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Sample records for antiandrogen flutamide therapy

  1. The efficacy of flutamide, an antiandrogen in idiopathic hirsutism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somani V

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of flutamide, an antiandrogen in idiopathic hirsutism was studied. The long term effects of. treatment with low doses of flutamide on clinical and hormonal parameters were investigated. Nine patients with idiopathic hirsutism were studied basally and during treatment with 125mg flutamide thrice daily for a period of 9 months. Safety parameters were assessed throughout the study. Hirsutism was graded by Ferriman and Gallwey score and hormones were evaluated basally and later quarterly. After three months of therapy, flutamide had caused a significant alleviation of hirsutism and this continued during the subsequent months. No clinical significant side effects were observed during the period of the study. Biochemical and hormonal parameters remained unchanged after 9 months of flutamide.

  2. Clinical Usefulness of Chlormadinone Acetate as an Alternative Antiandrogen Therapy for Prostate Cancer Relapse after Combined Androgen Blockade Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    江原, 英俊; 加藤, 成一; 中根, 慶太; 加藤, 卓; 高田, 俊彦; 小島, 圭太郎; 亀井, 信吾; 萩原, 徳康; 柚原, 一哉; 高橋, 義人; 藤本, 佳則; 藤広, 茂; 蟹本, 雄右; 出口, 隆

    2009-01-01

    We prospectively studied the usefulness of chlormadinone acetate (CMA) as an alternative therapy for prostate cancer relapse after combined androgen blockade (CAB) therapy. Sixteen patients with relapsed prostate cancer after treatment with CAB, including surgical or medical castration and nonsteroidal antiandrogens, 80 mg bicalutamide daily or 375 mg flutamide daily, were enrolled. After discontinuing the antiandrogen for evaluating the patient for the antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome, we ad...

  3. A Novel Amphibian Tier 2 Testing Protocol: A 30-Week Exposure of Xenopus Tropicalis to the Antiandrogen Flutamide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knechtges, Paul L; Sprando, Robert L; Porter, Karen L; Brennan, Linda M; Miller, Mark F; Kumsher, David M; Dennis, William E; Brown, Charles C; Clegg Paul L. Knechtges. Robert L. Sprando. Karen L. Potter., Eric D

    2007-01-01

    .... For that reason, a tier 2 testing protocol using Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis and a 30-week, flow-through exposure to the antiandrogen flutamide from stage 46 tadpoles through sexually mature adult frogs were developed and evaluated in this pilot study...

  4. Recurrent angioedema associated with hypogonadism or anti-androgen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, W J; Lehner, R; Späth, P J

    1989-10-01

    Two male patients with hypogonadism and four female patients who received an anti-androgen as contraceptive (cyproteronacetate) and who had recurrent angioedema are described. In one male patient, augmentation of the plasma androgen level resulted in disappearance of symptoms. In the four female patients, recurrent angioedema and urticaria developed after initiation of the anti-androgen treatment. Cessation of cyproteronacetate and a change to another contraceptive resulted in complete resolution of the previously frequent angioedematous attacks. The women are still symptom free after more than 60 patient's months. These cases suggest that an androgen deficit due to either hypogonadism or to anti-androgen treatment may be another cause of angioedema. One of the two male patients was untreated and presented with 40% normal value of C1-INH. Androgen therapy normalized C1-INH concentration in this male patient. Functional C1-INH in the same patient, studied before and after the beginning of androgen therapy, clearly increased when assessed by inhibition of amidolytic activity of C1-esterase. The other male patient with hypogonadism had already been under androgen treatment for 4 years and had C1-INH levels in the normal range. In the female patients, complement profiles were normal before and after cessation of anti-androgen contraception; however, the C1-INH plasma levels were higher after cessation of anti-androgen anticonception. These results indicate an effect of androgen deficit on the level of C1-INH in circulating plasma but do not prove a role of C1-INH in angioedema associated with diminished androgen plasma levels.

  5. Oestrogen and anti-androgen therapy for transgender women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangpricha, Vin; den Heijer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Transgender women experience lifelong gender dysphoria due to a gender assignment at birth that is incongruent with their gender identity. They often seek hormone therapy, with or without surgery, to improve their gender dysphoria and to better align their physical and psychological features with a more feminine gender role. Some of the desired physical changes from oestrogen and anti-androgen therapy include decreased body and facial hair, decreased muscle mass, breast growth, and redistribution of fat. Overall the risks of treatment are low, but include thromboembolism, the risk of which depends on the dose and route of oestrogen administration. Other associated conditions commonly seen in transgender women include increased risks of depression and osteoporosis. The risk of hormone-sensitive cancer seems to be low in transgender women, with no increased risk of breast cancer compared with women and no increase in prostate cancer when compared with men. The evidence base for the care of transgender women is limited by the paucity of high-quality research, and long-term longitudinal studies are needed to inform future guidelines. PMID:27916515

  6. Antiandrogen monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolvenbag, G J; Iversen, P; Newling, D W

    2001-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiandrogens are generally used in conjunction with castration as combined androgen blockade. However, the changing profile of patients with prostate cancer has made monotherapy with a nonsteroidal antiandrogen an attractive alternative therapeutic approach, offering potential quali...

  7. Flutamide-induced hypospadias in rats: A critical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Adriane Watkins; Cao, Mei; Pask, Andrew; Baskin, Laurence; Cunha, Gerald R

    This paper provides the first detailed description of flutamide-induced hypospadias in the rat based upon wholemount, histologic, three-dimensional reconstruction, scanning electron microscopic, and immunocytochemical analysis. The penile malformations elicited by this potent anti-androgen include a substantial proximal shift in the urethral meatus that clearly conforms to the definition of hypospadias based upon specific morphological criteria for this malformation. Through examination of the normal penile development and flutamide-induced abnormal penile development observed in prenatally oil- and flutamide-treated rats, our analysis provides insights into the morphogenetic mechanism of development of hypospadias. In this regard, a common theme in normal penile development is midline fusion of epithelia followed by removal of the epithelial seam and establishment of midline mesenchymal confluence during development of the penile urethra and prepuce, processes which are impaired as a result of prenatal flutamide treatment. The developmental processes occurring in normal penile development, through comparison with development of female external genitalia and those impaired due to prenatal flutamide treatment, are consistent with critical role of androgen receptors in normal penile development in the rat, and the specific penile abnormalities embodied in flutamide-induced rat hypospadias. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of flutamide and two major metabolites using HPLC-DAD and HPTLC methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahab, Nada S; Elshemy, Heba A H; Farid, Nehal F

    2018-01-25

    Flutamide is a potential antineoplastic drug classified as an anti-androgen. It is a therapy for men with advanced prostate cancer, administered orally after which it undergoes extensively first pass metabolism in the liver with the production of several metabolites. These metabolites are predominantly excreted in urine. One of the important metabolites in plasma is 4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenylamine (Flu-1), while the main metabolite in urine is 2-amino-5-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenol (Flu-3). In this work the two metabolites, Flu-1 and Flu-3, have been synthesized, and then structural confirmation has been carried out by HNMR analysis. Efforts were exerted to develop chromatographic methods for resolving Flutamide and its metabolites with the use of acceptable solvents without affecting the efficiency of the methods. The drug along with its metabolites were quantitatively analyzed in pure form, human urine, and plasma samples using two chromatographic methods, HPTLC and HPLC-DAD methods. FDA guidelines for bio-analytical method validation were followed and USP recommendations were used for analytical method validation. Interference from excipients has been tested by application of the methods to pharmaceutical tablets. No significant difference was found between the proposed methods and the official one when they were statistically compared at p value of 0.05%.

  9. Antiandrogenic therapy with finasteride attenuates cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwadlo, Carolin; Schmidtmann, Elisa; Szaroszyk, Malgorzata; Kattih, Badder; Froese, Natali; Hinz, Hebke; Schmitto, Jan Dieter; Widder, Julian; Batkai, Sandor; Bähre, Heike; Kaever, Volkhard; Thum, Thomas; Bauersachs, Johann; Heineke, Joerg

    2015-03-24

    In comparison with men, women have a better prognosis when experiencing aortic valve stenosis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or heart failure. Recent data suggest that androgens like testosterone or the more potent dihydrotestosterone contribute to the development of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Therefore, we analyzed whether antiandrogenic therapy with finasteride, which inhibits the generation of dihydrotestosterone by the enzyme 5-α-reductase, improves pathological ventricular remodeling and heart failure. We found a strongly induced expression of all 3 isoforms of the 5-α-reductase (Srd5a1 to Srd5a3) in human and mouse hearts with pathological hypertrophy, which was associated with increased myocardial accumulation of dihydrotestosterone. Starting 1 week after the induction of pressure overload by transaortic constriction, mice were treated with finasteride for 2 weeks. Cardiac function, hypertrophy, dilation, and fibrosis were markedly improved in response to finasteride treatment in not only male, but also in female mice. In addition, finasteride also very effectively improved cardiac function and mortality after long-term pressure overload and prevented disease progression in cardiomyopathic mice with myocardial Gαq overexpression. Mechanistically, finasteride, by decreasing dihydrotestosterone, potently inhibited hypertrophy and Akt-dependent prohypertrophic signaling in isolated cardiac myocytes, whereas the introduction of constitutively active Akt blunted these effects of finasteride. Finasteride, which is currently used in patients to treat prostate disease, potently reverses pathological cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction in mice and might be a therapeutic option for heart failure. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. The Glucocorticoid Receptor Is a Key Player for Prostate Cancer Cell Survival and a Target for Improved Antiandrogen Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhr, Martin; Hoefer, Julia; Eigentler, Andrea; Ploner, Christian; Handle, Florian; Schaefer, Georg; Kroon, Jan; Leo, Angela; Heidegger, Isabel; Eder, Iris; Culig, Zoran; Van der Pluijm, Gabri; Klocker, Helmut

    2018-02-15

    Purpose: The major obstacle in the management of advanced prostate cancer is the occurrence of resistance to endocrine therapy. Although the androgen receptor (AR) has been linked to therapy failure, the underlying escape mechanisms have not been fully clarified. Being closely related to the AR, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has been suggested to play a role in enzalutamide and docetaxel resistance. Given that glucocorticoids are frequently applied to prostate cancer patients, it is essential to unravel the exact role of the GR in prostate cancer progression. Experimental Design: Assessment of GR expression and functional significance in tissues from 177 prostate cancer patients, including 14 lymph node metastases, as well as in several human prostate cancer models, including androgen-dependent, androgen-independent, and long-term antiandrogen-treated cell lines. Results: Although GR expression is reduced in primary prostate cancer tissue, it is restored in metastatic lesions. Relapse patients with high GR experience shortened progression-free survival. GR is significantly increased upon long-term abiraterone or enzalutamide treatment in the majority of preclinical models, thus identifying GR upregulation as an underlying mechanism for cells to bypass AR blockade. Importantly, GR inhibition by RNAi or chemical blockade results in impaired proliferation and 3D-spheroid formation in all tested cell lines. Conclusions: GR upregulation seems to be a common mechanism during antiandrogen treatment and supports the notion that targeting the GR pathway combined with antiandrogen medication may further improve prostate cancer therapy. Clin Cancer Res; 24(4); 927-38. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Flutamide effects on morphology of reproductive organs and liver of Neotropical Anura, Rhinella schneideri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gregorio, Lara S; Franco-Belussi, Lilian; Gomes, Fernando R; de Oliveira, Classius

    2016-07-01

    Water contamination is one of the factors influencing the decline of amphibians. Flutamide is an antiandrogenic medicine that occurs as water contaminant. This compound especially affects the reproductive organs, but it can also show hepatotoxic effects. The Bufonidae family has a peculiar organ named Bidder's organ, considered by some authors as a rudimentary ovary, but capable to respond to some external stimuli. This study investigated flutamide effects on testes and Bidder's organ germ cells, liver pigmentation, and sexual hormones levels in Rhinella schneideri males. We randomly divided 15 males in three groups (N=5): two groups were injected with flutamide, at 1 and 5mg/kg, while the control group received only mineral oil, for 7days. After euthanasia, blood samples were collected and the organs were sent to histological routine. In the testes, both treatments caused an increase in spermatogonia and spermatocytes, and a decrease in spermatozoa and locular area. In the Bidder's organ, the final diplotene oocytes increased, but the initial diplotene, degrading and atresic oocytes reduced in both treatments. The lipofuscin in the Bidder's organ was not affected. In the liver, melanin and lipofuscin increased only for the 1mg/kg flutamide treatment. The 5mg/kg treatment did not affect the liver. Serum testosterone and estradiol levels did not vary compared with the control group. This compound has antiandrogenic activity, which can affect the spermatogenetic process. The decrease in degrading and atresic Bidderian oocytes indicated that flutamide could stimulate the organ, retarding the degradation processes. The increase in liver melanin, which has protective role, and lipofuscin, a sign of degradation, indicates that flutamide cause hepatotoxic effects. So we conclude that flutamide negatively affects the testes, especially by reducing the sperm area, and the liver, inducing cell degradation and producing protective responses. Furthermore, the compound

  12. Antiandrogen monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolvenbag, G J; Iversen, P; Newling, D W

    2001-01-01

    -of-life benefits (sexual interest and physical capacity), with preliminary data suggesting that the risk of osteoporosis may also be reduced by bicalutamide 150-mg monotherapy compared with castration. In general, bicalutamide is well tolerated, with a predictable adverse-effect profile. Breast pain (40......%) and gynecomastia (49%) are the most common adverse events seen during monotherapy with this drug. In summary, the availability of bicalutamide 150-mg monotherapy broadens treatment options for men with locally advanced prostate cancer, offering a viable and attractive alternative to castration in this patient......Nonsteroidal antiandrogens are generally used in conjunction with castration as combined androgen blockade. However, the changing profile of patients with prostate cancer has made monotherapy with a nonsteroidal antiandrogen an attractive alternative therapeutic approach, offering potential quality...

  13. Antiandrogen monotherapy: indications and results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter

    2002-01-01

    of life, causing loss of libido, impotence, fatigue, and reduced bone mineral density. Monotherapy with a nonsteroidal antiandrogen is an attractive therapeutic alternative to castration, offering effective therapy with potential quality-of-life benefits. Of the available nonsteroidal antiandrogens...... monotherapy is generally well tolerated, with a predictable side-effect profile. The most common side effects are male breast pain and gynecomastia. Emerging evidence also supports the use of bicalutamide 150 mg, both as immediate monotherapy and as adjuvant therapy in early stage (localized or locally...

  14. ADMINISTRATION OF POTENTIALLY ANTIANDROGENIC PESTICIDES (PROCYMIDONE, LINURON, IPRODIONE, CHLOZOLINATE, P,P'-DDE AND KETOCONAZOLE) AND TOXIC SUBSTANCES (DIBUTYL-AND DIETHYLHEXYL PHTHALATE, PCB 169, AND ETHANE DIMETHANE SULPHONATE) DURING SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION PRODUCES DIVERSE PROFILES OF REPRODUCTIVE MALFORMATIONS IN THE MALE RAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiandrogenic chemicals alter sexual differentiation by a variety of mechanisms, and as a consequence, they induce different profiles of effects. For example, in utero treatment with the androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, flutamide, produces ventral prostate agenesis and testicu...

  15. Antiandrogen monotherapy: indications and results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Many patients with prostate cancer for whom hormonal therapy is indicated are still physically and sexually active; quality of life is therefore a vital issue when considering treatment options. Traditional castration-based therapies, although effective, have implications with respect to quality...... of life, causing loss of libido, impotence, fatigue, and reduced bone mineral density. Monotherapy with a nonsteroidal antiandrogen is an attractive therapeutic alternative to castration, offering effective therapy with potential quality-of-life benefits. Of the available nonsteroidal antiandrogens...... with castration, in terms of sexual interest and physical capacity, in patients with either M0 and M1 stage disease. Data from a small subgroup of patients with stage M0 disease suggest that bicalutamide may also reduce the risk of osteoporosis compared with castration. Long-term therapy with bicalutamide 150-mg...

  16. Treatment of female pattern hair loss with oral antiandrogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinclair, R; Wewerinke, M; Jolley, D

    Background It has not been conclusively established that female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is either due to androgens or responsive to oral antiandrogen therapy. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of oral antiandrogen therapy in the management of women with FPHL using standardized photographic

  17. Effect of flutamide and metformin administered alone or in combination in dieting obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambineri, Alessandra; Pelusi, Carla; Genghini, Silvia; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Cacciari, Mauro; Pagotto, Uberto; Pasquali, Renato

    2004-02-01

    Hyperandrogenism, hyperinsulinaemia and obesity play a key and coordinating roles in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), contributing in different ways to the clinical expression of the syndrome. Weight loss is beneficial, but the additional administration of insulin-lowering drugs, such as metformin, and antiandrogens may produce further benefits, due to their different spectrum of action. The effects of long-term metformin and flutamide, an antiandrogen drug, added alone or in combination with a low-calorie diet, on body weight and fat distribution, androgens, metabolic parameters and clinical status in obese women with PCOS were investigated. Forty obese women with PCOS were enrolled in the study. After a 1-month diet, according to single-blind design, the patients were allocated to treatment with placebo, metformin (850 mg/orally, twice daily), flutamide (250 mg/orally, twice daily) or metformin (850 mg/orally, twice daily) + flutamide (250 mg/orally, twice daily) for the following 6 months, while continuing hypocaloric dieting. At baseline and at the end of the study, sex hormone, SHBG, lipid, insulin and insulin sensitivity determinations were evaluated. At the same time, clinical parameters such as anthropometry, total (TAT), visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue, hirsutism and menses were also measured. We found that, in obese PCOS women, following a hypocaloric diet the addition of metformin, flutamide or the combined metformin + flutamide treatment had some specific additional favourable effects with respect to the low-calorie diet alone. In particular, flutamide treatment seemed to add a significant effect in decreasing visceral fat, androstenedione, DHEA-S, total and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and in improving hirsutism. Conversely, metformin had significant benefits on the menstrual status. The two drugs showed an additive effect in reducing testosterone concentrations and a synergistic effect in

  18. Gene expression profiling of the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide and vinclozolin in zebrafish (Danio rerio) gonads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma, E-mail: dalma@stthomas.edu [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); University of St. Thomas, 2115 Summit Ave, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Wang Ronglin [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Ecological Exposure Research Division, 26W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Villeneuve, Daniel L. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Bencic, David C.; Lazorchak, Jim [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Ecological Exposure Research Division, 26W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Ankley, Gerald T. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States)

    2011-01-25

    The studies presented in this manuscript focus on characterization of transcriptomic responses to anti-androgens in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Research on the effects of anti-androgens in fish has been characterized by a heavy reliance on apical endpoints, and molecular mechanisms of action (MOA) of anti-androgens remain poorly elucidated. In the present study, we examined effects of a short term exposure (24-96 h) to the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide (FLU) and vinclozolin (VZ) on gene expression in gonads of sexually mature zebrafish, using commercially available zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays (4 x 44 K platform). We found that VZ and FLU potentially impact reproductive processes via multiple pathways related to steroidogenesis, spermatogenesis, and fertilization. Observed changes in gene expression often were shared by VZ and FLU, as demonstrated by overlap in differentially-expressed genes and enrichment of several common key pathways including: (1) integrin and actin signaling, (2) nuclear receptor 5A1 signaling, (3) fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling, (4) polyamine synthesis, and (5) androgen synthesis. This information should prove useful to elucidating specific mechanisms of reproductive effects of anti-androgens in fish, as well as developing biomarkers for this important class of endocrine-active chemicals.

  19. [Low-dose flutamide in the treatment of hyperandrogenism in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, A; Borrielli, I; Mastroeni, M T; Fattori, A; Dugo, C; Dugo, N; Dinatale, A

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of the use of flutamide at low doses for the therapy of the iperandrogenism in adolescents. The study enrolled 35 young women with acne and irsutism; 31 had polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and 4 periferic iperandrogenism. In other 8 young women, sexually active, the flutamide has been associated with the hormonal contraceptive. On the three young women with iperinsulinism it has been decided to associate the flutamide with the metformina. All the young women were checked each month for the liver functional. Before the beginning of the therapy the menstrual situation, the Body Mass Index (BMI), the Ferriman' s and Cremoncini's score, the ovary's ultrasound aspect, and the hormonal order were evaluated. Follow-up was made after three months and after six months after the beginning of the therapy with flutamide 62.5 mg/die. Only in 4 cases the therapy has been suspended due to collateral effects, soon regressed after one week of the treatment interruption. The results have demonstrated a overwhelming improvement of the peripheral symptoms of iperandrogenism in all patients. The authors hope that flutamide could enter in the list of medicines normally used to treat the beauty flaws of policistic acne and to restore a hormonal order associated to an effective contraception.

  20. Maternal administration of flutamide during late gestation affects the brain and reproductive organs development in the rat male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallarés, M E; Adrover, E; Imsen, M; González, D; Fabre, B; Mesch, V; Baier, C J; Antonelli, M C

    2014-10-10

    We have previously demonstrated that male rats exposed to stress during the last week of gestation present age-specific impairments of brain development. Since the organization of the fetal developing brain is subject to androgen exposure and prenatal stress was reported to disrupt perinatal testosterone surges, the aim of this research was to explore whether abnormal androgen concentrations during late gestation affects the morphology of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HPC) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), three major areas that were shown to be affected by prenatal stress in our previous studies. We administered 10-mg/kg/day of the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide (4'nitro-3'-trifluoromethylsobutyranilide) or vehicle injections to pregnant rats from days 15-21 of gestation. The antiandrogenic effects of flutamide were confirmed by the analysis of androgen-dependent developmental markers: flutamide-exposed rats showed reduced anogenital distance, delay in the completion of testis descent, hypospadias, cryptorchidism and atrophied seminal vesicles. Brain morphological studies revealed that prenatal flutamide decreased the number of MAP2 (a microtubule-associated protein type 2, present almost exclusively in dendrites) immunoreactive neuronal processes in all evaluated brain areas, both in prepubertal and adult offspring, suggesting that prenatal androgen disruption induces long-term reductions of the dendritic arborization of several brain structures, affecting the normal connectivity between areas. Moreover, the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunopositive neurons in the VTA of prepubertal offspring was reduced in flutamide rats but reach normal values at adulthood. Our results demonstrate that the effects of prenatal flutamide on the offspring brain morphology resemble several prenatal stress effects suggesting that the mechanism of action of prenatal stress might be related to the impairment of the organizational role of androgens on brain

  1. Compound list: flutamide [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available flutamide FT 00044 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/flut...amide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/flut...amide.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/flut...pen-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/flutamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  2. Use of the Three-Spined Stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) As a Sensitive in Vivo Test for Detection of Environmental Antiandrogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Morris, Steven; Squires, Christopher; Hurst, Mark Richard; James, Jonathan David; Scott, Alexander Pickering

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that exposure to exogenous androgens causes female sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to produce the glue protein, spiggin, in their kidneys. This protein can be quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay developed and validated at the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science. Here we report the development of an in vivo test for the detection of environmental antiandrogens. The system involves the simultaneous exposure of female sticklebacks to 17α-methyltestosterone (a model androgen) at 500 ng/L and suspected environmental antiandrogens over a period of 21 days. The spiggin content of the kidneys is then measured, and any antiandrogenic activity is evaluated by comparing the spiggin levels of female fish exposed to antiandrogens to those of female fish exposed solely to the model androgen. The assay detects the antiandrogenic activity of flutamide, vinclozolin (both used at 250 μg/L), linuron (at 150 μg/L), and fenitrothion (at 15 and 150 μg/L). These results provide the first evidence of in vivo antiandrogenic activity of both linuron and fenitrothion in teleosts. Although there are other suggested fish species that could be used for this purpose, the stickleback is the only widely available species in which it is now possible to study both estrogenic and antiandrogenic end points in the same individual. Furthermore, the species is endemic and ubiquitous in Europe, and it possesses many ecological traits that make it better suited than other potential species for field research into endocrine disruption. PMID:16818256

  3. Quantification of antiandrogen effect determined by Lightcycler technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, Christine Lydia; Vinggaard, Anne; Dalgaard, M.

    2001-01-01

    During the last decade, the possible effects of xenobiotics on male reproductive health have resulted in great concern. More recently. evidence of antiandrogen effect in vivo by certain chemicals has been reported. The classical Hershberger in vivo assay determining organ weight changes can...... be improved by measuring hormone levels as well as determining changes in gene expression of androgen-responsive genes. A real-time RT-PCR method using LightCycler technology (Roche) suitable for quantitative determination of gene expression is described. The technique combines rapid thermocycling with online...... with testosterone with or without addition of flutamide or vinclozolin for 7 days in total. We show that we can quantify the level of gene expression by use of LightCycler technology, supported by changes in reproductive organ weights as well as in hormone levels, and that analysis of gene expression levels...

  4. Combined exposure to anti-androgens causes markedly increased frequencies of hypospadias in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Scholze, M.; Petersen, Marta Axelstad

    2008-01-01

    of several anti-androgenic chemicals. In a mixture (MIX) study with three androgen receptor antagonists, vinclozolin, flutamide and procymidone, rats were gavaged during gestation and lactation with several doses of a MIX of the three chemicals or the chemicals alone. External malformations of the male...... reproductive organs were assessed on PND 47 using a score from 0 to 3 (normal to marked) for hypospadias. Markedly increased frequencies were observed after exposure to a MIX of the three chemicals compared to administration of the three chemicals alone. Anogenital distance at PND 1, nipple retention at PND 13...

  5. Antiandrogenic effects in short-term in vivo studies of the fungicide fenarimol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jacobsen, H.; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng

    2005-01-01

    of ventral prostate, seminal vesicles. musc. levator anitbulbocavernosus, and bulbourethral glands. Qualitatively similar, but weaker, effects were also evident in intact fenarimol-exposed young adult males. except that prostates were not significantly affected. Changes in androgen-regulated gene expression...... that fenarimol acts as an antiandrogen in vivo having effects qualitatively comparable to those of flutamide on organ level, whereas differential effects on gene expression were observed. In an additional Hershberger test, the effects of fenarimol were compared to those of estradiol benzoate, prochloraz...

  6. Radiotherapy for prevention and therapy of gynecomastia due to antiandrogen treatment in prostate cancer patients. A patterns-of-care-study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neu, Burkhard; Sautter, Verena; Melcher, Ute; Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Momm, Felix [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, Heinrich [Strahlenzentrum Hamburg (Germany); Micke, Oliver [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Gynecomastia is a frequent side effect of antiandrogen therapy for prostate cancer and may compromise quality of life. Although it has been successfully treated with radiotherapy (RT) for decades, the priority of RT as a preferred treatment option has recently been disputed as tamoxifen was also demonstrated to be effective. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of indications, frequency, and technique of RT in daily practice in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. On behalf of the DEGRO-AG GCG-BD (German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy of Benign Diseases) a standardized questionnaire was sent to 294 RT institutions. The questionnaires inquired about patient numbers, indications, RT technique, dose, and - if available - treatment results. Moreover, the participants were asked whether they were interested in participating in a prospective study. From a total of 294 institutions, 146 replies were received, of which 141 offered RT for gynecomastia. Seven of those reported prophylactic RT only, whereas 129 perform both preventive and symptomatic RT. In 110 of 137departments, a maximum of 20 patients were treated per year. Electron beams (76%) were used most often, while 24% of patients received photon beams or orthovolt x-rays. Total doses were up to 20 Gy for prophylactic and up to 40 Gy for therapeutic RT. Results were reported by 19 departments: prevention of gynecomastia was observed in 60-100% of patients. Only 13 institutions observed side effects. Prophylactic and symptomatic RT is widely used in the German-speaking countries, but patient numbers are small. The clinical results indicate that RT is a highly effective and well-tolerated treatment.

  7. Flutamide versus a cyproterone acetate-ethinyl estradiol combination in moderate acne: a pilot randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalatkhah H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Hassan Adalatkhah1, Farhad Pourfarzi2, Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani31Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil; 3Statistics and Epidemiology Department, Faculty of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranBackground: The use of oral flutamide is rarely investigated in acne therapy. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of oral flutamide with that of a cyproterone-estradiol combination in treating acne lesions.Methods: A randomized clinical trial enrolled patients with moderate acne into two equal groups to receive either oral flutamide or the cyproterone-estradiol combination for 6 months. Lesion count, Acne Severity Index, and Global Acne Grading system (GAGS scores were used to assess improvement in acne lesions. The dichotomous measurement scale for primary endpoint assessment was defined as improvement from moderate to mild acne based on GAGS score. Patient satisfaction and dermal fat were also assessed. Intention to treat and per protocol analyses were done, reporting related effect sizes.Results: Both treatments resulted in substantial improvement in acne lesions. Although flutamide seemed to have higher efficacy, an intention to treat analysis did not find the two treatment protocols to be different. The relative risk in intention to treat analysis was 1.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89–1.6, and was 1.33 (95% CI 1.03–1.72 for the per protocol analysis. The number needed to treat for flutamide compared with the cyproterone-estradiol combination was 7.7 and 4.2 in the intention to treat and per protocol analyses, respectively.Conclusion: Flutamide appears to be more effective than a cyproterone-estradiol combination in some aspects of acne treatment, but this requires confirmation in a larger trial.Keywords: acne vulgaris, flutamide, cyproterone acetate, ethinyl estradiol, androgen antagonists

  8. Di-(2 ethylhexyl phthalate and flutamide alter gene expression in the testis of immature male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Frank H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We previously demonstrated that the androgenic and anti-androgenic effects of endocrine disruptors (EDs alter reproductive function and exert distinct effects on developing male reproductive organs. To further investigate these effects, we used an immature rat model to examine the effects of di-(2 ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP and flutamide (Flu on the male reproductive system. Immature male SD rats were treated daily with DEHP and Flu on postnatal days (PNDs 21 to 35, in a dose-dependent manner. As results, the weights of the testes, prostate, and seminal vesicle and anogenital distances (AGD decreased significantly in response to high doses of DEHP or Flu. Testosterone (T levels significantly decreased in all DEHP- treated groups, whereas luteinizing hormone (LH plasma levels were not altered by any of the two treatments at PND 36. However, treatment with DEHP or Flu induced histopathological changes in the testes, wherein degeneration and disorders of Leydig cells, germ cells and dilatation of tubular lumen were observed in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, hyperplasia and denseness of Leydig, Sertoli and germ cells were observed in rats given with high doses of Flu. The results by cDNA microarray analysis indicated that 1,272 genes were up-regulated by more than two-fold, and 1,969 genes were down-regulated in response to DEHP, Flu or both EDs. These genes were selected based on their markedly increased or decreased expression levels. These genes have been also classified on the basis of gene ontology (e.g., steroid hormone biosynthetic process, regulation of transcription, signal transduction, metabolic process, biosynthetic process.... Significant decreases in gene expression were observed in steroidogenic genes (i.e., Star, Cyp11a1 and Hsd3b. In addition, the expression of a common set of target genes, including CaBP1, Vav2, Plcd1, Lhx1 and Isoc1, was altered following exposure to EDs, suggesting that they may be marker genes to

  9. Postnatal exposure to flutamide affects CDH1 and CTNNB1 gene expression in adult pig epididymis and prostate and alters metabolism of testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorowska, E; Zarzycka, M; Chojnacka, K; Bilinska, B; Hejmej, A

    2014-03-01

    In both epididymis and prostate the dynamic cross-talk between the cells is hormonally regulated and, in part, through direct cell-to-cell interactions. Functionality of the male reproductive organs may be affected by exposure to specific chemicals, so-called 'reprotoxicants'. In this study we tested whether early postnatal and prepubertal exposure to anti-androgen flutamide altered the expression of adherens junction genes encoding E-cadherin (CDH1) and β-catenin (CTNNB1) in adult pig epididymis and prostate. In addition, the expression of mRNAs and proteins for 5α-reductase (ST5AR2) and aromatase (CYP19A1) were examined to show whether flutamide alters metabolism of testosterone. Thus, flutamide was injected into male piglets between Days 2 and 10 and between Days 90 and 98 postnatally (PD2 and PD90; 50 mg/kg bw), tissues that were obtained on postnatal Day 270. To assess the expression of the genes and proteins, real-time RT-PCR and Western blot were performed respectively. Moreover, adherens junction proteins were localized by immunohistochemistry. In response to flutamide, CDH1 and CTNNB1 expressions were down-regulated along the epididymis, mostly in PD2 group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01). In the prostate, CDH1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly down-regulated (p < 0.01), whereas CTNNB1 mRNA was slightly up-regulated in both flutamide-treated groups. CTNNB1 protein level was markedly elevated in both PD2 (p < 0.001) and PD90 (p < 0.01) groups. In the epididymis, the expression of ST5AR2 and CYP19A1 was down- and up-regulated, respectively (p < 0.05), whereas in the prostate evident decrease in CYP19A1 expression (p < 0.001, p < 0.01, p < 0.05) was demonstrated. In both tissues, membranous immunolocalization of CTNNB1 suggests its involvement in cell-cell adhesion. Overall, flutamide administration resulted in suppression of androgen action in the epididymis and prostate leading to deregulation of CDH1 and CTNNB1 gene expressions which is probably

  10. Hepatotoxicidade pela flutamida em paciente sob tratamento para acne: relato de caso Flutamide-induced hepatotoxicity during treatment of acne: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Duques de Amorim

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A flutamida é agente antiandrogênico não esteróide usado no tratamento do câncer de próstata, da acne e do hirsutismo. Alguns casos de hepatotoxicidade grave têm sido apresentados na literatura com seu uso. Relata-se o caso de uma paciente com 21 anos de idade, que apresentou significativa elevação das aminotransferases durante o tratamento para acne com flutamida, completamente resolvida após a descontinuação da droga. Discute-se o diagnóstico, a relação risco/benefício e conclui-se que a monitoração com exames que avaliem o fígado é imperativa e que a droga deve ser suspensa se houver elevação de aminotransferases, dada a possibilidade de disfunção hepática grave.Flutamide is a non-steroidal anti-androgenic drug used in the treatment of prostate cancer, acne and hirsutism. Some cases of severe flutamide-induced hepatotoxicity have been reported in the literature. We report the case of a 21-year-old female who presented with a significant increase of aminotransferase levels during the treatment of acne with flutamide, which resolved completely after discontinuation of the drug. We discuss the diagnosis, the risk/benefit ratio, and conclude that monitoring liver function tests is mandatory and that the drug should be discontinued if an increase in aminotransferase levels occurs, due to the possibility of severe liver dysfunction.

  11. A Novel Amphibian Tier 2 Testing Protocol: A 30-Week Exposure of Xenopus Tropicalis to the Antiandrogen Flutamide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knechtges, Paul L; Sprando, Robert L; Porter, Karen L; Brennan, Linda M; Miller, Mark F; Kumsher, David M; Dennis, William E; Brown, Charles C; Clegg Paul L. Knechtges. Robert L. Sprando. Karen L. Potter., Eric D

    2007-01-01

    ...) using validated test systems. Subsequently, the Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Advisory Committee recommended the development of a standardized amphibian assay for tier 2 testing of EDCs...

  12. Utilization of bone densitometry for prediction and administration of bisphosphonates to prevent osteoporosis in patients with prostate cancer without bone metastases receiving antiandrogen therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, Abby; Khan, Muhammad A; Gujja, Swetha; Govindarajan, Rangaswmy

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer subjects with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse who are treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) are recommended to have baseline and serial bone densitometry and receive bisphosphonates. The purpose of this community population study was to assess the utilization of bone densitometry and bisphosphonate therapy in men receiving ADT for non-metastatic prostate cancer. A cohort study of men aged 65 years or older with non-metastatic incident diagnoses of prostate cancer was obtained from the Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER)-linked Medicare claims between 2004 and 2008. Claims were used to assess prescribed treatment of ADT, bone densitometry, and bisphosphonates. A total of 30,846 incident prostate cancer cases receiving ADT and aged 65 years or older had no bone metastases; 87.3% (n=26,935) on ADT did not receive either bone densitometry or bisphosphonate therapy. Three percent (n=931) of the cases on ADT received bisphosphonate therapy without ever receiving bone densitometry, 8.8% (n=2,702) of the cases on ADT received bone densitometry without receiving intravenous bisphosphonates, while nearly 1% (0.90%, n=278) of the cases on ADT received both bone densitometry and bisphosphonates. Analysis showed treatment differed by patient characteristics. Contrary to the recommendations, bone densitometry and bisphosphonate therapy are underutilized in men receiving ADT for non-metastatic prostate cancer

  13. The Effect of Estradiol-17(beta), Goitrogen (T3), and Flutamide on Gene Expression in Medaka, Oryzias latipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.Haut, J

    2005-09-06

    Concern has been generated over the discovery of endocrine disrupting chemicals in rivers near sewage outflows. The presence of endocrine disrupting chemicals such as estradiol-17{beta} has been associated with a reduction of reproductive success in fish and an increase in the female phenotype and gonadal intersex in fish downstream of sewage treatment facilities. Such effects are believed to result from a disruption in the normal estrogenic pathways since estrogen plays a vital role in reproduction, sexual differentiation, the developments of secondary sex characteristics, and ovulation. Most studies have focused on the effect of a single endocrine disruptor on a single gene which does not provide for the interaction between genes. Microarray technology has made it possible to put an entire genome on a single chip so that researchers can get a clearer picture of the interaction of genes expressed in a cell and changes of said interactions when those cells are exposed to various conditions. Medaka males were exposed to known endocrine disruptors, estradial-17{beta} and goitrogen, and medaka females were exposed to flutamide. All treatments were then compared to controls. Total RNA was extracted from the livers of both treated and untreated males and hybridized to a microarray chip designed to have EST sequences specific to medaka. ESTs were identified through two-channel microarray analysis and compared to GenBank using blastn searches to identify up regulated genes. Choriogenins H and L, zona radiata, and vitellogenin, previously shown to be estrogen-induced in male fish were identified. Heat shock proteins (hsp70, hsp90, and hsp8) were also induced by estradiol-17{beta}, as was choriogenin Hminor. Exposure to goitrogen (T3) resulted in the induced expression of glutathione S-transferase and a GABA receptor protein in male medaka. Treatment with flutamide, an antiandrogen, caused the up regulation of choriogenin L, choriogenin Hminor, and zona radiata-2 in female

  14. Comparison of the effects of metformin, flutamide plus oral contraceptives, and simvastatin on the metabolic consequences of polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdous Mehrabian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is one of the common endocrine disorders in women of reproductive ages. It is associated with a range of disorders, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance (IR, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, gestational, and type 2 diabetes, and increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity. There are different treatments available for PCOS. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the effects of metformin, flutamide plus oral contraceptives (OCs, and simvastatin on the metabolic consequences of PCOS. Materials and Methods: This study was a single-blind clinical trial. The subjects were selected from a group of patient with PCOS and metabolic syndrome, who were referred to the midwifery clinic of Al-Zahra Hospital and Beheshti Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A total of 111 subjects were randomly assigned to three groups: metformin, flutamide plus OCs, and simvastatin groups. The measurements were performed at baseline and after 6 months of therapy. Paired t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA, and chi-square test were applied in this study. Results: A total of 102 subjects were analyzed in this study, 34 subjects were allotted in each group. The prevalence of IR was statistically different between three groups (P-value = 0.001. After a 6-month course, metformin showed larger reduction in fasting blood sugar (FBS level (P-value 0.05. Conclusion: Metformin performed better in FBS reduction. Simvastatin had better performance in terms of reducing TG level and waist circumference.

  15. Comparison of the effects of metformin, flutamide plus oral contraceptives, and simvastatin on the metabolic consequences of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Ferdous; Ghasemi-Tehrani, Hatav; Mohamadkhani, Mahboobe; Moeinoddini, Maryam; Karimzadeh, Pooya

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the common endocrine disorders in women of reproductive ages. It is associated with a range of disorders, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance (IR), compensatory hyperinsulinemia, gestational, and type 2 diabetes, and increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity. There are different treatments available for PCOS. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the effects of metformin, flutamide plus oral contraceptives (OCs), and simvastatin on the metabolic consequences of PCOS. This study was a single-blind clinical trial. The subjects were selected from a group of patient with PCOS and metabolic syndrome, who were referred to the midwifery clinic of Al-Zahra Hospital and Beheshti Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A total of 111 subjects were randomly assigned to three groups: metformin, flutamide plus OCs, and simvastatin groups. The measurements were performed at baseline and after 6 months of therapy. Paired t -test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and chi-square test were applied in this study. A total of 102 subjects were analyzed in this study, 34 subjects were allotted in each group. The prevalence of IR was statistically different between three groups ( P -value = 0.001). After a 6-month course, metformin showed larger reduction in fasting blood sugar (FBS) level ( P -value 0.05). Metformin performed better in FBS reduction. Simvastatin had better performance in terms of reducing TG level and waist circumference.

  16. Antiandrogen monotherapy: indications and results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter

    2002-01-01

    monotherapy is generally well tolerated, with a predictable side-effect profile. The most common side effects are male breast pain and gynecomastia. Emerging evidence also supports the use of bicalutamide 150 mg, both as immediate monotherapy and as adjuvant therapy in early stage (localized or locally...

  17. Endosulfan and flutamide impair testicular development in the juvenile Asian catfish, Clarias batrachus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajakumar, A.; Singh, R.; Chakrabarty, S.; Murugananthkumar, R.; Laldinsangi, C.; Prathibha, Y.; Sudhakumari, C.C.; Dutta-Gupta, A. [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Life Sciences-Centre for Advanced Studies, University of Hyderabad, P. O. Central University, Hyderabad 500046, Andhra Pradesh (India); Senthilkumaran, B., E-mail: bsksl@uohyd.ernet.in [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Life Sciences-Centre for Advanced Studies, University of Hyderabad, P. O. Central University, Hyderabad 500046, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endosulfan and/or flutamide retard(s) testicular differentiation in juvenile fish. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endosulfan and/or flutamide target(s) cfGnRH-Tph2 axis, either directly or indirectly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of endosulfan and/or flutamide on plasma androgen levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared changes in testis-related transcripts with testis germ cell distribution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our study on endosulfan endorse its prompt and complete phase-out/ban. - Abstract: Endosulfan and flutamide, a widely used pesticide and a prostate cancer/infertility drug, respectively, have an increased risk of causing endocrine disruption if they reach water bodies. Though many studies are available on neurotoxicity/bioaccumulation of endosulfan and receptor antagonism of flutamide, only little is known about their impact on testicular steroidogenesis at molecular level. Sex steroids play an important role in sex differentiation of lower vertebrates including fishes. Hence, a small change in their levels caused by endocrine disruptors affects the gonadal development of aquatic vertebrates significantly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of endosulfan and flutamide on testis-related transcription factor and steroidogenic enzyme genes with a comparison on the levels of androgens during critical period of catfish testicular development. We also analyzed the correlation between the above-mentioned genes and catfish gonadotropin-releasing hormone (cfGnRH)-tryptophan hydroxylase2 (tph2). The Asian catfish, Clarias batrachus males at 50 days post hatch (dph) were exposed to very low dose of endosulfan (2.5 {mu}g/L) and flutamide (33 {mu}g/L), alone and in combination for 50 days. The doses used in this study were far less than those used in the previous studies of flutamide and reported levels of endosulfan in surface water and sediments. Sampling was done at end of the treatments (100

  18. Endosulfan and flutamide impair testicular development in the juvenile Asian catfish, Clarias batrachus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajakumar, A.; Singh, R.; Chakrabarty, S.; Murugananthkumar, R.; Laldinsangi, C.; Prathibha, Y.; Sudhakumari, C.C.; Dutta-Gupta, A.; Senthilkumaran, B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Endosulfan and/or flutamide retard(s) testicular differentiation in juvenile fish. ► Endosulfan and/or flutamide target(s) cfGnRH-Tph2 axis, either directly or indirectly. ► Effects of endosulfan and/or flutamide on plasma androgen levels. ► Compared changes in testis-related transcripts with testis germ cell distribution. ► Our study on endosulfan endorse its prompt and complete phase-out/ban. - Abstract: Endosulfan and flutamide, a widely used pesticide and a prostate cancer/infertility drug, respectively, have an increased risk of causing endocrine disruption if they reach water bodies. Though many studies are available on neurotoxicity/bioaccumulation of endosulfan and receptor antagonism of flutamide, only little is known about their impact on testicular steroidogenesis at molecular level. Sex steroids play an important role in sex differentiation of lower vertebrates including fishes. Hence, a small change in their levels caused by endocrine disruptors affects the gonadal development of aquatic vertebrates significantly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of endosulfan and flutamide on testis-related transcription factor and steroidogenic enzyme genes with a comparison on the levels of androgens during critical period of catfish testicular development. We also analyzed the correlation between the above-mentioned genes and catfish gonadotropin-releasing hormone (cfGnRH)-tryptophan hydroxylase2 (tph2). The Asian catfish, Clarias batrachus males at 50 days post hatch (dph) were exposed to very low dose of endosulfan (2.5 μg/L) and flutamide (33 μg/L), alone and in combination for 50 days. The doses used in this study were far less than those used in the previous studies of flutamide and reported levels of endosulfan in surface water and sediments. Sampling was done at end of the treatments (100 dph) to perform testicular germ cell count (histology), measurements of testosterone (T) and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) by

  19. Assessment of Protocol Designed to Detect Endocine Disrupting Effects of Flutamide in Xenopus Tropicalis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kenchtges, Paul L; Sprando, Robert L; Bremman, Linda M; Miller, Mark F; Kumsher, David M; Dennis, William E; Brown, Charles C; Clegg, Eric D

    2006-01-01

    .... Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Program. The frogs were exposed to the model anti-androgenic compound flutamine under flow-through conditions for a period of 30 weeks, beginning at 48 hours post-hatch...

  20. Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Electrochemical Sensor for Determination of Anticancer Drug Flutamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Julianna Santos; Zanin, Hudson; Caldas, Adriana Silva; dos Santos, Clenilton Costa; Damos, Flavio Santos; de Cássia Silva Luz, Rita

    2017-10-01

    An electrochemical sensor based on functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTf) has been developed and applied for determination of anticancer drug flutamide in pharmaceutical and artificial urine samples. The electrode was prepared by modifying a glassy carbon electrode with MWCNTf, denoted herein as MWCNTf/GCE. The MWCNTf/GCE electrode exhibited high catalytic activity, high sensitivity, and high stability and was applicable over a wide concentration range for flutamide. The effects of the scan rate, pH, and nature of the electrolyte on the electrochemical behavior of flutamide on the MWCNTf/GCE were investigated. The results showed that this electrode presented the best square-wave voltammetric response to flutamide in Britton-Robinson buffer solution at pH 5.0 at frequency of 50 Hz and amplitude of 0.06 V. The proposed sensor presents a wide linear response range from concentration of 0.1 μmol L-1 up to 1000 μmol L-1 (or 27.6 μg L-1 up to 0.27 g L-1), with limit of detection, limit of quantification, and sensitivity of 0.03 μmol L-1, 0.1 μmol L-1, and 0.30 μA μmol-1 L, respectively. The MWCNTf/GCE electrode was successfully applied for determination of flutamide in pharmaceutical formulations and artificial urine samples, giving results in agreement with those obtained by a comparative method described in literature. A paired Student's t-test revealed no statistical difference between the reference and proposed method at 95% confidence level. The average recovery for fortified samples was 101 ± 1%.

  1. A study of temporal effects of the model anti-androgen flutamide on components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in adult fathead minnows

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The aim of this study was to investigate temporal changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of fathead minnow treated with the model androgen receptor (AR)...

  2. Complexation and oxidation of Flutamide with Fe3+ and 1,10-phenanthroline: Few analytical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Aftab Aslam Parwaz Khan; Anish Khan; Abdullah M. Asiri; S.A. Khan; Ayaz Mohd

    2018-01-01

    A simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method has been proposed for the determination of flutamide (FLD). The method is based on its complexation and oxidation of FLD by Fe3+ and 1,10-phenanthroline. Two sets of condition were established. In the first set only FLD reacted with Fe3+ ion, while in the second one FLD was oxidized by Fe3+ in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline. The complexation and oxidation methods were monitored spectrophotometrically. All variables affecting the developmen...

  3. Anti-androgenic activity of Xylopic acid in orchidectomerized rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To characterize anti-androgenic properties of xylopic acid (XA) and to elucidate the possible mech-anism of the antifertility activity of XA, XA was administered to orchidectomized rats following the Hershberger assay protocol. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were orchidectomized or sham oper-ated at 42 days of age.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL ANDROGENS AND ANTIANDROGENS: AN EXPANDING CHEMICAL UNIVERSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the last ten years, awareness has grown about environmental chemicals that display antiandrogenic or androgenic activity. While studies in the early 1990s focused on pesticides that acted as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, it soon became evident that this was not the ...

  5. Antiandrogenic activity of phthalate mixtures: Validity of concentration addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christen, Verena [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Crettaz, Pierre; Oberli-Schrämmli, Aurelia [Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, Division Chemical Products, 3003 Bern (Switzerland); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@bluewin.ch [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich (ETH Zürich), Department of Environmental Sciences, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2012-03-01

    Phthalates and bisphenol A have very widespread use leading to significant exposure of humans. They are suspected to interfere with the endocrine system, including the androgen, estrogen and the thyroid hormone system. Here we analyzed the antiandrogenic activity of six binary, and one ternary mixture of phthalates exhibiting complete antiandrogenic dose–response curves, and binary mixtures of phthalates and bisphenol A at equi-effective concentrations of EC{sub 10}, EC{sub 25} and EC{sub 50} in MDA-kb2 cells. Mixture activity followed the concentration addition (CA) model with a tendency to synergism at high and antagonism at low concentrations. Isoboles and the toxic unit approach (TUA) confirmed the additive to synergistic activity of the binary mixtures BBP + DBP, DBP + DEP and DEP + BPA at high concentrations. Both methods indicate a tendency to antagonism for the EC{sub 10} mixtures BBP + DBP, BBP + DEP and DBP + DEP, and the EC{sub 25} mixture of DBP + BPA. A ternary mixture revealed synergism at the EC{sub 50}, and weak antagonistic activity at the EC{sub 25} level by the TUA. A mixture of five phthalates representing a human urine composition and reflecting exposure to corresponding parent compounds showed no antiandrogenic activity. Our study demonstrates that CA is an appropriate concept to account for mixture effects of antiandrogenic phthalates and bisphenol A. The interaction indicates a departure from additivity to antagonism at low concentrations, probably due to interaction with the androgen receptor and/or cofactors. This study emphasizes that a risk assessment of phthalates should account for mixture effects by applying the CA concept. -- Highlights: ► Antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of 2 and 3 phthalates are assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. ► Mixture activities followed the concentration addition model. ► A tendency to synergism at high and antagonism at low levels occurred.

  6. Quantification of antiandrogen effect determined by Lightcycler technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, Christine Lydia; Vinggaard, Anne; Dalgaard, M.

    2001-01-01

    fluorescence detection of PCR product formation. In this study, investigation of expression of prostate specific binding protein polypeptide C3 (PBP C3) and testosterone-repressed prostatic message 2 (TRPM-2) in the ventral prostate was performed in 60-days-old castrated Wistar rats treated daily...... with testosterone with or without addition of flutamide or vinclozolin for 7 days in total. We show that we can quantify the level of gene expression by use of LightCycler technology, supported by changes in reproductive organ weights as well as in hormone levels, and that analysis of gene expression levels...

  7. The combined antiandrogenic effects of five commonly used pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Nellemann, Christine Lydia; Jarfelt, Kirsten

    2004-01-01

    In this study, mixture effects of five dissimilarly acting pesticides were analyzed for antiandrogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. Deltamethrin, methiocarb, prochloraz, simazine, and tribenuron-methyl are all commonly used for agricultural and horticultural purposes. Concentration-response curves...... for the inhibition of R1881-induced transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) in vitro of each pesticide alone and in an equimolar mixture were obtained. The IC25 values for deltamethrin, methiocarb, prochloraz, and the mixture were 5.8, 5.8, 3.5, and 7.5 muM, respectively. Simazine and tribenuron...... of the pesticides in vitro. In vivo, each of the five pesticides and a mixture of the pesticides were tested for antiandrogenic effects in castrated testosterone-treated Wistar rats. The mixture induced a significant change of weights of the levator ani/bulbocavernosus muscle and adrenal glands. Changes in gene...

  8. Antiandrogenic actions of medroxyprogesterone acetate on epithelial cells within normal human breast tissues cultured ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochnik, Aleksandra M; Moore, Nicole L; Jankovic-Karasoulos, Tanja; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Ryan, Natalie K; Thomas, Mervyn R; Birrell, Stephen N; Butler, Lisa M; Tilley, Wayne D; Hickey, Theresa E

    2014-01-01

    Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), a component of combined estrogen-progestin therapy (EPT), has been associated with increased breast cancer risk in EPT users. MPA can bind to the androgen receptor (AR), and AR signaling inhibits cell growth in breast tissues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential of MPA to disrupt AR signaling in an ex vivo culture model of normal human breast tissue. Histologically normal breast tissues from women undergoing breast surgical operation were cultured in the presence or in the absence of the native AR ligand 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), MPA, or the AR antagonist bicalutamide. Ki67, bromodeoxyuridine, B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2), AR, estrogen receptor α, and progesterone receptor were detected by immunohistochemistry. DHT inhibited the proliferation of breast epithelial cells in an AR-dependent manner within tissues from postmenopausal women, and MPA significantly antagonized this androgenic effect. These hormonal responses were not commonly observed in cultured tissues from premenopausal women. In tissues from postmenopausal women, DHT either induced or repressed BCL2 expression, and the antiandrogenic effect of MPA on BCL2 was variable. MPA significantly opposed the positive effect of DHT on AR stabilization, but these hormones had no significant effect on estrogen receptor α or progesterone receptor levels. In a subset of postmenopausal women, MPA exerts an antiandrogenic effect on breast epithelial cells that is associated with increased proliferation and destabilization of AR protein. This activity may contribute mechanistically to the increased risk of breast cancer in women taking MPA-containing EPT.

  9. Rapid and sensitive reporter gene assays for detection of antiandrogenic and estrogenic effects of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jørgensen, E.C.B.; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential antiandrog......Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential...... antiandrogenic chemicals present in our environment. Thus, there is a great need for an effective in vitro screening method for (anti)androgenic chemicals. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible reporter gene assay for detection of antiandrogenic chemicals. Chinese Hamster Ovary cells were...

  10. Additive and synergistic antiandrogenic activities of mixtures of azol fungicides and vinclozolin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christen, Verena [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Crettaz, Pierre [Federal Office of Public Health, Division Chemical Products, 3003 Bern (Switzerland); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Department of Environmental System Sciences, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollution Dynamics, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: Many pesticides including pyrethroids and azole fungicides are suspected to have an endocrine disrupting property. At present, the joint activity of compound mixtures is only marginally known. Here we tested the hypothesis that the antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of azole fungicides can be predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. Methods: The antiandrogenic activity was assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. Following assessing single compounds activities mixtures of azole fungicides and vinclozolin were investigated. Interactions were analyzed by direct comparison between experimental and estimated dose–response curves assuming CA, followed by an analysis by the isobole method and the toxic unit approach. Results: The antiandrogenic activity of pyrethroids deltamethrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and permethrin was weak, while the azole fungicides tebuconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, econazole and vinclozolin exhibited strong antiandrogenic activity. Ten binary and one ternary mixture combinations of five antiandrogenic fungicides were assessed at equi-effective concentrations of EC{sub 25} and EC{sub 50}. Isoboles indicated that about 50% of the binary mixtures were additive and 50% synergistic. Synergism was even more frequently indicated by the toxic unit approach. Conclusion: Our data lead to the conclusion that interactions in mixtures follow the CA model. However, a surprisingly high percentage of synergistic interactions occurred. Therefore, the mixture activity of antiandrogenic azole fungicides is at least additive. Practice: Mixtures should also be considered for additive antiandrogenic activity in hazard and risk assessment. Implications: Our evaluation provides an appropriate “proof of concept”, but whether it equally translates to in vivo effects should further be investigated. - Highlights: • Humans are exposed to pesticide mixtures such as pyrethroids and azole fungicides. • We assessed the antiandrogenicity of

  11. Cumulative effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembra L. Howdeshell and L. Earl Gray, Jr.Toxicological studies of defined chemical mixtures assist human health risk assessment by characterizing the joint action of chemicals. This presentation will review the effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures on reproductive tract development in rats with a special focus on the reproductive toxicant phthalates. Observed mixture data are compared to mathematical mixture model predictions to determine how the individual chemicals in a mixture interact (e.g., response addition – probabilities of response for each individual chemical are added; dose-addition – the doses of each individual chemical at a given mixture dose are combined together based on the relative potency of the individual chemicals). Phthalate mixtures are observed to act in a dose-additive manner based on the relative potency of the individual phthalates to suppress fetal testosterone production. Similar dose-additive effects have been reported for mixtures of phthalates with anti-androgenic pesticides of differing mechanisms. Data from these phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonitoring data to determine individual hazard ratios. Furthermore, data from the toxicological studies can inform the analysis of human biomonitoring data on the association of detected chemicals and their metabolites with measured health outcomes. Data from phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonit

  12. Development of Suppositories Containing Flutamide-Loaded Alginate-Tamarind Microparticles for Rectal Administration: In Vitro and in Vivo Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Bharati Shivajirao; Mahajan, Hitendra Shaligram; Surana, Sanjay Javerilal

    2015-01-01

    In the present work the absorption of flutamide from suppositories containing hydrophilic tamarind alginate microparticles after rectal administration in rats was investigated with the purpose of enhancing bioavailability and to avoid hepatic toxicity. Microparticles were developed by ionic gelation method and optimized using one factorial design of response surface methodology. The optimized batch of microparticles had tamarind gum-sodium alginate (1 : 3) ratio and showed entrapment efficiency 94.969% and mucoadhesion strength 94.646% with desirability of 0.961. Suppositories loaded with microparticles were developed by fusion method using poloxamer 407 and poloxamer 188 in combination as suppository base. Kinetic analysis of the release data of microparticle-loaded suppositories showed time-independent release of drug. Higher values of 'n' (>0.89) represent Super Case II-type drug release. The pharmacokinetics of flutamide from flutamide tamarind alginate microparticle-loaded suppository were compared with oral suspension. Cmax of microparticle-loaded suppository was significantly larger than that of oral suspension (1.711 and 0.859 µg/mL, respectively).

  13. Effect of Metformin and Flutamide on Anthropometric Indices and Laboratory Tests in Obese/Overweight PCOS Women under Hypocaloric Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mania; Golsorkhtabaramiri, Masoumeh; Esmaeilzadeh, Sedigheh; Ghofrani, Faeze; Bijani, Ali; Ghorbani, Leila; Delavar, Moloud Agajani

    2014-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of metformin and flutamide alone or in combination with anthropometric indices and laboratory tests of obese/overweight PCOS women under hypocaloric diet. This single blind clinical trial was performed on 120 PCOS women. At the beginning, hypocaloric diet was recommended for the patients. After one month while they were on the diet, the patients were randomly divided in 4 groups; metformin (500 mg, 3/day), flutamide (250 mg, 2/day), combined, metformin (500 mg, 3/day) with flutamide (250 mg, 2/day) and finally placebo group. The patients were treated for 6 months. Anthropometric indices and laboratory tests (fasting and glucose-stimulated insulin levels, lipid profile and androgens) were measured. A one-way ANOVA (Post Hoc) and paired t-test were performed to analyze data. A p ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. After treatment, reduction in weight, BMI, hip circumference was significantly greater in the metformin group in comparison to other groups (pPCOS women under hypocaloric diet.

  14. A dramatic, objective antiandrogen withdrawal response: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litwin Alan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antiandrogen withdrawal response is an increasingly recognized entity in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. To our knowledge, there have been no reports describing a durable radiologic improvement along with prostate-specific antigen (PSA with discontinuation of the antiandrogen agent bicalutamide. We report a case in which a dramatic decline of serum PSA levels associated with a dramatic improvement in radiologic disease was achieved with bicalutamide discontinuation.

  15. Systemic therapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer:American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K; Carducci, Michael; Chen, Ronald C; Frame, James N; Garrels, Kristina; Hotte, Sebastien; Kattan, Michael W; Raghavan, Derek; Saad, Fred; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Walker-Dilks, Cindy; Williams, James; Winquist, Eric; Bennett, Charles L; Wootton, Ted; Rumble, R Bryan; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Virgo, Katherine S

    2014-10-20

    To provide treatment recommendations for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. When added to androgen deprivation, therapies demonstrating improved survival, improved quality of life (QOL), and favorable benefit-harm balance include abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 ((223)Ra; for men with predominantly bone metastases). Improved survival and QOL with moderate toxicity risk are associated with docetaxel/prednisone. For asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men, improved survival with unclear QOL impact and low toxicity are associated with sipuleucel-T. For men who previously received docetaxel, improved survival, unclear QOL impact, and moderate to high toxicity risk are associated with cabazitaxel/prednisone. Modest QOL benefit (without survival benefit) and high toxicity risk are associated with mitoxantrone/prednisone after docetaxel. No benefit and excess toxicity are observed with bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib. Continue androgen deprivation (pharmaceutical or surgical) indefinitely. Abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, or (223)Ra should be offered; docetaxel/prednisone should also be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Sipuleucel-T may be offered to asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men. For men who have experienced progression with docetaxel, cabazitaxel may be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Mitoxantrone may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited clinical benefit and toxicity risk. Ketoconazole or antiandrogens (eg, bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide) may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited known clinical benefit. Bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib should not be offered. There is insufficient evidence to evaluate optimal sequences or

  16. Rapid and sensitive reporter gene assays for detection of antiandrogenic and estrogenic effects of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jørgensen, E.C.B.; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential antiandrog......Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential...... antiandrogenic chemicals present in our environment. Thus, there is a great need for an effective in vitro screening method for (anti)androgenic chemicals. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible reporter gene assay for detection of antiandrogenic chemicals. Chinese Hamster Ovary cells were......-on laboratory time. This assay is a powerful tool for the efficient and accurate determination and quantification of the effects of antiandrogens on reporter gene transcription, To extend the application of FuGene, the reagent was shown to be superior compared to Lipofectin for transfecting MCF7 human breast...

  17. Social reintegration of sexual delinquents by a combination of psychotherapy and anti-androgen treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Moffaert, M

    1976-01-01

    The high frequency of recidivism with convicted sexual perverts is mainly due to the compulsive character of perversion. The classical methods of treatment are seldom satisfactory: Surgery provokes ethical objections, psychopharmaca and oestrogens lead to disagreeable side effects, psychotherapy of any kind is unlikely to be efficacious because of the unfavourable atmosphere the nature of perversion causes it to take place in. However, the climate of both psychoanalytical treatment and suggestive and directive psychotherapy can be enhanced by a combination with an anti-androgen treatment, which eliminates the patient's fear of conviction by inhibiting his sexual urge. Two cases illustrate this combined method. On the basis of a positive disposition, which arises from the improved climate, sublimation of the sex drive and the achievement of a feeling of social responsibility is aimed at. The advantages of the combined therapy are then discussed in comparison with the existing treatments. It is concluded that this combined treatment, next to social guidance and an attempt at solving the fundamental problem of loneliness, can promote the social reintegration of the convicted sexual pervert.

  18. Flutamide-Induced Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in an In Vitro Rat Hepatocyte System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al Maruf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flutamide (FLU is a competitive antagonist of the androgen receptor which has been reported to induce severe liver injury in some patients. Several experimental models suggested that an episode of inflammation during drug treatment predisposes animals to tissue injury. The molecular cytotoxic mechanisms of FLU in isolated rat hepatocytes using an in vitro oxidative stress inflammation system were investigated in this study. When a nontoxic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generating system (glucose/glucose oxidase with peroxidase or iron(II [Fe(II] (to partly simulate in vivo inflammation was added to the hepatocytes prior to the addition of FLU, increases in FLU-induced cytotoxicity and lipid peroxidation (LPO were observed that were decreased by 6-N-propyl-2-thiouracil or deferoxamine, respectively. N-Acetylcysteine decreased FLU-induced cytotoxicity in this system. Potent antioxidants, for example, Trolox ((±-6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid, resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, and DPPD (N,N′-diphenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine also significantly decreased FLU-induced cytotoxicity and LPO and increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP and glutathione (GSH levels in the H2O2 generating system with peroxidase. TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, a known reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger and superoxide dismutase mimetic, also significantly decreased toxicity caused by FLU in this system. These results raise the possibility that the presence or absence of inflammation may be another susceptibility factor for drug-induced hepatotoxicity.

  19. Use of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors as alternatives to luteinizing-hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs or anti-androgens for prostate downsizing before brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hee Joon; Mian, Omar; Vaidya, Dhananjay; DeWeese, Theodore L; Song, Daniel Y

    2017-10-10

    Prostate hypertrophy, median lobe hypertrophy, and pubic arch interference (PAI) are relative contraindications to brachytherapy because of potential morbidity and technical considerations. GnRH analogs or non-steroidal anti-androgens are currently utilized to achieve prostatic downsizing prior to brachytherapy. However, such agents have been associated with effects on body habitus, metabolism, and quality of life. In contrast, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARI) are far less frequently associated with these morbidities. Patients with large gland size, median lobe hypertrophy, or PAI were offered 5-ARI therapy. Repeat transrectal ultrasound was performed at 3 or 4 months, followed by brachytherapy if resolution was achieved. If downsizing was inadequate, patients were offered continuation of 5-ARI for additional 3 months, gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRH) agonist or antiandrogen therapy, or other curative treatment. Of 59 patients with follow-up available, 42 (71%) were deemed to have adequate downsizing; 37 (63%) after 3 to 4 months of 5-ARI and 5 (8%) after 7 to 8 months. Seventeen patients (29%) received other treatments because of inadequate effect. Median volume reduction was 20%. Of 41 patients undergoing brachytherapy, 4 (9.7%) required temporary catheterization because of obstruction. Median follow-up after implantation was 25 months (range, 1-64). Median time for return to International Prostate Symptom Score ≤5 of baseline score was 7 months (interquartile ratio, 6-13). All but 1 patient who received brachytherapy remain biochemically controlled. 5-ARI monotherapy is an alternative for downsizing in patients with hypertrophy or PAI, with more than 70% achieving adequate downsizing without use of GnRH analogs or antiandrogens. Patients who received brachytherapy experienced typical rates of postimplant urinary morbidity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Knocking Down TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Oncogene by siRNA Could be an Alternative Treatment to Flutamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Urbinati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to develop a new pharmacological approach for the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa, the most common neoplasia in men. Recently, we developed siRNA against the fusion oncogene TMPRSS2-ERG found in 50% of patients and showed an antitumoral activity in animal model. Herein, we want to compare or combine the developed siRNA to flutamide (FLU, one of the gold-standard treatment of PCa. Therefore, concomitant or subsequent association of FLU to siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG was performed in VCaP cells and in SCID mice bearing xenografted VCaP tumors. ERG, androgen receptor, cleaved-caspase-3 as well as phase 1 and 2 drug-metabolizing enzymes were investigated within tumors. We observed similar results in terms of TMPRSS2-ERG knock-down and cell viability impairment for all distinct schedules of administration. The association of siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG-squalene nanoparticles with flutamide displayed similar tumor growth inhibition as mice treated with siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG-squalene nanoparticles alone and was paralleled with modification of expression of ERG, androgen receptor, and cleaved-caspase-3. Phase 1 and 2 enzymes were essentially affected by FLU and reverted when combined with squalenoylated siRNA. In conclusion, these results confirm the therapeutic effectiveness of squalenoyl siRNA nanomedicine for PCa based on siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG.

  1. Metastatic prostate cancer treated by flutamide versus cyproterone acetate. Final analysis of the "European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer" (EORTC) Protocol 30892

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, Fritz H.; Whelan, Peter; de Reijke, Theo M.; Kurth, Karl Heinz; Pavone-Macaluso, Michele; Mattelaer, Johan; van Velthoven, Roland F.; Debois, Muriel; Collette, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    This trial was designed to compare the efficacy of Flutamide (FLU) versus Cyproterone acetate (CPA) in men with metastatic prostate cancer and favourable prognostic factors. The primary endpoint of the trial was overall survival, disease specific survival, time to progression and side effects were

  2. Should We Try Antiandrogen Withdrawal in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients? Insights From a Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroshi; Kosaka, Takeo; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Ezaki, Taisuke; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Morita, Shinya; Shinoda, Kazunobu; Shinojima, Toshiaki; Kikuchi, Eiji; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-12-01

    It remains uncertain whether those with response to antiandrogen withdrawal (AAW) have a better prognosis. We investigated the predictors of a better response to AAW and overall survival after acquiring resistance to first-line androgen deprivation therapy inpatients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 87 CRPC patients treated at Keio University Hospital. Sixty-seven of 87 CRPC patients underwent AAW. We analyzed clinicopathologic parameters to identify predictors of survival in CRPC patients and investigated predictors of good response to AAW. Younger age, longer duration of androgen deprivation therapy before CRPC development, and better response to AAW were independent favorable prognostic factors for overall survival. Although better response to AAW was a favorable prognostic factor in this study, trying AAW was not significantly related to overall survival. Duration of hormone therapy was significantly longer in those whose disease responded to AAW (69.9 ± 11.0 months) than those with no response (45.3 ± 5.2 months). The prognostic benefit of AAW was not clearly determined in this study. However, AAW might be beneficial in patients who have favorable prognostic factors for a response to AAW-that is, those who have received hormone therapy for a long period. However, AAW should not be done in patients who do not have favorable factors and who had a high prostate-specific antigen level at the time of their prostate cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antiandrogenic effects in vitro and in vivo of the fungicide prochloraz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Nellemann, Christine; Dalgaard, Majken

    2002-01-01

    The commonly used imidazole fungicide prochloraz was tested for antiandrogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. Prochloraz, but not the metabolites 2,4,6-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid or 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, inhibited the R1881-induced response in an androgen receptor reporter gene assay. In the Her......The commonly used imidazole fungicide prochloraz was tested for antiandrogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. Prochloraz, but not the metabolites 2,4,6-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid or 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, inhibited the R1881-induced response in an androgen receptor reporter gene assay...

  4. Probabilistic cumulative risk assessment of anti-androgenic pesticides in food.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, A.K.; Bosgra, S.; Boon, P.E.; van der Voet, H.; Nielsen, E.; Ladefoged, O.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a cumulative risk assessment of three anti-androgenic pesticides (vinclozolin, procymidone and prochloraz) using the relative potency factor (RPF) approach and an integrated probabilistic risk assessment (IPRA) model. RPFs for each substance were estimated for three

  5. Metabolomics reveals reduction of metabolic oxidation in women with polycystic ovary syndrome after pioglitazone-flutamide-metformin polytherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vinaixa

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a variable disorder characterized by a broad spectrum of anomalies, including hyperandrogenemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, body adiposity, low-grade inflammation and increased cardiovascular disease risks. Recently, a new polytherapy consisting of low-dose flutamide, metformin and pioglitazone in combination with an estro-progestagen resulted in the regulation of endocrine clinical markers in young and non-obese PCOS women. However, the metabolic processes involved in this phenotypic amelioration remain unidentified. In this work, we used NMR and MS-based untargeted metabolomics to study serum samples of young non-obese PCOS women prior to and at the end of a 30 months polytherapy receiving low-dose flutamide, metformin and pioglitazone in combination with an estro-progestagen. Our results reveal that the treatment decreased the levels of oxidized LDL particles in serum, as well as downstream metabolic oxidation products of LDL particles such as 9- and 13-HODE, azelaic acid and glutaric acid. In contrast, the radiuses of small dense LDL and large HDL particles were substantially increased after the treatment. Clinical and endocrine-metabolic markers were also monitored, showing that the level of HDL cholesterol was increased after the treatment, whereas the level of androgens and the carotid intima-media thickness were reduced. Significantly, the abundance of azelaic acid and the carotid intima-media thickness resulted in a high degree of correlation. Altogether, our results reveal that this new polytherapy markedly reverts the oxidant status of untreated PCOS women, and potentially improves the pro-atherosclerosis condition in these patients.

  6. Individual and combined in vitro (anti)androgenic effects of certain food additives and cosmetic preservatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Anca; Drugan, Tudor; Gutleb, Arno C; Lupu, Diana; Cherfan, Julien; Loghin, Felicia; Kiss, Béla

    2016-04-01

    The individual and combined (binary mixtures) (anti)androgenic effect of butylparaben (BuPB), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and propyl gallate (PG) was evaluated using the MDA-kb2 cell line. Exposing these cells to AR agonists results in the expression of the reporter gene (encoding for luciferase) and luminescence can be measured in order to monitor the activity of the reporter protein. In case of the evaluation of the anti-androgenic effect, the individual test compounds or binary mixtures were tested in the presence of a fixed concentration of a strong AR agonist (1000 pM 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone; DHT). Cell viability was assessed using a resazurin based assay. For PG, this is the first report in the literature concerning its (anti)androgenic activity. In case of both individual and mixture testing none of the compounds or binary combinations showed androgenic activity. When tested in the presence of DHT, BuPB, BHA and BHT proved to be weak anti-androgens and this was confirmed during the evaluation of binary mixtures (BuPB+BHA, BuPB+BHT and BHA+BHT). Besides performing the in vitro testing of the binary combinations, two mathematical models (dose addition and response addition) were evaluated in terms of accuracy of prediction of the anti-androgenic effect of the selected binary mixtures. The dose addition model guaranteed a good correlation between the experimental and predicted data. However, no estimation was possible in case of mixtures containing PG, due to the lack of effect of the compound in case of the individual testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ovarektomize Ratlarda Flutamid Uygulamasının Vücut Ağırlığı ve Uterus Histolojisi Üzerine Etkilerinin Karşılaştırılması

    OpenAIRE

    Saruhan, Berna Güney; Özbağ, Davut; Özdemir, Nurullah; Gümüşalan, Yakup

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of flutamide on uterine histology and to ascertain whether flutamide regulates body weight gain in the ovariectomized rat model. Materials and Methods: We used 36 sexually mature female Wistar-Albino rats in this study. The study was performed in the Department of Medical Science Application and Research Centre of Dicle University, Diyarbakir. We divided the model rats into 3 groups: group 1- control group, group 2- sham-operated group and group 3- bilat...

  8. Combined Exposure to Dissimilarly Acting Anti-Androgens causes Markedly Increased Frequency of Hypospadias in the Rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Scholze, Martin

    2007-01-01

    , a combination of doses of each chemical that on its own did not produce clear sign of hypospadias (DEHP, finasteride and prochloraz) or a frequency around 14% (vinclozolin) induced a 100% frequency of hypospadias. In conclusion, doses of anti-androgens, which appear to induce only low frequencies of hypospadias...... when judged on their own, may induce a very high frequency when they interact in concert with other anti-androgens....

  9. Risk of hormone escape in a human prostate cancer model depends on therapy modalities and can be reduced by tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Guyader

    Full Text Available Almost all prostate cancers respond to androgen deprivation treatment but many recur. We postulated that risk of hormone escape--frequency and delay--are influenced by hormone therapy modalities. More, hormone therapies induce crucial biological changes involving androgen receptors; some might be targets for escape prevention. We investigated the relationship between the androgen deprivation treatment and the risk of recurrence using nude mice bearing the high grade, hormone-dependent human prostate cancer xenograft PAC120. Tumor-bearing mice were treated by Luteinizing-Hormone Releasing Hormone (LHRH antagonist alone, continuous or intermittent regimen, or combined with androgen receptor (AR antagonists (bicalutamide or flutamide. Tumor growth was monitored. Biological changes were studied as for genomic alterations, AR mutations and protein expression in a large series of recurrent tumors according to hormone therapy modalities. Therapies targeting Her-2 or AKT were tested in combination with castration. All statistical tests were two-sided. Tumor growth was inhibited by continuous administration of the LH-RH antagonist degarelix (castration, but 40% of tumors recurred. Intermittent castration or complete blockade induced by degarelix and antiandrogens combination, inhibited tumor growth but increased the risk of recurrence (RR as compared to continuous castration (RR(intermittent: 14.5, RR(complete blockade: 6.5 and 1.35. All recurrent tumors displayed new quantitative genetic alterations and AR mutations, whatever the treatment modalities. AR amplification was found after complete blockade. Increased expression of Her-2/neu with frequent ERK/AKT activation was detected in all variants. Combination of castration with a Her-2/neu inhibitor decreased recurrence risk (0.17 and combination with an mTOR inhibitor prevented it. Anti-hormone treatments influence risk of recurrence although tumor growth inhibition was initially similar. Recurrent

  10. In vitro and in vivo screening of azole fungicides for antiandrogenic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Vinggaard, Anne; Hass, Ulla

    and antiandrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo. Two other azole fungicides, tebuconazole and epoxiconazole, have now been investigated for antiandrogenic effects in vitro and in vivo as well. The fungicides were screened in two well-established cell assays, including testing for agonistic and antagonistic...... effects on AR in transfected CHO cells, using an AR reporter gene assay. The compounds were also analyzed for effects on steroidogenesis in H295R cells, a human adrenocorticocarcinoma cell line, used to detect effects on steroid production. In vitro tebuconazole and epoxiconazole proved to be antagonists...... signs of feminization of the male offspring were investigated. Tebuconazole caused an increase in testicular 17alfa-hydroxyprogesterone and progesterone levels, and a decrease in testosterone levels in male fetuses. Epoxiconazole had no effect on any of the mesured hormonelevels. Furthermore...

  11. In vitro screening of azole fungicides for antiandrogenic effects – comparison with in vivo effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -based assays. In vitro prochloraz proved to be an activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), to inhibit aromatase activity and to possess antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo. Another two azole fungicides, tebuconazole and epoxiconazole, have now been investigated...... in H295R cells, a cell line, which produces a wide range of steroid hormones in measurable quantities, including testosterone, progesterone and estradiol, a property that makes it suitable as a screening assay to detect effects on steroidogenesis. In the in vitro tebuconazole and epoxiconazole showed...... antiandrogenic effects, and in the H295R cell assay, tebuconazole and epoxiconazole were like prochloraz able to inhibit testosterone and estradiol levels and increase progesterone levels. For the in vivo testing, a study was conducted testing the developmental effects on offspring after prenatal exposure...

  12. Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on the uptake of PSMA-targeted agents: Emerging opportunities challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakht, Martin K.; Oh, So Won; Youn, Hye Won; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kwak, Cheol; Kang, Keon Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an attractive target for both diagnosis and therapy because of its high expression in the vast majority of prostate cancers. Development of small molecules for targeting PSMA is important for molecular imaging and radionuclide therapy of prostate cancer. Recent evidence implies that androgen-deprivation therapy increase PSMA-ligand uptake in some cases. The reported upregulations in PSMA-ligand uptake after exposure to second-generation antiandrogens such as enzalutamide and abiraterone might disturb PSMA-targeted imaging for staging and response monitoring of patients undergoing treatment with antiandrogen-based drugs. On the other hand, second-generation antiandrogens are emerging as potential endoradio-/chemosensitizers. Therefore, the enhancement of the therapeutic efficiency of PSMA-targeted theranostic methods can be listed as a new capability of antiandrogens. In this manuscript, we will present what is currently known about the mechanism of increasing PSMA uptake following exposure to antiandrogens. In addition, we will discuss whether these above-mentioned antiandrogens could play the role of endoradio-/chemosensitizers in combination with the well-established PSMA-targeted methods for pre-targeting of prostate cancer.

  13. Degarelix monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists plus anti-androgen flare protection in advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Damber, Jan Erik; Malmberg, Anders

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to assess differences in efficacy outcomes between luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist plus antiandrogen (AA) flare protection and monotherapy with the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonist degarelix in patients with prostate cancer....../ml in the LHRH agonist + AA group, a case-control analysis using a conditional logistic regression model was utilized. This resulted in an OR for PSA PFS of 0.42 (95% CI 0.20-0.89; p = 0.023) in the overall population, and 0.35 (95% CI 0.13-0.96; p = 0.042) in patients with PSA >50 ng/ml at baseline, when...... protection therapy in patients with prostate cancer when a case-control analysis was used to compensate for differences between treatment groups....

  14. Development of an in vivo anti-androgenic activity detection assay using fenitrothion in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Haruna; Takanobu, Hitomi; Yagi, Ayano; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Iguchi, Taisen; Tatarazako, Norihisa

    2017-03-01

    The effects of endocrine disruptors, including anti-androgenic chemicals, on aquatic environments have received increased attention in recent years. Currently, the method used to screen chemicals for anti-androgenic activity is called the androgenized female stickleback screen, and it was established by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development in 2011 using the three-spined stickleback. However, screening chemicals for anti-androgenic activity has yet to be established using Japanese medaka. Thus, the purpose of this study was to establish a screening method for anti-androgenic activity utilizing the number of papillary processes in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as an indicator of the chemical's anti-androgenic activity. Thus, at 35 days post-fertilization, medaka were exposed to fenitrothion, an anti-androgenic compound, for 28 days. In the control group, the formation of papillary processes was observed in XY medaka, but not in XX medaka. However, after fenitrothion exposure, the number of papillary processes was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner in XY medaka; in the 300 μg l -1 concentration group, four of 11 XY medaka showed no papillary processes even if there were no significant effects on total length and wet body weight compared with the control group. Our results indicate that the number of papillary processes in Japanese medaka can be used as an indicator of anti-androgenic activity and that this model may prove useful as a chemical screening method. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Tamoxifen for the management of breast events induced by non-steroidal antiandrogens in patients with prostate cancer: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunath Frank

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tamoxifen has emerged as a potential management option for gynecomastia and breast pain due to non-steroidal antiandrogens, and it is considered an alternative to surgery or radiotherapy. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the benefits and harms of tamoxifen, in comparison to other treatment options, for either the prophylaxis or treatment of breast events induced by non-steroidal antiandrogens in prostate cancer patients. Methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, reference lists, the abstracts of three major conferences and three trial registers to identify ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Two authors independently screened the articles identified, assessed the trial quality and extracted data. The protocol was prospectively registered (CRD42011001320; http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO. Results Four studies were identified. Tamoxifen significantly reduced the risk of suffering from gynecomastia (risk ratio 9RR0 0.10, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.22 or breast pain (RR 0.06, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.17 at six months compared to untreated controls. Tamoxifen also showed a significant benefit for the prevention of gynecomastia (RR 0.22, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.58 and breast pain (RR 0.25, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.64 when compared to anastrozole after a median of 12 months. One study showed a significant benefit of tamoxifen for the prevention of gynecomastia (RR 0.24, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.65 and breast pain (RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.65 when compared with radiotherapy at six months. Radiotherapy increased the risk of suffering from nipple erythema and skin irritation, but there were no significant differences for any other adverse events (all P > 0.05. Conclusions The currently available evidence suggests good efficacy of tamoxifen for the prevention and treatment of breast events induced by non-steroidal antiandrogens. The impact of tamoxifen therapy on long-term adverse events, disease progression and survival remains unclear

  16. Hormone therapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebelameli P

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Only orchiectomy is still commonly used today either as a single therapy or in combination regimens. Hypophysectomy & adrenalectomy showed such devastating effects on the endocrine equilibrium as to be inconsistent with an acceptable quality of life or even with survival. Chemical adrenalectomy was also tried with drugs (eg. aminoglutethmide, spironolactone leading to consequences superimposable to those of surgical adrenalectomy. Along with orchiectomy, three groups of substances are commonly used today for the hormonal therapy of prostate cancer: estrogens, LHRH agonists & anti androgens. Bilateral orchiectomy removes 90-95% of circulating testosterone. Clinical studies document 60-80% of positive responders to castration, on continued evaluation, relapse occurs usually within 6-24 months in responders, with a death rate of 50% within 6 months. The androgenic activity still remaining after castration may explain the partial & progressively decreasing effectiveness of this & other testosterone reducing therapies. Antiandrogens define substances that act directly at the target site, where interacting with steroid hormone receptors, they impede the binding of androgens. A trend towards the combination of testosterone-reducing & androgen-blocking treatment is developing in modern therapy of prostate cancer. This is due to the complementary characteristics of the two different pharmacological mechanisms that are involved. In this study castration+antiandrogen is compared to castration alone. The results demonstrate a significantly greater percentage of positive objective & subjective responses with antiandrogen than with placebo. In addition survival time was increased in patients treated with castration+antiandrogen than castration+placebo.

  17. The influence of pH and temperature on the stability of flutamide. An HPLC investigation and identification of the degradation product by EI+-MS

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shaheny, Rania Nabih; Yamada, Koji

    2014-01-01

    The chemical stability of flutamide (FLT) was investigated using a new validated stability-indicating HPLC method. Separation of FLT from its degradation product was achieved on a C18 column using a mobile phase of methanol-phosphate buffer (0.04 M, pH 4.0) (75:25, v/v) with UV-detection at 240 nm. The method exhibited excellent linearity for FLT over the concentration range of 0.2-25.0 μg mL-1. FLT was found to be labile to degradation in buffered, acidic and alkaline solutions. The degradat...

  18. Estrogenic and anti-androgenic effects of the herbicide tebuthiuron in male Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Milena Devechi; Pereira, Thiago Scremin Boscolo; Batlouni, Sergio Ricardo; Boscolo, Camila Nomura Pereira; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves

    2018-01-01

    Tebuthiuron is a phenylurea herbicide widely used in agriculture that can reach the aquatic environments, possibly posing negative effects to the aquatic biota. Phenylurea herbicides, such as diuron, are known to cause estrogenic and anti-androgenic effects in fish, but no such effects were yet reported for tebuthiuron exposure. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate if tebuthiuron, at environmentally relevant concentrations (100 and 200ng/L) and after 25days of exposure have estrogenic and/or anti-androgenic effects on male of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), through the evaluation of plasmatic testosterone (T) and estradiol (E 2 ) levels, brain aromatase (CYP19) levels (western-blot), and by evaluating the histology of the testicles. When compared to the control group, plasmatic T levels decreased about 76% in the animals exposed to 200ng/L of tebuthiuron, while E 2 levels increased about 94%, which could be related to a significant increase (77%) in CYP19A1 levels, an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of androgens into estrogens. Histological analyses of the testicles also demonstrated that tebuthiuron at both tested concentrations caused a decrease in the diameter of the seminiferous tubules and in the diameter of the lumen. Therefore, the gonadosomatic index (GSI) was reduced by 36% % in the animals exposed 200ng/L to tebuthiuron. Indeed, the relative frequency of spermatocytes and spermatids increased respectively 73% (200ng/L) and 61% (100ng/L) in the tebuthiuron exposed animals, possibly due to the impairment of sperm release into the lumen, that was decreased 93% (200ng/L) in the treated animals compared to the control. These results confirm that tebuthiuron causes estrogenic and anti-androgenic effects in Nile tilapias at environmentally relevant concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Removal of novel antiandrogens identified in biological effluents of domestic wastewater by activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dehua; Chen, Lujun; Liu, Rui

    2017-10-01

    Environmental antiandrogenic (AA) contaminants in effluents from wastewater treatment plants have the potential for negative impacts on wildlife and human health. The aim of our study was to identify chemical contaminants with likely AA activity in the biological effluents and evaluate the removal of these antiandrogens (AAs) during advanced treatment comprising adsorption onto granular activated carbon (GAC). In this study, profiling of AA contaminants in biological effluents and tertiary effluents was conducted using effect-directed analysis (EDA) including high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation, a recombinant yeast screen containing androgen receptor (YAS), in combination with mass spectrometry analyses. Analysis of a wastewater secondary effluent from a membrane bioreactor revealed complex profiles of AA activity comprising 14 HPLC fractions and simpler profiles of GAC effluents with only 2 to 4 moderately polar HPLC fractions depending on GAC treatment conditions. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-nanospray mass spectrometry analyses of AA fractions in the secondary effluent resulted in detection of over 10 chemical contaminants, which showed inhibition of YAS activity and were potential AAs. The putative AAs included biocides, food additives, flame retardants, pharmaceuticals and industrial contaminants. To our knowledge, it is the first time that the AA properties of N-ethyl-2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexanecarboxamide (WS3), cetirizine, and oxcarbazepine are reported. The EDA used in this study was proven to be a powerful tool to identify novel chemical structures with AA activity in the complex aquatic environment. The adsorption process to GAC of all the identified antiandrogens, except WS3 and triclosan, fit well with the pseudo-second order kinetics models. Adsorption to GAC could further remove most of the AAs identified in the biological effluents with high efficiencies. Copyright

  20. Estrogenic and anti-androgenic endocrine disrupting chemicals and their impact on the male reproductive system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eDe Falco

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs are identified for their ability to perturb the homeostasis of endocrine system and hormonal balance. The male reproductive system is under close control of hormones and each change in their concentration and time of exposition and action can induce a deregulation of its physiology. In this review we summarize the most recent studies on two main categories of EDCs with different action: the estrogenic bisphenol A and alkylphenols and the anti-androgenic phthalates. This review describes the main effects of these substances on male reproductive system.

  1. Probabilistic cumulative risk assessment of anti-androgenic pesticides in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne Kirstine; Bosgra, Sieto; Boon, Polly E.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a cumulative risk assessment of three anti-androgenic pesticides (vinclozolin, procymidone and prochloraz) using the relative potency factor (RPF) approach and an integrated probabilistic risk assessment (IPRA) model. RPFs for each substance were estimated for three...... reproductive endpoints (ano-genital distance, and weights of the seminal vesicles and the musculus levator ani/bulbocavernosus) in male rat foetuses exposed in utero. The cumulative dietary intake was estimated based on consumption data and residue data from the Netherlands. The IPRA model combines variability...

  2. Antiandrogenic effects in vitro and in vivo of the fungicide prochloraz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, A.M.; Nellemann, Christine Lydia; Dalgaard, M.

    2002-01-01

    . In the Hershberger assay, prochloraz exposure at all dose levels (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) given orally to castrated testosterone (T)-treated males markedly reduced weights of ventral prostate, seminal vesicles, musc. levator ani/bulbocavernosus, and bulbourethral gland. These effects were accompanied by an increase...... of androgen-dependent tissues and that it antagonizes central androgen receptors blocking the negative feed-back mechanism of testosterone resulting in increased LH secretion from the pituitary. The antiandrogenic effects of prochloraz were in many ways qualitatively comparable, although weaker...

  3. Is there a role for antiandrogen monotherapy in patients with metastatic prostate cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P; Tyrrell, C J

    2001-01-01

    Castration is the most widely used form of androgen ablation employed in the treatment of metastatic (M1) prostate cancer. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy is a potential alternative treatment option for men for whom castration is unacceptable or not indicated. Of the three non-steroidal...... with a prostate specific antigen (PSA) level 400 ng/ml) may decide that quality of life and symptomatic benefits outweigh the slight survival disadvantage seen in clinical trials and opt for bicalutamide monotherapy as an alternative to castration.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2001) 4, 196-203....

  4. A Prospective Audit of Intermittent Anti-Androgen verses Pituitary Blockade Suggests a Bipolar Androgen Type Strategy May Be Safe in Untreated Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Timothy; Wilson, Peter; Ansell, Wendy; Philp, Tim; Chinegwundoh, Frank; Shamash, Jonathan; Shaw, Greg; Ahmad, Amar

    2018-01-01

    A locally advanced Gleason 4 + 4 prostate cancer patient who was on self-medication with intermittent anti-androgen monotherapy (iAAm) over 14 years suggested that raised testosterone was not dangerous and this suggestion needed investigating. Others who were on AA continuously were recruited to ongoing audit of intermittent hormone therapy (IHT) and iAAm outcomes were compared with intermittent LHRH therapy (iLHRH or iMAB). Between 1994 and 2007, 111 patients sought IHT because of side effects of treatment. Forty-two M0 patients received IHT with iLHRHm or iMAB and 33 received iAAm (31 of these were M0). PSA nadir below 4 was necessary for entry. Overall survival was 87, 72 and 67% with iAAm and 73, 56 and 43% with iLHRH/MAB at 5, 8 and 10 years respectively. Overall survival was 61, 55 and 33% continued on iAAm and 56, 41, and 32% on iLHRH/MAB at 5, 8, and 10 years respectively. Multivariable analysis and matched case control analysis confirm that the maintenance of advantage for iAAm Testosterone levels in patients on iAAm compared to iLHRH therapy was more intense throughout treatment. These results complement recent progress in using bipolar androgen therapy to reverse castration resistance and add to the increasing acceptance that controlled testosterone exposure might be relevant in hormone-naïve patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. 1,4-Substituted Triazoles as Nonsteroidal Anti-Androgens for Prostate Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Claudia; Pepe, Antonella; Kim, Yeong Sang; Lee, Sunmin; Guerrini, Andrea; Parenti, Marco Daniele; Tesei, Anna; Zamagni, Alice; Cortesi, Michela; Zaffaroni, Nadia; De Cesare, Michelandrea; Beretta, Giovanni Luca; Trepel, Jane B; Malhotra, Sanjay V; Varchi, Greta

    2017-04-13

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in men, and the androgen receptor (AR) represents the primary target for PC treatment, even though the disease frequently progresses toward androgen-independent forms. Most of the commercially available nonsteroidal antiandrogens show a common scaffold consisting of two aromatic rings connected by a linear or a cyclic spacer. By taking advantage of a facile, one-pot click chemistry reaction, we report herein the preparation of a small library of novel 1,4-substituted triazoles with AR antagonistic activity. Biological and theoretical evaluation demonstrated that the introduction of the triazole core in the scaffold of nonsteroidal antiandrogens allowed the development of small molecules with improved overall AR-antagonist activity. In fact, compound 14d displayed promising in vitro antitumor activity toward three different prostate cancer cell lines and was able to induce 60% tumor growth inhibition of the CW22Rv1 in vivo xenograft model. These results represent a step toward the development of novel and improved AR antagonists.

  6. Cumulative reproductive effects of in utero administration of mixtures of antiandrogens in male SD rats: synergy or additivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1996 the USEPA was charged under the FQPA to consider the cumulative effects of chemicals in their risk assessments. Our studies were conducted to provide a framework for assessing the cumulative effects of antiandrogens. Toxicants were administered individually or as mixtures...

  7. Identifying Androgen Receptor-Independent Mechanisms of Prostate Cancer Resistance to Second-Generation Antiandrogen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    cancers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Glucocorticoid Receptor, Serum and glucocorticoid -regulated kinase 1, SGK1, epithelial- mesenchymal transition, EMT 16...receptor transcription factor, glucocorticoid receptor (GR), can activate an overlapping set of AR target genes and can mediate resistance to enzalutamide... glucocorticoid -regulated kinase 1 (SGK1), a target gene of the GR transcriptional program, might be more suitable for targeted inhibition. GR and

  8. Antiandrogen monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolvenbag, G J; Iversen, P; Newling, D W

    2001-01-01

    %) and gynecomastia (49%) are the most common adverse events seen during monotherapy with this drug. In summary, the availability of bicalutamide 150-mg monotherapy broadens treatment options for men with locally advanced prostate cancer, offering a viable and attractive alternative to castration in this patient...

  9. Probabilistic cumulative risk assessment of anti-androgenic pesticides in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne Kirstine; Nielsen, Elsa

    2008-01-01

    A cumulative risk assessment of three anti-androgenic pesticides vinclozolin, procymidone and prochloraz in combination has been carried out using an Integrated Probabilistic Risk Assessment (IPRA) model. In the model, variability in both exposure and sensitivity between individuals were combined...... into a distribution of Individual Margins of Exposure (IMoE). Additionally, uncertainties related to input parameters were evaluated. The cumulative risk assessment was performed using the Relative Potency Factor (RPF) approach. RPFs for each substance were estimated for three reproductive endpoints in male foetuses...... as observed following in utero exposure in rats (ano-genital distance, and weight of the seminal vesicles and the levator ani/bulbocavernosus (LABC) muscles). The estimations of the cumulative dietary intake were based on consumption data (1997–1998) and residue data (2002–2003) from the Netherlands. Inter...

  10. Effects of combined exposure to anti-androgens on development and sexual dimorphic behaviour in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie

    the combined effects of anti-androgens and demonstrate that marked effects can occur at mixture doses below the NOAELs for the single chemicals. Since unhindered androgen action is essential for human male development in foetal life, these findings are highly relevant to human risk assessment. This must......Summary Background: Androgens are key regulators of male sexual differentiation during the in utero and early postnatal development. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that counteract androgen action at some stage in these periods can permanently demasculinise male foetuses and lead...... to malformations of the reproductive tract. The incidence of hypospadias (where the opening of the urethra is on the underside of the penis) in young boys has increased over the last decades but it is still unclear whether human exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals may be responsible for this increase...

  11. THE ESTROGENIC AND ANTIANDROGENIC PESTICIDE METHOXYCHLOR ALTERS THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT AND BEHAVIOR WITHOUT AFFECTING PITUITARY SIZE OR LH AND PROLACTIN SECRETION IN MALE RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The estrogenic and antiandrogenic pesticide methoxychlor alters the reproductive tract and behavior without affecting pituitary size or LH and prolactin secretion in male rats.Gray LE Jr, Ostby J, Cooper RL, Kelce WR.Endocrinology Branch, United States Environment...

  12. Considerazioni cliniche ed economiche nel trattamento del cancro della prostata: analisi costo-efficacia di bicalutamide vs flutamide in combinazione con LHRH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monia Marchetti

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate carcinoma (PC is the most common malign neoplasm found in men over 65 years of age. In Italy, the incidence of this cancer is around 60/100,000/year, corresponding to about 11,000 new cases each year. Patients with PC consume health resources for a cost that is 10-24% higher than that of similar populations without PC. It is estimated that in Italy, each year, there are 19,000 hospitalizations for prostate cancer in patients over 65, a figure that represents 4% of the total hospitalizations for oncological diseases. We conducted a marginal cost/effectiveness analysis of bicalutamide vs. flutamide, both administered in combination with LHRH, in patients with advanced (metastatic PC, on the basis of a randomized trial comparing 4 strategies of total androgenic blockade (TAB. The analysis was conducted in the perspective of the SSN (National health system. The comparison revealed that drug acquisition costs are not the only determinants of the economical differences between the two therapeutical strategies. Furthermore, we demonstrated that prolonged survival of the patients does not increase the consumption of health resources, since the chronological shift of the terminal phase reduces the value of the resources dedicated to it. When conducing the cost/effectiveness analysis, the survival advantage associated to bicalutamide has been adjusted to balance the low quality of life of PC patients. The pharmacoeconomical benefit of bicalutamide resulted of 12,150 Euro/QALY, while the cost per year of life saved resulted inferior, ranging from 8.327 to 11.440 Euro. This cost/QALY value is nevertheless lower than that associated to several therapeutical strategies that are commonly accepted in developed countries (domiciliar hemodialysis, heart transplantation, breast cancer screening, etc.. Considering that 12.150 Euro/QALY is the highest estimate of the relative cost/effectiveness of bicalutamide, it appears that the combination bicalutamide

  13. Comparison of antiandrogenic activities of vinclozolin and D,L-camphorquinone in androgen receptor gene transcription assay in vitro and mouse in utero exposure assay in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Michiya; Kodaira, Kazuhisa; Kenichi, Hino; Ishimoto, Yoichi; Tamura, Hiroto; Iguchi, Taisen

    2002-05-24

    A chemical substance used as a photoinitiator for light-cure resin compositions, D,L-camphorquinone (CQN) was found to be weakly antiandrogenic in vitro. It competitively antagonized dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced transcriptional activity on the yeast-based androgen receptor gene transcription assay (YAA). Antiandrogenic activity of CQN was shown at higher concentration than 10(-4) M while the well-known antiandrogen, vinclozolin (VCZ) showed the activity at concentrations of 10(-6) M and above in YAA. The antiandrogenic activity of CQN was reconfirmed in the human cell line-based androgen receptor gene transcription assay (HCAA). To determine whether CQN affect male reproductive development, CQN or VCZ was administered to pregnant mice daily from gestational days 10 to 18 by gavage. In utero exposure to VCZ at 100 mg/kg/day caused a significant decrease in anogenital distance (AGD) of F1 neonates and reduced spermatogenesis in F1 males at 42 days of age. In contrast, maternal doses (100 and 300 mg/kg/day) of CQN had no affect on these endpoints in F1 offspring. Further, VCZ or CQN had no adverse affect on F1 male fertility. From these observations, CQN is potentially antagonistic to androgen receptor (AR) in vitro, but is estimated to be less antiandrogenic in vivo when it is administered to pregnant mice by gavage. Furthermore, these findings are the first to demonstrate that VCZ exerts significant antiandrogenic effects on reproductive tract development during gestation in mice.

  14. In vivo anti-androgenic, anti-estrogenic and antioxidant activities of the aqueous extract of Eremomastax speciosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Simo Tagne

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the in vivo anti-androgenic, antioxidant activity and anti-estrogenic activities of Eremomastax speciosa (E. speciosa in order to find new method for fighting against chronic diseases such as cancer. Methods: Evaluations of antiandrogenic and antioxidant activities were carried out on male rate receiving simultaneous daily administration of testosterone and different doses of aqueous extract of E. speciosa, during a period of 10 d. The evaluation of antiestrogenic activity was carried out on mature ovariectomized female rats receiving simultaneous daily administration of estradiol and different doses of extract, for a week. Then reproductive organs were weighted, levels of prostatic acid phosphatase, superoxide dismutase and catalase as well as some hematologic parameters were measured. Results: The treatment significantly reduced (P<0.01 the weight of ventral prostate, penis, Cowper’s gland and the level of serum prostatic acid phosphatase; while a significant decrease (P<0.01 of the catalase activity was observed. A significant increase (P<0.05 in the lymphocyte number and significant decrease of monocyte (P<0.05 were noticed. The uterine relative weight were significantly reduced (P<0.01. Conclusions: Generally, these results denote the antiandrogenic, antiestrogenic and immunomodulatory potential of E. speciosa.

  15. A role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in the antiandrogenic effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in LNCaP human prostate carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kizu, Ryoichi; Okamura, Kazumasa; Toriba, Akira; Hayakawa, Kazuichi [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, 13-1 Takara-machi, Kanazawa 920-0934 (Japan); Kakishima, Hiroshi [Research Planning Department, Eiken Chemical Co. Ltd., 5-26-20 Oji, Kita-ku, Tokyo 114-0002 (Japan); Mizokami, Atsushi [School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, 13-1 Takara-machi, Kanazawa 920-8641 (Japan); Burnstein, Kerry L. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, University of Miami School of Medicine, FL 33101, Miami (United States)

    2003-06-01

    The role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) on the antiandrogenic effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was studied in LNCaP cells. The PAHs used in this study were chrysene (Chr), benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), anthracene (Ant) and pyrene (Pyr). Chr, BkF and BaP acted as AhR agonists in LNCaP cells, while Ant and Pyr did not. The antiandrogenic effects of the PAHs were evaluated on the basis of regulation of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) mRNA and protein levels by 5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Chr, BkF and BaP exhibited an antiandrogenic effect, but Ant and Pyr did not. {alpha}-Naphthoflavone ({alpha}-NF), an AhR antagonist, reversed the antiandrogen action of Chr, BkF and BaP, suggesting a requirement for activated AhR. The antiandrogenic PAHs did not significantly decrease androgen receptor (AR) levels or cellular DHT concentrations. Gel mobility shift assays revealed that Chr, BkF and BaP inhibited the binding of AR in nuclear extracts to oligonucleotide probes containing the AR-responsive element (ARE), whereas Ant and Pyr had no effect. The antiandrogenic PAHs elevated mRNA levels of c-fos and c-jun. Since activator protein-1 (AP-1), a heterodimer of c-jun and c-fos proteins, is known to inhibit binding of AR to ARE by protein-protein interaction with AR, the findings in the present study suggest a possible involvement of AP-1 in the antiandrogenic effects of PAHs acting as AhR agonists. These results suggest that AhR can stimulate AP-1 expression resulting in inhibition of the binding of AR to ARE in the transcription regulatory region of target genes such as PSA. (orig.)

  16. Statistical Modeling Suggests that Antiandrogens in Effluents from Wastewater Treatment Works Contribute to Widespread Sexual Disruption in Fish Living in English Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, Susan; Burn, Robert. W.; Thorpe, Karen; Williams, Richard; Tyler, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Background The widespread occurrence of feminized male fish downstream of some wastewater treatment works has led to substantial interest from ecologists and public health professionals. This concern stems from the view that the effects observed have a parallel in humans, and that both phenomena are caused by exposure to mixtures of contaminants that interfere with reproductive development. The evidence for a “wildlife–human connection” is, however, weak: Testicular dysgenesis syndrome, seen in human males, is most easily reproduced in rodent models by exposure to mixtures of antiandrogenic chemicals. In contrast, the accepted explanation for feminization of wild male fish is that it results mainly from exposure to steroidal estrogens originating primarily from human excretion. Objectives We sought to further explore the hypothesis that endocrine disruption in fish is multicausal, resulting from exposure to mixtures of chemicals with both estrogenic and antiandrogenic properties. Methods We used hierarchical generalized linear and generalized additive statistical modeling to explore the associations between modeled concentrations and activities of estrogenic and antiandrogenic chemicals in 30 U.K. rivers and feminized responses seen in wild fish living in these rivers. Results In addition to the estrogenic substances, antiandrogenic activity was prevalent in almost all treated sewage effluents tested. Further, the results of the modeling demonstrated that feminizing effects in wild fish could be best modeled as a function of their predicted exposure to both antiandrogens and estrogens or to antiandrogens alone. Conclusion The results provide a strong argument for a multicausal etiology of widespread feminization of wild fish in U.K. rivers involving contributions from both steroidal estrogens and xenoestrogens and from other (as yet unknown) contaminants with antiandrogenic properties. These results may add further credence to the hypothesis that endocrine

  17. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 exerts anti-androgenic activity in the prostate cancer xenograft R-3327G and anabolic activity on skeletal muscle mass & function in castrated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisamore, Michael J; Gentile, Michael A; Dillon, Gregory Michael; Baran, Matthew; Gambone, Carlo; Riley, Sean; Schmidt, Azriel; Flores, Osvaldo; Wilkinson, Hilary; Alves, Stephen E

    2016-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor super family of transcription factors. Androgens play an essential role in the development, growth, and maintenance of male sex organs, as well as the musculoskeletal and central nervous systems. Yet with advancing age, androgens can drive the onset of prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in males within the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by pharmacologic and/or surgical castration induces apoptosis of prostate cells and subsequent shrinkage of the prostate and prostate tumors. However, ADT is associated with significant musculoskeletal and behavioral adverse effects. The unique pharmacological activity of selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 recently has been reported as an AR antagonist with 5α-reductase inhibitor function. The molecule inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in AR positive, androgen dependent prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MK-4541 inhibited androgen-dependent prostate growth in male rats yet maintained lean body mass and bone formation following ovariectomy in female rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of SARM MK-4541 in the androgen-dependent Dunning R3327-G prostate carcinoma xenograft mouse model as well as on skeletal muscle mass and function, and AR-regulated behavior in mice. MK-4541 significantly inhibited the growth of R3327-G prostate tumors, exhibited anti-androgen effects on the seminal vesicles, reduced plasma testosterone concentrations in intact males, and inhibited Ki67 expression. MK-4541 treated xenografts appeared similar to xenografts in castrated mice. Importantly, we demonstrate that MK-4541 exhibited anabolic activity in androgen deficient conditions, increasing lean body mass and muscle function in adult castrated mice. Moreover, MK-4541 treatment restored general activity levels in castrated mice. Thus, MK-4541 exhibits an optimum profile as an adjuvant therapy to ADT

  18. Assessment of the adsorption mechanism of Flutamide anticancer drug on the functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube surface as a drug delivery vehicle: An alternative theoretical approach based on DFT and MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Maedeh; Raissi, Heidar; Morsali, Ali; Shahabi, Mahnaz

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, we have studied the drug delivery performance of the functionalized (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotube with a carboxylic acid group for Flutamide anticancer drug in the gas phase as well as water solution by means of density functional theory calculations. The obtained results confirmed the energetic stability of the optimized geometries and revealed that the nature of drug adsorption on the functionalized carbon nanotube is physical. Our computations showed that the hydrogen bonding between active sites of Flutamide molecule and the carboxyl functional group of the nanotube plays a vital role in the stabilization of the considered configurations. The natural bond orbital analysis suggested that the functionalized nanotube plays the role of an electron donor and Flutamide molecule acts as an electron acceptor at the investigated complexes. In addition, molecular dynamics simulation is also utilized to investigate the effect of functionalized carbon nanotube chirality on the dynamic process of drug molecule adsorption on the nanotube surface. Simulation results demonstrated that drug molecules are strongly adsorbed on the functionalized nanotube surface with (10,5) chirality, as reflected by the most negative van der Waals interaction energy and a high number of hydrogen bonds between the functionalized nanotube and drug molecules.

  19. Antiandrogenic and antimineralocorticoid health benefits of COC containing newer progestogens: dienogest and drospirenone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regidor, Pedro-Antonio; Schindler, Adolf E

    2017-10-10

    Data have demonstrated that COCs, besides offering a satisfactory and safe contraception, offer a variety of non-contraceptive health benefits and therapeutic positive aspects. Many prescribes and users, however, do not realize these positive aspects especially the non-contraceptive health benefits. While the contraceptive use is the primary indication for COC use for most women, these users should be advised in regard of the non-contraceptive benefits when contraception is discussed and prescribed. Using COCs specifically for non-contraceptive indications is an off-label use in many clinical situations (only some exceptions as e.g. acne vulgaris in some countries are allowed clinical entities for the use of these drugs). Therefore, appropriate discussions with the patient regarding this fact should performed and documented by the prescribing physicians. Independent of the off-label situation, COCs containing the newer progestogens dienogest and drospirenone with their antiandrogenic and antimineralocorticoid health benefits play an important role in the management of many diseases and their use should therefore be considered by clinician's. This review will focus on the effects of these COCs on the endometrium, the skin, the fat tissue and the premenstrual syndrome.

  20. Anti-androgenic activities of diuron and its metabolites in male Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Thiago Scremin Boscolo; Boscolo, Camila Nomura Pereira; Silva, Danilo Grünig Humberto da; Batlouni, Sergio Ricardo; Schlenk, Daniel; Almeida, Eduardo Alves de

    2015-07-01

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) is a widely used herbicide which has been frequently detected in surface waters throughout the world. In vivo bioassay guided fractionation studies indicated that diuron may have estrogenic activity augmented by biotransformation. This study evaluated the effects of diuron and three of its metabolites on plasma hormone concentrations and spermatogenesis of the freshwater fish Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Sexually mature male fish were exposed for 25 days to diuron, as well to its metabolites 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA), 3,4-dichlorophenylurea (DCPU) and 3,4-dichlorophenyl-N-methylurea (DCPMU), at concentrations of 200ng/L. Testosterone levels were decreased by diuron, but had limited effects on gonadal histology. Diuron metabolites, however, caused significant decreases in testosterone and in 11-ketotestosterone, gonadosomatic index, diameter of seminiferous tubules and in the mean percentages of germ cells (spermatids and spermatozoa). We conclude that these metabolites have antiandrogenic activity to male Nile tilapia, potentially causing reproductive impairment in male fish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation of uterine progesterone receptors by the nonsteroidal anti-androgen hydroxyflutamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekhar, Y.; Armstrong, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have recently reported that the anti-androgen hydroxyflutamide causes delayed implantation and exhibits antideciduogenic activity in the rat. The present experiments were conducted to examine whether hydroxyflutamide binds to the uterine progesterone receptors and/or alters the progesterone binding sites in the uterus. Cytosol and nuclear fractions from decidualized rat uterus were incubated with [3H]-R5020 without or with increasing concentrations of radioinert R5020, RU486, dihydrotestosterone, or hydroxyflutamide. From the log-dose inhibition curves, the relative binding affinity of both hydroxyflutamide and dihydrotestosterone was less than 0.1% and 2%, compared with R5020 (100%) for displacing [3H]-R5020 bound to uterine cytosol and nuclear fractions, respectively. Injection of estradiol-17 beta (1 microgram/rat) to ovariectomized prepubertal rats induced a 1.85-fold increase in uterine weight by 24 h. Hydroxyflutamide at 2.5 or 5.0 mg did not significantly alter the estrogen-induced increase in uterine weight. Compared to vehicle alone, estrogen induced an approximately 5-fold increase in uterine cytosolic progesterone binding sites. Hydroxyflutamide at both 2.5- and 5.0-mg doses significantly attenuated the estrogen-induced elevation in uterine progesterone binding sites. These studies demonstrate that hydroxyflutamide does not bind with high affinity to progesterone receptors, but suppresses the estrogen-induced elevation in progesterone receptor levels in the uterus

  2. Anti-androgenic effects of S-40542, a novel non-steroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejishima, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Noriko; Suzuki, Mika; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Nagata, Naoya; Yamada, Shizuo

    2012-10-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) would provide alternative therapeutic agent for androgen-related diseases. We identified a tetrahydroquinoline (THQ) derivative, 1-(8-nitro-3a, 4, 5, 9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolin-4-yl) ethane-1, 2-diol (S-40542) as a novel SARM antagonist. Affinity for nuclear receptors of S-40542 was evaluated in receptor-binding studies. Androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity of S-40542 was investigated by luciferase reporter assay in DU145AR cells. Normal and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) model rats were repeatedly treated with S-40542 and flutamide. The tissue weights of prostate and levator ani muscle as well as blood levels of testosterone and luteinizing hormone were measured. S-40542 bound to the AR with high affinity. S-40542 at relatively high concentrations increased the transcriptional activity. This agent also showed a concentration-dependent AR antagonistic action in the presence of 1 nM 5α-dihydrotestosterone. Repeated treatment with S-40542 and flutamide decreased dose-dependently the weights of the prostate to a similar extent. In contrast, the tissue weight-reducing effect by S-40542 treatment on the levator ani muscle was much weaker than that of flutamide. S-40542 had little effect on the blood level of testosterone and luteinizing hormone, whereas flutamide increased the level of both hormones. Furthermore, S-40542 decreased dose-dependently prostate weight of BPH rats. The current results indicate that S-40542 possesses the prostate-selective SARM activity, suggestive of clinical benefit against benign prostate hyperplasia. THQ compounds may be useful for the research of mode of action of SARMs and for the development of safe SARM antagonists. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. In vitro metabolism of the anti-androgenic fungicide vinclozolin by rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Santoyo, Adolfo; Angeles-Soto, Esperanza; de Lourdes López-González, Ma; Harrison, Randy A; Hughes, Michael F

    2012-03-01

    Vinclozolin (V) is a fungicide used in agricultural settings. V administered to rats is hydrolyzed to 2-[[(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-carbamoyl]oxy]-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (M1) and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2). V, M1 and M2 have antiandrogenic properties by interacting with the androgen receptor. Data on V, M1 and M2 biotransformation are limited. Our objective was to characterize V metabolism by rat liver microsomes. V was incubated with non-treated adult male Long-Evans rat liver microsomes and NADPH. Several metabolites were detected following the extraction of incubate with acetonitrile and analysis by HPLC/DAD/MSD. One metabolite was identified as [3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-5-(1,2-dihydroxyethyl)-1,3-oxazolidine-2,4-dione] (M4), which was gradually converted to 3',5'-dichloro-2,3,4-trihydroxy-2-methylbutylanilide (M5). Both co-eluted in the same HPLC peak. Another metabolite ([M7]) was detected by UV but was unstable for mass spectral analysis. The K(M app) for co-eluted M4/M5 and [M7] was 53.7 and 135.4 μM, the V(max app) was 0.812 and 0.669 nmoles/min/mg protein, and CL(int) was 15.1 and 4.9 ml/min/g protein, respectively. Pilocarpine, orphenadrine and proadifen and anti-rat cytochrome P450 (CYP)2A, 2B and 3A antibodies inhibited M4/M5 and [M7] formation. These results indicate that V is efficiently metabolized by CYP. Determination of the metabolites of V will provide further insight into the relationship between toxicity and tissue dose of V and its metabolites.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the antiandrogen vinclozolin after oral administration in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Santoyo, Adolfo; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Harrison, Randy A; Barton, Hugh A; Hughes, Michael F

    2008-11-01

    Vinclozolin (V) is a fungicide with antiandrogenic properties. To determine the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of V, adult male rats were administered an oral dose of V (100 mg/kg) in corn oil and sacrificed over time after dosing. V and its metabolites were analyzed in serum and tissues by high performance liquid chromatography/diode array detector/mass spectrometer. V, 2-[[(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-carbamoyl]oxy]-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (M1), and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2), and five other metabolites were detected in serum and tissues. One metabolite was identified as 3',5'-dichloro-2,3,4-trihydroxy-2-methylbutylanilide (M5). The mean serum concentration data for V were fitted to a one-compartment model for kinetic analysis. At 2 h, V serum concentration peaked; whereas only trace levels were detected at 24 h (t(1/2 elim) = 3.6 h). V was detected in all tissues and preferentially accumulated in fat. M1 serum levels increased until 8 h, being at least 2-fold higher than those of V at this time, and then declined with a t(1/2) = 3.3 h. M5 was the main metabolite in serum and tissues. Serum M5 levels were 5-fold higher than V and 2-fold greater than M1 at all times. At 48 h, M5 remained the main metabolite (t(1/2 elim) = 13.1 h). Liver and kidney exhibited the highest levels of M5, V, and M1. M2 and 3,5-dichloroaniline had the lowest levels of V metabolites in serum and tissues. V is well absorbed, extensively metabolized and widely distributed. M5, the most abundant V metabolite, may be used as an exposure biomarker for pharmacokinetic modeling. These results may clarify the relationship between toxicity and tissue dose of V and its metabolites.

  5. Selective androgen receptor modulator activity of a steroidal antiandrogen TSAA-291 and its cofactor recruitment profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikichi, Yukiko; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Hara, Takahito

    2015-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) specifically bind to the androgen receptor and exert agonistic or antagonistic effects on target organs. In this study, we investigated the SARM activity of TSAA-291, previously known as a steroidal antiandrogen, in mice because TSAA-291 was found to possess partial androgen receptor agonist activity in reporter assays. In addition, to clarify the mechanism underlying its tissue selectivity, we performed comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis of androgen receptor using TSAA-291 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an endogenous androgen. The androgen receptor agonistic activity of TSAA-291 was more obvious in reporter assays using skeletal muscle cells than in those using prostate cells. In castrated mice, TSAA-291 increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate and seminal vesicle. Comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis via mammalian two-hybrid methods revealed that among a total of 112 cofactors, 12 cofactors including the protein inhibitor of activated STAT 1 (PIAS1) were differently recruited to androgen receptor in the presence of TSAA-291 and DHT. Prostate displayed higher PIAS1 expression than skeletal muscle. Forced expression of the PIAS1 augmented the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor, and silencing of PIAS1 by siRNAs suppressed the secretion of prostate-specific antigen, an androgen responsive marker. Our results demonstrate that TSAA-291 has SARM activity and suggest that TSAA-291 may induce different conformational changes of the androgen receptor and recruitment profiles of cofactors such as PIAS1, compared with DHT, to exert tissue-specific activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Low-dose perinatal exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate induces anti-androgenic effects in male rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Boberg, Julie; Petersen, Marta Axelstad

    2010-01-01

    Developmental exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) demasculinizes male rat offspring by reducing anogenital distance (AGD), causing nipple retention (NR), and malforma¬tions and weight reductions of some reproductive organs. We investigated the effects of perinatal DEHP exposure in part...... A and B from a study, in which time-mated Wistar rats were gavaged from gestation day 7 to postnatal day 16 with 0, 10, 30, 100, 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg bw/day and 0, 3, 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg/day, respectively. The dose levels were selected with the aim of covering the whole dose-response curve...... for the demasculinizing effects of DEHP as well as investigating low dose effects. Our results demonstrate that DEHP at a relatively low dose of 10 mg/kg causes adverse anti-androgenic effects on male rat development. At this dose level, male anogenital distance was decreased, the incidence of nipple retention...

  7. Antiandrogen monotherapy in patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; McLeod, David G; See, William A

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once-daily as immediate hormonal therapy in patients with prostate cancer or as adjuvant to radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy.......To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once-daily as immediate hormonal therapy in patients with prostate cancer or as adjuvant to radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy....

  8. Anti-Androgenic Activity of Nardostachys jatamansi DC and Tribulus terrestris L. and Their Beneficial Effects on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome-Induced Rat Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, Palakkil Mavilavalappil; Bovee, Toine F H; Sreejith, Krishnan

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a major hyperandrogenic disorder. Many drugs prescribed specifically to treat PCOS have side effects; however, previous studies suggest that natural therapeutics including botanicals may be less invasive and equally effective for the management of PCOS. In the present study, plants were screened for antiandrogenic activity using the RIKILT yeast Androgen bioAssay (RAA). Selected positive plants were subsequently tested for their efficacy against PCOS induced by estradiol valerate (EV) in rat models. RAA revealed the antiandrogenic property of Nardostachys jatamansi DC (NJ), Tribulus terrestris L. (TT), and Embelia tsjeriam-cottam DC (EJ), whereas Whithania somnifera Dunal (WS), Symplocos racemosa Roxb. (SR), and Helicteres isora L. (HI) exhibited androgenic properties. EJ also exhibited mild androgenic activity and therefore was excluded from further study. EV administration reduced the weight gain and disrupted cyclicity in all rats. NJ and TT extract treatment normalized estrous cyclicity and steroidal hormonal levels and regularized ovarian follicular growth. The in vitro antiandrogenic activity of plant extracts and their positive effects on different parameters of PCOS were proved in vivo.

  9. Maximum androgen blockade in advanced prostate cancer: a meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials using nonsteroidal antiandrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caubet, J F; Tosteson, T D; Dong, E W; Naylon, E M; Whiting, G W; Ernstoff, M S; Ross, S D

    1997-01-01

    To assess the survival benefit of maximum androgen blockade (MAB) using nonsteroidal antiandrogens (NSAAs) through meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials (RCTs). All RCTs comparing treatment with NSAA plus either luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) or orchiectomy versus treatment with LHRH or orchiectomy alone were included if the necessary statistical summaries were present in the publication. Estimates and standard errors of log hazard ratio for overall survival and progression-free survival were derived from published studies using two methods: (1) reconstructing an annual life table from graphical presentations of survival distributions and fitting discrete proportional hazard models, and (2) reconstructing the log hazard ratio from reported P values and numbers of deaths. An alternative set of log hazard ratios was derived from figures presented in a summary report by the Prostate Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group (PCTCG). Comparative meta-analyses were performed using the random effects approach of DerSimonian and Laird. Additionally, published studies were used in a random-effects-based meta-analysis of objective tumor response. Nine studies provided enough information to perform a meta-analysis for survival using one of the two methods. Estimates of relative risks (RR) comparing treatment with NSAA plus either LHRH or orchiectomy versus treatment with LHRH or orchiectomy alone with respect to overall survival were 0.78 (95% confidence intervals [CIs] 0.67 to 0.90) using method 1, and 0.84 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.93) using method 2. Sensitivity analyses based on PCTCG data showed that a favorable survival result for MAB was associated with NSAAs but not with steroidal antiandrogens and depended on randomization blinding and overall trial quality. Additionally, random-effects-based meta-analysis of published studies showed a significant increase in time-to-progression (RR = 0.74; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.86) and an increase in objective tumor

  10. The effects of vinclozolin, an anti-androgenic fungicide, on male guppy secondary sex characters and reproductive success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Mark; Larsen, Peter Foged; Baekgaard, Henrik; Baatrup, Erik

    2003-12-01

    Despite the enormous volume of research concerning the various effects of chemicals with endocrine-disrupting properties in fish, there is still very little evidence that endocrine disruption can adversely affect individual fertility and, hence, pose problems for the population. In the present study, guppies (Poecilia reticulata) were fed with the anti-androgenic fungicide vinclozolin at concentrations ranging from 1.8 to 180 mg/kg from 8-14 wk of age. Male sperm count and the intensity of his sexual display behavior were significantly reduced in treatment groups, which was in line with the results of previous studies. Here, we show further that these impairments translate into reduced fertility, measured as the size of the female's first clutch. Also, this reduced fertility was correlated to the male sperm count, but not to the intensity of the male sexual display. Finally, by crossing exposed with unexposed animals, we show that the adverse effect of vinclozolin on reproduction is mediated through the male alone.

  11. Exposure of neonatal rats to anti-androgens induces penile mal-developments and infertility comparable to those induced by oestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, L; Avery, L; Braden, T D; Williams, C S; Okumu, L A; Williams, J W; Goyal, H O

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported that oestrogen exposure in neonatal rats induced permanent infertility and malformed penis characterized by fat accumulation, which replaced most of the smooth muscle cells and cavernous spaces in the body of the penis, structures essential for erection. The objective of this study was to determine if reduced androgen production/action in the neonatal period, in the absence of exogenous oestrogen exposure, induces penile deformities similar to those caused by oestrogen. Male rats were treated from postnatal days 1-6 with GnRH antagonist antide (A, 10 mg/kg) or androgen receptor (AR) antagonist flutamide (F, 50 mg/kg) or F + A, with or without AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT, 20 mg/kg). For comparison, pups received diethylstilbestrol (DES, 0.1 mg/kg), with or without DHT. Tissues were collected at ages 7 and 12 days and at adulthood. Flutamide alone decreased penile length and weight significantly (p penis and were infertile. In addition, reductions in penile length and weight were higher than in rats treated with F or A alone. DHT co-administration mitigated penile deformities in the DES group, but did not in the F + A group. Testicular testosterone was reduced by 70-95% at 7 or 12 days of age in all treated groups, except in the F group, which had threefold higher testosterone than controls. Collectively, data unequivocally show that reduced androgen production/action in the neonatal period, in the absence of oestrogen exposure, induces permanent infertility and malformed penis similar to that caused by oestrogen. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2011 European Academy of Andrology.

  12. Exponential rise in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) during anti-androgen withdrawal predicts PSA flare after docetaxel chemotherapy in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung Seok; Hong, Sung Joon

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between rising patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) before chemotherapy and PSA flare during the early phase of chemotherapy in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). This study included 55 patients with CRPC who received chemotherapy and in whom pre-treatment or post-treatment PSA levels could be serially obtained. The baseline parameters included age, performance, Gleason score, PSA level, and disease extent. PSA doubling time was calculated using the different intervals: the conventional interval from the second hormone manipulation following the nadir until anti-androgen withdrawal (PSADT1), the interval from the initial rise after anti-androgen withdrawal to the start of chemotherapy (PSADT2), and the interval from the nadir until the start of chemotherapy (PSADT3). The PSA growth patterns were analyzed using the ratio of PSADT2 to PSADT1. There were two growth patterns of PSA doubling time: 22 patients (40.0%) had a steady pattern with a more prolonged PSADT2 than PSADT1, while 33 (60.0%) had an accelerating pattern with a shorter PSADT2 than PSADT1. During three cycles of chemotherapy, PSA flare occurred in 11 patients (20.0%); of these patients, 3 were among 33 (9.1%) patients with an accelerating PSA growth pattern and 8 were among 22 patients (36.4%) with a steady PSA growth pattern (p=0.019). Multivariate analysis showed that only PSA growth pattern was an independent predictor of PSA flare (p=0.034). An exponential rise in PSA during anti-androgen withdrawal is a significant predictor for PSA flare during chemotherapy in CRPC patients.

  13. Dysgenesis and histological changes of genitals and perturbations of gene expression in male rats after in utero exposure to antiandrogen mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Dalgaard, Majken; Christiansen, Sofie

    2007-01-01

    end points, the joint effects of the three antiandrogens were dose additive. Histological evaluations showed that dysgenesis and hypoplasia of prostates, seminal vesicles, and epididymis were seen with the highest mixture doses. No changes were observed in any single-compound low-dose group...... for these lesions, nor were there histopathological changes in the testes. Pronounced dysgenesis of external genitals was observed with all doses of the mixture, and severe dysgenesis was seen with a mixture for which the individual compounds caused no effects. A combination of doses of each chemical that on its...

  14. Effects of anti-androgens cyproterone acetate, linuron, vinclozolin, and p,p'-DDE on the reproductive organs of the copepod Acartia tonsa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watermann, Burkard T.; Albanis, Triantafyllos A.; Galassi, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The study was performed to detect the effects of anti-androgenic compounds on the reproduction. In this paper alterations observed in the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa exposed to environmental concentrations of cyproterone acetate (CPA), linuron (LIN), vinclozolin (VIN), and 1,1-dichloro-2...... stimulated, whereas others displayed a disturbed spermatogenesis and a deformed spermatophore wall. In VIN exposed female A. tonsa, no effects were observed. Male A. tonsa exposed to p,p'-DDE displayed an impairment of spermatogenesis in all stages with increased degrees of apoptosis. In p...

  15. Critical role of androgen receptor level in prostate cancer cell resistance to new generation antiandrogen enzalutamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Julia; Akbor, Mohammady; Handle, Florian; Ofer, Philipp; Puhr, Martin; Parson, Walther; Culig, Zoran; Klocker, Helmut; Heidegger, Isabel

    2016-09-13

    Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor approved for therapy of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer. However, clinical application revealed that 30 to 40% of patients acquire resistance after a short period of treatment. Currently, the molecular mechanisms underlying such resistances are not completely understood, partly due to a lack of model systems. In the present study we established three different cellular models of enzalutamide resistance including a cell line with wild type AR (LAPC4), DuCaP cells which overexpress wild-type AR, as well as a cell which has been adapted to long term androgen ablation (LNCaP Abl) and harbors the AR T878A mutation. After 10 months of cultivation, sustained growth in the presence of enzalutamide was achieved. When compared to controls, resistant cells exhibit significantly decreased sensitivity to enzalutamide as measured with 3[H]thymidine incorporation and WST assay. Moreover, these cell models exhibit partly re-activated AR signaling despite presence of enzalutamide. In addition, we show that enzalutamide resistant cells are insensitive to bicalutamide but retain considerable sensitivity to abiraterone. Mechanistically, enzalutamide resistance was accompanied by increased AR and AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression as well as AR gene amplification, while no additional AR mutations have been identified.

  16. Comparison of the pharmacological effects of a novel selective androgen receptor modulator, the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride, and the antiandrogen hydroxyflutamide in intact rats: new approach for benign prostate hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Kearbey, Jeffrey D; Nair, Vipin A; Chung, Kiwon; Parlow, A F; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2004-12-01

    Tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) demonstrate tissue selectivity in both castrated and intact male rats, behaving as partial agonists in androgenic tissues (i.e. prostate and seminal vesicle), but full agonists in anabolic tissues (i.e. levator ani muscle). The partial agonist activity of SARMs (compounds S-1 and S-4) in the prostate of intact rats suggested that SARM could be used for androgen suppression in the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). This study was designed to explore the mechanisms of action of SARM and to characterize the tissue selectivity of S-1 in intact male rats compared with that of hydroxyflutamide (antiandrogen) and finasteride (5alpha-reductase inhibitor), two major drugs used for androgen suppression treatment of BPH. In intact male rats, S-1 (5, 10, and 25 mg/kg) selectively decreased the prostate weight with similar efficacy to finasteride (5 mg/kg), without affecting the levator ani muscle or increasing the plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. Hydroxyflutamide (0.5, 1, 5, 10, and 25 mg/kg), however, decreased both the prostate and levator ani muscle weights without any selectivity and increased plasma hormone levels in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, S-1 and S-4 showed very weak inhibitory effects toward transiently expressed type I and II human 5alpha-reductase (Ki, >20 microm) during in vitro assays. Therefore, although S-1 and finasteride showed very similar suppressive effects in the prostate of intact male rats, they decreased prostate size via different mechanisms of action. S-1 simply worked as androgen receptor partial agonist, whereas finasteride inhibited prostatic 5alpha-reductase. These studies indicate that SARMs may demonstrate clinical utility as single agent or combination therapy for BPH.

  17. Comparison of the Pharmacological Effects of a Novel Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator, the 5α-Reductase Inhibitor Finasteride, and the Antiandrogen Hydroxyflutamide in Intact Rats: New Approach for Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Kearbey, Jeffrey D.; Nair, Vipin A.; Chung, Kiwon; Parlow, A. F.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) demonstrate tissue selectivity in both castrated and intact male rats, behaving as partial agonists in androgenic tissues (i.e. prostate and seminal vesicle), but full agonists in anabolic tissues (i.e. levator ani muscle). The partial agonist activity of SARMs (compounds S-1 and S-4) in the prostate of intact rats suggested that SARM could be used for androgen suppression in the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). This study was designed to explore the mechanisms of action of SARM and to characterize the tissue selectivity of S-1 in intact male rats compared with that of hydroxyflutamide (antiandrogen) and finasteride (5α-reductase inhibitor), two major drugs used for androgen suppression treatment of BPH. In intact male rats, S-1 (5, 10, and 25 mg/kg) selectively decreased the prostate weight with similar efficacy to finasteride (5 mg/kg), without affecting the levator ani muscle or increasing the plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. Hydroxyflutamide (0.5, 1, 5, 10, and 25 mg/kg), however, decreased both the prostate and levator ani muscle weights without any selectivity and increased plasma hormone levels in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, S-1 and S-4 showed very weak inhibitory effects toward transiently expressed type I and II human 5α-reductase (Ki, >20 µM) during in vitro assays. Therefore, although S-1 and finasteride showed very similar suppressive effects in the prostate of intact male rats, they decreased prostate size via different mechanisms of action. S-1 simply worked as androgen receptor partial agonist, whereas finasteride inhibited prostatic 5α-reductase. These studies indicate that SARMs may demonstrate clinical utility as single agent or combination therapy for BPH. PMID:15308613

  18. Research Brief: Self-Reports of a Constellation of Persistent Antiandrogenic, Estrogenic, Physical, and Psychological Effects of Finasteride Usage Among Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walf, Alicia A; Kaurejo, Shan; Frye, Cheryl A

    2018-01-01

    Our research objective is to understand more, through subjective, self-reports on discussion boards/forums, persons' experiences associated with the use of drugs that alter androgen metabolism, such as finasteride. Finasteride is an orally active, specific inhibitor of 5α-reductase, which is localized to many androgen-dependent tissues. Finasteride inhibits the conversion of testosterone (T) to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and is commonly used to treat benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) and male pattern baldness (MPB), both disorders associated with elevated DHT levels and 5α-reductase activity in the prostate and hair follicles, respectively. It is now acknowledged that long-term use and discontinuation of finasteride has adverse effects (AEs); however, these claims have not been well documented. In this study, discussion board posts (forums) were analyzed as self-reports of what finasteride users indicate is problematic for them. Reports were categorized by the age of subjects as well as the types of AEs described: antiandrogenic, estrogenic, central, and nonspecific/severe. A total of 244 cases were recorded and analyzed on the discussion forum on propeciahelp.com . Among these, 74 (32%) cases reported antiandrogenic affects, 43 (19%) reported estrogenic effects, 70 (30%) reported central effects, 11 (5%) reported nonspecific/severe AEs, and 31 (14%) reported AEs in all categories. The categorization of AEs may prompt further investigation into the pathophysiology of post-finasteride syndrome (PFS). Also, subjective reports may engender greater understanding of the perceived lasting AEs of finasteride.

  19. Spearmint induced hypothalamic oxidative stress and testicular anti-androgenicity in male rats - altered levels of gene expression, enzymes and hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikas; Kural, Mool Raj; Pereira, B M J; Roy, Partha

    2008-12-01

    Mentha spicata Labiatae, commonly known as spearmint, can be used for various kinds of illnesses in herbal medicines and food industries. One of the prominent functions of this plant extract is its anti-androgenic activity. The present study investigated the probable correlation between oxidative stress in hypothalamic region and anti-androgenic action of this plant's aqueous extract on rats. Decreased activities of enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in hypothalamus of treated rats indicated spearmint induced oxidative stress. Further RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis demonstrated the decreased expression of some of the steroidogenic enzymes, cytochrome P450scc, cytochrome P450C17, 3beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD), 17beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD) and other related proteins like, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, androgen receptor and scavenger receptor class B-1. Further, in vitro enzyme assays demonstrated depressed activities of testicular 3beta-HSD and 17beta-HSD enzymes. Histopathology indicated a decreased sperm density in cauda epididymis and degeneration of ductus deference. Our study suggested that spearmint probably induced oxidative stress in hypothalamus resulting in decreased synthesis of LH and FSH which in turn down-regulated the production of testicular testosterone through the disruption of a number of intermediate cascades.

  20. The suitability of concentration addition for predicting the effects of multi-component mixtures of up to 17 anti-androgens with varied structural features in an in vitro AR antagonist assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermler, Sibylle; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.kortenkamp@brunel.ac.uk

    2011-12-15

    The risks associated with human exposures to chemicals capable of antagonising the effects of endogenous androgens have attracted considerable recent interest. Exposure is typically to large numbers of chemicals with androgen receptor (AR) antagonist activity, yet there is limited evidence of the combined effects of multi-component mixtures of these chemicals. A few in vitro studies with mixtures of up to six AR antagonists suggest that the concept of concentration addition (CA) provides good approximations of experimentally observed mixture effects, but studies with larger numbers of anti-androgens, and with more varied structural features, are missing. Here we show that the mixture effects of up to 17 AR antagonists, comprising compounds as diverse as UV-filter substances, parabens, perfluorinated compounds, bisphenol-A, benzo({alpha})pyrene, synthetic musks, antioxidants and polybrominated biphenyls, can be predicted well on the basis of the anti-androgenicity of the single components using the concept of CA. We tested these mixtures in an in vitro AR-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, based on MDA-kb2 cells. The effects of further mixtures, composed of four and six anti-androgens, could be predicted accurately by CA. However, there was a shortfall from expected additivity with a ten-component mixture at two different mixture ratios, but attempts to attribute these deviations to differential expression of hormone-metabolising CYP isoforms did not produce conclusive results. CA provides good approximations of in vitro mixture effects of anti-androgens with varying structural features. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humans are exposed to a large number of androgen receptor antagonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is limited evidence of the combined effects of anti-androgenic chemicals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modelled the predictability of combined effects of up to 17 anti-androgens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the

  1. [Our experience with hormonal therapy in transsexual patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Vladimír; Weiss, Petr; Fifková, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Hormonal therapy in transsexual patients (TS) includes sexagens administration: androgens in female-to-male transsexual patients (FtM) and oestrogens and antiandrogens in male-to-female transsexual patients (MtF). Duration of hormonal therapy should continue at least 1 year before gender reassignment surgery. Hormonal therapy supresses former gender and induces partially new gender changes. Hormonal therapy continues subsequently after surgery during life. Hormonal therapy in MtF TS includes oestrogens and antiandrogens application. In very young persons in both groups blocking gonadoliberin analogues can be used. In FtM TS testosterone oneself is given (orally and/or parenterally). Authors describe their own experiences with hormonal treatment in 282 TS (163 FtM and 119 MtF). During hormonal therapy statistically significant weight increasing was found in both groups. Total cholesterol increased in FtM. In MtF during hormonal therapy average prolactin level increased from 350.1 to 570.5 mU/l without clinical significance. Total average hormonal therapy duration was 6.73 years in FtM and 4.64 years in MtF and so overall therapy safety assessment is not possible. Any endocrinopathy occurence in the beginning of surveillance was found in 35 persons (12.4 %): simple goiter, autoimmune thyreoiditis, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, gynecomastia, DM type 1, congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), Klinefelter syndrome and nonfunctional pituitary adenoma. It is appropriate as well as in other rare medicine conditions to manage diagnosing and therapy in centers with experience with these issues.

  2. Scientific evidence for the use of current traditional systemic therapies in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusayen, Raed; Shear, Neil H

    2015-11-01

    Traditional systemic therapies are frequently prescribed for the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Clinicians consider antibiotics, retinoids, antiandrogens, immunosuppressants, and less common treatment, such as fumarates, in the management of HS. Different classes of medications have been selected to treat HS based on their ability to target various pathways of the condition. Concerns about infection, such as infection with Clostridium difficile, necessitates switching therapy or shortening the course of therapy with specific antibiotics. This review explores the outcomes with the use of numerous medical therapies and postulates explanations for their efficacy or lack of response. Data on long-term safety and efficacy with traditional systemic therapies are lacking. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of neonatal treatment of male mice with antiandrogens and of females with androgens on the development of the os penis and os clitoridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucksmann, A; Ooka-Souda, S; Miura-Yasugi, E; Mizuno, T

    1976-01-01

    The os penis in mice and rats is composed of a proximal intramembranous and endochondral osseous element and a distal cartilaginous, ossifying element. Female mice, but not rats, have a small os clitoridis which corresponds to the intramembranous part of the proximal element of the os penis. In mice of either sex a dense mesenchymatous formation ventral to the urethra is the anlage for the bones of the external genitalia. In the early postnatal period the proximal part of the os penis develops as bone at the outer and as cartilage at the basal end of the anlage, while in females a minute focus of ossification differentiates into the small os clitoridis without passing through a cartilaginous phase. The distal element of the os penis is formed later than the proximal rod and grows at a slower rate. Neonatal treatment with an antiandrogen inhibits the increase in size and calcification of the os penis. Neonatal castration is an even more effective inhibitor. Neonatal treatment with testosterone or dihydrotestosterone, but not with oestradiol, stimulates the growth of the bony proximal os clitoridis, but induces only a rudimentary collagenous distal element. The differences between mice and rats in the response of the tissues of the clitoris to androgenic treatment are discussed, particularly as regards the differentiation of proximal and distal elements. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:945257

  4. Perfluorohexane Sulfonate (PFHxS) and a Mixture of Endocrine Disrupters Reduce Thyroxine Levels and Cause Anti-Androgenic Effects in Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramhøj, Louise; Hass, Ulla; Boberg, Julie

    2018-01-01

    weight and slightly increased liver weights at high doses and in combination with the EDmix. A marked effect on T4 levels was seen in both dams and offspring, with significant reductions from 5 mg/kg/day. The EDmix caused anti-androgenic effects in male offspring, manifested as slight decreases...... performed. Study 1 included control, two doses of PFHxS and two doses of PFHxS+EDmix (n = 5-7). Study 2 included control, 0.05, 5 or 25 mg/kg body weight/day PFHxS, EDmix-only, 0.05, 5 or 25 mg PFHxS/kg plus EDmix (n = 13-20).PFHxS caused no overt toxicity in dams and offspring but decreased male pup birth...... in anogenital distance, increased nipple retention and reductions of the weight of epididymides, ventral prostrate and vesicular seminalis.PFHxS can induce developmental toxicity and in addition results of the co-exposure studies indicated that PFHxS and the EDmix potentiate the effect of each other on various...

  5. Mixture effects at very low doses with combinations of anti-androgenic pesticides, antioxidants, industrial pollutant and chemicals used in personal care products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, Frances; Ermler, Sibylle; Kugathas, Subramaniam [Institute for the Environment, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Rosivatz, Erika [Institute of Chemical Biology, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Scholze, Martin [Institute for the Environment, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Kortenkamp, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.kortenkamp@brunel.ac.uk [Institute for the Environment, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Many xenobiotics have been identified as in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, but information about their ability to produce combined effects at low concentrations is missing. Such data can reveal whether joint effects at the receptor are induced at low levels and may support the prioritisation of in vivo evaluations and provide orientations for the grouping of anti-androgens in cumulative risk assessment. Combinations of 30 AR antagonists from a wide range of sources and exposure routes (pesticides, antioxidants, parabens, UV-filters, synthetic musks, bisphenol-A, benzo(a)pyrene, perfluorooctane sulfonate and pentabromodiphenyl ether) were tested using a reporter gene assay (MDA-kb2). Chemicals were combined at three mixture ratios, equivalent to single components' effect concentrations that inhibit the action of dihydrotesterone by 1%, 10% or 20%. Concentration addition (CA) and independent action were used to calculate additivity expectations. We observed complete suppression of dihydrotestosterone effects when chemicals were combined at individual concentrations eliciting 1%, 10% or 20% AR antagonistic effect. Due to the large number of mixture components, the combined AR antagonistic effects occurred at very low concentrations of individual mixture components. CA slightly underestimated the combined effects at all mixture ratios. In conclusion, large numbers of AR antagonists from a wide variety of sources and exposure routes have the ability of acting together at the receptor to produce joint effects at very low concentrations. Significant mixture effects are observed when chemicals are combined at concentrations that individually do not induce observable AR antagonistic effects. Cumulative risk assessment for AR antagonists should apply grouping criteria based on effects where data are available, rather than on criteria of chemical similarity. - Highlights: • Mixtures of AR antagonists at low individual concentrations cause complete inhibition

  6. Patterns of androgen deprivation therapies among men diagnosed with localised prostate cancer: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycken, Magdalena; Garmo, Hans; Adolfsson, Jan; Stattin, Pär; Holmberg, Lars; Bill-Axelson, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Many men diagnosed with localised prostate cancer will eventually be treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). ADT is associated with adverse effects and its timing is controversial. Data on patterns of use are scarce. We describe patterns of ADT use, defined as castration (medical and surgical) or antiandrogen monotherapy initiated after primary treatment, in a population-based cohort. Data were extracted from the population-based Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe). Totally 45,147 men diagnosed between 1997 and 2009 with clinical stage T1-2, N0-NX, M0-MX and prostate specific antigen (PSA)<50ng/ml without primary ADT were included. Outcomes in the period 2006 through 2010 were analysed using a period analysis approach. The cumulative incidence of castration at 10years after diagnosis was 11.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), 11.0-12.2%). The corresponding proportion of antiandrogen monotherapy was 10.8% (95% CI, 10.2-11.4%). Castration was the dominant therapy among men on deferred treatment. The probability of receiving castration rather than antiandrogen monotherapy increased with age. Estimated median durations of castration ranged from 4years in the deferred treatment high-risk group to 17years in the prostatectomy low-risk group. The main limitation was the lack of information on progression to metastatic disease and PSA at the time for initiation of ADT. When initiated early after curative treatment, the duration of castration can be decades. The findings indicate that more accurate tools are necessary to guide which men should be selected for ADT as secondary treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of antiandrogenic progestins, chlormadinone and cyproterone acetate, and the estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and their mixtures: Transactivation with human and rainbowfish hormone receptors and transcriptional effects in zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleuthero-embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegenthaler, Patricia Franziska [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW), School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Bain, Peter [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Land and Water Flagship, PMB2, Glen Osmond, 5064 South Australia (Australia); Riva, Francesco [IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”, Environmental Biomarkers Unit, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Via La Masa 19, I-20156 Milan (Italy); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW), School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollution Dynamics, Department of Environmental System Sciences, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Agonistic and antagonistic activity of CMA and CPA were assessed in vitro. • CMA and CPA showed different interaction with human and fish receptors. • No progestogenic but antiandrogenic and antiglucocorticoid activity occurred in fish. • CMA and CPA showed transcriptional changes in zebrafish embryos. • Binary mixtures of the progestins with EE2 were assessed in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: Synthetic progestins act as endocrine disrupters in fish but their risk to the environment is not sufficiently known. Here, we focused on an unexplored antiandrogenic progestin, chlormadinone acetate (CMA), and the antiandrogenic progestin cyproterone acetate (CPA). The aim was to evaluate whether their in vitro interaction with human and rainbowfish (Melanotaenia fluviatilis) sex hormone receptors is similar. Furthermore, we investigated their activity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleuthero-embryos. First, we studied agonistic and antagonistic activities of CMA, CPA, and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), in recombinant yeast expressing either the human progesterone (PGR), androgen (AR), or estrogen receptor. The same compounds were also investigated in vitro in a stable transfection cell system expressing rainbowfish nuclear steroid receptors. For human receptors, both progestins exhibited progestogenic, androgenic and antiestrogenic activity with no antiandrogenic or estrogenic activity. In contrast, interactions with rainbowfish receptors showed no progestogenic, but antiandrogenic, antiglucocorticoid, and some antiestrogenic activity. Thus, interaction with and transactivation of human and rainbowfish PGR and AR were distinctly different. Second, we analyzed transcriptional alterations in zebrafish eleuthero‐embryos at 96 and 144 h post fertilization after exposure to CPA, CMA, EE2, and binary mixtures of CMA and CPA with EE2, mimicking the use in oral contraceptives. CMA led to slight down-regulation of the ar transcript, while CPA down-regulated ar

  8. Dienogest (DNG in der Therapie der Endometriose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebert AD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schon seit Jahren sind Gestagene in der Therapie der Endometriose etabliert. Dienogest (DNG, als „neues Gestagen“ der 19- Nortestosteron-Gruppe propagiert, nimmt eine Sonderstellung ein. DNG zeigt eine relativ starke antiandrogene Wirkung sowie auch eine günstige Pharmakokinetik. Bereits kurz nach seiner Entwicklung (1979 wurde es aufgrund seiner starken Wirkung am Endometrium als effektive endokrine Therapieoption bei Endometriose untersucht. Mehrere Studien mit etablierten GnRHAnaloga zeigten einen vergleichbaren Effekt von DNG auf den Endpunkt Schmerz mit deutlich geringeren Nebenwirkungen. DNG ist seit 2009 als Visanne® in der Dosierung 2 mg/d auf dem Markt und als Therapie bei Endometriose zugelassen. Diese neue Therapieoption ist ein weiterer wichtiger Schritt in Richtung der Endometriosetherapieoptimierung. Die stadiengerechte endokrine Endometriosetherapie wurde nach den GnRH-Analoga, den vorhandenen Gestagenen, den kombinierten oralen Kontrazeptiva nun durch ein weiteres effektives Präparat – DNG – bereichert. Obwohl Dienogest nach Studienlage eine effektive Langzeittherapie mit guter Lebensqualität bietet, wird auch dieses interessante Präparat noch nicht das Ende unserer Bemühungen darstellen können, innovative Ansätze für die kausale Therapie der Endometriose zu suchen und zu finden.

  9. Treatment effects in the prostate including those associated with traditional and emerging therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Andrew J; Ryan, Paul; Van derKwast, Theodorus

    2011-07-01

    Classic treatment options for prostate cancer consist of radical prostatectomy, antiandrogen (or hormonal) therapy, and radiation therapy. Hormonal and radiation therapy, in particular, have well known, often profound effects on the histologic appearance of benign prostate tissue and prostatic carcinoma. The tissue changes induced by these treatments have been comprehensively described in several sources. Novel therapies ranging from focal ablative treatments to highly targeted molecular therapies are beginning to emerge and pathologists will play a central role in documenting the effects of these treatments on normal and malignant prostate tissue. It is therefore important that pathologists have access to basic treatment information and a solid working knowledge of the morphologic changes induced by these therapies. This will ensure accurate interpretation and reporting of posttreatment prostate specimens. This review is based on a presentation given by Dr A. Evans at the International Society of Urological Pathology Companion Society Meeting (Hot Topics in Urological Pathology) at The United States Canadian Academy of Pathology Meeting in Washington DC on March 20, 2010. This review will cover the histopathologic features seen in benign prostate tissue and prostatic carcinoma seen following: hormonal therapy, radiation therapy, ablative therapies such as vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy, interstitial laser thermotherapy, and high-intensity focussed ultrasound. An emphasis is placed on these specific modalities as they are currently in use as primary, salvage, or investigational therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  10. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  11. Female pattern alopecia: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy LL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Lauren L Levy, Jason J Emer Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Hair loss is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice, with men presenting with a distinctive pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding (Norwood-Hamilton classification and women exhibiting diffuse hair thinning over the crown (increased part width and sparing of the frontal hairline (Ludwig classification. Female pattern hair loss has a strikingly overwhelming psychological effect; thus, successful treatments are necessary. Difficulty lies in successful treatment interventions, as only two medications – minoxidil and finasteride – are approved for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia, and these medications offer mediocre results, lack of a permanent cure, and potential complications. Hair transplantation is the only current successful permanent option, and it requires surgical procedures. Several other medical options, such as antiandrogens (eg, spironolactone, oral contraceptives, cyproterone, flutamide, dutasteride, prostaglandin analogs (eg, bimatoprost, latanoprost, and ketoconazole are reported to be beneficial. Laser and light therapies have also become popular despite the lack of a profound benefit. Management of expectations is crucial, and the aim of therapy, given the current therapeutic options, is to slow or stop disease progression with contentment despite patient expectations of permanent hair regrowth. This article reviews current perspectives on therapeutic options for female pattern hair loss. Keywords: androgenetic alopecia, female pattern hair loss, minoxidil, finasteride, antiandrogens, spironolactone

  12. Phase I/II trial evaluating combined radiotherapy and in situ gene therapy with or without hormonal therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer--A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, Bin S.; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Kernen, Kenneth; Chou, C.-C.; Shalev, Moshe; Vlachaki, Maria T.; Miles, Brian; Kadmon, Dov; Mai, W.-Y.; Caillouet, James; Davis, Maria; Ayala, Gustavo; Wheeler, Thomas; Brady, Jett; Carpenter, L. Steve; Lu, Hsin H.; Chiu, J. Kam; Woo, Shiao Y.; Thompson, Timothy; Butler, E. Brian

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To report the preliminary results of a Phase I/II study combining radiotherapy and in situ gene therapy (adenovirus/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene/valacyclovir) with or without hormonal therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Arm A: low-risk patients (T1-T2a, Gleason score <7, pretreatment PSA <10) were treated with combined radio-gene therapy. A mean dose of 76 Gy was delivered to the prostate with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Arm B: high-risk patients (T2b-T3, Gleason score ≥7, pretreatment PSA ≥10) were treated with combined radio-gene therapy and hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy was comprised of a 4-month leuprolide injection and 2-week use of flutamide. Arm C: Stage D1 (positive pelvic lymph node) patients received the same regimen as Arm B, with the additional 45 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics. Treatment-related toxicity was assessed using Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program common toxicity score and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity score. Results: Thirty patients (13 in Arm A, 14 in Arm B, and 3 in Arm C) completed the trial. Median follow-up was 5.5 months. Eleven patients (37%) developed flu-like symptoms (Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Grade 1) of fatigue and chills/rigors after gene therapy injection but recovered within 24 h. Four patients (13%) and 2 patients (7%) developed Grade 1 and 2 fever, respectively. There was no patient with weight loss. One patient in Arm B developed Grade 3 elevation in liver enzyme, whereas 11 and 2 patients developed Grade 1 and 2 abnormal liver function tests. There was no Grade 2 or above hematologic toxicity. Three patients had transient rise in creatinine. There was no RTOG Grade 3 or above lower gastrointestinal toxicity. Toxicity levels were as follows: 4 patients (13%), Grade 2; 6 patients (20%), Grade 1; and 20 patients (67%), no toxicity. There was 1 patient with RTOG Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, 12 patients (40%) with Grade 2, 8 patients

  13. Current status of first-line therapy for elderly patients with proatate cancer in Kyushu and Okinawa areas. A questionnaire study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Kenryu; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Koga, Hirofumi

    2005-01-01

    A survey based on a questionnaire to urologists in Kyushu and Okinawa areas was carried out to assess the current status of first-line therapy for elderly patients with prostate cancer. Ninety-three urologists from 93 institutes answered the questionnaire. Endocrine therapy is widely performed as first-line therapy for elderly patients with prostate cancer. They mostly receive immediate-continuous therapy regardless of their clinical factors. Only 8 (9%) and 7 (8%) institutes have the options of deferred and intermittent therapy, respectively. LH-RH analogue and non-steroidal anti-androgens are commonly used. Chemoendocrine therapy is performed in 33 (35%) institutes for selected patients. Estramustine and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) derivatives are commonly used as chemotherapeutic agents. Sixty (65%) institutes do not have this modality as a treatment option. Risks arising from the treatment and quality of life (QOL) disturbance are the main reasons for this. Radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy are performed in 53 (57%) and 47 (51%) institutes, respectively, for selected patients with loco-regional disease. However, 22 (24%) institutes do not have these definitive therapies as treatment options. QOL and risks arising from the treatments are the main factors for selecting definitive or non-definitive therapy. In elderly patients with prostate cancer, cancer control is not always the goal of treatment. QOL within a relatively shorter life expectancy is an important factor for decision making in the management of these patients. (authors)

  14. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweeney K

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Katrina Sweeney, Gunnel Halldén Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK Abstract: Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting localized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support

  15. The survival analysis on localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy followed by intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hong; Li Gaofeng; Wu Qinhong; Li Xuenan; Zhong Qiuzi; Xu Yonggang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively investigate clinical outcomes and prognostic factors in localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy followed by intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Between March 2003 and October 2008, 54 localized prostate cancer treated by IMRT were recruited. All patients had received endocrine therapy before IMRT. The endocrine therapy included surgical castration or medical castration in combination with antiandrogens. The target of IMRT was the prostate and seminal vesicles with or without pelvis. The biochemical failure was defined according to the phoenix definition. By using the risk grouping standard proposed by D'Amico, patients were divided into three groups: low-risk group (n = 5), intermediate-risk group (n = 12), and high-risk group (n = 37). Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the overall survival rate. Prognostic factors were analyzed by univariate and multiple Cox regression analysis. Results: The follow-up rate was 98%. The number of patients under follow-up was 39 at 3 years and 25 at 5 years. Potential prognostic factors, including risk groups, mode of endocrine therapy, time of endocrine therapy, phoenix grouping before IMRT, the prostate specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) before radiotherapy, PSA value before IMRT, interval of endocrine therapy and IMRT, irradiation region, and irradiation dose were analyzed by survival analysis. In univariate analysis, time of endocrine therapy (75 % vs 95 %, χ 2 = 6. 45, P = 0. 011), phoenix grouping before IMRT (87% vs 96%, χ 2 = 4. 36, P = 0. 037), interval of endocrine therapy and IMRT (80% vs 95%, χ 2 = 11.60, P= 0. 001), irradiation dose (75% vs 91%, χ 2 =5.92, P= 0. 015) were statistically significant prognostic factors for 3 - year overall survival , and risk groups (85 vs 53 vs 29, χ 2 = 6. 40, P =0. 041) and PSADT before IMRT (62 vs 120, U =24. 50, P =0. 003) were significant factors for the median survival time. In the multiple Cox

  16. Alopecia With Endocrine Therapies in Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggar, Vishal; Wu, Shenhong; Dickler, Maura N.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Whereas the frequency of alopecia to cytotoxic chemotherapies has been well described, the incidence of alopecia during endocrine therapies (i.e., anti-estrogens, aromatase inhibitors) has not been investigated. Endocrine agents are widely used in the treatment and prevention of many solid tumors, principally those of the breast and prostate. Adherence to these therapies is suboptimal, in part because of toxicities. We performed a systematic analysis of the literature to ascertain the incidence and risk for alopecia in patients receiving endocrine therapies. Methods. An independent search of citations was conducted using the PubMed database for all literature as of February 2013. Phase II–III studies using the terms “tamoxifen,” “toremifene,” “raloxifene,” “anastrozole,” “letrozole,” “exemestane,” “fulvestrant,” “leuprolide,” “flutamide,” “bicalutamide,” “nilutamide,” “fluoxymesterone,” “estradiol,” “octreotide,” “megestrol,” “medroxyprogesterone acetate,” “enzalutamide,” and “abiraterone” were searched. Results. Data from 19,430 patients in 35 clinical trials were available for analysis. Of these, 13,415 patients had received endocrine treatments and 6,015 patients served as controls. The incidence of all-grade alopecia ranged from 0% to 25%, with an overall incidence of 4.4% (95% confidence interval: 3.3%–5.9%). The highest incidence of all-grade alopecia was observed in patients treated with tamoxifen in a phase II trial (25.4%); similarly, the overall incidence of grade 2 alopecia by meta-analysis was highest with tamoxifen (6.4%). The overall relative risk of alopecia in comparison with placebo was 12.88 (p Alopecia is a common yet underreported adverse event of endocrine-based cancer therapies. Their long-term use heightens the importance of this condition on patients' quality of life. These findings are critical for pretherapy counseling, the identification of risk

  17. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex therapy Overview Sex therapy is a type of psychotherapy — a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a mental health professional. Through sex therapy, you can address concerns about sexual function, ...

  18. Age disrupts androgen receptor-modulated negative feedback in the gonadal axis in healthy men

    OpenAIRE

    Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Takahashi, Paul Y.; Keenan, Daniel M.; Liu, Peter Y.; Mielke, Kristi L.; Weist, Suanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Testosterone (T) exerts negative feedback on the hypothalamo-pituitary (GnRH-LH) unit, but the relative roles of the CNS and pituitary are not established. We postulated that relatively greater LH responses to flutamide (brain-permeant antiandrogen) than bicalutamide (brain-impermeant antiandrogen) should reflect greater feedback via CNS than pituitary/peripheral androgen receptor-dependent pathways. To this end, 24 healthy men ages 20–73 yr, BMI 21–32 kg/m2, participated in a prospective, pl...

  19. Duration of Androgen Deprivation Therapy Influences Outcomes for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy Following Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, William C; Schipper, Matthew J; Johnson, Skyler B; Foster, Corey; Li, Darren; Sandler, Howard M; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Hamstra, Daniel A; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Limited data exist to guide the use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for men treated with radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP). The optimal duration of ADT in this setting is unknown. To determine if the duration of ADT influences clinical outcomes for men receiving post-RP RT. A total of 680 men who received adjuvant radiation therapy (n=105) or salvage radiation therapy (n=575) between 1986 and 2010 at a single tertiary care institution were reviewed retrospectively. Median follow-up post-RT was 57.8 mo. RT was delivered using three-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated RT in 1.8-Gy fractions. For patients treated with ADT, >80% were treated with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist with or without a nonsteroidal antiandrogen. Biochemical failure (BF), distant metastasis (DM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), and overall mortality were assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and propensity score analysis. Overall, 144 patients (21%) received ADT with post-RP RT, most of whom had high-risk disease features such as Gleason score 8-10, seminal vesicle invasion, or pre-RT prostate-specific antigen >1 ng/ml. Median ADT duration was 12 mo (interquartile range: 6.0-23.7). Patients who received HR]: 2.27; p=0.003) and DM (HR: 2.48; p=0.03) compared with patients receiving ≥12 mo of ADT. The 5-yr rates of DM were 6.0% and 23% for ≥12 and controlling for pretreatment and treatment-related factors, each month of ADT was associated with a decreased risk for BF (HR: 0.95; p=0.0004), DM (HR: 0.88; p=0.0004), and PCSM (HR: 0.90; p=0.037). These findings are limited by the retrospective nature of our analysis. For men with high-risk disease features receiving ADT with post-RP RT, the duration of ADT is associated with clinical outcomes. Our findings suggest that for these men an extended course of ADT ≥12 mo may be preferable. Validation of our findings is needed. We evaluated outcomes for men with high-risk disease features

  20. Intermittent hormonal therapy in the treatment of post-irradiation residual/recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Aaron O; Kocherill, Paul G; Wallace, Michelle; Forman, Jeffrey D

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of intermittent hormonal therapy in the treatment of residual/recurrent prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with biochemical evidence of residual/recurrent prostate cancer were initially treated with radiation therapy (RT)(13), neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy and RT (3), or RT following prostatectomy (1). The mean follow-up time was 19.4 months from the initiation of hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy consisted of an LH-RH agonist alone (7), an anti-androgen alone (1) or a combination of both (9). Hormonal therapy was continued until the prostatic specific antigen (PSA) level became undetectable. IHT was reinstituted when the PSA reached a pre-determined level, usually greater than or equal to 10ng/ml. Results: The mean time from completion of primary treatment to the initiation of hormonal therapy was 32.5 months. The mean PSA at the start of the first cycle of hormonal therapy was 43.9ng/ml, the second cycle, 11.9ng/ml and the third cycle, 24ng/ml. The mean PSA levels at the end of the first and second cycle of hormonal therapy were .48 and .42ng/ml, respectively. No patient has yet completed the third cycle of hormonal therapy. The average duration of hormonal therapy was 10 months for the first cycle and 4 months for the second cycle. The mean intermittent time off hormones were 9.3 months between cycles 1 and 2, and 10 months between cycles 2 and 3. No patient has yet become refractory to hormonal therapy. Currently all patients are alive. All patients experienced hot flashes and decreased libido at varying degrees during treatment. Thirty-five percent experienced gynecomastia. During the intervals between hormonal therapy, most patients reported a decrease in hot flashes. Conclusion: This analysis supplies preliminary evidence that intermittent hormonal therapy is a viable option in patients with biochemical evidence of disease following initial therapy. It is associated with less treatment

  1. Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Insulin Therapy Insulin Therapy Share Print When you digest food, your ... you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  2. Hand Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a friend * required fields From * To * DESCRIPTION Hand Therapy is a type of rehabilitation performed by an occupational or physical therapist with patients that suffer from conditions affecting the hands and upper extremities. Therapy enables patients to hasten ...

  3. Electroconvulsive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007474.htm Electroconvulsive therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) uses an electric current to treat depression ...

  4. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  5. Therapy Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Independent School District, TX.

    Reviewed are the goals and activities of the therapy services in the Austin Early Childhood Special Education Program. Specific sections detail activities for speech therapy (such as diagnostic assessment, habilitation, consultation, and reporting procedures), occupational therapy (including identification and assessment, and services to children,…

  6. Age disrupts androgen receptor-modulated negative feedback in the gonadal axis in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Johannes D; Takahashi, Paul Y; Keenan, Daniel M; Liu, Peter Y; Mielke, Kristi L; Weist, Suanne M

    2010-10-01

    Testosterone (T) exerts negative feedback on the hypothalamo-pituitary (GnRH-LH) unit, but the relative roles of the CNS and pituitary are not established. We postulated that relatively greater LH responses to flutamide (brain-permeant antiandrogen) than bicalutamide (brain-impermeant antiandrogen) should reflect greater feedback via CNS than pituitary/peripheral androgen receptor-dependent pathways. To this end, 24 healthy men ages 20-73 yr, BMI 21-32 kg/m2, participated in a prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind crossover study of the effects of antiandrogen control of pulsatile, basal, and entropic (pattern regularity) measurements of LH secretion. Analysis of covariance revealed that flutamide but not bicalutamide 1) increased pulsatile LH secretion (P = 0.003), 2) potentiated the age-related abbreviation of LH secretory bursts (P = 0.025), 3) suppressed incremental GnRH-induced LH release (P = 0.015), and 4) decreased the regularity of GnRH-stimulated LH release (P = 0.012). Furthermore, the effect of flutamide exceeded that of bicalutamide in 1) raising mean LH (P = 0.002) and T (P = 0.017) concentrations, 2) accelerating LH pulse frequency (P = 0.013), 3) amplifying total (basal plus pulsatile) LH (P = 0.002) and T (P brain-predominant and pituitary-dependent feedback mechanisms in healthy men.

  7. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  8. Alternative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the widespread and erroneous belief that they are natural and do no harm, and because their use offers the opportunity for more control over treatment options and procedures. Alternative therapies can reduce stress, pain, and/or fatigue. Some therapies are covered ...

  9. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapists have graduate degrees and can demonstrate their competence in sex therapy by becoming credentialed by the ... ways to resolve your concerns and improve your communication and intimacy. Talking about sex and intimacy may ...

  10. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  11. Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best for you. Oxygen is usually delivered through nasal prongs (an oxygen cannula) or a face mask. Oxygen equipment can attach to other medical equipment such as CPAP machines and ventilators. Oxygen therapy can help you ...

  12. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it also can be a sign of endometrial cancer. All bleeding after menopause should be evaluated. Other side effects reported by women who take hormone therapy include fluid retention and breast soreness. This soreness usually lasts for a short ...

  13. Behavior Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with children with ADHD. Behavior therapy recognizes the limits that having ADHD puts on a child. It ... be tiring and trying. It can test the limits of even the best parents. Parent training and ...

  14. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relating to each other Set individual and family goals and work on ways to achieve them Results Family therapy doesn't automatically solve family conflicts or make an unpleasant situation go away. But ...

  15. External beam radiation therapy and a low-dose-rate brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Tobin J.; Hutchinson, Sean Z.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Cruz, Alex A.; Figura, Nicholas B.; Nethers, Kevin; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Heysek, Randy V.; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To assess outcomes with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and a low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 through August 2011, 120 intermediate-risk or high-risk prostate cancer patients were treated with EBRT to a total dose of 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions and a palladium-103 LDR brachytherapy boost of 10,000 cGy (n = 90) or an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost of 11,000 cGy (n = 30). ADT, consisting of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist ± an anti-androgen, was administered to 29/92 (32%) intermediate-risk patients for a median duration of 4 months and 26/28 (93%) high-risk patients for a median duration of 28 months. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-12.8 years). There was no statistically-significant difference in biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), or overall survival (OS) without or with ADT. Also, there was no statistically-significant difference in bDFS, DMFS, or OS with a palladium-103 vs. an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost. Conclusions: There was no statistically-significant difference in outcomes with the addition of ADT, though the power of the current study was limited. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0815 and 0924 phase III trials, which have accrual targets of more than 1,500 men, will help to clarify the role ADT in locally-advanced prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT and a brachytherapy boost. Palladium-103 and iodine-125 provide similar bDFS, DMFS, and OS. (author)

  16. Cost-efficacy analysis of hormonal treatments for advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iannazzo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: prostatic cancer is the second more frequent cancer in Italy (after lung cancer and is the third cancer-related death cause. Age is the principal risk factor and, given the ageing process undergoing in the Italian population, it seems clear that the public sanitary expenditure to treat the disease is bound to increase, arising the need to perform pharmacoeconomic evaluations of the therapeutic strategies available. Methods: we performed a cost/utility analysis, through a Markov model, of several hormonal therapies in patients with advanced prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy, from the biochemical recurrence to death. Nine androgen suppression therapies were considered: orchiectomy, two nonsteroidal antiandrogens (NSAA, four luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH agonists, cyproterone acetate and the association of a NSAA and a LHRH (BAT. In the simulation the androgen suppression therapies were started at the PSA recurrence and never stopped until death. The model used the Italian NHS prospective and a time horizon corresponding to patient’s lifetime. Drug costs were calculated for each therapy, considering the less costly brand. Results: all the considered therapies produced a life expectancy (LE of about 12 life years (LYs with a small variability ranging from 12.3 LYs for BAT (the most effective to 11.37 LYs for NSAA-flutamide (the least effective. Quality adjusted life expectancy ranged from 9.98 QALYs for BAT to 9.28 QALYs for NSAA-flutamide. The average cost per patient presented a more enhanced variability, from 12,538 Euro for orchiectomy to 59,496 Euro for NSAA-bicalutamide. Among all the alternatives orchiectomy resulted the most cost/effective alternative with a cost/utility ratio of about 1,300 Euro/QALY. In the LHRH-agonists class leuprorelin was the most cost/effective with about 2,200 Euro/QALY. A one-way sensitivity analysis showed a substantial stability of the results. Conclusions: BAT

  17. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  18. Radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, J F; Hoefnagel, C A

    1999-09-11

    Nuclear medicine therapy uses unsealed radioactive sources for the selective delivery of radiation to tumours or target organs. For benign disorders such as thyrotoxicosis and arthritis radionuclide therapy provides an alternative to surgery or medical treatment. In cancer treatment, it often combines the advantage of target selectivity (like brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy) with that of being systemic, as with chemotherapy, and it may be used as part of a therapeutic strategy with curative intent or for disease control and palliation. Toxicity is generally limited to the haematopoietic tissue and few side-effects are observed. When cure is feasible, the long-term consequences of radionuclide therapy (eg, fertility disorders and leukaemia or other secondary cancers) do compare favourably with the risks associated with and accepted for chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  19. Art Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibeke; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on a Jungian approach, this article will introduce an integrative model to therapeutic change using art therapy methods as practical tools, with the aim of improving quality of life and in the prevention of depression. In a research study involving six participants, painting, clay...... work and drumming were used together with imagination and personal dialogues linked to the artwork. These art therapy processes attempted to combine the participant’s experience of inner and outer reality. The effect of gaining more knowledge about their inner reality using dreams and symbols...... model of Art Therapy with this population. This article focuses on the psychological aspect of creativity related to mild depression with an emphasis on the interaction between the conscious and the unconscious part of the psyche....

  20. The effect of estrogen on the sexual interest of castrated males: Implications to prostate cancer patients on androgen-deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Erik; Wassersug, Richard J

    2013-09-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) treatment causes sexual dysfunction. We review here the effects of estrogen on the sexual performance of androgen-deprived males. The major findings are: 1. Estrogen receptors are present in brain centers that are important for sexual behavior; as well as in male reproductive organs, in a pattern suggesting that estrogen may have some role in orgasmic function and genital skin sensitivity. 2. Estrogen restores sexual interest above castrate levels in many vertebrates including reptiles, birds and mammals; but multiple factors contribute to the magnitude of this effect. 3. Data from castrated men, aromatase-deficient men, male-to-female transsexuals, and men on antiandrogens all suggest that estrogen can maintain some libido in androgen-deprived men. We discuss the general benefits of estrogen therapy to quality of life of men on ADT, the potential risks of this treatment, and possible treatment regimes for estrogen therapy in males. Unless contraindicated, we propose that PCa patients on ADT would benefit from supplemental parenteral estrogen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Animal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, D A

    1997-01-01

    This article explores the concept of animal therapy. The discussion includes a brief history of animal therapy, its importance, its relationship to rehabilitation, and its usefulness as a tool to influence adaptation, change, power, communication, advocacy, teaching, accountability, responsibility, and locus of control. This theoretical concept is important because of the joy and unconditional love animals can provide their owners. Relationships with animals can promote feelings of self-worth, help offset loneliness, reduce anxiety, provide contact, comfort, security, and the feeling of being needed.

  2. Emerging Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Amaliris; Musallam, Khaled M; Taher, Ali T; Rivella, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    At present, the only definitive cure for β-thalassemia is a bone marrow transplant (BMT); however, HLA-blood-matched donors are scarcely available. Current therapies undergoing clinical investigation with most potential for therapeutic benefit are the β-globin gene transfer of patient-specific hematopoietic stem cells followed by autologous BMT. Other emerging therapies deliver exogenous regulators of several key modulators of erythropoiesis or iron homeostasis. This review focuses on current approaches for the treatment of hemoglobinopathies caused by disruptions of β-globin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Shock therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Erin

    2016-02-03

    Therapies administered by mental health nurses, aimed at "curing" gay people of their sexual preference were still in common use in the UK in the 1960s and early 1970s. Some nurses tried to avoid participating in these practices, but many believed that they were helping their patients, as a new book reveals.

  4. Dance Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)

  5. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  6. New Insights into the Androgen-Targeted Therapies and Epigenetic Therapies in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit M. Godbole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States, and it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. The androgen receptor (AR, a receptor of nuclear family and a transcription factor, is the most important target in this disease. While most efforts in the clinic are currently directed at lowering levels of androgens that activate AR, resistance to androgen deprivation eventually develops. Most prostate cancer deaths are attributable to this castration-resistant form of prostate cancer (CRPC. Recent work has shed light on the importance of epigenetic events including facilitation of AR signaling by histone-modifying enzymes, posttranslational modifications of AR such as sumoylation. Herein, we provide an overview of the structure of human AR and its key structural domains that can be used as targets to develop novel antiandrogens. We also summarize recent findings about the antiandrogens and the epigenetic factors that modulate the action of AR.

  7. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, cognitive, emotional, and social functioning. Music therapists work with children and adults with developmental ...

  8. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation ... Inc. All rights reserved. Page 2 of 5 Physical and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria ...

  9. Radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.F. Jr.; Deliso, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ( 131 I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  10. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...... music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive...

  11. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    may cause detrimental long-term effects. Three studies have examined the effect of music therapy procedural support (MTPS) under needle procedures. Consequently, this study aims at examining the effects of MTPS in an RCT. Moreover, the study addresses clinical aspects of the applied MT intervention...... and provides research-based clinical tools. Methods 41 children (1 to 10 years) were enrolled and underwent a single PIVA procedure. The children were randomly assigned to either an MT or a comparable control group receiving PIVA. In addition, the music therapy (MT) group received individualised MTPS (i.......e. music alternate engagement) before, during, and after PIVA. The intervention was performed by a trained music therapist and comprised preferred songs, improvised songs/music, and instrument playing. The study was carried out in accordance with the rules in force regarding research ethics and clinical MT...

  12. Antiproton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Knudsen, Helge V; Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd-Jürgen; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Ratib, Osman; Solberg, Timothy D; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most important means we have for the treatment of localised tumours. It is therefore essential to optimize the technique, and a lot of effort goes into this endeavour. Since the proposal by Wilson in 1946 [R.R. Wilson, Radiology use of fast protons, Radiology 47 (1946) 487.] that proton beams might be better than photon beams at inactivating cancer cells, hadron therapy has been developed in parallel with photon therapy and a substantial knowledge has been gained on the effects of pions, protons and heavy ions (mostly carbon ions). Here we discuss the recent measurements by the CERN ACE collaboration of the biological effects of antiprotons, and argue that these particles very likely are the optimal agents for radiotherapy.

  13. Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Storr, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    Music Therapy is an established health profession in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address to physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs of individuals. After assessing the strength and needs of each client, the qualified music therapist provides the indicated treatment including creating, singing, moving to and/or listening to music. Through musical involvement in therapeutic context, clients, abilities are strengthened and transfer to other areas of their liv...

  14. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... material placed in the body near cancer cells ( internal radiation therapy , also called brachytherapy ). Systemic radiation therapy uses radioactive ... material placed in the body near cancer cells (internal radiation therapy, more commonly called brachytherapy). Systemic radiation therapy uses ...

  15. Second-Line Hormonal Therapy for Men With Chemotherapy-Naïve, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgo, Katherine S; Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K; Rumble, R Bryan; Carducci, Michael A; Nordquist, Luke; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Winquist, Eric; Singer, Eric A

    2017-06-10

    Purpose ASCO provisional clinical opinions (PCOs) offer direction to the ASCO membership after publication or presentation of potential practice-changing data. This PCO addresses second-line hormonal therapy for chemotherapy-naïve men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) who range from being asymptomatic with only biochemical evidence of CRPC to having documented metastases but minimal symptoms. Clinical Context The treatment goal for CRPC is palliation. Despite resistance to initial androgen deprivation therapy, most men respond to second-line hormonal therapies. However, guidelines have neither addressed second-line hormonal therapy for nonmetastatic CRPC nor provided specific guidance with regard to the chemotherapy-naïve population. Recent Data Six phase III randomized controlled trials and expert consensus opinion inform this PCO. Provisional Clinical Opinion For men with CRPC, a castrate state should be maintained indefinitely. Second-line hormonal therapy (eg, antiandrogens, CYP17 inhibitors) may be considered in patients with nonmetastatic CRPC at high risk for metastatic disease (rapid prostate-specific antigen doubling time or velocity) but otherwise is not suggested. In patients with radiographic evidence of metastases and minimal symptoms, enzalutamide or abiraterone plus prednisone should be offered after discussion with patients about potential harms, benefits, costs, and patient preferences. Radium-223 and sipuleucel-T also are options. No evidence provides guidance about the optimal order of hormonal therapies for CRPC beyond second-line treatment. Prostate-specific antigen testing every 4 to 6 months is reasonable for men without metastases. Routine radiographic restaging generally is not suggested but can be considered for patients at risk for metastases or who exhibit symptoms or other evidence of progression. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/genitourinary-cancer-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  16. Nutritional Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Julie

    2016-03-01

    This article provides the reader with steps needed to accurately assess patient nutrition behaviors that contribute to weight gain, inability to lose weight, or inability to sustain weight loss. Evidence-based approaches in nutrition therapy that can create the daily energy deficit needed to produce 1/2 to 2 pounds of weight loss per week, and the strategies to create the energy deficit, are presented. To optimize health, long-term weight loss maintenance is needed. The benefits of using a multidisciplinary team approach in treating obesity are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Gestalt therapy.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, J; Poupard, D

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe Gestalt Therapy. They retrace its fundamental theoretical axes. These are psychoanalysis, character analysis, the german Gestalt theory of perception, existentialism, and the Orient. Some principal concepts are then elaborated more fully such as the cycle of awareness, desensitization, excitation anxiety and the five defense mechanisms: retroflection, introjection, projection, deflection, and confluence. The nature and goals of the therapeutic process are also described before the presentation of some techniques specific to this approach such as enactment and role playing. Finally, certain basic Gestalt rules, which aim at facilitating and intensifying the communication process among group members, are enunciated.

  18. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy and external-beam radiotherapy versus external-beam irradiation alone for prostate cancer. A quality-of-life analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Fischedick, Karin; Siluschek, Jaroslav; Kehl, Mareike; Krenkel, Barbara; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2009-02-15

    To evaluate the impact of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT) on quality of life after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. A group of 170 patients (85 with and 85 without NHT) has been surveyed prospectively before EBRT (70.2-72 Gy), at the last day of EBRT, a median time of 2 months and 15 months after EBRT using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Pairs with and without NHT (median treatment time of 3.5 months before EBRT) were matched according to the respective planning target volume and prostate volume. Before EBRT, significantly lower urinary function/bother, sexual function and hormonal function/bother scores were found for patients with NHT. More than 1 year after EBRT, only sexual function scores remained lower. In a multivariate analysis, NHT and adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT) versus NHT only (hazard ratio 14; 95% confidence interval 2.7-183; p = 0.02) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists versus antiandrogens (hazard ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.1-12; p = 0.04) proved to be independent risk factors for long-term erectile dysfunction (no or very poor ability to have an erection). With the exception of sexual function (additional adjuvant HT and application of LHRH analog independently adverse), short-term NHT was not found to decrease quality of life after EBRT for prostate cancer. (orig.)

  19. Interferential therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganne, J M

    1976-09-01

    Interferential Therapy is a "new-comer" to the field of physical medicine, but it is gradually acquiring a particular identity. As the name implies, a current is generated within the tissues as a result of the interaction of two separate circuits. It can therefore be appreciated that four electrodes are required, two for each circuit. The two currents generated by the unit are medium frequency currents in the 4000 cycle per second range. One of these can be varied so that it is slightly out of phase with the other in such a way that a low frequency beat is generated where the two currents cross within the tissues, and this is equal to the difference between the two medium frequencies. The interferential current produced is an evenly alternating sinusoidal one, without polar effects (Diagram 1). Its frequency can be varied from 0 to 100 or 150, depending on the unit. It is evident that such a current can be made to scan the tissues more deeply, more accurately and more widely than the old sinusoidal current, depending on the way electrodes are placed, to determine where the low frequency current will be produced. Further, it has less superficial sensory effect, provided it is applied correctly. It is undoubtedly an effective therapy for controlling pain. Copyright © 1976 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation oncologist encounters the critically ill immunosuppressed patient in four settings. First, the newly diagnosed cancer patient presents for initial evaluation and treatment, with immunosuppression from the cancer itself, malnutrition, concomitant infectious disease, prior drug or alcohol abuse or other medical problems. Second, the previously treated cancer patient presents with metastatic or recurrent primary cancer causing local symptoms. Immune dysfunction in this setting may be due to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as any of the original factors. Third, the patient previously treated with radiation presents with a life-threatening problem possibly due to complications of prior therapy. In this setting, the radiation oncologist is asked to evaluate the clinical problem and to suggest whether radiation might be causing part or all of the problem and what can be done to treat these sequelae of radiation. Fourth, the patient with a benign diagnosis (not cancer) is seen with a problem potentially emeliorated by radiation (e.g., kidney transplant rejection, preparation for transplant, or intractable rheumatoid arthritis). This chapter reviews these four issues and presents clinical and radiobiologic principles on which recommendations for therapy are based

  1. Robotic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, H. I.; Hogan, N.

    2012-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a remarkable shift in the neuro-rehabilitation paradigm. Neuroscientists and clinicians moved away from the perception that the brain is static and hardwired, to a new dynamic understanding that plasticity is a fundamental property of the adult human brain and might be harnessed to remap or create new neural pathways. Capitalizing on this innovative understanding, we introduced a paradigm shift in the clinical practice in 1989 when we initiated the development of the MIT-Manus robot for neuro-rehabilitation and deployed it in the clinic in 1994 10. Since then, we and others have developed and tested a multitude of robotic devices for stroke, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Here we discuss whether robotic therapy has achieved a level of maturity to justify its broad adoption in the clinical realm as a tool for motor recovery. PMID:23080044

  2. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features on ... should treat your skin with care while receiving radiation therapy. Causes External radiation therapy uses high-powered x- ...

  3. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  4. [Physical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohnabayashi, Naohiko

    2008-01-01

    Recently, pulmonary rehabilitation program is widely considered one of the most effective and evidence-based treatment for not only chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but many clinical situations including neuro-muscular disease, post-operative status and weaning period from the ventilator, etc. The essential components of a pulmonary rehabilitation program are team assessment, patient training, psycho-social intervention, exercise, and follow-up. In 2003, Japanese medical societies (J. Thoracic Society, J. Pul. Rehabilitation Society and J. Physiotherapist Society) made a new guideline for pulmonary rehabilitation, especially how to aproach the execise training. As for the duration after surgical operation, airway cleaning is the important technique to prevent post-operative complications including pneumonia. Postural dranage technique is well known for such condition, at the same time, several instruments (flutter vulve, positive expiratory mask, high frequecy oscillation, etc) were also used for the patient to expectrate airway mucus easier. Lung transplantation is a new method of treatment for the critically-ill patients with chronic respiratoy failure. Several techniques of physical therapy are must be needed before and after lung transplantation to prevent both pulmonary infection and osteoporosis.

  5. American Art Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... WELCOME BOARD OF DIRECTORS NATIONAL STAFF STRATEGIC PLAN VALUES STATEMENT FINANCIAL INFORMATION COLLABORATORS ABOUT ART THERAPY FEATURED MEMBERS ETHICS VIDEOS: ART THERAPY IN ACTION STORY LIBRARY SHARE ...

  6. [Music therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, P A; Dallaire, C

    1993-02-01

    Music stands for the mystical expression of life cycles celebrations: birth, death, renewal of seasons, hunting, rituals of passage... It serves in other familiar conjunctures, such as the dentist chair, waiting rooms and on the telephone, helping us to relax or increase our patience. However, music is not for everyone at all times. With each individual, its significance varies according to the moment and the situation. If a nurse can make use of it with some persons, it is because they have convinced her that music can be of comfort to them and can reduce their pain and anxiety. The role of the caregiver is to attend to the sick by different means. Music is one of them. By being alert and prudent, nurses can provide a care traditionally perpetuated as comforting. Music therapy is the controlled use of music and its elements to help the physiological, psychological and emotional integration of the individual in the course of a treatment for illness or incapacity. Its active mode implies that clients participate by playing an instrument or by singing to express oneself. It opens or maintains the field of communication. In the passive mode, therapists use tapes, disks or interpret pieces of music themselves. Its meaning, its power, take on other dimensions. When introducing music on a palliative care unit, for example, an initial assessment of each client is required to discover and monitor the degree of their acceptance. Thereafter, a continuous evaluation ensures that appropriate adjustments are made in the choice of music offered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Comparing the androgenic and estrogenic properties of progestins used in contraception and hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw-du Toit, Renate; Perkins, Meghan S.; Hapgood, Janet P.; Africander, Donita

    2017-01-01

    Progestins used in endocrine therapies bind to multiple steroid receptors and are associated with several side-effects. It is thus important to understand the relationship between steroid receptor cross-reactivity and the side-effect profile of progestins. In cell lines that express negligible levels of steroid receptors, we report for the first time the binding affinities, potencies and efficacies of selected progestins from different generations determined in parallel. We show that the progestins bind to the androgen receptor (AR) with similar affinities to each other and progesterone, while none bind estrogen receptor (ER)-β, and only norethisterone acetate, levonorgestrel and gestodene bind ERα. Comparative dose-response analysis revealed that progestins from the first three generations display similar androgenic activity to the natural androgen dihydrotestosterone for transactivation, while norethisterone acetate, levonorgestrel and gestodene are ERα agonists. We show for the first time that the anti-androgenic properties of progesterone and drospirenone are similar to the well-known AR antagonist hydroxyflutamide, while nomegestrol acetate is more potent and nestorone less potent than both hydroxyflutamide and progesterone. Moreover, we are the first to report that the older progestins, unlike progesterone and the fourth generation progestins, are efficacious ERα agonists for transrepression, while the selected progestins from the second and third generation are efficacious AR agonists for transrepression. Considering the progestin potencies and their reported free serum concentrations relative to dihydrotestosterone and estradiol, our results suggest that the progestins are likely to exert AR-, but not ERα- or ERβ-mediated effects in vivo. PMID:28711501

  8. Changed processing of visual sexual stimuli under GnRH-therapy--a single case study in pedophilia using eye tracking and fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kirsten; Fromberger, Peter; Laubinger, Helge; Dechent, Peter; Müller, Jürgen L

    2014-05-17

    Antiandrogen therapy (ADT) has been used for 30 years to treat pedophilic patients. The aim of the treatment is a reduction in sexual drive and, in consequence, a reduced risk of recidivism. Yet the therapeutic success of antiandrogens is uncertain especially regarding recidivism. Meta-analyses and reviews report only moderate and often mutually inconsistent effects. Based on the case of a 47 year old exclusively pedophilic forensic inpatient, we examined the effectiveness of a new eye tracking method and a new functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-design in regard to the evaluation of ADT in pedophiles. We analyzed the potential of these methods in exploring the impact of ADT on automatic and controlled attentional processes in pedophiles. Eye tracking and fMRI measures were conducted before the initial ADT as well as four months after the onset of ADT. The patient simultaneously viewed an image of a child and an image of an adult while eye movements were measured. During the fMRI-measure the same stimuli were presented subliminally. Eye movements demonstrated that controlled attentional processes change under ADT, whereas automatic processes remained mostly unchanged. We assume that these results reflect either the increased ability of the patient to control his eye movements while viewing prepubertal stimuli or his better ability to manipulate his answer in a socially desirable manner. Unchanged automatic attentional processes could reflect the stable pedophilic preference of the patient. Using fMRI, the subliminal presentation of sexually relevant stimuli led to changed activation patterns under the influence of ADT in occipital and parietal brain regions, the hippocampus, and also in the orbitofrontal cortex. We suggest that even at an unconscious level ADT can lead to changed processing of sexually relevant stimuli, reflecting changes of cognitive and perceptive automatic processes. We are convinced that our experimental designs using eye tracking and

  9. Changed processing of visual sexual stimuli under GnRH-therapy – a single case study in pedophilia using eye tracking and fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiandrogen therapy (ADT) has been used for 30 years to treat pedophilic patients. The aim of the treatment is a reduction in sexual drive and, in consequence, a reduced risk of recidivism. Yet the therapeutic success of antiandrogens is uncertain especially regarding recidivism. Meta-analyses and reviews report only moderate and often mutually inconsistent effects. Case presentation Based on the case of a 47 year old exclusively pedophilic forensic inpatient, we examined the effectiveness of a new eye tracking method and a new functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-design in regard to the evaluation of ADT in pedophiles. We analyzed the potential of these methods in exploring the impact of ADT on automatic and controlled attentional processes in pedophiles. Eye tracking and fMRI measures were conducted before the initial ADT as well as four months after the onset of ADT. The patient simultaneously viewed an image of a child and an image of an adult while eye movements were measured. During the fMRI-measure the same stimuli were presented subliminally. Eye movements demonstrated that controlled attentional processes change under ADT, whereas automatic processes remained mostly unchanged. We assume that these results reflect either the increased ability of the patient to control his eye movements while viewing prepubertal stimuli or his better ability to manipulate his answer in a socially desirable manner. Unchanged automatic attentional processes could reflect the stable pedophilic preference of the patient. Using fMRI, the subliminal presentation of sexually relevant stimuli led to changed activation patterns under the influence of ADT in occipital and parietal brain regions, the hippocampus, and also in the orbitofrontal cortex. We suggest that even at an unconscious level ADT can lead to changed processing of sexually relevant stimuli, reflecting changes of cognitive and perceptive automatic processes. Conclusion We are convinced that our

  10. P52 Activation and Enzalutamide Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    acquired treatment resistance , and to increase the magnitude and duration of the benefits of second- generation antiandrogen. Changes /problems N/A...CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION : University of California, Davis Sacramento, CA 95817-2307 REPORT DATE: October 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR...Allen C. Gao, MD, PhD 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: acgao@ucdavis.edu 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S

  11. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: • Acupressure and acupuncture • Aromatherapy • Art therapy and music therapy • Chiropractic medicine and massage • Guided imagery • Meditation and ... should I avoid? • Is this complementary therapy (name therapy) safe? Is there research showing it is safe? • Are there side effects ...

  12. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  13. Radiotechnologies and gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jinsong

    2001-01-01

    Gene therapy is an exciting frontier in medicine today. Radiologist will make an uniquely contribution to these exciting new technologies at every level by choosing sites for targeting therapy, perfecting and establishing routes of delivery, developing imaging strategies to monitor therapy and assess gene expression, developing radiotherapeutic used of gene therapy

  14. Music therapy in kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Šírová, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the subject of music therapy in a special kindergarten for the children with combined disabilities. In the theoretical part it clarifies the concept and principle of music therapy and characterizes the types of disabilities that occur at researched clients. As a research method were used observation and interviews with three music therapists from the institution. KEYWORDS Music therapy, preschool education, special pedagogy, group music therapy,individual music therapy, p...

  15. Occupational therapy students' perceptions of occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Merrill June; Rodger, Sylvia; Hall, Anna R

    2012-10-01

    An understanding of students' perceptions of occupational therapy on entry is required to recognise how professional socialisation occurs through curriculum. Findings pertain to a qualitative study investigating students' perceptions of occupational therapy upon entry to two occupational therapy programmes in Australia. Students commencing Bachelor of Occupational Therapy and Masters of Occupational Therapy Studies programmes participated in the study (n = 462). A purpose-designed questionnaire was distributed to students in the first lecture of each programme. Preliminary analysis comprised identification of keywords/phrases and coding categories were generated from patterns of keywords. Frequency counts and percentages of keywords/phrases within categories were completed. Students' responses were categorised as 'what' occupational therapists do; 'how' they do it; 'why' they do it; and 'who' they work with. In 'what' occupational therapists do students frequently described 'helping' people. Both undergraduate and graduate entry masters students used the term 'rehabilitation' to describe how occupational therapy is done, with graduate entry students occasionally responding with 'through occupation' and 'modifying the environment'. Students perceived the 'why' of occupational therapy as getting back to 'everyday activities', with some students emphasising returning to 'normal' activities or life. Regarding the 'who' category, students also thought occupational therapists worked with people with an 'injury' or 'disability'. Students entered their occupational therapy programmes with perceptions consistent with the general public's views of occupational therapy. However, graduate entry students exposed to a pre-reading package prior to entry had more advanced occupational therapy concepts than undergraduate students. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  16. Art Therapy: What Is Art Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other health disability; and persons with autism, dementia, depression, and other disorders. Art therapy helps people resolve conflicts, improve interpersonal skills, manage problematic behaviors, reduce negative stress, and ...

  17. Radionuclide antisense therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Xiaohong

    2002-01-01

    Radionuclide antisense therapy achieves the joint goals of antisense therapy and internal radiation therapy. There have been a small number of investigations on the radionuclide antisense therapy in tissue culture and in animal studies. Considerable research is required before this novel technique can become a working practice. The authors reviewed some question and development on the radionuclide antisense therapy, such as selection of the target gene sequence, labelling the antisense oligonucleotide, improvement of the uptake and target of radionuclide antisense oligonucleotides and evaluation of the toxicity of the radionuclide antisense therapy

  18. Radiation therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomottogoo, G.

    1995-01-01

    The radiation therapy experienced at the hospital are classified into two sections:palliative and radically. A radically therapy can be done before or after surgery. Therapy after surgery is done when the results of the surgery have certain limits. The radiation therapy is accomplished within 2-3 weeks and 6 weeks at latest. A conclusion:1.To improving and increasing of radically radiation therapy method is necessary in the present time. 2.Monitoring, management and supervision capacity of the cancer radiation therapy for the nearest and future results should be strengthened

  19. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  20. Adlerian Marriage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jon; Dinkmeyer, Don, Sr.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the assumptions, processes, and techniques used in Alderian marriage therapy. Describes purpose of therapy as assessing current beliefs and behaviors while educating the couple in new procedures that can help the couple establish new goals. (Author/ABL)

  1. Kidney Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Kidney Replacement Therapy Diabetes sometimes damages kidneys so badly that ... Dialysis Dialysis, the more common form of kidney-replacement therapy, is a way of cleaning the blood ...

  2. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  3. Proton Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public interest in this form of radiation therapy is growing, but members of the medical and research communities are concerned that enthusiasm for this promising therapy may be getting ahead of the research.

  4. Combined tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrba, H.

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive survey of current methods and achievements first takes a look at the two basic therapies, devoting a chapter each to the surgery and radiotherapy of tumors. The principal subjects of the book, however, are the systemic, adjuvant therapy, biological therapies, hyperthermia and various other therapies (as e.g. treatment with ozone, oxygen, or homeopathic means), and psychotherapy. (MG) With 54 figs., 86 tabs [de

  5. Occupational Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Occupational Therapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Occupational Therapy What's in this ... care for some kids. Kids Who Might Need Occupational Therapy According to the AOTA, kids with these medical ...

  6. Predicting Marital Therapy Dropouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Scot M.; Crane, D. Russell

    1991-01-01

    Attempted to predict therapy dropouts using data gathered at marital therapy intake with 474 couples seeking marital therapy who attended at least 1 session. Significant predictors of dropping out included having less than two children, having a male intake clinician, and presenting problem relating only to one spouse. (Author/ABL)

  7. Aquatic Therapy for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucher, Greta; Moore, Kelsey; Rodia, Rachel; Moser, Christy Szczech

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic therapy has long been highlighted in the literature as a potentially powerful therapeutic intervention. This review will highlight basic definitions of aquatic therapy, review salient research, and identify specific diagnoses that may benefit from aquatic therapy. Online resources, blogs, and books that occupational therapists may find…

  8. Sacral neuromodulation: Therapy evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannah H Thompson

    2010-01-01

    Conclusions : Our understanding of SNM, as well as technological advances in therapy delivery, expands the pool of patients for which this form of therapy may prove beneficial. Less invasive instrumentation may even make this form of therapy appealing to patients without refractory symptoms.

  9. Biological Therapies for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page What is biological therapy? What is the immune system and what role does it have in biological therapy for cancer? ... trials (research studies involving people). What is the immune system and what role does it have in biological therapy for cancer? ...

  10. Detection of endocrine active substances in the aquatic environment in southern Taiwan using bioassays and LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuang-Yu; Chou, Pei-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    Endocrine active substances, including naturally occurring hormones and various synthetic chemicals have received much concern owing to their endocrine disrupting potencies. It is essential to monitor their environmental occurrence since these compounds may pose potential threats to biota and human health. In this study, yeast-based reporter assays were carried out to investigate the presence of (anti-)androgenic, (anti-)estrogenic, and (anti-)thyroid compounds in the aquatic environment in southern Taiwan. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was also used to measure the environmental concentrations of selected endocrine active substances for assessing potential ecological risks and characterizing contributions to the endocrine disrupting activities. Bioassay results showed that anti-androgenic (ND-7489 μg L(-1) flutamide equivalent), estrogenic (ND-347 ng L(-1) 17β-estradiol equivalent), and anti-thyroid activities were detected in the dissolved and particulate phases of river water samples, while anti-estrogenic activities (ND-10 μg L(-1) 4-hydroxytamoxifen equivalent) were less often found. LC-MS/MS analysis revealed that anti-androgenic and estrogenic contaminants, such as bisphenol A, triclosan, and estrone were frequently detected in Taiwanese rivers. In addition, their risk quotient values were often higher than 1, suggesting that they may pose an ecological risk to the aquatic biota. Further identification of unknown anti-androgenic and estrogenic contaminants in Taiwanese rivers may be necessary to protect Taiwan's aquatic environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Combined Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Research of Quinolinone Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Bai, Fang; Cao, Hong; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Antiandrogens bicalutamide, flutamide and enzalutamide etc. have been used in clinical trials to treat prostate cancer by binding to and antagonizing androgen receptor (AR). Although initially effective, the drug resistance problem will emerge eventually, which results in a high medical need for novel AR antagonist exploitation. Here in this work, to facilitate the rational design of novel AR antagonists, we studied the structure-activity relationships of a series of 2-quinolinone derivatives and investigated the structural requirements for their antiandrogenic activities. Different modeling methods, including 2D MLR, 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA, were implemented to evolve QSAR models. All these models, thoroughly validated, demonstrated satisfactory results especially for the good predictive abilities. The contour maps from 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA models provide visualized explanation of key structural characteristics relevant to the antiandrogenic activities, which is summarized to a position-specific conclusion at the end. The obtained results from this research are practically useful for rational design and screening of promising chemicals with high antiandrogenic activities.

  12. Music Therapy for Seniors

    OpenAIRE

    SLUNEČKOVÁ, Petra

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the use of music therapy in the lives of seniors. The target of this thesis is to map the possibilities of using music therapy ways with seniors and to recommend a suitable music therapy resources on the basis of the research and evaluation of obtained dates. The theoretical part describes the term "the music therapy", e.g. concept, definition, types and forms, the development of music therapy, the history, methods and techniques. This age group is defined in t...

  13. Inhalation Therapy in Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Mandy L; Costa, Lais R R

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the benefits and limitations of inhalation therapy in horses. Inhalation drug therapy delivers the drug directly to the airways, thereby achieving maximal drug concentrations at the target site. Inhalation therapy has the additional advantage of decreasing systemic side effects. Inhalation therapy in horses is delivered by the use of nebulizers or pressured metered dose inhalers. It also requires the use of a muzzle or nasal mask in horses. Drugs most commonly delivered through inhalation drug therapy in horses include bronchodilators, antiinflammatories, and antimicrobials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Music therapy and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, E; De Backer, J; Vermote, R

    2015-01-01

    Music therapy is a predominantly non-verbal psychotherapy based on music improvisation, embedded in a therapeutic relationship. This is the reason why music therapy is also used to treat depression. To examine the efficacy of music therapy and to report on the results of recent research into the value of music therapy as a treatment for depression. We reviewed the literature on recent research into music therapy and depression, reporting on the methods used and the results achieved, and we assessed the current position of music therapy for depression in the context of evidence-based scientific research. A wide variety of research methods was used to investigate the effects of using music therapy as a psychotherapy. Most studies focused usually on the added value that music therapy brings to the standard form of psychiatric treatment, when administered with or without psychopharmacological support. Music therapy produced particularly significant and favourable results when used to treat patients with depression. Current research into music therapy and depression points to a significant and persistent reduction in patients' symptoms and to improvements in their quality of life. However, further research is needed with regard to the best methods of illustrating the effects of music therapy.

  15. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  16. Radon therapy; Radon in der Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2017-04-01

    Radon therapies are used since more than 100 years in human medicine. Today this method is controversially discussed due to the possible increase of ionizing radiation induced tumor risk. Although the exact mode of biological radiation effect on the cell level is still not known new studies show the efficiency of the radon therapy without side effect for instance for rheumatic/inflammatory or respiratory disorders.

  17. Diagnostik und Therapie der kutanen Androgenisierung im klimakterischen Übergang sowie in der Peri- und Postmenopause: Hirsutismus und Alopezie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geisthövel F

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Die weibliche Androgenisierung umfasst ein weites Spektrum an heterogenen Dysfunktionen und Erkrankungen. Um die Therapieprinzipien des Hirsutismus sowie der Alopecia androgenetica während des klimakterischen Übergangs („menopausal transition“ [MT] und der Peri-/Postmenopause zu erfassen, ist es sinnvoll, sich auf eine Gruppe von androgenisierten Patientinnen zu beschränken, bei der die Haut pathogenetisch im Fokus liegt. Solch eine klar definierte Patientengruppe, die „funktionell kutane Androgenisierung“ (FCA, kann meist schon über die Diagnostikebene 1 (Screening-Ebene unseres Klassifikations-Algorithmus diagnostiziert werden. Der Ferriman-Gallwey-Index bzw. eine modifizierte Sinclair-Scale dienen zur Gradeinteilung von Hirsutismus bzw. Alopezie. Die ausgeprägte endokrine Dynamik während der MT ist hormondiagnostisch zu beachten. Wachsepilation und Lasertherapie sind vielfältig eingesetzte topischmechanische bzw. -physikalische Therapieverfahren. Eine topische Behandlung des Hirsutismus kann auch mit Eflornithin-Creme durchgeführt werden, die den Effekt einer Lasertherapie unterstützt. Minoxidil-Lösung gilt als Mittel der ersten Wahl bei der topischen Therapie der Alopecia androgenetica. Steroidale Präparate, welche aus der kontrazeptiven Kombination von Ethinylestradiol und antiandrogenen Gestagenen (AA bestehen, sind therapeutische Prinzipien bei androgenisierten Patientinnen in der MT, sie sind hingegen in der Postmenopause kontraindiziert. Die orale Einnahme von Spironolacton und/oder Finasterid, beides nicht-steroidale Antiandrogene, ist während der MT unter sicherer Kontrazeption und jene von Spironolacton für die Alopezie in der Postmenopause gut geeignet. Die Einnahme von Kombinationsprapäraten, welche die nicht-kontrazeptiven natürlichen Östrogene und AA enthalten, sind für die Behandlung der FCA bei Patientinnen indiziert, die zusätzlich unter klimakterischen und peri-/postmenopausalen Störungen leiden

  18. Omeprazole versus doxycycline combination therapy with topical erythromycin the treatment of acne vulgaris: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Jaffary

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acne vulgaris is self-limiting, multifactorial disease involving sebaceous glands. Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor with in vitro antibacterial effects against staphylococcus aureus and anti-androgen that can be potential treatment of acne vulgaris. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of oral omeprazole and erythromycin 4% compared to doxycycline combination therapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris. Methods: In this clinical trial study, patients with moderate acne were referred to Skin Diseases and Leishmaniasis Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Iran, during August 2014 until November 2015 and were randomized into two groups receiving topical erythromycin 4% plus omeprazole (34 patients or doxycycline (35 patients for 3 months. Moderate acne, lack of sensitivity to proton pump inhibitors, lack of warfarin, phenytoin, diazepam consumption, lack of active liver or kidney disease, being older than 12 years, were considered as inclusion criteria. Pregnant or lactating patients, patients with drug allergy history, patients taking oral contraceptives, acne topical medications (including retinoids or systemic treatment within 30 days of study, patients with oligomenorrhea, hirsutism, acne conglobata, acne fulminant or body acne alone were excluded from the study. All patients were tested for Helicobacter pylori test at the beginning of the study. Results: Both inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions decreased in both groups with negative correlation with age (P< 0.05. There was no significant correlation between positive Helicobacter pylori test and inflammatory or non-inflammatory lesion reduction (P= 0.794, P= 0.514. Also, patient satisfaction and rate of total drug side effects was not different between two treatment groups. Rate of skin reactions was 20.58% in omeprazole treated group and 11.42% in doxycycline group. For side effects, other than skin it was 2.94% versus 14.28% respectively

  19. Dehydroepiandrosterone Derivatives as Potent Antiandrogens with Marginal Agonist Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    pregnancy . Drug Metab Dispos 2009;37:1841–1847. 38. Hu DG, Mackenzie PI. Estrogen receptor a, fos-related an- tigen-2, and c-Jun coordinately regulate human...estradiol: a potential mechanism of increased lamotrigine elimination in pregnancy . Drug Metab Dispos 2009;37:1841–1847. 324 IZUMI ET AL. Molecular...NFATc1 has often been detected in, for instance, pancreatic [7], pulmonary [8], and hepatic [9] carcinomas, compared with their corresponding benign

  20. QSAR models for anti-androgenic effect - a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gunde Egeskov; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev; Wedebye, Eva Bay

    2011-01-01

    Three modelling systems (MultiCase (R), LeadScope (R) and MDL (R) QSAR) were used for construction of androgenic receptor antagonist models. There were 923-942 chemicals in the training sets. The models were cross-validated (leave-groups-out) with concordances of 77-81%, specificity of 78......-91% and sensitivity of 51-76%. The specificity was highest in the MultiCase (R) model and the sensitivity was highest in the MDL (R) QSAR model. A complementary use of the models may be a valuable tool when optimizing the prediction of chemicals for androgenic receptor antagonism. When evaluating the fitness...

  1. Gonadal suppressive and cross-sex hormone therapy for gender dysphoria in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine P; Madison, Christina M; Milne, Nikki M

    2014-12-01

    Individuals with gender dysphoria experience distress associated with incongruence between their biologic sex and their identified gender. Gender dysphoric natal males receive treatment with antiandrogens and estrogens to become feminized (transsexual females), whereas natal females with gender dysphoria receive treatment with androgens to become masculinized (transsexual males). Because of the permanence associated with cross-sex hormone therapy (CSHT), adolescents diagnosed with gender dysphoria receive gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs to suppress puberty. High rates of depression and suicide are linked to social marginalization and barriers to care. Behavior, emotional problems, depressive symptoms, and global functioning improve in adolescents receiving puberty suppression therapy. Gender dysphoria, psychological symptoms, quality of life, and sexual function improve in adults who receive CSHT. Within the first 6 months of CSHT, changes in transsexual females include breast growth, decreased testicular volume, and decreased spontaneous erections, and changes in transsexual males include cessation of menses, breast atrophy, clitoral enlargement, and voice deepening. Both transsexual females and males experience changes in body fat redistribution, muscle mass, and hair growth. Desired effects from CSHT can take between 3 and 5 years; however, effects that occur during puberty, such as voice deepening and skeletal structure changes, cannot be reversed with CSHT. Decreased sexual desire is a greater concern in transsexual females than in transsexual males, with testosterone concentrations linked to sexual desire in both. Regarding CSHT safety, bone mineral density is preserved with adequate hormone supplementation, but long-term fracture risk has not been studied. The transition away from high-dose traditional regimens is tied to a lower risk of venous thromboembolism and cardiovascular disease, but data quality is poor. Breast cancer has been reported in

  2. Chiral dimethylamine flutamide derivatives-modeling, synthesis, androgen receptor affinities and carbon-11 labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, Orit; Laky, Desideriu; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Elgavish, Sharona; Gozin, Michael; Even-Sapir, Einat; Leibovitc, Ilan; Gutman, Mordechai; Chisin, Roland; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Mishani, Eyal

    2006-01-01

    Most prostate cancers are androgen dependent upon initial diagnosis. On the other hand, some very aggressive forms of prostate cancer were shown to have lost the expression of the androgen receptor (AR). Although the AR is routinely targeted in endocrine treatment, the clinical outcome remains suboptimal. Therefore, it is crucial to demonstrate the presence and activity of the AR in each case of prostate cancer, before and after treatment. While noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to determine AR expression of tumor cells in vivo, fully optimized PET imaging agents are not yet available. Based on molecular modeling, three novel derivatives of hydroxyflutamide (Compounds 1-3) were designed and synthesized. They contain an electron-rich group (dimethylamine) located on the methyl moiety, which may confer a better stability to the molecule in vivo. Compounds 1-3 have AR binding that is similar or higher than that of the currently used commercial drugs. An automated carbon-11 radiolabeling route was developed, and the compounds were successfully labeled with a 10-15% decay-corrected radiochemical yield, 99% radiochemical purity and a specific activity of 4Ci/μmol end of bombardment (n=15). These labeled biomarkers may facilitate the future quantitative molecular imaging of AR-positive prostate cancer using PET and may also allow for image-guided treatment of prostate cancer

  3. 75 FR 50880 - TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... 0720-AB36 TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech... referrals of beneficiaries to the Military Health System for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and... practitioners will be allowed to issue referrals to patients for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and...

  4. Fertility and cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    With increased survival of increasing numbers of cancer patients as a result of therapy, the consequences, early and late, of the therapies must be realized. It is the treating physician's duty to preserve as much reproductive potential as possible for patients, consistent with adequate care. With radiotherapy this means shielding the gonads as much as possible, optimal but not excessive doses and fields, oophoropexy, or sperm collection and storage prior to irradiation. With chemotherapy it means the shortest exposure to drugs consistent with best treatment and prior to therapy the collection and storage of sperm where facilities are available. At present this is still an experimental procedure. Artificial insemination for a couple when the male has received cancer therapy is another alternative. Finally, it is the responsibility of physicians caring for patients with neoplasms to be knowledgeable about these and all other effects of therapy so that patients may be counseled appropriately and understand the implications of therapy for their life

  5. Evaluation of Inter Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This article (revised conference lecture from the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy, Oxford July 2002)) emphasizes the evaluation of the training of Inter Therapy for music therapy students at the MA training at Aalborg University. The students take turns in being client and therapist within t...... the same partner constellation. Through this training they learn as a therapeutic method to contain and incorporate experiences from being in the client role into managing the therapist role.......This article (revised conference lecture from the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy, Oxford July 2002)) emphasizes the evaluation of the training of Inter Therapy for music therapy students at the MA training at Aalborg University. The students take turns in being client and therapist within...

  6. Appropriate Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Michael G; Heil, Emily L; Hayes, Bryan D

    2017-02-01

    Prescribing antibiotics is an essential component of initial therapy in sepsis. Early antibiotics are an important component of therapy, but speed of administration should not overshadow the patient-specific characteristics that determine the optimal breadth of antimicrobial therapy. Cultures should be drawn before antibiotic therapy if it does not significantly delay administration. Combination antibiotic therapy against gram-negative infections is not routinely required, and combination therapy involving vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam is associated with an increase in acute kidney injury. Emergency practitioners should be aware of special considerations in the administration and dosing of antibiotics in order to deliver optimal care to septic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pain in photodynamic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mircea Tampa; Maria Isabela Sârbu; Mădălina-Irina Mitran; Cristina-Iulia Mitran; Adrian Dumitru; Vasile Benea; Simona-Roxana Georgescu

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a modern treatment with applications in several medical specialties, which has been intensely studied in the last years. The main indications in dermatology are actinic keratosis, superficial basal cell carcinoma and Bowen's disease- common skin disorders in which photodynamic therapy proved its efficacy. At present, the use of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of other skin disorders is profoundly researched. Pain is the most common and redoubtable adverse effect...

  8. Nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eary, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    One in three of the 30 million Americans who are hospitalized are diagnosed or treated with nuclear medicine techniques. This text provides a succinct overview and detailed set of procedures and considerations for patient therapy with unsealed radioactivity sources.  Serving as a complete literature reference for therapy with radiopharmaceuticals currently utilized in practice, this source covers the role of the physician in radionuclide therapy, and essential procedures and protocols required by health care personnel.

  9. Electroconvulsive therapy revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, S D; Smith, C; Smith, E M; Miller, J M

    1991-05-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains an extremely valuable tool in the treatment of certain psychiatric disorders. Despite the sensationalism of the past decade, ECT is the treatment of choice in severe depression that is unresponsive to other therapies or in patients who are overtly suicidal. In addition, ECT is particularly valuable in the elderly population, who are at risk for serious complications from the side effects associated with drug therapy. This report describes a case of recurrent depression in which ECT was successfully used.

  10. Medical Art Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Aydin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses art materials. Art therapy combines traditional psychotherapeutic theories and techniques with an understanding of the psychological aspects of the creative process, especially the affective properties of the different art materials. Medical art therapy has been defined as the clinical application of art expression and imagery with individuals who are physically ill, experiencing physical trauma or undergoing invasive or aggressive medical procedures such as surgery or chemotherapy and is considered as a form of complementary or integrative medicine. Several studies have shown that patients with physical illness benefit from medical art therapy in different aspects. Unlike other therapies, art therapy can take the patients away from their illness for a while by means of creative activities during sessions, can make them forget the illness or lost abilities. Art therapy leads to re-experiencing normality and personal power even with short creative activity sessions. In this article definition, influence and necessity of medical art therapy are briefly reviewed.

  11. Marital and family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Hargun; Anand, Tanya; Suman, L N

    2018-02-01

    Substance abuse is a family disease that adversely impacts both the user and the user's family. The family can act as a risk factor for the development of substance abuse among children and adults. The family can also be involved in therapy to either help the recovery process or prevent substance abuse. Marital and family therapy have been found to be effective in reducing the severity of substance use, lowering marital and family conflict, improving family communication and cohesion as well as effective parenting practices. Behavioural Couples Therapy has been found to have good empirical support for bringing about the desired changes in both substance abuse and marital relationship. While targeting entire families, the most common evidenced based family interventions are Brief Strategic Family Therapy, Multidimensional Family Therapy, Family Behaviour Therapy, Functional Family Therapy and Community Reinforcement Programme. Marital and family therapy have to be sensitive to gender and culture. Effective use of marital and family therapy requires adequate training to equip practitioners in adequately treating not only substance use disorders and family pathology, but also in treating co-morbid mental health conditions.

  12. Is Bicarbonate Therapy Useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Kate

    2017-03-01

    Despite concerns about the negative effects of metabolic acidosis, there is minimal evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration is an effective treatment. In addition, sodium bicarbonate therapy is associated with many adverse effects, including paradoxic intracellular acidosis, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypernatremia, and hyperosmolality. Definitive recommendations regarding bicarbonate therapy are challenging as there is little high-quality evidence available. In most clinical scenarios of metabolic acidosis, treatment efforts should focus on resolution of the underlying cause, and sodium bicarbonate therapy should be used with caution, if at all. An exception to this is kidney disease, wherein sodium bicarbonate therapy may have a valuable role. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Nanomedicine and cancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Sebastian, Mathew; Ninan, Neethu

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to radically change the way cancer is diagnosed, imaged, and treated. The holistic approach to cancer involves noninvasive procedures that emphasize restoring the health of human energy fields. Presenting a wealth of information and research about the most potent cancer healing therapies, this forward-thinking book explores how nanomedicine, holistic medicine, and other cancer therapies play important roles in treatment of this disease. Topics include nanobiotechnology for antibacterial therapy and diagnosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and cancer, antioxidants and combinatorial therapies, and optical and mechanical investigations of nanostructures for biomolecular detection.

  14. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  15. Gene therapy and radionuclides targeting therapy in mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jinhua

    2003-01-01

    Breast carcinoma's gene therapy is a hotspot in study of the tumor's therapy in the recent years. Currently the major therapy methods that in the experimentative and primary clinical application phases include immunological gene therapy, multidrug resistance gene therapy, antisense oligonucleotide therapy and suicide gene therapy. The gene targeting brachytherapy, which is combined with gene therapy and radiotherapy has enhanced the killer effects of the suicide gene and nuclide in tumor cells. That has break a new path in tumor's gene therapy. The further study in this field will step up it's space to the clinical application

  16. On the organization of partner preference behavior in female Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, T; Slob, A K

    1991-03-01

    The possible prenatal organizing effects of testosterone (T) on adult sexual partner preference, i.e., sexual orientation in female rats, were studied through prenatal exposure (days 11-22) of female fetuses to the antiandrogens flutamide (Sch 13521; 4'-nitro-3'-trifluoromethylisobutyranilide; 5 or 10 mg/day; Experiment 1) or anandron [RU 23908; 5,5-dimethyl-3-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)- 2,4-imidazolidinedione; 35 mg/kg/day; Experiment 2]. The neonatal organizing effects of T were further studied by giving T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or oil within 9 h after birth to female pups (Experiment 3). In adulthood sexual orientation was ascertained, after ovariectomy followed by hormone treatment, in an automated open field (AOF), with stimulus animals behind wire mesh, and in a 3-compartment box (3-CB), with stimulus animals tethered. When given the choice between an estrous female and a sexually active male in the AOF, flutamide females, as well as controls, preferred the male partner. After long-term T treatment and 3 weekly pair-tests with an estrous female, flutamide females as well as controls switched their preference to the estrous female partner. In anadron females similar results were obtained. Thus the prenatal antiandrogens had no significant effect on sexual orientation in female rats. This suggests that adult sexual orientation in female rats is not organized prenatally through endogenous T. The change in preference after sexual experience corroborates earlier findings from our laboratory. When given the choice between an estrous female and a sexually active male in the 3-CB (sexual interaction with incentives possible), neonatally DHTP-treated females preferred the male; neonatally TP- or oil-treated females showed no preference.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Pediatric Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathom-Radocy, Wanda B.

    This book on music therapy includes relevant medical, psychological, and developmental information to help service providers, particularly music therapists, and parents to understand children with disabilities. The first two chapters describe the process of assessment and delineation of goals in music therapy that leads to the design of the music…

  18. Boganmeldelse - Music Therapy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    . Alligevel følger her en anbefaling af bogen: for musikterapeuter er det en bog, man ikke kommer uden om. Music Therapy Research, på dansk Musikterapiforskning, er en gennemrevideret, ja faktisk nyudgivelse, af bogen Music Therapy Research: Quantitative and Qualitative Perspectives, som udkom i 1995. Også...

  19. Radiation Therapy - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Radiation Therapy - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ... Information Translations Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Expand Section Radiation Therapy - Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  20. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-20

    May 20, 2003 ... It is a form of therapy where the patient is helped to recognise patterns of ... The article briefly discusses the development of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), and makes mention of the important contri- butions made by South ..... was the displace- ment of aspects of the Newtonian paradigm of physics by.

  1. Electroconvulsive Therapy and Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanney, Bryan L.

    1986-01-01

    When the effectiveness and mortality-morbidity of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are compared with those of drug therapies, it appears that ECT is an effective and preferred treatment strategy. It remains underutilized as a modality of suicide prevention. Addresses controversies that presently limit the use of this treatment. (Author/ABB)

  2. INITIATING ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    annaline

    2005-09-02

    Sep 2, 2005 ... than if they had started ART immediately', because most patients will eventually fail therapy. Therefore I do ... deal with those who are suffering most. REFERENCES. 1. Cole S, Li R, Anastos K, Detels ... Antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes are a part of the response to the massive mortality occurring in ...

  3. Therapy of Lies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Conversion therapy comes in many forms, ranging from informal chats with counselors to aggressive physical coercion, but all are based on the belief that a gay male or a lesbian can be changed "back" to heterosexual behavior. It is not just alarmed parents who turn to this therapy. Many LGBT individuals seek out such treatment in an effort to…

  4. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  6. Therapy in Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costonis, Maureen Needham, Ed.

    This book contains a collection of articles on the subject of movement therapy. It can be used as a set of supplementary readings for an academic course in dance therapy or a psychiatric residency program. It includes an exhaustive bibliography on this field for students and practioners in this field. Four principal themes have been selected as a…

  7. Animal-Assisted Therapy and Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Gena; Stella, Tiffany; Wilkison, Megan; Szczech Moser, Christy; Hoelzel, Allison; Hendricks, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The use of animals for therapeutic purposes has been documented in the literature for centuries. This review will highlight evidence of the benefits of animal-assisted therapy as well as provide a plethora of resources for therapists interested in learning more about how animals can provide restorative benefits for their clients.

  8. Transcriptional networks associated with the immune system are disrupted by organochlorine pesticides in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J; Doperalski, Nicholas J; Feswick, April; Prucha, Melinda S; Kroll, Kevin J; Barber, David S; Denslow, Nancy D

    2016-08-01

    Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) inhabiting Lake Apopka, Florida are exposed to high levels of persistent organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and dietary uptake is a significant route of exposure for these apex predators. The objectives of this study were to determine the dietary effects of two organochlorine pesticides (p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene; p, p' DDE and methoxychlor; MXC) on the reproductive axis of largemouth bass. Reproductive bass (late vitellogenesis) were fed one of the following diets: control pellets, 125ppm p, p'-DDE, or 10ppm MXC (mg/kg) for 84days. Due to the fact that both p,p' DDE and MXC have anti-androgenic properties, the anti-androgenic pharmaceutical flutamide was fed to a fourth group of largemouth bass (750ppm). Following a 3 month exposure, fish incorporated p,p' DDE and MXC into both muscle and ovary tissue, with the ovary incorporating 3 times more organochlorine pesticides compared to muscle. Endpoints assessed were those related to reproduction due to previous studies demonstrating that these pesticides impact the reproductive axis and we hypothesized that a dietary exposure would result in impaired reproduction. However, oocyte distribution, gonadosomatic index, plasma vitellogenin, and plasma sex steroids (17β-estradiol, E2 and testosterone, T) were not different between control animals and contaminant-fed largemouth bass. Moreover, neither p, p' DDE nor MXC affected E2 or T production in ex vivo oocyte cultures from chemical-fed largemouth bass. However, both pesticides did interfere with the normal upregulation of androgen receptor that is observed in response to human chorionic gonadotropin in ex vivo cultures, an observation that may be related to their anti-androgenic properties. Transcriptomics profiling in the ovary revealed that gene networks related to cell processes such as leukocyte cell adhesion, ossification, platelet function and inhibition, xenobiotic metabolism, fibrinolysis, and thermoregulation

  9. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  10. Music therapy improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Kuzma

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the technique of music therapy – music therapy improvisation is introduced. In this form of music therapy the improvising partners share meaning through the improvisation: the improvisation is not an end in itself: it portrays meaning that is personal, complex and can be shared with the partner. The therapeutic work, then, is meeting and matching the client's music in order to give the client an experience of "being known", being responded through sounds and being able to express things and communicate meaningfully. Rather than the client playing music, the therapy is about developing the engagement through sustained, joint improvisations. In music therapy, music and emotion share fundamental features: one may represent the other, i.e., we hear the music not as music but as dynamic emotional states. The concept of dynamic structure explains why music makes therapeutic sense.

  11. Accelerators for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-01-01

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy

  12. Medical therapy in acromegaly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sherlock, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease characterized by excess secretion of growth hormone (GH) and increased circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentrations. The disease is associated with increased morbidity and premature mortality, but these effects can be reduced if GH levels are decreased to <2.5 μg\\/l and IGF-1 levels are normalized. Therapy for acromegaly is targeted at decreasing GH and IGF-1 levels, ameliorating patients\\' symptoms and decreasing any local compressive effects of the pituitary adenoma. The therapeutic options for acromegaly include surgery, radiotherapy and medical therapies, such as dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor ligands and the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant. Medical therapy is currently most widely used as secondary treatment for persistent or recurrent acromegaly following noncurative surgery, although it is increasingly used as primary therapy. This Review provides an overview of current and future pharmacological therapies for patients with acromegaly.

  13. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  14. Accelerators for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy. (author)

  15. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  16. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... novel targeted therapies can act as radiosensitizers. Systemic Radiation Therapy Certain cancers may be treated with radioactive drugs ... intravenous). This type of treatment is called systemic radiation therapy because the medicine goes to the entire body. ...

  17. Massage therapy research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Does photodynamic therapy enhance standard antibacterial therapy in dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fawad; Romanos, Georgios E

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether or not photodynamic therapy enhanced standard antibacterial therapy in dentistry. Photodynamic therapy when used as an adjunct to conventional periodontal therapy kills more bacteria than when conventional periodontal therapy is used alone. To address the focused question, "Does photodynamic therapy enhance killing of oral bacteria?" PubMed/MEDLINE(®) and Google Scholar databases were explored. Original human and experimental studies and studies using photodynamic therapy for killing oral bacteria were included. Letters to the Editor, historic reviews, and unpublished data were excluded. Photodynamic therapy significantly reduces periodontopathogenic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Photodynamic therapy kills cariogenic bacteria (such as Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis), bacteria associated with infected root canals, and those associated with periimplantitis. Photodynamic therapy, when used as an adjunct to conventional oral disinfection protocols, enhances standard antibacterial therapy in dentistry.

  19. Feminist music therapy pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahna, Nicole; Swantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between......) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/social activism, and (d) critical thinking/ open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n = 32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n = 46) of participants identified as using...... of the data indicated that the survey subscale measuring political activism (p research...

  20. Complications of cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, P.S.; Parker, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to review systematically the toxicity of contemporary chemotherapy and irradiation on normal tissues of growing children. Whenever possible, the separate toxicity of chemotherapy, irradiation, and combination therapy is addressed. However, it is not always possible to quantitate specifically such reactions in the face of multiple drug therapy, which may enhance radiation injury or reactivate prior radiation injury. Prior detailed reviews have provided important sources of information concerning radiation injury for this more general discussion. The information provided will assist both the clinician and the radiologist in the recognition of early and late complications of therapy in pediatric oncology

  1. Collaboration in experiential therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdondini, Lucia; Elliott, Robert; Shearer, Joan

    2012-02-01

    We offer a view of the nature and role of client-therapist collaboration in experiential psychotherapy, focusing on Gestalt and emotion-focused therapy (EFT). We distinguish between the necessary condition of mutual trust (the emotional bond between client and therapist) and effective collaboration (regarding the goals and tasks of therapy). Using a case study of experiential therapy for social anxiety, we illustrate how the development of collaboration can be both complex and pivotal for therapeutic success, and how it can involve client and therapist encountering one another through taking risks by openly and nonjudgementally disclosing difficult experiences in order to enrich and advance the work. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Medical Therapy of Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Plöckinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the present status of medical therapy of acromegaly. Indications for permanent postoperative treatment, postirradiation treamtent to bridge the interval until remission as well as primary medical therapy are elaborated. Therapeutic efficacy of the different available drugs—somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs, dopamine agonists, and the GH antagonist Pegvisomant—is discussed, as are the indications for and efficacy of their respective combinations. Information on their mechanism of action, and some pharmakokinetic data are included. Special emphasis is given to the difficulties to define remission criteria of acromegaly due to technical assay problems. An algorithm for medical therapy in acromegaly is provided.

  3. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Cancer Treatment Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Brain ...

  4. Music Therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    initiatives can be developed. Apart from a report from each country, this special issue of Approaches includes the following 16 articles: The role of the EMTC for development and recognition of the music therapy profession Hanne Mette Ridder, Adrienne Lerner & Ferdinando Suvini (pp.13-22) The European Music...... of Guided Imagery and Music (GIM) in Europe Lars Ole Bonde (pp.86-90) Solo or tutti, together or alone – What form of professional/legal recognition is best for music therapy? Melanie Voigt (pp.91-97) The role of professional associations in the recognition process Ranka Radulovic (pp.98-109) Towards......Professional development and recognition is an 'old' issue in music therapy but still a relevant, complex and crucial one. Burning questions regarding professionalisation are at the forefront of most music therapy associations’ agendas across Europe and beyond, and feed back directly to the work...

  5. Nicotine replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoking cessation - nicotine replacement; Tobacco - nicotine replacement therapy ... Before you start using a nicotine replacement product, here are some things to know: The more cigarettes you smoke, the higher the dose you may need to ...

  6. Drug therapy smartens up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  7. Therapy Dogs and Volunteerism

    OpenAIRE

    Overbay, AE

    2016-01-01

    A reverse look at the formative evaluation process for therapy animal work and selecting who might be qualified. Lecture for OT 551 Masters and Doctoral Students true (Invited?) true (Extension publication?)

  8. [Gene therapy in cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, David

    2002-01-01

    The modification of genetic material of living cells for therapeutic purposes have been regarded by many as an unrealized promise. However, recent successful achievements in the field have contributed to vanish this perception and have reopened the possibility to use gene therapy as a medical intervention in humans. In the case of cardiovascular diseases, and despite its high prevalence, the number of approved human gene therapy protocols has remained low. This may be due, at least in part, to the availability of effective alternative therapies for some of the most common vasculopathies. However, recent advances in the understanding of the genetic and molecular bases of the cardiovascular system have opened the possibility to introduce gene therapy in the management of a great variety of cardiovascular disorders. The purpose of this communication is to briefly summarize the progress in this area.

  9. Oxygen therapy - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of oxygen therapy. Another method is a nasal CPAP system . CPAP stands for continuous positive airway pressure. ... risk for infection. Similar problems can occur with nasal CPAP devices. Also, some CPAP devices use wide nasal ...

  10. Physical Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and school personnel about an individual education plan (IEP) provide instructions for home exercise programs recommend when ... Parents Kids Teens Delayed Speech or Language Development Autism Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Cerebral Palsy Occupational Therapy ...

  11. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  12. Endoscopic injection therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Woon Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Deflux for the treatment of vesicoureteral reflux, endoscopic injection therapy using Deflux has become a popular alternative to open surgery and continuous antibiotic prophylaxis. Endoscopic correction with Deflux is minimally invasive, well tolerated, and provides cure rates approaching those of open surgery (i.e., approximately 80% in several studies. However, in recent years a less stringent approach to evaluating urinary tract infections (UTIs and concerns about long-term efficacy and complications associated with endoscopic injection have limited the use of this therapy. In addition, there is little evidence supporting the efficacy of endoscopic injection therapy in preventing UTIs and vesicoureteral reflux-related renal scarring. In this report, we reviewed the current literature regarding endoscopic injection therapy and provided an updated overview of this topic.

  13. Endoscopic injection therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Woon; Lee, Yong Seung

    2017-01-01

    Since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Deflux) for the treatment of vesicoureteral reflux, endoscopic injection therapy using Deflux has become a popular alternative to open surgery and continuous antibiotic prophylaxis. Endoscopic correction with Deflux is minimally invasive, well tolerated, and provides cure rates approaching those of open surgery (i.e., approximately 80% in several studies). However, in recent years a less stringent approach to evaluating urinary tract infections (UTIs) and concerns about long-term efficacy and complications associated with endoscopic injection have limited the use of this therapy. In addition, there is little evidence supporting the efficacy of endoscopic injection therapy in preventing UTIs and vesicoureteral reflux-related renal scarring. In this report, we reviewed the current literature regarding endoscopic injection therapy and provided an updated overview of this topic. PMID:28612059

  14. Dystonia: Physical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Stress Management Oral Medications Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections Neurosurgery Complementary Therapies Partnering with Your Doctor Find a ... Treatment Find a Doctor Oral Medications Botulinum Neurotoxin Neurosurgery Living With Dystonia Finding Support Emotional Health Online ...

  15. American Music Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... national-memorial-day-concert/features/2017-wounds-of-war/ Watch the full concert online if you missed ... election. Continue Reading Friday, October 13, 2017 Interprofessional Education & Music Therapy This AMTA-Pro podcast features Dr. ...

  16. Interactional Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warehime, Robert G.

    1981-01-01

    Group gestalt therapy in which the leader facilitates the development of helping capacity in group members is described. The general characteristics of this approach are discussed and ground rules concerning leader and member behaviors are suggested. (RC)

  17. Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Andrew; Doss, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy (IBCT) is based in part on traditional behavioral couple therapy but expands both the conceptualization of couple distress and of intervention. The efficacy of IBCT has been supported in three clinical trials, including one with five year follow-up. Additionally, the effectiveness of IBCT in the real world has been supported through a system-wide dissemination effort in the United States Department of Veteran’s Affairs. The reach of IBCT has also been ext...

  18. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hong; He, Ri-Hui; Zheng, Yun-Rong; Tao, Ran

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the main method of psychotherapy generally accepted in the field of substance addiction and non-substance addiction. This chapter mainly introduces the methods and technology of cognitive-behavior therapy of substance addiction, especially in order to prevent relapse. In the cognitive-behavior treatment of non-substance addiction, this chapter mainly introduces gambling addiction and food addiction.

  19. Radionuclide therapy of diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Keigo

    1998-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy has a long history of more than 50 years. Radioiodine (I-131) is specifically taken up by the thyroid and has been still used for the therapy of Graves' disease and thyroid cancer. In the western country, I-131 is the first choice of the therapy of Graves' disease and it is well known that Mr. Geroge Bush, the former president of the United States, was suffered from Graves' disease and treated with I-131. I-131 therapy is cheap, safe, effective, but little adverse effects. On the contrary, in Japan I-131 therapy is less frequently used than the anti-thyroid drugs due to the national sentiments of allergy to radionuclides, and the strict regulation by the government. Bone pain is commonly seen in patients with bone metastasis, which occurs in prostate, breast and lung cancers. Strontium-89 is an effective treatment of bone pain palliation and widely used in the western countries. In Japan clinical use of strontium-89 is planned to be approved by this coming summer on the out-patients basis. Still we have many problems for the radionuclide therapy of diseases, although it is very useful method of treatment. (author)

  20. Fertility and cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maguire, L.C.

    1979-05-01

    With increased survival of increasing numbers of cancer patients as a result of therapy, the consequences, early and late, of the therapies must be realized. It is the treating physician's duty to preserve as much reproductive potential as possible for patients, consistent with adequate care. With radiotherapy this means shielding the gonads as much as possible, optimal but not excessive doses and fields, oophoropexy, or sperm collection and storage prior to irradiation. With chemotherapy it means the shortest exposure to drugs consistent with best treatment and prior to therapy the collection and storage of sperm where facilities are available. At present this is still an experimental procedure. Artificial insemination for a couple when the male has received cancer therapy is another alternative. Finally, it is the responsibility of physicians caring for patients with neoplasms to be knowledgeable about these and all other effects of therapy so that patients may be counseled appropriately and understand the implications of therapy for their life.

  1. Concept Analysis: Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Bekhet, Abir K

    2016-01-01

    Down through the ages, music has been universally valued for its therapeutic properties based on the psychological and physiological responses in humans. However, the underlying mechanisms of the psychological and physiological responses to music have been poorly identified and defined. Without clarification, a concept can be misused, thereby diminishing its importance for application to nursing research and practice. The purpose of this article was for the clarification of the concept of music therapy based on Walker and Avant's concept analysis strategy. A review of recent nursing and health-related literature covering the years 2007-2014 was performed on the concepts of music, music therapy, preferred music, and individualized music. As a result of the search, the attributes, antecedents, and consequences of music therapy were identified, defined, and used to develop a conceptual model of music therapy. The conceptual model of music therapy provides direction for developing music interventions for nursing research and practice to be tested in various settings to improve various patient outcomes. Based on Walker and Avant's concept analysis strategy, model and contrary cases are included. Implications for future nursing research and practice to use the psychological and physiological responses to music therapy are discussed.

  2. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ANDROGEN EXCESS AND PCOS SOCIETY DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: GUIDE TO THE BEST PRACTICES IN THE EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME--PART 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Neil F; Cobin, Rhoda H; Futterweit, Walter; Glueck, Jennifer S; Legro, Richard S; Carmina, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    , alopecia, and acne. Cycle length >35 days suggests chronic anovulation, but cycle length slightly longer than normal (32 to 35 days) or slightly irregular (32 to 35-36 days) needs assessment for ovulatory dysfunction. Ovulatory dysfunction is associated with increased prevalence of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer, in addition to infertility. In PCOS, hirsutism develops gradually and intensifies with weight gain. In the neoplastic virilizing states, hirsutism is of rapid onset, usually associated with clitoromegaly and oligomenorrhea. Girls with severe acne or acne resistant to oral and topical agents, including isotretinoin (Accutane), may have a 40% likelihood of developing PCOS. Hair loss patterns are variable in women with hyperandrogenemia, typically the vertex, crown or diffuse pattern, whereas women with more severe hyperandrogenemia may see bitemporal hair loss and loss of the frontal hairline. Oral contraceptives (OCPs) can effectively lower androgens and block the effect of androgens via suppression of ovarian androgen production and by increasing sex hormone-binding globulin. Physiologic doses of dexamethasone or prednisone can directly lower adrenal androgen output. Anti-androgens can be used to block the effects of androgen in the pilosebaceous unit or in the hair follicle. Anti-androgen therapy works through competitive antagonism of the androgen receptor (spironolactone, cyproterone acetate, flutamide) or inhibition of 5α-reductase (finasteride) to prevent the conversion of T to its more potent form, 5α-dihydrotestosterone. The choice of antiandrogen therapy is guided by symptoms. The diagnosis of PCOS in adolescents is particularly challenging given significant age and developmental issues in this group. Management of infertility in women with PCOS requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of anovulation as well as currently available treatments. Many features of PCOS, including acne, menstrual irregularities, and hyperinsulinemia

  3. Humanistic therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Rachel; Davies, Philippa; Caldwell, Deborah; Moore, Theresa HM; Jones, Hannah; Lewis, Glyn; Hunot, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all humanistic therapies compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different humanistic therapy models (person-centred, gestalt, process-experiential, transactional analysis, existential and non-directive therapies) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all humanistic therapies compared with different psychological therapy approaches (psychodynamic, behavioural, humanistic, integrative, cognitive-behavioural) for acute depression. PMID:25278809

  4. Supplementation with Pfaffia glomerata (Sprengel) Pedersen does not affect androgenic-anabolic parameters in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ney Felipe; Martino-Andrade, Anderson Joel; Dos Santos Lourenço, Ana Carolina; Muller, Juliane Centeno; Spercoski, Katherinne Maria; Nihi, Fabiola; Miguel, Marilis Dallarmi; de Oliveira, Vinícius Bednarczuk; Dalsenter, Paulo Roberto; Morais, Rosana Nogueira

    2015-02-23

    Paffia spp (Amaranthacea) has a widespread use of in Brazil as a possible hormonal supplement and a substitute of Panax ginseng, although information on its reproductive effects is missing. To evaluated possible anabolic-androgenic or anti-androgenic effects of Pfaffia glomerata (PG) extract using intact eight-months-old male rats and pre-pubertal castrated rats. Three different dose levels of PG (8.5, 30 and 85 mg/kg/day) were administered to eight-months-old rats for 28 days or to castrated males for 7 days (Hershberger assay). In the experiment with intact animals, 24h fecal samples were collected for quantification of fecal metabolites of androgens throughout treatment. At the end of the treatment period, animals were euthanized for evaluation of serum testosterone, reproductive organ weights, number of spermatids per testis, diameter of seminiferous tubules and cross-sectional area of soleus muscle fibers. In the Hershberber assay, androgenic or anti-androgenic effects were evaluated by the weights of androgen-dependent tissues: ventral prostate, seminal vesicle, glans penis and levator ani muscle/bulbocavernosus muscle. No effects were observed in the concentrations of fecal metabolites of androgens monitored during the treatment of intact eight-months-old rats. Moreover, at the end of treatment, no changes were seen in any of the investigated parameters. In the Hershberger assay, the PG extract did not induce androgenic or anti-androgenic effects at the dose levels tested. Significant effects were only observed in animals treated with testosterone and testosterone plus flutamide, which were used as positive controls for androgenicity and anti-androgenicity, respectively. At the dose levels tested, PG extract does not induce anabolic-androgenic or anti-androgenic effects in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Food therapy and medical diet therapy of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Qunli Wu; Xiaochun Liang

    2018-01-01

    Food therapy of traditional Chinese medicine aims to maintain balanced nutrition through diet. Medical diet therapy, however, is to achieve the balance of Yin and Yang through the combination of nutrition and medicine. Either “food therapy” or “medical diet therapy” aims to keep health, prevent disease, remove illness and slow aging. In recent years, both food therapy and medical diet therapy have been increasingly applied in clinical nutrition therapy. In terms of traditional Chinese food th...

  6. Adjuvant and salvage therapy following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: effect of combined transient androgen deprivation and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eulau, Stephen M.; Tate, David J.; Cox, Richard S.; Bagshaw, Malcolm A.; Hancock, Steven L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant and salvage irradiation have been shown to improve local control after radical prostatectomy for prostatic cancer in patients with high risk pathologic features, rising PSA, or evidence of local failure. Transient androgen deprivation combined with primary irradiation has resulted in improved local control and biochemical disease free survival in patients with locally advanced, unresected, prostate cancer. This retrospective study evaluates whether transient androgen blockade improves the outcome from post-prostatectomy irradiation given as either adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods: From August, 1985 to December, 1995, 105 patients were treated with radiotherapy to the prostatic fossa following radical prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. No patient had clinically or radiographically evident distant disease. Median follow-up was 4.6 years from the date of surgery and 3.2 years from completion of radiotherapy. Findings at prostatectomy included capsular penetration in 38 patients, seminal vesicle involvement in 42 patients, lymph node involvement in 15 patients, and positive surgical margins in 70 patients. Treatment was administered as adjuvant therapy for high risk pathologic features in 39 patients, for persistent or rising PSA in 52 patients, or for clinically evident local recurrence in 14 patients. Of the 105 patients, 32 received combined androgen deprivation/radiotherapy and 73 received radiotherapy alone. Both groups received 60-70 Gy in 2 Gy daily fractions to the prostatic fossa. Selected patients with poor prognostic features received pelvic irradiation to a median dose of 50 Gy. Androgen deprivation typically consisted of Lupron and Flutamide for 4 to 6 months before, during, and in selected cases, after irradiation. No patients received maintenance androgen deprivation or underwent orchiectomy. Tumor stage, lymph node status, Gleason sum, and indications for treatment did not differ significantly between the two groups

  7. Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    hormones that play a critical role in stimulating prostate cancer growth . Androgens activate a protein called the androgen receptor (AR), which...variants, and evaluating if they block androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell growth . To understand how these molecule blocks AR function , we will...regulates genes involved in cell growth . Although powerful anti-androgen drugs can be administered to block AR action and have been used successfully to

  8. Hadron Therapy for Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, Arlene

    2003-01-01

    The biological and physical rationale for hadron therapy is well understood by the research community, but hadron therapy is not well established in mainstream medicine. This talk will describe the biological advantage of neutron therapy and the dose distribution advantage of proton therapy, followed by a discussion of the challenges to be met before hadron therapy can play a significant role in treating cancer. A proposal for a new research-oriented hadron clinic will be presented.

  9. Therapy of Ewing's sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunst, J.; Sauer, R.

    1993-01-01

    Therapy of Ewing's sarcoma requires a qualified clinical, radiological, and pathohistological diagnosis and, in particular, an optimal therapy by an experienced team of oncological specialists. Important prognostic factors are the presence of hematogenous metastases at diagnosis, the initial tumor volume, the response to chemotherapy, and adequate local therapy. Presently, cure rates of more than 60% can be achieved for localized Ewing's sarcoma by combination of local therapy and chemotherapy. The four-drug combination VACA (vincristin, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, adriamycin) can be considered as cytostatic gold standard. More aggressive regimens (VAIA, EVAIA, autologous bone marrow transplant) may be beneficial in subgroups and are under investigation. Concerning local therapy adequate radiotherapy plays a major role and achieves the same survival rates as radical surgery, comparable patient selection provided. Several factors have impact on radiotherapeutic results, especially total dose (45 Gy large volume, 55 Gy to the primary tumor), target volume (safety margin at least 2 cm according to the pretreatment volume, at least 5 cm in proximal and distal extension of long bones), timing of radiotherapy (as early as possible) and quality of treatment. Radiotherapy as sole local treatment is indicated in inoperable lesions (spine, sacrum, skull) and in small, good-responding tumors. High-risk patients should receive combined radiotherapeutic-surgical treatment, preferably as pre-operative irradiation. The value of hyperfractionation is not yet proven despite theoretical advantages. (orig.) [de

  10. Therapy of hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildmeister, W.

    1982-03-22

    The etiology of hyperthyroidism is still largely unknown and therefore no causal therapy of this condition is possible. Antithyroid drug treatment is usually carried out with thiocarbamides. When an euthyroid state is achieved synthetic thyroid hormones are added. Pregnancy and iodine contamination (after exposure to contrast medium) require individual treatment. In this paper the advantages, indications and contraindications are discussed as well as supportive drug therapy necessary in specific cases. Radioiodine therapy is reserved for patients over 35 years of age; the individual dose is calculated according to the size of the thyroid gland and the iodine uptake. Disadvantageous is the late onset of therapeutic efficiency, the small effect on the size of goitre and the exposure to radiation. A patient should be operated upon in an euthyroid state, i.e. after preoperative drug therapy. Operations are normally performed on individuals with a coexistent goitre or where antithyroid drugs or radioiodine therapy are contraindicated. Paresis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and hypoparathyroidism are rare complications. 3 to 4 g of thyroid tissues should remain. Of great importance in all cases are precise diagnostics both before and after commencing treatment and adequate follow up.

  11. Therapy of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildmeister, W.

    1982-01-01

    The etiology of hyperthyroidism is still largely unknown and therefore no causal therapy of this condition is possible. Antithyroid drug treatment is usually carried out with thiocarbamides. When an euthyroid state is achieved synthetic thyroid hormones are added. Pregnancy and iodine contamination (after exposure to contrast medium) require individual treatment. In this paper the advantages, indications and contraindications are discussed as well as supportive drug therapy necessary in specific cases. Radioiodine therapy is reserved for patients over 35 years of age; the individual dose is calculated according to the size of the thyroid gland and the iodine uptake. Disadvantageous is the late onset of therapeutic efficiency, the small effect on the size of goitre and the exposure to radiation. A patient should be operated upon in an euthyroid state, i.e. after preoperative drug therapy. Operations are normally performed on individuals with a coexistent goitre or where antithyroid drugs or radioiodine therapy are contraindicated. Paresis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and hypoparathyroidism are rare complications. 3 to 4 g of thyroid tissues should remain. Of great importance in all cases are precise diagnostics both before and after commencing treatment and adequate follow up. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Bittar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease characterised by arterial and/or venous thrombosis, recurrent pregnancy loss, and persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs. It could be life-threatening as in the case of catastrophic APS where multi-organ failure is observed. APS morbidities are thought to be the result of a combination of thrombotic and inflammatory processes. Over the past decades, the mainstay of therapy of APS has been anticoagulation. As new mechanisms of pathogenesis are being unravelled with time, novel targeted immunomodulatory therapies are being proposed as promising agents in the treatment of APS. In this article, we present an overview of new pathogenetic mechanisms in APS as well as novel antithrombotic and immunomodulatory therapies.

  13. PUVA combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, W L

    1985-08-01

    Various adjunctive treatments are now frequently used in combination with PUVA therapy with the aims of limiting adverse effects, improving efficacy and decreasing the cost of treatment. In the management of psoriasis, PUVA plus retinoids, PUVA plus methotrexate and PUVA plus UVB phototherapy are the most frequently used combinations. PUVA plus topical corticosteroids and PUVA plus anthralin are also efficacious but adverse effects and poor acceptance by patients are limiting factors. Combinations of PUVA plus nitrogen mustard and ionizing radiation are used in mycosis fungoides to treat tumors and residual disease in secluded sites. In the management of photodermatoses with PUVA therapy, prednisone is often required to prevent exacerbation of disease. A combination of prednisone and PUVA therapy can also be useful in lichen planus and atopic eczema. The selection of a suitable combination treatment, will depend upon the preferences of the clinician, the disease being treated, and the characteristics of the patient.

  14. Interstitial cystitis intravesical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tanya; Xu, Jie Hua

    2017-07-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a progressive bladder disorder that presents with symptoms of bladder urgency, frequency and pain. The aetiology of the disease remains uncertain, but it is postulated that there is an initial infective insult which damages the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) layer of the bladder urothelium. This defect allows an influx of ions, particularly potassium, which initiates an inflammatory reaction in the bladder wall, which incites the symptoms described above. Treatment initially involves behavioural and oral medication, with second line being intravesical instillation therapy. Treatment strategies focus on restoring lower urinary tract epithelial function, inhibiting neural activation, controlling allergies and relieving symptoms. In this review, current intravesical therapy will be discussed, as well as what lies on the horizon for intravesical therapy in IC.

  15. Involved Node Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Aznar, Marianne C; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The involved node radiation therapy (INRT) strategy was introduced for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) to reduce the risk of late effects. With INRT, only the originally involved lymph nodes are irradiated. We present treatment outcome in a retrospective analysis using this strategy...... to 36 Gy). Patients attended regular follow-up visits until 5 years after therapy. RESULTS: The 4-year freedom from disease progression was 96.4% (95% confidence interval: 92.4%-100.4%), median follow-up of 50 months (range: 4-71 months). Three relapses occurred: 2 within the previous radiation field......, and 1 in a previously uninvolved region. The 4-year overall survival was 94% (95% confidence interval: 88.8%-99.1%), median follow-up of 58 months (range: 4-91 months). Early radiation therapy toxicity was limited to grade 1 (23.4%) and grade 2 (13.8%). During follow-up, 8 patients died, none from HL, 7...

  16. [Multimodal therapy of dyslipidemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahn, Annett; Hanefeld, Markolf

    2011-05-01

    In the multifactorial process of atherogenesis not only increased LDL-cholesterol but also decreased HDL-cholesterol and raised triglycerides correlate closely to cardiovascular events. Multiple studies have demonstrated a high prevalence of dyslipidemia and the metabolic syndrome in Germany.Statins remain first-line therapy for the treatment of dyslipidemia. However, despite therapy a relevant cardiovascular risk remains. Therefore, it is important to also aim for an adequate treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and also to raise HDL-levels. Many combination therapies have been shown to be effective in treating dyslipidemia. Adding Omega-3-fatty acids, nicotinic acid/laropiprant or a fibrate to statin monotherapy provide additional beneficial lipid-modifying effects for combined dyslipidemia. In the future a recommendation for the treatment of mixed hyperlipoproteinemia with decreased HDL, raised triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol shall have to be added to our guidelines.

  17. Therapy with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biersack, H.J.; Hotze, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy of benign and malignant thyroid diseases is a well-established procedure in Nuclear Medicine. However, the therapeutic use of radioisotopes in other diseases is relatively unknown among our refering physicians. The therapeutic effects of intraarticular (rheumatoid arthritis) and intracavitary (pleural and peritoneal carcinosis) applications yields good results. The radiophosphorus therapy in polycythemia vera rubra has always to be considered as an alternative to chemotherapy. The use of analgetics may be reduced by pain therapy of bone metastasis by injection of bone-seeking beta emitters like Rh-186 HEDP. Other procedures like therapeutic application of meta-iodo-benzylguanidine in neuroblastoma and malignant pheochromocytoma resulted in at least remissions of the disease. Radioimmunotherapy needs further evaluation before it can be recommended as a routine procedure. (orig.) [de

  18. Ozone Therapy in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domb, William C

    2014-01-01

    Summary The 21st century dental practice is quite dynamic. New treatment protocols and new materials are being developed at a rapid pace. Ozone dental therapy falls into the category of new treatment protocols in dentistry, yet ozone is not new at all. Ozone therapy is already a major treatment modality in Europe, South America and a number of other countries. What is provided here will not be an exhaustive scientific treatise so much as a brief general introduction into what dentists are now doing with ozone therapies and the numerous oral/systemic links that make this subject so important for physicians so that, ultimately, they may serve their patients more effectively and productively. PMID:25363268

  19. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  20. Yoga Therapy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Keishin

    2017-11-01

    This perspective piece gives an overview of the current situation of yoga therapy in Japan today. Traditional yoga in Japan suffered a serious setback in 1995 with a nerve gas terrorist attack on the Tokyo subway, which was carried out by a cult that recruited members through yoga classes. But with the increase in popularity with modern forms of yoga such as Iyengar yoga, Ashtanga yoga and hot yoga in the West, the general public in Japan today is forgetting its aversion to yoga and considers it to be something that can contribute to good health. In 2012, the Japan Yoga Therapy Society (JYTS) conducted a study on adverse events in yoga classes throughout Japan with the University of Kyushu School of Medicine, with support from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. This study indicated that more than half of people attending yoga classes have some form of chronic illness, with 42.3% receiving outpatient care. This survey was the beginning of growing interest from both the government and universities in yoga therapy. JYTS is beginning to make inroads into bringing yoga therapy into cancer and palliative care, senior citizen homes, alcohol and drug addiction rehabilitation, cardiovascular rehabilitation, and research on trauma and schizophrenia. While there are still limited opportunities for yoga therapists to work in mainstream healthcare services, there is growing interest among medical professionals in both physical and mental health. JYTS is beginning to make inroads into bringing yoga therapy into cancer and palliative care, senior citizen homes, alcohol and drug addiction rehabilitation, cardiovascular rehabilitation, and research on trauma and schizophrenia. While there are still limited opportunities for yoga therapists to work in mainstream healthcare services, there is growing interest among medical professionals in both physical and mental health. This perspective piece introduces some of the developments in yoga therapy research and practice in

  1. [Therapy of childhood schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, C

    1977-01-01

    Due to the multifacet genesis and variability of clinical phenomenology, the therapy of childhood schizophrenia must be multidimensional. Formerly applied techniques like electroshock- and insulin-therapy are now replaced by pharmaco-therapy, primarily with phenothiazines, butyrophenones and chlorprothixens. The dosage depends on age, body weight or body surface. Because of extrapyramidal motor side effects, combinations with anticholinergic drugs may be necessary. Psychopharmaco-therapy alone, however, is insufficient. High emphasis must be placed on psychotherapy and educational guidance and counselling of the psychotic child. Participation in play groups, sports, muscial activities, arts and crafts, and acting helps make it possible to improve communication behaviour and to transform aggressive anxiety defense into stabilized control of emotions and impulses. In addition to successive integration of the psychotic child into small groups, play therapy with the single child is meaningful. In this case, a constant and confidential relation between therapist and child is extremely important and only possible if the therapist attempts to place himself into the magic-animistic phantasies of the psychotic child. He has first to learn the psychotic language of his patient in order to support more reality-oriented behaviour processes of the child's thinking, preceiving and performing later on. In this manner, the magic-omnipotent phantasies can be dissolved and an increasing orientation of the child toward reality can be encouraged. This involves strengthening and support of non-pathological ego-functions and initiation of a new level of ego-functioning. Such an integrated developmental concept can best be realized through play therapy.

  2. Neutron irradiation therapy machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Conventional neutron irradiation therapy machines, based on the use of cyclotrons for producing neutron beams, use a superconducting magnet for the cyclotron's magnetic field. This necessitates complex liquid He equipment and presents problems in general hospital use. If conventional magnets are used, the weight of the magnet poles considerably complicates the design of the rotating gantry. Such a therapy machine, gantry and target facilities are described in detail. The use of protons and deuterons to produce the neutron beams is compared and contrasted. (U.K.)

  3. Cerebrospinal tomo-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumagalli, I.; Coche-Dequeant, B.; Lacornerie, T.; Reynaert, N.; Lartigau, E.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the study of the feasibility of a cerebrospinal tomo-therapy, of the protection of organs at risk, and of tolerance. Nine patients have been treated, one with a bi-fractionated irradiation and the others with a conventional fractionation. Seven had chemotherapy before radiotherapy, and two had intensification with self-grafting of stem cells. The dose constraints and the planning target volume (PTV) differed with respect to the treated organ (kidney, lung, thyroid, parotid, hypophysis). The tolerance was good. It appears that cerebrospinal tomo-therapy results in a better comfort for the patient and an easier treatment plan with a good dose homogeneity. Short communication

  4. Art therapy for schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, María Isabel; Aceituno, David; Rada, Gabriel

    2017-01-19

    Art therapy is used as a complementary treatment to antipsychotics in schizophrenia. However, its effectiveness is not clear. To answer this question, we searched in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases. We identified five systematic reviews including 20 studies overall, of which four were randomized trials. We extracted data and prepared summary of findings tables using the GRADE method. We concluded it is not clear whether art therapy leads to clinical improvement in schizophrenia because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  5. Spa therapy in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeba Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spa therapy constitutes the use of mineral springs and thermal mud to soothe and heal various ailments. Like the mineral springs, seas and oceans are also important centers for spa therapy of which the most important is Dead Sea (DS. DS has been famous for thousands of years for its miraculous curative and cosmetic properties. Intensive research is going on using DS minerals in a wide range of dermatological conditions especially psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and other eczemas and several papers have been published in various international and pharmacological journals.

  6. Anticholinerge Therapie der OAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampel C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenntnisse über Differentialdiagnostik und Pathophysiologie des Blasenüberaktivitäts-Syndroms sind essentiell für eine erfolgreiche Therapie. Obwohl Verhaltenstraining und Elektrostimulation ihre Wirksamkeit bei OAB bewiesen haben, ist die Therapie der ersten Wahl nach wie vor die anticholinerge Behandlung. Dessen ungeachtet ist die Einnahmetreue der Patienten unbefriedigend, was in der letzten Zeit zu verschiedenen Medikamentenneuentwicklungen mit verbesserter Verträglichkeit bei gleichbleibend hoher Effektivität geführt hat. Retard-Formulierungen, extraenterale Applikationswege und Rezeptor-Subselektivität sind hierbei die Prinzipien, welche die Behandlungsakzeptanz und Patientenzufriedenheit steigern sollen.

  7. Genetically Guided Statin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    outcomes known to be prevented by statin therapy, we examined hospitalizations for three diagnoses: acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and...0.84 Tobacco 0.051368 (736) 0.043552 (5418) 1.69E-05 Follow-Up (days) 1325.7711 1260.4477 əe-20 Product Strength (mg) 45.9049 43.6006 0.000923...cholesterol. However, the ultimate goal of statin therapy is to decrease incidence of CAD, acute myocardial infarction and perhaps stroke. However, there is a

  8. Population Health and Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braveman, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners play an important role in improving the health of populations through the development of occupational therapy interventions at the population level and through advocacy to address occupational participation and the multiple determinants of health. This article defines and explores population health as a concept and describes the appropriateness of occupational therapy practice in population health. Support of population health practice as evidenced in the official documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and the relevance of population health for occupational therapy as a profession are reviewed. Recommendations and directions for the future are included related to celebration of the achievements of occupational therapy practitioners in the area of population health, changes to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and educational accreditation standards, and the importance of supporting, recognizing, rewarding, and valuing occupational therapy practitioners who assume roles in which direct care is not their primary function. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  9. Basic physics of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selman, J.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the following chapter headings: simple mathematics gradiation therapy; matter and energy; the nature of radiation;reactions between radiation and matter; x-ray production and control; high-energy therapy units and particle accelerators; quantity of x rays and γ rays; x-ray quality; dosage in x-ray and γ-ray therapy; therapy planning; radioactivity and nuclear physics; implant therapy with radium, radon, and artificial radionuclides; surface therapy with β particles; medical use of radionuclides; radiobiology; radiotherapy with heavy particles; and protection in radiotherapy-health physics

  10. The ethics of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sarah; Harris, John

    2006-10-01

    Recent developments have progressed in areas of science that pertain to gene therapy and its ethical implications. This review discusses the current state of therapeutic gene technologies, including stem cell therapies and genetic modification, and identifies ethical issues of concern in relation to the science of gene therapy and its application, including the ethics of embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning, the risks associated with gene therapy, and the ethics of clinical research in developing new therapeutic technologies. Additionally, ethical issues relating to genetic modification itself are considered: the significance of the human genome, the distinction between therapy and enhancement, and concerns regarding gene therapy as a eugenic practice.

  11. Type T Marital Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Frank; Carlson, Jon

    1991-01-01

    Briefly reviews Farley's Type T theory of personality and then considers a range of issues in marital therapy from the perspective of Type T. Suggests that Type T theory may be relevant in dealing with infidelity, sexual problems, love, marital abuse, child rearing, drug and alcohol use, money, division of household labor, recreation, and…

  12. Music therapy for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalbers, Sonja; Fusar-Poli, Laura; Freeman, Ruth E.; Spreen, Marinus; Ket, Johannes C.F.; Vink, Annemiek C.; Maratos, Anna; Crawford, Mike; Chen, Xi Jing; Gold, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Background: Depression is a highly prevalent mood disorder that is characterised by persistent low mood, diminished interest, and loss of pleasure. Music therapy may be helpful in modulating moods and emotions. An update of the 2008 Cochrane review was needed to improve knowledge on effects of music

  13. Salk therapy begins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A clinical trial to test an immune therapy developed by polio pioneer Jonas Salk has begun enrollment of 3,000 participants, who will receive Remune shots every 12 weeks for 3 years to see if disease progression is slowed. The manufacturer is Immune Response, and the study is being conducted by the University of California at San Francisco.

  14. Radionuclide therapy beyond radioiodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Michael

    2012-10-01

    For decades, Iodine-131 has been used for the treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. In recent years, increasingly, other radiopharmaceuticals are in clinical use in the treatment of various malignant diseases. Although in principle these therapies-as in all applications of radionuclides-special radiation protection measures are required, a separate nuclear medicine therapy department is not necessary in many cases due to the lower or lack of gamma radiation. In the following article, four different radionuclide therapies are more closely presented which are emerging in the last years. One of them is the "Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy," the so-called PRRT in which radiolabeled somatostatin (SST)-receptor(R) ligands are used in patients with neuroendocrine tumors. On the basis of radiolabeled antibodies against CD20-positive cells, the so-called radioimmunotherapy is used in the treatment of certain forms of malignant lymphoma. In primary or secondary liver tumors, the (90)Y-labeled particles can be administered. Last but not the least, the palliative approach of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals is noted in patients with painful bone metastases.

  15. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ciples of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and also the relevant ... systemic toxicity, and. (f) be chemically pure and of known specific composition. Among these six major guidelines, the first two are the most important ones and the rationale behind such stringent optical .... tizers are either porphyrins or their structural analogues.

  16. Targeted radionuclide therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    but negative for a Ga-68-DOTATATE PET/. CT.[7]. Accumulated evidence from clinical experience indicates that partial and complete responses may be achieved in almost 50% of patients, and that the duration of the therapy response is more than 40 months.[8] The patients' self-assessed quality of life also improves signi ...

  17. [Domiciliary oxygen therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Kafi, S

    2010-09-01

    In Belgium, oxygen therapy is becoming more and more accessible. When oxygen is needed for short periods or for special indications as palliative care, an agreement between mutual insurance companies and pharmacists allows the practitioner the home installation of gazeous oxygen cylinder or of oxygen concentrator. When long term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is indicated for patients with respiratory insufficiency, the pneumologist must first ask the INAMI the authorization to install one of the following modalities: oxygen concentrator with or without demand oxygen delivery cylinder and liquid oxygen. The goal of LTOT is to increase survival and quality of life. The principal and well accepted indication for LTOT is severe hypoxemia. The beneficial effects of oxygen therapy limited at night or on exertion are controversial. In order to increase patient's autonomy, oxygen can be prescribed for ambulation, respecting prescription's rules. At each step of oxygen therapy implementing (indication, choice of the device and follow-up) the patient under oxygen may benefit from a joint approach between the general practitioner and the chest specialist.

  18. Antibiotic therapy of cholera*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbaum, John; Greenough, William B.; Islam, M. R.

    1967-01-01

    Recent clinical trials having established the value of tetracycline as an adjunct to fluid and electrolyte replacement in cholera treatment, a controlled trial of antibiotic therapy was conducted in Dacca on 318 adults hospitalized for cholera. The effects of 4 antibiotics orally administered in varying dosage schedules were studied. Cholera therapy with tetracycline or chloramphenicol caused a highly significant reduction in the duration of diarrhoea and of positive culture, in stool volume, and in intravenous fluid requirement as compared with the results in controls who received intravenous fluid therapy only. Streptomycin was also effective, but to a lesser degree; paromomycin was of little value. The severity of dehydration on admission was significantly related to subsequent duration of diarrhoea regardless of whether antibiotics were given. Increasing age was associated with more prolonged purging in patients receiving antibiotics. Increasing the dose of tetracycline to 2 to 3 times that usually administered, or prolonging treatment from 2 to 4 days, did not enhance the therapeutic results. The effect of tetracycline was apparent within a few hours of administration. Bacteriological relapses were seen after discontinuation of therapy in all treatment groups, but were not due to the development of resistant bacteria. PMID:4865453

  19. Affect in Marital Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Leslie S.; Johnson, Susan M.

    1986-01-01

    Using a network theory of emotion, the role of the evocation of emotion in emotionally focused marital therapy to create intimacy and facilitate conflict resolution is discussed. Accessing underlying primary emotional responses in partners makes available adaptive action tendencies which promote problem solving and helps change self- and…

  20. Tumor therapy evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattmann, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Kaser-Hotz, B.; Parvis, A. [Zurich Univ., Zurich (Switzerland)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this program is to acquire data in order to evaluate the advantages of the proton spot scan technique compared to other forefront radiotherapy procedures, and to integrate the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of the life science department for human cancer therapy by testing it in veterinary radio-oncology. (author) 1 fig., 2 tab., 2 refs.

  1. Modeling Internal Radiation Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Theo E.; Pellegrini, M.; Fred, A.; Filipe, J.; Gamboa, H.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique is described to model (internal) radiation therapy. It is founded on morphological processing, in particular distance transforms. Its formal basis is presented as well as its implementation via the Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transform. Its use for all variations of internal

  2. Types of hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... both. Sometimes testosterone is also added. Menopause and Hormones Menopause symptoms include: Hot flashes Night sweats Sleep problems ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hormone Replacement Therapy Menopause Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A.; Stegenga, B.; Wijkstra, P. J.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; Meinesz, A. F.; de Bont, L. G. M.

    In clinical practice, oral appliances are used primarily for obstructive sleep apnea patients who do not respond to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We hypothesized that an oral appliance is not inferior to CPAP in treating obstructive sleep apnea effectively. We randomly assigned

  4. Efficacy of play therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Abstract. The objectives of the study are to know whether play therapy can facilitate the self- healing process, to improve the academic performance, increase the attentive level, and to ensure self-confidence and esteem of children under difficult circumstances. Data for this study were the case works of the researcher (for ...

  5. Unmodified electroconvulsive therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Unmodified electroconvulsive therapy: changes in knowledge and attitudes of Nigerian medical ... countries, the process of change towards the full implementation and use of modified ECT has been slow. The unmodified format is still ..... lecture in Greece improved students attitudes toward. ECT26, while a clerkship in the ...

  6. Tumor therapy evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattmann, H.; Kaser-Hotz, B.; Parvis, A.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this program is to acquire data in order to evaluate the advantages of the proton spot scan technique compared to other forefront radiotherapy procedures, and to integrate the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of the life science department for human cancer therapy by testing it in veterinary radio-oncology. (author) 1 fig., 2 tab., 2 refs

  7. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... way to evaluate the use of PDT for cancers of the brain, skin, prostate , cervix , and peritoneal cavity (the space in the abdomen ... of the activating light ( 5 ). Selected References Dolmans DE, Fukumura D, Jain RK. Photodynamic therapy for cancer. Nature Reviews Cancer 2003; 3(5):380–387. [ ...

  8. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  9. Induction Therapy for Mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Isabelle; Weder, Walter

    2015-01-01

    One particular approach of multimodality treatment for mesothelioma is induction therapy followed by surgery. Among its several advantages, the most important is downstaging of the tumor into a resectable stage, although morbidity and mortality might be increased. In this article we review the principles and outcome of different modalities for induction treatment of mesothelioma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Brief Therapy with Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeShazer, Steve

    1979-01-01

    Presents a model of brief therapy with families allowing the therapist to develop a cognitive map of triadic interaction with a completeness which words alone cannot capture. The family is viewed as an interlocking system of interdependent relationships. Case material illustrates the use of this model in changing dysfunctional patterns. (Author)

  11. Indomethacin therapy in hydramnios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhyankar S

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The use of indomethacin in treatment of hydramnios was evaluated. SUBJECTS & METHODS: Twelve patients with symptomatic hydramnios were treated with indomethacin (2.2- 3.0 mg/kg body weight/day. RESULTS: The treatment was started at a gestational age of 31.17-/+7.94 weeks and continued for 3.74-/+2.3 weeks. Eleven patients responded to the therapy both subjectively and objectively and pregnancies were prolonged by 4.6-/+3.1 weeks (range 0.1-10 weeks. Five women had term deliveries. Six patients had a favourable perinatal outcome. Four patients who had a known congenital anomaly in the foetus, delivered stillborn babies or had an early neonatal death. One patient who did not follow up after commencing therapy delivered a full-term stillbirth. One patient delivered within 1 day of starting therapy. Indomethacin therapy caused no maternal complications. CONCLUSION: Indomethacin was effective in the management of hydramnios and preventing it′s complications.

  12. Autophagy in photodynamic therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is crucial for cell survival during starvation and plays important roles in ... The work in this area is still limited. Keywords: Autophagy, Photodynamic therapy, Apoptosis, Cancer. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science .... photodynamic dosages did not result in.

  13. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    Antiprotons are interesting as a modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, they behave as protons. Well before the Bragg-peak, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers exhibit equal radiobiology. But when the antiprotons co...

  14. Adlerian Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkmeyer, Don; Dinkmeyer, Don, Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the competencies basic to Adlerian therapy--including influencing psychological movement, working with the family communication system, focusing on the real issue, aligning goals and dealing with resistance, stimulating social interest, encouragement, and tentative hypotheses, and antisuggestion. A specific process for helping the family…

  15. [The Bioptron light therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dediulescu, Lucretia

    2004-01-01

    The Bioptron light therapy system acts naturally, upholding the capacity of regeneration of the body. Since the discovery of the therapeutical effects of the Bioptron light, over 20 years ago, its use as treatment has been developed for a large variety of diseases, among which also the eye-diseases (simplex and zoster herpes, conjunctivitis).

  16. Physical therapy and manual physical therapy: Differences in patient characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, G.G.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  17. Physical Therapy and Manual Physical Therapy: Differences in Patient Characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G M; Pool, Jan J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  18. Therapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Sadeghi, R.; Takavar, A.; Fard, A.; Saghari, M.

    2002-01-01

    Although there have been very significant development in the field of radionuclide therapy within the past 10 years, radionuclide therapy in the form of 131 I, 33 P,.... have been in use for over 46 years. Palliation of bone pain is a good example for radionuclide therapy. It has an especial role in advanced metastatic cancer. 32 P, 89 Sr-Cl, 186 Re-HEDP, 133 Sm-EDTMP, and 117 mSn-DTPA are used in these patients. They are usually effective and help to maintain a painless life for patients with advanced cancer. Although this kind of therapy is not as rapid as radiotherapy, its effect lasts longer. In addition re-treatment with these agents is safe and effective. Radioimmunotherapy is a new exciting technique in the radionuclide therapy. In this technique monoclonal antibodies or their fragments are labeled with a suitable radionuclide, these antibodies can irradiate tumor cells over a distance of some fraction of a millimeter. Bulky tumors are obviously unsuitable targets for Rit. Several antibodies specific for Cd 20 (B1 and 1 F 5) and CD 37 (Mb-1) labeled with 131 I have been used for hematologic malignancies with good response. Several antigens associated with carcinomas of various histologic types have been targeted for therapeutic purposes by antibodies labeled with different radionuclides. Other routes of administration like intraperitoneal, intrathecal, and intravesical have been used with different rates of success. Pre targeting techniques can be used to reduce unwanted radioactive concentration in normal tissues. The avidin-biotin system is an example, which exploits the high-affinity binding between avidin and biotin, and was first used with anti-Cea antibody. Radiation synovectomy is another aspect of radionuclide therapy 198 Au colloid, 90 Y resin colloid, and 165 Dy-FHMA are some of the radionuclides used in the field of hematology. There has been significant advances in the field of therapy in nuclear medicine in recent years, which are briefly

  19. Current perspectives of radiation therapy. History of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itami, Jun

    2011-01-01

    More than 100 years have passed since the discovery of X-Strahlen by Roentgen. The history of radiation therapy has evolved under mutual stimulating relationships of the external beam radiation therapy by X-ray tubes and accelerators, and the internal radiation therapy employing radium and other radionuclides. The currently employed technologies in radiation therapy have its origin already till nineteen sixties and the development of physics and engineering have realized the original concept. (author)

  20. Emotion Regulation in Schema Therapy and Dialectical Behavior Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassbinder, E.; Schweiger, U.; Martius, D.; Brand-de Wilde, O.; Arntz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Schema therapy (ST) and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) have both shown to be effective treatment methods especially for borderline personality disorder. Both, ST and DBT, have their roots in cognitive behavioral therapy and aim at helping patient to deal with emotional dysregulation. However,

  1. Comparison of efficacy of neural therapy and physical therapy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of neural therapy, and physical therapy on level of pain, disability, quality of life, and psychological status in patients with chronic low back pain. Patients admitted to the physical therapy and rehabilitation outpatient clinic with the complaint of low back pain of at ...

  2. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, where the mortality rate of prostate cancer is lower than in Western countries, radical prostatectomy or hormonal therapy has been applied more frequently than radiation therapy. However, the number of patients with prostate cancer has been increasing recently and the importance of radiation therapy has rapidly been recognized. Although there have been no randomized trials, results from several institutions in Western countries suggest that similar results of cancer control are achieved with either radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. For higher-risk cases, conformal high-dose therapy or adjuvant hormonal therapy is more appropriate. In this article, the results of radiation therapy for prostate cancer were reviewed, with a view to the appropriate choice of therapy in Japan. (author)

  3. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the lung cancer and your overall health. Radiation Therapy Radiation is a high-energy X-ray that ... surgery, chemotherapy or both depending upon the circumstances. Radiation therapy works within cancer cells by damaging their ability ...

  4. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make sure they are safe to use during radiation therapy. • Eat a balanced diet. If food tastes funny ... melanoma.org Skin Cancer Foundation www.skincancer.org Radiation Therapy Answers www.rtanswers.org LEARNING ABOUT CLINICAL TRIALS ...

  5. Cybernetics of Brief Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, Bradford P.; Ross, Jeffrey M.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a cybernetic view of brief family therapy. Includes a historical discussion of the key ideas underlying brief family therapy, a cybernetic model of therapeutic change, and a clinical case for exemplification. (Author/JAC)

  6. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert

    2008-01-01

    ...) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy. Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies, e.g., ̃40...

  7. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert S

    2005-01-01

    ...) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy. Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies, e.g., -40...

  8. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert

    2007-01-01

    ...) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy. Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies, e.g., ̃40...

  9. Dance therapy for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Juanjuan; Xia, Jun

    2013-10-04

    Dance therapy or dance movement therapy (DMT) is defined as 'the psychotherapeutic use of movement as a process which furthers the emotional, social, cognitive, and physical integration of the individual'. It may be of value for people with developmental, medical, social, physical or psychological impairments. Dance therapy can be practiced in mental health rehabilitation units, nursing homes, day care centres and incorporated into disease prevention and health promotion programmes. To evaluate the effects of dance therapy for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses compared with standard care and other interventions. We updated the original July 2007 search of the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group' register in July 2012. We also searched Chinese main medical databases. We included one randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing dance therapy and related approaches with standard care or other psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia. We reliably selected, quality assessed and extracted data. For continuous outcomes, we calculated a mean difference (MD); for binary outcomes we calculated a fixed-effect risk ratio (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). We created a 'Summary of findings' table using the GRADE approach. We included one single blind study (total n = 45) of reasonable quality. It compared dance therapy plus routine care with routine care alone. Most people tolerated the treatment package but nearly 40% were lost in both groups by four months (1 RCT n = 45, RR 0.68 95% CI 0.31 to 1.51, low quality evidence). The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) average endpoint total scores were similar in both groups (1 RCT n = 43, MD -0.50 95% CI -11.80 to 10.80, moderate quality evidence) as were the positive sub-scores (1 RCT n = 43, MD 2.50 CI -0.67 to 5.67, moderate quality evidence). At the end of treatment, significantly more people in the dance therapy group had a greater than 20% reduction in PANSS negative symptom

  10. Therapy of endemic goitre; Therapie der Jodmangelstruma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leisner, B. [Allg. Krankenhaus St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1995-12-01

    1. In childhood the first line treatment of endemic goitre is Kl (100-150 {mu}g/day). Once the goitre volume has shrinked during L-thyroxine treatment in older patients, this effect is to be maintained by Kl ({proportional_to}200 {mu}g/day). The same holds true after surgery in cases with normal TSH responsiveness to TRH. 2. TSH suppressive L-thyroxine therapy is indicated in goitre patients older than 40 years. However, the effectiveness will be limited by the nodularity of the thyroid. So prevention of further growth prevails over true tissue reduction. 3. Obviously thyroid surgery yields the best cosmetic results with an acceptably low complication rate. When euthyroidism is established, a lifelong iodine prophylaxy (200 {mu}g/day) of recurrent goitre is mandatory. In cases with latent or overt hypothyroidism an appropriate therapy with thyroid hormone should be given. 4. By radiodine it is possible to realize a short term volume loss of 30-40% which may increase further on up to 60%. Relief of symptoms is usually even more impressive than actual volume loss. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] 1. Kaliumjodid ist heute das Mittel der Wahl zur Behandlung der Jodmangelstruma von Kindern (100 {mu}g) und Jugendlichen (150 {mu}g). Lebenslange Einnahme von Jodid (200 {mu}g) dient der Erhaltung einer Organverkleinerung, die durch L-Thyroxin bei aelteren Patienten erreicht wurde, und postoperativ bei gesicherter Euthyreose (TSH). In der Schwangerschaft ist eine Jodid-Medikation fuer Mutter und Kind erforderlich. 2. L-Thyroxin in TSH-suppressiver Dosierung sollte eingesetzt werden, wenn mit Jodid kein Verkleinerungseffekt erreichbar ist. Primaer ist es indiziert bei Patienten ueber 40 Jahren. Postoperativ muss L-Thyroxin dann verordnet werden, wenn eine latente oder manifeste Hypothyreose gesichert ist. Damit behandelt es sich aber nicht um eine Rezidiv-Prophylaxe im engeren Sinn. 3. Eine wirkliche Substanzverminderung des Kropfes gelingt durch die operative Resektion. Eine konsequente

  11. Advances in radiation therapy dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Paliwal, Bhudatt; Tewatia, Dinesh

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been an explosion of new radiation therapy planning and delivery tools. We went through a rapid transition from conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments, and additional new techniques for motion-adaptive radiation therapy are being introduced. These advances push the frontiers in our effort to provide better patient care; and with the addition of IMRT, temporal dimensions are ma...

  12. Cell therapies for Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli Dos Santos; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos

    2017-11-01

    In this review of cell therapies in Chagas disease, we cover aspects related to the disease, its treatment and world demographics, before proceeding to describe the preclinical and clinical trials performed using cell therapies in the search for an alternative therapy for the most severe and lethal form of this disease, chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Radionuclide therapy in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fettich, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In Slovenia 1260 radionuclide therapies are performed per year for a population of 2,000,000 (63/100,000 inhabitants). Approximately half of the patients (691) were treated as outpatients. There are 7 nuclear medicine departments in the country and 4 of them are licensed to perform radionuclide therapy and two have specialised wards for patients receiving radionuclide treatment (10 beds). 131-I is used by far most commonly for benign thyroid diseases and differentiated thyroid Ca treatment. The patients receiving doses of radioactivity below 550 MBqs, i.e. mostly patients with Graves' disease, are treated as outpatients i.e. 610/year, (31/100 000 inhabitants). The patients treated with doses between 740 1110 MBq, mostly hyperthyroid patients with autonomous thyroid tissue (Plummer's disease), 300/year (15/100 000 inhabitants) are hospitalised for 3-5 days in a specialised wards. (Fractionated therapy is not used). 137 therapies were performed for ablation and treatment of metastases in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer receiving 1850 5550 MBq, in 2004 as inpatients. 131-I mIBG is used for treatment of neuroblastoma very occasionally, less than 1/year due to low number of patients. Such patient has to be hospitalised in an adult radiotherapy ward, a situation not preferred by paediatricians. 186-Re HEDP, 153-Sm EDTPM and 89-Sr were used for palliation of bone pain due to bony metastasis usually as outpatients, depending on patient's condition, in only 14 patients in 2004. 186-Re colloid and 90-Y colloid are used for radiosynovectomies in patients with rheumatic and (32/year) and hemophilic (25/year) arthropathies. These patients are not hospitalised. 5 patients were treated with 90-Y anti CD20 MoAB for NHLymphoma, all on outpatient basis and 2 patients received 90-Y Octreotide for metastatic carcinoid also as outpatients. 12 patients received 90-Y colloid intraperitoneally for experimental treatment of carcinosis due to ovarian Ca in 2004

  14. Tailored thrombolytic therapy. A perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Simoons (Maarten); A.E.R. Arnold (Alfred)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. In contrast with current standard regimens, it seems more appropriate to tailor thrombolytic therapy to individual patient characteristics. A proposed model for such tailored therapy is based on individual assessment of benefits and risks of thrombolytic therapy, taking into

  15. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and oxygen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, S L

    1999-07-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and oxygen therapy are often necessary procedures done in veterinary practice. There are variations in CPR technique, especially in cardiac life support. Oxygen therapy can be an important adjunctive therapy in emergency and critical care medicine. The techniques used for oxygen administration differ depending on the medical problem and the animal.

  16. Moral Education through Play Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalle, Salwa; Zakaria, Gamal Abdul Nasir; Nawi, Aliff

    2014-01-01

    This paper will discuss on how sand therapy (as one type of play therapies) can be applied as an additional technique or approach in counseling. The research questions for this study are to see what are the development, challenges faced by the therapist during the sessions given and how sand therapy can aid to the progress of the client. It is a…

  17. Schema Therapy in Sex Therapy: A Theoretical Conceptualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Danny S; Peleg-Sagy, Tal; Doron, Guy

    2016-10-02

    Schema therapy is an integrative approach of psychotherapy developed by Jeffrey E. Young. Its aim is to help clients explore and understand their deep emotional needs and meet them in a healthy manner. It is suitable for complex pathologies, such as comorbidities and personality disorders. In sex therapy, schema therapy can serve as a method for a deep, evidence-based, integrative conceptualization of a client's difficulties and needs. However, its principles have never been demonstrated in sex therapy. In this paper, we briefly review schema therapy and introduce schema domains. We bring a case study of a couple undergoing sex therapy from the cognitive-behavioral perspective. We then return to the same case study, in order to demonstrate the usefulness of a schema therapy conceptualization.

  18. Gestalt Therapy and Cognitive Therapy - Contrasts or Complementarities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesvang, Jan; Sommer, Ulla; Hammink, James

    2010-01-01

    The article investigates the relationship between crucial concepts and understandings in gestalt therapy and cognitive therapy aiming at discussing if and how they can be mutually enriching when considered as complementary parts in a more encompassing integrative therapeutic approach. It is argued...... that gestalt therapy, defined as a fieldtheoretical approach to the study of gestalt formation process, can complement the schema-based understanding and practice in cognitive therapy. The clinical benefits from a complementary view of the two approaches will be a wider scope of awareness toward individual...... between fundamental awareness work in gestalt therapy and the tendency within cognitive therapy toward incorporating mindfulness as a therapeutic tool. In the conclusion of the article, additional complementary points between the two approaches are outlined. Keywords: integrative therapy, gestalt...

  19. Behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Kiyomi; Honyashiki, Mina; Imai, Hissei; Hunot, Vivien; Caldwell, Deborah M; Davies, Philippa; Moore, Theresa H M; Furukawa, Toshi A; Churchill, Rachel

    2013-10-16

    Behavioural therapies represent one of several categories of psychological therapies that are currently used in the treatment of depression. However, the effectiveness and acceptability of behavioural therapies for depression compared with other psychological therapies remain unclear. 1. To examine the effects of all BT approaches compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.2. To examine the effects of different BT approaches (behavioural therapy, behavioural activation, social skills training and relaxation training) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.3. To examine the effects of all BT approaches compared with different psychological therapy approaches (CBT, third wave CBT, psychodynamic, humanistic and integrative psychological therapies) for acute depression. We searched the Cochrane Depression Anxiety and Neurosis Group Trials Specialised Register (CCDANCTR, 31/07/2013), which includes relevant randomised controlled trials from The Cochrane Library (all years), EMBASE, (1974-), MEDLINE (1950-) and PsycINFO (1967-). We also searched CINAHL (May 2010) and PSYNDEX (June 2010) and reference lists of the included studies and relevant reviews for additional published and unpublished studies. Randomised controlled trials that compared behavioural therapies with other psychological therapies for acute depression in adults. Two or more review authors independently identified studies, assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. Twenty-five trials involving 955 participants compared behavioural therapies with one or more of five other major categories of psychological therapies (cognitive-behavioural, third wave cognitive-behavioural, psychodynamic, humanistic and integrative therapies). Most studies had a small sample size and were assessed as being at unclear or high risk of bias. Compared with all other psychological therapies together

  20. Regenerative periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägi, Tobias T; Laugisch, Oliver; Ivanovic, Aleksandar; Sculean, Anton

    2014-03-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is to completely restore the tooth's supporting apparatus that has been lost due to inflammatory periodontal disease or injury. It is characterized by formation of new cementum with inserting collagen fibers, new periodontal ligament, and new alveolar bone. Indeed conventional, nonsurgical, and surgical periodontal therapy usually result in clinical improvements evidenced by probing depth reduction and clinical attachment gain, but the healing occurs predominantly through formation of a long junctional epithelium and no or only unpredictable periodontal regeneration. Therefore, there is an ongoing search for new materials and improved surgical techniques, with the aim of predictably promoting periodontal wound healing/regeneration and improving the clinical outcome. This article attempts to provide the clinician with an overview of the most important biologic events involved in periodontal wound healing/ regeneration and on the criteria on how to select the appropriate regenerative material and surgical technique in order to optimize the clinical outcomes.

  1. Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akine, Yasuyuki; Tokita, Nobuhiko; Tokuuye, Koichi; Satoh, Michinao; Churei, Hisahiko

    1993-01-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy makes use of photons and electrons produced by nuclear reactions between gadolinium and lower-energy neutrons which occur within the tumor. The results of our studies have shown that its radiation effect is mostly of low LET and that the electrons are the significant component in the over-all dose. The dose from gadolinium neutron capture reactions does not seem to increase in proportion to the gadolinium concentration, and the Gd-157 concentration of about 100 μg/ml appears most optimal for therapy. Close contact between gadolinium and the cell is not necessarily required for cell inactivation, however, the effect of electrons released from intracellular gadolinium may be significant. Experimental studies on tumor-bearing mice and rabbits have shown that this is a very promising modality though further improvements in gadolinium delivery to tumors are needed. (author)

  2. Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Andrew; Doss, Brian D

    2017-02-01

    Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy (IBCT) is based in part on traditional behavioral couple therapy but expands both the conceptualization of couple distress and of intervention. The efficacy of IBCT has been supported in three clinical trials, including one with five year follow-up. Additionally, the effectiveness of IBCT in the real world has been supported through a system-wide dissemination effort in the United States Department of Veteran's Affairs. The reach of IBCT has also been extended through an online program, www.OurRelationship.com, based on IBCT. A nationwide clinical trial with a representative sample of the US population demonstrated the effectiveness of this program on both relationship and individual variables.

  3. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should...... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  4. Medical leech therapy (Hirudotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leeches have been used in medicine long time before BC. In recent years medical leech therapy has gained increasing interest in reconstructive surgery and pain management and other medical fields. The possible indications and success rates of this treatment are discussed. There is a special interest in salvage of flaps and grafts by the use of medical leeches. Retrospective analysis indicates a success rate of >80%. Randomized controlled trials have been performed in osteoarthritis. Case reports and smaller series are available for the treatment of chronic wounds, post-phlebitic syndrome and inflammatory skin diseases. The most common adverse effects are prolonged bleeding and infection by saprophytic intestinal bacteria of leeches. Medical leech therapy is a useful adjunct to other measures wound management.

  5. Biological therapy of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivamani Raja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of psoriasis has undergone a revolution with the advent of biologic therapies, including infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, efalizumab, and alefacept. These medications are designed to target specific components of the immune system and are a major technological advancement over traditional immunosuppressive medications. These usually being well tolerated are being found useful in a growing number of immune-mediated diseases, psoriasis being just one example. The newest biologic, ustekinumab, is directed against the p40 subunit of the IL-12 and IL-23 cytokines. It has provided a new avenue of therapy for an array of T-cell-mediated diseases. Biologics are generally safe; however, there has been concern over the risk of lymphoma with use of these agents. All anti-TNF-α agents have been associated with a variety of serious and "routine" opportunistic infections.

  6. Drug therapy of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kubanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy (Hansen’s disease is a chronic granulomatous bacterial infection mainly affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system yet also involving other organs and systems as a result of a pathological process. The causative agent of leprosy - Mycobacterium leprae - is an obligate intracellular microorganism. Despite the removal of a threat of a leprosy epidemic, European countries still record outbreaks of the disease mainly among migrants coming from endemic areas. A golden standard of the treatment of leprosy is a WHO-recommended combined drug therapy comprising drugs such as dapsone, clofazimine and rifampicin. The article provides current data on the mechanisms of action, efficacy and safety of these drugs and their combined scheme of treatment obtained as a result of clinical trials. Moreover, it also reviews new regimens of the drug therapy of leprosy including those with the use of drugs from the group of fluoroquinols as well as immunotherapy of the disease.

  7. Selective retina therapy (SRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkmann, R.; Birngruber, R.

    2007-01-01

    Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) is a new and very gentle laser method developed at the Medical Laser Center Luebeck. It is currently investigated clinically in order to treat retinal disorders associated with a decreased function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). SRT is designed to selectively effect the RPE while sparing the neural retina and the photoreceptors as well as the choroid. Aim of the therapy is the rejuvenation of the RPE in the treated areas, which should ideally lead to a long term metabolic increase at the chorio-retinal junction. In contrast to conventional laser photocoagulation, which is associated with a complete thermal necrosis of the treated site, SRT completely retains full vision. This paper reviews the methods and mechanisms behind selective RPE effects and reports the first clinical results. An online dosimetry technique to visualize the ophthalmoscopically invisible effects is introduced. (orig.)

  8. Marketing occupational therapy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzmann, L N

    1985-01-01

    The ability to understand and appropriately apply business skills is a key component in the development of a successful private practice. Marketing is one of the business skills occupational therapists need to have in order to take full advantage of the opportunities available to entrepeneurs in the health care industry. The purpose of this article is to present a structured approach to marketing occupational therapy services through the use of a marketing plan. The four components of a marketing plan, a situation analysis, the identification of problems, opportunities, and target markets, the development of a marketing strategy for each targeted market, and a method to monitor the plan, are discussed. Applications to occupational therapy practice are suggested. The use of a marketing plan as a method for organizing and focusing marketing efforts is an effective means of supporting and enhancing the development of a private practice.

  9. Comments on chelation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    The primary purpose of actinide chelation is to decrease the risk from radiation-induced cancer. While occupational exposures in the past have mainly involved low specific activity 239 Pu, future exposures will increasingly involve high specific activity plutonium, americium, and curium - all of which clear more rapidly from the lung. This will tend to shift the cancer risk from lung to bone and liver. Although therapy with Ca- or Zn-DTPA rapidly removes 241 Am from the canine, the sub-human primate, and the human liver, improved methods for removal from bone and lung are needed. DTPA can remove 241 Am more easily from the growing skeleton of a child than from the mature skeleton of an adult. Investigators at Karlsruhe are developing chelation agents for oral administration and are investigating the reduction in local dose to bone resulting from chelation therapy

  10. Music therapy in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Crellin, Nadia; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent reviews on music therapy for people with dementia have been limited to attempting to evaluate whether it is effective, but there is a need for a critical assessment of the literature to provide insight into the possible mechanisms of actions of music therapy. This systematic review...... uses a narrative synthesis format to determine evidence for effectiveness and provide insight into a model of action. Method The narrative synthesis framework consists of four elements: (i) theory development; (ii) preliminary synthesis of findings; (iii) exploration of relationships between studies......; and (iv) assessment of the robustness of the synthesis. Results Electronic and hand searches identified 263 potentially relevant studies. Eighteen studies met the full inclusion criteria. Three distinctive strands of investigations emerged: eight studies explored behavioural and psychological aspects...

  11. Targeted therapy in lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalli Franco

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Discovery of new treatments for lymphoma that prolong survival and are less toxic than currently available agents represents an urgent unmet need. We now have a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of lymphoma, such as aberrant signal transduction pathways, which have led to the discovery and development of targeted therapeutics. The ubiquitin-proteasome and the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathways are examples of pathological mechanisms that are being targeted in drug development efforts. Bortezomib (a small molecule protease inhibitor and the mTOR inhibitors temsirolimus, everolimus, and ridaforolimus are some of the targeted therapies currently being studied in the treatment of aggressive, relapsed/refractory lymphoma. This review will discuss the rationale for and summarize the reported findings of initial and ongoing investigations of mTOR inhibitors and other small molecule targeted therapies in the treatment of lymphoma.

  12. Neutron beams for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuplenikov, Eh.L.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Tsymbal, V.A.; Kandybej, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    It was given the analysis and generalization of the study results carried out during some decades in many world countries on application of thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons for neutron, gamma-neutron and neutron-capture therapy. The main attention is focused on the practical application possibility of the accumulated experience for the base creation for medical research and the cancer patients effective treatment.

  13. Proton beam therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs

  14. Virtual reality exposure therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rothbaum, BO; Hodges, L; Kooper, R

    1997-01-01

    It has been proposed that virtual reality (VR) exposure may be an alternative to standard in vivo exposure. Virtual reality integrates real-time computer graphics, body tracking devices, visual displays, and other sensory input devices to immerse a participant in a computer- generated virtual environment. Virtual reality exposure is potentially an efficient and cost-effective treatment of anxiety disorders. VR exposure therapy reduced the fear of heights in the first control...

  15. Operation Brain Trauma Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    brain edema quantified via the gold standard wet-dry weight method in sections through the injured hemisphere. This suggests that the benefit of GLI...edema was quantified using the established wet-dry weight technique which is the gold standard for brain edema. At 24 h after the insult, mice...the OBTT consortium—namely, nicotinamide, EPO, CsA, sim - vastatin, and levetiracetam. These five therapies represent agents that would be readily

  16. Assessment in Cognitive Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Gary P.; Clark, David A.

    2015-01-01

    This volume brings together leading experts to explore the state of the art of cognitive clinical assessment and identify cutting-edge approaches of interest to clinicians and researchers. The book highlights fundamental problems concerning the validity of assessments that are widely used in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Key directions for further research and development are identified. Updated cognitive assessment methods are described in detail, with particular attention to transdiag...

  17. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a uniquely comprehensive source of information on the entire field of radiation therapy physics. The very significant advances in imaging, computational, and accelerator technologies receive full consideration, as do such topics as the dosimetry of radiolabeled antibodies and dose calculation models. The scope of the book and the expertise of the authors make it essential reading for interested physicians and physicists and for radiation dosimetrists.

  18. Psychological therapies for thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anie, Kofi A; Massaglia, Pia

    2014-03-06

    Thalassaemia is a group of genetic blood disorders characterised by the absence or reduction in the production of haemoglobin. Severity is variable from less severe anaemia, through thalassaemia intermedia, to profound severe anaemia (thalassaemia major). In thalassaemia major other complications include growth retardation, bone deformation, and enlarged spleen. Blood transfusion is required to treat severe forms of thalassaemia, but this results in excessive accumulation of iron in the body (iron overload), removed mostly by a drug called desferrioxamine through 'chelation therapy'. Non-routine treatments are bone marrow transplantation (which is age restricted), and possibly hydroxyurea, designed to raise foetal haemoglobin level, thus reducing anaemia. In addition, psychological therapies seem appropriate to improving outcome and adherence to medical treatment. To examine the evidence that in people with thalassaemia, psychological treatments improve the ability to cope with the condition, and improve both medical and psychosocial outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register which comprises of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Searches on the Internet were also performed.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 11 November 2013. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing the use of psychological intervention to no (psychological) intervention in people with thalassaemia. No trials of psychological therapies have been found in the literature for inclusion in this review. There are currently no results to be reported. As a chronic disease with a considerable role for self-management, psychological support seems appropriate for managing thalassaemia. However, from the information currently available, no conclusions

  19. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Novel Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Bittar; Imad Uthman

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterised by arterial and/or venous thrombosis, recurrent pregnancy loss, and persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs). It could be life-threatening as in the case of catastrophic APS where multi-organ failure is observed. APS morbidities are thought to be the result of a combination of thrombotic and inflammatory processes. Over the past decades, the mainstay of therapy of APS has been anticoagulation. As new mechan...

  20. Medical nutrition therapy planning

    OpenAIRE

    Torović Ljilja; Grujičić Maja; Pavlović-Trajković Ljiljana; Jovičić Jelena; Novaković Budimka; Balać Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Diet has vital, preventive and therapeutic functions. Medical nutrition therapy is a part of the Standardized Nutrition Care Process integrated in health care systems. Material and methods. An overview of the Nutrition Care Process model and the application of nutrition guidelines based on literature, reports, documents and programmes of international health, food and physical activity authorities was done. Results. The Nutrition Care Process model requires registered diet...

  1. Proton therapy project status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroni, E.; Bevan, A.; Blattmann, H.; Boehringer, T.; Coray, A.; Egger, E.; Emmenegger, M.; Grossmann, M.; Lomax, A.; Lin, S.; Munkel, G.; Schaffner, B.

    1997-01-01

    The main activities of 1996 have focused on the commissioning of the facility, the debugging of the software for the steering (therapy controller and dose controller computers) and the development of the dosimetry for the verification of three-dimensional conformal dose distribution. The safety aspects of the spot scanning technique have been inspected during a safety hearing with international experts. In November the facility was finally ready for the treatment of the first human patient on the PSI gantry. (author) 1 fig

  2. A Technique: Exposure Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan AKKOYUNLU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Exposure with response prevention is an effective treatment for all anxiety disorders. According to the behavioral learning theories, fears which are conditioned via classical conditioning are reinforced by respondent conditioning. Avoidance and safety seeking behaviors prevent disconfirmation of anxious beliefs. In exposure client faces stimulates or cues that elicit fear or distress, by this avoidance is inhibited. Clients are also encouraged to resists performing safety seeking behaviors or rituals that they utilize to reduce fear or distress. Accomplishing these habituation or extinction is achieved. In addition to this clients learn that feared consequences does not realize or not harmful as they believed by experiencing. Emotional processing is believed to be the mechanism of change in exposure.Objective: The aim of this review is to provide a definition of exposure and its effectiveness briefly, and describe how to implement exposure, its steps and remarkable aspects using. Exposure therapies and treatments that involve exposure are proved to be effective in all anxiety disorders. Exposure therapy can be divided in three parts: Assessment and providing a treatment rationale, creating an exposure hierarchy and response prevention plan, implementing exposure sessions. Clients must also continue to perform exposure between sessions. Therapy transcripts are also provided to exemplify these parts. Conclusion: Exposure with response prevention is a basic and effective technique. Every cognitive behavior therapist must be able to implement this technique and be cognizant of pearls of this procedure.

  3. Superficial Bladder Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Schenkman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer treatment remains a challenge despite significant improvements in preventing disease progression and improving survival. Intravesical therapy has been used in the management of superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder (i.e. Ta, T1, and carcinoma in situ with specific objectives which include treating existing or residual tumor, preventing recurrence of tumor, preventing disease progression, and prolonging survival. The initial clinical stage and grade remain the main determinant factors in survival regardless of the treatment. Prostatic urethral mucosal involvement with bladder cancer can be effectively treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG intravesical immunotherapy. Intravesical chemotherapy reduces short-term tumor recurrence by about 20%, and long-term recurrence by about 7%, but has not reduced progression or mortality. Presently, BCG immunotherapy remains the most effective treatment and prophylaxis for TCC (Ta, T1, CIS and reduces tumor recurrence, disease progression, and mortality. Interferons, Keyhole-limpet hemocyanin (KLH, bropirimine and Photofrin-Photodynamic Therapy (PDT are under investigation in the management of TCC and early results are encouraging. This review highlights and summarizes the recent advances in therapy for superficial TCC.

  4. Radiotherapy : proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The first phase of proton therapy at the National Accelerator Centre will be the development of a 200 MeV small-field horizontal beam radioneurosurgical facility in the south treatment vault. A progressive expansion of this facility is planned. The patient support and positioning system has been designed and developed by the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Surveying of the University of Cape Town to ensure the accurate positioning in the proton beam of the lesion to be treated. The basic components of the system are an adjustable chair, a series of video cameras and two computers. The specifications for the proton therapy interlock system require that the inputs to and the outputs from the system be similar to those of the neutron therapy system. Additional facilities such as a full diagnostic system which would assist the operators in the event of an error will also be provided. Dosimeters are required for beam monitoring, for monitor calibration and for determining dose distributions. Several designs of transmission ionization chambers for beam monitoring have been designed and tested, while several types of ionization chambers and diodes have been used for the dose distribution measurements. To facilitate the comparison of measured ranges and energy losses of proton beams in the various materials with tabled values, simple empirical approximations, which are sufficiently accurate for most applications, have been used. 10 refs., 10 fig., 4 tabs

  5. [Therapy of hyperhidrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölze, E

    1984-01-01

    In the treatment of hyperhidrosis stabilization of psychovegetative functions is certainly desirable. However, autogenic exercise, hypnosis, psychotherapy as well as the administration of sedatives and tranquilizers serve only as adjuvant therapeutic measures. Systemic antihidrotics, like sage or camphor, proved ineffective; anticholinergics pose the risk of side effects. For topical therapy aldehydes, organic acids, and especially metallic salts are favorable. Tanning agents are of limited effect. Topical anticholinergics suppress sweating but provoke systemic side effects, if resorbed in larger quantities. Surgical treatment includes sympathetic blockade, sympathectomy, excision or curettage of eccrine glands, and cryotherapy or application of sclerosing agents. Concerning efficacy and risks of therapy only excision of axillary skin fields can be advocated. Among physical measures X-ray therapy is rendered obsolete. However, tap water iontophoresis is gaining increasing significance as an effective and safe treatment in palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis. In hyperhidrosis axillaris, palmaris, or plantaris topical application of aluminum chloride solution is emphasized as an efficacious treatment modality. If it fails, axillary skin fields can be excised and hyperhidrosis of palms or soles can be treated with tap water iontophoresis.

  6. Novel therapies for constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayalasekeran, Sreedhari; Ali, Hani; Tsai, Her-Hsin

    2013-12-07

    Constipation is a common medical problem and when standard laxatives fail it can be difficult to treat. Different aetiologies require tailored therapeutic approaches. Simple constipation may only require dietary manipulation while severe neurological or slow transit constipation may need pharmacologic intervention. Recently new drug therapies have been introduced. PubMed and Ovid were searched for reviews, systematic reviews and meta-analysis published since 2003 using the terms: constipation, prucalopride, linaclotide and lubiprostone. This review summarizes potential novel therapies identified as effective in the management of chronic constipation. Prucalopride is a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor agonist. The prucalopride study was in patients, largely women with idiopathic constipation showed improved spontaneous complete bowel movement (SCBM) at a dose of 2 mg a day with few adverse events reported. Linaclotide is a 14-amino acid peptide guanylate cyclase-C agonist. The linaclotide study was carried out in patients with irritable bowel syndrome, constipation group (IBS-C). There was significant improvement of bowel evacuation and symptom resolution in patients on the active treatment arm. Lubiprostone activates type-2 chloride channels, increasing intestinal fluid secretion. In the trials of this drug, the lubiprostone arms had a greater mean number of SCBM. The novel therapies, prucalopride, lubiprostone, and linaclotide had very different modes of action yet, all three have been shown to be efficacious and safe in the treatment dose for constipation. © 2013 Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited. All rights reserved.

  7. Smart Radiation Therapy Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Boateng, Francis; Kumar, Rajiv; Irvine, Darrell J; Formenti, Silvia; Ngoma, Twalib; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Hildenbrand, Georg Lars; Hausmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a crucial component of cancer care, used in the treatment of over 50% of cancer patients. Patients undergoing image guided RT or brachytherapy routinely have inert RT biomaterials implanted into their tumors. The single function of these RT biomaterials is to ensure geometric accuracy during treatment. Recent studies have proposed that the inert biomaterials could be upgraded to "smart" RT biomaterials, designed to do more than 1 function. Such smart biomaterials include next-generation fiducial markers, brachytherapy spacers, and balloon applicators, designed to respond to stimuli and perform additional desirable functions like controlled delivery of therapy-enhancing payloads directly into the tumor subvolume while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. More broadly, smart RT biomaterials may include functionalized nanoparticles that can be activated to boost RT efficacy. This work reviews the rationale for smart RT biomaterials, the state of the art in this emerging cross-disciplinary research area, challenges and opportunities for further research and development, and a purview of potential clinical applications. Applications covered include using smart RT biomaterials for boosting cancer therapy with minimal side effects, combining RT with immunotherapy or chemotherapy, reducing treatment time or health care costs, and other incipient applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: dynamic MLC (DMLC) therapy, multisegment therapy and tomotherapy. An example of QA in DMLC therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.

    1998-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy will make a quantum leap in tumor control. It is the new radiation therapy for the new millennium. The major methods to achieve IMRT are: 1. Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) therapy, 2. multisegment therapy, and 3. tomotherapy. The principles of these 3 techniques are briefly reviewed. Each technique presents unique QA issues which are outlined. As an example this paper will present the results of a recent new study of an important QA concern in DMLC therapy. (orig.) [de

  9. Family Therapy in a Women's Group: Integrating Marriage and Family Therapy and Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Hildy G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a family therapy perspective can be integrated into group as a treatment modality. Concepts from family therapy are illustrated through a description of a specific women's group and case study. Techniques from family therapy applied in group are derived from multigenerational, experiential/humanistic, and cognitive-behavioral…

  10. Scientific perspectives on music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillecke, Thomas; Nickel, Anne; Bolay, Hans Volker

    2005-12-01

    What needs to be done on the long road to evidence-based music therapy? First of all, an adequate research strategy is required. For this purpose the general methodology for therapy research should be adopted. Additionally, music therapy needs a variety of methods of allied fields to contribute scientific findings, including mathematics, natural sciences, behavioral and social sciences, as well as the arts. Pluralism seems necessary as well as inevitable. At least two major research problems can be identified, however, that make the path stony: the problem of specificity and the problem of eclecticism. Neuroscientific research in music is giving rise to new ideas, perspectives, and methods; they seem to be promising prospects for a possible contribution to a theoretical and empirical scientific foundation for music therapy. Despite the huge heterogeneity of theoretical approaches in music therapy, an integrative model of working ingredients in music therapy is useful as a starting point for empirical studies in order to question what specifically works in music therapy. For this purpose, a heuristic model, consisting of five music therapy working factors (attention modulation, emotion modulation, cognition modulation, behavior modulation, and communication modulation) has been developed by the Center for Music Therapy Research (Viktor Dulger Institute) in Heidelberg. Evidence shows the effectiveness of music therapy for treating certain diseases, but the question of what it is in music therapy that works remains largely unanswered. The authors conclude with some questions to neuroscientists, which we hope may help elucidate relevant aspects of a possible link between the two disciplines.

  11. Radiation therapy for digestive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Levy, E.; Thirion, P.; Martin, L.; Calitchi, E.; Otmezguine, Y.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    This brief review of radiation therapy of digestive tumors in 1994 seeks to provide practical answers to the most commonly asked questions: What is the place of radiation therapy versus chemotherapy for the treatment of these patients ? What are the approved indications of radiation therapy and which avenues of research are being explored ? Radiation therapy is used in over two-thirds of patients referred to an oncology department for a gastrointestinal tract tumor. The main indications are reviewed: cancer of the rectum and anal canal and, to a lesser extent, cancer of the esophagus and pancreas. The main focuses of current research include radiation therapy-chemotherapy combinations, intraoperative radiation therapy, and radiation therapy of hepatobiliary tumors. (authors). 23 refs., 1 fig

  12. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drisko, C H

    2001-01-01

    Regular home care by the patient in addition to professional removal of subgingival plaque is generally very effective in controlling most inflammatory periodontal diseases. When disease does recur, despite frequent recall, it can usually be attributed to lack of sufficient supragingival and subgingival plaque control or to other risk factors that influence host response, such as diabetes or smoking. Causative factors contributing to recurrent disease include deep inaccessible pockets, overhangs, poor crown margins and plaque-retentive calculus. In most cases, simply performing a thorough periodontal debridement under local anesthesia will stop disease progression and result in improvement in the clinical signs and symptoms of active disease. If however, clinical signs of disease activity persist following thorough mechanical therapy, such as increased pocket depths, loss of attachment and bleeding on probing, other pharmacotherapeutic therapies should be considered. Augmenting scaling and root planing or maintenance visits with adjunctive chemotherapeutic agents for controlling plaque and gingivitis could be as simple as placing the patient on an antimicrobial mouthrinse and/or toothpaste with agents such as fluorides, chlorhexidine or triclosan, to name a few. Since supragingival plaque reappears within hours or days after its removal, it is important that patients have access to effective alternative chemotherapeutic products that could help them achieve adequate supragingival plaque control. Recent studies, for example, have documented the positive effect of triclosan toothpaste on the long-term maintenance of both gingivitis and periodontitis patients. Daily irrigation with a powered irrigation device, with or without an antimicrobial agent, is also useful for decreasing the inflammation associated with gingivitis and periodontitis. Clinically significant changes in probing depths and attachment levels are not usually expected with irrigation alone. Recent

  13. Current systemic therapies for melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palathinkal, Darren M; Sharma, Timmie R; Koon, Henry B; Bordeaux, Jeremy S

    2014-09-01

    Systemic agents are used in melanoma for adjuvant therapy and to treat metastatic disease. Currently, interferon-α is the only agent approved for adjuvant therapy. Six drugs are FDA approved for metastatic disease: dacarbazine, interleukin-2 (IL-2), vemurafenib, ipilimumab, dabrafenib, and trametinib. Vemurafenib and ipilimumab were approved in 2011, whereas dabrafenib and trametinib were approved in 2013. This review will update the practicing dermatologist on the differences in efficacy, adverse events, and cost of systemic therapies available for the treatment of melanoma. This article is a review of the current literature on systemic therapies for advanced melanoma. Key search words included "advanced melanoma," "systemic therapy," and "adjuvant therapy" with particular focus on the past 20 years. Before 2011, dacarbazine and IL-2 were the only FDA approved therapies for metastatic melanoma, and IFN-α is the only approved agent for adjuvant therapy. The new agents vemurafenib, ipilimumab, dabrafenib, and trametinib are the first to have improved overall survival in Phase III studies in comparison with other systemic therapies. Despite new developments, there remains a significant need for better therapies with improved long-term efficacy and decreased toxicity.

  14. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersahin, Devrim; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David

    2011-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose

  15. Operation Brain Trauma Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    IL‐1B and MIP‐2  concentrations   reduced  NONE  Brain  conc at 4, 8,  12, or 24h; Dose  response seen;  5000 IV gave  highest  brain  conc  18/Xiong et...by the Operation Brain Trauma Therapy consortium Drugs Secondary Injury Mechanisms Inflammation Axonal Injury Excitotoxicity/ Neurotransmitter ...glutamatergic transmission in the prefrontal cortex of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats. Neurosci Lett. 2002;320:109–112. 45. Nakamura K

  16. [Physical therapy in apoplexy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, G

    1987-02-15

    Within the complex medical rehabilitation of patients with apoplexia physiotherapy occupies an important position. The individual functional kinesitherapy on neurophysiological basis shall begin immediately after the acute pathological process. The electrotherapy may be used in the laxly as well as spastically paralysed muscle. In the early phase by this means the gradually developing spasticity and the muscle atrophies are diminished. The cryotherapy reduces the tonus of the spastic muscles and provides better prerequisites for the kinesitherapy. The work therapy has the task to restore the fine motoricity of the diseased hand and to make the patient again independent in the activities of daily life.

  17. Metformin poisoning: which therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Casagranda

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious adverse effect in metformintreated- patients. The authors report a case of metformin-associated lactic acidosis and discuss the appropriated therapy. The patient was treated with bicarbonate iv and with two short dialysis session, also because of acute renal failure. Many authors do not agree with using bicarbonate, and about hemodialysis some authors suggest that the session should go on at least 12 hours. In this case the use of bicarbonate and short hemodialysis determinated a favourable outcame.

  18. Proton therapy device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  19. New antiepileptic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, J

    1997-04-01

    This is an exciting time for AED development. Four new AEDs have been approved for use in the last 3 years and several more are being evaluated. New formulations of traditional therapies, such as Tegretol XR, and IV and IM fosphenytoin offer alternatives for the management of acute and chronic seizure disorders (see "Clip & Save" and "What's News"). With these new treatments options, providers will be challenged to choose the most appropriate drug or drug combination for their patients based on seizure type, AED mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetic properties, adverse effects, and drug interactions.

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, R G; Wiens, A N

    1975-10-01

    Recent research on the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on memory is critically reviewed. Despite some inconsistent findings, unilateral nondominant ECT appears to affect verbal memory less than bilateral ECT. Adequate research on multiple monitored ECT is lacking. With few exceptions, the research methodologies for assessing memory have been inadequate. Many studies have confounded learning with retention, and only very recently has long term memory been adequately studied. Standardized assessment procedures for short term and long term memory are needed, in addition to more sophisticated assessment of memory processes, the duration of memory loss, and qualitative aspects of memories.

  1. Physical Therapy Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Loredan Biomedical, Inc.'s LIDO, a computerized physical therapy system, was purchased by NASA in 1985 for evaluation as a Space Station Freedom exercise program. In 1986, while involved in an ARC muscle conditioning project, Malcom Bond, Loredan's chairman, designed an advanced software package for NASA which became the basis for LIDOSOFT software used in the commercially available system. The system employs a "proprioceptive" software program which perceives internal body conditions, induces perturbations to muscular effort and evaluates the response. Biofeedback on a screen allows a patient to observe his own performance.

  2. Progestin therapy in endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezer, Altay; Oral, Engin

    2015-08-01

    Progestins are synthetic compounds that mimic the effects of progesteron. For over 50 years, oral progestins have been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of endometriosis. They were reported to reduce or eliminate pain symptoms in approximately 90% of the patients. Progestins are available in many forms, including oral preparations, injections, subdermal implants and intrauterine systems. Continuous progestin use is an effective therapy for the treatment of painful symptoms associated with endometriosis but there had been no evidence of progestin use being superior to other types of treatment in endometriosis-related pain symptoms.

  3. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossmann, Beate; Ulle, Tanja; Kahl, Kai G; Wasem, Jürgen; Aidelsburger, Pamela

    2008-05-29

    Obesity is a worldwide health problem whose prevalence is on the increase. Many obesity-associated diseases require intensive medical treatment and are the cause of a large proportion of health-related expenditures in Germany. Treatment of obesity includes nutritional, exercise and behaviour therapy, usually in combination. The goal of behaviour therapy for obesity is to bring about a long-term alteration in the eating and exercise habits of overweight and obese individuals. Under certain circumstances, drug treatment may be indicated. What is the effectiveness of behaviour therapy for obesity considering approved drugs reduce weight under medical, economic, ethical-social and legal aspects? A systematic review was conducted using relevant electronic literature databases. Publications chosen according to predefined criteria are evaluated by approved methodical standards of the evidence-based medicine systematically and qualitatively. In total 18 studies, included one HTA and one meta-analysis could be identified according to the predefined inclusion criteria. Three studies compare behaviour therapy to other therapy forms (advice or instruction on nutritional changes, physical activity or a combination of the two), six studies evaluate different forms of behaviour therapy, four studies and four studies compare behaviour therapies mediated by Internet or telephone. Three studies could be identified examining the effect of the combination of behaviour and drug therapy. Furthermore one HTA and one meta-analysis could be included in the evaluation. The behaviour therapy in comparison with other therapy forms reveals a higher effectiveness. In comparison of the different therapeutic approaches of the behaviour therapy intensive behaviour therapy forms and group therapy show a higher effectiveness. Studies related to behaviour therapy based on media support demonstrate a weight reduction both through the interventions of media alone as well as through the intervention of

  4. Targeted Therapy for Melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, Thomas; Moore, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    The research project, entitled ''Targeted Therapy for Melanoma,'' was focused on investigating the use of kidney protection measures to lower the non-specific kidney uptake of the radiolabeled Pb-DOTA-ReCCMSH peptide. Previous published work demonstrated that the kidney exhibited the highest non-target tissue uptake of the 212Pb/203 Pb radiolabeled melanoma targeting peptide DOTA-ReCCMSH. The radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptide analog DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH, which binds the melanocortin-1 receptor over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells, has shown promise as a PRRT agent in pre-clinical studies. High tumor uptake of 212 Pb labeled DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH resulted in tumor reduction or eradication in melanoma therapy studies. Of particular note was the 20-50% cure rate observed when melanoma mice were treated with alpha particle emitter 212 Pb. However, as with most PRRT agents, high radiation doses to the kidneys where observed. To optimize tumor treatment efficacy and reduce nephrotoxicity, the tumor to kidney uptake ratio must be improved. Strategies to reduce kidney retention of the radiolabeled peptide, while not effecting tumor uptake and retention, can be broken into several categories including modification of the targeting peptide sequence and reducing proximal tubule reabsorption.

  5. Profiling Antihypertensive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Anil K.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of treating hypertension are to achieve adequate control of blood pressure (BP) and maintain it under tight control. Maintenance of tight control of BP will most likely prevent stroke, heart attack, and heart failure, cause regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, and quite possibly preserve or improve renal function. The last two salutary effects combined will further reduce the morbidity and mortality in the treated hypertensive subjects. Choice of antihypertensive drugs is of significant importance so that our efforts to control hypertension do not grossly alter the quality of life. The cost of therapy is also an important consideration. Thus, thiazide diuretics, beta-blockers, and central inhibitors that are relatively inexpensive and adequately lower BP should be a common choice. However, if drowsiness interferes with work, or impotence becomes a threat for the marital partner or significant other, adjustment has to be made. The metabolic abnormalities consisting mainly of impaired glucose tolerance, hypercholesterolemia, and insulin resistance often induced by these relatively inexpensive drugs have put calcium channel blocker and ACE inhibitor group of drugs on the top of the list for antihypertensive therapy. They are far more expensive, yet offer no greater antihypertensive advantage than a diuretic or central inhibitor, except in special circumstances.

  6. Photon-activation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable 127 I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors

  7. Therapies in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Joseph; Poewe, Werner

    2012-08-01

    This review examines currently available therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease, emphasizing evidence-based data as well as a patient-centered approach to the treatment of motor and nonmotor symptoms. Although clinical trials of disease-modifying approaches have been thus far disappointing, steady advances are being made in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease. In this review, we focus on recent studies with monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors (selegiline and rasagiline), coenzyme Q10, creatine, and exercise in early Parkinson's disease. We also discuss the relative merits and disadvantages of delaying the initiation of levodopa therapy, the role of dopamine agonists, particularly ropinirole and pramipexole, and management of motor and behavioral complications, such as fluctuations, dyskinesias and impulse-control disorders. Novel formulations and delivery approaches for conventional and new drugs are also discussed. Finally, we review recent studies of surgical treatments of Parkinson's disease, such as deep brain stimulation. Numerous clinical trials have provided evidence that health-related quality of life can be substantially improved with early diagnosis and institution of exercise and other physical measures, appropriate timing of dopaminergic therapy, and strategies to delay and treat levodopa-related motor complications and nonmotor Parkinson's disease-related symptoms.

  8. Therapy of Chlorpromazine Melanosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, A. C.; Nicolson, G. A.; Baker, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    Melanosis observed in association with prolonged chlorpromazine therapy has become a serious problem in mental institutions. Skin pigmentation has produced an appearance which is cosmetically undesirable. Ocular deposits have caused visual impairment. Diffuse visceral involvement has been accompanied by functional disturbances of the involved organs. Withholding chlorpromazine did not diminish the pigment deposits already present in eight patients with chlorpromazine-induced melanosis. Therefore therapy for existing cases and means of preventing this side effect were investigated. A method of blocking melanin synthesis by depressing tyrosinase activity was devised. A copperchelating agent, D-penicillamine, was administered for a period of four weeks (300 mg. three times daily for six days each week, with mineral supplement substituted on the seventh day). Four of six days patients thus treated improved markedly as evidenced by diminution of skin pigmentation. Urinary copper excretion was substantially increased during the trial period. An alternative method of treatment designed to stimulate melatonin production by the pineal gland was employed. Two patients were kept in darkness for a period of four weeks. One improved markedly, the other only slightly. PMID:14201250

  9. Targeted Therapy for Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Thomas [Alphamed, Jackson, TN (United States); Moore, Herbert [Alphamed, Jackson, TN (United States)

    2016-12-05

    The research project, entitled ”Targeted Therapy for Melanoma,” was focused on investigating the use of kidney protection measures to lower the non-specific kidney uptake of the radiolabeled Pb-DOTA-ReCCMSH peptide. Previous published work demonstrated that the kidney exhibited the highest non-target tissue uptake of the 212Pb/203Pb radiolabeled melanoma targeting peptide DOTA-ReCCMSH. The radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptide analog DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH, which binds the melanocortin-1 receptor over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells, has shown promise as a PRRT agent in pre-clinical studies. High tumor uptake of 212Pb labeled DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH resulted in tumor reduction or eradication in melanoma therapy studies. Of particular note was the 20-50% cure rate observed when melanoma mice were treated with alpha particle emitter 212Pb. However, as with most PRRT agents, high radiation doses to the kidneys where observed. To optimize tumor treatment efficacy and reduce nephrotoxicity, the tumor to kidney uptake ratio must be improved. Strategies to reduce kidney retention of the radiolabeled peptide, while not effecting tumor uptake and retention, can be broken into several categories including modification of the targeting peptide sequence and reducing proximal tubule reabsorption.

  10. Emerging Therapies for Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. McClung

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although several effective therapies are available for the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and older men, there remains a need for the development of even more effective and acceptable drugs. Several new drugs that are in late-stage clinical development will be discussed. Abaloparatide (recombinant parathyroid hormone related peptide [PTHrP] analogue has anabolic activity like teriparatide. Recent data from the phase 3 fracture prevention trial demonstrate that this agent is effective in reducing fracture risk. Inhibiting cathepsin K reduces bone resorption without decreasing the numbers or activity of osteoclasts, thereby preserving or promoting osteoblast function. Progressive increases in bone mineral density (BMD have been observed over 5 years. Early data suggest that odanacatib effectively reduces fracture risk. Lastly, inhibiting sclerostin with humanized antibodies promotes rapid, substantial but transient increases in bone formation while inhibiting bone resorption. Marked increases in BMD have been observed in phase 2 studies. Fracture prevention studies are underway. The new therapies with novel and unique mechanisms of action may, alone or in combination, provide more effective treatment options for our patients.

  11. Neutron capture therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.

    1999-11-02

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  12. Neutron capture therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Shefer, Ruth E.; Klinkowstein, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  13. Nanotechnology in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Burcu; Ozpolat, Bulent; Sood, Anil K; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality worldwide and advanced techniques for therapy are urgently needed. The development of novel nanomaterials and nanocarriers has allowed a major drive to improve drug delivery in cancer. The major aim of most nanocarrier applications has been to protect the drug from rapid degradation after systemic delivery and allowing it to reach tumor site at therapeutic concentrations, meanwhile avoiding drug delivery to normal sites as much as possible to reduce adverse effects. These nanocarriers are formulated to deliver drugs either by passive targeting, taking advantage of leaky tumor vasculature or by active targeting using ligands that increase tumoral uptake potentially resulting in enhanced antitumor efficacy, thus achieving a net improvement in therapeutic index. The rational design of nanoparticles plays a critical role since structural and physical characteristics, such as size, charge, shape, and surface characteristics determine the biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, internalization and safety of the drugs. In this review, we focus on several novel and improved strategies in nanocarrier design for cancer therapy.

  14. 42 CFR 410.35 - X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.35 X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope. Medicare Part B pays for X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services, including radium therapy and...

  15. Prolonged Intermittent Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrees, Fahad; Li, Tingting; Vijayan, Anitha

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy (PIRRT) is becoming an increasingly popular alternative to continuous renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. There are significant practice variations in the provision of PIRRT across institutions, with respect to prescription, technology, and delivery of therapy. Clinical trials have generally demonstrated that PIRRT is non-inferior to continuous renal replacement therapy regarding patient outcomes. PIRRT offers cost-effective renal replacement therapy along with other advantages such as early patient mobilization and decreased nursing time. However, due to lack of standardization of the procedure, PIRRT still poses significant challenges, especially pertaining to appropriate drug dosing. Future guidelines and clinical trials should work toward developing consensus definitions for PIRRT and ensure optimal delivery of therapy. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  17. Parathyroid hormone therapy for hypoparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusano, Natalie E.; Rubin, Mishaela R.; Bilezikian, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is a disease characterized by hypocalcemia and insufficient parathyroid hormone (PTH). It is a rare disorder that has been given an orphan disease designation in the United States and European Union. Hypoparathyroidism is the only endocrine deficiency disease for which the missing hormone, PTH, is not yet an approved therapy. Conventional therapy includes calcium and active vitamin D supplementation, often in large doses. Although serum calcium can be controlled with conventional therapy, it can be a challenge and, moreover, does not address other aspects of the disease, such as abnormal skeletal features and reduced quality of life. This review focuses on PTH replacement therapy in hypoparathyroidism, utilizing the full-length molecule PTH(1–84) as well as the fully active but truncated form PTH(1–34). PTH therapy addresses some aspects of the disease not ameliorated with conventional therapy. PMID:25617172

  18. Physics controversies in proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsman, Martijn; Schwarz, Marco; Dong, Lei

    2013-04-01

    The physical characteristics of proton beams are appealing for cancer therapy. The rapid increase in operational and planned proton therapy facilities may suggest that this technology is a "plug-and-play" valuable addition to the arsenal of the radiation oncologist and medical physicist. In reality, the technology is still evolving, so planning and delivery of proton therapy in patients face many practical challenges. This review article discusses the current status of proton therapy treatment planning and delivery techniques, indicates current limitations in dealing with range uncertainties, and proposes possible developments for proton therapy and supplementary technology to try to realize the actual potential of proton therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene therapy of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wei; Tan Jian

    2007-01-01

    Normally, differentiated thyroid carcinoma(DTC) is a disease of good prognosis, but about 30% of the tumors are dedifferentiate, which are inaccessible to standard therapeutic procedures such as 'operation, 131 I therapy and thyroid hormone'. Both internal and abroad experts are researching a new therapy of dedifferentiated thyroid carcinoma--gene therapy. Many of them utilize methods of it, but follow different strategies: (1) transduction of the thyroid sodium/iodide transporter gene to make tissues that do not accumulate iodide treatable by 131 I therapy; (2) strengthening of the anti-tumor immune response; (3) suicide gene therapy; (4) depression the generation of tumor cells; (5) gene therapy of anti- vascularization. (authors)

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Fajardo, Humberto; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Llorens-Arenas, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Bermudez, Jesús; Ruiz-Chow, Ángel; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela

    2015-10-01

    Purpose To analyze the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy for the management of depression and/or psychosis refractory to drug therapy in patients with Parkinson disease.Methods A retrospective study was carried out including patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy during the period between 2002 and 2013. A review of the literature was performed.Results A total of 27 patients were included. In regards to the neuropsychiatric diagnosis, 14 patients had major depression, 12 patients had both psychosis and depression, and only one patient had isolated psychosis. The mean number of electroconvulsive therapy sessions was 12 ± 2.8. After electroconvulsive therapy, all patients showed a statistically significant improvement in the Brief Psychiatric Rating scale (reduction of 52% points) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (reduction of 50% points) independent of the presence of psychosis, depression or both.Conclusion Electroconvulsive therapy is effective for the treatment of refractory neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

  1. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  2. Art therapy in cancer fight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Rodrigues D'Alencar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is the therapeutic use of artistic activity in the context of the professional relationship with people affected by disease, injury or by seeking personal development. This study aims to report the experience of art therapy activities with a group of patients and their caregivers in a university hospital. This is an experience report, in Fortaleza - CE, during September 2010 to February 2011. In the meetings, participated 49 people, who performed activities, using the methods of art therapy, like painting, cutting, drawing, collage, creative visualization and color therapy. In the assessments, after the groups, the participants demonstrated the effects of art therapy, which described that the intervention allowed speak from the process of facing life to cancer fight. It is concluded that the techniques of art therapy provided self-knowledge, self-esteem and redemption sense of well-being with relaxation, and promote happiness and reduce stress.

  3. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasem, Jürgen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is a worldwide health problem whose prevalence is on the increase. Many obesity-associated diseases require intensive medical treatment and are the cause of a large proportion of health-related expenditures in Germany. Treatment of obesity includes nutritional, exercise and behaviour therapy, usually in combination. The goal of behaviour therapy for obesity is to bring about a long-term alteration in the eating and exercise habits of overweight and obese individuals. Under certain circumstances, drug treatment may be indicated. Objectives: What is the effectiveness of behaviour therapy for obesity considering approved drugs reduce weight under medical, economic, ethical-social and legal aspects? Methods: A systematic review was conducted using relevant electronic literature databases. Publications chosen according to predefined criteria are evaluated by approved methodical standards of the evidence-based medicine systematically and qualitatively. Results: In total 18 studies, included one HTA and one meta-analysis could be identified according to the predefined inclusion criteria. Three studies compare behaviour therapy to other therapy forms (advice or instruction on nutritional changes, physical activity or a combination of the two, six studies evaluate different forms of behaviour therapy, four studies and four studies compare behaviour therapies mediated by Internet or telephone. Three studies could be identified examining the effect of the combination of behaviour and drug therapy. Furthermore one HTA and one meta-analysis could be included in the evaluation. The behaviour therapy in comparison with other therapy forms reveals a higher effectiveness. In comparison of the different therapeutic approaches of the behaviour therapy intensive behaviour therapy forms and group therapy show a higher effectiveness. Studies related to behaviour therapy based on media support demonstrate a weight reduction both through the

  4. The physics of proton therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes a...

  5. Interaction Themes in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    Based on a doctoral study, the author presents a type of music therapy interaction called ‘Interaction Themes.’ These are developed from session to session and often appear in music therapy interventions with children with severe functional limitations, especially children with autism. Although...... whose expressions are often difficult to understand. The presented article describes the characteristics and functions of Interaction Themes, compares the phenomenon with music therapy case literature and delimits it in regard to other types of music therapy interaction with this client group....

  6. The physics of proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-04-21

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy.

  7. [Cardiac effects of radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohinen, Suvi; Turpeinen, Anu; Skyttä, Tanja; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Because of increased life-expentancy cancer patients having undergone radiation therapy nowadays live longer, and late-appearing adverse effects are therefore playing a more significant role. Radiation therapy given to the chest is known to approximately double the risk of heart disease, the cumulative total radiation dose being the most important risk-increasing factor. The most significant adverse effects appear only years after the treatment. The mortality from late manifestations reduces the total benefit of radiation therapy. Patients with radiation therapy due to a cancer of the left breast or Hodgkin's lymphoma are particularly susceptible to cardiac effects. A safe radiation dose is not known.

  8. Cell Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Madani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Recently, cell therapy has sparked a revolution in ischemic heart disease that will in the future help clinicians to cure patients. Earlier investigations in animal models and clinical trials have suggested that positive paracrine effects such as neoangiogenesis and anti-apoptotic can improve myocardial function. In this regard the Royan cell therapy center designed a few trials in collaboration with multi hospitals such as Baqiyatallah, Shahid Lavasani, Tehran Heart Center, Shahid rajaee, Masih daneshvari, Imam Reza, Razavi and Sasan from 2006. Their results were interesting. However, cardiac stem cell therapy still faces great challenges in optimizing the treatment of patients. Keyword: Cardiovascular disease, Cell therapy.  

  9. Dosimetry of proton therapy beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andric, S.

    1996-01-01

    Review of basic dosimetry of proton therapy treatment are presented with a goal to further development of the center for proton therapy planed in the frame of accelerator installation TESLA, which construction has been going on in the Vinca Institute. The basic of existing international recommendation for proton dosimetry, related both to dosimeter choice and calibration, as well as to absorbed dose determination methods, are presented. Recommendation statement and supposition in the future proton therapy practice belongs to the basic elements of developed conceptual program for proton therapy usage

  10. The physics of proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy. PMID:25803097

  11. Therapy of atopic eczema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Thomas; Claes, Christa; Kulp, Werner; Greiner, Wolfgang; von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Major objective is the evaluation of the medical effectiveness of different therapeutical approaches and the cost effectiveness with relevance for Germany. Methods This health technology assessment (HTA) evaluates systemically randomized controlled studies (RCT) on the therapy of atopic dermatitis which were published between 1999 and 2004. Further it includes some important clinical studies which have been published after 2004 and other updates the English HTA report by Hoare et al. [1]. Results Topical corticosteroids and topical calcineurin-inhibitors are the principal substances which are currently used for anti-inflammatory therapy in atopic dermatitis. These substances have shown a significant therapeutic efficacy in controlled studies. In newer controlled studies no difference was observable when corticosteroids were applied once or more than once daily onto the skin. Moreover, there is now one controlled study available which points to the fact that an interval therapy with a stronger topical corticosteroid over a limited time (some weeks) may lower the risk of recurrent flares of atopic dermatitis. Both topical calcineurin-inhibitors pimecrolimus and tacrolimus have shown a significant therapeutical efficacy in a number of placebo-controlled prospective studies. The wealth of data is high for these substances. Both substances have been shown to be efficient in infants, children and adult patients with atopic dermatitis. The importance of a so-called basic therapy with emollients which have to be adapted to the current status of skin is generally accepted in clinical practice. Controlled studies show the efficacy of ”basic therapy” - although the level of evidence is quite low for this approach. The skin of patients with atopic dermatitis is colonized in the majority with Staphylococcus aureus, a gram-positive bacterium. Therefore, a therapeutical approach for the treatment of atopic dermatitis is the anti-bacterial or anti-septic treatment

  12. [Acceptance and commitment therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducasse, D; Fond, G

    2015-02-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a third generation of cognitive-behavioral therapies. The point is to help patients to improve their psychological flexibility in order to accept unavoidable private events. Thus, they have the opportunity to invest energy in committed actions rather than struggle against their psychological events. (i) To present the ACT basic concepts and (ii) to propose a systematic review of the literature about effectiveness of this kind of psychotherapy. (i) The core concepts of ACT come from Monestès (2011), Schoendorff (2011), and Harris (2012); (ii) we conducted a systematic review of the literature using the PRISMA's criteria. The research paradigm was « acceptance and commitment therapy AND randomized controlled trial ». The bases of the MEDLINE, Cochrane and Web of science have been checked. Overall, 61 articles have been found, of which, after reading the abstracts, 40 corresponded to the subject of our study. (I) Psychological flexibility is established through six core ACT processes (cognitive defusion, acceptance, being present, values, committed action, self as context), while the therapist emphasizes on experiential approach. (II) Emerging research shows that ACT is efficacious in the psychological treatment of a wide range of psychiatric problems, including psychosis, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, trichotillomania, generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder, eating disorders. ACT has also shown a utility in other areas of medicine: the management chronic pain, drug-dependence, smoking cessation, the management of epilepsy, diabetic self-management, the management of work stress, the management of tinnitus, and the management of multiple sclerosis. Meta-analysis of controlled outcome studies reported an average effect size (Cohen's d) of 0.66 at post-treatment (n=704) and 0.65 (n=580) at follow-up (on average 19.2 weeks later). In studies involving

  13. Iodine neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Kazi Fariduddin

    A new technique, Iodine Neutron Capture Therapy (INCT) is proposed to treat hyperthyroidism in people. Present thyroid therapies, surgical removal and 131I treatment, result in hypothyroidism and, for 131I, involve protracted treatment times and excessive whole-body radiation doses. The new technique involves using a low energy neutron beam to convert a fraction of the natural iodine stored in the thyroid to radioactive 128I, which has a 24-minute half-life and decays by emitting 2.12-MeV beta particles. The beta particles are absorbed in and damage some thyroid tissue cells and consequently reduce the production and release of thyroid hormones to the blood stream. Treatment times and whole-body radiation doses are thus reduced substantially. This dissertation addresses the first of the several steps needed to obtain medical profession acceptance and regulatory approval to implement this therapy. As with other such programs, initial feasibility is established by performing experiments on suitable small mammals. Laboratory rats were used and their thyroids were exposed to the beta particles coming from small encapsulated amounts of 128I. Masses of 89.0 mg reagent-grade elemental iodine crystals have been activated in the ISU AGN-201 reactor to provide 0.033 mBq of 128I. This activity delivers 0.2 Gy to the thyroid gland of 300-g male rats having fresh thyroid tissue masses of ˜20 mg. Larger iodine masses are used to provide greater doses. The activated iodine is encapsulated to form a thin (0.16 cm 2/mg) patch that is then applied directly to the surgically exposed thyroid of an anesthetized rat. Direct neutron irradiation of a rat's thyroid was not possible due to its small size. Direct in-vivo exposure of the thyroid of the rat to the emitted radiation from 128I is allowed to continue for 2.5 hours (6 half-lives). Pre- and post-exposure blood samples are taken to quantify thyroid hormone levels. The serum T4 concentration is measured by radioimmunoassay at

  14. Patients' adherence to antiretroviral therapy at Antiretroviral Therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adherence is the most important factor influencing successful antiretroviral therapy. Long term success with antiretroviral therapy (ART) requires taking 95% of medication. Less than 95% adherence can result in less than optimal therapeutic response and drug resistance. The aim of this study was to determine the ...

  15. Physical therapy and occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radder, D.L.M.; Sturkenboom, I.H.W.M.; Nimwegen, M. van; Keus, S.H.; Bloem, B.R.; Vries, N.M. de

    2017-01-01

    Current medical management is only partially effective in controlling the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. As part of comprehensive multidisciplinary care, physical therapy and occupational therapy aim to support people with Parkinson's disease in dealing with the consequences of their disease in

  16. [Negative pressure therapy: NPT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, H

    2015-01-01

    Negative pressure therapy or treatment (NPT) is used very frequently in hospitals in both surgical and medical departments. NPT consists of maintaining the wound surface at a pressure below ambient atmospheric pressure by means of a specially designed dressing attached to a depressurisation device as well as a system to drain exudate. NPT has been shown to be beneficial in increasing blood flow, thanks to feedback resulting from the decreased oxygen pressure, angiogenesis and reduction of the wound surface area. The French Health Authority (HAS) has issued recommendations for good use in a specific and limited series of applications. NPT may be used in post-traumatic or post-surgical wounds, burns, and in chronic wounds, such as bedsores and ulcers. It is also effective as an adjuvant treatment for infected wounds. In recent years, various different NPT devices have become commercially available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Cell-Based Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kitada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell transplantation is a strategy with great potential for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and many types of stem cells, including neural stem cells and embryonic stem cells, are considered candidates for transplantation therapy. Mesenchymal stem cells are a great therapeutic cell source because they are easy accessible and can be expanded from patients or donor mesenchymal tissues without posing serious ethical and technical problems. They have trophic effects for protecting damaged tissues as well as differentiation ability to generate a broad spectrum of cells, including dopamine neurons, which contribute to the replenishment of lost cells in Parkinson's disease. This paper focuses mainly on the potential of mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic cell source and discusses their potential clinical application in Parkinson's disease.

  18. Cohesion in group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, Gary M; McClendon, Debra Theobald; Alonso, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Cohesion is the most popular of several relationship constructs in the clinical and empirical group therapy literature. This article reviews the most frequently cited definitions and studied measures of group cohesion. We briefly introduce a new measure, the Group Questionnaire, which elucidates group relationships by suggesting two latent factors of cohesion-relationship quality (positive bond, positive work, and negative relationship) and structure factors (member-leader and member-member). To further understand the literature, we conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between cohesion and treatment outcome in 40 studies. Results indicate cohesion that the weighted aggregate correlation was statistically significant with outcome r = .25, k (40), N (3,323), z = 6.54 (p cohesion outcome correlation (age, theoretical orientation, length, and size of group, as well as interventions intended to enhance cohesion). Consideration of measures and practices to improve treatment outcome are highlighted. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres-Barrenechea, E.C.

    2001-01-01

    A ten year study (1988-98) was done at the Veterans Memorial Medical Center on radioiodine (RAI) therapy for hyperthyroidism. A total of 162 patients received 131-I after careful selection hence was included in this study. A predominantly female population was seen (81%) compared to only (19%) males. The most frequent age group were in the third and fourth decades of life. Those included had clinical manifestations of thyrotoxicosis aside from the abnormal thyroid function tests and elevated RAI uptake. Almost all were given antithyroid drugs and beta-blockers prior to RAI ablation. Doses ranged from 7 to 12 mCi depending on gland size and degree of toxicity. Success rate of treatment was 92% which meant that the symptoms were abated and there was shrinkage of the thyroid gland after a single dose of iodine. The most common short term complications were sialitis and local neck tenderness while hypothyroidism was the commonest long term complication. (author)

  20. Premature ejaculation. 3. Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piediferro, Guido; Colpi, Elisabetta M; Castiglioni, Fabrizio; Scroppo, Fabrizio I

    2004-12-01

    Serotonergic drugs (SSRIs) are the most commonly used, but they are characterized by relapse some time after medication interruption as well as by sexual side effects. The efficacy of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors seems excellent, but the risk of tachyphylaxis has been reported. The former (fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, clomipramine) should be used in young patients with hyper-orgasmic forms, while the latter (sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil) should be used in hypo-orgasmic forms, in old age or when PE is associated with erectile dysfunction. Topical anesthetics provide satisfactory results in premature ejaculation due to hypersensitivity of the glans, and physiotherapy of the pelvic floor muscles proves successful in cases associated with pelvic floor dysfunction. Therapeutic associations and psycho-sexual therapy techniques may improve results, particularly in the long term.

  1. Gene therapy for hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Herzog, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors. PMID:25553466

  2. Therapie des Harnwegsinfekts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoiser B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Harnwegsinfektionen gehören zu den häufigsten entzündlichen Erkrankungen im niedergelassenen Bereich. Eine intelligente Therapiestrategie stellt damit nicht nur eine klinische Herausforderung dar, sondern ermöglicht rasche Heilung, Vermeidung von Resistenzbildungen sowie oft unnötiger, teurer diagnostischer Schritte. Der erste entscheidende Schritt ist die genaue Klassifizierung des Harnweginfektes – asymptomatische Bakteriurie bis zur komplizierten Pyelonephritis. Hier entscheiden sich bereits Aggressivität der Behandlung sowie diagnostischer Aufwand. Für die Entwicklung einer empirischen antimikrobiellen Therapie ist die Kenntnis der häufigsten Erreger sowie lokaler Resistenzmuster wichtig. Bei gezieltem Vorgehen können die meisten Harnwegsinfekte ohne erhöhten diagnostischen Aufwand therapiert werden.

  3. Onychomycosis: features external therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Zaslavsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Onychomycosis - one of the most frequent diseases with defeat of a nail bed, matrics and nail plate of a fungal origin. Frequency of an onychomycosis in Russia reaches 5% (to 15 million people, and practically every tenth visit of the dermatologist is connected with this pathology. Treatment of an onychomycosis still remains very difficult task. Application of varnishes, ointments with antimycotics and local agents on an oil basis has an essential shortcoming - insufficient receipt of a preparation to the center of pathological changes. It is supposed that for optimum therapy it is necessary to influence: first, from frontal and distal part of a nail, secondly, to apply aqueous-alcoholic solutions of a preparation which can freely get into subnail spaces with the phenomena of an onycholysis. For example, it has been shown highly efficient application of naftifina a hydrochloride under control of solution of the diamond green, showing diffusion distribution active ingredient to subnail space and on channels.

  4. [Types of insulin therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez de la Fuente, J; Granja Berna, V; Ferrari Piquero, J M; Valero Zanuy, M A; Herreros de Tejada López-Coterilla, A

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease associated with a series of long-term microvascular and macrovascular complications that requires continuing therapeutic control. In recent years, the pharmaceutical industry has developed new types of insulin and administration systems in order to more closely mimic human insulin secretion. In this way, insulin therapy is divided into conventional and intensive regimens according to their complexity. In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients, the treatment of choice is the one which achieves intensive glycemic control. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, we can start with a simplified conventional regimen which could progress into an intensive one similar to that of T1DM treatment. Both types of diabetes require an individualized treatment prescription based on the needs and characteristics of each patient.

  5. Gene therapy in keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahgol Farjadnia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus (KC is the most common ectasia of the cornea and is a common reason for corneal transplant. Therapeutic strategies that can arrest the progression of this disease and modify the underlying pathogenesis are getting more and more popularity among scientists. Cumulating data represent strong evidence of a genetic role in the pathogenesis of KC. Different loci have been identified, and certain mutations have also been mapped for this disease. Moreover, Biophysical properties of the cornea create an appropriate candidate of this tissue for gene therapy. Immune privilege, transparency and ex vivo stability are among these properties. Recent advantage in vectors, besides the ability to modulate the corneal milieu for accepting the target gene for a longer period and fruitful translation, make a big hope for stupendous results reasonable.

  6. Neuroimaging and electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, Tom G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the 1970s, a number of neuroimaging studies of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) have been conducted to elucidate the working action of this highly efficacious treatment modality. The technologies used are single photon emission tomography, positron emission tomography, magnetic...... in localized cortical and subcortical areas of the brain and have revealed differences in neurophysiology and metabolism between the hyperactive ictal state and the restorative interictal/postictal periods. Recent magnetic resonance imaging studies seem to pave way for new insights into ECT's effects...... on increased connectivity in the brain during depression. CONCLUSION: The existing data reveal considerable variations among studies and therefore do not yet allow the formulation of a unified hypothesis for the mechanism of ECT. The rapid developments in imaging technology, however, hold promises for further...

  7. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy & Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Gulbrandsen, Knut Arild

    Coaching is an expanding area of professional work, and recent years have brought forward the notion of cognitive coaching (Costa, 2006; Oestrich, 2005) which adapts theory and techniques from cognitive therapy to serve self-enhancement in non-clinical populations. We suggest that a cognitive...... coaching module in the graduate curriculum for students of psychology is a rewarding introduction to cognitive behavioural approaches, since it allows combination of traditional lectures with “action-reflection-learning” workshops, during which students train cognitive behavioural techniques in their own...... repertoire. The skills needed for cognitive coaching reflect all therapeutic techniques but at a less advanced psychotherapeutic level, and still prepare for future clinical work and development. In the poster, we summarise a cognitive coaching course syllabus as well as results from data collected...

  8. Accelerators for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlit, W.

    1994-01-01

    In the past decades circular and linear electron accelerators have been developed for clinical use in radiation therapy of tumors with the aim of achieving a high radiation dose in the tumor and as low as possible dose in the adjacent normal tissues. Today about one thousand accelerators are in medical use throughout the world and many hundred thousand patients are treated every day with accelerator-produced radiation. There exists, however, a large number of patients who cannot be treated satisfactorily in this way. New types of radiations such as neutrons, negative pions, protons and heavy ions were therefore tested recently. The clinical experience with these radiations and with new types of treatment procedures indicate that in future the use of a scanning beam of high energy protons might be optimal for the treatment of tumors. (orig.)

  9. Perioperative allergy: therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajno, G B; Crisafulli, G; Caminiti, L; Marseglia, G L; Cardinale, F; Paravati, F; Caffarelli, C

    2011-01-01

    Perioperative allergic reactions manifest in various ways. The majority of systemic reactions occur during anesthesia within minutes of intravenous induction; however, agents which are administered via other routes may cause reactions after more than 15 minutes. Anaphylaxis during anesthesia may present in many different ways and the signs and symptoms, which do not vary from those of anaphylactic reactions in general, may be masked by hypovolemia, light, deep anesthesia or extensive regional blockade. Recommendations for treatment are based on available evidence in the literature. A treatment algorithm is suggested, with emphasis on the incremental titration of adrenaline and fluid therapy as first-line treatment. Increased focus on this subject will hopefully lead to prompt diagnosis and rapid, correct treatment.

  10. A Phase 3 Trial of 2 Years of Androgen Suppression and Radiation Therapy With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Final Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase 3 Randomized Trial NRG Oncology RTOG 9902

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosents@sutterhealth.org [Radiation Oncology, Sutter Cancer Centers, Roseville, California (United States); Hunt, Daniel [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sartor, A. Oliver [Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Pienta, Kenneth J. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gomella, Leonard [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grignon, David [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Rajan, Raghu [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kerlin, Kevin J. [Community Clinical Oncology Program, Southeast Cancer Control Consortium, Inc, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiation Oncology, Sutter Cancer Centers, Roseville, California (United States); Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Dobelbower, Michael [University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Shipley, William U. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zeitzer, Kenneth [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Donavanik, Viroon [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, Wilmington, Delaware (United States); Rotman, Marvin [State University of New York Health Science Center–Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Hartford, Alan C. [Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Michalski, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Seider, Michael [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Kim, Harold [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); and others

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Long-term (LT) androgen suppression (AS) with radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment of high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 was a randomized trial testing the hypothesis that adjuvant combination chemotherapy (CT) with paclitaxel, estramustine, and oral etoposide plus LT AS plus RT would improve overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Patients with high-risk PCa (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score [GS] ≥7 or clinical stage ≥T2 and GS ≥8) were randomized to RT and AS (AS + RT) alone or with adjuvant CT (AS + RT + CT). CT was given as four 21-day cycles, delivered beginning 28 days after 70.2 Gy of RT. AS was given as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for 24 months, beginning 2 months before RT plus an oral antiandrogen for 4 months before and during RT. The study was designed based on a 6% improvement in OS from 79% to 85% at 5 years, with 90% power and a 2-sided alpha of 0.05. Results: A total of 397 patients (380 eligible) were randomized. The patients had high-risk PCa, 68% with GS 8 to 10 and 34% T3 to T4 tumors, and median prostate-specific antigen of 22.6 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.2 years. The trial closed early because of excess thromboembolic toxicity in the CT arm. The 10-year results for all randomized patients revealed no significant difference between the AS + RT and AS + RT + CT arms in OS (65% vs 63%; P=.81), biochemical failure (58% vs 54%; P=.82), local progression (11% vs 7%; P=.09), distant metastases (16% vs 14%; P=.42), or disease-free survival (22% vs 26%; P=.61). Conclusions: NRG Oncology RTOG 9902 showed no significant differences in OS, biochemical failure, local progression, distant metastases, or disease-free survival with the addition of adjuvant CT to LT AS + RT. The trial results provide valuable data regarding the natural history of high-risk PCa treated with LT AS + RT and have implications for

  11. Immunosupportive therapies in aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fülöp, Tamas; Larbi, Anis; Hirokawa, Katsuiku; Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Lesourd, Bruno; Castle, Stephen; Wikby, Anders; Franceschi, Claudio; Pawelec, Graham

    2007-01-01

    The primary role of the immune system is to protect the organism against pathogens, but age-associated alterations to immunity increase the susceptibility of the elderly to infectious disease. The exact nature of these changes is still controversial, but the use of screening procedures, such as the SENIEUR protocol to exclude underlying illness, helped to better characterize the changes actually related to physiological aging rather than pathology. It is generally agreed that the most marked changes occur in the cellular immune response reflecting profound alterations in T cells. Much of this is due to thymic involution as well as changes in the proportions of T cell subpopulations resulting from antigen exposure, and altered T cell activation pathways. However, a body of data indicates that innate immune responses, including the critical bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and antigen presenting capacity are not completely resistant to senescence processes. The consequences of all these alterations are an increased incidence of infections, as well as possibly cancers, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases. The leading question is what, if anything, can we do to prevent these deleterious changes without dangerously dysregulating the precarious balance of productive immunity versus immunopathology? There are many potential new therapeutic means now available to modulate immunosenescence and many others are expected to be available shortly. One main problem in applying these experimental therapies is ethical: there is a common feeling that as ageing is not a disease; the elderly are not sick and therefore do not require adventurous therapies with unpredictable side-effects in mostly frail individuals. Animal models are not helpful in this context. In this chapter we will first briefly review what we think we know about human immunosenescence and its consequences for the health status of elderly individuals. We will then discuss possible

  12. Interventional MR: interstitial therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Mack, M.G.; Straub, R.; Engelmann, K.; Eichler, K. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Mueller, P.K. [Department of Radiology, Virchow, Humboldt Univ. of Berlin (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    The rationale and results for interstitial therapies via interventional MRI in the treatment of tumors in various regions are presented. Different interstitial treatment techniques are presented based on varying technologies both for tumor ablation and treatment monitoring. Data are presented based on 335 patients, 29-84 years of age (mean age 59 years, 196 men and 139 women) with a total of 932 liver tumors, 16 head and neck tumors and 14 abdominal recurrent pelvic and lymphatic tumors. All lesions had been treated with MR-guided laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) via 2516 laser applications and 1856 cannulations. Data in the literature are extremely varying depending on author experience, treatment technique, and the included patient material. In our patient material we were able to achieve a local tumor control of 96.7 % depending on the size of the tumorous lesion, the topographical relationship, and the applied laser parameters. The overall cumulative survival rate of patients with liver metastases was 45.74 months (median 40.97 months, 95 % confidence interval 31.42-50.52). The cumulative survival rate of the patient group with hepatic metastases of colorectal carcinoma was 42.71 months (median 39.33 months, 95 % confidence interval 33.26-45.37). In patients with head and neck tumors a relevant reduction in clinically relevant symptoms such as pain, swallowing disorders, or nervous compression was achieved in 11 of 15 patients treated with LITT. In 14 soft tissue tumors, such as pelvic tumor recurrence and lymph node metastases, a local tumor control was obtained in 68 % of lesions. Interstitial therapies under interventional MRI guidance, such as LITT, results in a high local tumor control with an improved survival rate. (orig.) With 7 figs., 28 refs.

  13. Development of copepod nauplii to copepodites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Wollenberger, Leah; Halling-Sørensen, Bent

    2001-01-01

    , known for their differing effects on the vertebrate estrogen system, were potent inhibitors of naupliar development. Other estrogens, 17b-estradiol, estrone, and bisphenol A, had little potency. Testosterone and progesterone did not inhibit development, but the antiandrogen flutamide had inhibitory......Test compounds including natural hormones, endocrine disrupters, environmentally occurring compounds, and reference compounds were tested for acute toxicity and inhibitory effect on larval development in the copepod Acartia tonsa. Three compounds, 17a-ethinylestradiol, p-octylphenol, and tamoxifen...... of the 17 test compounds had 50% lethal concentration to 50% effective concentration (EC50) ratios higher than 10. The results suggest that naupliar development, as a parameter, is able to detect hormonal disrupters in addition to other chemicals that have other specific modes of action....

  14. Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... studied in the WHI trials? Is there an optimal age at which to initiate MHT or an optimal duration of therapy that maximizes benefits and minimizes ... PubMed Abstract] Holmberg L, Anderson H. HABITS (hormonal replacement therapy after breast cancer―is it safe?), a ...

  15. Music Therapy with Premature Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Jayne

    2003-01-01

    Over 20 years of research and clinical practice in music therapy with premature infants has been compiled into this text designed for Board Certified Music Therapists specializing in Neonatal Intensive Care clinical services, for NICU medical staff incorporating research-based music therapy into developmental care plans, and for parents of…

  16. Emerging targeted therapies for melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Douglas B; Pollack, Megan H; Sosman, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive cutaneous malignancy associated with poor response to traditional therapies. Recent regulatory approval for immune checkpoint inhibitors and agents targeting mutated BRAF has led to a tremendous expansion of effective treatment options for patients with advanced melanoma. Unfortunately, primary or acquired resistance develops in most patients, highlighting the need for additional therapies. Numerous genetic and other molecular features of this disease may provide effective targets for therapy development. This article reviews available melanoma treatments, including immune and molecularly-targeted therapies. We then discuss agents in development, with a focus on targeted (rather than immune) therapies. In particular, we discuss agents that block mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, as well as other emerging approaches such as antibody-drug conjugates, cell-cycle targeting, and novel genetically-informed clinical trials. Despite the incredible advances in melanoma therapeutics over the last several years, a clear need to develop more effective therapies remains. Molecularly-targeted therapy approaches will likely remain a cornerstone of melanoma treatment in parallel to immune therapy strategies.

  17. When to start antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens D; Babiker, Abdel G; Gordin, Fred M

    2013-01-01

    Strategies for use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) have traditionally focused on providing treatment to persons who stand to benefit immediately from initiating the therapy. There is global consensus that any HIV+ person with CD4 counts less than 350 cells/μl should initiate ART. However, it rema...

  18. Family Therapy and Psychosomatic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Edward M.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the use of family therapy in dealing with illnesses such as childhood diabetes, asthma, pain, and anorexia nervosa. Marital and family therapy may be effective in treating some psychosomatic problems. Family assessment is helpful in the management of all psychosomatic problems. (Author/JAC)

  19. Radiation therapy in palliative care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Hitoshi; Nishitani, Hiromu

    2005-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a valuable treatment for palliation of local symptoms with consistently high response rates in the relief and control of bone pain, neurological symptom, obstructive symptoms, and tumor hemorrhage. Over than 80% of patients who developed bone metastasis and superior vena cava syndrome obtained symptom relief by radiation therapy. Radiation therapy is also well established as an effective treatment for brain metastasis, improving symptoms and preventing progressive neurological deficits, and recently stereotactic irradiation had became a alternative treatment of surgery for small metastatic brain tumors. Both radiation therapy and surgery are effective in the initial treatment of malignant spinal cord compression syndrome, and no advantages of surgery over radiation therapy has been demonstrated in published series when patients have a previously conformed diagnosis of malignant disease and no evidence of vertebral collapse. The outcome of treatment depends primarily upon the speed of diagnosis and neurological status at initiation of treatment. It is very important to start radiation therapy before patient become non-ambulant. Low irradiation dose and short treatment period of palliative radiation therapy can minimize disruption and acute morbidity for the patients with advanced cancer with enabling control of symptoms and palliative radiation therapy is applicable to the patient even in poor general condition. (author)

  20. Learning theory and gestalt therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, R; Bauer, R; Kannarkat, J

    1976-01-01

    This article discusses the theory and operations of Gestalt Therapy from the viewpoint of learning theory. General comparative issues are elaborated as well as the concepts of introjection, retroflextion, confluence, and projection. Principles and techniques of Gestalt Therapy are discussed in terms of learning theory paradigm. Practical implications of the various Gestalt techniques are presented.

  1. Orchidectomy and oestrogen therapy revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P

    1998-01-01

    , orchidectomy is indicated when an immediate reduction of testosterone levels is required, or the patient does not comply with other treatments or objects to the cost of medical therapy. Oestrogen therapy may be superior to castration in terms of efficacy, but orally administered oestrogens are associated...

  2. The Strategic Systems Therapies: Measuring the Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbaugh, Michael

    As family therapy becomes a serious intellectual disipline, the relationships among its leading variations require closer examination. To examine similarities and differences among four closely related approaches (brief, problem-focused therapy; structural family therapy; strategic family therapy; and systemic family therapy) and to determine if…

  3. Hormone therapy and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal and postmenopau...... therapy each year. CONCLUSION: Regardless of the duration of use, the formulation, estrogen dose, regimen, progestin type, and route of administration, hormone therapy was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer.......CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal...... and postmenopausal women receiving different hormone therapies. DESIGN AND SETTING: Nationwide prospective cohort study including all Danish women aged 50 through 79 years from 1995 through 2005 through individual linkage to Danish national registers. Redeemed prescription data from the National Register...

  4. Particle therapy for noncancer diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert, Christoph; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Biophysics Department, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Philipps-University Marburg, Center for Radiology, Department of Radiation Therapy, Baldinger Strasse, 35043 Marburg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Biophysics Department, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Hochschulstrasse 3, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany) and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    Radiation therapy using high-energy charged particles is generally acknowledged as a powerful new technique in cancer treatment. However, particle therapy in oncology is still controversial, specifically because it is unclear whether the putative clinical advantages justify the high additional costs. However, particle therapy can find important applications in the management of noncancer diseases, especially in radiosurgery. Extension to other diseases and targets (both cranial and extracranial) may widen the applications of the technique and decrease the cost/benefit ratio of the accelerator facilities. Future challenges in this field include the use of different particles and energies, motion management in particle body radiotherapy and extension to new targets currently treated by catheter ablation (atrial fibrillation and renal denervation) or stereotactic radiation therapy (trigeminal neuralgia, epilepsy, and macular degeneration). Particle body radiosurgery could be a future key application of accelerator-based particle therapy facilities in 10 years from today.

  5. [Radiation therapy for malignant tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shumei; Konishi, Koji

    2008-04-01

    Radiation therapy uses ionizing radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors, with consideration to minimize harmful damages to health tissues. About 30% of all people with cancer are treated with radiation therapy, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. Radiation therapy may be internal or external. In brachytheraphy as the internal radiation therapy the radioisotope is implanted into or near the tumor by tubes as the container. And it is often used for patients with the tongue cancer. External radiation, the type most often used, comes from a machine outside the body. It is usually used for shrinking tumors with bony invasions such as gingival cancer and improving the pain in patients with bony metastasis. For the primary bone tumor the radiation therapy is not always used because the radiosensitivity of the almost primary bone tumor is low.

  6. Chemosensory alterations and cancer therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartoshuk, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Taste and olfaction provide sensory information and sensory pleasure. Cancer therapies affect both. Chemotherapy has not been shown to produce dramatic losses of taste or smell, but systematic studies on various chemotherapeutic agents and types of cancer are lacking. Radiation therapy does produce clear losses of both taste and smell. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy alter the pleasure produced by taste and smell through the formation of conditioned aversions. That is, foods consumed in proximity with the nausea of therapy come to be unpleasant. The impact of conditioned aversions can be diminished by providing a scapegoat food just before therapy. Alterations in foods may be beneficial to the cancer patient. Increasing the concentrations of flavor ingredients can compensate for sensory losses, and providing pureed foods that retain the cognitive integrity of a meal can benefit the patient who has chewing or swallowing problems

  7. The physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Khan's classic textbook on radiation oncology physics is now in its thoroughly revised and updated Fourth Edition. It provides the entire radiation therapy team—radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists—with a thorough understanding of the physics and practical clinical applications of advanced radiation therapy technologies, including 3D-CRT, stereotactic radiotherapy, HDR, IMRT, IGRT, and proton beam therapy. These technologies are discussed along with the physical concepts underlying treatment planning, treatment delivery, and dosimetry. This Fourth Edition includes brand-new chapters on image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and proton beam therapy. Other chapters have been revised to incorporate the most recent developments in the field. This edition also features more than 100 full-color illustrations throughout.

  8. Comparison microbial killing efficacy between sonodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drantantiyas, Nike Dwi Grevika; Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Nasution, Aulia M. T.

    2016-11-01

    Biofilm is a way used by bacteria to survive from their environmental conditions by forming colony of bacteria. Specific characteristic in biofilm formation is the availability of matrix layer, known as extracellular polymer substance. Treatment using antibiotics may lead bacteria to be to resistant. Other treatments to reduce microbial, like biofilm, can be performed by using photodynamic therapy. Successful of this kind of therapy is induced by penetration of light and photosensitizer into target cells. The sonodynamic therapy offers greater penetrating capability into tissues. This research aimed to use sonodynamic therapy in reducing biofilm. Moreover, it compares also the killing efficacy of photodynamic therapy, sonodynamic therapy, and the combination of both therapeutic schemes (known as sono-photodynamic) to achieve higher microbial killing efficacy. Samples used are Staphylococcus aureus biofilm. Treatments were divided into 4 groups, i.e. group under ultrasound treatment with variation of 5 power levels, group of light treatment with exposure of 75s, group of combined ultrasound-light with variation of ultrasound power levels, and group of combined lightultrasound with variation of ultrasound power levels. Results obtained for each treatment, expressed in % efficacy of log CFU/mL, showed that the treatment of photo-sonodynamic provides greater killing efficacy in comparison to either sonodynamic and sono-photodynamic. The photo-sonodynamic shows also greater efficacy to photodynamic. So combination of light-ultrasound (photo-sonodynamic) can effectively kill microbial biofilm. The combined therapy will provide even better efficacy using exogenous photosensitizer.

  9. Immunosupportive therapies in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas Fülöp

    2007-04-01

    subpopulations resulting from antigen exposure, and altered T cell activation pathways. However, a body of data indicates that innate immune responses, including the critical bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and antigen presenting capacity are not completely resistant to senescence processes. The consequences of all these alterations are an increased incidence of infections, as well as possibly cancers, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases. The leading question is what, if anything, can we do to prevent these deleterious changes without dangerously dysregulating the precarious balance of productive immunity versus immunopathology? There are many potential new therapeutic means now available to modulate immunosenescence and many others are expected to be available shortly. One main problem in applying these experimental therapies is ethical: there is a common feeling that as ageing is not a disease; the elderly are not sick and therefore do not require adventurous therapies with unpredictable side-effects in mostly frail individuals. Animal models are not helpful in this context. In this chapter we will first briefly review what we think we know about human immunosenescence and its consequences for the health status of elderly individuals. We will then discuss possible interventions that might one day become applicable in an appropriate ethical environment.Keywords: immunosenescence, T cells, phagocytic cells, nutrition, vaccination, exercise, CMV, inflammaging, IRP, immunorestorative therapies

  10. Mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy; Diagnostik und Therapie des Mammakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Uwe; Baum, Friedemann (eds.) [Diagnostisches Brustzentrum Goettingen BZG, Goettingen(Germany)

    2014-11-01

    The book on mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy covers the following issues: development, anatomy and physiology of the mammary glands, pathology of benign and malign mammary gland changes, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography; ultrasonic mammography; magnetic resonance tomography of the mammary glands; imaging diagnostics findings; mammary interventions; examination concepts; operative therapy of the mammary carcinoma; chemotherapy of the mammary carcinoma; radio-oncological therapy of the mammary carcinoma; logistics in a medical center for mammary gland diseases; logistics in an interdisciplinary center for mammary diseases; dialogue conduction and psycho-social attendance.

  11. Intensive Insulin Therapy: Tight Blood Sugar Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intensive insulin therapy: Tight blood sugar control Intensive insulin therapy can help prevent long-term diabetes complications. Consider the ... cases if you have type 2 diabetes — intensive insulin therapy may be the key to long-term ...

  12. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormone replacement therapy and your heart Are you taking — or considering — hormone therapy to treat bothersome menopausal symptoms? Understand ... you. By Mayo Clinic Staff Long-term hormone replacement therapy used to be routinely prescribed for postmenopausal ...

  13. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chicago Learn More Close The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy ASGCT is the primary membership organization for scientists, ... Therapeutics Official Journal of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Molecular Therapy is the leading journal for gene ...

  14. Therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Toru; Nakamori, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult diseases to cure. Japan pancreas society guidelines for management of pancreatic cancer indicate therapeutic algorithm according to the clinical stage. For locally limited pancreatic cancer (cStage I, II, III in Japanese classification system), surgical resection is recommended, however prognosis is still poor. Major randomized controlled trials of resected pancreatic cancer indicates that adjuvant chemotherapy is superior to observation and gemcitabine is superior to 5-fluorouracil (FU). For locally advanced resectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in Japanese classification system (JCS)), we perform neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Phase I study established a recommended dose of 800 mg gemcitabine and radiation dose of 36 Gy. For locally advanced nonresectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in JCS), chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy is recommended. Although pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy resistant tumor, systemic chemotherapy is recommended for metastatic pancreatic cancer (cStage IVb in JCS). Single-agent gemcitabine is the standard first line agent for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy showed possibility of survival benefit of gemcitabine combination chemotherapy over gemcitabine alone. We hope gemcitabine combination chemotherapy or molecular targeted therapy will improve prognosis of pancreatic cancer in the future. (author)

  15. Neurobrucellosis: Challenges for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Alothman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Brucellosis is a common zoonotic infection throughout the world, and is endemic in Saudi Arabia. Neurobrucellosis is a rare, severe form of systemic brucella infection. Treatment of neurobrucellosis continues to be variable, depending on the location of diagnosis. Methods A retrospective patient chart review was undertaken from 1995 to 2010 at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, to identify cases of neurobrucellosis following a proposed case definition. Follow-up visits were evaluated to determine response to treatment. Results A total of 22 cases of neurobrucellosis were identified from a total of 517 cases of brucellosis. The mean patient age was 42.5 years with a male to female ratio of 1:1. Most antibiotic combinations included doxycycline, rifampin, and cotrimoxazole (36%. Three patients received ciprofloxacin in combination with other antibiotics and showed a satisfactory response. Conclusion Combination of antibrucella antibiotics is recommended, but there are no clear guidelines regarding antibiotic selection and duration of therapy. The use of ciprofloxacin in cases of neurobrucellosis should be evaluated.

  16. [Dignity therapy in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Carla Ida

    2016-04-01

    In oncology, little is known about dignity, dignity-related distress and the issues that influence the sense of dignity for patients. Dignity is personal, subject to changes depending on the experience and the path of life. In oncology some patients feel that their dignity is directly related to the disease, to physical and emotional symptoms, to the highest level of physical and cognitive autonomy and to the continuity of the self. Patient dignity inventory (PDI) is a validate tool designed to measure various sources of dignity-related distress among patients nearing the end of life and serve as a screening tool to assess a broad range of issues that influence the sense of dignity. Dignity therapy is a novel focused psychotherapy consisting in a brief semi-structured interview, audio-recorded and transcribed in order to obtain the "generativity document". The patients are invited to tell about their life history, and to leave words of guidance and offer instructions to pass along to their son, daughters, husband, wife, parents, others. The generativity document is the result of process of emotional and existential care for the patients and a gift for everybody will receive it.

  17. Principles of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, M.P.; Share, F.S.; Goodman, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation oncology now represents the integration of knowledge obtained over an 80-year period from the physics and biology laboratories and the medical clinic. Such integration is recent; until the supervoltage era following World War II, the chief developments in these three areas for the most part were realized independently. The physics and engineering laboratories have now developed a dependable family of sources of ionizing radiations that can be precisely directed at tumor volumes at various depths within the body. The biology laboratory has provided the basic scientific support underlying the intensive clinical experience and currently is suggesting ways of using ionizing radiations more effectively, such as modified fractionation schedules relating to cell cycle kinetics and the use of drugs and chemicals as modifiers of radiation response and normal tissue reaction. The radiation therapy clinic has provided the patient stratum on which the acute and chronic effects of irradiation have been assessed, and the patterns of treatment success and failure identified. The radiation therapist has shared with the surgeon and medical oncologist the responsibility for clarifying the natural history of a large number of human neoplasms, and through such clarifications, has developed more effective treatment strategies. Several examples of this include the improved results in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease, squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, seminoma, and epithelial neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract

  18. [Therapy of tic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessner, Veit; Schoenefeld, Katia; Buse, Judith; Wanderer, Sina; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2012-07-01

    Tremendous progress has taken place in the last 8 years since the publication of our review on «Therapy of Tic Disorders» in the Zeitschrift für Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie. Several steps in treatment have been specified. For example, consensus-based indications for treatment have been published, and a detailed manual for a so-called habit-reversal training program has been developed and evaluated. In addition, new treatment options such as aripiprazole and deep-brain stimulation have been implemented. Increasing attention is being given to the disabling consequences of the commonly co-occurring psychiatric conditions known as ADHD or OCD. Nevertheless, there is still much to be learned about the treatment of tic disorders; standardized and sufficiently large drug trials in patients with tic disorders fulfilling evidence-based medicine standards are still scarce. The same is true for direct comparisons of different agents as well as of medication versus behavioral treatment. Finally, the question of how to predict the individual course of tics and how best to deal with the problems of waxing and waning of tics in this context still limits evidence base for treatment decisions. Large clinical experience is still a pre-requisite for making optimal decisions for the treatment of individual patients suffering from a tic disorder.

  19. Dietary Therapies for Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H Kossoff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since their introduction in 1921, high-fat, low-carbohydrate "ketogenic" diets have been used worldwide for refractory childhood epilepsy. Approximately half of the children have at least half their seizures reduced, including 15% who are seizure free. The mechanisms of action of dietary therapies are under active investigation and appear to involve mitochondria. Once perceived as a last resort, modifications to initiation and maintenance, as well as the widespread use of pre-made ketogenic formulas have allowed dietary treatment to be used earlier in the course of epilepsy. For infantile spasms (West syndrome specifically, the ketogenic diet is successful about 50% of the time as a first-line treatment. New "alternative" diets such as the modified Atkins diet were created in 2003 and can be started more easily and are less restrictive. They may have particular value for countries in Asia. Side effects include constipation, dyslipidemia, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones. Additionally, neurologists are studying ketogenic diets for conditions other than epilepsy, including Alzheimer's disease, autism, and brain tumors.

  20. [Mirror therapy in hemiplegic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisalde-Rodríguez, María Elena; Garcia-Fernández, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Mirror therapy is a relatively new intervention, every time more used and with easy access for the rehabilitation treatment of stroke patient. The patient moves the unaffected limb in front of a mirror watching the reflection of that move as if he was moving de affected limb. To analyze the effectiveness of mirror therapy in the sensorimotor function, hemineglect and activities of daily living of stroke patients. We defined a strategy of bibliography search in Medline, EMBASE, PEDro y Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) looking for randomised controlled trials (RCT) conducted with hemiplegic patients considering mirror therapy as the main rehabilitation intervention. Seven trials met the inclusion criteria with medium-high methodological quality. Most of them evaluate the mirror therapy effect on motor outcomes showing significant improvements. Three of this RCTs evaluate the effect of mirror therapy on the hemineglect with positive result. A combination of mirror therapy with conventional rehabilitation obtained significant improvements mainly in motor function but not that much on sensory function and functional performance. About the effect of mirror therapy on hemineglect, there are significant improvements but supported only with a few RCTs with small sample sizes producing promising but inconclusive results.

  1. Systematic reviews informing occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sally; Hoffmann, Tammy; McCluskey, Annie; Coghlan, Nicole; Tooth, Leigh

    2013-01-01

    We sought to identify and describe the number, topics, and publishing trends of systematic reviews relevant to occupational therapy indexed in the OTseeker database. We performed a cross-sectional survey of the systematic reviews contained in OTseeker in December 2011. Of the 1,940 systematic reviews indexed in OTseeker, only 53 (2.7%) were published in occupational therapy journals. The most common diagnostic categories were stroke (n = 195, 10.1%) and affective disorders (n = 204, 10.5%). The most common intervention categories were consumer education (n = 644, 33.2%) and psychosocial techniques (n = 571, 29.4%). Only 390 (20.1%) of the 1,940 systematic reviews specifically involved occupational therapy. Occupational therapists need to search broadly to locate relevant systematic reviews or, alternatively, to use databases such as OTseeker. Clarity about the involvement of occupational therapy in reports of future research will improve the ability to identify occupational therapy research for all stakeholders. Finally, occupational therapy practitioners need to read systematic reviews critically to determine whether review conclusions are justified. Copyright © 2013 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  2. Gene therapy and reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stribley, John M; Rehman, Khurram S; Niu, Hairong; Christman, Gregory M

    2002-04-01

    To review the literature on the principles of gene therapy and its potential application in reproductive medicine. Literature review. Gene therapy involves transfer of genetic material to target cells using a delivery system, or vector. Attention has primarily focused on viral vectors. Significant problems remain to be overcome including low efficacy of gene transfer, the transient expression of some vectors, safety issues with modified adenoviruses and retroviruses, and ethical concerns. If these issues can be resolved, gene therapy will be applicable to an increasing spectrum of single and multiple gene disorders, as the Human Genome Project data are analyzed, and the genetic component of human disease becomes better understood. Gynecologic gene therapy has advanced to human clinical trials for ovarian carcinoma, and shows potential for the treatment of uterine leiomyomata. Obstetric applications of gene therapy, including fetal gene therapy, remain more distant goals. Concerns about the safety of human gene therapy research are being actively addressed, and remarkable progress in improving DNA transfer has been made. The first treatment success for a genetic disease (severe combined immunodeficiency disease) has been achieved, and ongoing research efforts will eventually yield clinical applications in many spheres of reproductive medicine.

  3. A Functionally Significant Cross-talk between Androgen Receptor and ErbB2 Pathways in Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Naderi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have identified novel subgroups in ER-negative breast cancer based on the expression pattern of androgen receptor (AR. One subtype (molecular apocrine has an over-expression of steroid-response genes and ErbB2. Using breast cancer cell lines with molecular apocrine features, we demonstrate a functional cross-talk between AR and ErbB2 pathways. We show that stimulation of AR and ErbB2 pathways leads to the cross-regulation of gene expression for AR, ErbB2, FOXA1, XBP1, TFF3, and KLK3. As opposed to the physiologic transient phosphorylation of extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK1/2 observed with the testosterone treatment, we demonstrate that the addition of ErbB2 inhibition leads to a persistent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which negatively regulates the downstream signaling and cell growth. This suggests a mechanism for the cross-talk involving the ERK pathway. Moreover, testosterone stimulates the proliferation of molecular apocrine breast cell lines, and this effect can be reversed using antiandrogen flutamide and anti-ErbB2 AG825. Conversely, the growth stimulatory effect of heregulin can also be inhibited with flutamide, suggesting a cross-talk between the AR and ErbB2 pathways affecting cell proliferation. Importantly, there is a synergy with the combined use of flutamide and AG825 on cell proliferation and apoptosis, which indicates a therapeutic advantage in the combined blockage of AR and ErbB2 pathways.

  4. Anogenital distance plasticity in adulthood: implications for its use as a biomarker of fetal androgen action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rod T; Mungall, Will; McKinnell, Chris; Sharpe, Richard M; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Milne, Laura; Smith, Lee B

    2015-01-01

    Androgen action during the fetal masculinization programming window (MPW) determines the maximum potential for growth of androgen-dependent organs (eg, seminal vesicles, prostate, penis, and perineum) and is reflected in anogenital distance (AGD). As such, determining AGD in postnatal life has potential as a lifelong easily accessible biomarker of overall androgen action during the MPW. However, whether the perineum remains androgen responsive in adulthood and thus responds plastically to perturbed androgen drive remains unexplored. To determine this, we treated adult male rats with either the antiandrogen flutamide or the estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) for 5 weeks, followed by a 4-week washout period of no treatment. We determined AGD and its correlate anogenital index (AGI) (AGD relative to body weight) at weekly intervals across this period and compared these with normal adult rats (male and female), castrated male rats, and appropriate vehicle controls. These data showed that, in addition to reducing circulating testosterone and seminal vesicle weight, castration significantly reduced AGD (by ∼17%), demonstrating that there is a degree of plasticity in AGD in adulthood. Flutamide treatment increased circulating testosterone yet also reduced seminal vesicle weight due to local antagonism of androgen receptor. Despite this suppression, surprisingly, flutamide treatment had no effect on AGD at any time point. In contrast, although DES treatment suppressed circulating testosterone and reduced seminal vesicle weight, it also induced a significant reduction in AGD (by ∼11%), which returned to normal 1 week after cessation of DES treatment. We conclude that AGD in adult rats exhibits a degree of plasticity, which may be mediated by modulation of local androgen/estrogen action. The implications of these findings regarding the use of AGD as a lifelong clinical biomarker of fetal androgen action are discussed.

  5. Severe gynecomastia due to anti androgens intake: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chentli Farida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gynecomastia is the most bothersome side effect in men taking antiandrogens. It is exceptionally severe and distressing physically and mentally as in the reported case. A man, aged 63, with a history of a well-treated macroprolactinoma, was referred in 2004 for gynecomastia that appeared after treatment by microsurgery, radiotherapy and flutamide for a lesion suspected to be prostate cancer. Clinical examination was normal except for huge enlargement of the breasts. Mammography and breasts MRI did not show any tumor. There was not any metastasis of the supposed prostate cancer and prostatic acid phosphates were within normal ranges. Hormonal exploration showed subclinical hypogonadism [testosterone: 7.4 ng/ml (n: 3-9, FSH: 14.9 mu/ml (n: 0.7-11 and LH: 9.7 mu/ml (n: 0.8-7.6]. Testes ultrasounds were normal. Radiological and hormonal adrenal explorations were normal [Cortisol: 76 ng/ml (n: 50-250, DHEA-S: 59 μg/ml (n: 50-560, E2:40.2 pg/ml (n < 50]. Body scan was normal too. The discussed etiologies were post radiation subclinical hypogonadism, and treatment with anti androgens. After flutamide withdraw, there was not any sign of prostate cancer recurrence, and gynecomastia decreased significantly, but did not disappear probably because of fibrosis.

  6. Therapy: a new nonsurgical therapy option for benign thyroid nodules?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increasing implementation of iodization programs, benign nodular thyroid disease will remain a prevalent therapeutic concern for decades. recent research suggests that nonsurgical therapy, including radioactive iodine, radiofrequency thermal ablation and percutaneous laser ablation...

  7. Proton-therapy and hadron-therapy ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissonnat, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the ARCHADE project (Advanced Resource Center for Hadron-therapy in Europe), a research project in Carbone ion beam therapy and clinical Proton-therapy, this work investigates the beam monitoring and dosimetry aspects of ion beam therapy. The main goal, here, is to understand the operating mode of air ionization chambers, the detectors used for such applications. This study starts at a very fundamental level as the involved physical and chemical parameters of air were measured in various electric field conditions with dedicated setups and used to produce a simulation tools aiming at reproducing the operating response in high intensity PBS (Pencil Beam Scanning) coming from IBA's (Ion Beam Applications) next generation of proton beam accelerators. In addition, an ionization chamber-based dosimetry equipment was developed, DOSION III, for radiobiology studies conducted at GANIL under the supervision of the CIMAP laboratory. (author)

  8. Traditional Therapies for Severe Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Eileen; Hoyte, Flavia C L

    2016-08-01

    Severe asthma is a complex and heterogeneous disease. The European Respiratory Society and American Thoracic Society guidelines define severe asthma for patients 6 years or older as "asthma which requires treatment with high-dose inhaled corticosteroids…plus a second controller or systemic corticosteroids to prevent it from becoming 'uncontrolled' or which remains 'uncontrolled' despite this therapy." This article reviews available traditional therapies, data behind their uses in severe asthma, and varying recommendations. As various asthma endotypes and phenotypes are better understood and characterized, targeted therapies should help improve disease outcomes, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Family therapy and clinical psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    1995-01-01

    The results of a survey of 111 clinical psychologists in the Republic of Ireland along with some comparable data from US and UK surveys were used to address a series of questions about the link between family therapy and clinical psychology. Family therapy was not a clearly identifiable sub-specialty within clinical psychology in Ireland. Family therapy theoretical models were used by more than a quarter of the Irish sample to conceptualize their work but by less than a tenth of US and UK res...

  10. [Music therapy on Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côrte, Beltrina; Lodovici Neto, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    This study is a result of a qualitative research, in the Gerontology and Music therapy scenario. It was analyzed the importance of alternative practices like playing an instrument (piano, violin, etc.), singing, or practicing a guided musical exercise as a therapy activity for elder people with Parkinson Disease. The analysis, systematization and interpretation of the data pointed: music therapy is an excellent way to improve the life of the patient that becomes more sociable, decreasing physical and psychological symptoms ('symptomatology') and the subject change for a singular and own position in the relation with your disease and the people around.

  11. Regenerative Therapy for Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narsis Daftarian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in various disciplines of basic sciences including embryology, molecular and cell biology, genetics, and nanotechnology, as well as stem cell biology have opened new horizons for regenerative therapy. The unique characteristics of stem cells prompt a sound understanding for their use in modern regenerative therapies. This review article discusses stem cells, developmental stages of the eye field, eye field transcriptional factors, and endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. Recent studies and challenges in the application of stem cells for retinal pigment epithelial degeneration models will be summarized followed by obstacles facing regenerative therapy.

  12. Bone changes from prostaglandin therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poznanski, A.K.; Fernbach, S.K.; Berry, T.E.; Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL

    1985-01-01

    Prostaglandin E therapy in infants causes periosteal elevation. Although the changes usually take 30-40 days to become visible, we have seen them as early as nine days. In 15 infants who had prostaglandin E therapy for over six days, three developed periosteal elevation. Three other cases are described in greater detail, with long-term follow-up in two in which the bone remodeled to normal. Gallium scan in one showed increased uptake in areas involved. The periosteal cloaking may mimic Caffey disease but the pattern of involvement is different, since the mandible, which is commonly affected in Caffey disease, is rarely involved in prostaglandin E therapy. (orig.)

  13. Hadron accelerators in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaldi, U.; Silari, M.

    1997-01-01

    The application of hadron accelerators (protons and light ions) in cancer therapy is discussed. After a brief introduction on the rationale for the use of heavy charged particles in radiation therapy, a discussion is given on accelerator technology and beam delivery systems. Next, existing and planned facilities are briefly reviewed. The Italian Hadrontherapy Project (the largest project of this type in Europe) is then described, with reference to both the National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy and the design of two types of compact proton accelerators aimed at introducing proton therapy in a large number of hospitals. Finally, the radiation protection requirements are discussed. (author)

  14. Wanted: entrepreneurs in occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kristin M; Nelson, David L

    2011-01-01

    The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) has challenged occupational therapy practitioners to advance the profession so that we may become more "powerful" and "widely recognized" by the year 2017 (AOTA, 2007a). To fully achieve this vision, this article argues that the profession should encourage occupational therapy entrepreneurship. As Herz, Bondoc, Richmond, Richman, and Kroll (2005, p.2) stated, "Entrepreneurship may provide us with the means to achieve the outcomes we need to succeed in the current health care environment." This article also argues the urgency of seizing the many opportunities that entrepreneurship offers and recommends specific actions to be taken by AOTA and by therapists.

  15. Mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Uwe; Baum, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    The book on mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy covers the following issues: development, anatomy and physiology of the mammary glands, pathology of benign and malign mammary gland changes, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography; ultrasonic mammography; magnetic resonance tomography of the mammary glands; imaging diagnostics findings; mammary interventions; examination concepts; operative therapy of the mammary carcinoma; chemotherapy of the mammary carcinoma; radio-oncological therapy of the mammary carcinoma; logistics in a medical center for mammary gland diseases; logistics in an interdisciplinary center for mammary diseases; dialogue conduction and psycho-social attendance.

  16. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the endometrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potish, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common malignant tumor in the female genital tract. Radiation therapy continues to play a major role in the management of endometrial carcinoma, both as primary therapy and as adjuvant treatment. The utility of pelvic external beam therapy and intracavitary therapy is long established. However, the modern era of surgical staging has lead to an appreciation of the role of radiation therapy beyond the pelvis. Radiation therapy has been shown to be of particular benefit in peritoneal and nodal spread. The classic management of endometrial cancer is reviewed and relatively new and somewhat controversial topics, such as preoperative intracavitary therapy followed by external beam therapy are discussed

  17. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yaowen; Cao Yongzhen; Li Jin; Wang Qin

    2008-01-01

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  18. Chemotherapy and molecular target therapy combined with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy has been established as standard treatment approach for locally advanced head and neck cancer, esophageal cancer and so on through randomized clinical trials. However, radiation-related morbidity such as acute toxicity also increased as treatment intensity has increased. In underlining mechanism for enhancement of normal tissue reaction in chemo-radiation therapy, chemotherapy enhanced radiosensitivity of normal tissues in addition to cancer cells. Molecular target-based drugs combined with radiation therapy have been expected as promising approach that makes it possible to achieve cancer-specific enhancement of radiosensitivity, and clinical trials using combined modalities have been performed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In order to obtain maximum radiotherapeutic gain, a detailed understanding of the mechanism underlying the interaction between radiation and Molecular target-based drugs is indispensable. Among molecular target-based drugs, inhibitors targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its signal transduction pathways have been vigorously investigated, and mechanisms regarding the radiosensitizing effect have been getting clear. In addition, the results of randomized clinical trials demonstrated that radiation therapy combined with cetuximab resulted in improvement of overall and disease-specific survival rate compared with radiation therapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer. In this review, clinical usefulness of chemo-radiation therapy and potential molecular targets for potentiation of radiation-induced cell killing are summarized. (author)

  19. Gestalt therapy and cognitive therapy--contrasts or complementarities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnesvang, Jan; Sommer, Ulla; Hammink, James; Sonne, Mikael

    2010-12-01

    The article investigates the relationship between crucial concepts and understandings in gestalt therapy and cognitive therapy aiming at discussing if and how they can be mutually enriching when considered as complementary parts in a more encompassing integrative therapeutic approach. It is argued that gestalt therapy, defined as a field-theoretical approach to the study of gestalt formation process, can complement the schema-based understanding and practice in cognitive therapy. The clinical benefits from a complementary view of the two approaches will be a wider scope of awareness toward individual and contextual aspects of therapeutic change processes, toward different levels of memory involved in these processes, and toward the relationship between basic needs, sensation and cognition in therapeutic work. Further, a dialogue between the two approaches will pave the way for addressing the connection between fundamental awareness work in gestalt therapy and the tendency within cognitive therapy toward incorporating mindfulness as a therapeutic tool. In the conclusion of the article, additional complementary points between the two approaches are outlined. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Effectiveness of hypnosis therapy and Gestalt therapy as depression treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth González-Ramírez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the effectiveness of two psychological therapies to treat depression in the Culiacan population, Mexico. According to criteria of MINI (international Neuropsychiatric interview, 30 individuals from a total of 300 were selected and diagnosed with some kind of depression. Patients were divided in three groups: 1 treatment with hypnosis therapy, 2 treatment with Gestalt-hypnosis therapy, and 3 control group. Before and after the treatments the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI was applied to know the depression level of the analyzed groups. The results show that the three groups were presenting a moderated level of depression. The groups under hypnosis therapy and Gestalt-hypnosis therapy show statistical differences between pre-test and post-test. The hypnosis therapy shows significant statistic differences to treat depression with respect to the other two groups. In conclusion, the therapeutic hypnosis is an effective treatment and has relevance to treat depression, while other therapeutic treatments tend to be slow and with minor result. This study is the first of this kind carried out in Culiacan in Sinaloa, Mexico.