new therapeutic strategies, particularly the identification of new drug targets. In this paper, we evaluate the power of GWAS studies to find drug targets by examining how many existing drug targets have been directly 'rediscovered' by this technique, and the extent to which GWAS results may ...

  12. LIVER SPECIFIC DRUG TARGETING STRATEGIES: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh S. Gorad*, Satish K. Mandlik and Kishore N. Gujar

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery to liver is one of the most challenging research areas in pharmaceutical sciences. The some physiological barrier such as opsonization, mechanical entrapment by pulmonary vascular bed, uptake by RES represents an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of proteins and drugs, including antibiotics, antineoplastic agents and antiviral agents to target liver disorders. Therefore, various strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery of different drugs to liver and hepato...

  13. Identifying targets for quality improvement in hospital antibiotic prescribing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreuwel, P.C. van; Blok, H.; Langelaar, M.F.; Kullberg, B.J.; Mouton, J.W.; Natsch, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To audit antibiotic use in a university hospital and to identify targets for quality improvement in a setting with low antibiotic use and resistance rates. METHODOLOGY: A point-prevalence survey (PPS), using a patient-based audit tool for antibiotic use, was executed in the Radboud Unive

  14. Gene-Drug Interactions and the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Adam Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic resistance is shaped by interactions between genes, the chemical environment, and an antibiotic's mechanism of action. This thesis explores these interactions with experiments, theory, and analysis, seeking a mechanistic understanding of how different interactions between genes and drugs can enhance or constrain the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Chapter 1 investigates the effects of the chemical decay of an antibiotic. Tetracycline resistant and sensitive bac...

  15. Antibiotic Adjuvants: Diverse Strategies for Controlling Drug-Resistant Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Erin E.; Franco, Octavio L.; Robert E. W. Hancock

    2014-01-01

    The growing number of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to numerous antibiotics is a cause for concern around the globe. There have been no new broad-spectrum antibiotics developed in the last 40 years, and the drugs we have currently are quickly becoming ineffective. In this article, we explore a range of therapeutic strategies that could be employed in conjunction with antibiotics and may help to prolong the life span of these life-saving drugs. Discussed topics include antiresistance ...

  16. Magnetic targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Wiedmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in both men and women. Treatment by intravenous or oral administration of chemotherapy agents results in serious and often treatment-limiting side effects. Delivery of drugs directly to the lung by inhalation of an aerosol holds the promise of achieving a higher concentration in the lung with lower blood levels. To further enhance the selective lung deposition, it may be possible to target deposition by using external magnetic fields to direct the delivery of drug coupled to magnetic particles. Moreover, alternating magnetic fields can be used to induce particle heating, which in turn controls the drug release rate with the appropriate thermal sensitive material.With this goal, superparamagetic nanoparticles (SPNP were prepared and characterized, and enhanced magnetic deposition was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. SPNPs were also incorporated into a lipid-based/SPNP aerosol formulation, and drug release was shown to be controlled by thermal activation. Because of the inherent imaging potential of SPNPs, this use of nanotechnology offers the possibility of coupling the diagnosis of lung cancer to drug release, which perhaps will ultimately provide the “magic bullet” that Paul Ehrlich originally sought.

  17. Supramolecular Antibiotic Switches: A Potential Strategy for Combating Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Haotian; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial infectious disease is a serious public health concern throughout the world. Pathogen drug resistance, arising from both rational use and abuse/misuse of germicides, complicates the situation. Aside from developing novel antibiotics and antimicrobial agents, molecular approaches have become another significant method to overcome the problem of pathogen drug resistance. Established supramolecular systems, the antibiotic properties of which can be switched "on" and "off" through host-guest interactions, show great potential in combating issues regarding antibiotic resistance in the long term, as indicated by several recent studies. In this Concept, recently developed strategies for antibacterial regulation are summarized and further directions for research into antibiotic switches are proposed. PMID:27312106

  18. LIVER SPECIFIC DRUG TARGETING STRATEGIES: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh S. Gorad*, Satish K. Mandlik and Kishore N. Gujar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Drug delivery to liver is one of the most challenging research areas in pharmaceutical sciences. The some physiological barrier such as opsonization, mechanical entrapment by pulmonary vascular bed, uptake by RES represents an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of proteins and drugs, including antibiotics, antineoplastic agents and antiviral agents to target liver disorders. Therefore, various strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery of different drugs to liver and hepatocytes which includes passive accumulation of nanoparticle therapeutics and active targeting by surface modifications of nanoparticles with specific ligands such as carbohydrates, peptides, proteins and antibodies. The present review enlightens about different pathologies of liver and targeting strategies employed in relation to liver anatomy and disease etiologies.

  19. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  20. Bacterial Protein Synthesis as a Target for Antibiotic Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenz, Stefan; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis occurs on macromolecular machines, called ribosomes. Bacterial ribosomes and the translational machinery represent one of the major targets for antibiotics in the cell. Therefore, structural and biochemical investigations into ribosome-targeting antibiotics provide not only insight into the mechanism of action and resistance of antibiotics, but also insight into the fundamental process of protein synthesis. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of protein synthesis, particularly with respect to X-ray and cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of ribosome complexes, and highlights the different steps of translation that are targeted by the diverse array of known antibiotics. Such findings will be important for the ongoing development of novel and improved antimicrobial agents to combat the rapid emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27481773

  1. Thiamin (Vitamin B1 Biosynthesis and Regulation: A Rich Source of Antimicrobial Drug Targets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglin Du, Honghai Wang, Jianping Xie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance of pathogens has necessitated the identification of novel targets for antibiotics. Thiamin (vitamin B1 is an essential cofactor for all organisms in its active form thiamin diphosphate (ThDP. Therefore, its metabolic pathways might be one largely untapped source of antibiotics targets. This review describes bacterial thiamin biosynthetic, salvage, and transport pathways. Essential thiamin synthetic enzymes such as Dxs and ThiE are proposed as promising drug targets. The regulation mechanism of thiamin biosynthesis by ThDP riboswitch is also discussed. As drug targets of existing antimicrobial compound pyrithiamin, the ThDP riboswitch might serves as alternative targets for more antibiotics.

  2. The immune system as a target for antibiotics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grondel, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on antibiotics, oxytetracycline (OxyTC) in particular, are presented in this thesis with respect to the influence of these drugs on the immune system of carp and chickens. Special attention was paid to the pharmacokinetic behaviour of OxyTC.ImmunologyCarp ( Cyprinusca

  3. Design, Characterization, and Optimization of Controlled Drug Delivery System Containing Antibiotic Drug/s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Apurv; Dodiya, Hitesh; Shelate, Pragna; Shastri, Divyesh; Dave, Divyang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was design, characterization, and optimization of controlled drug delivery system containing antibiotic drug/s. Osmotic drug delivery system was chosen as controlled drug delivery system. The porous osmotic pump tablets were designed using Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken factorial design to find out the best formulation. For screening of three categories of polymers, six independent variables were chosen for Plackett-Burman design. Osmotic agent sodium chloride and microcrystalline cellulose, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate and sucrose, and coating agent ethyl cellulose and cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. Optimization of osmotic tablets was done by Box-Behnken design by selecting three independent variables. Osmotic agent sodium chloride, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate, and coating agent cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. The result of Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken design and ANOVA studies revealed that osmotic agent and pore former had significant effect on the drug release up to 12 hr. The observed independent variables were found to be very close to predicted values of most satisfactory formulation which demonstrates the feasibility of the optimization procedure in successful development of porous osmotic pump tablets containing antibiotic drug/s by using sodium chloride, sodium lauryl sulphate, and cellulose acetate as key excipients. PMID:27610247

  4. Design of dual action antibiotics as an approach to search for new promising drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review is devoted to the latest achievements in the design of dual action antibiotics — heterodimeric (chimeric) structures based on antibacterial agents of different classes (fluoroquinolones, anthracyclines, oxazolidines, macrolides and so on). Covalent binding can make the pharmacokinetic characteristics of these molecules more predictable and improve the penetration of each component into the cell. Consequently, not only does the drug efficacy increase owing to inhibition of two targets but also the resistance to one or both antibiotics can be overcome. The theoretical grounds of elaboration, design principles and methods for the synthesis of dual action antibiotics are considered. The structures are classified according to the type of covalent spacer (cleavable or not) connecting the moieties of two agents. Dual action antibiotics with a spacer that can be cleaved in a living cell are considered as dual action prodrugs. Data on the biological action of heterodimeric compounds are presented and structure–activity relationships are analyzed. The bibliography includes 225 references

  5. Preclinical pharmacodynamic evaluation of antibiotic nitroxoline for anticancer drug repurposing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Shanshan; Yang, Dexuan; PAN, KEVIN; Li, Linna; Yuan, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    The established urinary antibiotic nitroxoline has recently regained considerable attention, due to its potent activities in inhibiting angiogenesis, inducing apoptosis and blocking cancer cell invasion. These features make nitroxoline an excellent candidate for anticancer drug repurposing. To rapidly advance nitroxoline repurposing into clinical trials, the present study performed systemic preclinical pharmacodynamic evaluation of its anticancer activity, including a methyl thiazolyl tetrazo...

  6. Molecular mechanisms of membrane targeting antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epand, Richard M; Walker, Chelsea; Epand, Raquel F; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2016-05-01

    The bacterial membrane provides a target for antimicrobial peptides. There are two groups of bacteria that have characteristically different surface membranes. One is the Gram-negative bacteria that have an outer membrane rich in lipopolysaccharide. Several antimicrobials have been found to inhibit the synthesis of this lipid, and it is expected that more will be developed. In addition, antimicrobial peptides can bind to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and block passage of solutes between the periplasm and the cell exterior, resulting in bacterial toxicity. In Gram-positive bacteria, the major bacterial lipid component, phosphatidylglycerol can be chemically modified by bacterial enzymes to convert the lipid from anionic to cationic or zwitterionic form. This process leads to increased levels of resistance of the bacteria against polycationic antimicrobial agents. Inhibitors of this enzyme would provide protection against the development of bacterial resistance. There are antimicrobial agents that directly target a component of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes that can act on both Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria. Many of these are cyclic peptides with a rigid binding site capable of binding a lipid component. This binding targets antimicrobial agents to bacteria, rather than being toxic to host cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26514603

  7. Blast from the Past: Reassessing Forgotten Translation Inhibitors, Antibiotic Selectivity, and Resistance Mechanisms to Aid Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenz, Stefan; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a major target within the bacterial cell for antibiotics. Investigations into ribosome-targeting antibiotics have provided much needed functional and structural insight into their mechanism of action. However, the increasing prevalence of multi-drug-resistant bacteria has limited the utility of our current arsenal of clinically relevant antibiotics, highlighting the need for the development of new classes. Recent structural studies have characterized a number of antibiotics discovered decades ago that have unique chemical scaffolds and/or utilize novel modes of action to interact with the ribosome and inhibit translation. Additionally, structures of eukaryotic cytoplasmic and mitochondrial ribosomes have provided further structural insight into the basis for specificity and toxicity of antibiotics. Together with our increased understanding of bacterial resistance mechanisms, revisiting our treasure trove of "forgotten" antibiotics could pave the way for the next generation of antimicrobial agents. PMID:26585390

  8. A new approach for the discovery of antibiotics by targeting non-multiplying bacteria: a novel topical antibiotic for staphylococcal infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmin Hu

    Full Text Available In a clinical infection, multiplying and non-multiplying bacteria co-exist. Antibiotics kill multiplying bacteria, but they are very inefficient at killing non-multipliers which leads to slow or partial death of the total target population of microbes in an infected tissue. This prolongs the duration of therapy, increases the emergence of resistance and so contributes to the short life span of antibiotics after they reach the market. Targeting non-multiplying bacteria from the onset of an antibiotic development program is a new concept. This paper describes the proof of principle for this concept, which has resulted in the development of the first antibiotic using this approach. The antibiotic, called HT61, is a small quinolone-derived compound with a molecular mass of about 400 Daltons, and is active against non-multiplying bacteria, including methicillin sensitive and resistant, as well as Panton-Valentine leukocidin-carrying Staphylococcus aureus. It also kills mupirocin resistant MRSA. The mechanism of action of the drug is depolarisation of the cell membrane and destruction of the cell wall. The speed of kill is within two hours. In comparison to the conventional antibiotics, HT61 kills non-multiplying cells more effectively, 6 logs versus less than one log for major marketed antibiotics. HT61 kills methicillin sensitive and resistant S. aureus in the murine skin bacterial colonization and infection models. No resistant phenotype was produced during 50 serial cultures over a one year period. The antibiotic caused no adverse affects after application to the skin of minipigs. Targeting non-multiplying bacteria using this method should be able to yield many new classes of antibiotic. These antibiotics may be able to reduce the rate of emergence of resistance, shorten the duration of therapy, and reduce relapse rates.

  9. 21 CFR 510.106 - Labeling of antibiotic and antibiotic-containing drugs intended for use in milk-producing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of antibiotic and antibiotic-containing... ANIMAL DRUGS Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 510.106 Labeling of antibiotic and antibiotic-containing drugs intended for use in milk-producing animals. Whenever the labeling of...

  10. Antibiotic adjuvants: diverse strategies for controlling drug-resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Erin E; Franco, Octavio L; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-01-01

    The growing number of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to numerous antibiotics is a cause for concern around the globe. There have been no new broad-spectrum antibiotics developed in the last 40 years, and the drugs we have currently are quickly becoming ineffective. In this article, we explore a range of therapeutic strategies that could be employed in conjunction with antibiotics and may help to prolong the life span of these life-saving drugs. Discussed topics include antiresistance drugs, which are administered to potentiate the effects of current antimicrobials in bacteria where they are no longer (or never were) effective; antivirulence drugs, which are directed against bacterial virulence factors; host-directed therapies, which modulate the host's immune system to facilitate infection clearance; and alternative treatments, which include such therapies as oral rehydration for diarrhea, phage therapy, and probiotics. All of these avenues show promise for the treatment of bacterial infections and should be further investigated to explore their full potential in the face of a postantibiotic era. PMID:25393203

  11. Nanomechanics of Drug-target Interactions and Antibacterial Resistance Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Ndieyira, J. W.; Watari, M.; McKendry, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    The cantilever sensor, which acts as a transducer of reactions between model bacterial cell wall matrix immobilized on its surface and antibiotic drugs in solution, has shown considerable potential in biochemical sensing applications with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity(1-5). The drug-target interactions generate surface stress, causing the cantilever to bend, and the signal can be analyzed optically when it is illuminated by a laser. The change in surface stress measured with nano-...

  12. Evaluation and validation of drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-huaDU

    2004-01-01

    Drug target is one of the key factors for discovering and developing new drugs. To find and validate drug targets is a crucial technique required in drug discovery by the strategy of high throughput screening. Based on the knowledge of molecular biology, human genomics and proteomics, it has been predicted that 5000 to 10000 drug targets exist in human. So, it is important orocedure to evaluate and validate the drug targets.

  13. Microencapsulation of anti-tumor, antibiotic and thrombolytic drugs in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Mosier, Benjamin; Cassanto, John

    1994-01-01

    Encapsulation of cytotoxic or labile drugs enables targeted delivery and sustained release kinetics that are not available with intravenous injection. A new liquid-liquid diffusion process has been developed for forming unique microcapsules that contain both aqueous and hydrocarbon soluble drugs. Microgravity experiments, on sounding rockets (1989-92) and Shuttle missions STS-52 (1992) and STS-56 (1993) using an automated Materials Dispersion Apparatus, produced multi-lamellar microcapsules containing both Cis-platinum (anti-tumor drug) and iodinated poppy seed oil (a radiocontrast medium), surrounded by a polyglyceride skin. Microcapsules formed with amoxicillin (antibiotic) or urokinase (a clot dissolving enzyme), co-encapsulated with IPO, are still intact after two years. Microcapsules were formed with the drug so concentrated that crystals formed inside. Multi-layered microspheres, with both hydrophobic drug compartments, can enable diffusion of complementary drugs from the same microcapsule, e.g. antibiotics and immuno-stimulants to treat resistant infections or multiple fibrinolytic drugs to dissolve emboli. Co-encapsulation of enough radio-contrast medium enables oncologists to monitor the delivery of anti-tumor microcapsules to target tumors using computerized tomography and radiography that would track the distribution of microcapsules after release from the intra-arterial catheter. These microcapsules could have important applications in chemotheraphy of certain liver, kidney, brain and other tumors.

  14. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Human Services that applicant did not act with due diligence; (iii) One-half the number of days... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human...

  15. Bacterial Transcription as a Target for Antibacterial Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Transcription, the first step of gene expression, is carried out by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) and is regulated through interaction with a series of protein transcription factors. RNAP and its associated transcription factors are highly conserved across the bacterial domain and represent excellent targets for broad-spectrum antibacterial agent discovery. Despite the numerous antibiotics on the market, there are only two series currently approved that target transcription. The determination of the three-dimensional structures of RNAP and transcription complexes at high resolution over the last 15 years has led to renewed interest in targeting this essential process for antibiotic development by utilizing rational structure-based approaches. In this review, we describe the inhibition of the bacterial transcription process with respect to structural studies of RNAP, highlight recent progress toward the discovery of novel transcription inhibitors, and suggest additional potential antibacterial targets for rational drug design. PMID:26764017

  16. Drug targeting to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardridge, William M

    2007-09-01

    The goal of brain drug targeting technology is the delivery of therapeutics across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), including the human BBB. This is accomplished by re-engineering pharmaceuticals to cross the BBB via specific endogenous transporters localized within the brain capillary endothelium. Certain endogenous peptides, such as insulin or transferrin, undergo receptor-mediated transport (RMT) across the BBB in vivo. In addition, peptidomimetic monoclonal antibodies (MAb) may also cross the BBB via RMT on the endogenous transporters. The MAb may be used as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry across the BBB large molecule pharmaceuticals, including recombinant proteins, antibodies, RNA interference drugs, or non-viral gene medicines. Fusion proteins of the molecular Trojan horse and either neurotrophins or single chain Fv antibodies have been genetically engineered. The fusion proteins retain bi-functional properties, and both bind the BBB receptor, to trigger transport into brain, and bind the cognate receptor inside brain to induce the pharmacologic effect. Trojan horse liposome technology enables the brain targeting of non-viral plasmid DNA. Molecular Trojan horses may be formulated with fusion protein technology, avidin-biotin technology, or Trojan horse liposomes to target to brain virtually any large molecule pharmaceutical. PMID:17554607

  17. Predicting new molecular targets for known drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Keiser, Michael J.; Setola, Vincent; Irwin, John J.; Laggner, Christian; Abbas, Atheir; Hufeisen, Sandra J.; Jensen, Niels H.; Kuijer, Michael B.; Matos, Roberto C.; Tran, Thuy B.; Whaley, Ryan; Glennon, Richard A.; Hert, Jérôme; THOMAS, KELAN L. H.; Edwards, Douglas D.

    2009-01-01

    Whereas drugs are intended to be selective, at least some bind to several physiologic targets, explaining both side effects and efficacy. As many drug-target combinations exist, it would be useful to explore possible interactions computationally. Here, we compared 3,665 FDA-approved and investigational drugs against hundreds of targets, defining each target by its ligands. Chemical similarities between drugs and ligand sets predicted thousands of unanticipated associations. Thirty were tested...

  18. Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  19. Light and drugs: the photochemistry of fluoroquinolone antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Barberis Negra

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Light-related adverse side-effects of drugs are now an important source of concern. In order that the mechanism underlying to such effects is recognised, an in-depth photochemical study must be carried out. The case of some fluoroquinolone antibiotics (norfloxacin, enoxacin, lomefloxacin is discussed as a representative example. These drugs undergo heterolytic fragmentation of the C—F bond leading to aryl cations. Quantum yields in neutral water range from 0.001 to 0.5 depending on the charge transfer degree of the ππ* state. Lower values are obtained at both acidic and basic pH. There is indication that the excited state involved in most of this reactions is a relatively long-lived triplet. The aryl cations undergo intra- or intermolecular reactions, and are presumably involved in the reported photo-toxic effect.

  20. Assembly and clustering of natural antibiotics guides target identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Chad W; Skinnider, Michael A; Dejong, Chris A; Rees, Philip N; Chen, Gregory M; Walker, Chelsea G; French, Shawn; Brown, Eric D; Bérdy, János; Liu, Dennis Y; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are essential for numerous medical procedures, including the treatment of bacterial infections, but their widespread use has led to the accumulation of resistance, prompting calls for the discovery of antibacterial agents with new targets. A majority of clinically approved antibacterial scaffolds are derived from microbial natural products, but these valuable molecules are not well annotated or organized, limiting the efficacy of modern informatic analyses. Here, we provide a comprehensive resource defining the targets, chemical origins and families of the natural antibacterial collective through a retrobiosynthetic algorithm. From this we also detail the directed mining of biosynthetic scaffolds and resistance determinants to reveal structures with a high likelihood of having previously unknown modes of action. Implementing this pipeline led to investigations of the telomycin family of natural products from Streptomyces canus, revealing that these bactericidal molecules possess a new antibacterial mode of action dependent on the bacterial phospholipid cardiolipin. PMID:26829473

  1. Drug targeting through pilosebaceous route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourasia, Rashmi; Jain, Sanjay K

    2009-10-01

    Local skin targeting is of interest for the pharmaceutical and the cosmetic industry. A topically applied substance has basically three possibilities to penetrate into the skin: transcellular, intercellular, and follicular. The transfollicular path has been largely ignored because hair follicles constitute only 0.1% of the total skin. The hair follicle is a skin appendage with a complex structure containing many cell types that produce highly specialised proteins. The hair follicle is in a continuous cycle: anagen is the hair growth phase, catagen the involution phase and telogen is the resting phase. Nonetheless, the hair follicle has great potential for skin treatment, owing to its deep extension into the dermis and thus provides much deeper penetration and absorption of compounds beneath the skin than seen with the transdermal route. In the case of skin diseases and of cosmetic products, delivery to sweat glands or to the pilosebaceous unit is essential for the effectiveness of the drug. Increased accumulation in the pilosebaceous unit could treat alopecia, acne and skin cancer more efficiently and improve the effect of cosmetic substances and nutrients. Therefore, we review herein various drug delivery systems, including liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, lipid nanocarriers, gene therapy and discuss the results of recent researches. We also review the drugs which have been investigated for pilosebaceous delivery. PMID:19663765

  2. Genotoxic and immunotoxic potential effects of selected psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) hemocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential toxicity of pharmaceuticals towards aquatic invertebrates is still poorly understood and sometimes controversial. This study aims to document the in vitro genotoxicity and immunotoxicity of psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on Mytilus edulis. Mussel hemocytes were exposed to fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and erythromycin, at concentrations ranging from μg/L to mg/L. Paroxetine at 1.5 μg/L led to DNA damage while the same concentration of venlafaxine caused immunomodulation. Fluoxetine exposure resulted in genotoxicity, immunotoxicity and cytotoxicity. In the case of antibiotics, trimethoprim was genotoxic at 200 μg/L and immunotoxic at 20 mg/L whereas erythromycin elicited same detrimental effects at higher concentrations. DNA metabolism seems to be a highly sensitive target for psychotropic drugs and antibiotics. Furthermore, these compounds affect the immune system of bivalves, with varying intensity. This attests the relevance of these endpoints to assess the toxic mode of action of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. - Highlights: • Psychotropic drugs and antibiotics affect the immune system of Mytilus edulis. • Genotoxic and immunotoxic endpoints were relevant to assess pharmaceuticals toxicity. • DNA metabolism is a highly sensitive target for pharmaceuticals. • Fluoxetine and paroxetine were the most toxic compounds on mussel hemocytes. - Psychotropic drugs and antibiotics have the potential to cause immune toxicity and genotoxicity on Mytilus edulis hemocytes

  3. Search of antimicrobial activity of selected non-antibiotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszewska, Hanna; Zareba, Tomasz; Tyski, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    A variety of pharmaceutical preparations, which are applied in the management of non-infectious diseases, have shown in vitro some antimicrobial activity. These drugs are called "non-antibiotics". The aim of this study was to detect and characterise the antimicrobial activity of non-antibiotic drugs. selected from the preparations analysed during state control performed at the Drug Institute in Poland. Over 160 pharmaceutical preparations were randomly chosen from different groups of drugs. The surveillance study was performed on standard ATCC microbial strains used for drug control: S aureus, E. coil, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It was shown that the drugs listed below inhibited growth of at least one of the examined strains:acyclovir (Awirol 5%, cream), alendronate (Alenato 5 mg, tabl.), alverine (Meteospasmyl 20 mg, caps.), butorphanole (Butamidor 10 mg/ml, amp.), clodronate (Sindronat 400 mg, caps), diclofenac (Olfen 75 mg, amp.), emadastine (Emadine 0.05%, eye dr.), etodolac (Febret 200 mg, caps.), fluvastatine (Lescol 40 mg, tabl.), ketamine (Ketamidor 10%, amp.), levocabastine (Histimet 0.5 mg/ml, eye dr.), losartan (Lorista 50 mg, tabl.), matipranolol (Betaman 0.3% eye dr.), mesalazine (Pentasa 1%, susp.), naproxen (Nalgesin 550 mg, tabl.), oxaprosine (Reumax 600 mg, tabl.), oxymethazoline (Nasivin 0.025%, nose dr.), proxymetacaine (Alcaine 0.5%, eye dr.), ribavirin (Rebetol 200 mg, caps.), rutoside with ascorbic acid (Cerutin 20+200 mg, tabl.), sulodexide (Vessel due F, 250 LSU, caps.), tegaserole (Zelmac 50 mg, tabl.), telmisartan (Pritor 20 mg, tabl.), temosolomide (Temodal 100 mg, caps.), ticlopidine (Ticlid 250 mg, tabl.), tolfenamic acid (Migea rapid 200 mg, tabl.), tramadole (Tramundin 100 mg, tabl.), tropicamide (Tropicamidum 1%, eye dr.). Staphylococcus aureus was susceptible to most of the drugs listed above. Ticlopidine showed activity against S. aureus, E. coli and C. albicans (MICs equal to: 0.45; 0.45 and 0.65 mg/ml, respectively

  4. Di/tri-peptide transporters as drug delivery targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C U; Brodin, Birger

    2003-01-01

    -dependent, and the transporters thus belong to the Proton-dependent Oligopeptide Transporter (POT)-family. The transporters are not drug targets per se, however due to their uniquely broad substrate specificity; they have proved to be relevant drug targets at the level of drug transport. Drug molecules such as...... oral active beta-lactam antibiotics, bestatin, prodrugs of aciclovir and ganciclovir have oral bioavailabilities, which largely are a result of their interaction with PepT1. In the last few years an increasing number of studies concerned with regulation of di/tri-peptide transporter capacity have...... the level of increased gene transcription. PepT1-mediated transport is up-regulated by short-term exposure to receptor agonists such as EGF, insulin, leptin, and clonidine, and down-regulated by VIP. Overall, the regulation of di/tri-peptide transport may be contributed to 1) changes in apical proton...

  5. Antiepileptic drugs: newer targets and new drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Vihang S. Chawan; Abhishek M. Phatak; Kalpesh V. Gawand; Sagar V. Badwane; Sagar S. Panchal

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder affecting 0.5-1% of the population in India. Majority of patients respond to currently available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), but a small percentage of patients have shown poor and inadequate response to AEDs in addition to various side effects and drug interactions while on therapy. Thus there is a need to develop more effective AEDs in drug resistant epilepsy which have a better safety profile with minimal adverse effects. The United States food and...

  6. A differential drug screen for compounds that select against antibiotic resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remy Chait

    Full Text Available Antibiotics increase the frequency of resistant bacteria by providing them a competitive advantage over sensitive strains. Here, we develop a versatile assay for differential chemical inhibition of competing microbial strains, and use it to identify compounds that preferentially inhibit tetracycline-resistant relative to sensitive bacteria, thus "inverting" selection for resistance. Our assay distinguishes compounds selecting directly against specific resistance mechanisms and compounds whose selection against resistance is based on their physiological interaction with tetracycline and is more general with respect to resistance mechanism. A pilot screen indicates that both types of selection-inverting compounds are secreted by soil microbes, suggesting that nature has evolved a repertoire of chemicals that counteracts antibiotic resistance. Finally, we show that our assay can more generally permit simple, direct screening for drugs based on their differential activity against different strains or targets.

  7. Antiepileptic drugs: newer targets and new drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vihang S. Chawan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder affecting 0.5-1% of the population in India. Majority of patients respond to currently available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, but a small percentage of patients have shown poor and inadequate response to AEDs in addition to various side effects and drug interactions while on therapy. Thus there is a need to develop more effective AEDs in drug resistant epilepsy which have a better safety profile with minimal adverse effects. The United States food and drug administration (USFDA has approved eslicarbazepine acetate, ezogabine, perampanel and brivaracetam which have shown a promising future as better AEDs and drugs like ganaxolone, intranasal diazepam, ICA- 105665, valnoctamide, VX-765, naluzotan are in the pipeline. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 587-592

  8. Aquaporins as potential drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang WANG; Xue-chao FENG; Yong-ming LI; Hong YANG; Tong-hui MA

    2006-01-01

    The aquaporins (AQP) are a family of integral membrane proteins that selectively transport water and,in some cases,small neutral solutes such as glycerol and urea.Thirteen mammalian AQP have been molecularly identified and localized to various epithelial,endothelial and other tissues.Phenotype studies of transgenic mouse models of AQP knockout,mutation,and in some cases humans with AQP mutations have demonstrated essential roles for AQP in mammalian physiology and pathophysiology,including urinary concentrating function,exocrine glandular fluid secretion,brain edema formation,regulation of intracranial and intraocular pressure,skin hydration,fat metabolism,tumor angiogenesis and cell migration.These studies suggest that AQP may be potential drug targets for not only new diuretic reagents for various forms of pathological water retention,but also targets for novel therapy of brain edema,inflammatory disease,glaucoma,obesity,and cancer.However,potent AQP modulators for in vivo application remain to be discovered.

  9. Antibiotic use and resistance : Assessing and improving utilisation and provision of antibiotics and other drugs in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Mattias

    2003-01-01

    Background: In Vietnam there were shortages of drugs until the end of the 1980's. In 1986 the "Doi Moi" economic reforms towards market economy were initiated. An expanding private health care sector emerged and the per capita drug consumption has increased dramatically. Aim: To assess drug provision in the public and private sectors, antibiotic use and resistance in the community, as well as the effect of an intervention package aimed at improving case management in private...

  10. USE OF LIPOSOMES AND NANOPARTICLES FOR BRAIN DRUG TARGETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutam Pal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Blood Brain Barrier (BBB poses a obstacle for a drugs, including antineoplastic agent, antibiotics, neuropeptides, CNS active agents, to be delivered to the brain for therapeutic reasons. The use of formulation dependent strategy such as the use of heterogenous pharmaceutical systems for its effective targeting to the brain is being explored recently. Liposomes and Nanoparticles are good possibilities to achieve the goal. Chemically modified liposomes and nanoparticles are tried in recent times to act as brain targeting aids, and this article tries to explain the possibilities and problems behind such an endeavor.KEY WORDS:

  11. A rapid screening assay for identifying mycobacteria targeted nanoparticle antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Samantha; Tran, Lang; Johnston, Helinor; McLuckie, Joyce; Stevenson, Karen; Stone, Vicki

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem. Nanotechnology offers enormous potential in medicine, yet there is limited knowledge regarding the toxicity of nanoparticles (NP) for mycobacterial species that cause serious human diseases (e.g. tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy). Mycobacterial diseases are a major global health problem; TB caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) kills up to 2 million people annually and there are over 200 000 leprosy cases each year caused by Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). Few drugs are effective against these mycobacteria and increasing antibiotic resistance exacerbates the problem. As such, alternative therapies are urgently needed but most current assays used to assess the effectiveness of therapeutics against mycobacteria are slow and expensive. This study aimed to develop a rapid, low-cost assay which can be used for screening the antimicrobial properties of compounds against pathogenic mycobacteria and to assess the toxicity of three NP (silver [Ag], copper oxide [Cu(II)O], and zinc oxide [ZnO]) against a green fluorescent protein reporter strain of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, a slow growing, pathogenic mycobacterial species causing paratuberculosis in ruminants. Fluorescence was used to monitor mycobacterial growth over time, with NP concentrations of 6.25-100 μg/mL tested for up to 7 days, and a method of data analysis was designed to permit comparison between results. Mycobacterial sensitivity to the NP was found to be NP composition specific and toxicity could be ranked in the following order: Ag > Cu(II)O > ZnO. PMID:26618564

  12. In silico identification of candidate drug and vaccine targets from various pathways in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barh, Debmalya; Kumar, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is responsible for causing gonorrhea, one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases prevailing globally. Although extensive researches are in progress in order to control the transmission of the disease and to develop drug(s) against the pathogen, till date no effective vaccine or specific drug could be developed and only antibiotic treatment is in use. Perhaps, due to excess use of antibiotics, several resistant strains have been found. In the present study, metabolic pathways-related candidate drug and vaccine targets have been identified in N. gonorrhoeae virulent strain FA 1090 using an in silico subtractive genomics approach. 106 putative drug targets out of 537 essential genes have been predicted. 67 cytoplasmic and 9 membrane enzymes, along with 10 membrane transporters are found to be the potential drug targets from the host-pathogen common metabolic pathways. Among these targets, competence lipoproteins (NGO0277) and cysW have been identified as candidate vaccine targets. 20 drug targets have been identified from pathogen specific unique metabolic pathways. Out of these, 6 enzymes are involved in dual metabolic pathways and 2 are expressed in cell wall and fimbrium. These gonococci-specific proteins are expected to be better possible drug targets. Screening of the functional inhibitors against these novel targets may result in discovery of novel therapeutic compounds that can be effective against antibiotic resistant strains. PMID:20109152

  13. Genomes2Drugs: identifies target proteins and lead drugs from proteome data.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, David

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome sequencing and bioinformatics have provided the full hypothetical proteome of many pathogenic organisms. Advances in microarray and mass spectrometry have also yielded large output datasets of possible target proteins\\/genes. However, the challenge remains to identify new targets for drug discovery from this wealth of information. Further analysis includes bioinformatics and\\/or molecular biology tools to validate the findings. This is time consuming and expensive, and could fail to yield novel drugs if protein purification and crystallography is impossible. To pre-empt this, a researcher may want to rapidly filter the output datasets for proteins that show good homology to proteins that have already been structurally characterised or proteins that are already targets for known drugs. Critically, those researchers developing novel antibiotics need to select out the proteins that show close homology to any human proteins, as future inhibitors are likely to cross-react with the host protein, causing off-target toxicity effects later in clinical trials. METHODOLOGY\\/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To solve many of these issues, we have developed a free online resource called Genomes2Drugs which ranks sequences to identify proteins that are (i) homologous to previously crystallized proteins or (ii) targets of known drugs, but are (iii) not homologous to human proteins. When tested using the Plasmodium falciparum malarial genome the program correctly enriched the ranked list of proteins with known drug target proteins. CONCLUSIONS\\/SIGNIFICANCE: Genomes2Drugs rapidly identifies proteins that are likely to succeed in drug discovery pipelines. This free online resource helps in the identification of potential drug targets. Importantly, the program further highlights proteins that are likely to be inhibited by FDA-approved drugs. These drugs can then be rapidly moved into Phase IV clinical studies under \\'change-of-application\\' patents.

  14. Cooperative Antibiotic Resistance in a Multi-Drug Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Dai, Lei; Gore, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. A frequent mechanism of antibiotic resistance involves the production of an enzyme which inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can ``share'' their resistance with other cells in the bacterial population, suggesting that it may be possible to observe cooperation between strains that inactivate different antibiotics. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics. We find that together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either of the strains individually. We observe that even when there is stable coexistence between the two strains, the population size of each strain can undergo large oscillations. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  15. Nanogel Carrier Design for Targeted Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Eckmann, D.M.; Composto, R. J.; Tsourkas, A; Muzykantov, V. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based nanogel formulations offer features attractive for drug delivery, including ease of synthesis, controllable swelling and viscoelasticity as well as drug loading and release characteristics, passive and active targeting, and the ability to formulate nanogel carriers that can respond to biological stimuli. These unique features and low toxicity make the nanogels a favorable option for vascular drug targeting. In this review, we address key chemical and biological aspects of nanoge...

  16. Drug bioactivation, covalent binding to target proteins and toxicity relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shufeng; Chan, Eli; Duan, Wei; Huang, Min; Chen, Yu-Zong

    2005-01-01

    A number of therapeutic drugs with different structures and mechanisms of action have been reported to undergo metabolic activation by Phase I or Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivation gives rise to reactive metabolites/intermediates, which readily confer covalent binding to various target proteins by nucleophilic substitution and/or Schiff's base mechanism. These drugs include analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen), antibacterial agents (e.g., sulfonamides and macrolide antibiotics), anticancer drugs (e.g., irinotecan), antiepileptic drugs (e.g., carbamazepine), anti-HIV agents (e.g., ritonavir), antipsychotics (e.g., clozapine), cardiovascular drugs (e.g., procainamide and hydralazine), immunosupressants (e.g., cyclosporine A), inhalational anesthetics (e.g., halothane), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDSs) (e.g., diclofenac), and steroids and their receptor modulators (e.g., estrogens and tamoxifen). Some herbal and dietary constituents are also bioactivated to reactive metabolites capable of binding covalently and inactivating cytochrome P450s (CYPs). A number of important target proteins of drugs have been identified by mass spectrometric techniques and proteomic approaches. The covalent binding and formation of drug-protein adducts are generally considered to be related to drug toxicity, and selective protein covalent binding by drug metabolites may lead to selective organ toxicity. However, the mechanisms involved in the protein adduct-induced toxicity are largely undefined, although it has been suggested that drug-protein adducts may cause toxicity either through impairing physiological functions of the modified proteins or through immune-mediated mechanisms. In addition, mechanism-based inhibition of CYPs may result in toxic drug-drug interactions. The clinical consequences of drug bioactivation and covalent binding to proteins are unpredictable, depending on many factors that are associated with the administered drugs and patients

  17. Targeted Drug Delivery in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yuqing; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2009-01-01

    Effective drug delivery in pancreatic cancer treatment remains a major challenge. Because of the high resistance to chemo and radiation therapy, the overall survival rate for pancreatic cancer is extremely low. Recent advances in drug delivery systems hold great promise for improving cancer therapy. Using liposomes, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes to deliver cancer drugs and other therapeutic agents such as siRNA, suicide gene, oncolytic virus, small molecule inhibitor and antibody has been a success in recent pre-clinical trials. However, how to improve the specificity and stability of the delivered drug using ligand or antibody directed delivery represent a major problem. Therefore, developing novel, specific, tumor-targeted drug delivery systems is urgently needed for this terrible disease. This review summarizes the current progress on targeted drug delivery in pancreatic cancer, and provides important information on potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:19853645

  18. Recycling antibiotics into GUMBOS: A new combination strategy to combat multi-drug resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria, coupled with the lack of new antibiotics in development, is fast evolving into a global crisis. New strategies utilizing existing antibacterial agents are urgently needed. We propose one such strategy in which four outmoded ß-lactam antibiotics (amp...

  19. Splicing regulators: targets and drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, Gene Wei-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Silencing of splicing regulators by RNA interference, combined with splicing-specific microarrays, has revealed a complex network of distinct alternative splicing events in Drosophila, while a high-throughput screen of more than 6,000 compounds has identified drugs that interfere specifically and directly with one class of splicing regulators in human cells.

  20. Drug targeting using solid lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Elham; Kashanian, Soheila; Azandaryani, Abbas H; Faramarzi, Hossain; Dolatabadi, Jafar Ezzati Nazhad; Omidfar, Kobra

    2014-07-01

    The present review aims to show the features of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) which are at the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery and research. Because of some unique features of SLNs such as their unique size dependent properties it offers possibility to develop new therapeutics. A common denominator of all these SLN-based platforms is to deliver drugs into specific tissues or cells in a pathological setting with minimal adverse effects on bystander cells. SLNs are capable to incorporate drugs into nanocarriers which lead to a new prototype in drug delivery which maybe used for drug targeting. Hence solid lipid nanoparticles hold great promise for reaching the goal of controlled and site specific drug delivery and hence attracted wide attention of researchers. This review presents a broad treatment of targeted solid lipid nanoparticles discussing their types such as antibody SLN, magnetic SLN, pH sensitive SLN and cationic SLN. PMID:24717692

  1. Targeted Delivery of Protein Drugs by Nanocarriers

    OpenAIRE

    Antonella Battisti; Federica Chiellini; Roberto Solaro

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology demonstrate that peptides and proteins are the basis of a new generation of drugs. However, the transportation of protein drugs in the body is limited by their high molecular weight, which prevents the crossing of tissue barriers, and by their short lifetime due to immuno response and enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the ability to selectively deliver drugs to target organs, tissues or cells is a major challenge in the treatment of several human diseases, incl...

  2. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Ray

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX. SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  3. Drug-induced regulation of target expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskar, Murat; Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    -induced differential expression of drug target mRNA was examined in three cell lines using the Connectivity Map. To overcome various biases in this valuable resource, we have developed a computational normalization and scoring procedure that is applicable to gene expression recording upon heterogeneous drug treatments...... further newly identified drug-induced differential regulation of Lanosterol 14-alpha demethylase, Endoplasmin, DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha and Calmodulin 1. The feedback regulation in these and other targets is likely to be relevant for the success or failure of the molecular intervention....

  4. Targeting an Essential GTPase Obg for the Development of Broad-Spectrum Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonventre, Josephine A; Zielke, Ryszard A; Korotkov, Konstantin V; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2016-01-01

    A promising new drug target for the development of novel broad-spectrum antibiotics is the highly conserved small GTPase Obg (YhbZ, CgtA), a protein essential for the survival of all bacteria including Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC). GC is the agent of gonorrhea, a prevalent sexually transmitted disease resulting in serious consequences on reproductive and neonatal health. A preventive anti-gonorrhea vaccine does not exist, and options for effective antibiotic treatments are increasingly limited. To address the dire need for alternative antimicrobial strategies, we have designed and optimized a 384-well GTPase assay to identify inhibitors of Obg using as a model Obg protein from GC, ObgGC. The assay was validated with a pilot screen of 40,000 compounds and achieved an average Z' value of 0.58 ± 0.02, which suggests a robust assay amenable to high-throughput screening. We developed secondary assessments for identified lead compounds that utilize the interaction between ObgGC and fluorescent guanine nucleotide analogs, mant-GTP and mant-GDP, and an ObgGC variant with multiple alterations in the G-domains that prevent nucleotide binding. To evaluate the broad-spectrum potential of ObgGC inhibitors, Obg proteins of Klebsiella pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were assessed using the colorimetric and fluorescence-based activity assays. These approaches can be useful in identifying broad-spectrum Obg inhibitors and advancing the therapeutic battle against multidrug resistant bacteria. PMID:26848972

  5. Mathematical modelling of magnetically targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grief, Andrew D. [Theoretical Mechanics, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: andrew.grief@nottingham.ac.uk; Richardson, Giles [Theoretical Mechanics, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: giles.richardson@nottingham.ac.uk

    2005-05-15

    A mathematical model for targeted drug delivery using magnetic particles is developed. This includes a diffusive flux of particles arising from interactions between erythrocytes in the microcirculation. The model is used to track particles in a vessel network. Magnetic field design is discussed and we show that it is impossible to specifically target internal regions using an externally applied field.

  6. Targeted Delivery of Protein Drugs by Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Battisti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biotechnology demonstrate that peptides and proteins are the basis of a new generation of drugs. However, the transportation of protein drugs in the body is limited by their high molecular weight, which prevents the crossing of tissue barriers, and by their short lifetime due to immuno response and enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the ability to selectively deliver drugs to target organs, tissues or cells is a major challenge in the treatment of several human diseases, including cancer. Indeed, targeted delivery can be much more efficient than systemic application, while improving bioavailability and limiting undesirable side effects. This review describes how the use of targeted nanocarriers such as nanoparticles and liposomes can improve the pharmacokinetic properties of protein drugs, thus increasing their safety and maximizing the therapeutic effect.

  7. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load. PMID:26415215

  8. Nanomechanics of drug-target interactions and antibacterial resistance detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndieyira, Joseph W; Watari, Moyu; McKendry, Rachel A

    2013-01-01

    The cantilever sensor, which acts as a transducer of reactions between model bacterial cell wall matrix immobilized on its surface and antibiotic drugs in solution, has shown considerable potential in biochemical sensing applications with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. The drug-target interactions generate surface stress, causing the cantilever to bend, and the signal can be analyzed optically when it is illuminated by a laser. The change in surface stress measured with nano-scale precision allows disruptions of the biomechanics of model bacterial cell wall targets to be tracked in real time. Despite offering considerable advantages, multiple cantilever sensor arrays have never been applied in quantifying drug-target binding interactions. Here, we report on the use of silicon multiple cantilever arrays coated with alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers mimicking bacterial cell wall matrix to quantitatively study antibiotic binding interactions. To understand the impact of vancomycin on the mechanics of bacterial cell wall structures. We developed a new model(1) which proposes that cantilever bending can be described by two independent factors; i) namely a chemical factor, which is given by a classical Langmuir adsorption isotherm, from which we calculate the thermodynamic equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) and ii) a geometrical factor, essentially a measure of how bacterial peptide receptors are distributed on the cantilever surface. The surface distribution of peptide receptors (p) is used to investigate the dependence of geometry and ligand loading. It is shown that a threshold value of p ~10% is critical to sensing applications. Below which there is no detectable bending signal while above this value, the bending signal increases almost linearly, revealing that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor combined by the mechanical connectivity of reacted regions and provides a new paradigm for design of powerful

  9. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Buregyeya, Esther; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Clarke, Siân E; Lal, Sham; Hansen, Kristian S; Magnussen, Pascal; LaRussa, Philip

    2016-01-01

    private health sector in Uganda. METHODS: A survey was conducted within 57 parishes from August to October 2014 in Mukono District, Uganda. Data was captured on the following variables: drug shop characteristics, training of staff in management of pneumonia, availability of guidelines and basic equipment......OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety in the......, available antibiotics, knowledge on treatment of pneumonia in children aged <5 years. The main study outcome was the proportion of private health facilities prescribing an antibiotic. RESULTS: A total of 170 registered drug shops were surveyed between August and October 2014. The majority of drug shops, 93...

  10. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies.

  11. Molecularly targeted drugs for metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng YD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ying-dong Cheng, Hua Yang, Guo-qing Chen, Zhi-cao Zhang Department of General Surgery, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Abstract: The survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC has significantly improved with applications of molecularly targeted drugs, such as bevacizumab, and led to a substantial improvement in the overall survival rate. These drugs are capable of specifically targeting the inherent abnormal pathways in cancer cells, which are potentially less toxic than traditional nonselective chemotherapeutics. In this review, the recent clinical information about molecularly targeted therapy for mCRC is summarized, with specific focus on several of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted drugs for the treatment of mCRC in the clinic. Progression-free and overall survival in patients with mCRC was improved greatly by the addition of bevacizumab and/or cetuximab to standard chemotherapy, in either first- or second-line treatment. Aflibercept has been used in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–irinotecan (FOLFIRI chemotherapy in mCRC patients and among patients with mCRC with wild-type KRAS, the outcomes were significantly improved by panitumumab in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–oxaliplatin (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI. Because of the new preliminary studies, it has been recommended that regorafenib be used with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI as first- or second-line treatment of mCRC chemotherapy. In summary, an era of new opportunities has been opened for treatment of mCRC and/or other malignancies, resulting from the discovery of new selective targeting drugs. Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, antiangiogenic drug, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, cetuximab, panitumumab, clinical trial, molecularly targeted therapy

  12. P-glycoprotein targeted nanoscale drug carriers

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wengang

    2013-02-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a trend whereby tumor cells exposed to one cytotoxic agent develop cross-resistance to a range of structurally and functionally unrelated compounds. P -glycoprotein (P -gp) efflux pump is one of the mostly studied drug carrying processes that shuttle the drugs out of tumor cells. Thus, P -gp inhibitors have attracted a lot of attention as they can stop cancer drugs from being pumped out of target cells with the consumption of ATP. Using quantitive structure activity relationship (QSAR), we have successfully synthesized a series of novel P -gp inhibitors. The obtained dihydropyrroloquinoxalines series were fully characterized and then tested against bacterial and tumor assays with over-expressed P -gps. All compounds were bioactive especially compound 1c that had enhanced antibacterial activity. Furthermore, these compounds were utilized as targeting vectors to direct drug delivery vehicles such as silica nanoparticles (SNPs) to cancerous Hela cells with over expressed P -gps. Cell uptake studies showed a successful accumulation of these decorated SNPs in tumor cells compared to undecorated SNPs. The results obtained show that dihydropyrroloquinoxalines constitute a promising drug candidate for targeting cancers with MDR. Copyright © 2013 American Scientific Publishers All rights reserved.

  13. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  14. Targeting molecular networks for drug research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Pinto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of molecular networks has recently moved into the limelight of biomedical research. While it has certainly provided us with plenty of new insights into cellular mechanisms, the challenge now is how to modify or even restructure these networks. This is especially true for human diseases, which can be regarded as manifestations of distorted states of molecular networks. Of the possible interventions for altering networks, the use of drugs is presently the most feasible. In this mini-review, we present and discuss some exemplary approaches of how analysis of molecular interaction networks can contribute to pharmacology (e.g., by identifying new drug targets or prediction of drug side effects, as well as listing pointers to relevant resources and software to guide future research. We also outline recent progress in the use of drugs for in vitro reprogramming of cells, which constitutes an example par excellence for altering molecular interaction networks with drugs.

  15. Antibiotic and oral contraceptive drug interactions: Is there a need for concern?

    OpenAIRE

    George G Zhanel; Siemens, Shannon; Slayter, Kathryn; Mandell, Lionell

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical significant of antibiotic and oral contraceptive drug interactions.DATA SELECTION: MEDLINE search from 1975 to 1998 (September) inclusive. Search terms ‘antitiobic’, ‘oral contraceptive’ and ‘pregnancy’ were included. Published papers as well as references from these papers were reviewed. Papers documenting mechanistic interactions between antibiotics and oral contraceptives were included.DATA EXTRACTION: Studies reporting oral contraceptive pharmacokinetics,...

  16. DNA topoisomerases in apicomplexan parasites: promising targets for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Estrada, Carlos; Prada, Christopher Fernández; Fernández-Rubio, Celia; Rojo-Vázquez, Francisco; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael

    2010-06-22

    The phylum Apicomplexa includes a large group of protozoan parasites responsible for a wide range of animal and human diseases. Destructive pathogens, such as Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, causative agents of human malaria, Cryptosporidium parvum, responsible of childhood diarrhoea, and Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for miscarriages and abortions in humans, are frequently associated with HIV immunosuppression in AIDS patients. The lack of effective vaccines, along with years of increasing pressure to eradicate outbreaks with the use of drugs, has favoured the formation of multi-drug resistant strains in endemic areas. Almost all apicomplexan of medical interest contain two endosymbiotic organelles that contain their own mitochondrial and apicoplast DNA. Apicoplast is an attractive target for drug testing because in addition to harbouring singular metabolic pathways absent in the host, it also has its own transcription and translation machinery of bacterial origin. Accordingly, apicomplexan protozoa contain an interesting mixture of enzymes to unwind DNA from eukaryotic and prokaryotic origins. On the one hand, the main mechanism of DNA unwinding includes the scission of one-type I-or both DNA strands-type II eukaryotic topoisomerases, establishing transient covalent bonds with the scissile end. These enzymes are targeted by camptothecin and etoposide, respectively, two natural drugs whose semisynthetic derivatives are currently used in cancer chemotherapy. On the other hand, DNA gyrase is a bacterial-borne type II DNA topoisomerase that operates within the apicoplast and is effectively targeted by bacterial antibiotics like fluoroquinolones and aminocoumarins. The present review is an update on the new findings concerning topoisomerases in apicomplexan parasites and the role of these enzymes as targets for therapeutic agents. PMID:20200034

  17. Meningococcal disease and future drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, L K; Colding, H; Hartzen, S H; Penkowa, M

    2011-01-01

    recent data and current knowledge on molecular mechanisms of meningococcal disease and explains how host immune responses ultimately may aggravate neuropathology and the clinical prognosis. Within this context, particular importance is paid to the endotoxic components that provide potential drug targets...

  18. Mystery unraveled about antifungal drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ A long-standing mystery about the functional roles of the N-terminal region of protein N-myristoyltransferase, an ideal target for antifungal drugs, was recently decoded, thanks to the threeyear joint efforts of researchers from the CAS Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology and their US colleagues at the DuPont Stine Haskell Research Center.

  19. Recycling Antibiotics into GUMBOS: A New Combination Strategy to Combat Multi-Drug-Resistant Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha R. Cole

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of multi-drug-resistant bacteria, coupled with the lack of new antibiotics in development, is fast evolving into a global crisis. New strategies utilizing existing antibacterial agents are urgently needed. We propose one such strategy in which four outmoded β-lactam antibiotics (ampicillin, carbenicillin, cephalothin and oxacillin and a well-known antiseptic (chlorhexidine di-acetate were fashioned into a group of uniform materials based on organic salts (GUMBOS as an alternative to conventional combination drug dosing strategies. The antibacterial activity of precursor ions (e.g., chlorhexidine diacetate and β-lactam antibiotics, GUMBOS and their unreacted mixtures were studied with 25 clinical isolates with varying antibiotic resistance using a micro-broth dilution method. Acute cytotoxicity and therapeutic indices were determined using fibroblasts, endothelial and cervical cell lines. Intestinal permeability was predicted using a parallel artificial membrane permeability assay. GUMBOS formed from ineffective β-lactam antibiotics and cytotoxic chlorhexidine diacetate exhibited unique pharmacological properties and profound antibacterial activity at lower concentrations than the unreacted mixture of precursor ions at equivalent stoichiometry. Reduced cytotoxicity to invasive cell types commonly found in superficial and chronic wounds was also observed using GUMBOS. GUMBOS show promise as an alternative combination drug strategy for treating wound infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria.

  20. Targeted drug discovery for pediatric leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndrewDNapper

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite dramatic advances in the treatment of pediatric leukemia over the past 50 years, there remain subsets of patients who respond poorly to treatment. Many of the high-risk cases of childhood leukemia with the poorest prognosis have been found to harbor specific genetic signatures, often resulting from chromosomal rearrangements. With increased understanding of the genetic and epigenetic makeup of high-risk pediatric leukemia has come the opportunity to develop targeted therapies that promise to be both more effective and less toxic than current chemotherapy. Of particular importance is an understanding of the interconnections between different targets within the same cancer, and observations of synergy between two different targeted therapies or between a targeted drug and conventional chemotherapy. It has become clear that many cancers are able to circumvent a single specific blockade, and pediatric leukemias are no exception in this regard. This review highlights the most promising approaches to new drugs and drug combinations for high-risk pediatric leukemia. Key biological evidence supporting selection of molecular targets is presented, together with a critical survey of recent progress towards the discovery, pre-clinical development, and clinical study of novel molecular therapeutics.

  1. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B

    2009-08-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addition to directly blocking the activity of a targeted protease, one can take advantage of differential expression in disease states to selectively deliver therapeutic or imaging agents. Recent studies in targeted drug development for the metalloproteases (matrix metalloproteinases, adamalysins, pappalysins, neprilysin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, metallocarboxypeptidases, and glutamate carboxypeptidase II), serine proteases (elastase, coagulation factors, tissue/urokinase plasminogen activator system, kallikreins, tryptase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV) and cysteine proteases (cathepsin B) are discussed herein. PMID:19689354

  2. Selective target inactivation rather than global metabolic dormancy causes antibiotic tolerance in uropathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goneau, Lee W; Yeoh, Nigel S; MacDonald, Kyle W; Cadieux, Peter A; Burton, Jeremy P; Razvi, Hassan; Reid, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells represent a multidrug-tolerant (MDT), physiologically distinct subpopulation of bacteria. The ability of these organisms to survive lethal antibiotic doses raises concern over their potential role in chronic disease, such as recurrent urinary tract infection (RUTI). Persistence is believed to be conveyed through global metabolic dormancy, which yields organisms unresponsive to external stimuli. However, recent studies have contested this stance. Here, various antibiotics that target different cellular processes were used to dissect the activity of transcription, translation, and peptidoglycan turnover in persister cells. Differential susceptibility patterns were found in type I and type II persisters, and responses differed between Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Escherichia coli uropathogens. Further, SOS-deficient strains were sensitized to ciprofloxacin, suggesting DNA gyrase activity in persisters and indicating the importance of active DNA repair systems for ciprofloxacin tolerance. These results indicate that global dormancy per se cannot sufficiently account for antibiotic tolerance. Rather, the activity of individual cellular processes dictates multidrug tolerance in an antibiotic-specific fashion. Furthermore, the susceptibility patterns of persisters depended on their mechanisms of onset, with subinhibitory antibiotic pretreatments selectively shutting down cognate targets and increasing the persister fraction against the same agent. Interestingly, antibiotics targeting transcription and translation enhanced persistence against multiple agents indirectly related to these processes. Conducting these assays with uropathogenic E. coli isolated from RUTI patients revealed an enriched persister fraction compared to organisms cleared with standard antibiotic therapy. This finding suggests that persister traits are either selected for during prolonged antibiotic treatment or initially contribute to therapy failure. PMID:24449771

  3. Targeted proteins for diabetes drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolism disorder characterized by high glucose in the bloodstream, especially in the case of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Nowadays, it is very common in middle-aged people and involves such dangerous symptoms as increasing risk of stroke, obesity and heart failure. In Vietnam, besides the common treatment of insulin injection, some herbal medication is used but no unified optimum remedy for the disease yet exists and there is no production of antidiabetic drugs in the domestic market yet. In the development of nanomedicine at the present time, drug design is considered as an innovative tool for researchers to study the mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level. The aim of this article is to review some common protein targets involved in type 2 diabetes, offering a new idea for designing new drug candidates to produce antidiabetic drugs against type 2 diabetes for Vietnamese people. (review)

  4. The culturable soil antibiotic resistome: a community of multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Walsh

    Full Text Available Understanding the soil bacterial resistome is essential to understanding the evolution and development of antibiotic resistance, and its spread between species and biomes. We have identified and characterized multi-drug resistance (MDR mechanisms in the culturable soil antibiotic resistome and linked the resistance profiles to bacterial species. We isolated 412 antibiotic resistant bacteria from agricultural, urban and pristine soils. All isolates were multi-drug resistant, of which greater than 80% were resistant to 16-23 antibiotics, comprising almost all classes of antibiotic. The mobile resistance genes investigated, (ESBL, bla NDM-1, and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR resistance genes were not responsible for the respective resistance phenotypes nor were they present in the extracted soil DNA. Efflux was demonstrated to play an important role in MDR and many resistance phenotypes. Clinically relevant Burkholderia species are intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin but the soil Burkholderia species were not intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin. Using a phenotypic enzyme assay we identified the antibiotic specific inactivation of trimethoprim in 21 bacteria from different soils. The results of this study identified the importance of the efflux mechanism in the soil resistome and variations between the intrinsic resistance profiles of clinical and soil bacteria of the same family.

  5. Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariprasad, Seenu M; Mieler, William F

    2016-01-01

    The Endophthalmitis Vitrectomy Study (EVS) provided ophthalmologists with evidence-based management strategies to deal with endophthalmitis for the first time. However, since the completion of the EVS, numerous unresolved issues remain. The use of oral antibiotics has important implications for the ophthalmologist, particularly in the prophylaxis and/or management of postoperative, posttraumatic, or bleb-associated bacterial endophthalmitis. One can reasonably conclude that significant intraocular penetration of an antibiotic after oral administration may be a property unique to the newer-generation fluoroquinolones. Prophylactic use of mupirocin nasal ointment resulted in significant reduction of conjunctival flora with or without preoperative topical 5% povidone-iodine preparation. Ocular fungal infections have traditionally been very difficult to treat due to limited therapeutic options both systemically and intravitreally. Because of its broad spectrum of coverage, low MIC90 levels for the organisms of concern, good tolerability, and excellent bioavailability, voriconazole through various routes of administration may be useful to the ophthalmologist in the primary treatment of or as an adjunct to the current management of ocular fungal infections. PMID:26501865

  6. Drug Utilization Study on Antibiotics Use in Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Govind Naik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Antibiotics are commonly prescribed for the lower respiratory tract infection. But if antibiotics are not used rationally then there will be increase chances of resistance of bacteria as well as increase in the total cost of treatment. This study was conducted to see the antibiotics utilization pattern. Aim: This drug utilization study was conducted to evaluate the pattern of antibiotics use in Medicine Department of a Krishna Hospital, Karad, Maharashtra, India. 96 case records were examined, of which 46.87% were LRTI (nonspecific LRTI and acute bronchitis and 51% were pneumonia. Female accounted for 53.12% and male for 46.87 % of total cases. The World Health Organization (WHO indicators (utilization in defined daily doses (DDD; DDD/1000inhibitant/day were used and the ATC/DDD method was implemented. The most frequently prescribed antibiotic was ceftriaxone, followed by Azithromycin. The DDD/1000inhibitant/day of Azithromycin was the highest (5.74. Average treatment period was found to be 5.42 and 6.52 for LRTI (nonspecific LRTI and Acute Bronchitis and pneumonia respectively. A total of 96 cases studied; in which 33 cases had mono-antibiotic therapy (33.37% and rest contained poly-antibiotics therapy (66.63%. Prescribing by generic names has to be encouraged. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(4.000: 324-327

  7. Tumor targeting using liposomal antineoplastic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Huwyler

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Jörg Huwyler1, Jürgen Drewe2, Stephan Krähenbühl21University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, Institute of Pharma Technology, Muttenz, Switzerland; 2Department of Research and Division of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: During the last years, liposomes (microparticulate phospholipid vesicles have beenused with growing success as pharmaceutical carriers for antineoplastic drugs. Fields of application include lipid-based formulations to enhance the solubility of poorly soluble antitumordrugs, the use of pegylated liposomes for passive targeting of solid tumors as well as vector-conjugated liposomal carriers for active targeting of tumor tissue. Such formulation and drug targeting strategies enhance the effectiveness of anticancer chemotherapy and reduce at the same time the risk of toxic side-effects. The present article reviews the principles of different liposomal technologies and discusses current trends in this field of research.Keywords: tumor targeting, antineoplastic drugs, liposomes, pegylation, steric stabilization, immunoliposomes

  8. Mining metabolic networks for optimal drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Padmavati; Song, Bin; Kahveci, Tamer; Ranka, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in bioinformatics promote drug-design methods that aim to reduce side-effects. Efficient computational methods are required to identify the optimal enzyme-combination (i.e., drug targets) whose inhibition, will achieve the required effect of eliminating a given target set of compounds, while incurring minimal side-effects. We formulate the optimal enzyme-combination identification problem as an optimization problem on metabolic networks. We define a graph based computational damage model that encapsulates the impact of enzymes onto compounds in metabolic networks. We develop a branch-and-bound algorithm, named OPMET, to explore the search space dynamically. We also develop two filtering strategies to prune the search space while still guaranteeing an optimal solution. They compute an upper bound to the number of target compounds eliminated and a lower bound to the side-effect respectively. Our experiments on the human metabolic network demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can accurately identify the target enzymes for known successful drugs in the literature. Our experiments also show that OPMET can reduce the total search time by several orders of magnitude as compared to the exhaustive search. PMID:18229694

  9. Genotoxic and immunotoxic potential effects of selected psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) hemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Emilie; Pédelucq, Julie; Fortier, Marlène; Brousseau, Pauline; Auffret, Michel; Budzinski, Hélène; Fournier, Michel

    2015-07-01

    The potential toxicity of pharmaceuticals towards aquatic invertebrates is still poorly understood and sometimes controversial. This study aims to document the in vitro genotoxicity and immunotoxicity of psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on Mytilus edulis. Mussel hemocytes were exposed to fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and erythromycin, at concentrations ranging from μg/L to mg/L. Paroxetine at 1.5 μg/L led to DNA damage while the same concentration of venlafaxine caused immunomodulation. Fluoxetine exposure resulted in genotoxicity, immunotoxicity and cytotoxicity. In the case of antibiotics, trimethoprim was genotoxic at 200 μg/L and immunotoxic at 20 mg/L whereas erythromycin elicited same detrimental effects at higher concentrations. DNA metabolism seems to be a highly sensitive target for psychotropic drugs and antibiotics. Furthermore, these compounds affect the immune system of bivalves, with varying intensity. This attests the relevance of these endpoints to assess the toxic mode of action of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. PMID:25829077

  10. Prediction of potential drug targets based on simple sequence properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Luhua

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past decades, research and development in drug discovery have attracted much attention and efforts. However, only 324 drug targets are known for clinical drugs up to now. Identifying potential drug targets is the first step in the process of modern drug discovery for developing novel therapeutic agents. Therefore, the identification and validation of new and effective drug targets are of great value for drug discovery in both academia and pharmaceutical industry. If a protein can be predicted in advance for its potential application as a drug target, the drug discovery process targeting this protein will be greatly speeded up. In the current study, based on the properties of known drug targets, we have developed a sequence-based drug target prediction method for fast identification of novel drug targets. Results Based on simple physicochemical properties extracted from protein sequences of known drug targets, several support vector machine models have been constructed in this study. The best model can distinguish currently known drug targets from non drug targets at an accuracy of 84%. Using this model, potential protein drug targets of human origin from Swiss-Prot were predicted, some of which have already attracted much attention as potential drug targets in pharmaceutical research. Conclusion We have developed a drug target prediction method based solely on protein sequence information without the knowledge of family/domain annotation, or the protein 3D structure. This method can be applied in novel drug target identification and validation, as well as genome scale drug target predictions.

  11. VNP: Interactive Visual Network Pharmacology of Diseases, Targets, and Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Q-N; Deng, Z.; Tu, W; X. Yang; Meng, Z-B; Deng, Z-X; Liu, J

    2014-01-01

    In drug discovery, promiscuous targets, multifactorial diseases, and “dirty” drugs construct complex network relationships. Network pharmacology description and analysis not only give a systems-level understanding of drug action and disease complexity but can also help to improve the efficiency of target selection and drug design. Visual network pharmacology (VNP) is developed to visualize network pharmacology of targets, diseases, and drugs with a graph network by using disease, target or dr...

  12. Targeting of antileishmanial drugs produced by nanotechnologies

    OpenAIRE

    Pujals Naranjo, Georgina

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop an effective new MGA delivery system by means of nanotechnology for the treatment of leishmaniosis which could be administered by parenteral or oral route in a future. Moreover, for ensuring the effectiveness of the formulations developed, their in vitro activities will be assessed against L. infantum. The intention is to prepare a target drug delivery system by means of different technological strategies like micro-nanoparticles by spray drying. These formu...

  13. Analyzing ferrofluid transport for magnetic drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and numerical investigations of magnetically induced localization of ferrofluid and its subsequent dispersion are performed in a forced flow. The ferrofluid accumulation behaves as a solid obstacle in the flow as the competing magnetic and fluid shear forces give rise to a rigidly bound core region followed by a washaway region at its wake. Results of the analysis provide meaningful information on ferrofluid transport for various magnetic drug targeting applications

  14. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B.

    2009-01-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addit...

  15. Functional genomics and cancer drug target discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Susan E; Boehm, Jesse S; Barbie, David A; Hahn, William C

    2010-06-01

    The recent development of technologies for whole-genome sequencing, copy number analysis and expression profiling enables the generation of comprehensive descriptions of cancer genomes. However, although the structural analysis and expression profiling of tumors and cancer cell lines can allow the identification of candidate molecules that are altered in the malignant state, functional analyses are necessary to confirm such genes as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Moreover, recent research suggests that tumor cells also depend on synthetic lethal targets, which are not mutated or amplified in cancer genomes; functional genomics screening can facilitate the discovery of such targets. This review provides an overview of the tools available for the study of functional genomics, and discusses recent research involving the use of these tools to identify potential novel drug targets in cancer. PMID:20521217

  16. Developments and strategies for inhaled antibiotic drugs in tuberculosis therapy: a critical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppentocht, M; Hagedoorn, P; Frijlink, H W; de Boer, A H

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled antibiotics have been a valuable tool in treating pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis patients for decades, and the pulmonary route is now becoming increasingly interesting for other infectious diseases like tuberculosis too. Especially with multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis emerging, great effort is put into the improvement of pulmonary antibiotic administration to fight this global threat. Several reviews have been written on inhalable antibiotics, giving clear overviews of the compounds of interest. Furthermore, various formulation studies and administration strategies are on-going with these compounds. What is often missing is a critical evaluation of these developments. Several risks may be involved varying from obtaining insufficient local drug concentrations to adverse side effects and unwanted changes in physiological processes from the excipients used. In this manuscript, the pros and cons and feasibility of recent advances in pulmonary antibiotic tuberculosis therapy are presented and critically evaluated. Furthermore, the advantages of dry powder inhalation over wet nebulisation for inhaled antibiotics in developing countries where prevalence of tuberculosis is highest are discussed. It has to be concluded that a greater effort in good inhaler development and more research in the physico-chemical properties of the compounds of interest are needed. PMID:24189498

  17. Drug-therapy networks and the predictions of novel drug targets

    OpenAIRE

    Spiro, Zoltan; Kovacs, Istvan A.; Csermely, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a number of drug-therapy, disease, drug, and drug-target networks have been introduced. Here we suggest novel methods for network-based prediction of novel drug targets and for improvement of drug efficiency by analysing the effects of drugs on the robustness of cellular networks.

  18. New Alkaloid Antibiotics That Target the DNA Topoisomerase I of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, M. T.; Blazquez, M. A.; Ferrandiz, M. J.; Sanz, M. J.; Silva-Martin, N.; Hermoso, J. A.; De La Campa, A G

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae has two type II DNA-topoisomerases (DNA-gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV) and a single type I enzyme (DNA-topoisomerase I, TopA), as demonstrated here. Although fluoroquinolones target type II enzymes, antibiotics efficiently targeting TopA have not yet been reported. Eighteen alkaloids (seven aporphine and 11 phenanthrenes) were semisynthesized from boldine and used to test inhibition both of TopA activity and of cell growth. Two phenanthrenes (seconeolitsine and N-me...

  19. Antibiotic residues and drug resistance in human intestinal flora.

    OpenAIRE

    Corpet, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of residual levels of ampicillin on the drug resistance of fecal flora was studied in human volunteers given 1.5 mg of ampicillin orally per day for 21 days. This treatment failed to have any significant reproducible effect on the number of resistant Escherichia coli in their feces. The effect of continuous administration of small doses of ampicillin, chlortetracycline, or streptomycin in the drinking water was studied in gnotobiotic mice inoculated with a human fecal flora. In thi...

  20. Bioinspired Nanonetworks for Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Nasibeh Rady; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    A biomimicry approach to nanonetworks is proposed here for targeted cancer drug delivery (TDD). The swarm of bioinspired nanomachines utilizes the blood distribution network and chemotaxis to carry drug through the vascular system to the cancer site, recognized by a high concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is multi-scale and includes processes that occur both within cells and with their neighbors. The proposed bionanonetwork takes advantage of several organic processes, some of which already occur within the human body, such as a plate-like structure similar to those of red blood cells for more environmental contact; a berry fruit architecture for its internal multi-foams architecture; the penetrable structure of cancer cells, tissue, as well as the porous structure of the capillaries for drug penetration; state of glycocalyx for ligand-receptor adhesion; as well as changes in pH state of blood and O 2 release for nanomachine communication. For a more appropriate evaluation, we compare our work with a conventional chemotherapy approach using a mathematical model of cancer under actual experimental parameter settings. Simulation results show the merits of the proposed method in targeted cancer therapy by improving the densities of the relevant cancer cell types and VEGF concentration, while following more organic and natural processes. PMID:26529771

  1. Cooperative assembly in targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguste, Debra

    2012-02-01

    Described as cell analogues, liposomes are self-assembled lipid bilayer spheres that encapsulate aqueous volumes. Liposomes offer several drug delivery advantages due to their structural versatility related to size, composition, bilayer fluidity, and ability to encapsulate a large variety of compounds non-covalently. However, liposomes lack the structural information embedded within cell membranes. Partitioning of unsaturated and saturated lipids into liquid crystalline (Lα) and gel phase (Lβ) domains, respectively, affects local molecular diffusion and elasticity. Liposome microdomains may be used to pattern molecules, such as antibodies, on the liposome surface to create concentrated, segregated binding regions. We have synthesized, characterized, and evaluated a series of homogeneous and heterogeneous liposomal vehicles that target inflamed endothelium. These drug delivery vehicles are designed to complement the heterogeneous presentation of lipids and receptors on endothelial cells (ECs). EC surfaces are dynamic; they segregate receptors within saturated lipid microdomains on the cell surface to regulate binding and signaling events. We have demonstrated that cooperative binding of two antibodies enhances targeting by multiple fold. Further, we have shown that organization of these antibodies on the surface can further enhance cell uptake. The data suggest that EC targeting may be enhanced by designing liposomes that mirror the segregated structure of lipid and receptor molecules involved in neutrophil-EC adhesion. This strategy is employed in an atherosclerotic mouse model in vivo.

  2. Highly stable, protein capped gold nanoparticles as effective drug delivery vehicles for amino-glycosidic antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the production of highly stable gold nanoparticles (Au NP) was optimized using sodium borohydride as reducing agent and bovine serum albumin as capping agent. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV–visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X‐ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic light scattering techniques. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of pink colour and an absorption maximum at 532 nm. These protein capped nanoparticles exhibited excellent stability towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape, nearly monodispersed and with an average particle size of 7.8 ± 1.7 nm. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles in face centered cubic structure is confirmed from the selected‐area electron diffraction and XRD patterns. The nanoparticles were functionalized with various amino-glycosidic antibiotics for utilizing them as drug delivery vehicles. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the possible functional groups of antibiotics bound to the nanoparticle surface have been examined. These drug loaded nanoparticle solutions were tested for their antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains, by well diffusion assay. The antibiotic conjugated Au NP exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity, compared to pure antibiotic at the same concentration. Being protein capped and highly stable, these gold nanoparticles can act as effective carriers for drugs and might have considerable applications in the field of infection prevention and therapeutics. - Highlights: ► Method for NaBH4 reduced and BSA capped gold nanoparticle was standardized. ► Nanoparticles were spherical and nearly monodispersed with a size of 7.8 nm. ► Nanoparticles are extremely stable towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. ► Antibiotic conjugated nanoparticles exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity

  3. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    Migraine has a 1-year prevalence of 10% and high socioeconomic costs. Despite recent drug developments, there is a huge unmet need for better pharmacotherapy. In this review we discuss promising anti-migraine strategies such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists and 5......-hydroxytrypamine (5-HT)(1F) receptor agonists, which are in late-stage development. Nitric oxide antagonists are also in development. New forms of administration of sumatriptan might improve efficacy and reduce side effects. Botulinum toxin A has recently been approved for the prophylaxis of chronic migraine....... Tonabersat, a cortical spreading depression inhibitor, has shown efficacy in the prophylaxis of migraine with aura. Several new drug targets such as nitric oxide synthase, the 5-HT(1D) receptor, the prostanoid receptors EP(2) and EP(4), and the pituitary adenylate cyclase receptor PAC1 await development. The...

  4. Drug-resistance mechanisms and prevalence of Enterobacter cloacae resistant to multi-antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张杰; 顾怡明; 俞云松; 周志慧; 杜小玲

    2004-01-01

    @@The main drug-resistance mechanism of gram-negative bacteria is producing β-lactamases. Two kinds of enzymes cause drug resistance by hydrolyzing oxyimino-cephalosporins and aztreonam: one is chromosomally encoded AmpC β-lactamases, the other is plasmid-mediated extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). Enterobacter cloacae can produce both of them, so that these strains are seriously resistance to many antibiotics. In order to study the main drug-resistant mechanism in Enterobacter cloacae, PCR and nucleotide sequencing were performed on 58 multidrug resistant strains.

  5. New Drugs and Treatment Targets in Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Skov, Lone; Zachariae, Claus

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the increased understanding of the pathophysiology of psoriasis has resulted in several new treatments. The success of ustekinumab proved the importance of the IL-23/T helper cell 17 axis in psoriatic diseases. Several new biologics targeting this axis will reach the clinic in the...... phosphodiesterase inhibitors. We review published clinical trials, and conference abstracts presented during the last years, concerned with new drugs under development for the treatment of psoriasis. In conclusion, our psoriasis armamentarium will be filled with several new effective therapeutic options the coming...

  6. Toward repurposing ciclopirox as an antibiotic against drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M Carlson-Banning

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant infections caused by gram-negative bacteria are a major healthcare concern. Repurposing drugs circumvents the time and money limitations associated with developing new antimicrobial agents needed to combat these antibiotic-resistant infections. Here we identified the off-patent antifungal agent, ciclopirox, as a candidate to repurpose for antibiotic use. To test the efficacy of ciclopirox against antibiotic-resistant pathogens, we used a curated collection of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates that are representative of known antibiotic resistance phenotypes. We found that ciclopirox, at 5-15 µg/ml concentrations, inhibited bacterial growth regardless of the antibiotic resistance status. At these same concentrations, ciclopirox reduced growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates, but some of these pathogens required higher ciclopirox concentrations to completely block growth. To determine how ciclopirox inhibits bacterial growth, we performed an overexpression screen in E. coli. This screen revealed that galE, which encodes UDP-glucose 4-epimerase, rescued bacterial growth at otherwise restrictive ciclopirox concentrations. We found that ciclopirox does not inhibit epimerization of UDP-galactose by purified E. coli GalE; however, ΔgalU, ΔgalE, ΔrfaI, or ΔrfaB mutant strains all have lower ciclopirox minimum inhibitory concentrations than the parent strain. The galU, galE, rfaI, and rfaB genes all encode enzymes that use UDP-galactose or UDP-glucose for galactose metabolism and lipopolysaccharide (LPS biosynthesis. Indeed, we found that ciclopirox altered LPS composition of an E. coli clinical isolate. Taken together, our data demonstrate that ciclopirox affects galactose metabolism and LPS biosynthesis, two pathways important for bacterial growth and virulence. The lack of any reported fungal resistance to ciclopirox in over twenty years of use in the clinic

  7. A non-target approach to identify disinfection byproducts of structurally similar sulfonamide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Helbling, Damian E

    2016-10-01

    There is growing concern over the formation of new types of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from pharmaceuticals and other emerging contaminants during drinking water production. Free chlorine is a widely used disinfectant that reacts non-selectively with organic molecules to form a variety of byproducts. In this research, we aimed to investigate the DBPs formed from three structurally similar sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole, sulfathiazole, and sulfadimethoxine) to determine how chemical structure influences the types of chlorination reactions observed. We conducted free chlorination experiments and developed a non-target approach to extract masses from the experimental dataset that represent the masses of candidate DBPs. Structures were assigned to the candidate DBPs based on analytical data and knowledge of chlorine chemistry. Confidence levels were assigned to each proposed structure according to conventions in the field. In total, 11, 12, and 15 DBP structures were proposed for sulfamethoxazole, sulfathiazole, and sulfadimethoxine, respectively. The structures of the products suggest a variety of reaction types including chlorine substitution, SC cleavage, SN hydrolysis, desulfonation, oxidation/hydroxylation, and conjugation reactions. Some reaction types were common to all of the sulfonamide antibiotics, but unique reaction types were also observed for each sulfonamide antibiotic suggesting that selective prediction of DBP structures of other sulfonamide antibiotics based on chemical structure is unlikely to be possible based on these data alone. This research offers an approach to comprehensively identify DBPs of organic molecules and fills in much needed data on the formation of specific DBPs from three environmentally relevant sulfonamide antibiotics. PMID:27348196

  8. Evaluation of starch based cryogels as potential biomaterials for controlled release of antibiotic drugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L P Bagri; J Bajpai; A K Bajpai

    2011-12-01

    In the present study starch has been blended with poly(vinyl alcohol) to design macroporous architectures following a repeated freeze-thaw method. These macroporous cryogels were loaded with an antibiotic drug, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (Cfx), and evaluated for its in vitro delivery in a completely controlled manner thus exploring possibilities to use it as a biomaterial in burn or wound healing applications. The key advantage of the present system is that cryogels formed do not contain any chemical crosslinking agent which is often harmful to organic compounds. These Cfx loaded cryogels were characterized by infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The controlled release of Cfx drug from cryogels was investigated under varying experimental conditions such as percent loading of the antibiotic drug, chemical architecture of the cryogels and pH, temperature, and nature of the release media. The prepared cryogels show promise to provide a possible pathway for controlling delivery of antibiotic drug thus minimizing the known side effects and improving efficacy also.

  9. NSAIDs: Old Drugs Reveal New Anticancer Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A. Piazza

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors have antineoplastic activity, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition and the suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limits their use for cancer chemoprevention. Previous studies as reviewed here suggest that the mechanism for their anticancer properties does not require COX inhibition, but instead involves an off-target effect. In support of this possibility, recent molecular modeling studies have shown that the NSAID sulindac can be chemically modified to selectively design out its COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity. Unexpectedly, certain derivatives that were synthesized based on in silico modeling displayed increased potency to inhibit tumor cell growth. Other experiments have shown that sulindac can inhibit phosphodiesterase to increase intracellular cyclic GMP levels and that this activity is closely associated with its ability to selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Together, these studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  10. Reversible antibiotic tolerance induced in Staphylococcus aureus by concurrent drug exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Friberg, Cathrine; McCreary, Mark;

    2015-01-01

    antibiotic that targets the coinfecting pathogen. While investigating factors that affect bacterial antibiotic sensitivity, we discovered that susceptibility of S. aureus to vancomycin is reduced by concurrent exposure to colistin, a cationic peptide antimicrobial employed to treat infections by Gram......-negative pathogens. We show that colistin-induced vancomycin tolerance persists only as long as the inducer is present and is accompanied by gene expression changes similar to those resulting from mutations that produce stably inherited reduction of vancomycin sensitivity (vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus [VISA......] strains). As colistin-induced vancomycin tolerance is reversible, it may not be detected by routine sensitivity testing and may be responsible for treatment failure at vancomycin doses expected to be clinically effective based on such routine testing. IMPORTANCE: Commonly, antibiotic resistance is...

  11. The hydrogenosome as a drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchimol, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenosomes are spherical or slightly elongated organelles found in non-mitochondrial organisms. In Trichomonas hydrogenosomes measure between 200 to 500 nm, but under drug treatment they can reach 2 microm. Like mitochondria hydrogenosomes: (1) are surrounded by two closely apposed membranes and present a granular matrix: (2) divide in three different ways: segmentation, partition and the heart form; (3) they may divide at any phase of the cell cycle; (4) produce ATP; (5) participate in the metabolism of pyruvate formed during glycolysis; (6) are the site of molecular hydrogen formation; (7) present a relationship with the endoplasmic reticulum; (8) incorporate calcium; (9) import proteins post-translationally; (10) present cardiolipin. However, there are differences, such as: (1) absence of genetic material, at least in trichomonas; (2) lack a respiratory chain and cytochromes; (3) absence of the F(0)-F(1) ATPase; (4) absence of the tricarboxylic acid cycle; (5) lack of oxidative phosphorylation; (6) presence of peripheral vesicles. Hydrogenosomes are considered an excellent drug target since their metabolic pathway is distinct from those found in mitochondria and thus medicines directed to these organelles will probably not affect the host-cell. The main drug used against trichomonads is metronidazole, although other drugs such as beta-Lapachone, colchicine, Taxol, nocodazole, griseofulvin, cytochalasins, hydroxyurea, among others, have been used in trichomonad studies, showing: (1) flagella internalization forming pseudocyst; (2) dysfunctional hydrogenosomes; (3) hydrogenosomes with abnormal sizes and shapes and with an electron dense deposit called nucleoid; (4) intense autophagy in which hydrogenosomes are removed and further digested in lysosomes. PMID:18473836

  12. Multi-Target Drugs: The Trend of Drug Research and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Jian Lu; Wei Pan; Yuan-Jia Hu; Yi-Tao Wang

    2012-01-01

    Summarizing the status of drugs in the market and examining the trend of drug research and development is important in drug discovery. In this study, we compared the drug targets and the market sales of the new molecular entities approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from January 2000 to December 2009. Two networks, namely, the target-target and drug-drug networks, have been set up using the network analysis tools. The multi-target drugs have much more potential, as shown by the n...

  13. Exogenous pulmonary surfactant as a drug delivering agent: influence of antibiotics on surfactant activity.

    OpenAIRE

    van 't Veen, A; Gommers, D.; Mouton, J. W.; Kluytmans, J.A.; Krijt, E. J.; Lachmann, B.

    1996-01-01

    1. It has been proposed to use exogenous pulmonary surfactant as a drug delivery system for antibiotics to the alveolar compartment of the lung. Little, however, is known about interactions between pulmonary surfactant and antimicrobial agents. This study investigated the activity of a bovine pulmonary surfactant after mixture with amphotericin B, amoxicillin, ceftazidime, pentamidine or tobramycin. 2. Surfactant (1 mg ml-1 in vitro and 40 mg ml-1 in vivo) was mixed with 0.375 mg ml-1 amphote...

  14. Non-equivalence of antibiotic generic drugs and risk for intensive care patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Rangoonwala, Ramzan; Reshetnykov, Mykhaylo; Barbeck, Mike; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    Background: The underlying axiom in applying generic drugs is the equivalence of their active ingredient with the (usually more expensive) innovator product, an all-embracing statement with the insidious result that physicians assume that the generic products have been subjected to the same rigorous testing regimens as the brand-name products. The present paper presents novel experimental data on an investigator-blinded comparison between the innovator imipenem antibiotic, and a number of its...

  15. Drug-targeting methodologies with applications: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Feng, Yu; Childress, Emily

    2014-12-16

    Targeted drug delivery to solid tumors is a very active research area, focusing mainly on improved drug formulation and associated best delivery methods/devices. Drug-targeting has the potential to greatly improve drug-delivery efficacy, reduce side effects, and lower the treatment costs. However, the vast majority of drug-targeting studies assume that the drug-particles are already at the target site or at least in its direct vicinity. In this review, drug-delivery methodologies, drug types and drug-delivery devices are discussed with examples in two major application areas: (1) inhaled drug-aerosol delivery into human lung-airways; and (2) intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting. The major problem addressed is how to deliver efficiently the drug-particles from the entry/infusion point to the target site. So far, most experimental results are based on animal studies. Concerning pulmonary drug delivery, the focus is on the pros and cons of three inhaler types, i.e., pressurized metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler and nebulizer, in addition to drug-aerosol formulations. Computational fluid-particle dynamics techniques and the underlying methodology for a smart inhaler system are discussed as well. Concerning intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting, passive and active targeting are reviewed as well as direct drug-targeting, using optimal delivery of radioactive microspheres to liver tumors as an example. The review concludes with suggestions for future work, considereing both pulmonary drug targeting and direct drug delivery to solid tumors in the vascular system. PMID:25516850

  16. Study on drug utilization pattern of antibiotics among dermatology in-patients of a tertiary care teaching hospital, Karaikal, Puducherry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Divyashanthi

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Our study provided an idea about the prevalence of dermatological disorders in a coastal area of Karaikal, Puducherry, the drug utilization strategy of antibiotics, the rationality behind usage and has given useful suggestions to achieve treatment success through judicious use of antibiotics. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(6.000: 1072-1077

  17. Strategies to improve intracellular drug delivery by targeted liposomes

    OpenAIRE

    Fretz, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological advances increased the number of novel macromolecular drugs and new drug targets. The latter are mostly found intracellular. Unfortunately, most of the new macromolecular drugs rely on drug delivery tools for their intracellular delivery because their unfavourable physicochemical properties hamper them to cross cellular barriers, like the plasma and endosomal membranes. The work described in this thesis aims to improve intracellular drug delivery by applying targeted liposome...

  18. QSRR analysis of β-lactam antibiotics on a penicillin G targeted MIP stationary phase.

    OpenAIRE

    Kempe, Henrik; Kempe, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The imprinting factors of the β-lactam antibiotics penicillin V, methicillin, nafcillin, oxacillin, cloxacillin, dicloxacillin, and piperacillin on a poly(methacrylic acid-co-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate) molecularly imprinted stationary phase targeted for penicillin G were correlated with molecular descriptors obtained by molecular computation. One-parameter linear regression and multivariate data analysis by principal component analysis and partial least square regression indicated th...

  19. In vivo characteristics of targeted drug-carrying filamentous bacteriophage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaks Lilach

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines are a new class of nanomedicines that combines biological and chemical components into a modular nanometric drug delivery system. The core of the system is a filamentous phage particle that is produced in the bacterial host Escherichia coli. Target specificity is provided by a targeting moiety, usually an antibody that is displayed on the tip of the phage particle. A large drug payload is chemically conjugated to the protein coat of the phage via a chemically or genetically engineered linker that provides for controlled release of the drug after the particle homed to the target cell. Recently we have shown that targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines can be used to eradicate pathogenic bacteria and cultured tumor cells with great potentiation over the activity of the free untargeted drug. We have also shown that poorly water soluble drugs can be efficiently conjugated to the phage coat by applying hydrophilic aminoglycosides as branched solubility-enhancing linkers. Results With an intention to move to animal experimentation of efficacy, we tested anti-bacterial drug-carrying phage nanomedicines for toxicity and immunogenicity and blood pharmacokinetics upon injection into mice. Here we show that anti-bacterial drug-carrying phage nanomedicines that carry the antibiotic chloramphenicol conjugated via an aminoglycoside linker are non-toxic to mice and are greatly reduced in immunogenicity in comparison to native phage particles or particles to which the drug is conjugated directly and are cleared from the blood more slowly in comparison to native phage particles. Conclusion Our results suggest that aminoglycosides may serve as branched solubility enhancing linkers for drug conjugation that also provide for a better safety profile of the targeted nanomedicine.

  20. A computational approach to finding novel targets for existing drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Y Li

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Repositioning existing drugs for new therapeutic uses is an efficient approach to drug discovery. We have developed a computational drug repositioning pipeline to perform large-scale molecular docking of small molecule drugs against protein drug targets, in order to map the drug-target interaction space and find novel interactions. Our method emphasizes removing false positive interaction predictions using criteria from known interaction docking, consensus scoring, and specificity. In all, our database contains 252 human protein drug targets that we classify as reliable-for-docking as well as 4621 approved and experimental small molecule drugs from DrugBank. These were cross-docked, then filtered through stringent scoring criteria to select top drug-target interactions. In particular, we used MAPK14 and the kinase inhibitor BIM-8 as examples where our stringent thresholds enriched the predicted drug-target interactions with known interactions up to 20 times compared to standard score thresholds. We validated nilotinib as a potent MAPK14 inhibitor in vitro (IC50 40 nM, suggesting a potential use for this drug in treating inflammatory diseases. The published literature indicated experimental evidence for 31 of the top predicted interactions, highlighting the promising nature of our approach. Novel interactions discovered may lead to the drug being repositioned as a therapeutic treatment for its off-target's associated disease, added insight into the drug's mechanism of action, and added insight into the drug's side effects.

  1. Bacterial proteinases as targets for the development of second-generation antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, J; Potempa, J

    2000-03-01

    The emergence of bacterial pathogen resistance to common antibiotics strongly supports the necessity to develop alternative mechanisms for combating drug-resistant forms of these infective organisms. Currently, few pharmaceutical companies have attempted to investigate the possibility of interrupting metabolic pathways other than those that are known to be involved in cell wall biosynthesis. In this review, we describe multiple, novel roles for bacterial proteinases during infection using, as a specific example, the enzymes from the organism Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontopathogen, which is known to be involved in the development and progression of periodontal disease. In this manner, we are able to justify the concept of developing synthetic inhibitors against members of this class of enzymes as potential second-generation antibiotics. Such compounds could not only prove valuable in retarding the growth and proliferation of bacterial pathogens but also lead to the use of this class of inhibitors against invasion by other infective organisms. PMID:10708847

  2. Identifying mechanism-of-action targets for drugs and probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Setola, Vincent; Hert, Jérôme; Crews, Brenda A; Irwin, John J; Lounkine, Eugen; Marnett, Lawrence; Roth, Bryan L; Shoichet, Brian K

    2012-07-10

    Notwithstanding their key roles in therapy and as biological probes, 7% of approved drugs are purported to have no known primary target, and up to 18% lack a well-defined mechanism of action. Using a chemoinformatics approach, we sought to "de-orphanize" drugs that lack primary targets. Surprisingly, targets could be easily predicted for many: Whereas these targets were not known to us nor to the common databases, most could be confirmed by literature search, leaving only 13 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with unknown targets; the number of drugs without molecular targets likely is far fewer than reported. The number of worldwide drugs without reasonable molecular targets similarly dropped, from 352 (25%) to 44 (4%). Nevertheless, there remained at least seven drugs for which reasonable mechanism-of-action targets were unknown but could be predicted, including the antitussives clemastine, cloperastine, and nepinalone; the antiemetic benzquinamide; the muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine; the analgesic nefopam; and the immunomodulator lobenzarit. For each, predicted targets were confirmed experimentally, with affinities within their physiological concentration ranges. Turning this question on its head, we next asked which drugs were specific enough to act as chemical probes. Over 100 drugs met the standard criteria for probes, and 40 did so by more stringent criteria. A chemical information approach to drug-target association can guide therapeutic development and reveal applications to probe biology, a focus of much current interest. PMID:22711801

  3. New Role for FDA-Approved Drugs in Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Jourdan A; Fitts, Eric C; Kirtley, Michelle L; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Peniche, Alex G; Dann, Sara M; Motin, Vladimir L; Chauhan, Sadhana; Rosenzweig, Jason A; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance in medically relevant bacterial pathogens, coupled with a paucity of novel antimicrobial discoveries, represents a pressing global crisis. Traditional drug discovery is an inefficient and costly process; however, systematic screening of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapeutics for other indications in humans offers a rapid alternative approach. In this study, we screened a library of 780 FDA-approved drugs to identify molecules that rendered RAW 264.7 murine macrophages resistant to cytotoxicity induced by the highly virulent Yersinia pestis CO92 strain. Of these compounds, we identified 94 not classified as antibiotics as being effective at preventing Y. pestis-induced cytotoxicity. A total of 17 prioritized drugs, based on efficacy in in vitro screens, were chosen for further evaluation in a murine model of pneumonic plague to delineate if in vitro efficacy could be translated in vivo Three drugs, doxapram (DXP), amoxapine (AXPN), and trifluoperazine (TFP), increased animal survivability despite not exhibiting any direct bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect on Y. pestis and having no modulating effect on crucial Y. pestis virulence factors. These findings suggested that DXP, AXPN, and TFP may modulate host cell pathways necessary for disease pathogenesis. Finally, to further assess the broad applicability of drugs identified from in vitro screens, the therapeutic potential of TFP, the most efficacious drug in vivo, was evaluated in murine models of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Clostridium difficile infections. In both models, TFP treatment resulted in increased survivability of infected animals. Taken together, these results demonstrate the broad applicability and potential use of nonantibiotic FDA-approved drugs to combat respiratory and gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. PMID:27067323

  4. Combinatorial Activity of Flavonoids with Antibiotics Against Drug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Ana Cristina; Serra, Sofia C; Borges, Anabela; Saavedra, Maria José; Mcbain, Andrew J; Salgado, António J; Simões, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    The use of resistance-modifying agents is a potential strategy that is used to prolong the effective life of antibiotics in the face of increasing antibiotic resistance. Since certain flavonoids are potent bacterial efflux pump inhibitors, we assessed morin, rutin, quercetin, hesperidin, and (+)-catechin for their combined activity with the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, erythromycin, oxacillin, and ampicillin against drug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Four established methods were used to determine the combined efficacy of each combination: microdilution checkerboard assays, time-kill determinations, the Etest, and dual disc-diffusion methods. The cytotoxicity of the flavonoids was additionally evaluated in a mouse fibroblast cell line. Quercetin and its isomer morin decreased by 3- to 16-fold the minimal inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and erythromycin against some S. aureus strains. Rutin, hesperidin, and (+)-catechin did not promote any potentiation of antibiotics. Despite the potential cytotoxicity of these phytochemicals at a high concentration (fibroblast IC50 of 41.8 and 67.5 mg/L, respectively), quercetin is commonly used as a supplement for several therapeutic purposes. All the methods, with exception of the time-kill assay, presented a high degree of congruence without any apparent strain specificity. PMID:25734256

  5. Prediction of Drug-Target Interactions for Drug Repositioning Only Based on Genomic Expression Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Kejian Wang; Jiazhi Sun; Shufeng Zhou; Chunling Wan; Shengying Qin; Can Li; Lin He; Lun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Small drug molecules usually bind to multiple protein targets or even unintended off-targets. Such drug promiscuity has often led to unwanted or unexplained drug reactions, resulting in side effects or drug repositioning opportunities. So it is always an important issue in pharmacology to identify potential drug-target interactions (DTI). However, DTI discovery by experiment remains a challenging task, due to high expense of time and resources. Many computational methods are therefore develop...

  6. Drug target identification using side-effect similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael; Gavin, Anne-Claude;

    2008-01-01

    Targets for drugs have so far been predicted on the basis of molecular or cellular features, for example, by exploiting similarity in chemical structure or in activity across cell lines. We used phenotypic side-effect similarities to infer whether two drugs share a target. Applied to 746 marketed...... drugs, a network of 1018 side effect-driven drug-drug relations became apparent, 261 of which are formed by chemically dissimilar drugs from different therapeutic indications. We experimentally tested 20 of these unexpected drug-drug relations and validated 13 implied drug-target relations by in vitro...... binding assays, of which 11 reveal inhibition constants equal to less than 10 micromolar. Nine of these were tested and confirmed in cell assays, documenting the feasibility of using phenotypic information to infer molecular interactions and hinting at new uses of marketed drugs....

  7. Identifying drug-target proteins based on network features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Proteins rarely function in isolation inside and outside cells, but operate as part of a highly intercon- nected cellular network called the interaction network. Therefore, the analysis of the properties of drug-target proteins in the biological network is especially helpful for understanding the mechanism of drug action in terms of informatics. At present, no detailed characterization and description of the topological features of drug-target proteins have been available in the human protein-protein interac- tion network. In this work, by mapping the drug-targets in DrugBank onto the interaction network of human proteins, five topological indices of drug-targets were analyzed and compared with those of the whole protein interactome set and the non-drug-target set. The experimental results showed that drug-target proteins have higher connectivity and quicker communication with each other in the PPI network. Based on these features, all proteins in the interaction network were ranked. The results showed that, of the top 100 proteins, 48 are covered by DrugBank; of the remaining 52 proteins, 9 are drug-target proteins covered by the TTD, Matador and other databases, while others have been dem- onstrated to be drug-target proteins in the literature.

  8. Identifying drug-target proteins based on network features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU MingZhu; GAO Lei; LI Xia; LIU ZhiCheng

    2009-01-01

    Proteins rarely function in isolation Inside and outside cells, but operate as part of a highly Intercon-nected cellular network called the interaction network. Therefore, the analysis of the properties of drug-target proteins in the biological network is especially helpful for understanding the mechanism of drug action In terms of informatice. At present, no detailed characterization and description of the topological features of drug-target proteins have been available in the human protein-protein interac-tion network. In this work, by mapping the drug-targets in DrugBank onto the interaction network of human proteins, five topological indices of drug-targets were analyzed and compared with those of the whole protein interactome set and the non-drug-target set. The experimental results showed that drug-target proteins have higher connectivity and quicker communication with each other in the PPI network. Based on these features, all proteins In the interaction network were ranked. The results showed that, of the top 100 proteins, 48 are covered by DrugBank; of the remaining 52 proteins, 9 are drug-target proteins covered by the TTD, Matador and other databases, while others have been dem-onstrated to be drug-target proteins in the literature.

  9. Nanomechanical detection of antibiotic-mucopeptide binding in a model for superbug drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; Watari, Moyu; Barrera, Alejandra Donoso; Zhou, Dejian; Vögtli, Manuel; Batchelor, Matthew; Cooper, Matthew A.; Strunz, Torsten; Horton, Mike A.; Abell, Chris; Rayment, Trevor; Aeppli, Gabriel; McKendry, Rachel A.

    2008-11-01

    The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbugs methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report the label-free detection of vancomycin binding to bacterial cell wall precursor analogues (mucopeptides) on cantilever arrays, with 10 nM sensitivity and at clinically relevant concentrations in blood serum. Differential measurements have quantified binding constants for vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant mucopeptide analogues. Moreover, by systematically modifying the mucopeptide density we gain new insights into the origin of surface stress. We propose that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor describing the mechanical connectivity of regions activated by local binding in terms of a percolation process. Our findings place BioMEMS devices in a new class of percolative systems. The percolation concept will underpin the design of devices and coatings to significantly lower the drug detection limit and may also have an impact on our understanding of antibiotic drug action in bacteria.

  10. In Search of Alternative Antibiotic Drugs: Quorum-Quenching Activity in Sponges and their Bacterial Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurav, Kumar; Bar-Shalom, Rinat; Haber, Markus; Burgsdorf, Ilia; Oliviero, Giorgia; Costantino, Valeria; Morgenstern, David; Steindler, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the extensive development of drug resistance in pathogens against the available antibiotic arsenal, antimicrobial resistance is now an emerging major threat to public healthcare. Anti-virulence drugs are a new type of therapeutic agent aiming at virulence factors rather than killing the pathogen, thus providing less selective pressure for evolution of resistance. One promising example of this therapeutic concept targets bacterial quorum sensing (QS), because QS controls many virulence factors responsible for bacterial infections. Marine sponges and their associated bacteria are considered a still untapped source for unique chemical leads with a wide range of biological activities. In the present study, we screened extracts of 14 sponge species collected from the Red and Mediterranean Sea for their quorum-quenching (QQ) potential. Half of the species showed QQ activity in at least 2 out of 3 replicates. Six out of the 14 species were selected for bacteria isolation, to test for QQ activity also in isolates, which, once cultured, represent an unlimited source of compounds. We show that ≈20% of the isolates showed QQ activity based on a Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 screen, and that the presence or absence of QQ activity in a sponge extract did not correlate with the abundance of isolates with the same activity from the same sponge species. This can be explained by the unknown source of QQ compounds in sponge-holobionts (host or symbionts), and further by the possible non-symbiotic nature of bacteria isolated from sponges. The potential symbiotic nature of the isolates showing QQ activity was tested according to the distribution and abundance of taxonomically close bacterial Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in a dataset including 97 sponge species and 178 environmental samples (i.e., seawater, freshwater, and marine sediments). Most isolates were found not to be enriched in sponges and may simply have been trapped in the filtration channels of the

  11. In search of alternative antibiotic drugs: Quorum-quenching activity in sponges and their bacterial isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar eSaurav

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the extensive development of drug resistance in pathogens against the available antibiotic arsenal, antimicrobial resistance is now an emerging major threat to public healthcare. Anti-virulence drugs are a new type of therapeutic agent aiming at virulence factors rather than killing the pathogen, thus providing less selective pressure for evolution of resistance. One promising example of this therapeutic concept targets bacterial quorum sensing (QS, because QS controls many virulence factors responsible for bacterial infections. Marine sponges and their associated bacteria are considered a still untapped source for unique chemical leads with a wide range of biological activities. In the present study, we screened extracts of fourteen sponge species collected from the Red and Mediterranean Sea for their quorum-quenching (QQ potential. Half of the species showed QQ activity in at least 2 out of 3 replicates. Six out of the 14 species were selected for bacteria isolation, to test for QQ activity also in isolates, which, once cultured, represent an unlimited source of compounds. We show that approximately 20% of the isolates showed QQ activity based on a Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 screen, and that the presence or absence of QQ activity in a sponge extract did not co-relate with the abundance of isolates with the same activity from the same sponge species. This can be explained by the unknown source of QQ compounds in sponge-holobionts (host or symbionts, and further by the possible non-symbiotic nature of bacteria isolated from sponges. The potential symbiotic nature of the isolates showing QQ activity was tested according to the distribution and abundance of taxonomically close bacterial Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs in a dataset including 97 sponge species and 178 environmental samples (i.e., seawater, freshwater and marine sediments. Most isolates were found not to be enriched in sponges, and may simply have been trapped in the

  12. Repurposing of approved drugs from the human pharmacopoeia to target Wolbachia endosymbionts of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly L. Johnston; Louise Ford; Indira Umareddy; Simon Townson; Sabine Specht; Kenneth Pfarr; Achim Hoerauf; Ralf Altmeyer; Taylor, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis are debilitating diseases caused by parasitic filarial nematodes infecting around 150 million people throughout the tropics with more than 1.5 billion at risk. As with other neglected tropical diseases, classical drug-discovery and development is lacking and a 50 year programme of macrofilaricidal discovery failed to deliver a drug which can be used as a public health tool. Recently, antibiotic targeting of filarial Wolbachia, an essential bacterial sym...

  13. The AEROPATH project targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa: crystallographic studies for assessment of potential targets in early-stage drug discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A focused strategy has been directed towards the structural characterization of selected proteins from the bacterial pathogen P. aeruginosa. The objective is to exploit the resulting structural data, in combination with ligand-binding studies, and to assess the potential of these proteins for early-stage antimicrobial drug discovery. Bacterial infections are increasingly difficult to treat owing to the spread of antibiotic resistance. A major concern is Gram-negative bacteria, for which the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs has been particularly scarce. In an effort to accelerate early steps in drug discovery, the EU-funded AEROPATH project aims to identify novel targets in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by applying a multidisciplinary approach encompassing target validation, structural characterization, assay development and hit identification from small-molecule libraries. Here, the strategies used for target selection are described and progress in protein production and structure analysis is reported. Of the 102 selected targets, 84 could be produced in soluble form and the de novo structures of 39 proteins have been determined. The crystal structures of eight of these targets, ranging from hypothetical unknown proteins to metabolic enzymes from different functional classes (PA1645, PA1648, PA2169, PA3770, PA4098, PA4485, PA4992 and PA5259), are reported here. The structural information is expected to provide a firm basis for the improvement of hit compounds identified from fragment-based and high-throughput screening campaigns

  14. MAGNETIC MICROSPHERES AS A TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM : A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TARUN PATEL

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The in-vivo targeting of tumors with magnetic microspheres is currently realized through the applicationof external non-uniform magnetic fields generated by rare-earth permanent magnets or electromagnets.This technique can be applied to magnetically targeted cancer therapy, magnetic embolization therapywith magnetic particles that contain anticancer agent, such as chemotherapeutic drugs or therapeuticradioisotopes. Drug targeting is one way of local or regional antitumor treatment. Magneticallycontrolled drug targeting is one of the various possible ways of drug targeting. This technology is basedon binding establish anticancer drug with ferrofluids that concentrate the drug in the area of interest(tumor site by means of magnetic fields. There has been keen interest in the development of amagnetically target drug delivery system. These drug delivery systems aims to deliver the drug at a ratedirected by the needs of the body during the period of treatment, and target the activity entity to the siteof action. This paper gives an overview of current application of magnetic microspheres (ferrofluid inconjunction with magnetic fields as they relate to the latest advances in medical application and inparticular to anticancer therapy and also discuss about mechanism of magnetic targeted delivery, drugrelease rate in-vitro, benefits and drawbacks of magnetic targeting.

  15. Multi-Target Drugs: The Trend of Drug Research and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Pan, Wei; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Summarizing the status of drugs in the market and examining the trend of drug research and development is important in drug discovery. In this study, we compared the drug targets and the market sales of the new molecular entities approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from January 2000 to December 2009. Two networks, namely, the target–target and drug–drug networks, have been set up using the network analysis tools. The multi-target drugs have much more potential, as shown by the n...

  16. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  17. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO₂ hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4-8.3) × 10⁵ s(-1) and kcat/KM values of (4.7-8.5) × 10⁷ M(-1)·s(-1). In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3-90.5 nM). The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2-88.5 nM). Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets. PMID:27322334

  18. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu T. Supuran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1 are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4–8.3 × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM values of (4.7–8.5 × 107 M−1·s−1. In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3–90.5 nM. The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2–88.5 nM. Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets.

  19. Quantitative aspects of recognition of the antibiotic drug oxytetracycline by bovine serum albumin: Calorimetric and spectroscopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Thermodynamics of oxytetracycline (OTC)-bovine serum albumin (BSA) binding addressed. ► ITC and fluorescence spectroscopic analysis provide values of binding constant. ► Binding is mainly ionic, hydrophobic with minor hydrogen bonding contribution. ► Quantitative effects of OTC on BSA stability provided by DSC. ► Preferential complexation of one domain of BSA by OTC at site II is suggested. -- Abstract: A quantitative understanding of the mode of interaction of drugs with target proteins provides a guide for the synthesis of new drug molecules. The binding of the antibiotic drug oxytetracycline with serum albumin has been studied by a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The values of the binding constant (K), enthalpy change (ΔH), entropy (ΔS), and stoichiometry of binding have been determined along with the associated conformational changes in the protein. Oxytetracycline binds to bovine serum albumin with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with a weakly temperature dependent association constant of 1.8 · 104 at T = 298.15 K. The effect of ionic strength, tetrabutylammonium bromide, and sucrose on the thermodynamic parameters obtained from ITC and DSC measurements indicate involvement of predominantly ionic and hydrophobic interactions with a minor hydrogen bonding contribution in the drug-protein complexation. The DSC results on the binding of oxytetracycline with bovine serum albumin in the absence and presence of these additives provide quantitative information on the effect of drugs on the stability of bovine serum albumin, and suggest preferential complexation of one of the domains of the protein. The results further indicate that the drug occupies binding site II on bovine serum albumin

  20. Repurposing Drugs to Target the Diabetes Epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nigel; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Osborne, Brenna; Rogers, Suzanne; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Despite major investment by pharmaceutical companies in conventional drug discovery pipelines, development of new drugs has failed to keep up with the increasing incidence of many diseases, including type 2 diabetes (T2D). Drug repurposing, where existing drugs are applied to a new indication, is gaining momentum as a successful approach to overcome the bottlenecks commonly encountered with conventional approaches. Repurposing takes advantage of available information on the molecular pharmacology of clinical agents to drastically shorten drug development timelines. This review discusses recent advances in the discovery of new antidiabetic agents using repurposing strategies. PMID:26900045

  1. QSRR analysis of β-lactam antibiotics on a penicillin G targeted MIP stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Henrik; Kempe, Maria

    2010-12-01

    The imprinting factors of the β-lactam antibiotics penicillin V, methicillin, nafcillin, oxacillin, cloxacillin, dicloxacillin, and piperacillin on a poly(methacrylic acid-co-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate) molecularly imprinted stationary phase targeted for penicillin G were correlated with molecular descriptors obtained by molecular computation. One-parameter linear regression and multivariate data analysis by principal component analysis and partial least square regression indicated that descriptors associated with molecular topology, shape, size, and volume were highly correlated with the imprinting factor and influential on the derived models. PMID:20936264

  2. Identification of Multiple Cryptococcal Fungicidal Drug Targets by Combined Gene Dosing and Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon-Dong; Sun, Wei; Salas, Antonio; Antia, Avan; Carvajal, Cindy; Wang, Amy; Xu, Xin; Meng, Zhaojin; Zhou, Ming; Tawa, Gregory J.; Dehdashti, Jean; Zheng, Wei; Henderson, Christina M.; Zelazny, Adrian M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus that is responsible for up to half a million cases of meningitis globally, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Common fungistatic drugs, such as fluconazole, are less toxic for patients but have low efficacy for initial therapy of the disease. Effective therapy against the disease is provided by the fungicidal drug amphotericin B; however, due to its high toxicity and the difficulty in administering its intravenous formulation, it is imperative to find new therapies targeting the fungus. The antiparasitic drug bithionol has been recently identified as having potent fungicidal activity. In this study, we used a combined gene dosing and drug affinity responsive target stability (GD-DARTS) screen as well as protein modeling to identify a common drug binding site of bithionol within multiple NAD-dependent dehydrogenase drug targets. This combination genetic and proteomic method thus provides a powerful method for identifying novel fungicidal drug targets for further development. PMID:27486194

  3. Exploring drug-target interaction networks of illicit drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Atreya, Ravi V; Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug addiction is a complex and chronic mental disease, which places a large burden on the American healthcare system due to its negative effects on patients and their families. Recently, network pharmacology is emerging as a promising approach to drug discovery by integrating network biology and polypharmacology, allowing for a deeper understanding of molecular mechanisms of drug actions at the systems level. This study seeks to apply this approach for investigation of illicit dru...

  4. Large-scale prediction of drug-target relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Michael; Campillos, Mónica; González, Paula;

    2008-01-01

    also provides a more global view on drug-target relations. Here we review recent attempts to apply large-scale computational analyses to predict novel interactions of drugs and targets from molecular and cellular features. In this context, we quantify the family-dependent probability of two proteins to...

  5. Hydrodynamic modeling of ferrofluid flow in magnetic targeting drug delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Han-dan; XU Wei; WANG Shi-gang; KE Zun-ji

    2008-01-01

    Among the proposed techniques for delivering drugs to specific locations within human body, magnetic drug targeting prevails due to its non-invasive character and its high targeting efficiency. Magnetic targeting drug delivery is a method of carrying drug-loaded magnetic nanoparticles to a target tissue target under the applied magnetic field. This method increases the drug concentration in the target while reducing the adverse side-effects. Although there have been some theoretical analyses for magnetic drug targeting, very few researchers have addressed the hydrodynamic models of magnetic fluids in the blood vessel. A mathematical model is presented to describe the hydrodynamics of ferrofluids as drug carriers flowing in a blood vessel under the applied magnetic field. In this model, magnetic force and asymmetrical force are added, and an angular momentum equation of magnetic nanoparticles in the applied magnetic field is modeled. Engineering approximations are achieved by retaining the physically most significant items in the model due to the mathematical complexity of the motion equations. Numerical simulations are performed to obtain better insight into the theoretical model with computational fluid dynamics. Simulation results demonstrate the important parameters leading to adequate drug delivery to the target site depending on the magnetic field intensity, which coincident with those of animal experiments. Results of the analysis provide important information and suggest strategies for improving delivery in clinical application.

  6. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Lu; Ye Li; Wei Wu

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modifi...

  7. Genotoxicity induced by drug-drug interaction between the antidepressant sertraline and the antibiotic erythromycin in micebone marrow cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany A. Tohamy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interaction represents a widely distributed health problem. The pharmacological action and side effects of two or more drugs can act additively or antagonistically. The present study was designed to evaluate the possible genotoxicity of concurrent treatment with the antidepressant sertraline, one of the serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI and the broad spectrum macrolide antibiotic erythromycin. Sertraline and erythromycin are metabolized through CYP3A4 which is one of the cytochrome P-450 enzymes in liver and are responsible for the metabolism of large number of endogenous substrates and therapeutic agents. The frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs, micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes (MNNCEs and the ratio PCE/NCE were evaluated to measure the genotoxicity of separate and combined treatment with the tested two drugs. Clinical doses of both sertraline (0.71 mg /kg b.w. and erythromcyin strearate (14.30 mg / kg b.w. were used. Groups of animals received single separate or combined doses of either sertraline and/or erythromycin, and sacrificed after 24 hours. Other groups of mice were treated in the same way but for five consecutive days and sacrificed 24 hours after the last injection. In all treated groups, the percentage of PCEs increased significantly when compared with that of the negative control group which may indicate a stimulation of proliferative activity to an early phase of cell depletion. The genotoxicity of multiple treatment for 5 consecutive days with sertraline alone or in combination with erythromcyin was expressed in increased number of MNPCEs. The observed increased genotoxicity after multiple combined treatment with sertraline and erythromycin may indicate increased risk of toxicity-based drug-drug interaction. This toxicity may be due to the ability of sertraline and erythromycin to inhibit the activity of CYP3A4 which lead to a prolonged storage period of drugs in the body and hence

  8. NIOSOMES IN TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY : A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRAGNA GADHIYA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several years, treatment of infectious diseases and immunization has undergone aparadigm shift. Stemming from the nanobiotechnology research, not only a large number of diseasespecificbiologicals have been developed, but also enormous efforts have been made to effectivelydeliver these biologicals. Non-ionic surfactant vesicles (or niosomes are now widely studied asalternates to liposomes. Different novel approaches used for delivering these drugs include liposomes,Microspheres, nanotechnology, micro emulsions, antibody-loaded drug delivery, magneticMicrocapsules, implantable pumps and niosomes. Niosomes and liposomes are equiactive In drugdelivery potential and both increase drug efficacy as compared with that of free Drug. Niosomes arepreferred over liposomes because the former exhibit high chemical Stability and economy. Niosomes areself assembled vesicles composed primarily of synthetic surfactants and cholesterol. They are analogousin structure to the more widely studied liposomes formed from biologically derived phospholipids.Niosomes represent an emerging class of novel vesicular systems. Niosome formation requires thepresence of a particular class of amphiphile and aqueous solvent. In recent years a comprehensiveresearch carried over niosome as a drug carrier. Various drugs are enlisted and tried in niosomesurfactant vesicles. Niosome appears to be a Well preferred drug delivery system over liposome asniosome being stable and economic. Also niosomes have great drug delivery potential for targeteddelivery of anti-cancer, Anti-infective agents. Drug delivery potential of niosome can enhance by usingnovel Concepts like proniosomes, discomes and aspasome. Niosomes also serve better aid in diagnosticimaging and as a vaccine adjuvant.

  9. Identifying mechanism-of-action targets for drugs and probes

    OpenAIRE

    Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Setola, Vincent; Hert, Jérôme; Crews, Brenda A.; Irwin, John J.; Lounkine, Eugen; Marnett, Lawrence; Roth, Bryan L.; Brian K Shoichet

    2012-01-01

    Notwithstanding their key roles in therapy and as biological probes, 7% of approved drugs are purported to have no known primary target, and up to 18% lack a well-defined mechanism of action. Using a chemoinformatics approach, we sought to “de-orphanize” drugs that lack primary targets. Surprisingly, targets could be easily predicted for many: Whereas these targets were not known to us nor to the common databases, most could be confirmed by literature search, leaving only 13 Food and Drug Adm...

  10. DNA Gyrase Is the Target for the Quinolone Drug Ciprofloxacin in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Roberts, Katherine M.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Wall, Melisa K.; Leroux, Julie; Mylne, Joshua S.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains four genes that were originally annotated as potentially encoding DNA gyrase: ATGYRA, ATGYRB1, ATGYRB2, and ATGYRB3. Although we subsequently showed that ATGYRB3 does not encode a gyrase subunit, the other three genes potentially encode subunits of a plant gyrase. We also showed evidence for the existence of supercoiling activity in A. thaliana and that the plant is sensitive to quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics, compounds that target DNA gyrase in bacteria. However, it was not possible at that time to show whether the A. thaliana genes encoded an active gyrase enzyme, nor whether that enzyme is indeed the target for the quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics. Here we show that an A. thaliana mutant resistant to the quinolone drug ciprofloxacin has a point mutation in ATGYRA. Moreover we show that, as in bacteria, the quinolone-sensitive (wild-type) allele is dominant to the resistant gene. Further we have heterologously expressed ATGYRA and ATGYRB2 in a baculovirus expression system and shown supercoiling activity of the partially purified enzyme. Expression/purification of the quinolone-resistant A. thaliana gyrase yields active enzyme that is resistant to ciprofloxacin. Taken together these experiments now show unequivocally that A. thaliana encodes an organelle-targeted DNA gyrase that is the target of the quinolone drug ciprofloxacin; this has important consequences for plant physiology and the development of herbicides. PMID:26663076

  11. Corrosion Inhibition Study of Mild Steel in Acidic Medium by Antibiotic Drugs: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. A. Aziz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of the inhibiting efficiency of antibiotic drugs (ciprofloxacin, cloxacillin, and amoxicillin on the corrosion of mild steel in 1 mol·L−1 HCl were studied at room temperature using mass loss measurement. The main reason is probably be due to the formation of protective coverage by the inhibitor as other authors reported previously. Adsorption characteristics of the inhibitor has also been studied using simple equation and it was found that drugs inhibits the corrosion of mild steel by being adsorbed on the surface of mild steel by a physical adsorption mechanism. The adsorption of drugs on the mild steel surface was found to be spontaneous and obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. It was observed that the test drug has a promising inhibitory action in acid medium against corrosion of mild steel. Moreover it was revealed that an inhibition efficiency of 80.1 % can be achieved with 3×10-3M ciprofloxacin drug treatment on mild steel.

  12. Targeted electrohydrodynamic printing for micro-reservoir drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfluidic drug delivery systems consisting of a drug reservoir and microfluidic channels have shown the possibility of simple and robust modulation of drug release rate. However, the difficulty of loading a small quantity of drug into drug reservoirs at a micro-scale limited further development of such systems. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing was employed to fill micro-reservoirs with controlled amount of drugs in the range of a few hundreds of picograms to tens of micrograms with spatial resolution of as small as 20 µm. Unlike most EHD systems, this system was configured in combination with an inverted microscope that allows in situ targeting of drug loading at micrometer scale accuracy. Methylene blue and rhodamine B were used as model drugs in distilled water, isopropanol and a polymer solution of a biodegradable polymer and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also tetracycline-HCl/DI water was used as actual drug ink. The optimal parameters of EHD printing to load an extremely small quantity of drug into microscale drug reservoirs were investigated by changing pumping rates, the strength of an electric field and drug concentration. This targeted EHD technique was used to load drugs into the microreservoirs of PDMS microfluidic drug delivery devices and their drug release performance was demonstrated in vitro. (paper)

  13. Future target-based drug discovery for tuberculosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, Bavesh Davandra; Karakousis, Petros C; Parish, Tanya; Dick, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    New drugs that retain potency against multidrug/extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with the additional benefit of a shortened treatment duration and ease of administration, are urgently needed by tuberculosis (TB) control programs. Efforts to develop this new generation of treatment interventions have been plagued with numerous problems, the most significant being our insufficient understanding of mycobacterial metabolism during disease. This, combined with limited chemical diversity and poor entry of small molecules into the cell, has limited the number of new bioactive agents that result from drug screening efforts. The biochemical, target-driven approach to drug development has been largely abandoned in the TB field, to be replaced by whole-cell or target-based whole-cell screening approaches. In this context, the properties of a good drug target are unclear, since these are directly determined by the ability to find compounds, using current screening algorithms, which are able to kill M. tuberculosis. In this review, we discuss issues related to the identification and validation of drug targets and highlight some key properties for promising targets. Some of these include essentiality for growth, vulnerability, druggability, reduced propensity to evolve drug resistance and target location to facilitate ready access to drugs during chemotherapy. We present these in the context of recent drugs that have emerged through various approaches with the aim of consolidating the knowledge gained from these experiences to inform future efforts. PMID:25458615

  14. Targeted liposomal drug delivery to monocytes and macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Ciara Kelly; Caroline Jefferies; Sally-Ann Cryan

    2011-01-01

    As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can ha...

  15. Drugs acting on central nervous system (CNS) targets as leads for non-CNS targets

    OpenAIRE

    Kharkar, Prashant S.

    2014-01-01

    Innovative drug discovery approaches are currently needed to rejuvenate the shrinking product pipelines of the pharmaceutical companies across the globe. Here a theme is presented – the use of central nervous system (CNS) drugs as leads for non-CNS targets. The approach is related to the use of existing drugs for new indications. Suitable chemical modifications of the CNS drugs abolish their CNS penetration. These novel analogs may then be screened for activity against non-CNS targets. Carefu...

  16. Polymeric micelles for solubilization and targeting of hydrophobic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focussed on the encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs into polymeric micelles and was intended to show the strengths and limitations of these self-assembling systems in terms of solubilization and drug targeting. Characterization of hydrophobic drug solubilization prior to intravenous injection was one of the key goals of this thesis. For this purpose a novel drug loading procedure was developed based on mechanistic considerations during the loading processes (Chapter 2). The cosolve...

  17. Identifying co-targets to fight drug resistance based on a random walk model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance has now posed more severe and emergent threats to human health and infectious disease treatment. However, wet-lab approaches alone to counter drug resistance have so far still achieved limited success due to less knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance. Our approach apply a heuristic search algorithm in order to extract active network under drug treatment and use a random walk model to identify potential co-targets for effective antibacterial drugs. Results We use interactome network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and gene expression data which are treated with two kinds of antibiotic, Isoniazid and Ethionamide as our test data. Our analysis shows that the active drug-treated networks are associated with the trigger of fatty acid metabolism and synthesis and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH-related processes and those results are consistent with the recent experimental findings. Efflux pumps processes appear to be the major mechanisms of resistance but SOS response is significantly up-regulation under Isoniazid treatment. We also successfully identify the potential co-targets with literature confirmed evidences which are related to the glycine-rich membrane, adenosine triphosphate energy and cell wall processes. Conclusions With gene expression and interactome data supported, our study points out possible pathways leading to the emergence of drug resistance under drug treatment. We develop a computational workflow for giving new insights to bacterial drug resistance which can be gained by a systematic and global analysis of the bacterial regulation network. Our study also discovers the potential co-targets with good properties in biological and graph theory aspects to overcome the problem of drug resistance.

  18. From knock-out phenotype to three-dimensional structure of a promising antibiotic target from Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Con Dogovski

    Full Text Available Given the rise in drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, there is an urgent need to discover new antimicrobials targeting this pathogen and an equally urgent need to characterize new drug targets. A promising antibiotic target is dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in lysine biosynthesis. In this study, we firstly show by gene knock out studies that S. pneumoniae (sp lacking the DHDPS gene is unable to grow unless supplemented with lysine-rich media. We subsequently set out to characterize the structure, function and stability of the enzyme drug target. Our studies show that sp-DHDPS is folded and active with a k(cat = 22 s(-1, K(M(PYR = 2.55 ± 0.05 mM and K(M(ASA = 0.044 ± 0.003 mM. Thermal denaturation experiments demonstrate sp-DHDPS exhibits an apparent melting temperature (T(M(app of 72 °C, which is significantly greater than Escherichia coli DHDPS (Ec-DHDPS (T(M(app = 59 °C. Sedimentation studies show that sp-DHDPS exists in a dimer-tetramer equilibrium with a K(D(4→2 = 1.7 nM, which is considerably tighter than its E. coli ortholog (K(D(4→2 = 76 nM. To further characterize the structure of the enzyme and probe its enhanced stability, we solved the high resolution (1.9 Å crystal structure of sp-DHDPS (PDB ID 3VFL. The enzyme is tetrameric in the crystal state, consistent with biophysical measurements in solution. Although the sp-DHDPS and Ec-DHDPS active sites are almost identical, the tetramerization interface of the s. pneumoniae enzyme is significantly different in composition and has greater buried surface area (800 Å(2 compared to its E. coli counterpart (500 Å(2. This larger interface area is consistent with our solution studies demonstrating that sp-DHDPS is considerably more thermally and thermodynamically stable than Ec-DHDPS. Our study describe for the first time the knock-out phenotype, solution properties, stability and crystal structure of DHDPS from S. pneumoniae, a

  19. Drug Repurposing: Far Beyond New Targets for Old Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprea, Tudor; Mestres, J.

    2012-01-01

    Repurposing drugs requires finding novel therapeutic indications compared to the ones for which they were already approved. This is an increasingly utilized strategy for finding novel medicines, one that capitalizes on previous investments while derisking clinical activities. This approach is of...... repurposing, but may limit the commercial applications by patent applications. Certain clinical applications may be more feasible for repurposing than others because of marked differences in side effect tolerance. Other factors that ought to be considered when assessing drug repurposing opportunities include...

  20. Cancer Drug Development: New Targets for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt

    1996-01-01

    cancer drug screening and cancer drug development. At the NCI, for example, the old in vivo mouse screen using mouse lymphomas has been shelved; it discovered compounds with some activity in lymphomas, but not the common solid tumors of adulthood. It has been replaced with an initial in vitro screen of some sixty cell lines, representing the common solid tumors-ovary, G.I., lung, breast, CNS, melanoma and others. The idea was to not only discover new drugs with specific anti-tumor activity but also to use the small volumes required for in vitro screening as a medium to screen for new natural product compounds, one of the richest sources of effective chemotherapy. The cell line project had an unexpected dividend. The pattern of sensitivity in the panel predicted the mechanism of action of unknown compounds. An antifolate suppressed cell growth of the different lines like other antifolates, anti-tubulin compounds suppressed like other anti-tubulins, and so on. It now became possible, at a very early stage of cancer drug screening, to select for drugs with unknown-and potentially novel-mechanisms of action. The idea was taken to the next logical step, and that was to characterize the entire panel for important molecular properties of human malignancy: mutations in the tumor suppressor gene p53, expression of important oncogenes like ras or myc, the gp170 gene which confers multiple drug resistance, protein-specific kinases, and others. It now became possible to use the cell line panel as a tool to detect new drugs which targeted a specific genetic property of the tumor cell. Researchers can now ask whether a given drug is likely to inhibit multiple drug resistance or kill cells which over-express specific oncogenes at the earliest phase of drug discovery. In this issue of The Oncologist, Tom Connors celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of cancer chemotherapy. His focus is on the importance of international collaboration in clinical trials and the negative impact of

  1. Targeted drug induces responses in aggressive lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preliminary results from clinical trials in a subtype of lymphoma show that for a number of patients whose disease was not cured by other treatments, the drug ibrutinib can provide significant anti-cancer responses with modest side effects.

  2. Drug Discovery Targeted to Transthyretin Related Amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Blasi Pérez, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    [eng] Several drug discovery approaches has been performed to find new compounds able to interact with high affinity with the hormone binding site of the homotetrameric protein transthyretin (TTR), and stabilize this tetramer, becoming drug candidates to treat several rare amyloid diseases associated with TTR. With this aim, several computational workflows and chemico-biological databases have been developed, and in collaboration with two experimental research laboratories of our TTR Con...

  3. Re-Inventing Infectious Disease: Antibiotic Resistance and Drug Development at the Bayer Company 1945-80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradmann, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyses how research on antibiotic resistance has been a driving force in the development of new antibiotics. Drug resistance, while being a problem for physicians and patients, offers attractive perspectives for those who research and develop new medicines. It imposes limits on the usability of older medicines and simultaneously modifies pathologies in a way that opens markets for new treatments. Studying resistance can thus be an important part of developing and marketing antibiotics. The chosen example is that of the German pharmaceutical company Bayer. Before World War Two, Bayer had pioneered the development of anti-infective chemotherapy, sulpha drugs in particular, but had missed the boat when it came to fungal antibiotics. Exacerbated by the effects of war, Bayer's world market presence, which had been considerable prior to the war, had plummeted. In this critical situation, the company opted for a development strategy that tried to capitalise on the problems created by the use of first-generation antibiotics. Part and parcel of this strategy was monitoring what can be called the structural change of infectious disease. In practice, this meant to focus on pathologies resulting from resistance and hospital infections. In addition, Bayer also focused on lifestyle pathologies such as athlete's foot. This paper will follow drug development and marketing at Bayer from 1945 to about 1980. In this period, Bayer managed to regain some of its previous standing in markets but could not escape from the overall crisis of anti-infective drug development from the 1970s on. PMID:26971595

  4. Application of basic pharmacology and dispensing practice of antibiotics in accredited drug-dispensing outlets in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minzi OM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OM Minzi,1 VS Manyilizu21Unit of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2Logistics System Strengthening Unit, John Snow Inc, Dar es Salaam, TanzaniaBackground: Provision of pharmaceutical services in accredited drug-dispensing outlets (ADDOs in Tanzania has not been reported. This study compared the antibiotics dispensing practice between ADDOs and part II shops, or duka la dawa baridi (DLDBs, in Tanzania.Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study that was conducted in ADDOs and DLDBs. A simulated client method for data collection was used, and a total of 85 ADDOs, located in Mvomero, Kilombero, and Morogoro rural districts, were compared with 60 DLDBs located in Kibaha district. The research assistants posed as simulated clients and requested to buy antibiotics from ADDOs and DLDBs after presenting a case scenario or disease condition. Among the diseases presented were those requiring antibiotics and those usually managed only by oral rehydration salt or analgesics. The simulated clients wanted to know the antibiotics that were available at the shop. The posed questions set a convincing ground to the dispenser either to dispense the antibiotic directly, request a prescription, or refer the patient to a health facility. Proportions were used to summarize categorical variables between ADDOs and DLDBs, and the chi-square test was used to test for statistical difference between the two drug-outlet types in terms of antibiotic-dispensing practice.Results: As many as 40% of trained ADDO dispensers no longer worked at the ADDO shops, so some of the shops employed untrained staff. A larger proportion of ADDOs than DLDBs dispensed antibiotics without prescriptions (P = 0.004. The overall results indicate that there was no difference between the two types of shops in terms of adhering to regulations for dispensing antibiotics. However, in some circumstances, eg

  5. Systematic identification of synergistic drug pairs targeting HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xu; Hu, Long; Luquette, Lovelace J; Gao, Geng; Liu, Yifang; Qu, Hongjing; Xi, Ruibin; Lu, Zhi John; Park, Peter J; Elledge, Stephen J

    2012-11-01

    The systematic identification of effective drug combinations has been hindered by the unavailability of methods that can explore the large combinatorial search space of drug interactions. Here we present multiplex screening for interacting compounds (MuSIC), which expedites the comprehensive assessment of pairwise compound interactions. We examined ∼500,000 drug pairs from 1,000 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved or clinically tested drugs and identified drugs that synergize to inhibit HIV replication. Our analysis reveals an enrichment of anti-inflammatory drugs in drug combinations that synergize against HIV. As inflammation accompanies HIV infection, these findings indicate that inhibiting inflammation could curb HIV propagation. Multiple drug pairs identified in this study, including various glucocorticoids and nitazoxanide (NTZ), synergize by targeting different steps in the HIV life cycle. MuSIC can be applied to a wide variety of disease-relevant screens to facilitate efficient identification of compound combinations. PMID:23064238

  6. Development of New Drugs for an Old Target — The Penicillin Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luxen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of β-lactam antibiotics has led to the worldwide appearance of drug-resistant strains. Bacteria have developed resistance to β-lactams by two main mechanisms: the production of β-lactamases, sometimes accompanied by a decrease of outer membrane permeability, and the production of low-affinity, drug resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs. PBPs remain attractive targets for developing new antibiotic agents because they catalyse the last steps of the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, which is unique to bacteria, and lies outside the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we summarize the “current state of the art” of non-β-lactam inhibitors of PBPs, which have being developed in an attempt to counter the emergence of β-lactam resistance. These molecules are not susceptible to hydrolysis by β-lactamases and thus present a real alternative to β-lactams. We present transition state analogs such as boronic acids, which can covalently bind to the active serine residue in the catalytic site. Molecules containing ring structures different from the β-lactam-ring like lactivicin are able to acylate the active serine residue. High throughput screening methods, in combination with virtual screening methods and structure based design, have allowed the development of new molecules. Some of these novel inhibitors are active against major pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and thus open avenues new for the discovery of novel antibiotics.

  7. Inhibition of bacterial growth by iron oxide nanoparticles with and without attached drug: Have we conquered the antibiotic resistance problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Jain, Priyanka; Malagodi, Angelina; Fornelli, F. Zuly; Hayat, Allison; Rivera, Antonio C.; French, Michael; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the top three leading causative opportunistic human pathogens, possessing one of the largest bacterial genomes and an exceptionally large proportion of regulatory genes therein. It has been known for more than a decade that the size and complexity of the P. aeruginosa genome is responsible for the adaptability and resilience of the bacteria to include its ability to resist many disinfectants and antibiotics. We have investigated the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa bacterial biofilms to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (NPs) with and without attached drug (tobramycin). We also characterized the susceptibility of zero-valent iron NPs, which are known to inactivate microbes. The particles, having an average diameter of 16 nm were capped with natural alginate, thus doubling the hydrodynamic size. Nanoparticle-drug conjugates were produced via cross-linking drug and alginate functional groups. Drug conjugates were investigated in the interest of determining dosage, during these dosage-curve experiments, NPs unbound to drug were tested in cultures as a negative control. Surprisingly, we found that the iron oxide NPs inhibited bacterial growth, and thus, biofilm formation without the addition of antibiotic drug. The inhibitory dosages of iron oxide NPs were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations are presented. These findings suggest that NP-drug conjugates may overcome the antibiotic drug resistance common in P. aeruginosa infections.

  8. Chemical proteomics: terra incognita for novel drug target profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ce Bian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand for new therapeutic strategies in the medical and pharmaceutic fields has resulted in a pressing need for novel druggable targets. Paradoxically, however, the targets of certain drugs that are already widely used in clinical practice have largely not been annotated. Because the pharmacologic effects of a drug can only be appreciated when its interactions with cellular components are clearly delineated, an integrated deconvolution of drug-target interactions for each drug is necessary. The emerging field of chemical proteomics represents a powerful mass spectrometry (MS-based affinity chromatography approach for identifying proteome-wide small molecule-protein interactions and mapping these interactions to signaling and metabolic pathways. This technique could comprehensively characterize drug targets, profile the toxicity of known drugs, and identify possible off-target activities. With the use of this technique, candidate drug molecules could be optimized, and predictable side effects might consequently be avoided. Herein, we provide a holistic overview of the major chemical proteomic approaches and highlight recent advances in this area as well as its potential applications in drug discovery.

  9. What makes a good anti-inflammatory drug target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, David L

    2006-03-01

    This review focuses on the major, 'successful' target families in inflammation and attempts to identify some of the key features of what makes a good anti-inflammatory target. The review is based on a systematic analysis of approved anti-inflammatory drugs grouped according to their drug-target family. The cytokine family is a drug-dense area. They have yielded and continue to yield a rich stream of drugs. As in other therapeutic areas, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), also known as seven-transmembrane pass receptors, have provided significant drug targets. In addition, the superfamilies of cell adhesion molecules and co-stimulatory molecules, which have special relevance to immune processes, have begun to provide the first approved drugs and might yield many more. The recent, rapid increase in the number of defined targets in the immune system -- leukocyte surface antigens, cytokines, GPCRs, adhesion molecules and co-stimulatory molecules -- will ensure a rich stream of future anti-inflammatory drug targets. PMID:16580598

  10. SYNERGY OF A NOVEL ANTIBIOTIC ADJUVANT ENTITY AGAINST MULTI DRUG RESISTANT ENTEROBACTERIACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Chaudhary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, we investigated the in vitro interaction of ceftriaxone plus sulbactam with disodium edetate, a Non Antibiotic Adjuvant (NAA against selected clinical isolates and in vitro susceptibility studies were also performed. The isolates were tested against a range of ratios of ceftriaxone and sulbactam using a microdilution checkerboard method. Having determined the appropriate ratios of ceftriaxone plus sulbactam, effect of various concentration of disodium edetate were also studied using the microdilution checkerboard method. All the results were analysed with the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration (FIC indices. Susceptibility studies were carried out according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI methods. Results of this study demonstrated that 2:1 ratio of ceftriaxone and sulbactam was the more synergistic with FIC index values 0.4281, 0.4023, 0.4124 and 0.4325 for E. coli, A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae. The synergicity of ceftriaxone and sulbactam was enhanced significantly with increasing concentration of disodium edetate and produced the lowest FIC index (4 log of killing reduction was observed with synergistic ratio of Elores in time kill curve study. This study suggest that Elores could be an alternative regimen in combating antibiotic resistance among multi drug resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

  11. Antibiotic Resistance of Probiotic Strains of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Marketed Foods and Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG LIU; ZHUO-YANG ZHANG; KE DONG; JIAN-PING YUAN; XIAO-KUI GUO

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify the antimicrobial resistance of commercial lactic acid bacteria present in microbial foods and drug additives by analyzing their isolated strains used for fermentation and probioties. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility of 41 screened isolates was tested with disc diffusion and E-test methods after species-level identification. Resistant strains were selected and examined for the presence of resistance genes by PCR. Results Distribution of resistance was found in different species. All isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cephalothin, and imipenem. In addition, isolates resistant to vancomycin, rifampicin, streptomycin, bacitracin, and erythromycin were detected, although the incidence of resistance to these antibiotics was relatively low. In contrast, most strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin, amikacin, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole, and gentamycin. The genes msrC, vanX, and dfrA were detected in strains of Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Lactococcus lactis. Conclusion Antibiotic resistance is present in different species of probiotic strains, which poses a threat to food safety. Evaluation of the safety of lactic acid bacteria for human consumption should be guided by established criteria, guidelines and regulations.

  12. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com . PMID:27167132

  13. Leveraging Big Data to Transform Target Selection and Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Butte, AJ

    2016-01-01

    The advances of genomics, sequencing, and high throughput technologies have led to the creation of large volumes of diverse datasets for drug discovery. Analyzing these datasets to better understand disease and discover new drugs is becoming more common. Recent open data initiatives in basic and clinical research have dramatically increased the types of data available to the public. The past few years have witnessed successful use of big data in many sectors across the whole drug discovery pipeline. In this review, we will highlight the state of the art in leveraging big data to identify new targets, drug indications, and drug response biomarkers in this era of precision medicine. PMID:26659699

  14. An antibiotic protocol to minimize emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Espíndola, Aquino L.; Girardi, Daniel; Penna, T. J. P.; Bauch, Chris T.; Troca Cabella, Brenno C.; Martinez, Alexandre Souto

    2014-04-01

    A within-host model of the spread of tuberculosis is proposed here where the emergence of drug resistance and bacterial dormancy are simultaneously combined. We consider both sensitive and resistant strains of tuberculosis pathogens as well as a dormant state of these bacteria. The dynamics of the within-host system is modeled by a set of coupled differential equations which are numerically solved to find a relation between the within-host bacterial populations and the host health states. The values of the parameters were taken from the current literature when available; a sensitivity analysis was performed for the others. Antibiotic treatment for standard, intermittent and oscillating intermittent protocols is analyzed for different conditions. Our results suggest that the oscillating protocol is the most effective one, that would imply a lower treatment cost.

  15. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yeol Ahn

    Full Text Available The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents.

  16. in Silico analysis of Escherichia coli polyphosphate kinase (PPK) as a novel antimicrobial drug target and its high throughput virtual screening against PubChem library

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Saurav Bhaskar; Verma, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    Multiple drug resistance (MDR) in bacteria is a global health challenge that needs urgent attention. The 2011 outbreak caused by Escherichia coli O104:H4 in Europe has exposed the inability of present antibiotic arsenal to tackle the problem of antimicrobial infections. It has further posed a tremendous burden on entire pharmaceutical industry to find novel drugs and/or drug targets. Polyphosphate kinase (PPK) in bacteria plays a crucial role in helping latter to adapt to stringent conditions...

  17. REAL TIME PCR IDENTIFICATION FOR TARGET ADJUNCTIVE ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY OF SEVERE CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS. PART II - MICROBIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamen Kotsilkov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Antibiotic use in chronic periodontitis may result in improvement in periodontal status, although many questions regarding the indications for this therapy remain unanswered. The polymicrobial etiology of the periodontal infection hinders the choice of the proper antibiotic agent. Furthermore the indiscriminate use of antibiotics could lead to high levels of resistance and to various adverse reactions. In the recent years a various molecular diagnostics protocols were proposed in order to facilitate the decision for adjunctive antibiotic administration. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to compare the microbiological effectiveness of adjunctive antibiotic administration with the mechanical periodontal therapy. METHODS: 30 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were enrolled in this study and were divided in 3 groups: Control group – with mechanical debridement only. Test group 1 – with combined adjunctive antibiotic administration using Amoxicillin+ Metronidazole. Test group 2 – with target antibiotic administration according to the resuts from the Real Time PCR identification. RESULTS: The prevalence of all the isolated microorganisms (exept. E.nodatum and C.gingivalis in Test Group 2 demonstrates statistically significant reduction compared with the other treatment approaches. Almost complete elimination was registered for the consensus pathogens from the red and orange complexes (above 99% and 100% for P.intemedia. CONCLUSION: The adjunct antibiotic treatment targeted with Real-Time PCR identification demonstrates almost complete elimination of the putative periodontal pathogens in the deep periodontal pockets in patients with severe chronic periodontitis. This result suggests slower recolonisation of these habitats thus limiting the risk for progression of the periodontal destruction.

  18. Decorating Nanoparticle Surface for Targeted Drug Delivery: Opportunities and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiqiang Shen; Mu-Ping Nieh; Ying Li

    2016-01-01

    The size, shape, stiffness (composition) and surface properties of nanoparticles (NPs) have been recognized as key design parameters for NP-mediated drug delivery platforms. Among them, the surface functionalization of NPs is of great significance for targeted drug delivery. For instance, targeting moieties are covalently coated on the surface of NPs to improve their selectively and affinity to cancer cells. However, due to a broad range of possible choices of surface decorating molecules, it...

  19. Survey of pharmacists and physicians on drug interactions between combined oral contraceptives and broad-spectrum antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masters KP

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate physician and pharmacist knowledge on potential drug interactions between combined oral contraceptives (COC and broad-spectrum antibiotics and determine if any difference exists between responses.Methods: Two hundred licensed retail pharmacists and 200 licensed family practice physicians in the states of Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland were mailed an anonymous survey between August 2007 and November 2007. The survey consisted of 3 short questions asking practitioners about their current opinion on drug interactions with COCs and whether an alternative form of contraception is needed for patients taking COC and concomitant broad-spectrum antibiotics. The main outcome measure of the survey included: identifying how physicians and pharmacists handle prescribing or dispensing COCs along with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Gender, educational degree, and years in practice were also collected. Results: A total of 182 participants returned the surveys (57% were physicians and 43% were pharmacists. When asked if broad-spectrum antibiotics have a clinically significant interaction with COCs, 82.7% of physicians and 88.5% of pharmacists answered, “yes”. Of the respondents, 84.6% stated that the drug interaction warrants the patient to be advised to use back-up contraception. A total of 90.1% stated that they currently instruct patients to use back-up contraception when prescribing or dispensing antibiotics to a patient who is on COC, with no statistically significant difference existing between the responses of the pharmacists and the physicians.Conclusion: Physicians and pharmacists believe that broad-spectrum antibiotics decrease the effectiveness of COCs. These practitioners warn their patients of this interaction and advise the use of back-up contraception. More education should be provided to practitioners regarding the data concerning COCs and broad spectrum antibiotics and lack of a proven interaction.

  20. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on ocular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Miki; Asai, Tomohiro; Oku, Naoto; Araki, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Minoru; Ebihara, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Poor drug delivery to lesions in patients' eyes is a major obstacle to the treatment of ocular diseases. The accessibility of these areas to drugs is highly restricted by the presence of barriers, including the corneal barrier, aqueous barrier, and the inner and outer blood-retinal barriers. In particular, the posterior segment is difficult to reach for drugs because of its structural peculiarities. This review discusses various barriers to drug delivery and provides comprehensive information for designing nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery systems for the treatment of ocular diseases. Nanoparticles can be designed to improve penetration, controlled release, and drug targeting. As highlighted in this review, the therapeutic efficacy of drugs in ocular diseases has been reported to be enhanced by the use of nanoparticles such as liposomes, micro/nanospheres, microemulsions, and dendrimers. Our recent data show that intravitreal injection of targeted liposomes encapsulating an angiogenesis inhibitor caused significantly greater suppression of choroidal neovascularization than did the injection of free drug. Recent progress in ocular drug delivery systems research has provided new insights into drug development, and the use of nanoparticles for drug delivery is thus a promising approach for advanced therapy of ocular diseases. PMID:23439842

  1. Tumor targeting using liposomal antineoplastic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Jörg Huwyler; Jürgen Drewe; Stephan Krähenbühl

    2008-01-01

    Jörg Huwyler1, Jürgen Drewe2, Stephan Krähenbühl21University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, Institute of Pharma Technology, Muttenz, Switzerland; 2Department of Research and Division of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: During the last years, liposomes (microparticulate phospholipid vesicles) have beenused with growing success as pharmaceutical carriers for antineoplastic drugs. Fields of applicatio...

  2. Sequencing targeting insurgents and drugs in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Farrell, Michelle L.

    2007-01-01

    Colombia President Pastrana President Uribe Drug Trade Coca Counter-narcotics FARC FARC-EP Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia Government of Colombia Insurgency Terrorism Plan Colombia Plan Patriota Demilitarized Zone Democratic Defense and Security Policy DSP Peru's success in first defeating the Shining Path guerrilla movement in the early 1990s and then reducing coca cultivation in the mid-1990s demonstrates the effectiveness of a s...

  3. REVIEW ON ADVANCES IN COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunena Sethi, SL Harikumar* and Nirmala

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The colon is the terminal part of the GIT which has gained in recent years as a potential site for delivery of various novel therapeutic drugs, i.e. peptides. However, colon is rich in microflora which can be used to target the drug release in the colon. Colon is a site where both local and systemic drug delivery can take place. Local delivery allows the topical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. If drug can be targeted directly into the colon, treatment can become more effective and side effects can be minimized. These systemic side effects can be minimized by primary approaches for CDDS (Colon specific drug delivery namely prodrugs, pH and time dependent systems and microbially triggered system which gained limited success and have limitations as compared with recently new CDDS namely pressure controlled colon delivery capsules (PCDCS, CODESTM (Novel colon targeted delivery system osmotic controlled drug delivery system, Pulsincap system, time clock system, chronotropic system. This review is to understand the pharmaceutical approaches to colon targeted drug delivery systems for better therapeutic action without compromising on drug degradation (or its low bioavailability.

  4. Targeted drug delivery to magnetic implants for therapeutic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for locally targeted drug delivery is proposed that employs magnetic implants placed directly in the cardiovascular system to attract injected magnetic carriers. Theoretical simulations and experimental results support the assumption that using magnetic implants in combination with externally applied magnetic field will optimize the delivery of magnetic drug to selected sites within a subject

  5. Targeting anti-HIV drugs to the CNS

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Kavitha S.; Ghorpade, Anuja; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The development of antiretroviral drugs over the past couple of decades has been commendable due to the identification of several new targets within the overall Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) replication cycle. However, complete control over HIV/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome is yet to be achieved. This is because the current anti-HIV drugs, although effective in reducing plasma viral levels, cannot eradicate the virus completely from the body. This occurs because most anti-HIV drugs...

  6. Design of Nanoparticle-Based Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojiao Yu; Ian Trase; Muqing Ren; Kayla Duval; Xing Guo; Zi Chen

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have shown promise as both drug delivery vehicles and direct antitumor systems, but they must be properly designed in order to maximize efficacy. Computational modeling is often used both to design new nanoparticles and to better understand existing ones. Modeled processes include the release of drugs at the tumor site and the physical interaction between the nanoparticle and cancer cells. In this paper, we provide an overview of three different targeted drug delivery methods (p...

  7. Prediction of drug-target interactions for drug repositioning only based on genomic expression similarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejian Wang

    Full Text Available Small drug molecules usually bind to multiple protein targets or even unintended off-targets. Such drug promiscuity has often led to unwanted or unexplained drug reactions, resulting in side effects or drug repositioning opportunities. So it is always an important issue in pharmacology to identify potential drug-target interactions (DTI. However, DTI discovery by experiment remains a challenging task, due to high expense of time and resources. Many computational methods are therefore developed to predict DTI with high throughput biological and clinical data. Here, we initiatively demonstrate that the on-target and off-target effects could be characterized by drug-induced in vitro genomic expression changes, e.g. the data in Connectivity Map (CMap. Thus, unknown ligands of a certain target can be found from the compounds showing high gene-expression similarity to the known ligands. Then to clarify the detailed practice of CMap based DTI prediction, we objectively evaluate how well each target is characterized by CMap. The results suggest that (1 some targets are better characterized than others, so the prediction models specific to these well characterized targets would be more accurate and reliable; (2 in some cases, a family of ligands for the same target tend to interact with common off-targets, which may help increase the efficiency of DTI discovery and explain the mechanisms of complicated drug actions. In the present study, CMap expression similarity is proposed as a novel indicator of drug-target interactions. The detailed strategies of improving data quality by decreasing the batch effect and building prediction models are also effectively established. We believe the success in CMap can be further translated into other public and commercial data of genomic expression, thus increasing research productivity towards valid drug repositioning and minimal side effects.

  8. "Nanotheranostics" for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Peng

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique is a promising tool that improves cancer detection, facilitates diagnosis and monitors therapeutic effects. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have emerged as MRI contrast agents for tumor imaging and as potential vectors for targeted anti-cancer drug delivery; nevertheless, the application of SPIOs has been hampered due to a lack of specificity to tumor tissues and premature drug release. This project aims at developing multifunctional SPIOs for both cancer imaging and targeted drug delivery via conjugation of tumor specific antibodies with SPIOs. The application of anti-TAG-72 antibodies as tumor targeting modalities was evaluated in cultured colorectal cancer cells and in xenograft models by using fluorescent imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. It was demonstrated that antibody-labeled SPIOs were superior imaging agents and drug carriers for increased tumor specificity. The regulation and kinetics of intracellular drug release from SPIOs were explored by means of fluorescence imaging. In vitro and in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging was employed to investigate the mechanisms of premature drug release from nanocarriers. The large volume and high hydrophobicity of cell membranes were found to play an important role in premature drug release. The encapsulation of SPIOs into nanocarriers decreased drug release in a dose-dependent mode. This study provided future opportunities to improve the efficiency of nanocarriers by exploring the mechanism of drug release and disassembly of SPIO-loaded polymeric nanoparticles.

  9. Treponema pallidum Putative Novel Drug Target Identification and Validation: Rethinking Syphilis Therapeutics with Plant-Derived Terpenoids

    OpenAIRE

    Dwivedi, Upendra N.; Tiwari, Sameeksha; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, Swati; Awasthi, Manika; Pandey, Veda P.

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis, a slow progressive and the third most common sexually transmitted disease found worldwide, is caused by a spirochete gram negative bacteria Treponema pallidum. Emergence of antibiotic resistant T. pallidum has led to a search for novel drugs and their targets. Subtractive genomics analyses of pathogen T. pallidum and host Homo sapiens resulted in identification of 126 proteins essential for survival and viability of the pathogen. Metabolic pathway analyses of these essential protein...

  10. Predicting drug-target interaction for new drugs using enhanced similarity measures and super-target clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian-Yu; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Li, Yiming; Leung, Henry C M; Chin, Francis Y L

    2015-07-15

    Predicting drug-target interaction using computational approaches is an important step in drug discovery and repositioning. To predict whether there will be an interaction between a drug and a target, most existing methods identify similar drugs and targets in the database. The prediction is then made based on the known interactions of these drugs and targets. This idea is promising. However, there are two shortcomings that have not yet been addressed appropriately. Firstly, most of the methods only use 2D chemical structures and protein sequences to measure the similarity of drugs and targets respectively. However, this information may not fully capture the characteristics determining whether a drug will interact with a target. Secondly, there are very few known interactions, i.e. many interactions are "missing" in the database. Existing approaches are biased towards known interactions and have no good solutions to handle possibly missing interactions which affect the accuracy of the prediction. In this paper, we enhance the similarity measures to include non-structural (and non-sequence-based) information and introduce the concept of a "super-target" to handle the problem of possibly missing interactions. Based on evaluations on real data, we show that our similarity measure is better than the existing measures and our approach is able to achieve higher accuracy than the two best existing algorithms, WNN-GIP and KBMF2K. Our approach is available at http://web.hku.hk/∼liym1018/projects/drug/drug.html or http://www.bmlnwpu.org/us/tools/PredictingDTI_S2/METHODS.html. PMID:25957673

  11. Preclinical validation of Aurora kinases-targeting drugs in osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tavanti, E; Sero, V; Vella, S; M. Fanelli; Michelacci, F; Landuzzi, L; Magagnoli, G; Versteeg, R; Picci, P; Hattinger, C M; M. Serra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aurora kinases are key regulators of cell cycle and represent new promising therapeutic targets in several human tumours. Methods: Biological relevance of Aurora kinase-A and -B was assessed on osteosarcoma clinical samples and by silencing these genes with specific siRNA in three human osteosarcoma cell lines. In vitro efficacy of two Aurora kinases-targeting drugs (VX-680 and ZM447439) was evaluated on a panel of four drug-sensitive and six drug-resistant human osteosarcoma cell...

  12. Bacterial Sortase A as a drug target

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Sortase A is a housekeeping enzyme of Gram-positive bacteria that catalyses the anchoring of surface proteins to the bacterial peptidoglycan. The enzyme works to establish an interaction between bacteria and host cells and is essential for pathogenesis. This makes Sortase A a potential suitable target for inhibition, in order to treat bacterial infections. In this degree project Sortase A from Staphylococcus aureus was explored and potential inhibitors were investigated by performing enzyme a...

  13. Glial cells as drug targets: What does it take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2016-10-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development times of CNS drugs, on average over 12 years, this is not completely surprising. However, there is increasing interest from academia and industry to exploit glial targets to develop drugs for the benefit of patients with currently limited or no therapeutic options. CNS drug development has a high attrition rate and has encountered many challenges. It seems unlikely that developing drugs against glial targets would be any less demanding. However, the knowledge generated in traditional CNS drug discovery teaches valuable lessons, which could enable the glial community to accelerate the cycle time from basic discovery to drug development. In this review we will discuss steps necessary to bring a "glial target idea" to a clinical development program. GLIA 2016;64:1742-1754. PMID:27121701

  14. Nanostructured materials for selective recognition and targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective recognition requires the introduction of a molecular memory into a polymer matrix in order to make it capable of rebinding an analyte with a very high specificity. In addition, targeted drug delivery requires drug-loaded vesicles which preferentially localize to the sites of injury and avoid uptake into uninvolved tissues. The rapid evolution of nanotechnology is aiming to fulfill the goal of selective recognition and optimal drug delivery through the development of molecularly imprinted polymeric (MIP) nanoparticles, tailor-made for a diverse range of analytes (e.g., pharmaceuticals, pesticides, amino acids, etc.) and of nanostructured targeted drug carriers (e.g., liposomes and micelles) with increased circulation lifetimes. In the present study, PLGA microparticles containing multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), and MIP nanoparticles were synthesized to be employed as drug carriers and synthetic receptors respectively

  15. Novel colon targeted drug delivery system using natural polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel colon targeted tablet formulation was developed using pectin as carrier and diltiazem HCl and indomethacin as model drugs. The tablets were coated with inulin followed by shellac and were evaluated for average weight, hardness and coat thickness. In vitro release studies for prepared tablets were carried out for 2 h in pH 1.2 HCl buffer, 3 h in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer and 6 h in simulated colonic fluid. The drug release from the coated systems was monitored using UV/Vis spectroscopy. In vitro studies revealed that the tablets coated with inulin and shellac have limited the drug release in stomach and small intestinal environment and released maximum amount of drug in the colonic environment. The study revealed that polysaccharides as carriers and inulin and shellac as a coating material can be used effectively for colon targeting of both water soluble and insoluble drugs.

  16. A Computational Drug Repositioning Approach for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayvert, Kaitlyn M; Dardenne, Etienne; Cheung, Cynthia; Boland, Mary Regina; Lorberbaum, Tal; Wanjala, Jackline; Chen, Yu; Rubin, Mark A; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Rickman, David S; Elemento, Olivier

    2016-06-14

    Mutations in transcription factor (TF) genes are frequently observed in tumors, often leading to aberrant transcriptional activity. Unfortunately, TFs are often considered undruggable due to the absence of targetable enzymatic activity. To address this problem, we developed CRAFTT, a computational drug-repositioning approach for targeting TF activity. CRAFTT combines ChIP-seq with drug-induced expression profiling to identify small molecules that can specifically perturb TF activity. Application to ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets revealed known drug-TF interactions, and a global drug-protein network analysis supported these predictions. Application of CRAFTT to ERG, a pro-invasive, frequently overexpressed oncogenic TF, predicted that dexamethasone would inhibit ERG activity. Dexamethasone significantly decreased cell invasion and migration in an ERG-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of electronic medical record data indicates a protective role for dexamethasone against prostate cancer. Altogether, our method provides a broadly applicable strategy for identifying drugs that specifically modulate TF activity. PMID:27264179

  17. Membrane lipidomics for the discovery of new antiparasitic drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maréchal, Eric; Riou, Mickaël; Kerboeuf, Dominique; Beugnet, Frédéric; Chaminade, Pierre; Loiseau, Philippe M

    2011-11-01

    Advances in lipid separation methods and mass spectrometry technologies allow the fine characterization of the lipidome of parasites, ranging from unicellular protists to worms, which cause threatening infections in vertebrates, including humans. Specific lipid structures or lipid metabolic pathways can inspire the development of novel antiparasitic drugs. Changes in the lipid balance in membranes of parasites can also provide clues on the dynamics of drugs and some mechanisms of drug resistance. This review highlights recent trends in parasite lipidomics, combined with functional analyses, for the discovery of novel targets and the development of novel drugs. PMID:21862412

  18. The Membrane Steps of Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis as Antibiotic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Breukink, Eefjan

    2016-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is the major component of the cell envelope of virtually all bacteria. It has structural roles and acts as a selective sieve for molecules from the outer environment. Peptidoglycan synthesis is therefore one of the most important biogenesis pathways in bacteria and has been studied extensively over the last twenty years. The pathway starts in the cytoplasm, continues in the cytoplasmic membrane and finishes in the periplasmic space, where the precursor is polymerized into the peptidoglycan layer. A number of proteins involved in this pathway, such as the Mur enzymes and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs), have been studied and regarded as good targets for antibiotics. The present review focuses on the membrane steps of peptidoglycan synthesis that involve two enzymes, MraY and MurG, the inhibitors of these enzymes and the inhibition mechanisms. We also discuss the challenges of targeting these two cytoplasmic membrane (associated) proteins in bacterial cells and the perspectives on how to overcome the issues. PMID:27571111

  19. The Membrane Steps of Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis as Antibiotic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan is the major component of the cell envelope of virtually all bacteria. It has structural roles and acts as a selective sieve for molecules from the outer environment. Peptidoglycan synthesis is therefore one of the most important biogenesis pathways in bacteria and has been studied extensively over the last twenty years. The pathway starts in the cytoplasm, continues in the cytoplasmic membrane and finishes in the periplasmic space, where the precursor is polymerized into the peptidoglycan layer. A number of proteins involved in this pathway, such as the Mur enzymes and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs, have been studied and regarded as good targets for antibiotics. The present review focuses on the membrane steps of peptidoglycan synthesis that involve two enzymes, MraY and MurG, the inhibitors of these enzymes and the inhibition mechanisms. We also discuss the challenges of targeting these two cytoplasmic membrane (associated proteins in bacterial cells and the perspectives on how to overcome the issues.

  20. Drug Elucidation: Invertebrate Genetics Sheds New Light on the Molecular Targets of CNS Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donard S. Dwyer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many important drugs approved to treat common human diseases were discovered by serendipity, without a firm understanding of their modes of action. As a result, the side effects and interactions of these medications are often unpredictable, and there is limited guidance for improving the design of next-generation drugs. Here, we review the innovative use of simple model organisms, especially Caenorhabditis elegans, to gain fresh insights into the complex biological effects of approved CNS medications. Whereas drug discovery involves the identification of new drug targets and lead compounds/biologics, and drug development spans preclinical testing to FDA approval, drug elucidation refers to the process of understanding the mechanisms of action of marketed drugs by studying their novel effects in model organisms. Drug elucidation studies have revealed new pathways affected by antipsychotic drugs, e.g., the insulin signaling pathway, a trace amine receptor and a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Similarly, novel targets of antidepressant drugs and lithium have been identified in C. elegans, including lipid-binding/transport proteins and the SGK-1 signaling pathway, respectively. Elucidation of the mode of action of anesthetic agents has shown that anesthesia can involve mitochondrial targets, leak currents and gap junctions. The general approach reviewed in this article has advanced our knowledge about important drugs for CNS disorders and can guide future drug discovery efforts.

  1. Modern pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic techniques to study physiological mechanisms of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions and disposition of antibiotics and to assess clinical relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Landersdorfer, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    There are numerous areas of application for which PKPD models are a valuable tool. We studied dose linearity, bone penetration and drug-drug interactions of antibiotics by PKPD modeling. Knowledge about possible saturation of elimination pathways at therapeutic concentrations is important for studying the probability of successful treatment of dosage regimens via MCS at various doses, other modes of administration, or both. We studied the dose linearity of flucloxacillin and piperacillin. For...

  2. Drug treatment and novel drug target against Cryptosporidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargala G.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis emergence triggered the screening of many compounds for potential anti-cryptosporidial activity in which the majority were ineffective. The outbreak of cryptosporidiosis which occurred in Milwaukee in 1993 was not only the first significant emergence of Cryptosporidium spp. as a major human pathogen but also a huge waterborne outbreak thickening thousands of people from a major city in North America. Since then, outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis are regularly occurring throughout the world. New drugs against this parasite became consequently urgently needed. Among the most commonly used treatments against cryptosporidiosis are paromomycin, and azithromycin, which are partially effective. Nitazoxanide (NTZ’s effectiveness was demonstrated in vitro, and in vivo using several animal models and finally in clinical trials. It significantly shortened the duration of diarrhea and decreased mortality in adults and in malnourished children. NTZ is not effective without an appropriate immune response. In AIDS patients, combination therapy restoring immunity along with antimicrobial treatment of Cryptosporidium infection is necessary. Recent investigations focused on the potential of molecular-based immunotherapy against this parasite. Others tested the effects of probiotic bacteria, but were unable to demonstrate eradication of C. parvum. New synthetic isoflavone derivatives demonstrated excellent activity against C. parvum in vitro and in a gerbil model of infection. Newly synthesized nitroor non nitro- thiazolide compounds, derived from NTZ, have been recently shown to be at least as effective as NTZ against C. parvum in vitro development and are promising new therapeutic agents.

  3. Large-scale prediction of drug-target interactions using protein sequences and drug topological structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Dongsheng [Research Center of Modernization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu Shao [Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Xu Qingsong [School of Mathematical Sciences and Computing Technology, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Lu Hongmei; Huang Jianhua [Research Center of Modernization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Hu Qiannan [Key Laboratory of Combinatorial Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery (Wuhan University), Ministry of Education, and Wuhan University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liang Yizeng, E-mail: yizeng_liang@263.net [Research Center of Modernization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2012-11-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Drug-target interactions are predicted using an extended SAR methodology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A drug-target interaction is regarded as an event triggered by many factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular fingerprint and CTD descriptors are used to represent drugs and proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our approach shows compatibility between the new scheme and current SAR methodology. - Abstract: The identification of interactions between drugs and target proteins plays a key role in the process of genomic drug discovery. It is both consuming and costly to determine drug-target interactions by experiments alone. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new in silico prediction approaches capable of identifying these potential drug-target interactions in a timely manner. In this article, we aim at extending current structure-activity relationship (SAR) methodology to fulfill such requirements. In some sense, a drug-target interaction can be regarded as an event or property triggered by many influence factors from drugs and target proteins. Thus, each interaction pair can be represented theoretically by using these factors which are based on the structural and physicochemical properties simultaneously from drugs and proteins. To realize this, drug molecules are encoded with MACCS substructure fingerings representing existence of certain functional groups or fragments; and proteins are encoded with some biochemical and physicochemical properties. Four classes of drug-target interaction networks in humans involving enzymes, ion channels, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and nuclear receptors, are independently used for establishing predictive models with support vector machines (SVMs). The SVM models gave prediction accuracy of 90.31%, 88.91%, 84.68% and 83.74% for four datasets, respectively. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the ability of our proposed method to predict the drug-target

  4. Process Modeling of Ferrofluids Flowfor Magnetic Targeting Drug Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Handan; WANG Shigang; XU Wei

    2009-01-01

    Among the proposed techniques for delivering drugs to specific sites within the human body, magnetic targeting drug delivery surpasses due to its non-invasive character and its high targeting efficiency. Although there have been some analyses theoretically for magnetic drug targeting, very few researchers have addressed the hydrodynamic models of magnetic fluids in the blood vessel of human body. This paper presents a mathematical model to describe the hydrodynamics of ferrofluids as drug carriers flowing in a blood vessel under the applied magnetic field. A 3D flow field of magnetic particles in a blood vessel model is numerically simulated in order to further understand clinical application of magnetic targeting drug delivery. Simulation results show that magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a target region depending on the applied magnetic field intensity. Magnetic resonance imaging conftrms the enrichment of ferrofluids in a desired body tissue of Sprague-Dawley rats. The simulation results coincide with those animal experiments. Results of the analysis provide the important information and can suggest strategies for improving delivery in favor of the clinical application.

  5. Prophylactic antibiotics are associated with a lower incidence of pneumonia in cardiac arrest survivors treated with targeted temperature management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, David J; Nielsen, Niklas; Fraser, Gilles L;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Prophylactic antibiotics (PRO) reduce the incidence of early-onset pneumonia in comatose patients with structural brain injury, but have not been examined in cardiac arrest survivors undergoing targeted temperature management (TTM). We investigated the effect of PRO on the development...... TTM at 32-34 °C were enrolled in the registry. Differences were analyzed in univariate analyses and with logistic regression models to evaluate independent associations of clinical factors with incidence of pneumonia and good functional outcome. RESULTS: 416 of 1240 patients (33.5%) received PRO...... outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Prophylactic antibiotics were associated with a reduced incidence of pneumonia but a similar rate of good functional outcome....

  6. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on ocular targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honda M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Miki Honda,1 Tomohiro Asai,2 Naoto Oku,2 Yoshihiko Araki,3 Minoru Tanaka,1 Nobuyuki Ebihara11Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka, Japan; 3Institute for Environmental and Gender-Specific Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Poor drug delivery to lesions in patients' eyes is a major obstacle to the treatment of ocular diseases. The accessibility of these areas to drugs is highly restricted by the presence of barriers, including the corneal barrier, aqueous barrier, and the inner and outer blood–retinal barriers. In particular, the posterior segment is difficult to reach for drugs because of its structural peculiarities. This review discusses various barriers to drug delivery and provides comprehensive information for designing nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery systems for the treatment of ocular diseases. Nanoparticles can be designed to improve penetration, controlled release, and drug targeting. As highlighted in this review, the therapeutic efficacy of drugs in ocular diseases has been reported to be enhanced by the use of nanoparticles such as liposomes, micro/nanospheres, microemulsions, and dendrimers. Our recent data show that intravitreal injection of targeted liposomes encapsulating an angiogenesis inhibitor caused significantly greater suppression of choroidal neovascularization than did the injection of free drug. Recent progress in ocular drug delivery systems research has provided new insights into drug development, and the use of nanoparticles for drug delivery is thus a promising approach for advanced therapy of ocular diseases.Keywords: intravitreal injection, drug delivery system, age-related macular degeneration, APRPG-modified PEGylated liposome, DDS

  7. Re-Inventing Infectious Disease: Antibiotic Resistance and Drug Development at the Bayer Company 1945–80

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradmann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses how research on antibiotic resistance has been a driving force in the development of new antibiotics. Drug resistance, while being a problem for physicians and patients, offers attractive perspectives for those who research and develop new medicines. It imposes limits on the usability of older medicines and simultaneously modifies pathologies in a way that opens markets for new treatments. Studying resistance can thus be an important part of developing and marketing antibiotics. The chosen example is that of the German pharmaceutical company Bayer. Before World War Two, Bayer had pioneered the development of anti-infective chemotherapy, sulpha drugs in particular, but had missed the boat when it came to fungal antibiotics. Exacerbated by the effects of war, Bayer’s world market presence, which had been considerable prior to the war, had plummeted. In this critical situation, the company opted for a development strategy that tried to capitalise on the problems created by the use of first-generation antibiotics. Part and parcel of this strategy was monitoring what can be called the structural change of infectious disease. In practice, this meant to focus on pathologies resulting from resistance and hospital infections. In addition, Bayer also focused on lifestyle pathologies such as athlete’s foot. This paper will follow drug development and marketing at Bayer from 1945 to about 1980. In this period, Bayer managed to regain some of its previous standing in markets but could not escape from the overall crisis of anti-infective drug development from the 1970s on. PMID:26971595

  8. Quantitative targeting maps based on experimental investigations for a branched tube model in magnetic drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitter, K., E-mail: kurt.gitter@tu-dresden.de [TU Dresden, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Odenbach, S. [TU Dresden, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Magnetic drug targeting (MDT), because of its high targeting efficiency, is a promising approach for tumour treatment. Unwanted side effects are considerably reduced, since the nanoparticles are concentrated within the target region due to the influence of a magnetic field. Nevertheless, understanding the transport phenomena of nanoparticles in an artery system is still challenging. This work presents experimental results for a branched tube model. Quantitative results describe, for example, the net amount of nanoparticles that are targeted towards the chosen region due to the influence of a magnetic field. As a result of measurements, novel drug targeting maps, combining, e.g. the magnetic volume force, the position of the magnet and the net amount of targeted nanoparticles, are presented. The targeting maps are valuable for evaluation and comparison of setups and are also helpful for the design and the optimisation of a magnet system with an appropriate strength and distribution of the field gradient. The maps indicate the danger of accretion within the tube and also show the promising result of magnetic drug targeting that up to 97% of the nanoparticles were successfully targeted. - Highlights: > Quantitative targeting maps summarise a series of measurements. > Targeting maps combine quantitative data, magnetic volume forces and magnet position. > Here, up to 97% of injected particles were targeted towards the tumour region. > High concentration of injected ferrofluid brings the danger of accretion. > Low miscibility of ferrofluid by water modelling the blood flow is detected.

  9. Targeted drug delivery by ultrasound-triggered margination of microbubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Guckenberger, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The ideal agent for targeted drug delivery should stay away from the biochemically active walls of the blood vessels during circulation. However, upon reaching its target it should attain a near-wall position. Though seemingly contradictory, we show that coated microbubbles (ultrasound contrast agents) possess precisely these two properties. Using numerical simulations we find that application of a localized ultrasound pulse at the target organ triggers their rapid migration from the vessel center toward the endothelial wall. This ultrasound-triggered margination is due to hydrodynamic interactions between the red blood cells and the oscillating bubbles. Importantly, we find that the effect is very robust, existing even if the duration in the stiff state is five times lower than the opposing time in the soft state. Our results might also explain why recent in-vivo studies found strongly enhanced drug uptake by co-administration of microbubbles with classical drug delivery agents.

  10. Docking Studies in Target Proteins Involved in Antibacterial Action Mechanisms: Extending the Knowledge on Standard Antibiotics to Antimicrobial Mushroom Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Alves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the knowledge on target proteins of standard antibiotics was extended to antimicrobial mushroom compounds. Docking studies were performed for 34 compounds in order to evaluate their affinity to bacterial proteins that are known targets for some antibiotics with different mechanism of action: inhibitors of cell wall synthesis, inhibitors of protein synthesis, inhibitors of nucleic acids synthesis and antimetabolites. After validation of the molecular docking approach, virtual screening of all the compounds was performed against penicillin binding protein 1a (PBP1a, alanine racemase (Alr, d-alanyl-d-alanine synthetase (Ddl, isoleucyl-tRNA sinthetase (IARS, DNA gyrase subunit B, topoisomerase IV (TopoIV, dihydropteroate synthetase (DHPS and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR using AutoDock4. Overall, it seems that for the selected mushroom compounds (namely, enokipodins, ganomycins and austrocortiluteins the main mechanism of the action is the inhibition of cell wall synthesis, being Alr and Ddl probable protein targets.

  11. Targeted Liposomal Drug Delivery to Monocytes and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciara Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS, particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can have a very significant effect on the efficiency with which liposomes target MPS cells. MPS cells express a range of receptors including scavenger receptors, integrins, mannose receptors and Fc-receptors that can be targeted by the addition of ligands to liposome surfaces. These ligands include peptides, antibodies and lectins and have the advantages of increasing target specificity and avoiding the need for cationic lipids to trigger intracellular delivery. The goal for targeting monocytes/macrophages using liposomes includes not only drug delivery but also potentially a role in cell ablation and cell activation for the treatment of conditions including cancer, atherosclerosis, HIV, and chronic inflammation.

  12. Targeting dengue virus NS4B protein for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xuping; Zou, Jing; Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-06-01

    The flavivirus nonstructural 4B protein (NS4B) has recently emerged as a valid antiviral target for drug discovery. Here we review (i) the current understanding of the structure and function of DENV NS4B, (ii) the approaches that have been taken to identify NS4B inhibitors, and (iii) the known inhibitors of flavivirus NS4B protein. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on flavivirus drug discovery. PMID:25796970

  13. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications Imaging, Targeting, and Delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book clearly demonstrates the progression of nanoparticle therapeutics from basic research to applications. Unlike other books covering nanoparticles used in medical applications, Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications presents the medical challenges that can be reduced or even overcome by recent advances in nanoscale drug delivery. Each chapter highlights recent progress in the design and engineering of select multifunctional nanoparticles with topics covering targeting, imaging, delivery, diagnostics, and therapy.

  14. Targeting protein kinases in the malaria parasite: update of an antimalarial drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Veronica M; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C

    2012-01-01

    Millions of deaths each year are attributed to malaria worldwide. Transmitted through the bite of an Anopheles mosquito, infection and subsequent death from the Plasmodium species, most notably P. falciparum, can readily spread through a susceptible population. A malaria vaccine does not exist and resistance to virtually every antimalarial drug predicts that mortality and morbidity associated with this disease will increase. With only a few antimalarial drugs currently in the pipeline, new therapeutic options and novel chemotypes are desperately needed. Hit-to-Lead diversity may successfully provide novel inhibitory scaffolds when essential enzymes are targeted, for example, the plasmodial protein kinases. Throughout the entire life cycle of the malaria parasite, protein kinases are essential for growth and development. Ongoing efforts continue to characterize these kinases, while simultaneously pursuing them as antimalarial drug targets. A collection of structural data, inhibitory profiles and target validation has set the foundation and support for targeting the malarial kinome. Pursuing protein kinases as cancer drug targets has generated a wealth of information on the inhibitory strategies that can be useful for antimalarial drug discovery. In this review, progress on selected protein kinases is described. As the search for novel antimalarials continues, an understanding of the phosphor-regulatory pathways will not only validate protein kinase targets, but also will identify novel chemotypes to thwart malaria drug resistance. PMID:22242850

  15. Identifying problematic drugs based on the characteristics of their targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Jose eDa Silva Lopes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Identifying promising compounds during the early stages of drug development is a major challenge for both academia and the pharmaceutical industry. The difficulties are even more pronounced when we consider multi-target pharmacology, where the compounds often target more than one protein, or multiple compounds are used together. Here, we address this problem by using machine learning and network analysis to process sequence and interaction data from human proteins to identify promising compounds. We used this strategy to identify properties that make certain proteins more likely to cause harmful effects when targeted; such proteins usually have domains commonly found throughout the human proteome. Additionally, since currently marketed drugs hit multiple targets simultaneously, we combined the information from individual proteins to devise a score that quantifies the likelihood of a compound being harmful to humans. This approach enabled us to distinguish between approved and problematic drugs with an accuracy of 60%¬–70%. Moreover, our approach can be applied as soon as candidate drugs are available, as demonstrated with predictions for more than 5000 experimental drugs. These resources are available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/psin/.

  16. Herbal and polymeric approaches for liver-targeting drug delivery: novel strategies and their significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohilla, Raman; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-06-01

    The liver is a vital organ present in vertebrates, which performs many functions including detoxification, protein synthesis and production of various bio-chemicals which are very important for digestion. A large number of serious liver disorders affect millions of people worldwide which are very difficult to treat properly despite many efforts. There are several factors which are responsible for liver injuries, include plants (Crotalaria Senecio Heliotropium Symphytum officinale), drugs (analgesic and antibiotics), industrial toxins (mercury and lead), water, alcohol and so on. Herbal medicinal preparations can be used for the treatment of a large number of human liver disorders like cirrhosis, hepatitis, carcinomas, etc. Indian Medicinal Practitioner's Co-operative pharmacy and Stores (IMPCPS) approved herbal-based systems (Unani, Siddha and Ayurveda) for the treatment of various chronic liver disorders. Different types of the receptors are found on the surface of hepatocytes, Kupffer cell, hepatic stellate cell and sinusoidal endothelial cells, etc., which can be used for achieving liver targeting. These receptors bind to different types of ligands (galactosylated, lactobionic acid, asialofetuin, etc.) which can be used in the formulation to achieve targeted delivery of the drug. Various novel particulate approaches (liposomes, niosomes, nanoparticles, micelles, nanosuspensions, etc.) can be used to enhance the targeting efficiency of systems to receptors found on the surface of different cells present in the liver. In this review, we focused on the status of liver targeting via herbal and nanotechnology inspired formulation approaches. PMID:25101832

  17. The concept of focused magnet for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A special focused magnet, designed for the use in the magnetic targeted drug delivery system, was constructed. The theoretical calculation of the adhesion condition for a magnetic fluid drop in magnetic field with obtained design showed that the constructed focused magnet generates a sufficient magnetic force for the capture of a magnetic drop on the vessel wall and can be used 2.5-3 cm deeper in an organism compared with the prism permanent magnet which could enable the non-invasivity of the magnetic drug targeting procedure. The maximal values for the magnetic field and gradient of the magnetic field are 0.38 T and 101 T/m

  18. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  19. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references

  20. Do we need new antibiotics? The search for new targets and new compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spížek, Jaroslav; Novotná, Jitka; Řezanka, Tomáš; Demain, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 12 (2010), s. 1241-1248. ISSN 1367-5435 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Antibiotics * Infectious diseases * Antibiotic resistance Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.416, year: 2010

  1. Appropriateness of antibiotic treatment in intravenous drug users, a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fluckiger Ursula

    2008-04-01

    -up, 24.6% of the patients died: 6.4% died during hospitalization (1.2% infection-related and 13.6% of patients died after discharge. Conclusion Appropriate antibiotic therapy according to standard guidelines in hospitalized intravenous drug users is generally practicable and successful. In a minority alternative treatments may be indicated, although associated with a higher risk of relapse.

  2. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  3. Development of magnetically targeted drug delivery system using superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of a novel drug delivery system was made to accumulate/navigate magnetic drugs with the help of a superconducting magnet in order to control the drugs in blood vessels located deep inside the body. In the present paper, we tested the feasibility of a novel navigation system, made by applying a strong external (magnetic) field through SmBaCuO and YBaCuO bulk superconductors in order to realize the practice of using externally applied magnetic fields for targeting the magnetic particles to a circumscribed body region

  4. Polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery and targeting: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Jawahar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, many modern technologies have been established in the pharmaceutical research and development area. The field of nanotechnology has been revolutionary as substantial and technical, and scientific growth, in basic sciences plus manipulation by physical or chemical process of individual atoms and molecules have widened its horizon. Polymeric nanoparticles with a size in the nanometer range protect drugs against in vitro and in vivo degradation; it releases the drug in a controlled manner and also offers the possibility of drug targeting. The use of polymeric drug nanoparticles is a universal approach to increase the therapeutic performance of poorly soluble drugs in any route of administration. The present review discusses the physico-chemical properties of polymeric nanoparticles, production methods, routes of administration and potential therapeutic applications.

  5. Prediction of drug-target interactions and drug repositioning via network-based inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixiong Cheng

    Full Text Available Drug-target interaction (DTI is the basis of drug discovery and design. It is time consuming and costly to determine DTI experimentally. Hence, it is necessary to develop computational methods for the prediction of potential DTI. Based on complex network theory, three supervised inference methods were developed here to predict DTI and used for drug repositioning, namely drug-based similarity inference (DBSI, target-based similarity inference (TBSI and network-based inference (NBI. Among them, NBI performed best on four benchmark data sets. Then a drug-target network was created with NBI based on 12,483 FDA-approved and experimental drug-target binary links, and some new DTIs were further predicted. In vitro assays confirmed that five old drugs, namely montelukast, diclofenac, simvastatin, ketoconazole, and itraconazole, showed polypharmacological features on estrogen receptors or dipeptidyl peptidase-IV with half maximal inhibitory or effective concentration ranged from 0.2 to 10 µM. Moreover, simvastatin and ketoconazole showed potent antiproliferative activities on human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line in MTT assays. The results indicated that these methods could be powerful tools in prediction of DTIs and drug repositioning.

  6. Targeting Antibacterial Agents by Using Drug-Carrying Filamentous Bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoby, Iftach; Shamis, Marina; Bar, Hagit; Shabat, Doron; Benhar, Itai

    2006-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been used for more than a century for (unconventional) therapy of bacterial infections, for half a century as tools in genetic research, for 2 decades as tools for discovery of specific target-binding proteins, and for nearly a decade as tools for vaccination or as gene delivery vehicles. Here we present a novel application of filamentous bacteriophages (phages) as targeted drug carriers for the eradication of (pathogenic) bacteria. The phages are genetically modified to d...

  7. Is drug release necessary for antimicrobial activity of siderophore-drug conjugates? Syntheses and biological studies of the naturally occurring salmycin “Trojan Horse” antibiotics and synthetic desferridanoxamine-antibiotic conjugates

    OpenAIRE

    Wencewicz, Timothy A.; Möllmann, Ute; Long, Timothy E.; Miller, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    The recent rise in drug resistance found amongst community acquired infections has sparked renewed interest in developing antimicrobial agents that target resistant organisms and limit the natural selection of immune variants. Recent discoveries have shown that iron uptake systems in bacteria and fungi are suitable targets for developing such therapeutic agents. The use of siderophore-drug conjugates as “Trojan Horse” drug delivery agents has attracted particular interest in this area. This r...

  8. Signal-on electrochemical detection of antibiotics at zeptomole level based on target-aptamer binding triggered multiple recycling amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Wang, Yu; Liu, Su; Yu, Jinghua; Guo, Yuna; Xu, Ying; Huang, Jiadong

    2016-06-15

    In the work, a signal-on electrochemical DNA sensor based on multiple amplification for ultrasensitive detection of antibiotics has been reported. In the presence of target, the ingeniously designed hairpin probe (HP1) is opened and the polymerase-assisted target recycling amplification is triggered, resulting in autonomous generation of secondary target. It is worth noting that the produced secondary target could not only hybridize with other HP1, but also displace the Helper from the electrode. Consequently, methylene blue labeled HP2 forms a "close" probe structure, and the increase of signal is monitored. The increasing current provides an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection for antibiotics down to 1.3fM. To our best knowledge, such work is the first report about multiple recycling amplification combing with signal-on sensing strategy, which has been utilized for quantitative determination of antibiotics. It would be further used as a general strategy associated with more analytical techniques toward the detection of a wide spectrum of analytes. Thus, it holds great potential for the development of ultrasensitive biosensing platform for the applications in bioanalysis, disease diagnostics, and clinical biomedicine. PMID:26878484

  9. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Nikolaus; Beate Strehlitz

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminog...

  10. Application of basic pharmacology and dispensing practice of antibiotics in accredited drug-dispensing outlets in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Provision of pharmaceutical services in accredited drug-dispensing outlets (ADDOs) in Tanzania has not been reported. This study compared the antibiotics dispensing practice between ADDOs and part II shops, or duka la dawa baridi (DLDBs), in Tanzania. Methodology This was a cross-sectional study that was conducted in ADDOs and DLDBs. A simulated client method for data collection was used, and a total of 85 ADDOs, located in Mvomero, Kilombero, and Morogoro rural districts, were com...

  11. Application of basic pharmacology and dispensing practice of antibiotics in accredited drug-dispensing outlets in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Minzi, Omary

    2013-01-01

    OM Minzi,1 VS Manyilizu21Unit of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2Logistics System Strengthening Unit, John Snow Inc, Dar es Salaam, TanzaniaBackground: Provision of pharmaceutical services in accredited drug-dispensing outlets (ADDOs) in Tanzania has not been reported. This study compared the antibiotics dispensing practice between ADDOs and part II shops, or duka la dawa baridi (DLDBs), in Tanzan...

  12. In silico search of DNA drugs targeting oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra

    2012-01-01

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) represent a class of drug candidates for antigene therapy. Based on strict criteria, we investigated the potential of 25 known oncogenes to be regulated by TFOs in the mRNA synthesis level and we report specific target sequences found in seven of these genes. PMID:23221090

  13. The tuberculosis drug discovery and development pipeline and emerging drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdluli, Khisimuzi; Kaneko, Takushi; Upton, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The recent accelerated approval for use in extensively drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis (MDR-TB) of two first-in-class TB drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, has reinvigorated the TB drug discovery and development field. However, although several promising clinical development programs are ongoing to evaluate new TB drugs and regimens, the number of novel series represented is few. The global early-development pipeline is also woefully thin. To have a chance of achieving the goal of better, shorter, safer TB drug regimens with utility against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant disease, a robust and diverse global TB drug discovery pipeline is key, including innovative approaches that make use of recently acquired knowledge on the biology of TB. Fortunately, drug discovery for TB has resurged in recent years, generating compounds with varying potential for progression into developable leads. In parallel, advances have been made in understanding TB pathogenesis. It is now possible to apply the lessons learned from recent TB hit generation efforts and newly validated TB drug targets to generate the next wave of TB drug leads. Use of currently underexploited sources of chemical matter and lead-optimization strategies may also improve the efficiency of future TB drug discovery. Novel TB drug regimens with shorter treatment durations must target all subpopulations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis existing in an infection, including those responsible for the protracted TB treatment duration. This review summarizes the current TB drug development pipeline and proposes strategies for generating improved hits and leads in the discovery phase that could help achieve this goal. PMID:25635061

  14. On practicability of NGA as carrier of hepatic targeting drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) is a synthetic ligand specific for the hepatic binding protein (HBP) receptor, which resides at the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. We used NGA as a carrier of hepatic targeting drugs and coupled NGA with nortriptyline and primaquine respectively by succinyl bridge to obtain model compounds NGA-nortriptyline and NGA-primaquine. Both coupled compounds were labelled with 99mTc. The scintigraphy showed that both coupled compounds had remarkable liver taxis. The result of HPLC revealed that the coupled compound was stable in blood and the carried drug was released at liver in the tested rabbit. We think that NGA is a excellent carrier of hepatic targeting drugs

  15. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Lo Sciuto

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery.

  16. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Bertuccini, Lucia; Iosi, Francesca; Superti, Fabiana; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery. PMID:25093328

  17. Functional and mechanistic analysis of telomerase: An antitumor drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yinnan; Zhang, Yanmin

    2016-07-01

    The current research on anticancer drugs focuses on exploiting particular traits or hallmarks unique to cancer cells. Telomerase, a special reverse transcriptase, has been recognized as a common factor in most tumor cells, and in turn a distinctive characteristic with respect to non-malignant cells. This feature has made telomerase a preferred target for anticancer drug development and cancer therapy. This review aims to analyze the pharmacological function and mechanism and role of telomerase in oncogenesis; to provide fundamental knowledge for research on the structure, function, and working mechanism of telomerase; to expound the role that telomerase plays in the initiation and development of tumor and its relationship with tumor cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and related pathway molecules; and to display potential targets of antitumor drug for inhibiting the expression, reconstitution, and trafficking of the enzyme. We therefore summarize recent advances in potential telomerase inhibitors for antitumor including natural products, synthetic small molecules, peptides and proteins, which indicate that optimizing the delivery method and drug combination could be of help in a combinatorial drug treatment for tumor. More extensive understanding of the structure, biogenesis, and mechanism of telomerase will provide invaluable information for increasing the efficiency of rational antitumor drug design. PMID:27118336

  18. A conceptual framework for the identification of candidate drugs and drug targets in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, T T; Borup, R; Willer, A;

    2010-01-01

    transcriptional regulation, and (ii) the identification of candidate drugs and drug targets for therapeutic interventions. Significantly, our study provides a conceptual framework that can be applied to any subtype of AML and cancer in general to uncover novel information from published microarray data sets at...... low cost. In a broader perspective, our study provides strong evidence that genomic strategies might be used in a clinical setting to prospectively identify candidate drugs that subsequently are validated in vitro to define the most effective drug combination for individual cancer patients on a...

  19. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunah; Shin, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. PMID:27313454

  20. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting

  1. Short communication: Drug residues in goat milk after prophylactic use of antibiotics in intravaginal sponges for estrus synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, T; Balado, J; Althaus, R L; Beltrán, M C; Molina, M P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the prophylactic use of antibiotics in intravaginal sponges used for estrus synchronization in goats may result in the presence of inhibitors in milk and, therefore, of positive results by microbial screening tests. Ninety-eight Murciano-Granadina goats were used, divided into 7 groups of 14 animals. Intravaginal sponges were placed in 6 groups using 2 concentrations of 3 different antibiotics: doxycycline, oxytetracycline, and sulfathiazole-framycetin. The sponges of the control group were placed without antibiotics. Milk samples were collected daily until 7 d posttreatment and analyzed using 3 microbial tests. Positive samples were retested by specific receptor-binding assays to confirm the positive results. Vaginal status was evaluated by visual assessment of the external aspect of the sponges after removal. The microbial test response was not affected by either day posttreatment or dose of antibiotic used, except for oxytetracycline at the higher concentration. Moreover, no positive results were obtained using receptor-binding assays, suggesting that residues, if present in milk, did not exceed the regulatory (safety) levels established for these drugs. The occurrence of soiled sponges was higher in the control group. With respect to the dose of antibiotics used, no significant differences were found for the lower dose administered. However, a significant increase in the percentage of clean sponges was observed for the higher dose of doxycycline. We conclude that the prophylactic use of low doses of doxycycline, oxytetracycline, or sulfathiazole in intravaginal sponges used for synchronization of estrus helps to reduce clinical vaginitis in dairy goats and does not seem to be the cause of positive results in microbial inhibitor tests used to detect antibiotics in goat milk. PMID:26585470

  2. Carbon nanotubes: an emerging drug carrier for targeting cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Vaibhav; Yadav, Pragya; Bhattacharya, Shiv Sankar; Mishra, Arun Kumar; Verma, Navneet; Verma, Anurag; Pandit, Jayanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    During recent years carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted by many researchers as a drug delivery carrier. CNTs are the third allotropic form of carbon-fullerenes which were rolled into cylindrical tubes. To be integrated into the biological systems, CNTs can be chemically modified or functionalised with therapeutically active molecules by forming stable covalent bonds or supramolecular assemblies based on noncovalent interactions. Owing to their high carrying capacity, biocompatibility, and specificity to cells, various cancer cells have been explored with CNTs for evaluation of pharmacokinetic parameters, cell viability, cytotoxicty, and drug delivery in tumor cells. This review attempts to highlight all aspects of CNTs which render them as an effective anticancer drug carrier and imaging agent. Also the potential application of CNT in targeting metastatic cancer cells by entrapping biomolecules and anticancer drugs has been covered in this review. PMID:24872894

  3. Multiple Targets for Drug-Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Kendall B

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is rapidly gaining the interest of researchers and practitioners as a prominent liability in drug discovery and development, accounting for a growing proportion of preclinical drug attrition and post-market withdrawals or black box warnings by the U.S. FDA. To date, the focus of registries of drugs that elicit mitochondrial toxicity has been largely restricted to those that either inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) or uncouple mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Less appreciated are the toxicities that are secondary to the drug affecting either the molecular regulation, assembly or incorporation of the ETC into the inner mitochondrial membrane or those that limit substrate availability. The current article describes the complexities of molecular events and biochemical pathways required to sustain mitochondrial fidelity and substrate homeostasis with examples of drugs that interfere which the various pathways. The principal objective of this review is to shed light on the broader scope of drug-induced mitochondrial toxicities and how these secondary targets may account for a large portion of drug failures. PMID:25973981

  4. HT-SPOTi: A Rapid Drug Susceptibility Test (DST) to Evaluate Antibiotic Resistance Profiles and Novel Chemicals for Anti-Infective Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danquah, Cynthia A; Maitra, Arundhati; Gibbons, Simon; Faull, Jane; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the major threats to global health and well-being. The past decade has seen an alarming rise in the evolution and spread of drug-resistant strains of pathogenic microbes. The emergence of extensively drug resistant (XDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and antimicrobial resistance among the ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) as well as fungal pathogens (such as certain species of Candida, Aspergillus, Cryptococcus, and Trichophyton) poses a significant 21st century scientific challenge. With an extremely limited arsenal of efficacious antibiotics, techniques that can (a) identify novel antimicrobials and (b) detect antimicrobial resistance are becoming increasingly important. In this article, we illustrate the HT-SPOTi, an assay that is principally based on the growth of an organism on agar medium containing a range of different concentrations of drugs or inhibitors. The simple methodology makes this assay ideal for evaluating novel antimicrobial compounds as well as profiling an organism's antibiotic resistance profile. PMID:26855282

  5. Structural genomics of infectious disease drug targets: the SSGCID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An introduction and overview of the focus, goals and overall mission of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) is given. The Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) is a consortium of researchers at Seattle BioMed, Emerald BioStructures, the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that was established to apply structural genomics approaches to drug targets from infectious disease organisms. The SSGCID is currently funded over a five-year period by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to determine the three-dimensional structures of 400 proteins from a variety of Category A, B and C pathogens. Target selection engages the infectious disease research and drug-therapy communities to identify drug targets, essential enzymes, virulence factors and vaccine candidates of biomedical relevance to combat infectious diseases. The protein-expression systems, purified proteins, ligand screens and three-dimensional structures produced by SSGCID constitute a valuable resource for drug-discovery research, all of which is made freely available to the greater scientific community. This issue of Acta Crystallographica Section F, entirely devoted to the work of the SSGCID, covers the details of the high-throughput pipeline and presents a series of structures from a broad array of pathogenic organisms. Here, a background is provided on the structural genomics of infectious disease, the essential components of the SSGCID pipeline are discussed and a survey of progress to date is presented

  6. Assessment of three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division drug efflux transporters of Burkholderia cenocepacia in intrinsic antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venturi Vittorio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia are opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria that can cause chronic pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These bacteria demonstrate a high-level of intrinsic antibiotic resistance to most clinically useful antibiotics complicating treatment. We previously identified 14 genes encoding putative Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND efflux pumps in the genome of B. cenocepacia J2315, but the contribution of these pumps to the intrinsic drug resistance of this bacterium remains unclear. Results To investigate the contribution of efflux pumps to intrinsic drug resistance of B. cenocepacia J2315, we deleted 3 operons encoding the putative RND transporters RND-1, RND-3, and RND-4 containing the genes BCAS0591-BCAS0593, BCAL1674-BCAL1676, and BCAL2822-BCAL2820. Each deletion included the genes encoding the RND transporter itself and those encoding predicted periplasmic proteins and outer membrane pores. In addition, the deletion of rnd-3 also included BCAL1672, encoding a putative TetR regulator. The B. cenocepacia rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated increased sensitivity to inhibitory compounds, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in drug resistance. Moreover, the rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated reduced accumulation of N-acyl homoserine lactones in the growth medium. In contrast, deletion of the rnd-1 operon had no detectable phenotypes under the conditions assayed. Conclusion Two of the three inactivated RND efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia J2315 contribute to the high level of intrinsic resistance of this strain to some antibiotics and other inhibitory compounds. Furthermore, these efflux systems also mediate accumulation in the growth medium of quorum sensing molecules that have been shown to contribute to infection. A systematic study of RND efflux systems in B. cenocepacia is required to provide a full picture of intrinsic antibiotic resistance in this opportunistic

  7. Drugs and drug delivery systems targeting amyloid-β in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Robinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder with no cure and limited treatment solutions that are unable to target any of the suspected causes. Increasing evidence suggests that one of the causes of neurodegeneration is the overproduction of amyloid beta (Aβ and the inability of Aβ peptides to be cleared from the brain, resulting in self-aggregation to form toxic oligomers, fibrils and plaques. One of the potential treatment options is to target Aβ and prevent self-aggregation to allow for a natural clearing of the brain. In this paper, we review the drugs and drug delivery systems that target Aβ in relation to Alzheimer's disease. Many attempts have been made to use anti-Aβ targeting molecules capable of targeting Aβ (with much success in vitro and in vivo animal models, but the major obstacle to this technique is the challenge posed by the blood brain barrier (BBB. This highly selective barrier protects the brain from toxic molecules and pathogens and prevents the delivery of most drugs. Therefore novel Aβ aggregation inhibitor drugs will require well thought-out drug delivery systems to deliver sufficient concentrations to the brain.

  8. Genetic Approaches To Identifying Novel Osteoporosis Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommage, Robert

    2015-10-01

    During the past two decades effective drugs for treating osteoporosis have been developed, including anti-resorptives inhibiting bone resorption (estrogens, the SERM raloxifene, four bisphosphonates, RANKL inhibitor denosumab) and the anabolic bone forming daily injectable peptide teriparatide. Two potential drugs (odanacatib and romosozumab) are in late stage clinical development. The most pressing unmet need is for orally active anabolic drugs. This review describes the basic biological studies involved in developing these drugs, including the animal models employed for osteoporosis drug development. The genomics revolution continues to identify potential novel osteoporosis drug targets. Studies include human GWAS studies and identification of mutant genes in subjects having abnormal bone mass, mouse QTL and gene knockouts, and gene expression studies. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that Wnt signaling plays a major role in regulating bone formation and continued study of this complex pathway is likely to lead to key discoveries. In addition to the classic Wnt signaling targets DKK1 and sclerostin, LRP4, LRP5/LRP6, SFRP4, WNT16, and NOTUM can potentially be targeted to modulate Wnt signaling. Next-generation whole genome and exome sequencing, RNA-sequencing and CRISPR/CAS9 gene editing are new experimental techniques contributing to understanding the genome. The International Knockout Mouse Consortium efforts to knockout and phenotype all mouse genes are poised to accelerate. Accumulating knowledge will focus attention on readily accessible databases (Big Data). Efforts are underway by the International Bone and Mineral Society to develop an annotated Skeletome database providing information on all genes directly influencing bone mass, architecture, mineralization or strength. PMID:25833316

  9. 21 CFR 558.15 - Antibiotic, nitrofuran, and sulfonamide drugs in the feed of animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the feed of animals. 558.15 Section 558.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR USE... similar products except the nitrofuran drugs not the subject of an approved new animal drug...

  10. NIOSOMES: A ROLE IN TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Singh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Niosomes are non-ionic surfactant vesicles inclosing an aqueous phase and a wide range of molecules could be encapsulated within aqueous spaces of lipid membrane vesicles. They are microscopic lamellar structures formed on the admixture of a non-ionic surfactant, cholesterol and phosphate with subsequent hydration in aqueous media. Niosomes belongs to novel drug delivery system which offers a large number of advantages over other conventional and vesicular delivery systems. Namely they are the targeted drug delivery system which showing reduction of dose, stability and compatibility of non-ionic surfactants, easy modification, delayed clearance, suitability for a wide range of Active Pharmaceutical Agents.

  11. An efficient targeted drug delivery through apotransferrin loaded nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athuluri Divakar Sai Krishna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancerous state is a highly stimulated environment of metabolically active cells. The cells under these conditions over express selective receptors for assimilation of factors essential for growth and transformation. Such receptors would serve as potential targets for the specific ligand mediated transport of pharmaceutically active molecules. The present study demonstrates the specificity and efficacy of protein nanoparticle of apotransferrin for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Apotransferrin nanoparticles were developed by sol-oil chemistry. A comparative analysis of efficiency of drug delivery in conjugated and non-conjugated forms of doxorubicin to apotransferrin nanoparticle is presented. The spherical shaped apotransferrin nanoparticles (nano have diameters of 25-50 etam, which increase to 60-80 etam upon direct loading of drug (direct-nano, and showed further increase in dimension (75-95 etam in conjugated nanoparticles (conj-nano. The competitive experiments with the transferrin receptor specific antibody showed the entry of both conj-nano and direct-nano into the cells through transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Results of various studies conducted clearly establish the superiority of the direct-nano over conj-nano viz. (a localization studies showed complete release of drug very early, even as early as 30 min after treatment, with the drug localizing in the target organelle (nucleus (b pharmacokinetic studies showed enhanced drug concentrations, in circulation with sustainable half-life (c the studies also demonstrated efficient drug delivery, and an enhanced inhibition of proliferation in cancer cells. Tissue distribution analysis showed intravenous administration of direct nano lead to higher drug localization in liver, and blood as compared to relatively lesser localization in heart, kidney and spleen. Experiments using rat cancer model confirmed the efficacy of the formulation in

  12. Core as a Novel Viral Target for Hepatitis C Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Mousseau; Snyder, John K.; Arthur Donny Strosberg; Virginia Takahashi; Smitha Kota

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 130 million people worldwide and is a major cause of liver disease. No vaccine is available. Novel specific drugs for HCV are urgently required, since the standard-of-care treatment of pegylated interferon combined with ribavirin is poorly tolerated and cures less than half of the treated patients. Promising, effective direct-acting drugs currently in the clinic have been described for three of the ten potential HCV target proteins: NS3/NS4A protease, NS5B...

  13. Combining physical and virtual contexts through augmented reality: design and evaluation of a prototype using a drug box as a marker for antibiotic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nifakos, Sokratis; Tomson, Tanja; Zary, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Antimicrobial resistance is a global health issue. Studies have shown that improved antibiotic prescription education among healthcare professionals reduces mistakes during the antibiotic prescription process. The aim of this study was to investigate novel educational approaches that through the use of Augmented Reality technology could make use of the real physical context and thereby enrich the educational process of antibiotics prescription. The objective is to investigate which type of information related to antibiotics could be used in an augmented reality application for antibiotics education. Methods. This study followed the Design-Based Research Methodology composed of the following main steps: problem analysis, investigation of information that should be visualized for the training session, and finally the involvement of the end users the development and evaluation processes of the prototype. Results. Two of the most important aspects in the antibiotic prescription process, to represent in an augmented reality application, are the antibiotic guidelines and the side effects. Moreover, this study showed how this information could be visualized from a mobile device using an Augmented Reality scanner and antibiotic drug boxes as markers. Discussion. In this study we investigated the usage of objects from a real physical context such as drug boxes and how they could be used as educational resources. The logical next steps are to examine how this approach of combining physical and virtual contexts through Augmented Reality applications could contribute to the improvement of competencies among healthcare professionals and its impact on the decrease of antibiotics resistance. PMID:25548733

  14. Combining physical and virtual contexts through augmented reality: design and evaluation of a prototype using a drug box as a marker for antibiotic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokratis Nifakos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Antimicrobial resistance is a global health issue. Studies have shown that improved antibiotic prescription education among healthcare professionals reduces mistakes during the antibiotic prescription process. The aim of this study was to investigate novel educational approaches that through the use of Augmented Reality technology could make use of the real physical context and thereby enrich the educational process of antibiotics prescription. The objective is to investigate which type of information related to antibiotics could be used in an augmented reality application for antibiotics education. Methods. This study followed the Design-Based Research Methodology composed of the following main steps: problem analysis, investigation of information that should be visualized for the training session, and finally the involvement of the end users the development and evaluation processes of the prototype. Results. Two of the most important aspects in the antibiotic prescription process, to represent in an augmented reality application, are the antibiotic guidelines and the side effects. Moreover, this study showed how this information could be visualized from a mobile device using an Augmented Reality scanner and antibiotic drug boxes as markers. Discussion. In this study we investigated the usage of objects from a real physical context such as drug boxes and how they could be used as educational resources. The logical next steps are to examine how this approach of combining physical and virtual contexts through Augmented Reality applications could contribute to the improvement of competencies among healthcare professionals and its impact on the decrease of antibiotics resistance.

  15. Nanomechanical detection of antibiotic-mucopeptide binding in a model for superbug drug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ndieyira, J. W.; Watari, M.; Barrera, A. Donoso; Zhou, D; Vögtli, M; Batchelor, M.; Cooper, M. A.; Strunz, T; Horton, M. A.; Abell, C; Rayment, T.; Aeppli, G.; McKendry, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbugs methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report the label-free detection of vancomycin binding to bacterial cell wall precursor analogues (mucopeptides) on cantilever arrays, with 10 nM sensitivity and at clinically relevant concentrations in blood serum. Differential measurements...

  16. Functional liposomes in the cancer-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tila, Dena; Ghasemi, Saeed; Yazdani-Arazi, Seyedeh Narjes; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed

    2015-07-01

    Cancer is considered as one of the most severe health problems and is currently the third most common cause of death in the world after heart and infectious diseases. Novel therapies are constantly being discovered, developed and trialed. Many of the current anticancer agents exhibit non-ideal pharmaceutical and pharmacological properties and are distributed non-specifically throughout the body. This results in death of the both normal healthy and malignant cells and substantially leads to accruing a variety of serious toxic side effects. Therefore, the efficient systemic therapy of cancer is almost impossible due to harmful side effects of anticancer agents to the healthy organs and tissues. Furthermore, several problems such as low bioavailability of the drugs, low drug concentrations at the site of action, lack of drug specificity and drug-resistance also cause many restrictions on clinical applications of these drugs in the tumor therapy. Different types of the liposomal formulations have been used in medicine due to their distinctive advantages associated with their structural flexibility in the encapsulation of various agents with different physicochemical properties. They can also mediate delivery of the cargo to the appropriate cell type and subcellular compartment, reducing the effective dosage and possible side effects which are related to high systemic concentrations. Therefore, these novel systems were found very promising and encouraging dosage forms for the treatment of different types of cancer by increasing efficiency and reducing the systemic toxicity due to the specific drug delivery and targeting. PMID:25823898

  17. Forgotten antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, Céline; Bush, Karen; Craig, William A;

    2012-01-01

    disease specialists in Europe, the United States, Canada, and Australia. An international expert panel selected systemic antibacterial drugs for their potential to treat infections caused by resistant bacteria or their unique value for specific criteria. Twenty-two of the 33 selected antibiotics were...... available in fewer than 20 of 38 countries. Economic motives were the major cause for discontinuation of marketing of these antibiotics. Fourteen of 33 antibiotics are potentially active against either resistant Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria. Urgent measures are then needed to ensure better...

  18. Drug targets for lymphatic filariasis: A bioinformatics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Sharma

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses the current scenario of the national and international burden due to lymphatic filariasis (LF and describes the active elimination programmes for LF and their achievements to eradicate this most debilitating disease from the earth. Since, bioinformatics is a rapidly growing field of biological study, and it has an increasingly significant role in various fields of biology. We have reviewed its leading involvement in the filarial research using different approaches of bioinformatics and have summarized available existing drugs and their targets to re-examine and to keep away from the resisting conditions. Moreover, some of the novel drug targets have been assembled for further study to design fresh and better pharmacological therapeutics. Various bioinformatics-based web resources, and databases have been discussed, which may enrich the filarial research.

  19. From hybrid compounds to targeted drug delivery in antimalarial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rudi; Miranda, Daniela; Magalhães, Joana; Capela, Rita; Perry, Maria J; O'Neill, Paul M; Moreira, Rui; Lopes, Francisca

    2015-08-15

    The discovery of new drugs to treat malaria is a continuous effort for medicinal chemists due to the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum to nearly all used antimalarials. The rapid adaptation of the malaria parasite remains a major limitation to disease control. Development of hybrid antimalarial agents has been actively pursued as a promising strategy to overcome the emergence of resistant parasite strains. This review presents the journey that started with simple combinations of two active moieties into one chemical entity and progressed into a delivery/targeted system based on major antimalarial classes of drugs. The rationale for providing different mechanisms of action against a single or additional targets involved in the multiple stages of the parasite's life-cycle is highlighted. Finally, a perspective for this polypharmacologic approach is presented. PMID:25913864

  20. tcTKB: an integrated cardiovascular toxicity knowledge base for targeted cancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Rong; Wang, QuanQiu

    2015-01-01

    Targeted cancer drugs are often associated with unexpectedly high cardiovascular (CV) adverse events. Systematic approaches to studying CV events associated with targeted anticancer drugs have high potential for elucidating the complex pathways underlying targeted anti-cancer drugs. In this study, we built tcTKB, a comprehensive CV toxicity knowledge base for targeted cancer drugs, by extracting drug-CV pairs from five large-scale and complementary data sources. The data sources include FDA d...

  1. Antibody–drug conjugates: targeted weapons against cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Luisa Iamele, Luca Vecchia, Claudia ScottiDepartment of Molecular Medicine, Unit of Immunology and General Pathology, University of Pavia, Pavia, PV, Italy  All authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) are formed by a targeting antibody conjugated to a chemotherapeutic molecule through a linker. Recent data demonstrate that ADCs represent a valuable advancement for the clinics and, despite their recent appearance in medicine, they ...

  2. Decorating Nanoparticle Surface for Targeted Drug Delivery: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Shen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The size, shape, stiffness (composition and surface properties of nanoparticles (NPs have been recognized as key design parameters for NP-mediated drug delivery platforms. Among them, the surface functionalization of NPs is of great significance for targeted drug delivery. For instance, targeting moieties are covalently coated on the surface of NPs to improve their selectively and affinity to cancer cells. However, due to a broad range of possible choices of surface decorating molecules, it is difficult to choose the proper one for targeted functions. In this work, we will review several representative experimental and computational studies in selecting the proper surface functional groups. Experimental studies reveal that: (1 the NPs with surface decorated amphiphilic polymers can enter the cell interior through penetrating pathway; (2 the NPs with tunable stiffness and identical surface chemistry can be selectively accepted by the diseased cells according to their stiffness; and (3 the NPs grafted with pH-responsive polymers can be accepted or rejected by the cells due to the local pH environment. In addition, we show that computer simulations could be useful to understand the detailed physical mechanisms behind these phenomena and guide the design of next-generation NP-based drug carriers with high selectivity, affinity, and low toxicity. For example, the detailed free energy analysis and molecular dynamics simulation reveals that amphiphilic polymer-decorated NPs can penetrate into the cell membrane through the “snorkeling” mechanism, by maximizing the interaction energy between the hydrophobic ligands and lipid tails. We anticipate that this work will inspire future studies in the design of environment-responsive NPs for targeted drug delivery.

  3. Optimized shapes of magnetic arrays for drug targeting applications

    OpenAIRE

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of permanent magnet elements have been utilized as light-weight, inexpensive sources for applying external magnetic fields in magnetic drug targeting applications, but they are extremely limited in the range of depths over which they can apply useful magnetic forces. In this paper, designs for optimized magnet arrays are presented, which were generated using an optimization routine to maximize the magnetic force available from an arbitrary arrangement of magnetized elements, depending ...

  4. Metaphors in Nanomedicine: The Case of Targeted Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Bensaude Vincent, Bernadette; Loeve, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    The promises of nanotechnology have been framed by a variety of metaphors, that not only channel the attention of the public, orient the questions asked by researchers, and convey epistemic choices closely linked to ethical preferences. In particular, the image of the 'therapeutic missile' commonly used to present targeted drug delivery devices emphasizes precision, control, surveillance and efficiency. Such values are highly praised in the current context of crisis of pharmaceutical innovati...

  5. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although its total molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Therefore, the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of several function and explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting mitochondria in the disease processes. Newly evolving advances in disease diagnostics and therapy will further facilitate future growth in the field of mitochondrian biology, where there is a dire need for sensitive and more affordable diagnostic tools and an urgency to develop effective therapies and identify reliable drug to predict accurately the response to a cancer therapy. These approaches to treat mitochondrial dysfunction rationally could lead to selective protection of cells in different tissues and various disease states. To avoid mitochondrial liabilities, routine screens need to be positioned within the drug-development process as targets of drug-induced cytotoxicity or cancer promotion, as regulators of apoptosis, as sources of cell signalling through reactive oxygen species, and mitochondrial control of specific nuclear responses. However, several novel mitochondrial targets are now emerging, including the potential to manipulate the mitochondrial pool to maintain function via biogenesis and mitophagy. Forthcoming insights into the fine regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis will likely open future perspectives for cancer drug development.

  6. Access to a polymerase chain reaction assay method targeting 13 respiratory viruses can reduce antibiotics: a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindh Magnus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral respiratory infections are common worldwide and range from completely benign disease to life-threatening illness. Symptoms can be unspecific, and an etiologic diagnosis is rarely established because of a lack of suitable diagnostic tools. Improper use of antibiotics is common in this setting, which is detrimental in light of the development of bacterial resistance. It has been suggested that the use of diagnostic tests could reduce antibiotic prescription rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether access to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay panel for etiologic diagnosis of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs would have an impact on antibiotic prescription rate in primary care clinical settings. Methods Adult patients with symptoms of ARTI were prospectively included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed by using a multiplex real-time PCR method targeting thirteen viruses and two bacteria. Patients were recruited at 12 outpatient units from October 2006 through April 2009, and samples were collected on the day of inclusion (initial visit and after 10 days (follow-up visit. Patients were randomised in an open-label treatment protocol to receive a rapid or delayed result (on the following day or after eight to twelve days. The primary outcome measure was the antibiotic prescription rate at the initial visit, and the secondary outcome was the total antibiotic prescription rate during the study period. Results A total sample of 447 patients was randomised. Forty-one were excluded, leaving 406 patients for analysis. In the group of patients randomised for a rapid result, 4.5% (9 of 202 of patients received antibiotics at the initial visit, compared to 12.3% (25 of 204 (P = 0.005 of patients in the delayed result group. At follow-up, there was no significant difference between the groups: 13.9% (28 of 202 in the rapid result group and 17.2% (35 of 204 in the delayed result group (P

  7. Core as a Novel Viral Target for Hepatitis C Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Mousseau

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infects over 130 million people worldwide and is a major cause of liver disease. No vaccine is available. Novel specific drugs for HCV are urgently required, since the standard-of-care treatment of pegylated interferon combined with ribavirin is poorly tolerated and cures less than half of the treated patients. Promising, effective direct-acting drugs currently in the clinic have been described for three of the ten potential HCV target proteins: NS3/NS4A protease, NS5B polymerase and NS5A, a regulatory phosphoprotein. We here present core, the viral capsid protein, as another attractive, non-enzymatic target, against which a new class of anti-HCV drugs can be raised. Core plays a major role in the virion’s formation, and interacts with several cellular proteins, some of which are involved in host defense mechanisms against the virus. This most conserved of all HCV proteins requires oligomerization to function as the organizer of viral particle assembly. Using core dimerization as the basis of transfer-of-energy screening assays, peptides and small molecules were identified which not only inhibit core-core interaction, but also block viral production in cell culture. Initial chemical optimization resulted in compounds active in single digit micromolar concentrations. Core inhibitors could be used in combination with other HCV drugs in order to provide novel treatments of Hepatitis C.

  8. New alginic acid–atenolol microparticles for inhalatory drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceschan, Nazareth Eliana; Bucalá, Verónica [Planta Piloto de Ingeniería Química (PLAPIQUI), CONICET, Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Camino La Carrindanga Km 7, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Departamento de Ingeniería Química, UNS, Avenida Alem 1253, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Ramírez-Rigo, María Verónica, E-mail: vrrigo@plapiqui.edu.ar [Planta Piloto de Ingeniería Química (PLAPIQUI), CONICET, Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Camino La Carrindanga Km 7, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Departamento de Biología, Bioquímica y Farmacia, UNS, San Juan 670, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2014-08-01

    The inhalatory route allows drug delivery for local or systemic treatments in a noninvasively way. The current tendency of inhalable systems is oriented to dry powder inhalers due to their advantages in terms of stability and efficiency. In this work, microparticles of atenolol (AT, basic antihypertensive drug) and alginic acid (AA, acid biocompatible polyelectrolyte) were obtained by spray drying. Several formulations, varying the relative composition AT/AA and the total solid content of the atomized dispersions, were tested. The powders were characterized by: Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Powder X-ray Diffraction, while also the following properties were measured: drug load efficiency, flow properties, particles size and density, moisture content, hygroscopicity and morphology. The ionic interaction between AA and AT was demonstrated, then the new chemical entity could improve the drug targeting to the respiratory membrane and increase its time residence due to the mucoadhesive properties of the AA polymeric chains. Powders exhibited high load efficiencies, low moisture contents, adequate mean aerodynamic diameters and high cumulative fraction of respirable particles (lower than 10 μm). - Highlights: • Novel particulate material to target atenolol to the respiratory membrane was developed. • Crumbled microparticles were obtained by spray drying of alginic–atenolol dispersions. • Ionic interaction between alginic acid and atenolol was demonstrated in the product. • Amorphous solids with low moisture content and high load efficiency were produced. • Relationships between the feed formulation and the product characteristics were found.

  9. New alginic acid–atenolol microparticles for inhalatory drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inhalatory route allows drug delivery for local or systemic treatments in a noninvasively way. The current tendency of inhalable systems is oriented to dry powder inhalers due to their advantages in terms of stability and efficiency. In this work, microparticles of atenolol (AT, basic antihypertensive drug) and alginic acid (AA, acid biocompatible polyelectrolyte) were obtained by spray drying. Several formulations, varying the relative composition AT/AA and the total solid content of the atomized dispersions, were tested. The powders were characterized by: Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Powder X-ray Diffraction, while also the following properties were measured: drug load efficiency, flow properties, particles size and density, moisture content, hygroscopicity and morphology. The ionic interaction between AA and AT was demonstrated, then the new chemical entity could improve the drug targeting to the respiratory membrane and increase its time residence due to the mucoadhesive properties of the AA polymeric chains. Powders exhibited high load efficiencies, low moisture contents, adequate mean aerodynamic diameters and high cumulative fraction of respirable particles (lower than 10 μm). - Highlights: • Novel particulate material to target atenolol to the respiratory membrane was developed. • Crumbled microparticles were obtained by spray drying of alginic–atenolol dispersions. • Ionic interaction between alginic acid and atenolol was demonstrated in the product. • Amorphous solids with low moisture content and high load efficiency were produced. • Relationships between the feed formulation and the product characteristics were found

  10. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources of...... antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I...... to rationally design drug combinations that limit the evolution of antibiotic resistance due to counteracting evolutionary trajectories. My results highlight that an in-depth knowledge about the genetic responses to the individual antimicrobial compounds enables the prediction of responses to drug...

  11. Disulfide-based multifunctional conjugates for targeted theranostic drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Hee; Sessler, Jonathan L; Kim, Jong Seung

    2015-11-17

    Theranostics, chemical entities designed to combine therapeutic effects and imaging capability within one molecular system, have received considerable attention in recent years. Much of this interest reflects the promise inherent in personalized medicine, including disease-targeted treatments for cancer patients. One important approach to realizing this latter promise involves the development of so-called theranostic conjugates, multicomponent constructs that selectively target cancer cells and deliver cytotoxic agents while producing a readily detectable signal that can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo. This requires the synthesis of relatively complex systems comprising imaging reporters, masked chemotherapeutic drugs, cleavable linkers, and cancer targeting ligands. Ideally, the cleavage process should take place within or near cancer cells and be activated by cellular components that are associated with cancer states or specifically expressed at a higher level in cancer cells. Among the cleavable linkers currently being explored for the construction of such localizing conjugates, disulfide bonds are particularly attractive. This is because disulfide bonds are stable in most blood pools but are efficiently cleaved by cellular thiols, including glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx), which are generally found at elevated levels in tumors. When disulfide bonds are linked to fluorophores, changes in emission intensity or shifts in the emission maxima are typically seen upon cleavage as the result of perturbations to internal charge transfer (ICT) processes. In well-designed systems, this allows for facile imaging. In this Account, we summarize our recent studies involving disulfide-based fluorescent drug delivery conjugates, including preliminary tests of their biological utility in vitro and in vivo. To date, a variety of chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and camptothecin, have been used to create disulfide-based conjugates, as have

  12. Effect In Vitro of Antiparasitic Drugs on Microbial Inhibitor Test Responses for Screening Antibiotic Residues in Goat's Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, T; Beltrán, M C; Reybroeck, W; Molina, M P

    2015-09-01

    Microbial inhibitor tests are widely used to screen antibiotic residues in milk; however, these tests are nonspecific and may be affected by various substances capable of inhibiting the growth of the test microorganism. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of antiparasitic drugs in goat's milk on the microbial inhibitor test response. Raw antibiotic-free milk from Murciano-Granadina goats was supplemented with eight concentrations of seven antiparasitic substances (albendazole, 10 to 170 mg/kg; closantel, 1 to 140 mg/kg; diclazuril, 8 to 45 mg/kg; febendazole, 10 to 140 mg/kg; levamisole, 40 to 440 mg/kg; diazinon, 8 to 45 mg/kg; and ivermectin, 40 to 200 mg/kg). Twelve replicates for each concentration were analyzed with three microbial inhibitor tests: BRT MRL, Delvotest SP-NT MSC, and Eclipse 100. The results were interpreted visually (negative or positive). Using a logistic regression model, the concentrations of the antiparasitic drugs producing 5% (IC5), 10% (IC10), and 50% (IC50) positive results were determined. In general, the Eclipse 100 test was less sensitive to the effect of antiparasitic substances; the inhibitory concentrations of almost all the drugs assayed were higher than those for other tests. Conversely, the BRT MRL test was most affected, with high levels of interference at lower antiparasitic drug concentrations. Closantel and diazinon interfered with all microbial tests at lower concentrations than did other drugs (IC5 = 1 to 26 and 12 to 20 mg/kg, respectively), and higher concentrations of levamisole and diclazuril (IC5 = 30 to 240 and 50 to 117 mg/kg, respectively) were required to produce 5% positive results. These findings indicate that microbial inhibitor tests can be affected by elevated concentrations of antiparasitic drugs in goat's milk. PMID:26319732

  13. Companion diagnostics for targeted cancer drugs - clinical and regulatory aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Dana; Jørgensen, Jan Trøst

    2014-01-01

    Companion diagnostics (CDx) holds the promise of improving the predictability of the oncology drug development process and become an important tool for the oncologist in relation to the choice of treatment for the individual patient. A number of drug-diagnostic co-development programs have already been completed successfully, and in the clinic, the use of several targeted cancer drugs is now guided by a CDx. This central role of the CDx assays has attracted the attention of the regulators, and especially the US Food and Drug Administration has been at the forefront in relation to developing regulatory strategies for CDx and the drug-diagnostic co-development project. For an increasing number of cancer patients the treatment selection will depend on the result generated by a CDx assay, and consequently this type of assay has become critical for the care and safety of the patients. In order to secure that the CDx assays have a high degree of analytical and clinical validity, they must undergo an extensive non-clinical and clinical testing before release for routine patient management. This review will give a brief introduction to some of the scientific and medical challenges related to the CDx development with specific emphasis on the regulatory requirements in different regions of the world. PMID:24904822

  14. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed. PMID:26706565

  15. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system.Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The

  16. Encapsulation of methotrexate loaded magnetic microcapsules for magnetic drug targeting and controlled drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakkarapani, Prabu [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology & Centre for Excellence in Nanobio Translational Research, Anna University, Bharathidasan Institute of Technology Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Subbiah, Latha, E-mail: lathasuba2010@gmail.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology & Centre for Excellence in Nanobio Translational Research, Anna University, Bharathidasan Institute of Technology Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Palanisamy, Selvamani; Bibiana, Arputha [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology & Centre for Excellence in Nanobio Translational Research, Anna University, Bharathidasan Institute of Technology Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Jonasson, Christian; Johansson, Christer [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls backe 4, SE-411 33 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    We report on the development and evaluation of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) for targeted rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Methotrexate was loaded into CaCO{sub 3}-PSS (poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)) doped microparticles that were coated successively with poly (allylamine hydrochloride) and poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) by layer-by-layer technique. Ferrofluid was incorporated between the polyelectrolyte layers. CaCO{sub 3}-PSS core was etched by incubation with EDTA yielding spherical MMC. The MMC were evaluated for various physicochemical, pharmaceutical parameters and magnetic properties. Surface morphology, crystallinity, particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, loading capacity, drug release pattern, release kinetics and AC susceptibility studies revealed spherical particles of ~3 µm size were obtained with a net zeta potential of +24.5 mV, 56% encapsulation and 18.6% drug loading capacity, 96% of cumulative drug release obeyed Hixson-Crowell model release kinetics. Drug excipient interaction, surface area, thermal and storage stability studies for the prepared MMC was also evaluated. The developed MMC offer a promising mode of targeted and sustained release drug delivery for rheumatoid arthritis therapy. - Highlights: • Development of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) by layer-by-layer method. • Characterization of physicochemical, pharmaceutical and magnetic properties of MMC. • Multiple layers of alternative polyelectrolytes prolongs methotrexate release time. • MMC is capable for targeted and sustained release rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

  17. Encapsulation of methotrexate loaded magnetic microcapsules for magnetic drug targeting and controlled drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the development and evaluation of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) for targeted rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Methotrexate was loaded into CaCO3-PSS (poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)) doped microparticles that were coated successively with poly (allylamine hydrochloride) and poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) by layer-by-layer technique. Ferrofluid was incorporated between the polyelectrolyte layers. CaCO3-PSS core was etched by incubation with EDTA yielding spherical MMC. The MMC were evaluated for various physicochemical, pharmaceutical parameters and magnetic properties. Surface morphology, crystallinity, particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, loading capacity, drug release pattern, release kinetics and AC susceptibility studies revealed spherical particles of ~3 µm size were obtained with a net zeta potential of +24.5 mV, 56% encapsulation and 18.6% drug loading capacity, 96% of cumulative drug release obeyed Hixson-Crowell model release kinetics. Drug excipient interaction, surface area, thermal and storage stability studies for the prepared MMC was also evaluated. The developed MMC offer a promising mode of targeted and sustained release drug delivery for rheumatoid arthritis therapy. - Highlights: • Development of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) by layer-by-layer method. • Characterization of physicochemical, pharmaceutical and magnetic properties of MMC. • Multiple layers of alternative polyelectrolytes prolongs methotrexate release time. • MMC is capable for targeted and sustained release rheumatoid arthritis therapy

  18. Antibiotic Adjuvant Therapy for Multi-Drug Resistant Carbapenemases Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Associated Sepsis: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Robin

    2016-04-01

    Rising resistance and spread of K. pneumoniae strains, create great concerns in treating sepsis patients due to high incidence of mortality and morbidity. The current study is a case of a 20-year-old male with sepsis and bilateral lung lesions infected with Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) carbapenemase producing K. pneumoniae (KPC) showing resistance to carbapenem and polymyxin. Based on sensitivity report, patient was put on antibiotic adjuvant: Elores (ceftriaxone, sulbactam, disodium edetate) along with fluconazole for 10 days. Elores was instituted with remarkable recovery and patient was discharged. PMID:27190808

  19. Antibiotic Adjuvant Therapy for Multi-Drug Resistant Carbapenemases Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Associated Sepsis: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Rising resistance and spread of K. pneumoniae strains, create great concerns in treating sepsis patients due to high incidence of mortality and morbidity. The current study is a case of a 20-year-old male with sepsis and bilateral lung lesions infected with Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) carbapenemase producing K. pneumoniae (KPC) showing resistance to carbapenem and polymyxin. Based on sensitivity report, patient was put on antibiotic adjuvant: Elores (ceftriaxone, sulbactam, disodium edetate) along with fluconazole for 10 days. Elores was instituted with remarkable recovery and patient was discharged. PMID:27190808

  20. Lymphatic Targeting of Nanosystems for Anticancer Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellan-Pose, Raquel; Csaba, Noemi; Alonso, Maria Jose

    2016-01-01

    The lymphatic system represents a major route of dissemination in metastatic cancer. Given the lack of selectivity of conventional chemotherapy to prevent lymphatic metastasis, in the last years there has been a growing interest in the development of nanocarriers showing lymphotropic characteristics. The goal of this lymphotargeting strategy is to facilitate the delivery of anticancer drugs to the lymph node-resident cancer cells, thereby enhancing the effectiveness of the anti-cancer therapies. This article focuses on the nanosystems described so far for the active or passive targeting of oncological drugs to the lymphatic circulation. To understand the design and performance of these nanosystems, we will discuss first the physiology of the lymphatic system and how physiopathological changes associated to tumor growth influence the biodistribution of nanocarriers. Second, we provide evidence on how the tailoring of the physicochemical characteristics of nanosystems, i.e. particle size, surface charge and hydrophilicity, allows the modulation of their access to the lymphatic circulation. Finally, we provide an overview of the relationship between the biodistribution and antimetastatic activity of the nanocarriers loaded with oncological drugs, and illustrate the most promising active targeting approaches investigated so far. PMID:26675222

  1. Peptide IDR-1018: modulating the immune system and targeting bacterial biofilms to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Sarah C; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-05-01

    Host defense (antimicrobial) peptides, produced by all complex organisms, typically contain an abundance of positively charged and hydrophobic amino acid residues. A small synthetic peptide termed innate defense regulator (IDR-)1018 was derived by substantial modification of the bovine neutrophil host defense peptide bactenecin. Here, we review its intriguing properties that include anti-infective, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, and anti-biofilm activities. It was initially developed as an immune modulator with an ability to selectively enhance chemokine production and polarize cellular differentiation while suppressing/balancing the pro-inflammatory response. In this regard, it has demonstrated in vivo activity in murine models including enhancement of wound healing and an ability to protect against Staphylococcus aureus, multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, herpes virus, and inflammatory disorders, including cerebral malaria and neuronal damage in a pre-term birth model. More recently, IDR-1018 was shown, in a broad-spectrum fashion, to selectively target bacterial biofilms, which are adaptively resistant to many antibiotics and represent the most common growth state of bacteria in human infections. Furthermore, IDR-1018 demonstrated synergy with conventional antibiotics to both prevent biofilm formation and treat pre-existing biofilms. These data are consistent with a strong potential as an adjunctive therapy against antibiotic-resistant infections. PMID:25358509

  2. Drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli in urinary tract infection: A need for strict antibiotic prescription policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Dogra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The etiology of urinary tract infections (UTIs and the antibiotic resistance of uropathogens have been changing over the past years. This retrospective study was conducted to survey the resistance pattern of Gram-negative uropathogens to first-line agents for UTIs; this would be helpful for the clinicians to facilitate the empiric treatment and management of patients with UTI and maybe useful for the formulation of guidelines of antibiotic policies. Materials and Methods: Isolated uropathogens were tested against ampicillin-sulbactam, amikacin, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefoperazone, gentamicin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and imipenem. Result: A total of 2,146 urine samples were cultured, of which 448 samples were positive for Gram-negative bacilli. The most common Gram-negative isolate was Esherichia coli (52% followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (17.6% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12.9%. E. coli was found to be most resistant to ampicillin-sulbactam (90.1%, followed by norfloxacin (76.3%, and most sensitive to imipenem. P. aeruginosa was least resistant to amikacin (27.5%. Overall resistance to imipenem is less than 20% among the Gram-negative uropathogens except Acinetobacter spp. and P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: Ofloxacin and amikacin are recommended as the drugs of choice for the empirical treatment of UTI, whereas specific treatment should be based on the etiological agent isolated in the urine culture. There is a strict need for developing specific guidelines for antibiotic prescriptions for UTI in India.

  3. Functionalized Silica Nanoparticles As an Alternative Platform for Targeted Drug-Delivery of Water Insoluble Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Luciane França; Bouchmella, Karim; Gonçalves, Kaliandra de Almeida; Bettini, Jefferson; Kobarg, Jörg; Cardoso, Mateus Borba

    2016-04-01

    The selective action of drugs in tumor cells is a major problem in cancer therapy. Most chemotherapy drugs act nonspecifically and damage both cancer and healthy cells causing various side effects. In this study, the preparation of a selective drug delivery system, which is able to act as a carrier for hydrophobic and anticancer drugs is reported. Amino-functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with curcumin were successfully synthesized via sol-gel approach and duly characterized. Thereafter, the targeting ligand, folate, was covalently attached to amino groups of nanoparticle surface through amide bond formation. The cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles on prostate cancer cells line was evaluated and compared to normal cells line (prostate epithelial cell). Cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated that folate-functionalized nanoparticles were significantly cytotoxic to tumor cells, whereas normal cells were much less affected by the presence of these structures. PMID:26930039

  4. Targeting the treatment of drug abuse with molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although imaging studies in and of themselves have significant contributions to the study of human behavior, imaging in drug abuse has a much broader agenda. Drugs of abuse bind to molecules in specific parts of the brain in order to produce their effects. Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a unique opportunity to track this process, capturing the kinetics with which an abused compound is transported to its site of action. The specific examples discussed here were chosen to illustrate how PET can be used to map the regional distribution and kinetics of compounds that may or may not have abuse liability. We also discussed some morphological and functional changes associated with drug abuse and different stages of recovery following abstinence. PET measurements of functional changes in the brain have also led to the development of several treatment strategies, one of which is discussed in detail here. Information such as this becomes more than a matter of academic interest. Such knowledge can provide the bases for anticipating which compounds may be abused and which may not. It can also be used to identify biological markers or changes in brain function that are associated with progression from drug use to drug abuse and also to stage the recovery process. This new knowledge can guide legislative initiatives on the optimal duration of mandatory treatment stays, promoting long-lasting abstinence and greatly reducing the societal burden of drug abuse. Imaging can also give some insights into potential pharmacotherapeutic targets to manage the reinforcing effects of addictive compounds, as well as into protective strategies to minimize their toxic consequences

  5. Targeted Tumor Therapy with "Magnetic Drug Targeting": Therapeutic Efficacy of Ferrofluid Bound Mitoxantrone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Schmid, R.; Jurgons, R.; Bergemann, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Parak, F.G.

    The difference between success or failure of chemotherapy depends not only on the drug itself but also on how it is delivered to its target. Biocompatible ferrofluids (FF) are paramagnetic nanoparticles, that may be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents in locoregional tumor therapy, called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment (tumor) using an external magnetic field, which is focused on the area of the tumor. Through this form of target directed drug application, one attempts to concentrate a pharmacological agent at its site of action in order to minimize unwanted side effects in the organism and to increase its locoregional effectiveness. Tumor bearing rabbits (VX2 squamous cell carcinoma) in the area of the hind limb, were treated by a single intra-arterial injection (A. femoralis) of mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids (FF-MTX), while focusing an external magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) onto the tumor for 60 minutes. Complete tumor remissions could be achieved in these animals in a dose related manner (20% and 50% of the systemic dose of mitoxantrone), without any negative side effects, like e.g. leucocytopenia, alopecia or gastrointestinal disorders. The strong and specific therapeutic efficacy in tumor treatment with mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids may indicate that this system could be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents, like radionuclids, cancer-specific antibodies, anti-angiogenetic factors, genes etc.

  6. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster ... been finding the meaningful biological targets. What's been the problem? If a drug is aimed at the ...

  7. Motif mediated protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi-Verge, Carles; Kim, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) are involved in virtually every cellular process and thus represent an attractive target for therapeutic interventions. A significant number of protein interactions are frequently formed between globular domains and short linear peptide motifs (DMI). Targeting these DMIs has proven challenging and classical approaches to inhibiting such interactions with small molecules have had limited success. However, recent new approaches have led to the discovery of potent inhibitors, some of them, such as Obatoclax, ABT-199, AEG-40826 and SAH-p53-8 are likely to become approved drugs. These novel inhibitors belong to a wide range of different molecule classes, ranging from small molecules to peptidomimetics and biologicals. This article reviews the main reasons for limited success in targeting PPIs, discusses how successful approaches overcome these obstacles to discovery promising inhibitors for human protein double minute 2 (HDM2), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), and provides a summary of the promising approaches currently in development that indicate the future potential of PPI inhibitors in drug discovery. PMID:26936767

  8. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Ope, Omotayo; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Schuchter, Lynn M; Gangadhar, Tara C; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Liu, Qin; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A; Wargo, Jennifer A; Avadhani, Narayan G; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Altieri, Dario C; Flaherty, Keith T; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2016-05-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  9. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-28

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system. PMID:27074960

  10. Cyanobacterial Cyclopeptides as Lead Compounds to Novel Targeted Cancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Briasoulis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial cyclopeptides, including microcystins and nodularins, are considered a health hazard to humans due to the possible toxic effects of high consumption. From a pharmacological standpoint, microcystins are stable hydrophilic cyclic heptapeptides with a potential to cause cellular damage following uptake via organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP. Their intracellular biological effects involve inhibition of catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 and PP2, glutathione depletion and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Interestingly, certain OATPs are prominently expressed in cancers as compared to normal tissues, qualifying MC as potential candidates for cancer drug development. In the era of targeted cancer therapy, cyanotoxins comprise a rich source of natural cytotoxic compounds with a potential to target cancers expressing specific uptake transporters. Moreover, their structure offers opportunities for combinatorial engineering to enhance the therapeutic index and resolve organ-specific toxicity issues. In this article, we revisit cyanobacterial cyclopeptides as potential novel targets for anticancer drugs by summarizing existing biomedical evidence, presenting structure-activity data and discussing developmental perspectives.

  11. Money, Sex, and Drugs: A Case Study to Teach the Genetics of Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud-Hansen, Karen A.; Kuehner, Jason N.; Tong, Lillian; Miller, Sarah; Handelsman, Jo

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the work reported here was to help students expand their understanding of antibiotic resistance, the Central Dogma, and evolution. We developed a unit entitled "Ciprofloxacin Resistance in "Neisseria gonorrhoeae,"" which was constructed according to the principles of scientific teaching by a team of graduate students, science faculty,…

  12. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Sheikh Arslan; Hassan, Mubashir; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18). Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor-ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. PMID:24899801

  13. Companion Diagnostics for Targeted Cancer Drugs - Clinical and Regulatory Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan TrøstJørgensen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Companion diagnostics (CDx holds the promise of improving the predictability of the oncology drug development process and become an important tool for the oncologist in relation to the choice of treatment for the individual patient. A number of drug-diagnostic co-development programs have already been completed successfully, and in the clinic, the use of several targeted cancer drugs is now guided by a CDx. This central role of the CDx assays has attracted the attention of the regulators, and especially the US FDA has been at the forefront in relation to developing regulatory strategies for CDx and the drug-diagnostic co-development project. For an increasing number of cancer patients the treatment selection will depend on the result generated by a CDx assay, and consequently this type of assay has become critical for the care and safety of the patients. In order to secure that the CDx assays have a high degree of analytical and clinical validity they must undergo an extensive non-clinical and clinical testing before release for routine patient management. This review will give a brief introduction to some of the scientific and medical challenges related to the CDx development with specific emphasis on the regulatory requirements in different regions of the world.  

  14. Dual responsive PNIPAM–chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadavalli, Tejabhiram, E-mail: tejabhiram@gmail.com [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Ramasamy, Shivaraman [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Michael, Isaac; Therese, Helen Annal [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Chennakesavulu, Ramasamy [Department of Pharmacy practice, SRM College of Pharmacy, Chennai 603203 (India)

    2015-04-15

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation. - Highlights: • The use of gadolinium doped nickel ferrite with the suggested doping level. • The use of PNIPMA–chitosan polymer with folic acid and fluorescein as a drug carrier complex. • Magnetic hyperthermia studies of gadolinium doped nickel ferrites are being reported for the first time. • Proton relaxivity studies which indicate the MRI contrasting properties on the reported system are new. • Use of curcumin, a hydrophobic Indian spice as a cancer killing agent inside the reported magnetic polymer complex.

  15. Dual responsive PNIPAM–chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation. - Highlights: • The use of gadolinium doped nickel ferrite with the suggested doping level. • The use of PNIPMA–chitosan polymer with folic acid and fluorescein as a drug carrier complex. • Magnetic hyperthermia studies of gadolinium doped nickel ferrites are being reported for the first time. • Proton relaxivity studies which indicate the MRI contrasting properties on the reported system are new. • Use of curcumin, a hydrophobic Indian spice as a cancer killing agent inside the reported magnetic polymer complex

  16. Genetic Validation of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases as Drug Targets in Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Kalidas, Savitha; Cestari, Igor; Monnerat, Severine; Li, Qiong; Regmi, Sandesh; Hasle, Nicholas; Labaied, Mehdi; Parsons, Marilyn; Stuart, Kenneth; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is an important public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Current drugs are unsatisfactory, and new drugs are being sought. Few validated enzyme targets are available to support drug discovery efforts, so our goal was to obtain essentiality data on genes with proven utility as drug targets. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are known drug targets for bacterial and fungal pathogens and are required for protein synthesis. Here we survey the essentiality of...

  17. Chronic neuropathic pain: mechanisms, drug targets and measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Sindrup, Søren H.; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in many diseases or injuries of the peripheral or central nervous system, and has a substantial impact on quality of life and mood. Lesions of the nervous system may lead to potentially irreversible changes and imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory systems. Precli...... assess various symptoms and signs in neuropathic pain and knowledge of drug mechanisms are prerequisites for pursuing this approach. The present review summarizes mechanisms of neuropathic pain, targets of currently used drugs, and measures used in neuropathic pain trials.......Neuropathic pain is common in many diseases or injuries of the peripheral or central nervous system, and has a substantial impact on quality of life and mood. Lesions of the nervous system may lead to potentially irreversible changes and imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory systems...

  18. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the...

  19. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer

  20. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Xu, Chuan [Division of Scientific Research and Training, General Hospital of PLA Chengdu Military Area Command, Chengdu, Sichuan 610083 (China); Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Zhou, Zhansong, E-mail: zhouzhans@sina.com [Institute of Urinary Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Xiang, Zhonghuai [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Cui, Hongjuan, E-mail: hcui@swu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  1. TRPV1: A Target for Rational Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective, Ca(2+) permeable cation channel activated by noxious heat, and chemical ligands, such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Many compounds have been developed that either activate or inhibit TRPV1, but none of them are in routine clinical practice. This review will discuss the rationale for antagonists and agonists of TRPV1 for pain relief and other conditions, and strategies to develop new, better drugs to target this ion channel, using the newly available high-resolution structures. PMID:27563913

  2. PEPTIDE TARGETING OF PLATINUM ANTI-CANCER DRUGS

    OpenAIRE

    Ndinguri, Margaret W.; Solipuram, Rajasree; Gambrell, Robert P.; Aggarwal, Sita; Hansel, William; Hammer, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Besides various side effects caused by platinum anticancer drugs, they are not efficiently absorbed by the tumor cells. Two Pt-peptide conjugates; cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pt (7) and cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pten (8) bearing the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) targeting sequence, a malonoyl linker and low molecular weight miniPEG groups have been synthesized. The platinum ligand was attached to the peptide via the carboxylic end of the malonate group at the end of the peptide. The pegylated peptide is non toxic and high...

  3. Calculation of nanoparticle capture efficiency in magnetic drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implant assisted magnetic targeted drug delivery system of Aviles, Ebner and Ritter, which uses high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is considered. In this 2D model large ferromagnetic particles are implanted as seeds to aid collection of multiple domain nanoparticles (radius ∼200nm). Here, in contrast, single domain magnetic nanoparticles (radius in 20-100 nm) are considered and the Langevin function is used to describe the magnetization. Simulations based on this model were performed using the open source C++ finite volume library OpenFOAM. The simulations indicate that use of the Langevin function predicts greater collection efficiency than might be otherwise expected

  4. Development of modified pulsincap drug delivery system of metronidazole for drug targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Sindhu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified Pulsincap dosage form of metronidazole was developed to target drug release in the colon. Bodies of hard gelatin capsules were treated with formaldehyde keeping the caps as such. Metronidazole pellets prepared by extrusion-spheronization method were incorporated into these specialized capsule shells and plugged with polymers guar gum, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose 10K, carboxymethylcellulose sodium and sodium alginate separately at concentrations 20 mg, 30 mg and 40 mg. The filled capsules were completely coated with 5% cellulose acetate phthalate to prevent variable gastric emptying. All the formulations were assayed to determine drug content and the ability of the modified Pulsincap to provide colon-specific drug delivery was assessed by in vitro drug release studies in buffer pH 1.2 for 2 h, pH 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid for 3 h and pH 6.8 (stimulated colonic fluid for 7 h. The results indicated that significant drug release occurred only after 5 h from the start of experiment. Thus, metronidazole could be successfully colon targeted by the use of the modified Pulsincap, thereby reducing systemic side effects.

  5. Encapsulation of methotrexate loaded magnetic microcapsules for magnetic drug targeting and controlled drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakkarapani, Prabu; Subbiah, Latha; Palanisamy, Selvamani; Bibiana, Arputha; Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Jonasson, Christian; Johansson, Christer

    2015-04-01

    We report on the development and evaluation of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) for targeted rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Methotrexate was loaded into CaCO3-PSS (poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)) doped microparticles that were coated successively with poly (allylamine hydrochloride) and poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) by layer-by-layer technique. Ferrofluid was incorporated between the polyelectrolyte layers. CaCO3-PSS core was etched by incubation with EDTA yielding spherical MMC. The MMC were evaluated for various physicochemical, pharmaceutical parameters and magnetic properties. Surface morphology, crystallinity, particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, loading capacity, drug release pattern, release kinetics and AC susceptibility studies revealed spherical particles of ~3 μm size were obtained with a net zeta potential of +24.5 mV, 56% encapsulation and 18.6% drug loading capacity, 96% of cumulative drug release obeyed Hixson-Crowell model release kinetics. Drug excipient interaction, surface area, thermal and storage stability studies for the prepared MMC was also evaluated. The developed MMC offer a promising mode of targeted and sustained release drug delivery for rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

  6. Two cases of bowel perforation in patients with metastatic renal cancer treated with molecular target drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 82-year-old man started immunotherapy with interferon because of lung metastasis 5 years after he had undergone radical nephrectomy. Three years later, he developed multiple metastases, and was started on sorafenib (400 mg/day) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) orally. As his cancer-related pain worsened with time, he was administered 30 Gy radiation therapy for bone metastasis of L4. He was then admitted to our hospital for pain control because of ineffective radiation therapy. One day, he suddenly had abdominal pain and vomiting, and was diagnosed as bowel perforation based on computed tomography. He was managed conservatively by nasogastric suction and antibiotic course. A 62-year-old man diagnosed as metastatic renal cell cancer began immunotherapy soon after undergoing radical nephrectomy in Dec., 2006. Although he was started on oral sorafenib (800 mg/day) in July, 2008, metastatic foci enlarged after 18 months. He was then changed to sunitinib (50 mg/day). Sunitinib had immediate and long-lasting effect on the cancer for about 10 months, but he was then admitted to our hospital for pleural effusion. While under treatment for thoracic cavity drainage, he experienced upper abdominal pain and was diagnosis as bowel perforation based on computed tomography. He underwent emergency laparotomy. Molecular target drugs such as sorafenib and sunitinib have serious adverse effects. Bowel perforation is rare, but among those adverse effects. It should be remembered that caution is required for long-term use or combined radiation therapy and NSAIDs with molecular target drug. (author)

  7. Antibiotic prescribing policy of the Republic health insurance fund of Montenegro in the period 2000-2004: Effects of drug utilization reform strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duborija-Kovačević Nataša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Monitoring of antibiotic prescribing promotes rational use of these drugs, reduces costs and slows down the progress of resistance. The objective of present study was to analyze the effects of drug utilization reform strategy realized by the Republic Health Insurance Fund of Montenegro, during the period 2000-2004. Material and methods. This before-after comparative pharmacoepidemiological study comprised a sample of 100% prescription only antibiotics available in public pharmacies during the period 2000-2004. The drug use was calculated using A TC/DDD methodology and Wilcoxon's test for matched pairs was used in order to calculate the statistical significance of difference. Results. Antibiotic prescribing was aproximately lower by 12% in 2004 in regard to 2000 (12.80 vs. 14.57 DDDs, p>0.05. The participation of this pharmacotherapeutic group in the total drug dispensing has remained almost equal (aproximately 8%. The highest increase in prescribing was established for macrolides (1.05 vs. 1.64 DDDs, 59%; penicillins were also prescribed more frequently (6.41 vs. 6.56 DDDs, 2%. but other subgroups were prescribed less frequently: cephalosporins - (23% (3.11 vs. 2.43 DDDs and quinolones - (63% f 1.10 vs. 0.47 DDDs. Conclusion The drug utilization reform strategy showed mostly positive effects on antibiotic prescribing during the period 2000-2004. Further educational activities are necessary in order to establish more rational approach to prescribing and utilization of antibiotics. .

  8. Virtual target screening to rapidly identify potential protein targets of natural products in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pevzner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inherent biological viability and diversity of natural products make them a potentially rich source for new therapeutics. However, identification of bioactive compounds with desired therapeutic effects and identification of their protein targets is a laborious, expensive process. Extracts from organism samples may show desired activity in phenotypic assays but specific bioactive compounds must be isolated through further separation methods and protein targets must be identified by more specific phenotypic and in vitro experimental assays. Still, questions remain as to whether all relevant protein targets for a compound have been identified. The desire is to understand breadth of purposing for the compound to maximize its use and intellectual property, and to avoid further development of compounds with insurmountable adverse effects. Previously we developed a Virtual Target Screening system that computationally screens one or more compounds against a collection of virtual protein structures. By scoring each compound-protein interaction, we can compare against averaged scores of synthetic drug-like compounds to determine if a particular protein would be a potential target of a compound of interest. Here we provide examples of natural products screened through our system as we assess advantages and shortcomings of our current system in regards to natural product drug discovery.

  9. Nanomechanical detection of antibiotic-mucopeptide binding in a model for superbug drug resistance

    CERN Document Server

    Ndieyira, J W; Barrera, A Donoso; Zhou, D; Vögtli, M; Batchelor, M; Cooper, M A; Strunz, T; Horton, M A; Abell, C; Rayment, T; Aeppli, G; Mckendry, R A; 10.1038/nnano.2008.275

    2008-01-01

    The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbugs methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report the label-free detection of vancomycin binding to bacterial cell wall precursor analogues (mucopeptides) on cantilever arrays, with 10 nM sensitivity and at clinically relevant concentrations in blood serum. Differential measurements quantified binding constants for vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant mucopeptide analogues. Moreover, by systematically modifying the mucopeptide density we gain new insights into the origin of surface stress. We propose that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor describing the mechanical connectivity of regions affected by local binding in terms of a percolation process. Our findings place BioMEMS devices in a new class of percolative systems. The percolation concept w...

  10. Predicting enzyme targets for cancer drugs by profiling human Metabolic reactions in NCI-60 cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Wai-Ki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drugs can influence the whole metabolic system by targeting enzymes which catalyze metabolic reactions. The existence of interactions between drugs and metabolic reactions suggests a potential way to discover drug targets. Results In this paper, we present a computational method to predict new targets for approved anti-cancer drugs by exploring drug-reaction interactions. We construct a Drug-Reaction Network to provide a global view of drug-reaction interactions and drug-pathway interactions. The recent reconstruction of the human metabolic network and development of flux analysis approaches make it possible to predict each metabolic reaction's cell line-specific flux state based on the cell line-specific gene expressions. We first profile each reaction by its flux states in NCI-60 cancer cell lines, and then propose a kernel k-nearest neighbor model to predict related metabolic reactions and enzyme targets for approved cancer drugs. We also integrate the target structure data with reaction flux profiles to predict drug targets and the area under curves can reach 0.92. Conclusions The cross validations using the methods with and without metabolic network indicate that the former method is significantly better than the latter. Further experiments show the synergism of reaction flux profiles and target structure for drug target prediction. It also implies the significant contribution of metabolic network to predict drug targets. Finally, we apply our method to predict new reactions and possible enzyme targets for cancer drugs.

  11. Money, Sex, and Drugs: A Case Study to Teach the Genetics of Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Cloud-Hansen, Karen A.; Kuehner, Jason N.; Tong, Lillian; Miller, Sarah; Handelsman, Jo

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the work reported here was to help students expand their understanding of antibiotic resistance, the Central Dogma, and evolution. We developed a unit entitled “Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae,” which was constructed according to the principles of scientific teaching by a team of graduate students, science faculty, and instructors. A variety of activities and assessments were used, including a case study, short lectures, and group problem-solving. Implementation ...

  12. SYNERGY OF A NOVEL ANTIBIOTIC ADJUVANT ENTITY AGAINST MULTI DRUG RESISTANT ENTEROBACTERIACEAE

    OpenAIRE

    Manu Chaudhary; Anurag Payasi

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, we investigated the in vitro interaction of ceftriaxone plus sulbactam with disodium edetate, a Non Antibiotic Adjuvant (NAA) against selected clinical isolates and in vitro susceptibility studies were also performed. The isolates were tested against a range of ratios of ceftriaxone and sulbactam using a microdilution checkerboard method. Having determined the appropriate ratios of ceftriaxone plus sulbactam, effect of various concentration of disodium edetate we...

  13. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery. PMID:27376328

  14. Essential gene identification and drug target prioritization in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqi; Sillaots, Susan; Lemieux, Sebastien; Davison, John; Kauffman, Sarah; Breton, Anouk; Linteau, Annie; Xin, Chunlin; Bowman, Joel; Becker, Jeff; Jiang, Bo; Roemer, Terry

    2007-03-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne filamentous fungal pathogen in humans, causing severe and often fatal invasive infections in immunocompromised patients. Currently available antifungal drugs to treat invasive aspergillosis have limited modes of action, and few are safe and effective. To identify and prioritize antifungal drug targets, we have developed a conditional promoter replacement (CPR) strategy using the nitrogen-regulated A. fumigatus NiiA promoter (pNiiA). The gene essentiality for 35 A. fumigatus genes was directly demonstrated by this pNiiA-CPR strategy from a set of 54 genes representing broad biological functions whose orthologs are confirmed to be essential for growth in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Extending this approach, we show that the ERG11 gene family (ERG11A and ERG11B) is essential in A. fumigatus despite neither member being essential individually. In addition, we demonstrate the pNiiA-CPR strategy is suitable for in vivo phenotypic analyses, as a number of conditional mutants, including an ERG11 double mutant (erg11BDelta, pNiiA-ERG11A), failed to establish a terminal infection in an immunocompromised mouse model of systemic aspergillosis. Collectively, the pNiiA-CPR strategy enables a rapid and reliable means to directly identify, phenotypically characterize, and facilitate target-based whole cell assays to screen A. fumigatus essential genes for cognate antifungal inhibitors. PMID:17352532

  15. Chemical Genomics and Emerging DNA Technologies in the Identification of Drug Mechanisms and Drug Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Louise Cathrine Braun; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2012-01-01

    Chemical genomics combines chemistry with molecular biology as a means of exploring the function of unknown proteins or identifying the proteins responsible for a particular phenotype induced by a small cell-permeable bioactive molecule. Chemical genomics therefore has the potential to identify and...... validate therapeutic targets and to discover drug candidates for rapidly and effectively generating new interventions for human diseases. The recent emergence of genomic technologies and their application on genetically tractable model organisms like Drosophila melanogaster,Caenorhabditis elegans and...... Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided momentum to cell biological and biomedical research, particularly in the functional characterization of gene functions and the identification of novel drug targets. We therefore anticipate that chemical genomics and the vast development of genomic technologies will play...

  16. Targeting Plasmodium Metabolism to Improve Antimalarial Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Sierra-Campos, Erick; Betancourt-Conde, Irene; Aguirre-Raudry, Miriam; Vázquez-Raygoza, Alejandra; Luevano-De la Cruz, Artemisa; Favela-Candia, Alejandro; Sarabia-Sanchez, Marie; Ríos-Soto, Lluvia; Méndez-Hernández, Edna; Cisneros-Martínez, Jorge; Palacio-Gastélum, Marcelo Gómez; Valdez-Solana, Mónica; Hernández-Rivera, Jessica; De Lira-Sánchez, Jaime; Campos-Almazán, Mara; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main infectious diseases in tropical developing countries and represents high morbidity and mortality rates nowadays. The principal etiological agent P. falciparum is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. The issue has escalated due to the emergence of resistant strains to most of the antimalarials used for the treatment including Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, and recently Artemisinin derivatives, which has led to diminished effectiveness and by consequence increased the severity of epidemic outbreaks. Due to the lack of effective compounds to treat these drug-resistant strains, the discovery or development of novel anti-malaria drugs is important. In this context, one strategy has been to find inhibitors of enzymes, which play an important role for parasite survival. Today, promising results have been obtained in this regard, involving the entire P. falciparum metabolism. These inhibitors could serve as leads in the search of a new chemotherapy against malaria. This review focuses on the achievements in recent years with regard to inhibition of enzymes used as targets for drug design against malaria. PMID:26983887

  17. New drugs targeting Th2 lymphocytes in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramori, Gaetano; Groneberg, David; Ito, Kazuhiro; Casolari, Paolo; Adcock, Ian M; Papi, Alberto

    2008-02-27

    Asthma represents a profound worldwide public health problem. The most effective anti-asthmatic drugs currently available include inhaled beta2-agonists and glucocorticoids and control asthma in about 90-95% of patients. The current asthma therapies are not cures and symptoms return soon after treatment is stopped even after long term therapy. Although glucocorticoids are highly effective in controlling the inflammatory process in asthma, they appear to have little effect on the lower airway remodelling processes that appear to play a role in the pathophysiology of asthma at currently prescribed doses. The development of novel drugs may allow resolution of these changes. In addition, severe glucocorticoid-dependent and resistant asthma presents a great clinical burden and reducing the side-effects of glucocorticoids using novel steroid-sparing agents is needed. Furthermore, the mechanisms involved in the persistence of inflammation are poorly understood and the reasons why some patients have severe life threatening asthma and others have very mild disease are still unknown. Drug development for asthma has been directed at improving currently available drugs and findings new compounds that usually target the Th2-driven airway inflammatory response. Considering the apparently central role of T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of asthma, drugs targeting disease-inducing Th2 cells are promising therapeutic strategies. However, although animal models of asthma suggest that this is feasible, the translation of these types of studies for the treatment of human asthma remains poor due to the limitations of the models currently used. The myriad of new compounds that are in development directed to modulate Th2 cells recruitment and/or activation will clarify in the near future the relative importance of these cells and their mediators in the complex interactions with the other pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cells and mediators responsible of the different asthmatic

  18. Development of modified pulsincap drug delivery system of metronidazole for drug targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham Sindhu; Srinath M

    2007-01-01

    A modified Pulsincap dosage form of metronidazole was developed to target drug release in the colon. Bodies of hard gelatin capsules were treated with formaldehyde keeping the caps as such. Metronidazole pellets prepared by extrusion-spheronization method were incorporated into these specialized capsule shells and plugged with polymers guar gum, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose 10K, carboxymethylcellulose sodium and sodium alginate separately at concentrations 20 mg, 30 mg and 40 mg. The filled c...

  19. Potential scorpionate antibiotics: targeted hydrolysis of lipid II containing model membranes by vancomycin-TACzyme conjugates and modulation of their antibacterial activity by Zn-ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauke Albada, H; Arnusch, Christopher J; Branderhorst, Hilbert M; Verel, Anne-Marie; Janssen, Wouter T M; Breukink, Eefjan; de Kruijff, Ben; Pieters, Roland J; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2009-07-15

    The antibiotic vancomycin-that binds lipid II in the bacterial cell membrane-was conjugated to a mono- and tetravalent mimic of the tris-histidine catalytic triad of metalloenzymes. Targeted hydrolysis by the conjugate was observed using model membranes containing lipid II, and in vitro MIC-values of the targeted mimic constructs could be modulated by Zn-ions. PMID:19524434

  20. The heme biosynthetic pathway of the obligate Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi as a potential anti-filarial drug target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Filarial parasites (e.g., Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, and Wuchereria bancrofti are causative agents of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, which are among the most disabling of neglected tropical diseases. There is an urgent need to develop macro-filaricidal drugs, as current anti-filarial chemotherapy (e.g., diethylcarbamazine [DEC], ivermectin and albendazole can interrupt transmission predominantly by killing microfilariae (mf larvae, but is less effective on adult worms, which can live for decades in the human host. All medically relevant human filarial parasites appear to contain an obligate endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia. This alpha-proteobacterial mutualist has been recognized as a potential target for filarial nematode life cycle intervention, as antibiotic treatments of filarial worms harboring Wolbachia result in the loss of worm fertility and viability upon antibiotic treatments both in vitro and in vivo. Human trials have confirmed this approach, although the length of treatments, high doses required and medical counter-indications for young children and pregnant women warrant the identification of additional anti-Wolbachia drugs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genome sequence analysis indicated that enzymes involved in heme biosynthesis might constitute a potential anti-Wolbachia target set. We tested different heme biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in ex vivo B. malayi viability assays and report a specific effect of N-methyl mesoporphyrin (NMMP, which targets ferrochelatase (FC, the last step. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates evolutionarily significant divergence between Wolbachia heme genes and their human homologues. We therefore undertook the cloning, overexpression and analysis of several enzymes of this pathway alongside their human homologues, and prepared proteins for drug targeting. In vitro enzyme assays revealed a approximately 600-fold difference in drug sensitivities to succinyl acetone (SA between

  1. Structural basis for the interaction of antibiotics with peptidyl transferase center in eubacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlunzen, Frank; Zarivach, Raz; Harms, Jörg; Bashan, Anat; Tocilj, Ante; Albrecht, Renate; Yonath, Ada; Franceschi, Francois (WIS-I); (Max Planck Germany)

    2009-10-07

    Ribosomes, the site of protein synthesis, are a major target for natural and synthetic antibiotics. Detailed knowledge of antibiotic binding sites is central to understanding the mechanisms of drug action. Conversely, drugs are excellent tools for studying the ribosome function. To elucidate the structural basis of ribosome-antibiotic interactions, we determined the high-resolution X-ray structures of the 50S ribosomal subunit of the eubacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, complexed with the clinically relevant antibiotics chloramphenicol, clindamycin and the three macrolides erythromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin. We found that antibiotic binding sites are composed exclusively of segments of 23S ribosomal RNA at the peptidyl transferase cavity and do not involve any interaction of the drugs with ribosomal proteins. Here we report the details of antibiotic interactions with the components of their binding sites. Our results also show the importance of putative Mg{sup +2} ions for the binding of some drugs. This structural analysis should facilitate rational drug design.

  2. Stent-Graft Placement with Early Debridement and Antibiotic Treatment for Femoral Pseudoaneurysms in Intravenous Drug Addicts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Qining, E-mail: cqmufqn@163.com; Meng, Xiyun, E-mail: 383274177@qq.com; Li, Fenghe, E-mail: lfh-cqmu@gmail.com; Wang, Xuehu, E-mail: 184037696@qq.co; Cheng, Jun, E-mail: cqdcj@163.com; Huang, Wen, E-mail: dhuangwen@hotmail.com; Ren, Wei, E-mail: renwei9771@yahoo.com.cn; Zhao, Yu, E-mail: zhaoyu-cqmu@126.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Department of Vascular Surgery (China)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeExplore the application of endovascular covered stent-graft (SG) placement in femoral pseudoaneurysms in intravenous drug addicts.Materials and MethodsWe evaluated a consecutive series of pseudoaneurysm in intravenous drug addicts treated with SGs from August 2010 to December 2013.Results15 patients with 16 arterial pseudoaneurysms were enrolled in this study. All were males with a mean age of 36.9 years. Hemorrhage was the most common reason (93.8 %) for seeking medical care, and 3 of these patients were in hemorrhagic shock at admission. All patients received broad-spectrum antibiotics, and debridement and drainage were implemented after SG placement. 7 of the 13 cases which had microbiologic results showed mixed infections, while gram-negative bacteria were the major pathogens. Except for 2 patients, who were lost to follow-up, two new pseudoaneurysms formed due to delayed debridement, and one stent thrombosis occurred, none of the remaining cases had SG infection or developed claudication.ConclusionsSG placement controls massive hemorrhage rapidly, gives enough time for subsequent treatment for pseudoaneurysms due to intravenous drug abuse, and reduces the incidence of postoperative claudication. With appropriate broad-spectrum antibiotics and early debridement, the incidence of SG infection is relatively low. It is an effective alternative especially as temporary bridge measure for critical patients. However, the high cost, uncertain long-term prospects, high demand for medical adherence, and the risk of using the conduits for re-puncture call for a cautious selection of patients. More evidence is required for the application of this treatment.

  3. Dysregulation of protein degradation pathways may mediate the liver injury and phospholipidosis associated with a cationic amphiphilic antibiotic drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosedale, Merrie [Hamner-University of North Carolina Institute for Drug Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Wu, Hong [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT06340 (United States); Kurtz, C. Lisa [Hamner-University of North Carolina Institute for Drug Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Schmidt, Stephen P. [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT06340 (United States); Adkins, Karissa, E-mail: Karissa.Adkins@pfizer.com [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT06340 (United States); Harrill, Alison H. [Hamner-University of North Carolina Institute for Drug Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR72205 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    A large number of antibiotics are known to cause drug-induced liver injury in the clinic; however, interpreting clinical risk is not straightforward owing to a lack of predictivity of the toxicity by standard preclinical species and a poor understanding of the mechanisms of toxicity. An example is PF-04287881, a novel ketolide antibiotic that caused elevations in liver function tests in Phase I clinical studies. In this study, a mouse diversity panel (MDP), comprised of 34 genetically diverse, inbred mouse strains, was utilized to model the toxicity observed with PF-04287881 treatment and investigate potential mechanisms that may mediate the liver response. Significant elevations in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in PF-04287881-treated animals relative to vehicle-treated controls were observed in the majority (88%) of strains tested following a seven day exposure. The average fold elevation in ALT varied by genetic background and correlated with microscopic findings of hepatocellular hypertrophy, hepatocellular single cell necrosis, and Kupffer cell vacuolation (confirmed as phospholipidosis) in the liver. Global liver mRNA expression was evaluated in a subset of four strains to identify transcript and pathway differences that distinguish susceptible mice from resistant mice in the context of PF-04287881 treatment. The protein ubiquitination pathway was highly enriched among genes associated with PF-04287881-induced hepatocellular necrosis. Expression changes associated with PF-04287881-induced phospholipidosis included genes involved in drug transport, phospholipid metabolism, and lysosomal function. The findings suggest that perturbations in genes involved in protein degradation leading to accumulation of oxidized proteins may mediate the liver injury induced by this drug. - Highlights: • Identified susceptible and resistant mouse strains to liver injury induced by a CAD • Liver injury characterized by single cell necrosis, and phospholipidosis

  4. Stent-Graft Placement with Early Debridement and Antibiotic Treatment for Femoral Pseudoaneurysms in Intravenous Drug Addicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeExplore the application of endovascular covered stent-graft (SG) placement in femoral pseudoaneurysms in intravenous drug addicts.Materials and MethodsWe evaluated a consecutive series of pseudoaneurysm in intravenous drug addicts treated with SGs from August 2010 to December 2013.Results15 patients with 16 arterial pseudoaneurysms were enrolled in this study. All were males with a mean age of 36.9 years. Hemorrhage was the most common reason (93.8 %) for seeking medical care, and 3 of these patients were in hemorrhagic shock at admission. All patients received broad-spectrum antibiotics, and debridement and drainage were implemented after SG placement. 7 of the 13 cases which had microbiologic results showed mixed infections, while gram-negative bacteria were the major pathogens. Except for 2 patients, who were lost to follow-up, two new pseudoaneurysms formed due to delayed debridement, and one stent thrombosis occurred, none of the remaining cases had SG infection or developed claudication.ConclusionsSG placement controls massive hemorrhage rapidly, gives enough time for subsequent treatment for pseudoaneurysms due to intravenous drug abuse, and reduces the incidence of postoperative claudication. With appropriate broad-spectrum antibiotics and early debridement, the incidence of SG infection is relatively low. It is an effective alternative especially as temporary bridge measure for critical patients. However, the high cost, uncertain long-term prospects, high demand for medical adherence, and the risk of using the conduits for re-puncture call for a cautious selection of patients. More evidence is required for the application of this treatment

  5. Dysregulation of protein degradation pathways may mediate the liver injury and phospholipidosis associated with a cationic amphiphilic antibiotic drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large number of antibiotics are known to cause drug-induced liver injury in the clinic; however, interpreting clinical risk is not straightforward owing to a lack of predictivity of the toxicity by standard preclinical species and a poor understanding of the mechanisms of toxicity. An example is PF-04287881, a novel ketolide antibiotic that caused elevations in liver function tests in Phase I clinical studies. In this study, a mouse diversity panel (MDP), comprised of 34 genetically diverse, inbred mouse strains, was utilized to model the toxicity observed with PF-04287881 treatment and investigate potential mechanisms that may mediate the liver response. Significant elevations in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in PF-04287881-treated animals relative to vehicle-treated controls were observed in the majority (88%) of strains tested following a seven day exposure. The average fold elevation in ALT varied by genetic background and correlated with microscopic findings of hepatocellular hypertrophy, hepatocellular single cell necrosis, and Kupffer cell vacuolation (confirmed as phospholipidosis) in the liver. Global liver mRNA expression was evaluated in a subset of four strains to identify transcript and pathway differences that distinguish susceptible mice from resistant mice in the context of PF-04287881 treatment. The protein ubiquitination pathway was highly enriched among genes associated with PF-04287881-induced hepatocellular necrosis. Expression changes associated with PF-04287881-induced phospholipidosis included genes involved in drug transport, phospholipid metabolism, and lysosomal function. The findings suggest that perturbations in genes involved in protein degradation leading to accumulation of oxidized proteins may mediate the liver injury induced by this drug. - Highlights: • Identified susceptible and resistant mouse strains to liver injury induced by a CAD • Liver injury characterized by single cell necrosis, and phospholipidosis

  6. Thermomechanical Properties, Antibiotic Release, and Bioactivity of a Sterilized Cyclodextrin Drug Delivery System

    OpenAIRE

    Halpern, Jeffrey M.; Gormley, Catherine A.; Keech, Melissa; von Recum, Horst A.

    2014-01-01

    Various local drug delivery devices and coatings are being developed as slow, sustained release mechanism for drugs, yet the polymers are typically not evaluated after commercial sterilization techniques. We examine the effect that commercial sterilization techniques have on the physical, mechanical, and drug delivery properties of polyurethane polymers. Specifically we tested cyclodextrin-hexamethyl diisocyanate crosslinked polymers before and after autoclave, ethylene oxide, and gamma radia...

  7. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal SA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sheikh Arslan Sehgal, Mubashir Hassan, Sajid Rashid National Center for Bioinformatics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan Abstract: Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18. Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor–ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. Keywords: migraine, bioinformatics, modeling and docking, KCNK18, TRESK, virtual screening, pharmacoinformatics

  8. RAS GTPase AS THE DRUG TARGET FOR ANTI-CANCER DESIGNING OF DRUG FROM TEMPLATE

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    A.S. Krishnapriya and P.K. Krishnan Namboori*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ras proteins in association with GTP and GDP act as a bio-molecular switch for signaling cell growth, cell survival and signal transduction. The presence of mutated Ras proteins is found to vary in different cancer types and the highest occurrence of about 90% is observed in pancreatic cancer. The Ras GTPase binding site is mainly involved in signal cell proliferation. Hence, this binding site has been considered as a major target. At the same time, targeting a specific protein and designing the drug molecule with respect to that is practically of no use as the target proteins are fast mutating. In this scenario, designing the template from the hot spot of proteins and fitting the template for all the target protein molecules seem to be a promising technique. The templates are initially screened on the basis of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic requirements. Six templates are found to be satisfying conditions like IC50, lipophilic efficiency, ligand efficiency etc. and their efficiencies are compared with standard reference molecules. The computed enrichment factors support these templates to be leads for effective anti-cancer drugs subject to further in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

  9. New insight into p-glycoprotein as a drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breier, Albert; Gibalova, Lenka; Seres, Mario; Barancik, Miroslav; Sulova, Zdenka

    2013-01-01

    changes in cell sensitivity to substances that are not P-gp substrates or modulators. We recently reported that P-gppositive L1210 cells exhibit reduced sensitivity to cisplatin, concanavalin A, thapsigargin and tunicamycin. Thus, P-gp-mediated MDR represents a more complex process than was expected, and the unintended effects of P-gp overexpression should be considered when describing this phenotype. The present review aims to provide the most current informations about P-gp-mediated MDR while paying particular attention to the possible dual function of this protein as a drug efflux pump and a regulatory protein that influences diverse cell processes. From a clinical standpoint, overexpression of P-gp in cancer cells represents a real obstacle to effective chemotherapy for malignant diseases. Therefore, this protein should be considered as a viable target for pharmaceutical design. PMID:22931413

  10. Nanomechanical detection of drug-target interactions using cantilever sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Vögtli, M

    2011-01-01

    The alarming growth of antibiotic-resistant superbugs including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. Novel cantilever array sensors offer a tool to probe the nanomechanics of biomolecular reactions and have recently attracted much attention as a ’label-free’ biosensor as they require no fluorescent or radioactive tags and ...

  11. Treponema pallidum putative novel drug target identification and validation: rethinking syphilis therapeutics with plant-derived terpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Upendra N; Tiwari, Sameeksha; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, Swati; Awasthi, Manika; Pandey, Veda P

    2015-02-01

    Syphilis, a slow progressive and the third most common sexually transmitted disease found worldwide, is caused by a spirochete gram negative bacteria Treponema pallidum. Emergence of antibiotic resistant T. pallidum has led to a search for novel drugs and their targets. Subtractive genomics analyses of pathogen T. pallidum and host Homo sapiens resulted in identification of 126 proteins essential for survival and viability of the pathogen. Metabolic pathway analyses of these essential proteins led to discovery of nineteen proteins distributed among six metabolic pathways unique to T. pallidum. One hundred plant-derived terpenoids, as potential therapeutic molecules against T. pallidum, were screened for their drug likeness and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity) properties. Subsequently the resulting nine terpenoids were docked with five unique T. pallidum targets through molecular modeling approaches. Out of five targets analyzed, D-alanine:D-alanine ligase was found to be the most promising target, while terpenoid salvicine was the most potent inhibitor. A comparison of the inhibitory potential of the best docked readily available natural compound, namely pomiferin (flavonoid) with that of the best docked terpenoid salvicine, revealed that salvicine was a more potent inhibitor than that of pomiferin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a terpenoid as a potential therapeutic molecule against T. pallidum with D-alanine:D-alanine ligase as a novel target. Further studies are warranted to evaluate and explore the potential clinical ramifications of these findings in relation to syphilis that has public health importance worldwide. PMID:25683888

  12. A comparison of machine learning techniques for detection of drug target articles

    OpenAIRE

    Danger, Roxana; Segura Bedmar, Isabel; Martínez, Paloma; Rosso, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Important progress in treating diseases has been possible thanks to the identification of drug targets. Drug targets are the molecular structures whose abnormal activity, associated to a disease, can be modified by drugs, improving the health of patients. Pharmaceutical industry needs to give priority to their identification and validation in order to reduce the long and costly drug development times. In the last two decades, our knowledge about drugs, their mechanisms of action and dru...

  13. Repurposing of approved drugs from the human pharmacopoeia to target Wolbachia endosymbionts of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Kelly L; Ford, Louise; Umareddy, Indira; Townson, Simon; Specht, Sabine; Pfarr, Kenneth; Hoerauf, Achim; Altmeyer, Ralf; Taylor, Mark J

    2014-12-01

    Lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis are debilitating diseases caused by parasitic filarial nematodes infecting around 150 million people throughout the tropics with more than 1.5 billion at risk. As with other neglected tropical diseases, classical drug-discovery and development is lacking and a 50 year programme of macrofilaricidal discovery failed to deliver a drug which can be used as a public health tool. Recently, antibiotic targeting of filarial Wolbachia, an essential bacterial symbiont, has provided a novel drug treatment for filariasis with macrofilaricidal activity, although the current gold-standard, doxycycline, is unsuitable for use in mass drug administration (MDA). The anti-Wolbachia (A·WOL) Consortium aims to identify novel anti-Wolbachia drugs, compounds or combinations that are suitable for use in MDA. Development of a Wolbachia cell-based assay has enabled the screening of the approved human drug-pharmacopoeia (∼2600 drugs) for a potential repurposing. This screening strategy has revealed that approved drugs from various classes show significant bacterial load reduction equal to or superior to the gold-standard doxycycline, with 69 orally available hits from different drug categories being identified. Based on our defined hit criteria, 15 compounds were then selectively screened in a Litomosoides sigmodontis mouse model, 4 of which were active. These came from the tetracycline, fluoroquinolone and rifamycin classes. This strategy of repurposing approved drugs is a promising development in the goal of finding a novel treatment against filariasis and could also be a strategy applicable for other neglected tropical diseases. PMID:25516838

  14. Repurposing of approved drugs from the human pharmacopoeia to target Wolbachia endosymbionts of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L. Johnston

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis are debilitating diseases caused by parasitic filarial nematodes infecting around 150 million people throughout the tropics with more than 1.5 billion at risk. As with other neglected tropical diseases, classical drug-discovery and development is lacking and a 50 year programme of macrofilaricidal discovery failed to deliver a drug which can be used as a public health tool. Recently, antibiotic targeting of filarial Wolbachia, an essential bacterial symbiont, has provided a novel drug treatment for filariasis with macrofilaricidal activity, although the current gold-standard, doxycycline, is unsuitable for use in mass drug administration (MDA. The anti-Wolbachia (A·WOL Consortium aims to identify novel anti-Wolbachia drugs, compounds or combinations that are suitable for use in MDA. Development of a Wolbachia cell-based assay has enabled the screening of the approved human drug-pharmacopoeia (∼2600 drugs for a potential repurposing. This screening strategy has revealed that approved drugs from various classes show significant bacterial load reduction equal to or superior to the gold-standard doxycycline, with 69 orally available hits from different drug categories being identified. Based on our defined hit criteria, 15 compounds were then selectively screened in a Litomosoides sigmodontis mouse model, 4 of which were active. These came from the tetracycline, fluoroquinolone and rifamycin classes. This strategy of repurposing approved drugs is a promising development in the goal of finding a novel treatment against filariasis and could also be a strategy applicable for other neglected tropical diseases.

  15. Identification of potential drug targets by subtractive genome analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7: an in silico approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal SI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Shakhinur Islam Mondal,1,6,* Sabiha Ferdous,1,* Nurnabi Azad Jewel,1 Arzuba Akter,2,6 Zabed Mahmud,1 Md Muzahidul Islam,1 Tanzila Afrin,3 Nurul Karim4,5 1Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Department, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet, Bangladesh; 2Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet, Bangladesh; 3Department of Pharmacy, East West University, Aftabnagar, Bangladesh; 4Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Bangladesh; 5Division of Parasitology, 6Division of Microbiology, Department of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Bacterial enteric infections resulting in diarrhea, dysentery, or enteric fever constitute a huge public health problem, with more than a billion episodes of disease annually in developing and developed countries. In this study, the deadly agent of hemorrhagic diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome, Escherichia coli O157:H7 was investigated with extensive computational approaches aimed at identifying novel and broad-spectrum antibiotic targets. A systematic in silico workflow consisting of comparative genomics, metabolic pathways analysis, and additional drug prioritizing parameters was used to identify novel drug targets that were essential for the pathogen’s survival but absent in its human host. Comparative genomic analysis of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotated metabolic pathways identified 350 putative target proteins in E. coli O157:H7 which showed no similarity to human proteins. Further bioinformatic approaches including prediction of subcellular localization, calculation of molecular weight, and web-based investigation of 3D structural characteristics greatly aided in filtering the potential drug targets from 350 to 120. Ultimately, 44 non-homologous essential proteins of E

  16. Quantitative analysis on the characteristics of targets with FDA approved drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena K. Sakharkar, Peng Li, Zhaowei Zhong, Kishore R. Sakharkar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated knowledge of genomic information, systems biology, and disease mechanisms provide an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate the genetic basis of diseases, and to discover new and novel therapeutic targets from the wealth of genomic data. With hundreds to a few thousand potential targets available in the human genome alone, target selection and validation has become a critical component of drug discovery process. The explorations on quantitative characteristics of the currently explored targets (those without any marketed drug and successful targets (targeted by at least one marketed drug could help discern simple rules for selecting a putative successful target. Here we use integrative in silico (computational approaches to quantitatively analyze the characteristics of 133 targets with FDA approved drugs and 3120 human disease genes (therapeutic targets not targeted by FDA approved drugs. This is the first attempt to comparatively analyze targets with FDA approved drugs and targets with no FDA approved drug or no drugs available for them. Our results show that proteins with 5 or fewer number of homologs outside their own family, proteins with single-exon gene architecture and proteins interacting with more than 3 partners are more likely to be targetable. These quantitative characteristics could serve as criteria to search for promising targetable disease genes.

  17. Melanocortin receptors as drug targets for disorders of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adan, Roger A H; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2006-06-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that the brain melanocortin system is a key regulator of energy balance, and dysregulations in the brain melanocortin system can lead to obesity. The melanocortin system is one of the major downstream leptin signaling pathways in the brain. In contrast to leptin, preclinical studies indicate that diet-induced obese animals are still responsive to the anorectic effects of melanocortin receptor agonists, suggesting the melanocortin system is an interesting therapeutic opportunity. Besides regulating energy balance, melanocortins are involved in a variety of other neuroendocrine processes, including inflammation, blood pressure regulation, addictive and sexual behavior, and sensation of pain. This review evaluates the melanocortin system function from the perspective to use specific melanocortin (MC) receptors as drug targets, with a focus on the treatment of obesity and eating disorders in humans, and the implications this may have on mechanisms beyond the control of energy balance. PMID:16787227

  18. Discovery of the target for immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takumi; Ando, Hideki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Half a century ago, the sedative thalidomide caused a serious drug disaster because of its teratogenicity and was withdrawn from the market. However, thalidomide, which has returned to the market, is now used for the treatment of leprosy and multiple myeloma (MM) under strict control. The mechanism of thalidomide action had been a long-standing question. We developed a new affinity bead technology and identified cereblon (CRBN) as a thalidomide-binding protein. We found that CRBN functions as a substrate receptor of an E3 cullin-Ring ligase complex 4 (CRL4) and is a primary target of thalidomide teratogenicity. Recently, new thalidomide derivatives, called immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), have been developed by Celgene. Among them, lenalidomide (Len) and pomalidomide (Pom) were shown to exert strong therapeutic effects against MM. It was found that Len and Pom both bind CRBN-CRL4 and recruit neomorphic substrates (Ikaros and Aiolos). More recently it was reported that casein kinase 1a (Ck1a) was identified as a substrate for CRBN-CRL4 in the presence of Len, but not Pom. Ck1a breakdown explains why Len is specifically effective for myelodysplastic syndrome with 5q deletion. It is now proposed that binding of IMiDs to CRBN appears to alter the substrate specificity of CRBN-CRL4. In this review, we introduce recent findings on IMiDs. PMID:27263779

  19. Structures of Trypanosome Vacuolar Soluble Pyrophosphatases: Antiparasitic Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunyun; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chun-Chi; Huang, Guozhong; Zheng, Yingying; Liu, Weidong; Wang, Iren; Ho, Meng-Ru; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; O'Dowd, Bing; Huff, Hannah C; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Docampo, Roberto; Oldfield, Eric; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2016-05-20

    Trypanosomatid parasites are the causative agents of many neglected tropical diseases, including the leishmaniases, Chagas disease, and human African trypanosomiasis. They exploit unusual vacuolar soluble pyrophosphatases (VSPs), absent in humans, for cell growth and virulence and, as such, are drug targets. Here, we report the crystal structures of VSP1s from Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei, together with that of the T. cruzi protein bound to a bisphosphonate inhibitor. Both VSP1s form a hybrid structure containing an (N-terminal) EF-hand domain fused to a (C-terminal) pyrophosphatase domain. The two domains are connected via an extended loop of about 17 residues. Crystallographic analysis and size exclusion chromatography indicate that the VSP1s form tetramers containing head-to-tail dimers. Phosphate and diphosphate ligands bind in the PPase substrate-binding pocket and interact with several conserved residues, and a bisphosphonate inhibitor (BPH-1260) binds to the same site. On the basis of Cytoscape and other bioinformatics analyses, it is apparent that similar folds will be found in most if not all trypanosomatid VSP1s, including those found in insects (Angomonas deanei, Strigomonas culicis), plant pathogens (Phytomonas spp.), and Leishmania spp. Overall, the results are of general interest since they open the way to structure-based drug design for many of the neglected tropical diseases. PMID:26907161

  20. Radiolabeling Strategies for Tumor-Targeting Proteinaceous Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Sugiura

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their large size proteinaceous drugs offer higher operative information content compared to the small molecules that correspond to the traditional understanding of druglikeness. As a consequence these drugs allow developing patient-specific therapies that provide the means to go beyond the possibilities of current drug therapy. However, the efficacy of these strategies, in particular “personalized medicine”, depends on precise information about individual target expression rates. Molecular imaging combines non-invasive imaging methods with tools of molecular and cellular biology and thus bridges current knowledge to the clinical use. Moreover, nuclear medicine techniques provide therapeutic applications with tracers that behave like the diagnostic tracer. The advantages of radioiodination, still the most versatile radiolabeling strategy, and other labeled compounds comprising covalently attached radioisotopes are compared to the use of chelator-protein conjugates that are complexed with metallic radioisotopes. With the techniques using radioactive isotopes as a reporting unit or even the therapeutic principle, care has to be taken to avoid cleavage of the radionuclide from the protein it is linked to. The tracers used in molecular imaging require labeling techniques that provide site specific conjugation and metabolic stability. Appropriate choice of the radionuclide allows tailoring the properties of the labeled protein to the application required. Until the event of positron emission tomography the spectrum of nuclides used to visualize cellular and biochemical processes was largely restricted to iodine isotopes and 99m-technetium. Today, several nuclides such as 18-fluorine, 68-gallium and 86-yttrium have fundamentally extended the possibilities of tracer design and in turn caused the need for the development of chemical methods for their conjugation.

  1. Are Pharmaceuticals with Evolutionary Conserved Molecular Drug Targets More Potent to Cause Toxic Effects in Non-Target Organisms?

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Furuhagen; Anne Fuchs; Elin Lundström Belleza; Magnus Breitholtz; Elena Gorokhova

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous use of pharmaceuticals has resulted in a continuous discharge into wastewater and pharmaceuticals and their metabolites are found in the environment. Due to their design towards specific drug targets, pharmaceuticals may be therapeutically active already at low environmental concentrations. Several human drug targets are evolutionary conserved in aquatic organisms, raising concerns about effects of these pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms. In this study, we hypothesized th...

  2. Cell-penetrating peptide and antibiotic combination therapy: a potential alternative to combat drug resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Harmandeep Kaur; Gautam, Ankur; Sharma, Minakshi; Bhatia, Rakesh; Varshney, Grish C; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh; Nandanwar, Hemraj

    2016-05-01

    The diverse pattern of resistance by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the major obstacle in the treatment of its infections. The key reason of resistance is the poor membrane permeability of drug molecules. Over the last decade, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as efficient drug delivery vehicles and have been exploited to improve the intracellular delivery of numerous therapeutic molecules in preclinical studies. Therefore, to overcome the drug resistance, we have investigated for the first time the effects of two CPPs (P3 and P8) in combination with four antibiotics (viz. oxacillin, erythromycin, norfloxacin, and vancomycin) against MRSA strains. We found that both CPPs internalized into the MRSA efficiently at very low concentration (oxacillin, norfloxacin, and vancomycin to susceptible levels (generally <1 μg/mL) for almost all five clinical isolates. Further, the bacterial cell death was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy as well as propidium iodide uptake assay. Simultaneously, time-kill kinetics revealed the increased uptake of antibiotics. In summary, CPPs assist to restore the effectiveness of antibiotics at much lower concentration, eliminate the antibiotic toxicity, and represent the CPP-antibiotic combination therapy as a potential novel weapon to combat MRSA infections. PMID:26837216

  3. Antibiotic sensitivity profiles determined with an Escherichia coli gene knockout collection: generating an antibiotic bar code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Anne; Tran, Lillian; Becket, Elinne; Lee, Kim; Chinn, Laney; Park, Eunice; Tran, Katherine; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2010-04-01

    We have defined a sensitivity profile for 22 antibiotics by extending previous work testing the entire KEIO collection of close to 4,000 single-gene knockouts in Escherichia coli for increased susceptibility to 1 of 14 different antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, rifampin [rifampicin], vancomycin, ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin, metronidazole, streptomycin, fusidic acid, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, erythromycin, and triclosan). We screened one or more subinhibitory concentrations of each antibiotic, generating more than 80,000 data points and allowing a reduction of the entire collection to a set of 283 strains that display significantly increased sensitivity to at least one of the antibiotics. We used this reduced set of strains to determine a profile for eight additional antibiotics (spectinomycin, cephradine, aztreonem, colistin, neomycin, enoxacin, tobramycin, and cefoxitin). The profiles for the 22 antibiotics represent a growing catalog of sensitivity fingerprints that can be separated into two components, multidrug-resistant mutants and those mutants that confer relatively specific sensitivity to the antibiotic or type of antibiotic tested. The latter group can be represented by a set of 20 to 60 strains that can be used for the rapid typing of antibiotics by generating a virtual bar code readout of the specific sensitivities. Taken together, these data reveal the complexity of intrinsic resistance and provide additional targets for the design of codrugs (or combinations of drugs) that potentiate existing antibiotics. PMID:20065048

  4. Dendrimers in drug delivery and targeting: Drug-dendrimer interactions and toxicity issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Madaan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers are the emerging polymeric architectures that are known for their defined structures, versatility in drug delivery and high functionality whose properties resemble with biomolecules. These nanostructured macromolecules have shown their potential abilities in entrapping and/or conjugating the high molecular weight hydrophilic/hydrophobic entities by host-guest interactions and covalent bonding (prodrug approach respectively. Moreover, high ratio of surface groups to molecular volume has made them a promising synthetic vector for gene delivery. Owing to these properties dendrimers have fascinated the researchers in the development of new drug carriers and they have been implicated in many therapeutic and biomedical applications. Despite of their extensive applications, their use in biological systems is limited due to toxicity issues associated with them. Considering this, the present review has focused on the different strategies of their synthesis, drug delivery and targeting, gene delivery and other biomedical applications, interactions involved in formation of drug-dendrimer complex along with characterization techniques employed for their evaluation, toxicity problems and associated approaches to alleviate their inherent toxicity.

  5. Leptin signaling molecular actions and drug target in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang N

    2014-11-01

    leptin and Ob-R in cancer cells compared to normal cells, makes leptin an ideal drug target for the prevention and treatment of HCC, especially in obese patients. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, leptin, leptin antagonist, leptin signaling, tumor angiogenesis, drug target

  6. Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins: Potential Targets for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathan Salma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The function of a protein is dependent on its three-dimensional structure. However, numerous proteins lacking intrinsic globular 3D structure under physiological conditions had been recognized. These proteins are frequently involved in some of the most critical cellular control mechanisms and it appears that their rapid turnover, aided by their unstructured nature in the unbound state, provides a level of control that allows rapid and accurate responses of the cell to changing environmental conditions. Approach: A significant number of proteins known to be involved in protein deposition disorders were now considered to Be Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUPs. For example, Aß peptide and tau protein in Alzheimer’s disease, PrP in Prion’s disease and a-Synuclein in Parkinson’s disease. The disorder of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUP's was crucial to their functions. They may adopt defined but extended structures when bound to cognate ligands. Their amino acid compositions were less hydrophobic than those of soluble proteins. They lack hydrophobic cores and hence did not become insoluble when heated. About 40% of eukaryotic proteins had at least one long (>50 residues disordered region. Roughly 10% of proteins in various genomes had been predicted to be fully disordered. Presently over 100 IUP's had been identified; none are enzymes. Obviously, IUP's were greatly underrepresented in the Protein Data Bank, although there were few cases of an IUP bound to a folded (intrinsically structured protein. Results: The five functional categories for intrinsically unstructured proteins and domains were entropic chains (bristles to ensure spacing, springs, flexible spacers/linkers, effectors (inhibitors and disassemblers, scavengers, assemblers and display sites. These IUPs could serve as potential targets for Structure Based Drug Design (SBDD which stress on the transition

  7. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  8. Orexin Receptor Targets for Anti-Relapse Medication Development in Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    See, Ronald E.; Luyi Zhou; Wei-Lun Sun

    2011-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic illness characterized by high rates of relapse. Relapse to drug use can be triggered by re-exposure to drug-associated cues, stressful events, or the drug itself after a period of abstinence. Pharmacological intervention to reduce the impact of relapse-instigating factors offers a promising target for addiction treatment. Growing evidence has implicated an important role of the orexin/hypocretin system in drug reward and drug-seeking, including animal models of rel...

  9. Antibiotic-loaded chitosan-Laponite films for local drug delivery by titanium implants: cell proliferation and drug release studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordikhani, Farideh; Dehghani, Mehdi; Simchi, Arash

    2015-12-01

    In this study, chitosan-Laponite nanocomposite coatings with bone regenerative potential and controlled drug-release capacity are prepared by electrophoretic deposition technique. The controlled release of a glycopeptide drug, i.e. vancomycin, is attained by the intercalation of the polymer and drug macromolecules into silicate galleries. Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry reveals electrostatic interactions between the charged structure of clay and the amine and hydroxyl groups of chitosan and vancomycin, leading to a complex positively-charged system with high electrophoretic mobility. By applying electric field the charged particles are deposited on the surface of titanium foils and uniform chitosan films containing 25-55 wt% Laponite and 937-1655 µg/cm(2) vancomycin are obtained. Nanocomposite films exhibit improved cell attachment with higher cell viability. Alkaline phosphatase assay reveals enhanced cell proliferation due the gradual dissolution of Laponite particles into the culture medium. In-vitro drug-release studies show lower release rate through a longer period for the nanocomposite compared to pristine chitosan. PMID:26507202

  10. Simultaneous detection of antibiotics and other drug residues in the dissolved and particulate phases of water by an off-line SPE combined with on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS: Method development and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, Ines; Caria, Giovanni; Ouddane, Baghdad; Ghorbel-Abid, Ibtissem; Ternane, Riadh; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika; Net, Sopheak

    2016-09-01

    Due to their widespread use in human and animal healthcare, antibiotics and other drug residues are ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Given their potential impacts on ecosystem functioning and public health, the quantification of environmental drug residues has become a necessity. Various analysis techniques have been found to be suitable for reliable detection of such compounds. However, quantification can be difficult because these compounds are present at trace or ultra-trace levels. Consequently, the accuracy of environmental analyses depends on both the efficiency and the robustness of the extraction and quantification method. In this work, an off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) combined with on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS was applied to the simultaneous extraction and quantification of 26 pharmaceutical products, including 18 antibiotics, dissolved in a water phase. Optimal conditions were determined and then applied to assess the contamination level of the targeted drug residues in water collected from four sites in Northern France: a river, the input and output of an aerated lagoon, and a wastewater treatment plant. Drug residues associated with suspended solid matter (SSM) were also quantified in this work using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) combined with an on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS system in order to complete an assessment of the degree of total background pollution. PMID:27151499

  11. Inconsistency of Synergy Between the β-Lactamase Inhibitor CP-45,899 and β-Lactam Antibiotics Against Multiply Drug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas Species

    OpenAIRE

    Fass, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    Synergy between CP-45,899 and ampicillin or newer β-lactam antibiotics against multiply drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas species was inconsistent. In contrast, synergy between CP-45,899 and ampicillin against β-lactamase-producing strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Bacteroides fragilis was consistent and marked.

  12. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety: a cross-sectional survey in the private sector in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Mbonye, AK; Buregyeya, E.; Rutebemberwa, E.; Clarke, SE; Lal, S; Hansen, KS; Magnussen, P; LaRussa, P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety in the private health sector in Uganda. Methods A survey was conducted within 57 parishes from August to October 2014 in Mukono District, Uganda. Data was captured on the following variables: drug shop charact...

  13. Comprehensive allergy work-up is mandatory in cystic fibrosis patients who report a history suggestive of drug allergy to beta-lactam antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Caimmi Silvia; Sanfiorenzo Céline; Caimmi Davide; Bousquet Philippe-Jean; Chiron Raphael; Demoly Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In the general population, reports on suspected ß-lactam hypersensitivity are common. After a drug allergy work-up at best 20% of the selected patients are positive. However, these considerations have not been explored in cystic fibrosis patients for whom antibiotics are even more crucial. Methods The study, part of the Drug Allergy and Hypersensitivity (DAHD) cohort, was performed in the regional cystic fibrosis center of Montpellier, France. After identifying patients wi...

  14. Antibiotic therapeutic options for infections caused by drug-resistant Gram-positive cocci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwan, K; Senok, A C; Rotimi, V O

    2009-01-01

    Serious infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria are currently difficult to treat because many of these pathogens are now resistant to standard antimicrobial agents. As a result of the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens, new antimicrobial agents are urgently needed for clinical use. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of drugs that have activity against these Gram-positive pathogens. Daptomycin, tigecycline, linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin and dalbavancin are five antimicrobial agents that are useful for the treatment of infections due to drug-resistant Gram-positive cocci. This review focuses on their mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, spectrum of activity, clinical effectiveness, drug interaction and safety. These antimicrobial agents provide the clinician with additional treatment options among the limited therapies for resistant Gram-positive bacterial infection. PMID:20701863

  15. Phytocompounds and modulatory effects of Anacardium microcarpum (cajui on antibiotic drugs used in clinical infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa-Filho VM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Valter M Barbosa-Filho,1,2 Emily P Waczuk,2 Nadghia F Leite,3 Irwin RA Menezes,1 José GM da Costa,1 Sírleis R Lacerda,1 Isaac A Adedara,2 Henrique Douglas Melo Coutinho,4 Thais Posser,5 Jean P Kamdem2,6 1Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde (CCBS, Universidade Regional do Cariri (URCA, Crato, CE, Brazil; 2Programa de Pós-Graduação em Bioquímica Toxicológica, Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil; 3Departamento de Química Biológica, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde (CCBS, 4Laboratory of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Universidade Regional do Cariri (URCA, Crato, CE, Brazil; 5Campus São Gabriel, Universidade Federal do Pampa, São Gabriel, RS, Brazil; 6Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básica da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil Background: The challenge of antibiotic resistance and the emergence of new infections have generated considerable interest in the exploration of natural products from plant origins as combination therapy. In this context, crude ethanolic extract (CEE, ethyl acetate fraction (EAF, and methanolic fraction (MF from Anacardium microcarpum were tested alone or in combination with antibiotics (amikacin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. Methods: Antibiotic resistance-modifying activity was performed using the microdilution method by determining the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC. In addition, phytochemical prospecting analyses of tested samples were carried out. Results: Our results indicated that all the extracts showed low antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant strains (MIC =512 µg/mL. However, addition of CEE, EAF, and MF to the growth medium at the subinhibitory concentration (MIC/8=64 µg/mL significantly modulated

  16. Systematic Identification of Synergistic Drug Pairs Targeting HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Xu; Hu, Long; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Gao, Geng; Liu, Yifang; Qu, Hongjing; Xi, Ruibin; Lu, Zhi John; Park, Peter J.; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The systematic identification of effective drug combinations has been hindered by the unavailability of methods that can explore the large combinatorial search space of drug interactions. Here we present a multiplex screening method named MuSIC (Multiplex Screening for Interacting Compounds), which expedites the comprehensive assessment of pair-wise compound interactions. We examined ~500,000 drug pairs from 1000 FDA-approved or clinically tested drugs and identified drugs that synergize to i...

  17. Structure-Based DNA-Targeting Strategies with Small Molecule Ligands for Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Jia; Gan, Jianhua; Huang, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acids are the molecular targets of many clinical anticancer drugs. However, compared with proteins, nucleic acids have traditionally attracted much less attention as drug targets in structure-based drug design, partially because limited structural information of nucleic acids complexed with potential drugs is available. Over the past several years, enormous progresses in nucleic acid crystallization, heavy-atom derivatization, phasing, and structural biology have been made. Many compl...

  18. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Asrar Alam

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes...

  19. Off-Target Effects of Psychoactive Drugs Revealed by Genome-Wide Assays in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Ericson, Elke; Gebbia, Marinella; Heisler, Lawrence E.; Wildenhain, Jan; Tyers, Mike; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2008-01-01

    To better understand off-target effects of widely prescribed psychoactive drugs, we performed a comprehensive series of chemogenomic screens using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Because the known human targets of these drugs do not exist in yeast, we could employ the yeast gene deletion collections and parallel fitness profiling to explore potential off-target effects in a genome-wide manner. Among 214 tested, documented psychoactive drugs, we identified 81 comp...

  20. Recent Advances in the Discovery of Haem-Targeting Drugs for Malaria and Schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. de Villiers

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Haem is believed to be the target of some of the historically most important antimalarial drugs, most notably chloroquine. This target is almost ideal as haem is host-derived and the process targeted, haemozoin formation, is a physico-chemical process with no equivalent in the host. The result is that the target remains viable despite resistance to current drugs, which arises from mutations in parasite membrane transport proteins. Recent advances in high-throughput screening methods, together with a better understanding of the interaction of existing drugs with this target, have created new prospects for discovering novel haem-targeting chemotypes and for target-based structural design of new drugs. Finally, the discovery that Schistosoma mansoni also produces haemozoin suggests that new drugs of this type may be chemotherapeutic not only for malaria, but also for schistosomiasis. These recent developments in the literature are reviewed.

  1. RGD-modified lipid disks as drug carriers for tumor targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Zhang, Mingfei; Wei, Xiaoli; Yan, Zhiqiang; Ren, Yachao; Ying, Man; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-03-01

    Melittin, the major component of the European bee venom, is a potential anticancer candidate due to its lytic properties. However, in vivo applications of melittin are limited due to its main side effect, hemolysis, especially when applied through intravenous administration. The polyethylene glycol-stabilized lipid disk is a novel type of nanocarrier, and the rim of lipid disks has a high affinity to amphiphilic peptides. In our study, a c(RGDyK) modified lipid disk was developed as a tumor targeted drug delivery system for melittin. Cryo-TEM was used to confirm the shape and size of lipid disks with or without c(RGDyK) modification. In vitro and in vivo hemolysis analyses revealed that the hemolysis effect significantly decreased after melittin associated with lipid disks. Importantly, the results of our in vivo biodistribution and tumor growth inhibitory experiments showed that c(RGDyK) modification increased the distribution of lipid disks in the tumor and the anticancer efficacy of melittin loaded lipid disks. Thus, we successfully achieved a targeted drug delivery system for melittin and other amphiphilic peptides with a good therapeutic effect and low side effects.

  2. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, C.; Yang, L.; Jiang, X.; Xu, C.; Wang, M.; Wang, Q.; Zhou, Z.; Xiang, Z.; Cui, H.

    2014-01-01

    Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of

  3. Thermomechanical Properties, Antibiotic Release, and Bioactivity of a Sterilized Cyclodextrin Drug Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Gormley, Catherine A; Keech, Melissa; von Recum, Horst A

    2014-05-14

    Various local drug delivery devices and coatings are being developed as slow, sustained release mechanism for drugs, yet the polymers are typically not evaluated after commercial sterilization techniques. We examine the effect that commercial sterilization techniques have on the physical, mechanical, and drug delivery properties of polyurethane polymers. Specifically we tested cyclodextrin-hexamethyl diisocyanate crosslinked polymers before and after autoclave, ethylene oxide, and gamma radiation sterilization processes. We found that there is no significant change in the properties of polymers sterilized by ethylene oxide and gamma radiation compared to non-sterilized polymers. Polymers sterilized by autoclave showed increased tensile strength (psterilized polymers . In the release of drugs, which were loaded after the autoclave sterilization process, we observed a prolonged release (psterilized polymers. The change in the release profile and tensile strength in polymers sterilized by autoclave was interpreted as being caused by additional crosslinking from residual, unreacted, or partially-reacted crosslinker contained within the polymer. Autoclaving therefore represents additional thermo-processing to modify rate and dose from polyurethanes and other materials. PMID:24949201

  4. Exposure to phages has little impact on the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance on drug concentration gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Quan-Guo

    2014-01-01

    The use of phages for treating bacterial pathogens has recently been advocated as an alternative to antibiotic therapy. Here, we test a hypothesis that bacteria treated with phages may show more limited evolution of antibiotic resistance as the fitness costs of resistance to phages may add to those of antibiotic resistance, further reducing the growth performance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. We did this by studying the evolution of phage-exposed and phage-free Pseudomonas fluorescens cul...

  5. The antihelmintic drug pyrvinium pamoate targets aggressive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    Full Text Available WNT signaling plays a key role in the self-renewal of tumor initiation cells (TICs. In this study, we used pyrvinium pamoate (PP, an FDA-approved antihelmintic drug that inhibits WNT signaling, to test whether pharmacologic inhibition of WNT signaling can specifically target TICs of aggressive breast cancer cells. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line, and SUM-159, a metaplastic basal-type breast cancer cell line, were used in these studies. We found that PP inhibited primary and secondary mammosphere formation of cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, at least 10 times less than the dose needed to have a toxic effect on cancer cells. A comparable mammosphere formation IC50 dose to that observed in cancer cell lines was obtained using malignant pleural effusion samples from patients with IBC. A decrease in activity of the TIC surrogate aldehyde dehydrogenase was observed in PP-treated cells, and inhibition of WNT signaling by PP was associated with down-regulation of a panel of markers associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In vivo, intratumoral injection was associated with tumor necrosis, and intraperitoneal injection into mice with tumor xenografts caused significant tumor growth delay and a trend toward decreased lung metastasis. In in vitro mammosphere-based and monolayer-based clonogenic assays, we found that PP radiosensitized cells in monolayer culture but not mammosphere culture. These findings suggest WNT signaling inhibition may be a feasible strategy for targeting aggressive breast cancer. Investigation and modification of the bioavailability and toxicity profile of systemic PP are warranted.

  6. Drug delivery and drug targeting with parenteral lipid nanoemulsions - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörmann, Karl; Zimmer, Andreas

    2016-02-10

    Lipid nanosized emulsions or nanoemulsions (NE) are oil in water dispersions with an oil droplet size of about 200nm. This size of oil droplets dispersed in a continuous water phase is a prerequisite for the parenteral, namely intravenous administration. Many parenteral nutrition and drug emulsions on the market confirm the safe use of NE over years. Parenteral emulsions loaded with APIs (active pharmaceutical ingredients) are considered as drug delivery systems (DDS). DDS focuses on the regulation of the in vivo dynamics, such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, and extended bioavailability, thereby improving the effectiveness and the safety of the drugs. Using an emulsion as a DDS, or through the use of surface diversification of the dispersed oil droplets of emulsions, a targeted increase of the API concentration in some parts of the human body can be achieved. This review focuses on NE similar to the marketed once with no or only low amount of additional surfactants beside the emulsifier from a manufacturing point of view (technique, used raw materials). PMID:26699427

  7. Cancer therapy with drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles-magnetic drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) in cancer therapy is to concentrate chemotherapeutics to a tumor region while simultaneously the overall dose is reduced. This can be achieved with coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles bound to a chemotherapeutic agent. These particles are applied intra arterially close to the tumor region and focused to the tumor by a strong external magnetic field. The interaction of the particles with the field gradient leads to an accumulation in the region of interest (i.e. tumor). The particle enrichment and thereby the drug-load in the tumor during MDT has been proven by several analytical and imaging methods. Moreover, in pilot studies we investigated in an experimental in vivo tumor model the effectiveness of this approach. Complete tumor regressions without any negative side effects could be observed. - Research Highlights: →Iron oxide nanoparticles can be enriched in tumors by external magnetic fields. → Histology evidences the intravasation of particles enter the intracellular space. → Non-invasive imaging techniques can display the spatial arrangement of particles. → HPLC-analysis show outstanding drug enrichment in tumors after MDT.

  8. Cancer therapy with drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles-magnetic drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexiou, Christoph, E-mail: c.alexiou@web.d [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine at the Else Kroener-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship (Germany); Tietze, Rainer; Schreiber, Eveline [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine at the Else Kroener-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship (Germany); Jurgons, Roland [Franz Penzoldt Center, University Hospital Erlangen (Germany); Richter, Heike; Trahms, Lutz [PTB Berlin (Germany); Rahn, Helene; Odenbach, Stefan [TU Dresden, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lyer, Stefan [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine at the Else Kroener-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    The aim of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) in cancer therapy is to concentrate chemotherapeutics to a tumor region while simultaneously the overall dose is reduced. This can be achieved with coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles bound to a chemotherapeutic agent. These particles are applied intra arterially close to the tumor region and focused to the tumor by a strong external magnetic field. The interaction of the particles with the field gradient leads to an accumulation in the region of interest (i.e. tumor). The particle enrichment and thereby the drug-load in the tumor during MDT has been proven by several analytical and imaging methods. Moreover, in pilot studies we investigated in an experimental in vivo tumor model the effectiveness of this approach. Complete tumor regressions without any negative side effects could be observed. - Research Highlights: Iron oxide nanoparticles can be enriched in tumors by external magnetic fields. Histology evidences the intravasation of particles enter the intracellular space. Non-invasive imaging techniques can display the spatial arrangement of particles. HPLC-analysis show outstanding drug enrichment in tumors after MDT.

  9. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Nikolaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given.

  10. High-dose antibiotic therapy is superior to a 3-drug combination of prostanoids and lipid A derivative in protecting irradiated canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an urgent need to develop non-toxic radioprotectors. We tested the efficacy of a 3-drug combination (3-DC) of iloprost, misoprostol, and 3D-MPL (3-deacylated monophosphoryl lipid A) and the effects of postirradiation clinical support with high doses of antibiotics and blood transfusion. Canines were given 3-DC or the vehicle and exposed to 3.4 Gy or 4.1 Gy of 60Co radiation. Canines irradiated at 4.1 Gy were also given clinical support, which consisted of blood transfusion and antibiotics (gentamicin, and cefoxitin or cephalexin). Peripheral blood cell profile and 60-day survival were used as indices of protection. At 3.4 Gy, 3-DC- or vehicle-treated canines without postirradiation clinical support survived only for 10 to 12 days. Fifty percent of the canines treated with 3-DC or vehicle and provided postirradiation clinical support survived 4.1-Gy irradiation. Survival of canines treated with vehicle before irradiation significantly correlated with postirradiation antibiotic treatments, but not with blood transfusion. The recovery profile of peripheral blood cells in 4.1 Gy-irradiated canines treated with vehicle and antibiotics was better than drug-treated canines. These results indicate that therapy with high doses of intramuscular aminoglycoside antibiotic (gentamicin) and an oral cephalosporin (cephalexin) enhanced survival of irradiated canines. Although blood transfusion correlated with survival of 3-DC treated canines, there were no additional survivors with 3-DC treated canines than the controls. (author)

  11. Antibacterial efficacy and drug-induced tooth discolouration of antibiotic combinations for endodontic regenerative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandras, N; Roana, J; Allizond, V; Pasqualini, D; Crosasso, P; Burlando, M; Banche, G; Denisova, T; Berutti, E; Cuffini, A M

    2013-01-01

    Elimination of microbial contamination from the root canal system is a precondition for successful root canal treatment. Teeth with immature root development, necrotic pulps and apical periodontitis present multiple challenges for successful treatment. Disinfection is achieved by irrigation followed by the placement of an intracanal medicament. A mixture of ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and minocycline (3-MIX S) has been shown to be very effective in eliminating endodontic pathogens in vitro and in vivo. Among the components of the mixture, minocycline can induce tooth discolouration after long-term oral use. Therefore, the elimination of minocycline from the above-mentioned combination has been suggested to prevent the occasion of this undesirable effect. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential antimicrobial efficacy of alternative antibiotic combinations [3-MIX C (clarithromycin); 3-MIX F (fosfomycin)] against bacteria from infected root canals. An additional objective was to evaluate their discolouration potential as possible alternatives to minocycline-based intracanal medicaments. Our in vitro results clearly demonstrated that 3-MIX C and 3-MIX F had a greater antimicrobial activity than 3-MIX S, underlying that clarithromycin still had a higher capacity to kill endodontic pathogens in vitro compared to fosfomycin. Both 3-MIX C and 3-MIX F were able to avoid the permanent staining effect of the crown. PMID:23755774

  12. Enzymes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis MEP and CoA Pathways Targeted for Structure-Based Drug Design

    OpenAIRE

    Björkelid, Christofer

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by the pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the most widespread and deadly infectious diseases today. Treatment of tuberculosis relies on antibiotics that were developed more than 50 years ago. These are now becoming ineffective due to the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of the bacteria. The aim of the research in this thesis was to develop new antibiotics for tuberculosis treatment. To this end, we targeted enzymes from two essential biosyn...

  13. Drug target mining and analysis of the Chinese tree shrew for pharmacological testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    Full Text Available The discovery of new drugs requires the development of improved animal models for drug testing. The Chinese tree shrew is considered to be a realistic candidate model. To assess the potential of the Chinese tree shrew for pharmacological testing, we performed drug target prediction and analysis on genomic and transcriptomic scales. Using our pipeline, 3,482 proteins were predicted to be drug targets. Of these predicted targets, 446 and 1,049 proteins with the highest rank and total scores, respectively, included homologs of targets for cancer chemotherapy, depression, age-related decline and cardiovascular disease. Based on comparative analyses, more than half of drug target proteins identified from the tree shrew genome were shown to be higher similarity to human targets than in the mouse. Target validation also demonstrated that the constitutive expression of the proteinase-activated receptors of tree shrew platelets is similar to that of human platelets but differs from that of mouse platelets. We developed an effective pipeline and search strategy for drug target prediction and the evaluation of model-based target identification for drug testing. This work provides useful information for future studies of the Chinese tree shrew as a source of novel targets for drug discovery research.

  14. Enzymology of the nematode cuticle: A potential drug target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Antony P; Stepek, Gillian; Winter, Alan D; Pertab, David

    2014-08-01

    All nematodes possess an external structure known as the cuticle, which is crucial for their development and survival. This structure is composed primarily of collagen, which is secreted from the underlying hypodermal cells. Extensive studies using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans demonstrate that formation of the cuticle requires the activity of an extensive range of enzymes. Enzymes are required both pre-secretion, for synthesis of component proteins such as collagen, and post-secretion, for removal of the previous developmental stage cuticle, in a process known as moulting or exsheathment. The excretion/secretion products of numerous parasitic nematodes contain metallo-, serine and cysteine proteases, and these proteases are conserved across the nematode phylum and many are involved in the moulting/exsheathment process. This review highlights the enzymes required for cuticle formation, with a focus on the post-secretion moulting events. Where orthologues of the C. elegans enzymes have been identified in parasitic nematodes these may represent novel candidate targets for future drug/vaccine development. PMID:25057463

  15. Proline Rich Motifs as Drug Targets in Immune Mediated Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythily Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current version of the human immunome network consists of nearly 1400 interactions involving approximately 600 proteins. Intermolecular interactions mediated by proline-rich motifs (PRMs are observed in many facets of the immune response. The proline-rich regions are known to preferentially adopt a polyproline type II helical conformation, an extended structure that facilitates transient intermolecular interactions such as signal transduction, antigen recognition, cell-cell communication and cytoskeletal organization. The propensity of both the side chain and the backbone carbonyls of the polyproline type II helix to participate in the interface interaction makes it an excellent recognition motif. An advantage of such distinct chemical features is that the interactions can be discriminatory even in the absence of high affinities. Indeed, the immune response is mediated by well-orchestrated low-affinity short-duration intermolecular interactions. The proline-rich regions are predominantly localized in the solvent-exposed regions such as the loops, intrinsically disordered regions, or between domains that constitute the intermolecular interface. Peptide mimics of the PRM have been suggested as potential antagonists of intermolecular interactions. In this paper, we discuss novel PRM-mediated interactions in the human immunome that potentially serve as attractive targets for immunomodulation and drug development for inflammatory and autoimmune pathologies.

  16. Structure determination of drug target proteins by neutron crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution X-ray crystallography provides information for most of the atoms comprising the proteins, with the exception of hydrogen atoms. Whereas, neutron crystallography, which is a powerful technique for locating hydrogen atoms, enables us to obtain accurate atomic positions within proteins. Neutron diffraction data can provide information of the location of hydrogen atoms to the structural information determined by X-ray crystallography. Here, we show the recent results of the structural determination of drug-target proteins, porcine pancreatic elastase and human immuno-deficiency virus type-1 protease by both X-ray and neutron diffraction. The structure of porcine pancreatic elastase with its potent inhibitor was determined to 0.094 nm resolution by X-ray diffraction and 0.165 nm resolution by neutron diffraction. The structure of HIV-PR with its potent inhibitor was also determined to 0.093 nm resolution by X-ray diffraction and 0.19 nm resolution by neutron diffraction. The ionization state and the location of hydrogen atoms of the catalytic residue in these enzymes were determined by neutron diffraction. Furthermore, collaborative use of both X-ray and neutron crystallography to identify the location of ambiguous hydrogen atoms will be shown. (author)

  17. A small molecule nanodrug consisting of amphiphilic targeting ligand-chemotherapy drug conjugate for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Quanbing; Ma, Yuan; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2016-05-28

    Targeted drug delivery is a broadly applicable approach for cancer therapy. However, the nanocarrier-based targeted delivery system suffers from batch-to-batch variation, quality concerns and carrier-related toxicity issues. Thus, to develop a carrier-free targeted delivery system with nanoscale characteristics is very attractive. Here, a novel targeting small molecule nanodrug self-delivery system consisting of targeting ligand and chemotherapy drug was constructed, which combined the advantages of small molecules and nano-assemblies together and showed excellent targeting ability and long blood circulation time with well-defined structure, high drug loading ratio and on-demand drug release behavior. As a proof-of-concept, lactose (Lac) and doxorubicin (DOX) were chosen as the targeting ligand and chemotherapy drug, respectively. Lac and DOX were conjugated through a pH-responsive hydrazone group. For its intrinsic amphiphilic property, Lac-DOX conjugate could self-assemble into nanoparticles in water. Both in vitro and in vivo assays indicated that Lac-DOX nanoparticles exhibited enhanced anticancer activity and weak side effects. This novel active targeting nanodrug delivery system shows great potential in cancer therapy. PMID:27040815

  18. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster Past ... reason is that we're not selecting the right biological changes to target from the start. How ...

  19. Preparation of Biocompatible Carboxymethyl Chitosan Nanoparticles for Delivery of Antibiotic Drug

    OpenAIRE

    Liang Zhao; Bingya Zhu; Yunhong Jia; Wenjiu Hou; Chang Su

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To prepare biocompatible ciprofloxacin-loaded carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles (CCC NPs) and evaluate their cell specificity as well as antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli in vitro. Methods. CCC NPs were prepared by ionic cross-linking method and optimized by using Box-Behnken response surface method (BBRSM). Zeta potential, drug encapsulation, and release of the obtained nanoparticles in vitro were thoroughly investigated. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and...

  20. Tetrahydrobiopterin Biosynthesis as an Off-Target of Sulfa Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Haruki, H.; Pedersen, M.G.; Gorska, K. I.; Pojer, F.; Johnsson, K.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of sulfa drugs for the chemotherapy of bacterial infections in 1935 revolutionized medicine. Although their mechanism of action is understood, the molecular bases for most of their side effects remain obscure. Here, we report that sulfamethoxazole and other sulfa drugs interfere with tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis through inhibition of sepiapterin reductase. Crystal structures of sepiapterin reductase with bound sulfa drugs reveal how structurally diverse sulfa drugs achiev...

  1. Investigation of xFe2O4 (x = Mn, Co) doped hydroxylapatite ferromagnetic biomaterials for the treatment of damaged bone and magnetically targeted drug delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vikas; Singh, K. J.; Kaur, Kulwinder; Bhatia, Gaurav

    2016-05-01

    Magnetically attracted MnFe2O4 and CoFe2O4 doped hydroxylapatite samples have been prepared by using co-precipitation method in the laboratory. Bioactive nature of samples has been confirmed from XRD spectra. Ferromagnetic behavior of samples has been studied by using vibration sample magnetometer. Human osteoblast cell line MG63 has been used to explore the cell viability of samples. Drug carrier ability of samples has been checked with gentamycin as an antibiotic and results show that samples can be used as excellent drug carriers. Drug loaded samples can be easily targeted to specific area due to their attractive nature towards external magnetic field. Our results indicate that prepared samples possess good bioactive as well as ferromagnetic behavior with drug carrier ability and hence, our samples can be potential candidates for the clinical applications.

  2. Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway as Target for Anti-trypanosomatid Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderley de Souza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sterols are constituents of the cellular membranes that are essential for their normal structure and function. In mammalian cells, cholesterol is the main sterol found in the various membranes. However, other sterols predominate in eukaryotic microorganisms such as fungi and protozoa. It is now well established that an important metabolic pathway in fungi and in members of the Trypanosomatidae family is one that produces a special class of sterols, including ergosterol, and other 24-methyl sterols, which are required for parasitic growth and viability, but are absent from mammalian host cells. Currently, there are several drugs that interfere with sterol biosynthesis (SB that are in use to treat diseases such as high cholesterol in humans and fungal infections. In this review, we analyze the effects of drugs such as (a statins, which act on the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, (b bisphosphonates, which interfere with the isoprenoid pathway in the step catalyzed by farnesyl diphosphate synthase, (c zaragozic acids and quinuclidines, inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS, which catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, (d allylamines, inhibitors of squalene epoxidase, (e azoles, which inhibit C14α-demethylase, and (f azasterols, which inhibit Δ24(25-sterol methyltransferase (SMT. Inhibition of this last step appears to have high selectivity for fungi and trypanosomatids, since this enzyme is not found in mammalian cells. We review here the IC50 values of these various inhibitors, their effects on the growth of trypanosomatids (both in axenic cultures and in cell cultures, and their effects on protozoan structural organization (as evaluted by light and electron microscopy and lipid composition. The results show that the mitochondrial membrane as well as the membrane lining the protozoan cell body and flagellum are the main targets. Probably as a consequence of these primary effects, other important changes take

  3. ORAL COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A REVIEW ON CURRENT AND NOVEL PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asija Rajesh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Small intestine is mostly the site for drug absorption but in some cases the drug needs to be targeted to colon due to some factors like local colonic disease, degradation related conditions, delayed release of drugs, systemic delivery of protein and peptide drugs etc. Colon targeted drug delivery is important and relatively new concept for the absorption of drugs because it offers almost neutral pH and long residence time, thereby increasing the drug absorption. Colon has proved to be a site for the absorption of poorly soluble drugs. For the successful targeting of drugs to colon the dosage form should be designed such that it prevents the drug release in upper GIT and releasing it in the colonic region. This review article discusses in brief about introduction of colon along with the novel and emerging technologies for colon targeting of drug molecule. Treatment of these diseases with colon-specific drug delivery system provides an interesting alternative over systemic drug administration because of lower dosing and fewer systemic side effects.

  4. Tuberculosis therapeutics: Engineering of nanomedicinal systems for local delivery of targeted drug cocktails

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addio, Suzanne M.

    In this thesis, a multifunctional nanocarrier drug delivery system was investigated and optimized to improve tuberculosis therapy by promoting the intracellular delivery of high payloads of antibiotics. To meet the needs of a patient population which continues to grow by close to 10 million people a year, innovative therapeutics must be formulated by robust and scalable processes. We use Flash NanoPrecipitation for the continuous precipitation of nanocarriers by block copolymer directed assembly, which enables the development of nanocarriers with tunable properties. Stable nanocarriers of Rifampicin and a hydrophobic Rifampicin prodrug have efficacy against tuberculosis in vitro that is equivalent to the soluble Rifampicin. To overcome poor in vivo efficacy of the recently discovered antitubercular drug SQ641, we co-encapsulate SQ641 and Cyclosporine A in a stable aqueous nanocarrier suspension, which enables drug administration and also enhances intracellular accumulation and antitubercular efficacy relative to SQ641 in solution. Since the mannose receptor is involved in the phagocytosis of tuberculosis bacilli, we modify the surface of nanocarriers with mannoside residues to target specific intracellular accumulation in macrophages. The surface density of mannoside terminated polyethylene glycol chains was controlled between 0 and 75% and in vitro cellular association reveals a 9% surface density is optimal for internalization mediated by the mannose receptor. We explore the preparation of large, porous aerosol carrier particles of with tunable deposition characteristics by spray freeze drying with ultrasonic atomization for direct dosing to the lungs. Nanocarriers are loaded at 3 - 50 wt% in mannitol particles with constant size, limited nanocarrier aggregation, and 63% dose delivered to the lungs, as determined by in vitro cascade impaction. There has been a lag in the development of new technologies to facilitate development and commercialization of

  5. High concentrations of drug in target tissues following local controlled release are utilized for both drug distribution and biologic effect: An example with epicardial inotropic drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Maslov, Mikhail Y.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Wei, Abraham E.; Pezone, Matthew J.; Lovich, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Local drug delivery preferentially loads target tissues with a concentration gradient from the surface or point of release that tapers down to more distant sites. Drug that diffuses down this gradient must be in unbound form, but such drug can only elicit a biologic effect through receptor interactions. Drug excess loads tissues, increasing gradients and driving penetration, but with limited added biological response. We examined the hypothesis that local application reduces dramatically syst...

  6. Preparation of Biocompatible Carboxymethyl Chitosan Nanoparticles for Delivery of Antibiotic Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To prepare biocompatible ciprofloxacin-loaded carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles (CCC NPs and evaluate their cell specificity as well as antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli in vitro. Methods. CCC NPs were prepared by ionic cross-linking method and optimized by using Box-Behnken response surface method (BBRSM. Zeta potential, drug encapsulation, and release of the obtained nanoparticles in vitro were thoroughly investigated. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and killing profiles of free or ciprofloxacin-loaded nanoparticles against Escherichia coli were documented. The cytotoicity of blank nanoparticles and cellular uptake of CCC NPs were also investigated. Results. The obtained particles were monodisperse nanospheres with an average hydrated diameter of 151 ± 5.67 nm and surface of charge −22.9 ± 2.21 mV. The MICs of free ciprofloxacin and CCC NPs were 0.16 and 0.08 μg/mL, respectively. Blank nanoparticles showed no obvious cell inhibition within 24 h, and noticeable phagocytosis effect was observed in the presence of CCC NPs. Conclusion. This study shows that CCC NPs have stronger antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli than the free ciprofloxacin because they can easily be uptaken by cells. The obtained CCC NPs have promising prospect in drug delivery field.

  7. Are pharmaceuticals with evolutionary conserved molecular drug targets more potent to cause toxic effects in non-target organisms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Furuhagen

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous use of pharmaceuticals has resulted in a continuous discharge into wastewater and pharmaceuticals and their metabolites are found in the environment. Due to their design towards specific drug targets, pharmaceuticals may be therapeutically active already at low environmental concentrations. Several human drug targets are evolutionary conserved in aquatic organisms, raising concerns about effects of these pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms. In this study, we hypothesized that the toxicity of a pharmaceutical towards a non-target invertebrate depends on the presence of the human drug target orthologs in this species. This was tested by assessing toxicity of pharmaceuticals with (miconazole and promethazine and without (levonorgestrel identified drug target orthologs in the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The toxicity was evaluated using general toxicity endpoints at individual (immobility, reproduction and development, biochemical (RNA and DNA content and molecular (gene expression levels. The results provide evidence for higher toxicity of miconazole and promethazine, i.e. the drugs with identified drug target orthologs. At the individual level, miconazole had the lowest effect concentrations for immobility and reproduction (0.3 and 0.022 mg L-1, respectively followed by promethazine (1.6 and 0.18 mg L-1, respectively. At the biochemical level, individual RNA content was affected by miconazole and promethazine already at 0.0023 and 0.059 mg L-1, respectively. At the molecular level, gene expression for cuticle protein was significantly suppressed by exposure to both miconazole and promethazine; moreover, daphnids exposed to miconazole had significantly lower vitellogenin expression. Levonorgestrel did not have any effects on any endpoints in the concentrations tested. These results highlight the importance of considering drug target conservation in environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals.

  8. Lipid II: a central component in bacterial cell wall synthesis and a target for antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruijff, Ben; van Dam, Vincent; Breukink, Eefjan

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall is mainly composed of peptidoglycan, which is a three-dimensional network of long aminosugar strands located on the exterior of the cytoplasmic membrane. These strands consist of alternating MurNAc and GlcNAc units and are interlinked to each other via peptide moieties that are attached to the MurNAc residues. Peptidoglycan subunits are assembled on the cytoplasmic side of the bacterial membrane on a polyisoprenoid anchor and one of the key components in the synthesis of peptidoglycan is Lipid II. Being essential for bacterial cell survival, it forms an attractive target for antibacterial compounds such as vancomycin and several lantibiotics. Lipid II consists of one GlcNAc-MurNAc-pentapeptide subunit linked to a polyiosoprenoid anchor 11 subunits long via a pyrophosphate linker. This review focuses on this special molecule and addresses three questions. First, why are special lipid carriers as polyprenols used in the assembly of peptidoglycan? Secondly, how is Lipid II translocated across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane? And finally, how is Lipid II used as a receptor for lantibiotics to kill bacteria? PMID:19008088

  9. A versatile fluorescent biosensor based on target-responsive graphene oxide hydrogel for antibiotic detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bing; Zhao, Huimin; Du, Lei; Gan, Xiaorong; Quan, Xie

    2016-09-15

    A fluorescent sensing platform based on graphene oxide (GO) hydrogel was developed through a fast and facile gelation, immersion and fluorescence determination process, in which the adenosine and aptamer worked as the co-crosslinkers to connect the GO sheets and then form the three-dimensional (3D) macrostructures. The as-prepared hydrogel showed high mechanical strength and thermal stability. The optimal hydrogel had a linear response for oxytetracycline (OTC) of 25-1000μg/L and a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 25μg/L. Moreover, together with the high affinity of the aptamer for its target, this assay exhibited excellent sensitivity and selectivity. According to its design principle, the as-designed hydrogel was also tested to possess the generic detection function for other molecules by simply replacing its recognition element, which is expected to lay a foundation to realize the assembly of functionalized hierarchical graphene-based materials for practical applications in analytical field. PMID:27132000

  10. Multiclass detection and quantitation of antibiotics and veterinary drugs in shrimps by fast liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Pulido, Marina; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; García-Reyes, Juan F; Martos, Natividad Ramos; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2011-09-15

    A fast liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOFMS) method has been developed for simultaneous quantitative multiclass determination of residues of selected antibiotics and other veterinary drugs (benzalkonium chloride, ethoxyquin, leucomalachite green (LMG), malachite green (MG), mebendazole, sulfadiazine, sulfadimethoxine, sulfamethazine, sulfamethizole, sulfanilamide, sulfapyridine, sulfathiazole and trimethoprim) in shrimps. Different sample treatment methodologies were tested for the extraction of the targeted species based on either liquid partitioning with different solvents, solid-phase extraction or and matrix solid-phase dispersion. The final selected extraction method consisted of solid-liquid extraction protocol using acetonitrile as solvent followed by a clean-up step with primary secondary amine (QuEChERS). Recovery rates for the extraction of the selected multiclass chemicals were in the range 58-133%. Subsequent identification, confirmation and quantitation were carried out by LC-TOFMS analysis using a reverse-phase C(18) column with 1.8 μm particle size. The confirmation of the target species was based on accurate mass measurements of the protonated molecules ([M+H](+)) and their fragment ions, obtaining routine accuracy errors lower than 2 ppm in most cases. The optimized LC-TOFMS method displayed excellent sensitivity for the studied analytes, with limits of detection (LODs) in the range 0.06-7 μg kg(-1). Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of 12 shrimp samples collected from different supermarkets, showing the potential applicability of the method for ultratrace detection of these chemicals in such complex matrix. PMID:21807204

  11. Influence of First-Line Antibiotics on the Antibacterial Activities of Acetone Stem Bark Extract of Acacia mearnsii De Wild. against Drug-Resistant Bacterial Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufunmiso O. Olajuyigbe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activity of the acetone extract of A. mearnsii and its interactions with antibiotics against some resistant bacterial strains. Methods. The antibacterial susceptibility testing was determined by agar diffusion and macrobroth dilution methods while the checkerboard method was used for the determination of synergy between the antibiotics and the extract. Results. The results showed that the susceptibility of the different bacterial isolates was concentration dependent for the extract and the different antibiotics. With the exception of S. marcescens, the inhibition zones of the extract produced by 20 mg/mL ranged between 18 and 32 mm. While metronidazole did not inhibit any of the bacterial isolates, all the antibiotics and their combinations, except for ciprofloxacin and its combination, did not inhibit Enterococcus faecalis. The antibacterial combinations were more of being antagonistic than of being synergistic in the agar diffusion assay. From the macrobroth dilution, the extract and the antibiotics exerted a varied degree of inhibitory effect on the test organisms. The MIC values of the acetone extract which are in mg/mL are lower than those of the different antibiotics which are in μg/mL. From the checkerboard assay, the antibacterial combinations showed varied degrees of interactions including synergism, additive, indifference, and antagonism interactions. While antagonistic and additive interactions were 14.44%, indifference interaction was 22.22% and synergistic interaction was 37.78% of the antibacterial combinations against the test isolates. While the additivity/indifference interactions indicated no interactions, the antagonistic interaction may be considered as a negative interaction that could result in toxicity and suboptimal bioactivity. Conclusion. The synergistic effects of the herbal-drug combinations may be harnessed for the discovery and development of more

  12. Glutamatergic Targets for Enhancing Extinction Learning in Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Cleva, R.M; Gass, J.T.; Widholm, J J; Olive, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of the motivational salience of drug-related environmental cues and contexts is one of the most problematic obstacles to successful treatment of drug addiction. Behavioral approaches to extinguishing the salience of drug-associated cues, such as cue exposure therapy, have generally produced disappointing results which have been attributed to, among other things, the context specificity of extinction and inadequate consolidation of extinction learning. Extinction of any behavio...

  13. Network based elucidation of drug response: from modulators to targets

    OpenAIRE

    Iorio, Francesco; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Bernardo, Diego di

    2013-01-01

    Network-based drug discovery aims at harnessing the power of networks to investigate the mechanism of action of existing drugs, or new molecules, in order to identify innovative therapeutic treatments. In this review, we describe some of the most recent advances in the field of network pharmacology, starting with approaches relying on computational models of transcriptional networks, then moving to protein and signaling network models and concluding with “drug networks”. These networks are de...

  14. Protein target discovery of drug and its reactive intermediate metabolite by using proteomic strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianghai Hu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Identifying protein targets of bioactive compounds is an effective approach to discover unknown protein functions, identify molecular mechanisms of drug action, and obtain information for optimization of lead compounds. At the same time, metabolic activation of a drug can lead to cytotoxicities. Therefore, it is very important to systemically characterize the drug and its reactive intermediate. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach has emerged as the most efficient to study protein functions and modifications. This review will discuss method development for the drug target discovery and the application in different fields including the drug toxicity mechanism caused by reactive metabolites.

  15. Selection between Michaelis–Menten and target-mediated drug disposition pharmacokinetic models

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Mager, Donald E.; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    Target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models have been applied to describe the pharmacokinetics of drugs whose distribution and/or clearance are affected by its target due to high binding affinity and limited capacity. The Michaelis–Menten (M–M) model has also been frequently used to describe the pharmacokinetics of such drugs. The purpose of this study is to investigate conditions for equivalence between M–M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models and provide guidelines for selection between these...

  16. Polypyrrole solid phase microextraction: A new approach to rapid sample preparation for the monitoring of antibiotic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szultka, Malgorzata [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus, Copernicus University, Gagarin 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Kegler, Ricarda [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Rostock, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Fuchs, Patricia [Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, University of Rostock, Schillingallee 35, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Olszowy, Pawel [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus, Copernicus University, Gagarin 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen K. [Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, University of Rostock, Schillingallee 35, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Buszewski, Boguslaw [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus, Copernicus University, Gagarin 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Mundkowski, Ralf G., E-mail: ralf.mundkowski@med.uni-rostock.de [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Rostock, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2010-05-14

    Simple or even rapid bioanalytical methods are rare, since they generally involve complicated, time-consuming sample preparation from the biological matrices like LLE or SPE. SPME provides a promising approach to overcome these limitations. The full potential of this innovative technique for medical diagnostics, pharmacotherapy or biochemistry has not been tapped yet. In-house manufactured SPME probes with polypyrrole (PPy) coating were evaluated using three antibiotics of high clinical relevance - linezolid, daptomycin, and moxifloxacin - from PBS, plasma, and whole blood. The PPy coating was characterised by scanning electron microscopy. Influences of pH, inorganic salt, and blood anticoagulants were studied for optimum performance. Extraction yields were determined from stagnant media as well as re-circulating human blood using the heart-and-lung machine model system. The PPy-SPME fibres showed high extraction yields, particularly regarding linezolid. The reproducibility of the method was optimised to achieve RSDs of 9% or 17% and 7% for SPME from stagnant or re-circulating blood using fresh and re-used fibres, respectively. The PPy-SPME approach was demonstrated to meet the requirements of therapeutic monitoring of the drugs tested, even from re-circulating blood at physiological flow rates. SPME represents a rapid and simple dual-step procedure with potency to significantly reduce the effort and expenditure of complicated sample preparations in biomedical analysis.

  17. Polypyrrole solid phase microextraction: A new approach to rapid sample preparation for the monitoring of antibiotic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple or even rapid bioanalytical methods are rare, since they generally involve complicated, time-consuming sample preparation from the biological matrices like LLE or SPE. SPME provides a promising approach to overcome these limitations. The full potential of this innovative technique for medical diagnostics, pharmacotherapy or biochemistry has not been tapped yet. In-house manufactured SPME probes with polypyrrole (PPy) coating were evaluated using three antibiotics of high clinical relevance - linezolid, daptomycin, and moxifloxacin - from PBS, plasma, and whole blood. The PPy coating was characterised by scanning electron microscopy. Influences of pH, inorganic salt, and blood anticoagulants were studied for optimum performance. Extraction yields were determined from stagnant media as well as re-circulating human blood using the heart-and-lung machine model system. The PPy-SPME fibres showed high extraction yields, particularly regarding linezolid. The reproducibility of the method was optimised to achieve RSDs of 9% or 17% and 7% for SPME from stagnant or re-circulating blood using fresh and re-used fibres, respectively. The PPy-SPME approach was demonstrated to meet the requirements of therapeutic monitoring of the drugs tested, even from re-circulating blood at physiological flow rates. SPME represents a rapid and simple dual-step procedure with potency to significantly reduce the effort and expenditure of complicated sample preparations in biomedical analysis.

  18. Frontline antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGowan, Alasdair; Albur, Maha

    2013-06-01

    The need to use front-line antibiotics wisely has never been greater. Antibiotic resistance and multi-drug resistant infection, driven by antibiotic use, remain major public health and professional concerns. To overcome these infection problems, use of older antibiotics active against multi drug-resistant pathogens is increasing - for example, colistin, fosfomycin, pivmecillinam, pristinamycin, temocillin and oral tetracyclines. The number of new antibacterials reaching clinical practice has reduced significantly in the last 20 years, most being focused on therapy of Gram-positive infection - eg linezolid, daptomycin, telavancin and ceftaroline. Recent guidance on antibiotic stewardship in NHS trusts in England is likely to provide a backdrop to antibiotic use in hospitals in the next 5 years. PMID:23760700

  19. A Chemoinformatics Approach to the Discovery of Lead-Like Molecules from Marine and Microbial Sources En Route to Antitumor and Antibiotic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florbela Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The comprehensive information of small molecules and their biological activities in the PubChem database allows chemoinformatic researchers to access and make use of large-scale biological activity data to improve the precision of drug profiling. A Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship approach, for classification, was used for the prediction of active/inactive compounds relatively to overall biological activity, antitumor and antibiotic activities using a data set of 1804 compounds from PubChem. Using the best classification models for antibiotic and antitumor activities a data set of marine and microbial natural products from the AntiMarin database were screened—57 and 16 new lead compounds for antibiotic and antitumor drug design were proposed, respectively. All compounds proposed by our approach are classified as non-antibiotic and non-antitumor compounds in the AntiMarin database. Recently several of the lead-like compounds proposed by us were reported as being active in the literature.

  20. Preparation and Optimization of Nanoemulsions for targeting Drug Delivery

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    Navneet Sharma

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanoemulsions have appeared as a novel drug delivery system which allows sustained or controlled release of drug, biological active ingredient and genetic material. Nanoemulsion is a dispersion consisting of oil, surfactant and an aqueous phase, which is a isotropically clear and thermo-dynamically or kinetically stable liquid solution, usually with droplet diameter within the range of 10-500nm. Although interest in nano-emulsions was developed for more than two decades now, mainly for nanoparticle preparation, it is in the last few years that direct applications of nano-emulsions in consumer products are being developed, mainly in pharmacy and cosmetics. These recent applications have made that studies on optimization methods for nano-emulsion preparation be a requirement. The design of effective formulations for drugs has long been a major task, because drug efficacy can severely limited by instability or poor solubility in the vehicle. Nanoemulsion is being applied to enhance the solubility and bioavailability of water insoluble drugs. The nanosized droplets leading to an enormous increase in interfacial areas associated with nanoemulsion would influence the transport properties of the drug [1, 2]. Recently, there has been a considerable attraction for this formulation, for the delivery of hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drug as drug carriers because of its improved drug solubilization capacity, long shelf life, ease of preparation and improvement of bioavailability of drugs. This review is focused on the most recent literature on developments of nano-emulsions as final application products and on the optimization of their preparation.

  1. Antibiotic-loaded, silver core-embedded mesoporous silica nanovehicles as a synergistic antibacterial agent for the treatment of drug-resistant infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Ding, Xiali; Chen, Yuan; Guo, Mingquan; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Xiaokui; Gu, Hongchen

    2016-09-01

    Drug-resistant bacterial infections have become one of the most serious risks in public health as they make the conventional antibiotics less efficient. There is an urgent need for developing new generations of antibacterial agents in this field. In this work, a nanoplatform of LEVO-loaded and silver core-embedded mesoporous silica nanovehicles (Ag@MSNs@LEVO) is demonstrated as a synergistic antibacterial agent for the treatment of drug-resistant infections both in vitro and in vivo. The combination of the inner Ag core and the loaded antibiotic drug in mesopores endows the single-particle nanoplatform with a synergistic effect on killing the drug-resistant bacteria. The nanoplatform of Ag@MSNs@LEVO exhibits superior antibacterial activity to LEVO-loaded MSNs (MSNs@LEVO) and silver core-embedded MSNs (Ag@MSNs) in vitro. In the in vivo acute peritonitis model, the infected drug-resistant Escherichia coli GN102 in peritoneal cavity of the mice is reduced by nearly three orders of magnitude and the aberrant pathological feature of spleen and peritoneum disappears after treatment with Ag@MSNs@LEVO. Importantly, this nanopaltform renders no obvious toxic side effect to the mice during the tested time. There is no doubt that this study strongly indicates a promising potential of Ag@MSNs@LEVO as a synergistic and safety therapy tool for the clinical drug-resistant infections. PMID:27294538

  2. Importance of the Genetic Diversity within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex for the Development of Novel Antibiotics and Diagnostic Tests of Drug Resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Koser, C. U.

    2012-09-24

    Despite being genetically monomorphic, the limited genetic diversity within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) has practical consequences for molecular methods for drug susceptibility testing and for the use of current antibiotics and those in clinical trials. It renders some representatives of MTBC intrinsically resistant against one or multiple antibiotics and affects the spectrum and consequences of resistance mutations selected for during treatment. Moreover, neutral or silent changes within genes responsible for drug resistance can cause false-positive results with hybridization-based assays, which have been recently introduced to replace slower phenotypic methods. We discuss the consequences of these findings and propose concrete steps to rigorously assess the genetic diversity of MTBC to support ongoing clinical trials.

  3. Optimizing drugs to reach treatment targets for children and adolescents living with HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Martina Penazzato; Janice Lee; Edmund Capparelli; Shaffiq Essajee; Nathan Ford; Atieno Ojoo; Fernando Pascual; Nandita Sugandhi; Marc Lallemant

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: As the global community makes progress towards the 90-90-90 targets by 2020, a key challenge is ensuring that antiretroviral drugs for children and adolescents are suitable to the context of resource-limited settings. Drug optimization aims to support the expanded use of more simplified, less toxic drug regimens with high barriers to drug resistance that require minimal clinical monitoring while maintaining therapeutic efficacy. This manuscript summarizes the progress made and o...

  4. Effect of Intestinal Flora on Protein Expression of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters in the Liver and Kidney of Germ-Free and Antibiotics-Treated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, Takuya; Hirayama-Kurogi, Mio; Ito, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2016-08-01

    Dysbiosis (alteration of intestinal flora) is associated with various host physiologies, including diseases. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of dysbiosis on protein expression levels in mouse liver and kidney by quantitative proteomic analysis, focusing in particular on drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in order to investigate the potential impact of dysbiosis on drug pharmacokinetics. Germ-free (GF) mice and antibiotics-treated mice were used as dysbiosis models. Expression levels of 825 and 357 proteins were significantly changed in the liver and kidney, respectively, of GF mice (vs specific-pathogen-free mice), while 306 and 178 proteins, respectively, were changed in antibiotics-treated mice (vs vehicle controls). Among them, 52 and 16 drug-metabolizing enzyme and transporter proteins were significantly changed in the liver and kidney, respectively, of GF mice, while 25 and 8, respectively were changed in antibiotics-treated mice. Expression of mitochondrial proteins was also changed in the liver and kidney of both model mice. In GF mice, Oatp1a1 was decreased in both the liver and kidney, while Sult1a1 and two Cyp enzymes were increased and Gstp1, four Cyp enzymes, three Ces enzymes, Bcrp1, and Oct1 were decreased in the liver. In antibiotics-treated mice, Cyp51a1 was increased and three Cyp enzymes, Bcrp1, and Bsep were decreased in the liver. Notably, the expression of Cyp2b10 and Cyp3a11 was greatly decreased in the liver of both models. Cyp2b activity in the liver microsomal fraction was also decreased. Our results indicate that dysbiosis changes the protein expression of multiple drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the liver and kidney and may alter pharmacokinetics in the host. PMID:27376980

  5. Associating Drugs, Targets and Clinical Outcomes into an Integrated Network Affords a New Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Repurposing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprea, Tudor; Nielsen, Sonny Kim; Ursu, Oleg;

    2011-01-01

    benefit from an integrated, semantic-web compliant computer-aided drug repurposing (CADR) effort, one that would enable deep data mining of associations between approved drugs (D), targets (T), clinical outcomes (CO) and SE. We report preliminary results from text mining and multivariate statistics, based...... on 7684 approved drug labels, ADL (Dailymed) via text mining. From the ADL corresponding to 988 unique drugs, the "adverse reactions" section was mapped onto 174 SE, then clustered via principal component analysis into a 5 x 5 self-organizing map that was integrated into a Cytoscape network of SE......Finding new uses for old drugs is a strategy embraced by the pharmaceutical industry, with increasing participation from the academic sector. Drug repurposing efforts focus on identifying novel modes of action, but not in a systematic manner. With intensive data mining and curation, we aim to apply...

  6. The use of microbubbles to target drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Richard

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultrasound-mediated microbubbles destruction has been proposed as an innovative method for noninvasive delivering of drugs and genes to different tissues. Microbubbles are used to carry a drug or gene until a specific area of interest is reached, and then ultrasound is used to burst the microbubbles, causing site-specific delivery of the bioactive materials. Furthermore, the ability of albumin-coated microbubbles to adhere to vascular regions with glycocalix damage or endothelial dysfunction is another possible mechanism to deliver drugs even in the absence of ultrasound. This review focuses on the characteristics of microbubbles that give them therapeutic properties and some important aspects of ultrasound parameters that are known to influence microbubble-mediated drug delivery. In addition, current studies involving this novel therapeutical application of microbubbles will be discussed.

  7. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 29 new BCCs among those who received a placebo . However, more than half of the patients taking vismodegib discontinued treatment because of side effects. Once patients stopped taking the drug, tumors began ...

  8. Identification of drug targets by chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Manhong

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To advance our understanding of disease biology, the characterization of the molecular target for clinically proven or new drugs is very important. Because of its simplicity and the availability of strains with individual deletions in all of its genes, chemogenomic profiling in yeast has been used to identify drug targets. As measurement of drug-induced changes in cellular metabolites can yield considerable information about the effects of a drug, we investigated whether combining chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast could improve the characterization of drug targets. BASIC METHODS: We used chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast to characterize the target for five drugs acting on two biologically important pathways. A novel computational method that uses a curated metabolic network was also developed, and it was used to identify the genes that are likely to be responsible for the metabolomic differences found. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The combination of metabolomic and chemogenomic profiling, along with data analyses carried out using a novel computational method, could robustly identify the enzymes targeted by five drugs. Moreover, this novel computational method has the potential to identify genes that are causative of metabolomic differences or drug targets. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  9. Molecular Targets Versus Models for New Antiepileptic Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Rogawski, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Animal models have played a key role in the discovery and characterization of all marketed antiepileptic drugs (AED). The conventional wisdom is that the standard animal screening models are becoming obsolete because they fail to identify compounds that act in mechanistically new ways and as a result do not offer therapeutic advantages over presently available agents. In fact, far from only detecting me-too drugs, the models often uncover compounds with distinctive profiles of activity in var...

  10. Predicted essential proteins ofPlasmodium falciparum for potential drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Feng He; Li Deng; Qin-Ying Xu; Zheng Shao

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective:To identify novel drug targets for treatment ofPlasmodium falciparum.Methods:LocalBLASTP were used to find the proteins non-homologous to human essential proteins as novel drug targets. Functional domains of novel drug targets were identified by InterPro and Pfam,3D structures of potential drug targets were predicated by theSWISS-MODELworkspace. Ligands and ligand-binding sites of the proteins were searched byEf-seek.Results:Three essential proteins were identified that might be considered as potential drug targets.AAN37254.1 belonged to1-deoxy-D-xylulose5-phosphate reductoisomerase,CAD50499.1 belonged to chorismate synthase,CAD51220.1 belonged toFAD binging3 family, but the function of CAD51220.1 was unknown. The3D structures, ligands and ligand-binding sites ofAAN37254.1 andCAD50499.1 were successfully predicated.Conclusions:Two of these potential drug targets are key enzymes in2-C-methyl-d-erythritol4-phosphate pathway and shikimate pathway, which are absent in humans, so these two essential proteins are good potential drug targets. The function and3D structures ofCAD50499.1 is still unknown, it still need further study.

  11. Off-target effects of psychoactive drugs revealed by genome-wide assays in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Ericson

    Full Text Available To better understand off-target effects of widely prescribed psychoactive drugs, we performed a comprehensive series of chemogenomic screens using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Because the known human targets of these drugs do not exist in yeast, we could employ the yeast gene deletion collections and parallel fitness profiling to explore potential off-target effects in a genome-wide manner. Among 214 tested, documented psychoactive drugs, we identified 81 compounds that inhibited wild-type yeast growth and were thus selected for genome-wide fitness profiling. Many of these drugs had a propensity to affect multiple cellular functions. The sensitivity profiles of half of the analyzed drugs were enriched for core cellular processes such as secretion, protein folding, RNA processing, and chromatin structure. Interestingly, fluoxetine (Prozac interfered with establishment of cell polarity, cyproheptadine (Periactin targeted essential genes with chromatin-remodeling roles, while paroxetine (Paxil interfered with essential RNA metabolism genes, suggesting potential secondary drug targets. We also found that the more recently developed atypical antipsychotic clozapine (Clozaril had no fewer off-target effects in yeast than the typical antipsychotics haloperidol (Haldol and pimozide (Orap. Our results suggest that model organism pharmacogenetic studies provide a rational foundation for understanding the off-target effects of clinically important psychoactive agents and suggest a rational means both for devising compound derivatives with fewer side effects and for tailoring drug treatment to individual patient genotypes.

  12. DNA Gyrase Is the Target for the Quinolone Drug Ciprofloxacin in Arabidopsis thaliana *

    OpenAIRE

    Evans-Roberts, Katherine M.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Wall, Melisa K.; Leroux, Julie; Mylne, Joshua S; Maxwell, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains four genes that were originally annotated as potentially encoding DNA gyrase: ATGYRA, ATGYRB1, ATGYRB2, and ATGYRB3. Although we subsequently showed that ATGYRB3 does not encode a gyrase subunit, the other three genes potentially encode subunits of a plant gyrase. We also showed evidence for the existence of supercoiling activity in A. thaliana and that the plant is sensitive to quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics, compounds that target DNA gyrase ...

  13. Mycobacterium abscessus: a new antibiotic nightmare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessar, Rachid; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Reyrat, Jean Marc; Murray, Alan; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2012-04-01

    The intrinsic and acquired resistance of Mycobacterium abscessus to commonly used antibiotics limits the chemotherapeutic options for infections caused by these mycobacteria. Intrinsic resistance is attributed to a combination of the permeability barrier of the complex multilayer cell envelope, drug export systems, antibiotic targets with low affinity and enzymes that neutralize antibiotics in the cytoplasm. To date, acquired resistance has only been observed for aminoglycosides and macrolides, which is conferred by mutations affecting the genes encoding the antibiotic targets (rrs and rrl, respectively). Here we summarize previous and recent findings on the resistance of M. abscessus to antibiotics in light of what has been discovered for other mycobacteria. Since we can now distinguish three groups of strains belonging to M. abscessus (M. abscessus sensu stricto, Mycobacterium massiliense and Mycobacterium bolletii), studies on antibiotic susceptibility and resistance should be considered according to this new classification. This review raises the profile of this important pathogen and highlights the work needed to decipher the molecular events responsible for its extensive chemotherapeutic resistance. PMID:22290346

  14. Smart linkers in polymer-drug conjugates for tumor-targeted delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Minglu; Zhang, Fang; Wei, Ting; Zuo, Tiantian; Guan, Yuanyuan; Lin, Guimei; Shao, Wei

    2016-07-01

    To achieve effective chemotherapy, many types of drug delivery systems have been developed for the specific environments in tumor tissues. Polymer-drug conjugates are increasingly used in tumor therapy due to several significant advantages over traditional delivery systems. In the fabrication of polymer-drug conjugates, a smart linker is an important component that joins two fragments or molecules together and can be cleared by a specific stimulus, which results in targeted drug delivery and controlled release. By regulating the conjugation between the drug and the nanocarriers, stimulus-sensitive systems based on smart linkers can offer high payloads, certified stability, controlled release and targeted delivery. In this review, we summarize the current state of smart linkers (e.g. disulfide, hydrazone, peptide, azo) used recently in various polymer-drug conjugate-based delivery systems with a primary focus on their sophisticated design principles and drug delivery mechanisms as well as in vivo processes. PMID:26560242

  15. Orexin Receptor Targets for Anti-Relapse Medication Development in Drug Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E. See

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a chronic illness characterized by high rates of relapse. Relapse to drug use can be triggered by re-exposure to drug-associated cues, stressful events, or the drug itself after a period of abstinence. Pharmacological intervention to reduce the impact of relapse-instigating factors offers a promising target for addiction treatment. Growing evidence has implicated an important role of the orexin/hypocretin system in drug reward and drug-seeking, including animal models of relapse. Here, we review the evidence for the role of orexins in modulating reward and drug-seeking in animal models of addiction and the potential for orexin receptors as specific targets for anti-relapse medication approaches.

  16. Antibiotic Sensitivity Profiles Determined with an Escherichia coli Gene Knockout Collection: Generating an Antibiotic Bar Code ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Anne; Tran, Lillian; Becket, Elinne; Lee, Kim; Chinn, Laney; Park, Eunice; Tran, Katherine; Miller, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    We have defined a sensitivity profile for 22 antibiotics by extending previous work testing the entire KEIO collection of close to 4,000 single-gene knockouts in Escherichia coli for increased susceptibility to 1 of 14 different antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, rifampin [rifampicin], vancomycin, ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin, metronidazole, streptomycin, fusidic acid, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, erythromycin, and triclosan). We screened one or more subinhibitory concentrations of each antibiotic, generating more than 80,000 data points and allowing a reduction of the entire collection to a set of 283 strains that display significantly increased sensitivity to at least one of the antibiotics. We used this reduced set of strains to determine a profile for eight additional antibiotics (spectinomycin, cephradine, aztreonem, colistin, neomycin, enoxacin, tobramycin, and cefoxitin). The profiles for the 22 antibiotics represent a growing catalog of sensitivity fingerprints that can be separated into two components, multidrug-resistant mutants and those mutants that confer relatively specific sensitivity to the antibiotic or type of antibiotic tested. The latter group can be represented by a set of 20 to 60 strains that can be used for the rapid typing of antibiotics by generating a virtual bar code readout of the specific sensitivities. Taken together, these data reveal the complexity of intrinsic resistance and provide additional targets for the design of codrugs (or combinations of drugs) that potentiate existing antibiotics. PMID:20065048

  17. One for All? Hitting Multiple Alzheimer's Disease Targets with One Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rebecca E.; Nikolic, Katarina; Ramsay, Rona R.

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Many AD target combinations are being explored for multi-target drug design.New databases and models increase the potential of computational drug designLiraglutide and other antidiabetics are strong candidates for repurposing to AD.Donecopride a dual 5-HT/AChE inhibitor shows promise in pre-clinical studies Alzheimer's Disease is a complex and multifactorial disease for which the mechanism is still not fully understood. As new insights into disease progression are discovered, new drugs must be designed to target those aspects of the disease that cause neuronal damage rather than just the symptoms currently addressed by single target drugs. It is becoming possible to target several aspects of the disease pathology at once using multi-target drugs (MTDs). Intended as an introduction for non-experts, this review describes the key MTD design approaches, namely structure-based, in silico, and data-mining, to evaluate what is preventing compounds progressing through the clinic to the market. Repurposing current drugs using their off-target effects reduces the cost of development, time to launch, and the uncertainty associated with safety and pharmacokinetics. The most promising drugs currently being investigated for repurposing to Alzheimer's Disease are rasagiline, originally developed for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease, and liraglutide, an antidiabetic. Rational drug design can combine pharmacophores of multiple drugs, systematically change functional groups, and rank them by virtual screening. Hits confirmed experimentally are rationally modified to generate an effective multi-potent lead compound. Examples from this approach are ASS234 with properties similar to rasagiline, and donecopride, a hybrid of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with pro-cognitive effects. Exploiting these interdisciplinary approaches, public-private collaborative lead factories promise faster delivery of new drugs to the clinic. PMID:27199640

  18. QSAR-Assisted Virtual Screening of Lead-Like Molecules from Marine and Microbial Natural Sources for Antitumor and Antibiotic Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florbela Pereira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR approach for classification was used for the prediction of compounds as active/inactive relatively to overall biological activity, antitumor and antibiotic activities using a data set of 1746 compounds from PubChem with empirical CDK descriptors and semi-empirical quantum-chemical descriptors. A data set of 183 active pharmaceutical ingredients was additionally used for the external validation of the best models. The best classification models for antibiotic and antitumor activities were used to screen a data set of marine and microbial natural products from the AntiMarin database—25 and four lead compounds for antibiotic and antitumor drug design were proposed, respectively. The present work enables the presentation of a new set of possible lead like bioactive compounds and corroborates the results of our previous investigations. By other side it is shown the usefulness of quantum-chemical descriptors in the discrimination of biologically active and inactive compounds. None of the compounds suggested by our approach have assigned non-antibiotic and non-antitumor activities in the AntiMarin database and almost all were lately reported as being active in the literature.

  19. Sensation Seeking and Targeting of Televised Anti-Drug PSAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohew, Lewis; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine how to reach out in an effective manner via televised public service announcements (PSAs) to particular at-risk audiences to motivate participation in drug abuse prevention programs. The subjects (207 young adults in Fayette County, Kentucky) responded to the M. Zuckerman sensation-seeking questionnaire. They…

  20. Therapeutic Targets for Influenza - Perspectives in Drug Development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majerová, Taťána; Hoffman, H.; Majer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 1 (2010), s. 81-103. ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : influenza * drug research * protein structure * oligonucleotides Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.853, year: 2010

  1. Discovering the first microRNA-targeted drug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of nearly every biological process in the cell and play key roles in the pathogenesis of human disease. As a result, there are many drug discovery programs that focus on developing miRNA-based therapeutics. The most advanced...

  2. Thioredoxin reductase from s. Coelicolor as a drug target

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koháryová, M.; Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Kollárová, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 282, Suppl 1 (2015), s. 396. ISSN 1742-464X. [Congress of the Federation of European Biochemical Societies (FEBS) - The Biochemical Basis of Life /40./. 04.07.2015-09.07.2015, Berlin] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : thioredoxin reductase * protein structure * drugs Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  3. Liposomal Tumor Targeting in Drug Delivery Utilizing MMP-2- and MMP-9-Binding Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oula Penate Medina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology offers an alternative to conventional treatment options by enabling different drug delivery and controlled-release delivery strategies. Liposomes being especially biodegradable and in most cases essentially nontoxic offer a versatile platform for several different delivery approaches that can potentially enhance the delivery and targeting of therapies to tumors. Liposomes penetrate tumors spontaneously as a result of fenestrated blood vessels within tumors, leading to known enhanced permeability and subsequent drug retention effects. In addition, liposomes can be used to carry radioactive moieties, such as radiotracers, which can be bound at multiple locations within liposomes, making them attractive carriers for molecular imaging applications. Phage display is a technique that can deliver various high-affinity and selectivity peptides to different targets. In this study, gelatinase-binding peptides, found by phage display, were attached to liposomes by covalent peptide-PEG-PE anchor creating a targeted drug delivery vehicle. Gelatinases as extracellular targets for tumor targeting offer a viable alternative for tumor targeting. Our findings show that targeted drug delivery is more efficient than non-targeted drug delivery.

  4. Versatile surface engineering of porous nanomaterials with bioinspired polyphenol coatings for targeted and controlled drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Wu, Shuxian; Wu, Cuichen; Qiu, Liping; Zhu, Guizhi; Cui, Cheng; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Wang, Yanyue; Zhang, Liqin; Teng, I.-Ting; Yang, Huang-Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-04-01

    The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles, termed MSN@polyphenol. The polyphenol coatings not only improved colloidal stability and prevented premature drug leakage, but also provided a scaffold for immobilization of targeting moieties, such as aptamers. Both immobilization of targeting aptamers and synthesis of polyphenol coating are easily accomplished without the aid of any other organic reagents. Importantly, the polyphenol coating (EGCg) used in this study could be biodegraded by acidic pH and intracellular glutathione, resulting in the release of trapped anticancer drugs. Based on confocal fluorescence microscopy and cytotoxicity experiments, drug-loaded and polyphenol-coated MSNs were shown to possess highly efficient internalization and an apparent cytotoxic effect on target cancer, but not control, cells. Our results suggest that these highly biocompatible and biodegradable polyphenol-coated MSNs are promising vectors for controlled-release biomedical applications and cancer therapy.The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles

  5. Small bowel protection against NSAID-injury in rats: Effect of rifaximin, a poorly absorbed, GI targeted, antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornai, Matteo; Antonioli, Luca; Pellegrini, Carolina; Colucci, Rocchina; Sacco, Deborah; Tirotta, Erika; Natale, Gianfranco; Bartalucci, Alessia; Flaibani, Marina; Renzulli, Cecilia; Ghelardi, Emilia; Blandizzi, Corrado; Scarpignato, Carmelo

    2016-02-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, besides exerting detrimental effects on the upper digestive tract, can also damage the small and large intestine. Although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, there is evidence that enteric bacteria play a pivotal role. The present study examined the enteroprotective effects of a delayed-release formulation of rifaximin-EIR (R-EIR, 50mg/kg BID, i.g.), a poorly absorbed antibiotic with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity, in a rat model of enteropathy induced by indomethacin (IND, 1.5mg/kg BID for 14 days) administration. R-EIR was administered starting 7 days before or in concomitance with IND administration. At the end of treatments, blood samples were collected to evaluate hemoglobin (Hb) concentration (as an index of digestive bleeding). Small intestine was processed for: (1) histological assessment of intestinal damage (percentage length of lesions over the total length examined); (2) assay of tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) and TNF levels, as markers of inflammation; (3) assay of tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl concentrations, as an index of lipid and protein peroxidation, respectively; (4) evaluation of the major bacterial phyla. IND significantly decreased Hb levels, this effect being significantly blunted by R-EIR. IND also induced the occurrence of lesions in the jejunum and ileum. In both intestinal regions, R-EIR significantly reduced the percentage of lesions, as compared with rats receiving IND alone. Either the markers of inflammation and tissue peroxidation were significantly increased in jejunum and ileum from IND-treated rats. However, in rats treated with R-EIR, these parameters were not significantly different from those observed in controls. R-EIR was also able to counterbalance the increase in Proteobacteria and Firmicutes abundance induced by INDO. To summarize, R-EIR treatment significantly prevents IND-induced intestinal damage, this enteroprotective effect being associated

  6. Drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli in urinary tract infection: A need for strict antibiotic prescription policy

    OpenAIRE

    Vinita Dogra; Abha Sharma; Bibhavati Mishra; Archana Thakur; Poonam S Loomba

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The etiology of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and the antibiotic resistance of uropathogens have been changing over the past years. This retrospective study was conducted to survey the resistance pattern of Gram-negative uropathogens to first-line agents for UTIs; this would be helpful for the clinicians to facilitate the empiric treatment and management of patients with UTI and maybe useful for the formulation of guidelines of antibiotic policies. Materials and Methods: Isola...

  7. A QSAR approach for virtual screening of lead-like molecules en route to antitumor and antibiotic drugs from marine and microbial natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florbela Pereira

    2014-05-01

    Figure 1. The unreported 15 lead antibiotic MNPs and MbNPs from AntiMarin database, using the best Rfs antibiotic model with a probability of being antibiotic greater than or equal to 0.8. Figure 2. The selected 4 lead antitumor MNPs and MbNPs from the AntiMarin database, using the best Rfs antitumor model with a probability of being antitumor greater than or equal to 0.8. The present work corroborates by one side the results of our previous work6 and enables the presentation of a new set of possible lead like bioactive compounds. Additionally, it is shown the usefulness of quantum-chemical descriptors in the discrimination of biological active and inactive compounds. The use of the εHOMO quantum-chemical descriptor in the discrimination of large scale data sets of lead-like or drug-like compounds has never been reported. This approach results in the reduction, in great extent, of the number of compounds used in real screens, and it reinforces the results of our previous work. Furthermore, besides the virtual screening, the computational methods can be very useful to build appropriate databases, allowing for effective shortcuts of NP extracts dereplication procedures, which will certainly result in increasing the efficiency of drug discovery.

  8. A novel solvent-free method for the manufacture of biodegradable antibiotic-capsules for a long-term drug release using compression sintering and ultrasonic welding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Jung; Tsai, Ying-E; Wen-Neng Ueng, Steve; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2005-08-01

    This report was to develop a novel solvent-free method for the manufacture of biodegradable capsules for a long-term drug delivery. To manufacture an antibiotic capsule, polylactide-polyglycolide copolymers were pre-mixed with vancomycin. The mixture was then injection compression molded to form a cylinder with a cover of 8mm in diameter. After the addition of gentamicin sulfate into the core, an ultrasonic welder was used to seal the capsule. An elution method and an high-performance liquid chromatography assay were employed to characterize the in vitro release rates of the antibiotics over a 30-day period. It was found that biodegradable capsules released high concentration of vancomycin and gentamicin (well above the minimum inhibition concentration) in vitro for the period of time needed to treat bone infection; i.e., 2-4 weeks. A bacterial inhibition test was carried out to determine the relative activity of the released antibiotics. The diameter of the sample inhibition zone ranged from 3 to 18 mm, which is equivalent to 16.7-100% of relative activity. By adopting this novel technique, we will be able to manufacture biodegradable capsules of various medicines for long-term drug delivery. PMID:15722136

  9. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D.; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J.; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Vemula, Praveen K.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amph...

  10. In vitro selection and characterization of streptomycin-binding RNAs: recognition discrimination between antibiotics.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, S T; Schroeder, R

    1998-01-01

    As pathogens continue to evade therapeutical drugs, a better understanding of the mode of action of antibiotics continues to have high importance. A growing body of evidence points to RNA as a crucial target for antibacterial and antiviral drugs. For example, the aminocyclitol antibiotic streptomycin interacts with the 16S ribosomal RNA and, in addition, inhibits group I intron splicing. To understand the mode of binding of streptomycin to RNA, we isolated small, streptomycin-binding RNA apta...

  11. Shear-stress sensitive lenticular vesicles for targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Margaret N.; Fedotenko, Illya A.; Abegg, Daniel; Althaus, Jasmin; Babel, Lucille; Favarger, France; Reiter, Renate; Tanasescu, Radu; Zaffalon, Pierre-Léonard; Ziegler, André; Müller, Bert; Saxer, Till; Zumbuehl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Atherosclerosis results in the narrowing of arterial blood vessels and this causes significant changes in the endogenous shear stress between healthy and constricted arteries. Nanocontainers that can release drugs locally with such rheological changes can be very useful. Here, we show that vesicles made from an artificial 1,3-diaminophospholipid are stable under static conditions but release their contents at elevated shear stress. These vesicles have a lenticular morphology, which potentially leads to instabilities along their equator. Using a model cardiovascular system based on polymer tubes and an external pump to represent shear stress in healthy and constricted vessels of the heart, we show that drugs preferentially release from the vesicles in constricted vessels that have high shear stress.

  12. Nitric oxide-related drug targets in headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY: Nitric oxide (NO) is a very important molecule in the regulation of cerebral and extra cerebral cranial blood flow and arterial diameters. It is also involved in nociceptive processing. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a pro-drug for NO, causes headache in normal volunteers and a so-called del......SUMMARY: Nitric oxide (NO) is a very important molecule in the regulation of cerebral and extra cerebral cranial blood flow and arterial diameters. It is also involved in nociceptive processing. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a pro-drug for NO, causes headache in normal volunteers and a so...... experimentation make it highly likely that antagonizing NO effects will be effective in the treatment of primary headaches. Nonselective NOS inhibitors are likely to have side effects whereas selective compounds are now in early clinical trials. Antagonizing the rate limiting cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin seems...

  13. Formulation, Evaluation and Optimization of Pectin- Bora Rice Beads for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Hemraj Ramteke

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this research was to established new polysaccharide for the colon targeted drug delivery system, its formulation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation. Methods: Microspheres containing pectin and bora rice were prepared by ionotropic gelation technique using zinc acetate as cross linking agent and model drug used was glipizide. A 32 full factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables, polymer to drug ratio (A, and concentration of cross linking agent (B on dependent variables, particle size, swelling index, drug entrapment efficiency and percentage drug release. Results: Results of trial batches indicated that polymer to drug ratio and concentration of cross linking agent affects characteristics of beads. Beads were discrete, spherical and free flowing. Beads exhibited small particle size and showed higher percentage of drug entrapment efficiency. The optimized batch P2 exhibited satisfactory drug entrapment efficiency 68% and drug release was also controlled for more than 24 hours. The polymer to drug ratio had a more significant effect on the dependent variables. In vivo gamma scintigraphy study of optimized pectin-bora rice beads demonstrated degradation of beads whenever they reached to the colon. Conclusion: Bora rice is potential polysaccharide for colon targeted drug delivery system.

  14. Carbon Nanotubes: An Emerging Drug Carrier for Targeting Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vaibhav Rastogi; Pragya Yadav; Shiv Sankar Bhattacharya; Arun Kumar Mishra; Navneet Verma; Anurag Verma; Jayanta Kumar Pandit

    2014-01-01

    During recent years carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted by many researchers as a drug delivery carrier. CNTs are the third allotropic form of carbon-fullerenes which were rolled into cylindrical tubes. To be integrated into the biological systems, CNTs can be chemically modified or functionalised with therapeutically active molecules by forming stable covalent bonds or supramolecular assemblies based on noncovalent interactions. Owing to their high carrying capacity, biocompatibility,...

  15. DRUG TARGETING TO THE KIDNEY WITH LOW-MOLECULAR-WEIGHT PROTEINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSSEN, EJF; MOOLENAAR, F; DEZEEUW, D; MEIJER, DKF

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the design of a drug targeting strategy for renal specific delivery and endorenal release of drugs using low-molecular-weight proteins (LMWPs). In general, LMWPs are known to be filtered and subsequently reabsorbed by the proximal tubular cells of the kidneys. Within these cells L

  16. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding the...

  17. A new look at drugs targeting malignant melanoma--an application for mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Yutaka; Végvári, Akos; Welinder, Charlotte; Jönsson, Göran; Ingvar, Christian; Lundgren, Lotta; Olsson, Håkan; Breslin, Thomas; Wieslander, Elisabet; Laurell, Thomas; Rezeli, Melinda; Jansson, Bo; Nishimura, Toshihide; Fehniger, Thomas E; Baldetorp, Bo; Marko-Varga, György

    2014-09-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) patients are being treated with an increasing number of personalized medicine (PM) drugs, several of which are small molecule drugs developed to treat patients with specific disease genotypes and phenotypes. In particular, the clinical application of protein kinase inhibitors has been highly effective for certain subsets of MM patients. Vemurafenib, a protein kinase inhibitor targeting BRAF-mutated protein, has shown significant efficacy in slowing disease progression. In this paper, we provide an overview of this new generation of targeted drugs, and demonstrate the first data on localization of PM drugs within tumor compartments. In this study, we have introduced MALDI-MS imaging to provide new information on one of the drugs currently used in the PM treatment of MM, vemurafenib. In a proof-of-concept in vitro study, MALDI-MS imaging was used to identify vemurafenib applied to metastatic lymph nodes tumors of subjects attending the regional hospital network of Southern Sweden. The paper provides evidence of BRAF overexpression in tumors isolated from MM patients and localization of the specific drug targeting BRAF, vemurafenib, using MS fragment ion signatures. Our ability to determine drug uptake at the target sites of directed therapy provides important opportunity for increasing our understanding about the mode of action of drug activity within the disease environment. PMID:25044963

  18. Drug targeting strategies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: a mechanistic update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2010-07-01

    The therapeutic management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) represents the perfect scenario for drug targeting to the site(s) of action. While existing formulation-based targeting strategies include rectal dosage forms and oral systems that target the colon by pH-, time-, microflora- and pressure-triggered drug release, novel approaches for site-specific delivery in IBD therapy will target the inflamed intestine per se rather than intestinal region. The purpose of this article is to present a mechanistic update on the strategies employed to achieve minimal systemic exposure accompanied by maximal drug levels in the inflamed intestinal tissue. The introduction of biological agents, micro/nanoparticulate carriers including liposomes, transgenic bacteria, and gene therapy opportunities are discussed, as well as the challenges remaining to be achieved in the targeted treatment of IBD. PMID:20594127

  19. Grants4Targets - an innovative approach to translate ideas from basic research into novel drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessl, Monika; Schoepe, Stefanie; Sommer, Anette; Schneider, Martin; Asadullah, Khusru

    2011-04-01

    Collaborations between industry and academia are steadily gaining importance. To combine expertises Bayer Healthcare has set up a novel open innovation approach called Grants4Targets. Ideas on novel drug targets can easily be submitted to http://www.grants4targets.com. After a review process, grants are provided to perform focused experiments to further validate the proposed targets. In addition to financial support specific know-how on target validation and drug discovery is provided. Experienced scientists are nominated as project partners and, depending on the project, tools or specific models are provided. Around 280 applications have been received and 41 projects granted. According to our experience, this type of bridging fund combined with joint efforts provides a valuable tool to foster drug discovery collaborations. PMID:21129498

  20. Protein target discovery of drug and its reactive intermediate metabolite by using proteomic strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Lianghai Hu; John Paul Fawcett; Jingkai Gu

    2012-01-01

    Identifying protein targets of bioactive compounds is an effective approach to discover unknown protein functions, identify molecular mechanisms of drug action, and obtain information for optimization of lead compounds. At the same time, metabolic activation of a drug can lead to cytotoxicities. Therefore, it is very important to systemically characterize the drug and its reactive intermediate. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach has emerged as the most efficient to study protein funct...

  1. Antibiotics Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  2. The Co-Metabolism within the Gut-Brain Metabolic Interaction: Potential Targets for Drug Treatment and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrenovich, Mark; Flückiger, Rudolf; Sykes, Lorraine; Donskey, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    We know that within the complex mammalian gut is any number of metabolic biomes. The gut has been sometimes called the "second brain" within the "gut-brain axis". A more informative term would be the gut-brain metabolic interactome, which is coined here to underscore the relationship between the digestive system and cognitive function or dysfunction as the case may be. Co-metabolism between the host and the intestinal microbiota is essential for life's processes. How diet, lifestyle, antibiotics and other factors shape the gut microbiome constitutes a rapidly growing area of research. Conversely, the gut microbiome also affects mammalian systems. Metabolites of the gut-brain axis are potential targets for treatment and drug design since the interaction or biochemical interplay results in net metabolite production or end-products with either positive or negative effects on human health. This review explores the gut-brain metabolic interactome, with particular emphasis on drug design and treatment strategies and how commensal bacteria or their disruption lead to dysbiosis and the effect this has on neurochemistry. Increasing data indicate that the intestinal microbiome can affect neurobiology, from mental and even behavioral health to memory, depression, mood, anxiety, obesity, cravings and even the creation and maintenance of the blood brain barrier. PMID:26831263

  3. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although it...

  4. Targets for Antibiotic and Health Care Resource Stewardship in Inpatient Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Comparison of Management Practices with National Guideline Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Timothy C.; Stella, Sarah A.; Cervantes, Lilia; Knepper, Bryan C.; Sabel, Allison L.; Price, Connie S.; Shockley, Lee; Hanley, Michael E.; Mehler, Philip S.; Burman, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the most common infection leading to hospitalization in the U.S. The objective of this study was to evaluate management practices for inpatient CAP in relation to IDSA/ATS guidelines to identify opportunities for antibiotic and health care resource stewardship. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of adults hospitalized for CAP at a single institution from April 15, 2008 – May 31, 2009. Results Of 209 cases, 166 (79%) were admitted to a medical ward and 43 (21%) to the intensive care unit (ICU). 61 (29%) cases were candidates for outpatient therapy per IDSA/ATS guidance with a CURB-65 score of 0 or 1 and absence of hypoxemia. 110 sputum cultures were ordered; however, an evaluable sample was obtained in 49 (45%) cases, median time from antibiotic initiation to specimen collection was 11 (IQR 6–19) hours, and a potential pathogen was identified in only 18 (16%). Blood cultures were routinely obtained for both non-ICU (81%) and ICU (95%) cases, but 15 of 36 (42%) positive cultures were false-positive results. The most common antibiotic regimen was ceftriaxone plus azithromycin (182, 87% cases). Discordant with IDSA/ATS recommendations, oral step-down therapy consisted of a new antibiotic class in 120 (66%), most commonly levofloxacin (101, 55%). Treatment durations were typically longer than suggested with a median of 10 (IQR 8 – 12) days. Conclusions In this cohort of patients hospitalized for CAP, management was frequently inconsistent with IDSA/ATS guideline recommendations revealing potential targets to reduce unnecessary antibiotic and health care resource utilization. PMID:23160837

  5. Large-scale prediction of drug–target interactions using protein sequences and drug topological structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Drug–target interactions are predicted using an extended SAR methodology. ► A drug–target interaction is regarded as an event triggered by many factors. ► Molecular fingerprint and CTD descriptors are used to represent drugs and proteins. ► Our approach shows compatibility between the new scheme and current SAR methodology. - Abstract: The identification of interactions between drugs and target proteins plays a key role in the process of genomic drug discovery. It is both consuming and costly to determine drug–target interactions by experiments alone. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new in silico prediction approaches capable of identifying these potential drug–target interactions in a timely manner. In this article, we aim at extending current structure–activity relationship (SAR) methodology to fulfill such requirements. In some sense, a drug–target interaction can be regarded as an event or property triggered by many influence factors from drugs and target proteins. Thus, each interaction pair can be represented theoretically by using these factors which are based on the structural and physicochemical properties simultaneously from drugs and proteins. To realize this, drug molecules are encoded with MACCS substructure fingerings representing existence of certain functional groups or fragments; and proteins are encoded with some biochemical and physicochemical properties. Four classes of drug–target interaction networks in humans involving enzymes, ion channels, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and nuclear receptors, are independently used for establishing predictive models with support vector machines (SVMs). The SVM models gave prediction accuracy of 90.31%, 88.91%, 84.68% and 83.74% for four datasets, respectively. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the ability of our proposed method to predict the drug–target interactions, and show a general compatibility between the new scheme and current SAR

  6. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuhorn, Inge; Georgieva, Julia V.; Hoekstra, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics in

  7. One For All? Hitting multiple Alzheimer’s Disease targets with one drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ellen Hughes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is a complex and multifactorial disease for which the mechanism is still not fully understood. As new insights into disease progression are discovered, new drugs must be designed to target those aspects of the disease that cause neuronal damage rather than just the symptoms currently addressed by single target drugs. It is becoming possible to target several aspects of the disease pathology at once using multi-target drugs. Intended as a introduction for non-experts, this review describes the key multi-target drug design approaches, namely structure-based, in silico, and data-mining, to evaluate what is preventing compounds progressing through the clinic to the market. Repurposing current drugs using their off-target effects reduces the cost of development, time to launch and also the uncertainty associated with safety and pharmacokinetics. The most promising drugs currently being investigated for repurposing to Alzheimer’s Disease are rasagiline, originally developed for the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease, and liraglutide, an antidiabetic. Rational drug design can combine pharmacophores of multiple drugs, systematically change functional groups, and rank them by virtual screening. Hits confirmed experimentally are rationally modified to generate an effective multi-potent lead compound. Examples from this approach are ASS234 with properties similar to rasagiline, and donecopride, a hybrid of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with pro-cognitive effects. Exploiting these interdisciplinary approaches, public-private collaborative lead factories promise faster delivery of new drugs to the clinic.

  8. Mining predicted essential genes of Brugia malayi for nematode drug targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar

    Full Text Available We report results from the first genome-wide application of a rational drug target selection methodology to a metazoan pathogen genome, the completed draft sequence of Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode responsible for human lymphatic filariasis. More than 1.5 billion people worldwide are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, a related filarial disease. Drug treatments for filariasis have not changed significantly in over 20 years, and with the risk of resistance rising, there is an urgent need for the development of new anti-filarial drug therapies. The recent publication of the draft genomic sequence for B. malayi enables a genome-wide search for new drug targets. However, there is no functional genomics data in B. malayi to guide the selection of potential drug targets. To circumvent this problem, we have utilized the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a surrogate for B. malayi. Sequence comparisons between the two genomes allow us to map C. elegans orthologs to B. malayi genes. Using these orthology mappings and by incorporating the extensive genomic and functional genomic data, including genome-wide RNAi screens, that already exist for C. elegans, we identify potentially essential genes in B. malayi. Further incorporation of human host genome sequence data and a custom algorithm for prioritization enables us to collect and rank nearly 600 drug target candidates. Previously identified potential drug targets cluster near the top of our prioritized list, lending credibility to our methodology. Over-represented Gene Ontology terms, predicted InterPro domains, and RNAi phenotypes of C. elegans orthologs associated with the potential target pool are identified. By virtue of the selection procedure, the potential B. malayi drug targets highlight components of key processes in nematode biology such as central metabolism, molting and regulation of gene expression.

  9. Remission of refractory pyoderma gangrenosum, severe acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH) syndrome using targeted antibiotic therapy in 4 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Join-Lambert, Olivier; Duchatelet, Sabine; Delage, Maïa; Miskinyte, Snaigune; Coignard, Hélène; Lemarchand, Nicolas; Alemy-Carreau, Murielle; Lortholary, Olivier; Nassif, Xavier; Hovnanian, Alain; Nassif, Aude

    2015-11-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum, severe acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PASH) syndrome can prove refractory to treatment and is characterized by relapses and recurrences. The combination of antibiotic therapy and surgery can produce success in the management of the syndrome. Acute treatment is required, but maintenance therapy is also necessary to prevent disease relapse. The response to antibiotic therapy is hypothesis generating, raising the issue of a modified host response. To date, anecdotal reports support the use of surgery and medical therapy, but controlled investigations with extended follow-up are necessary to substantiate preliminary data observed with individual cases. PMID:26470620

  10. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery. PMID:21133071

  11. Polymer-drug conjugates for targeted tumor theraphy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Etrych, Tomáš; Chytil, Petr; Koziolová, Eva; Šírová, Milada; Hoffman, S.; Müller, T.; Mäder, K.; Říhová, Blanka; Ulbrich, Karel

    Athens : International Institute of Anticancer Research, 2014, Roč. 34, č. 10, s. 5896-5898. ISSN 0250-7005. [International Conference of Anticancer Research /9./. Sithonia (GR), 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/11/0325; GA ČR GCP207/12/J030; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : HPMA copolymers * drug carrier Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; FD - Oncology ; Hematology (MBU-M)

  12. Neoadjuvant Window Studies of Metformin and Biomarker Development for Drugs Targeting Cancer Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Simon R; Patel, Neel; Liu, Dan; Fenwick, John; Gleeson, Fergus; Buffa, Francesca; Harris, Adrian L

    2015-05-01

    There has been growing interest in the potential of the altered metabolic state typical of cancer cells as a drug target. The antidiabetes drug, metformin, is now under intense investigation as a safe method to modify cancer metabolism. Several studies have used window of opportunity in breast cancer patients before neoadjuvant chemotherapy to correlate gene expression analysis, metabolomics, immunohistochemical markers, and metabolic serum markers with those likely to benefit. We review the role metabolite measurement, functional imaging and gene sequencing analysis play in elucidating the effects of metabolically targeted drugs in cancer treatment and determining patient selection. PMID:26063894

  13. Label-free integrative pharmacology on-target of drugs at the β2-adrenergic receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrie, Ann M.; Sun, Haiyan; Fang, Ye

    2011-07-01

    We describe a label-free integrative pharmacology on-target (iPOT) method to assess the pharmacology of drugs at the β2-adrenergic receptor. This method combines dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays using an array of probe molecule-hijacked cells with similarity analysis. The whole cell DMR assays track cell system-based, ligand-directed, and kinetics-dependent biased activities of the drugs, and translates their on-target pharmacology into numerical descriptors which are subject to similarity analysis. We demonstrate that the approach establishes an effective link between the label-free pharmacology and in vivo therapeutic indications of drugs.

  14. Visualization of network target crosstalk optimizes drug synergism in myocardial ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Wan

    Full Text Available Numerous drugs and compounds have been validated as protecting against myocardial ischemia (MI, a leading cause of heart failure; however, synergistic possibilities among them have not been systematically explored. Thus, there appears to be significant room for optimization in the field of drug combination therapy for MI. Here, we propose an easy approach for the identification and optimization of MI-related synergistic drug combinations via visualization of the crosstalk between networks of drug targets corresponding to different drugs (each drug has a unique network of targets. As an example, in the present study, 28 target crosstalk networks (TCNs of random pairwise combinations of 8 MI-related drugs (curcumin, capsaicin, celecoxib, raloxifene, silibinin, sulforaphane, tacrolimus, and tamoxifen were established to illustrate the proposed method. The TCNs revealed a high likelihood of synergy between curcumin and the other drugs, which was confirmed by in vitro experiments. Further drug combination optimization showed a synergistic protective effect of curcumin, celecoxib, and sililinin in combination against H₂O₂-induced ischemic injury of cardiomyocytes at a relatively low concentration of 500 nM. This result is in agreement with the earlier finding of a denser and modular functional crosstalk between their networks of targets in the regulation of cell apoptosis. Our study offers a simple approach to rapidly search for and optimize potent synergistic drug combinations, which can be used for identifying better MI therapeutic strategies. Some new light was also shed on the characteristic features of drug synergy, suggesting that it is possible to apply this method to other complex human diseases.

  15. Targeting aerobic glycolysis: 3-bromopyruvate as a promising anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, Simone; Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-02-01

    The Warburg effect refers to the phenomenon whereby cancer cells avidly take up glucose and produce lactic acid under aerobic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor reliance on glycolysis remains not completely clear, its inhibition opens feasible therapeutic windows for cancer treatment. Indeed, several small molecules have emerged by combinatorial studies exhibiting promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo, as a single agent or in combination with other therapeutic modalities. Therefore, besides reviewing the alterations of glycolysis that occur with malignant transformation, this manuscript aims at recapitulating the most effective pharmacological therapeutics of its targeting. In particular, we describe the principal mechanisms of action and the main targets of 3-bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent with impressive antitumor effects in several models of animal tumors. Moreover, we discuss the chemo-potentiating strategies that would make unparalleled the putative therapeutic efficacy of its use in clinical settings. PMID:22328057

  16. High Antibiotic Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; José Rabanaque, María; Feja, Cristina;

    2014-01-01

    a high proportion of antibiotics not recommended as first choice in primary health care. In conclusion, heavy antibiotic users consisted mainly of children and old adults. Inappropriate overuse of antibiotics (high quantity, high frequency, and inappropriate antibiotic choice) leads to a substantial...... individuals with highest consumption) were responsible for 21% of the total DDD consumed and received ≥6 packages per year. Elderly adults (≥60 years) and small children (0-9 years) were those exposed to the highest volume of antibiotics and with the most frequent exposure, respectively. Heavy users received...... risk of the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria, and interventions to reduce overuse of antibiotics should therefore primarily be targeted children and elderly people....

  17. Novel Methods for Drug-Target Interaction Prediction using Graph Mining

    KAUST Repository

    Ba Alawi, Wail

    2016-08-31

    The problem of developing drugs that can be used to cure diseases is important and requires a careful approach. Since pursuing the wrong candidate drug for a particular disease could be very costly in terms of time and money, there is a strong interest in minimizing such risks. Drug repositioning has become a hot topic of research, as it helps reduce these risks significantly at the early stages of drug development by reusing an approved drug for the treatment of a different disease. Still, finding new usage for a drug is non-trivial, as it is necessary to find out strong supporting evidence that the proposed new uses of drugs are plausible. Many computational approaches were developed to narrow the list of possible candidate drug-target interactions (DTIs) before any experiments are done. However, many of these approaches suffer from unacceptable levels of false positives. We developed two novel methods based on graph mining networks of drugs and targets. The first method (DASPfind) finds all non-cyclic paths that connect a drug and a target, and using a function that we define, calculates a score from all the paths. This score describes our confidence that DTI is correct. We show that DASPfind significantly outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in predicting the top ranked target for each drug. We demonstrate the utility of DASPfind by predicting 15 novel DTIs over a set of ion channel proteins, and confirming 12 out of these 15 DTIs through experimental evidence reported in literature and online drug databases. The second method (DASPfind+) modifies DASPfind in order to increase the confidence and reliability of the resultant predictions. Based on the structure of the drug-target interaction (DTI) networks, we introduced an optimization scheme that incrementally alters the network structure locally for each drug to achieve more robust top 1 ranked predictions. Moreover, we explored effects of several similarity measures between the targets on the prediction

  18. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes as Potential Drug Targets for the Treatment of Schizophrenia, Drug Abuse and Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Thomsen, Morgane; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2011-01-01

    's disease and drug abuse. Dopaminergic systems are regulated by cholinergic, especially muscarinic, input. Not surprisingly, increasing evidence implicates muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways as potential targets for the treatment of these disorders classically viewed as "dopamine based......) acetylcholine binding site. Such agents may lead to the development of novel classes of drugs useful for the treatment of psychosis, drug abuse and Parkinson's disease. The present review highlights recent studies carried out using muscarinic receptor knock-out mice and new subtype-selective allosteric ligands...... to assess the roles of M(1), M(4), and M(5) receptors in various central processes that are under strong dopaminergic control. The outcome of these studies opens new perspectives for the use of novel muscarinic drugs for several severe disorders of the CNS....

  19. UDP-galactopyranose mutase, a potential drug target against human pathogenic nematode Brugia malayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sweta; Valicherla, Guru R; Mohd Shahab; Gupta, Jyoti; Gayen, Jiaur R; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2016-08-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a vector-borne neglected tropical disease affects millions of population in tropical and subtropical countries. Vaccine unavailability and emerging drug resistance against standard antifilarial drugs necessitate search of novel drug targets for developing alternate drugs. Recently, UDP-galactopyranose mutases (UGM) have emerged as a promising drug target playing an important role in parasite virulence and survival. This study deals with the cloning and characterization of Brugia malayi UGM and further exploring its antifilarial drug target potential. The recombinant protein was actively involved in conversion of UDP-galactopyranose (substrate) to UDP-galactofuranose (product) revealing Km and Vmax to be ∼51.15 μM and ∼1.27 μM/min, respectively. The purified protein appeared to be decameric in native state and its 3D homology modeling using Aspergillus fumigatus UGM enzyme as template revealed conservation of active site residues. Two specific prokaryotic inhibitors (compounds A and B) of the enzyme inhibited B. malayi UGM enzymatic activity competitively depicting Ki values ∼22.68 and ∼23.0 μM, respectively. These compounds were also active in vitro and in vivo against B. malayi The findings suggest that B. malayi UGM could be a potential antifilarial therapeutic drug target. PMID:27465638

  20. Identification of potential drug targets in Helicobacter pylori strain HPAG1 by in silico genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelapu, Nageswara R R; Mutha, Naresh V R; Akula, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomach, causing gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. Drugs for treatment of H. pylori relieve from gastritis or pain but are not specific to H. pylori. Therefore, there is an immediate requirement for new therapeutic molecules to treat H. pylori. Current study investigates identification of drug targets in the strain HPAG1 of H. pylori by in silico genome analysis. Genome of HPAG1 was reconstructed for metabolic pathways and compared with Homosapien sapiens to identify genes which are unique to H. pylori. These unique genes were subjected to gene property analysis to identify the potentiality of the drug targets. Among the total number of genes analysed in H. pylori strain HPAG1, nearly 542 genes qualified as unique molecules and among them 29 were identified to be potential drug targets. Co/Zn/Cd efflux system membrane fusion protein, Ferric sidephore transport system and biopolymer transport protein EXbB were found to be critical drug targets to H. pylori HPAG1. Five genes (superoxide dismutase, HtrA protease/chaperone protein, Heatinducible transcription repressor HrcA, HspR, transcriptional repressor of DnaK operon, Cobalt-zinccadmium resistance protein CzcA) of the 29 predicted drug targets are already experimentally validated either genetically or biochemically lending credence to our unique approach. PMID:26205802

  1. Inhibition of Glutamine Synthetase: A Potential Drug Target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry L. Mowbray

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Globally, tuberculosis is second only to AIDS in mortality and the disease is responsible for over 1.3 million deaths each year. The impractically long treatment schedules (generally 6–9 months and unpleasant side effects of the current drugs often lead to poor patient compliance, which in turn has resulted in the emergence of multi-, extensively- and totally-drug resistant strains. The development of new classes of anti-tuberculosis drugs and new drug targets is of global importance, since attacking the bacterium using multiple strategies provides the best means to prevent resistance. This review presents an overview of the various strategies and compounds utilized to inhibit glutamine synthetase, a promising target for the development of drugs for TB therapy.

  2. 135例氟喹诺酮类抗菌药物致不良反应%135 Cases of Adverse Drug Reactions Induced by Fluoroquinolones Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张益钦; 谢根英; 辜雅莉; 吴小红

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the occurrence of adverse drug reactions ( ADR ) induced by fluoroquinolones antibiotics in clinic , so as to provide some tips for the clinic to attach more importance to the adverse drug reactions and promote the rational drug use .METHODS: ADR cases induced by fluoroquinolones antibiotics received by ADR monitoring center of Xiamen Haicang Hospital during 2012-2015 were statistically analyzed . RESULTS:Of the 135 cases, 36 cases were ≥60 years old, accounting for 26.67%; including three kinds of fluoroquinolones antibiotics , and moxifloxacin dominated the first place , followed by levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin . 73 cases were induced by oral administration , and 62 cases were induced by intravenous administration .The main manifestations of ADR induced by fluoroquinolones antibiotics were central nervous system symptoms , followed by gastrointestinal symptoms and anaphylactic reactions , etc..CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of ADR induced by fluoroquinolones antibiotics is relatively high , the clinic should strictly apply fluoroquinolones antibiotics according to the information of usage and dosage , contraindications, matters need attention, ADR, drug combination and medication of special crowd .Meanwhile , the clinic should closely observe the changes of patients'conditions , timely withdrawal drugs and give symptomatic treatment to the patients , so as to improve the rationality of drug use .%目的:了解氟喹诺酮类抗菌药物在临床应用中的不良反应发生情况,提醒临床警惕该类药物的不良反应,促进合理用药。方法:对厦门市海沧医院2012—2015年药品不良反应监测中心收到的氟喹诺酮类抗菌药物所致的不良反应进行整理和分析。结果:135例发生药品不良反应的患者中,≥60岁36例,占26.67%;涉及3种氟喹诺酮类抗菌药物,主要为莫西沙星,其次为左氧氟沙星,再次为环丙沙星;口服给药73例,静脉给药62

  3. Recent discoveries of influenza A drug target sites to combat virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hershna; Kukol, Andreas

    2016-06-15

    Sequence variations in the binding sites of influenza A proteins are known to limit the effectiveness of current antiviral drugs. Clinically, this leads to increased rates of virus transmission and pathogenicity. Potential influenza A inhibitors are continually being discovered as a result of high-throughput cell based screening studies, whereas the application of computational tools to aid drug discovery has further increased the number of predicted inhibitors reported. This review brings together the aspects that relate to the identification of influenza A drug target sites and the findings from recent antiviral drug discovery strategies. PMID:27284062

  4. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  5. Quantitative modeling of selective lysosomal targeting for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Rosania, G.; Horobin, R.W.;

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic organelles and are involved in various diseases, the most prominent is malaria. Accumulation of molecules in the cell by diffusion from the external solution into cytosol, lysosome and mitochondrium was calculated with the Fick–Nernst–Planck equation. The cell model considers...... the diffusion of neutral and ionic molecules across biomembranes, protonation to mono- or bivalent ions, adsorption to lipids, and electrical attraction or repulsion. Based on simulation results, high and selective accumulation in lysosomes was found for weak mono- and bivalent bases with intermediate...... to high log K ow. These findings were validated with experimental results and by a comparison to the properties of antimalarial drugs in clinical use. For ten active compounds, nine were predicted to accumulate to a greater extent in lysosomes than in other organelles, six of these were in the...

  6. Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, they can save lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able to resist the effects of an antibiotic. Using antibiotics can lead to resistance. ...

  7. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Leach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells.

  8. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, John C.; Wang, Andrew; Ye, Kaiming; Jin, Sha

    2016-01-01

    The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox) was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells. PMID:26985893

  9. In-silico prediction of drug targets, biological activities, signal pathways and regulating networks of dioscin based on bioinformatics

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Lianhong; Zheng, Lingli; Xu, Lina; Dong, Deshi; Han, Xu; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Xu, Youwei; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Inverse docking technology has been a trend of drug discovery, and bioinformatics approaches have been used to predict target proteins, biological activities, signal pathways and molecular regulating networks affected by drugs for further pharmacodynamic and mechanism studies. Methods In the present paper, inverse docking technology was applied to screen potential targets from potential drug target database (PDTD). Then, the corresponding gene information of the obtained drug-targe...

  10. {beta}-Lactam antibiotics epitope mapping with STD NMR spectroscopy: a study of drug-human serum albumin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milagre, Cintia D. F.; Cabeca, Luis F.; Almeida, Wanda P.; Marsaioli, Anita J., E-mail: cmilagre@rc.unesp.br [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Molecular recognition events are key issues in many biological processes. STD NMR (saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) is one of the techniques used to understand such biological interactions. Herein, we have investigated the interactions of four {beta}-lactam antibiotics belonging to two classes (cephalosporins and penicillins) with human serum albumin (HSA) by {sup 1}H STD NMR revealing that the interaction between the aromatic moiety and HSA is responsible for the binding efficiency. Thus, the structural differences from the five to six-membered thio ring in penicillins and cephalosporins do not seem to influence antibiotic albumin interactions. (author)

  11. The use of bone cement for the localized, controlled release of the antibiotics vancomycin, linezolid, or fusidic acid: effect of additives on drug release rates and mechanical strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, John; Leung, Fay; Duncan, Clive; Mugabe, Clement; Burt, Helen

    2011-04-01

    Bone cement containing antibiotics is commonly used to treat orthopedic related infections. However, effective treatment (especially of resistant bacteria, methacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) is compromised by very low levels of drug release so that typically less than 10% of loaded drug is released over a 6-week period. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of incorporation of water soluble excipients (polyethylene glycol, sodium chloride, or dextran) into antibiotic-loaded cement on mechanical strength and drug release properties. Poly(methyl methylacrylate) cement implants containing various amounts of drug (vancomycin, linezolid or fusidic acid (all MRSA active)) and excipients were cast in the form of beads or films and characterized using differential scanning calorimetry. Mechanical strength as assessed by Young's modulus was determined by thermo-mechanical analysis. Drug release was measured by incubation in phosphate buffered saline with analysis by HPLC methods. The inclusion of sodium chloride up to 20% w/w caused only minor reductions in Young's modulus. Vancomycin and linezolid released very slowly from unmodified bone cement beads (less than 3% released by 4 weeks) whereas fusidic acid released more quickly (approximately 8% released by 4 weeks). The inclusion of sodium chloride or dextran in bone cement resulted in major increases in the release rate of vancomycin, linezolid and fusidic acid. These studies support the inclusion of sodium chloride and dextran in bone cement to increase the release rate of vancomycin, linezolid, or fusidic acid without compromising the mechanical strength of the composite material. PMID:25788111

  12. Electrospun medicated shellac nanofibers for colon-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Yu, Deng-Guang; Li, Xiao-Yan; Bligh, S W Annie; Williams, Gareth R

    2015-07-25

    Medicated shellac nanofibers providing colon-specific sustained release were fabricated using coaxial electrospinning. A solution of 7.5 g shellac and 1.5 g of ferulic acid (FA) in 10 mL ethanol was used as the core fluid, and a mixture of ethanol and N,N-dimethylformamide (8/10 v/v) as the shell. The presence of the shell fluid was required to prevent frequent clogging of the spinneret. The diameters of the fibers (D) can be manipulated by varying the ratio of shell to core flow rates (F), according to the equation D=0.52 F(-0.19). Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that fibers prepared with F values of 0.1 and 0.25 had linear morphologies with smooth surfaces, but when the shell fluid flow rate was increased to 0.5 the fiber integrity was compromised. FA was found to be amorphously distributed in the fibers on the basis of X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry results. This can be attributed to good compatibility between the drug and carrier: IR spectra indicated the presence of hydrogen bonds between the two. In vitro dissolution tests demonstrated that there was minimal FA release at pH 2.0, and sustained release in a neutral dissolution medium. The latter occurred through an erosion mechanism. During the dissolution processes, the shellac fibers were gradually converted into nanoparticles as the FA was freed into solution, and ultimately completely dissolved. PMID:26043827

  13. Polysaccharide-based micro/nanocarriers for oral colon-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Sang, Yuan; Feng, Jing; Li, Zhaoming; Zhao, Aili

    2016-08-01

    Oral colon-targeted drug delivery has attracted many researchers because of its distinct advantages of increasing the bioavailability of the drug at the target site and reducing the side effects. Polysaccharides that are precisely activated by the physiological environment of the colon hold greater promise for colon targeting. Considerable research efforts have been directed towards developing polysaccharide-based micro/nanocarriers. Types of polysaccharides for colon targeting and in vitro/in vivo assessments of polysaccharide-based carriers for oral colon-targeted drug delivery are summarised. Polysaccharide-based microspheres have gained increased importance not just for the delivery of the drugs for the treatment of local diseases associated with the colon (colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), amoebiasis and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)), but also for it's potential for the delivery of anti-rheumatoid arthritis and anti-chronic stable angina drugs. Besides, Polysaccharide-based micro/nanocarriers such as microbeads, microcapsules, microparticles, nanoparticles, nanogels and nanospheres are also introduced in this review. PMID:26766303

  14. The antibiotic Furvina® targets the P-site of 30S ribosomal subunits and inhibits translation initiation displaying start codon bias

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Brandi, Letizia; Petrelli, Dezemona; Pon, Cynthia L.; Castañedo, Nilo R.; Medina, Ricardo; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2012-01-01

    Furvina®, also denominated G1 (MW 297), is a synthetic nitrovinylfuran [2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)-furan] antibiotic with a broad antimicrobial spectrum. An ointment (Dermofural®) containing G1 as the only active principle is currently marketed in Cuba and successfully used to treat dermatological infections. Here we describe the molecular target and mechanism of action of G1 in bacteria and demonstrate that in vivo G1 preferentially inhibits protein synthesis over RNA, DNA and cell wal...

  15. Synthesis and characterization of gadolinium nanostructured materials with potential applications in magnetic resonance imaging, neutron-capture therapy and targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanakis, Dimitrios; Ghanotakis, Demetrios F., E-mail: ghanotakis@chemistry.uoc.g [University of Crete, Department of Chemistry (Greece)

    2010-05-15

    Two Gadolinium nanostructured materials, Gd{sub 2}(OH){sub 5}NO{sub 3} nanoparticles and Gd(OH){sub 3} nanorods, were synthesized and extensively characterized by various techniques. In addition to the potential use of Gd{sub 2}(OH){sub 5}NO{sub 3} in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Neutron-capture therapy (NCT) application, it could also be used in targeted drug delivery. An antibiotic (nalidixic acid), two amino acids (aspartic and glutamic acid), a fatty acid and a surfactant (SDS) were intercalated in the nanoparticles. The surface of the nanoparticles was modified with folic acid in order to be capable of targeted delivery to folate receptor expressing sites, such as tumor human cells.

  16. From drug response profiling to target addiction scoring in cancer cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan Yadav

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deconvoluting the molecular target signals behind observed drug response phenotypes is an important part of phenotype-based drug discovery and repurposing efforts. We demonstrate here how our network-based deconvolution approach, named target addiction score (TAS, provides insights into the functional importance of druggable protein targets in cell-based drug sensitivity testing experiments. Using cancer cell line profiling data sets, we constructed a functional classification across 107 cancer cell models, based on their common and unique target addiction signatures. The pan-cancer addiction correlations could not be explained by the tissue of origin, and only correlated in part with molecular and genomic signatures of the heterogeneous cancer cells. The TAS-based cancer cell classification was also shown to be robust to drug response data resampling, as well as predictive of the transcriptomic patterns in an independent set of cancer cells that shared similar addiction signatures with the 107 cancers. The critical protein targets identified by the integrated approach were also shown to have clinically relevant mutation frequencies in patients with various cancer subtypes, including not only well-established pan-cancer genes, such as PTEN tumor suppressor, but also a number of targets that are less frequently mutated in specific cancer types, including ABL1 oncoprotein in acute myeloid leukemia. An application to leukemia patient primary cell models demonstrated how the target deconvolution approach offers functional insights into patient-specific addiction patterns, such as those indicative of their receptor-type tyrosine-protein kinase FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD status and co-addiction partners, which may lead to clinically actionable, personalized drug treatment developments. To promote its application to the future drug testing studies, we have made available an open-source implementation of the TAS calculation in the form

  17. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects.Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  18. Predicting Molecular Targets for Small-Molecule Drugs with a Ligand-Based Interaction Fingerprint Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ran; Wang, Yanli

    2016-06-20

    The computational prediction of molecular targets for small-molecule drugs remains a great challenge. Herein we describe a ligand-based interaction fingerprint (LIFt) approach for target prediction. Together with physics-based docking and sampling methods, we assessed the performance systematically by modeling the polypharmacology of 12 kinase inhibitors in three stages. First, we examined the capacity of this approach to differentiate true targets from false targets with the promiscuous binder staurosporine, based on native complex structures. Second, we performed large-scale profiling of kinase selectivity on the clinical drug sunitinib by means of computational simulation. Third, we extended the study beyond kinases by modeling the cross-inhibition of bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) for 10 well-established kinase inhibitors. On this basis, we made prospective predictions by exploring new kinase targets for the anticancer drug candidate TN-16, originally known as a colchicine site binder and microtubule disruptor. As a result, p38α was highlighted from a panel of 187 different kinases. Encouragingly, our prediction was validated by an in vitro kinase assay, which showed TN-16 as a low-micromolar p38α inhibitor. Collectively, our results suggest the promise of the LIFt approach in predicting potential targets for small-molecule drugs. PMID:26222196

  19. 5HT3 receptors: Target for new antidepressant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepali; Prabhakar, Visakh; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh

    2016-05-01

    5HT3 receptors (5HT3Rs) have long been identified as a potential target for antidepressants. Several studies have reported that antagonism of 5HT3Rs produces antidepressant-like effects. However, the exact role of 5HT3Rs and the mode of antidepressant action of 5HT3R antagonists still remain a mystery. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of 5HT3Rs: (a) regional and subcellular distribution of 5HT3Rs in discrete brain regions, (b) preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the antidepressant effect of 5HT3R antagonists, and (c) neurochemical, biological and neurocellular signaling pathways associated with the antidepressant action of 5HT3R antagonists. 5HT3Rs located on the serotonergic and other neurotransmitter interneuronal projections control their release and affect mood and emotional behavior; however, new evidence suggests that apart from modulating the neurotransmitter functions, 5HT3R antagonists have protective effects in the pathogenic events including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis hyperactivity, brain oxidative stress and impaired neuronal plasticity, pointing to hereby unknown and novel mechanisms of their antidepressant action. Nonetheless, further investigations are warranted to establish the exact role of 5HT3Rs in depression and antidepressant action of 5HT3R antagonists. PMID:26976353

  20. Prediction of Effective Drug Combinations by Chemical Interaction, Protein Interaction and Target Enrichment of KEGG Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug combinatorial therapy could be more effective in treating some complex diseases than single agents due to better efficacy and reduced side effects. Although some drug combinations are being used, their underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Therefore, it is of great interest to deduce a novel drug combination by their molecular mechanisms in a robust and rigorous way. This paper attempts to predict effective drug combinations by a combined consideration of: (1 chemical interaction between drugs, (2 protein interactions between drugs’ targets, and (3 target enrichment of KEGG pathways. A benchmark dataset was constructed, consisting of 121 confirmed effective combinations and 605 random combinations. Each drug combination was represented by 465 features derived from the aforementioned three properties. Some feature selection techniques, including Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance and Incremental Feature Selection, were adopted to extract the key features. Random forest model was built with its performance evaluated by 5-fold cross-validation. As a result, 55 key features providing the best prediction result were selected. These important features may help to gain insights into the mechanisms of drug combinations, and the proposed prediction model could become a useful tool for screening possible drug combinations.

  1. ‘VIROSOMES’ A NOVEL STRATEGY FOR DELIVERY OF DRUGS AND TARGETING: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gowtham

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the years there has been a great revolution in drug delivery technologies. Virosomes drug delivery systems are an example of the various novel drug delivery systems available. A virosome is a drug or vaccine delivery mechanism consisting of unilamellar phospholipid bilayer vesicle incorporating virus derived proteins to allow the virosomes to fuse with target cells. Virosomes are not able to replicate but are pure fusion-active vesicle. These are reconstituted viral envelopes that can serve as vaccines and as vehicles for cellular delivery of macromolecules. The prospect of drug delivery and targeting using virosomes is an interesting field of research and development. Because virosomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, nontoxic, and non-autoimmunogenic, attempts have been made to use them as vaccines or adjuvants as well as delivery systems for drugs, nucleic acids, or genes for therapeutic purposes. The success of virosomal drug delivery depends on the methods used to prepare the encapsulated bioactive materials and incorporate them into the virosomes, as are characterization and formulation of the finished preparation. This article gives an insight of virosomes as a newer method of drug delivery. This article gives an insight of hydrogels and virosomes as a newer futuristic tool.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of multi-drug tolerance and antibiotic-induced responses by the histone-like protein Lsr2 in M. tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Colangeli

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi-drug tolerance is a key phenotypic property that complicates the sterilization of mammals infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Previous studies have established that iniBAC, an operon that confers multi-drug tolerance to M. bovis BCG through an associated pump-like activity, is induced by the antibiotics isoniazid (INH and ethambutol (EMB. An improved understanding of the functional role of antibiotic-induced genes and the regulation of drug tolerance may be gained by studying the factors that regulate antibiotic-mediated gene expression. An M. smegmatis strain containing a lacZ gene fused to the promoter of M. tuberculosis iniBAC (PiniBAC was subjected to transposon mutagenesis. Mutants with constitutive expression and increased EMB-mediated induction of PiniBAC::lacZ mapped to the lsr2 gene (MSMEG6065, a small basic protein of unknown function that is highly conserved among mycobacteria. These mutants had a marked change in colony morphology and generated a new polar lipid. Complementation with multi-copy M. tuberculosis lsr2 (Rv3597c returned PiniBAC expression to baseline, reversed the observed morphological and lipid changes, and repressed PiniBAC induction by EMB to below that of the control M. smegmatis strain. Microarray analysis of an lsr2 knockout confirmed upregulation of M. smegmatis iniA and demonstrated upregulation of genes involved in cell wall and metabolic functions. Fully 121 of 584 genes induced by EMB treatment in wild-type M. smegmatis were upregulated ("hyperinduced" to even higher levels by EMB in the M. smegmatis lsr2 knockout. The most highly upregulated genes and gene clusters had adenine-thymine (AT-rich 5-prime untranslated regions. In M. tuberculosis, overexpression of lsr2 repressed INH-mediated induction of all three iniBAC genes, as well as another annotated pump, efpA. The low molecular weight and basic properties of Lsr2 (pI 10.69 suggested that it was a histone-like protein, although it did not

  3. Iontophoresis of minoxidil sulphate loaded microparticles, a strategy for follicular drug targeting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Barros, M Angélica de Oliveira; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Guy, Richard H; Lopez, Renata F V

    2015-10-01

    The feasibility of targeting drugs to hair follicles by a combination of microencapsulation and iontophoresis has been evaluated. Minoxidil sulphate (MXS), which is used in the treatment of alopecia, was selected as a relevant drug with respect to follicular penetration. The skin permeation and disposition of MXS encapsulated in chitosan microparticles (MXS-MP) was evaluated in vitro after passive and iontophoretic delivery. Uptake of MXS was quantified at different exposure times in the stratum corneum (SC) and hair follicles. Microencapsulation resulted in increased (6-fold) drug accumulation in the hair follicles relative to delivery from a simple MXS solution. Application of iontophoresis enhanced follicular delivery for both the solution and the microparticle formulations. It appears, therefore, that microencapsulation and iontophoresis can act synergistically to enhance topical drug targeting to hair follicles. PMID:26222406

  4. Cryptococcal therapies and drug targets: the old, the new and the promising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Carolina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-06-01

    Half a century after the introduction of Amphotericin B the management of cryptococcosis remains unsatisfactory. The disease, caused primarily by the two fungal species Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii, remains responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality despite standard medical care. Current therapeutic options are limited to Amphotericin B, azoles and 5-flucytosine. However, this organism has numerous well-characterized virulence mechanisms that are amenable to pharmacological interference and are thus potential therapeutic targets. Here, we discuss existing approved antifungal drugs, resistance mechanisms to these drugs and non-standard antifungal drugs that have potential in treatment of cryptococcosis, including immunomodulatory strategies that synergize with antifungal drugs, such as cytokine administration or monoclonal antibodies. Finally, we summarize attempts to target well-described virulence factors of Cryptococcus, the capsule or fungal melanin. This review emphasizes the pressing need for new therapeutic alternatives for cryptococcosis. PMID:26990050

  5. Recent advances in lymphatic targeted drug delivery system for tumor metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lymphatic system has an important defensive role in the human body. The metastasis of most tumors initially spreads through the surrounding lymphatic tissue and eventually forms lymphatic metastatic tumors; the tumor cells may even transfer to other organs to form other types of tumors. Clinically, lymphatic metastatic tumors develop rapidly. Given the limitations of surgical resection and the low effectiveness of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the treatment of lymphatic metastatic tumors remains a great challenge. Lymph node metastasis may lead to the further spread of tumors and may be predictive of the endpoint event. Under these circumstances, novel and effective lymphatic targeted drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs to tumor cells in lymph nodes. In this review, we summarize the principles of lymphatic targeted drug delivery and discuss recent advances in the development of lymphatic targeted carriers

  6. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX, are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems.

  7. Multidrug resistance in oncology and beyond : from imaging of drug efflux pumps to cellular drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagengast, Wouter B; Oude Munnink, Thijs H; Dijkers, Eli; Hospers, Geesiena; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Schröder, Carolien P; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2010-01-01

    Resistance of tumor cells to several structurally unrelated classes of natural products, including anthracyclines, taxanes, and epipodophyllotoxines, is often referred as multidrug resistance (MDR). This is associated with ATP-binding cassette transporters, which function as drug efflux pumps such a

  8. High concentrations of drug in target tissues following local controlled release are utilized for both drug distribution and biologic effect: an example with epicardial inotropic drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, Mikhail Y; Edelman, Elazer R; Wei, Abraham E; Pezone, Matthew J; Lovich, Mark A

    2013-10-28

    Local drug delivery preferentially loads target tissues with a concentration gradient from the surface or point of release that tapers down to more distant sites. Drug that diffuses down this gradient must be in unbound form, but such drug can only elicit a biologic effect through receptor interactions. Drug excess loads tissues, increasing gradients and driving penetration, but with limited added biological response. We examined the hypothesis that local application reduces dramatically systemic circulating drug levels but leads to significantly higher tissue drug concentration than might be needed with systemic infusion in a rat model of local epicardial inotropic therapy. Epinephrine was infused systemically or released locally to the anterior wall of the heart using a novel polymeric platform that provides steady, sustained release over a range of precise doses. Epinephrine tissue concentration, upregulation of cAMP, and global left ventricular response were measured at equivalent doses and at doses equally effective in raising indices of contractility. The contractile stimulation by epinephrine was linked to drug tissue levels and commensurate cAMP upregulation for IV systemic infusion, but not with local epicardial delivery. Though cAMP was a powerful predictor of contractility with local application, tissue epinephrine levels were high and variable--only a small fraction of the deposited epinephrine was utilized in second messenger signaling and biologic effect. The remainder of deposited drug was likely used in diffusive transport and distribution. Systemic side effects were far more profound with IV infusion which, though it increased contractility, also induced tachycardia and loss of systemic vascular resistance, which were not seen with local application. Local epicardial inotropic delivery illustrates then a paradigm of how target tissues differentially handle and utilize drug compared to systemic infusion. PMID:23872515

  9. Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PKKKRKV (Pro-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Lys-Val, PV7), a seven amino acid peptide, has emerged as one of the primary nuclear localization signals that can be targeted into cell nucleus via the nuclear import machinery. Taking advantage of chemical diversity and biological activities of this short peptide sequence, in this study, Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality were successfully developed for intracellular drug delivery. These nanomicelles with the size ∼ 100 nm were self-assembled from F127 polymer that was flanked with two PV7 sequences at its both terminal ends. Hydrophobic anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with inherent fluorescence was chosen as the model drug, which was found to be efficiently encapsulated into nanomicelles with the encapsulation efficiency at 72.68%. In comparison with the non-functionalized namomicelles, the microscopic observation reveals that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles display a higher cellular uptake, especially into the nucleus of HepG2 cells, due to the nuclear localization signal effects. Both cytotoxicity and apoptosis studies show that the DOX-loaded nanomicelles were more potent than drug nanomicelles without nuclear targeting functionality. It was thus concluded that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles could be a potentially alternative vehicle for nuclear targeting drug delivery. - Highlights: ► A new nuclear targeted drug delivery system based on micelles is developed. ► This micellar system features a core-shell structure with the size peaked at 100 nm. ► PV7, a short peptide sequence, is adopted as a nuclear targeting ligand. ► PV7 functionalized drug loaded micelles are more potent in killing tumor cells

  10. Natural Polymeric Nanoparticles for Brain-Targeting: Implications on Drug and Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzoghby, Ahmed O; Abd-Elwakil, Mahmoud M; Abd-Elsalam, Kholod; Elsayed, Mustafa T; Hashem, Yosra; Mohamed, Ola

    2016-01-01

    There is a broad range of biological, chemical and physical hurdles for drugs to reach the brain. Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems hold tremendous potential for diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders, including the capacity of crossing the blood-brain barrier and accessing to the brain after systemic administration. Thus, nanoparticles enable the delivery of a great variety of drugs including anticancer drugs, analgesics, anti- Alzheimer`s drugs, protease inhibitors, and several macromolecules into the brain. Moreover, nanoparticles may importantly reduce the drug`s toxicity and adverse effects due to an alteration of the body distribution. A very critical and important requirement for nanoparticulate brain delivery is that the employed nanoparticles are biocompatible and, moreover, rapidly biodegradable. Therefore, nanocarriers fabricated from natural polymers including polysaccharides and proteins are particularly interesting. Meeting requirements such as low cytotoxicity, abundant surface functional groups, high drug binding capacity and significant uptake into the targeted cells, natural polymer-based nanocarriers represent promising candidates for efficient drug and gene delivery to the brain. The current review highlights the latest advances achieved in developing drug-loaded polysaccharide and protein nanocarriers for brain delivery. The nanoparticles are discussed with respect to their formulation aspects, advantages, limitations, as well as the major outcomes of the in vitro and in vivo investigations. Modification of the nanoparticle surface with specific brain targeting ligands or by coating with certain surfactants for enhanced brain delivery is also reviewed. In addition, the mechanisms of the nanoparticle-mediated drug transport across the BBB are also discussed in this review. PMID:26845323

  11. Anti-HIV-1 Therapeutics: From FDA-approved Drugs to Hypothetical Future Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Adamson, Catherine S; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    More than twenty-five years after its discovery, HIV-1 remains one of the world’s most formidable and destructive pathogens. Several classes of anti-HIV-1 agents are currently in widespread clinical use in developed nations; however, viral resistance to these drugs limits their effectiveness in a growing number of patients. It is therefore imperative that novel drugs be developed. Recent advances in the fields of HIV-1 molecular virology and cell biology have revealed possible new targets for...

  12. Colon Targeting Drug - Synthesis and evaluation of prodrugs of Quiniodochlor by -Glucosidase enzyme with HPLC methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Gera Parul; Sharma S.K; Budhiraja Rajat

    2012-01-01

    Quiniodochlor has well established antimicrobial properties. It is used for treatment of amoebiasis caused by Entamoeba histolytica. The drug is to be delivered to the colon for its effective action against Entamoeba histolytica. But the pharmacokinetic profile of Quiniodochlor indicates that the drug is not completely and promptly absorbed after oral administration. Quiniodochlor is specifically targeted to colon by making its prodrugs. Chemical structure of Quiniodochlor posses a hydroxyl g...

  13. Is the beta3-adrenoceptor (ADRB3) a potential target for uterorelaxant drugs?

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The management of premature birth still remains unsatisfactory. Since the relative lack of efficiency and/or safety of current tocolytic agents have been highlighted, it is necessary to develop new uterorelaxant drugs deprived of important maternal and foetal side effects. Our work reported in this review focuses on a potential new target for tocolytic drugs, the beta3-adrenoceptor (ADRB3). This third type of ADRB is shown to be present and functional in human myometrium. We demonstrated that...

  14. Antibiotic Precautions in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Fayock, Kristopher; Voltz, Matthew; Sandella, Bradley; Close, Jeremy; Lunser, Matthew; Okon, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Context: Antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment for bacterial infections in patients of all ages. Athletes who maximally train are at risk for illness and various infections. Routinely used antibiotics have been linked to tendon injuries, cardiac arrhythmias, diarrhea, photosensitivity, cartilage issues, and decreased performance. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant articles published from 1989 to 2012 obtained through searching MEDLINE and OVID. Also, the Food and Drug Administration website w...

  15. The Innovative Medicines Initiative's New Drugs for Bad Bugs programme: European public-private partnerships for the development of new strategies to tackle antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyanev, T; Bonten, M J M; O'Brien, S; Steel, H; Ross, S; François, B; Tacconelli, E; Winterhalter, M; Stavenger, R A; Karlén, A; Harbarth, S; Hackett, J; Jafri, H S; Vuong, C; MacGowan, A; Witschi, A; Angyalosi, G; Elborn, J S; deWinter, R; Goossens, H

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance (ABR) is a global public health threat. Despite the emergence of highly resistant organisms and the huge medical need for new drugs, the development of antibacterials has slowed to an unacceptable level worldwide. Numerous government and non-government agencies have called for public-private partnerships and innovative funding mechanisms to address this problem. To respond to this public health crisis, the Innovative Medicines Initiative Joint Undertaking programme has invested more than €660 million, with a goal of matched contributions from the European Commission and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations, in the development of new antibacterial strategies. The New Drugs for Bad Bugs (ND4BB) programme, an Innovative Medicines Initiative, has the ultimate goal to boost the fight against ABR at every level from basic science and drug discovery, through clinical development to new business models and responsible use of antibiotics. Seven projects have been launched within the ND4BB programme to achieve this goal. Four of them will include clinical trials of new anti-infective compounds, as well as epidemiological studies on an unprecedented scale, which will increase our knowledge of ABR and specific pathogens, and improve the designs of the clinical trials with new investigational drugs. The need for rapid concerted action has driven the funding of seven topics, each of which should add significantly to progress in the fight against ABR. ND4BB unites expertise and provides a platform where the commitment and resources required by all parties are streamlined into a joint public-private partnership initiative of unprecedented scale. PMID:26568581

  16. Studies in Multifunctional Drug Development: Preparation and Evaluation of 11beta-Substituted Estradiol-Drug Conjugates, Cell Membrane Targeting Imaging Agents, and Target Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, KinhLuan Lenny D.

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease in the United State. Despite extensive research in development of antitumor drugs, most of these therapeutic entities often possess nonspecific toxicity, thus they can only be used to treat tumors in higher doses or more frequently. Because of the cytotoxicity and severe side effects, the drug therapeutic window normally is limited. Beside the toxicity issue, antitumor drug are also not selectively taken up by tumor cells, thus the necessitating concentrations that would eradicate the tumor can often not be used. In addition, tumor cells tend to develop resistance against the anticancer drugs after prolonged treatment. Therefore, alleviating the systemic cytotoxicity and side effects, improving in tumor selectivity, high potency, and therapeutic efficacy are still major obstacles in the area of anticancer drug development. A more promising approach for developing a selective agent for cancer is to conjugate a potent therapeutic drug, or an imaging agent with a targeting group, such as antibody or a high binding-specificity small molecule, that selectively recognize the overexpressed antigens or proteins on tumor cells. My research combines several approaches to describe this strategy via using different targeting molecules to different diseases, as well as different potent cytotoxic drugs for different therapies. Three studies related to the preparation and biological evaluation of new therapeutic agents, such as estradiol-drug hybrids, cell membrane targeted molecular imaging agents, and multifunctional NPs will be discussed. The preliminary results of these studies indicated that our new reagents achieved their initial objectives and can be further improved for optimized synthesis and in vivo experiments. The first study describes the method in which we employed a modular assembly approach to synthesize a novel 11beta-substituted steroidal anti-estrogen. The key intermediate was synthesized

  17. Octreotide-Mediated Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery via a Cleavable Doxorubicin-Peptide Conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelle, Marco; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Freidel, Christoph; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Musheev, Michael; Niehrs, Christof; Stalla, Günter; Peneva, Kalina

    2015-12-01

    Although recent methods for targeted drug delivery have addressed many of the existing problems of cancer therapy associated with undesirable side effects, significant challenges remain that have to be met before they find significant clinical relevance. One such area is the delicate chemical bond that is applied to connect a cytotoxic drug with targeting moieties like antibodies or peptides. Here we describe a novel platform that can be utilized for the preparation of drug-carrier conjugates in a site-specific manner, which provides excellent versatility and enables triggered release inside cancer cells. Its key feature is a cleavable doxorubicin-octreotide bioconjugate that targets overexpressed somatostatin receptors on tumor cells, where the coupling between the two components was achieved through the first cleavable disulfide-intercalating linker. The tumor targeting ability and suppression of adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion in AtT-20 cells by both octreotide and the doxorubicin hybrid were determined via a specific radioimmunoassay. Both substances reduced the hormone secretion to a similar extent, which demonstrated that the tumor homing peptide is able to interact with the relevant cell surface receptors after the attachment of the drug. Effective drug release was quickly accomplished in the presence of the physiological reducing agent glutathione. We also demonstrate the relevance of this scaffold in biological context in cytotoxicity assays with pituitary, pancreatic, and breast cancer cell lines. PMID:26524088

  18. Confidence from uncertainty - A multi-target drug screening method from robust control theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petzold Linda R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Robustness is a recognized feature of biological systems that evolved as a defence to environmental variability. Complex diseases such as diabetes, cancer, bacterial and viral infections, exploit the same mechanisms that allow for robust behaviour in healthy conditions to ensure their own continuance. Single drug therapies, while generally potent regulators of their specific protein/gene targets, often fail to counter the robustness of the disease in question. Multi-drug therapies offer a powerful means to restore disrupted biological networks, by targeting the subsystem of interest while preventing the diseased network from reconciling through available, redundant mechanisms. Modelling techniques are needed to manage the high number of combinatorial possibilities arising in multi-drug therapeutic design, and identify synergistic targets that are robust to system uncertainty. Results We present the application of a method from robust control theory, Structured Singular Value or μ- analysis, to identify highly effective multi-drug therapies by using robustness in the face of uncertainty as a new means of target discrimination. We illustrate the method by means of a case study of a negative feedback network motif subject to parametric uncertainty. Conclusions The paper contributes to the development of effective methods for drug screening in the context of network modelling affected by parametric uncertainty. The results have wide applicability for the analysis of different sources of uncertainty like noise experienced in the data, neglected dynamics, or intrinsic biological variability.

  19. Colon-targeted oral drug delivery systems: design trends and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Seth; Brown, Jack E; Dave, Vivek S

    2015-08-01

    Colon-specific drug delivery systems (CDDS) are desirable for the treatment of a range of local diseases such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pancreatitis, and colonic cancer. In addition, the colon can be a potential site for the systemic absorption of several drugs to treat non-colonic conditions. Drugs such as proteins and peptides that are known to degrade in the extreme gastric pH, if delivered to the colon intact, can be systemically absorbed by colonic mucosa. In order to achieve effective therapeutic outcomes, it is imperative that the designed delivery system specifically targets the drugs into the colon. Several formulation approaches have been explored in the development colon-targeted drug delivery systems. These approaches involve the use of formulation components that interact with one or more aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, such as the difference in the pH along the GI tract, the presence of colonic microflora, and enzymes, to achieve colon targeting. This article highlights the factors influencing colon-specific drug delivery and colonic bioavailability, and the limitations associated with CDDS. Further, the review provides a systematic discussion of various conventional, as well as relatively newer formulation approaches/technologies currently being utilized for the development of CDDS. PMID:26070545

  20. Crowd sourcing a new paradigm for interactome driven drug target identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Vashisht

    Full Text Available A decade since the availability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb genome sequence, no promising drug has seen the light of the day. This not only indicates the challenges in discovering new drugs but also suggests a gap in our current understanding of Mtb biology. We attempt to bridge this gap by carrying out extensive re-annotation and constructing a systems level protein interaction map of Mtb with an objective of finding novel drug target candidates. Towards this, we synergized crowd sourcing and social networking methods through an initiative 'Connect to Decode' (C2D to generate the first and largest manually curated interactome of Mtb termed 'interactome pathway' (IPW, encompassing a total of 1434 proteins connected through 2575 functional relationships. Interactions leading to gene regulation, signal transduction, metabolism, structural complex formation have been catalogued. In the process, we have functionally annotated 87% of the Mtb genome in context of gene products. We further combine IPW with STRING based network to report central proteins, which may be assessed as potential drug targets for development of drugs with least possible side effects. The fact that five of the 17 predicted drug targets are already experimentally validated either genetically or biochemically lends credence to our unique approach.