WorldWideScience

Sample records for anti-satellite defence

  1. Defence Science Library

    OpenAIRE

    Director DESIDOC

    2002-01-01

    DESIDOC functions as a central agency of Defence Research & Development Organization (DRDO) for collecting, processing and disseminating scientific and technical information for the scientists and Technologists of the Organization in particular and the Ministry of Defence in general. The Centre aims to meet the current and futuristic information requirements of these personnel. The task of gathering information for high-tech Defence projects requires trained information scientists having ...

  2. Defence Science Library

    OpenAIRE

    Director DESIDOC

    1990-01-01

    DESIDOC functions as a central agency of Defence Research & Development Organization (DRDO) for collecting, processing and disseminating scientific and technical information for the scientists and Technologists of the Organization in particular and the Ministry of Defence in general. The Centre aims to meet the current and futuristic information requirements of these personnel. The task of gathering information for high-tech Defence projects requires trained information scientists having suff...

  3. Chemical defences against herbivores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavia, Henrik; Baumgartner, Finn; Cervin, Gunnar;

    2012-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the recent and emerging research involving chemical defences against herbivory in aquatic primary producers. It provides an overview of plant chemical defence theories and highlights recent research on aquatic primary producers addressing a number of aspects of these...

  4. A new strategy of counterattacking anti-satellite based on motion camouflage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RADICE; Gianmarco

    2010-01-01

    Motion Camouflage (MC) is illuminated as a novel strategy in counterattacking anti-satellite by way of stealth trajectory scheduling. The dynamics model of MC in space is developed and a quadratic function with three boundary constraints is employed for trajectory determination. Based on the model a scenario is set to run the simulation. The results indicate given the designed acceleration input, the predator will be moved following a prescribed route, which precisely locates the predator between two objects at each time instant. In the last approaching phase, the motion is achieved with a big bumping rate which guarantees the power of this striking. Methods for deriving minimum fuel cost in the fixed approaching duration and the minimum approaching duration in limited acceleration input are proposed and are verified in the simulation. At last, camouflage is recognized as a multi-faceted affair, in which stealth trajectory design is considered an effective technique in stealth cooperation.

  5. New materials in defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National defence is very important and always needs new such materials which have technological and socio-economic development of human society. The types of materials used by a society reflect its level of sophistication. These modern materials are basically the same conventional materials but with a greater knowledge content which include superalloys, modern polymers, engineering ceramics and the advanced composite. The production and use of new materials is playing and important role in the recent development in the defence industry. (A.B.)

  6. On the defence notion

    CERN Document Server

    Bonfante, Anne

    2007-01-01

    'Trojan horses', 'logic bombs', 'armoured viruses' and 'cryptovirology' are terms recalling war gears. In fact, concepts of attack and defence drive the world of computer virology, which looks like a war universe in an information society. This war has several shapes, from invasions of a network by worms, to military and industrial espionage ...

  7. NATO Defence Planning Process. Implications for defence posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Fleischer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The NATO Defence Planning Process (NDPP is the most important element affecting the Alliance's defence posture. Under the process states commit themselves to provide capabilities and forces required to fulfil NATO missions, defined in the NATO Strategic Concept. The NDPP directly affects national defence plans by harmonizing them with identified security and defence objectives as well by influencing development of the novel national defence capabilities. The emergence of new threats in the NATO environment, demands modifications in the defense planning process and establishing new goals for the Alliance. Enhancement of the NDPP should be priority during the time of unrest.

  8. TNO and CBRN defence

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Within the Defence, Safety & Security branch of TNO a dedicated department focuses on Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Protection. This is a world class research department consisting of about 50 people and a High Tox laboratory that is the only facility in The Netherlands that is allowed by the Chemical Weapons Treaty to produce and handle Chemical Warfare Agents (CWA’s). The CBRN department has a laboratory facility for synthesis of and working with live CWA’s or Toxic ...

  9. Computers in Air Defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V.S. Rao

    1987-10-01

    Full Text Available With man's mastery over the third dimension - the near atmosphere and space- it has become increasingly necessary to protect oneself not merely from attacks from land and the sea but, more importantly, from attacks from the air. This was recognised even during the World War II and a rudimentary air defence capability was sought to be established; by the manul (visual surveillance and the anti-aircraft guns. The advent of radar signified a major advance in air defence technology and techniques. Rather than depend on visual observation and the hazards and limitations thereof, it became possible with radar to detect the presence of flying objects at much great distances. The PPI display of a conventional air-surveillance radar permits an operator to scan the sky for several hundreds of kilometers all around. Early radar-based air defence systems were dependent on human observation and decision making for detecting targets, identifying them, deciding on interception strategy and for recovering the interceptor after completion of his mission. This was feasible because, with a radar of between 200 to 400 kilometers and aircraft speeds in the range of 500 kilometers per hour, upto 30 minutes warning was available before the target was overhead.

  10. Current Status of Radioisotope Applications in Defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Bhatnagar

    1987-07-01

    Full Text Available Reviews the current status of radioisotope applications in Defence- R&D Establishments, Defence Inspectorates, Ordnance Factories, Public Sector Undertakings under the Defence Ministry, Army, Navy and Air Force Establishments and Military Hospitals. It also lists the users of film badge service in Defence. Training programmes in radioisotope applications in Defence conducted by DRDO organisations have also been highlighted.

  11. Inducible chemical defences in animals

    OpenAIRE

    Heyttyey, Attila; Tóth, Zoltán; Buskirk, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is extremely widespread in the behaviour, morphology and life-history of animals. However, inducible changes in the production of defensive chemicals are described mostly in plants and surprisingly little is known about similar plasticity in chemical defences of animals. Inducible chemical defences may be common in animals because many are known to produce toxins, the synthesis of toxins is likely to be costly, and there are a few known cases of animals adjusting their t...

  12. Defence Food Research in India

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, T. R.

    1984-01-01

    "The Defence Food Research Laboratory, Mysore, is a major centre of research in India, particularly in defence feeding. It is multi-disciplinary laboratory, well equipped to do research work in food technology, food preservation, packaging, nutrition and biochemistry and food microbiology. Special emphasis is laid on development of light weight processed food suiting Indian palate. This paper gives a bird's eye view of the activities and achievements of the laboratory and indicates the...

  13. In Defence of Pashukanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Koen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay presents an extended defence of the general theory of law formulated by the Bolshevik jurist, Evgeny Pashukanis, and published in his Law and Marxism: A General Theory in 1924. The general theory is a theory of the legal form. Although Pashukanis did not name his theory, it has become known as the commodity form theory of law because of its theorising the legal form as a homologue of the commodity form. However, despite having weighty Marxist and revolutionary Bolshevik credentials, the general theory has been subjected to sustained attack, especially from new left and neo-Marxist circles. This essay identifies and explicates six major objections to Pashukanism from its left critics. These are that the general theory is too abstract to comprehend the reality of legal relations; that it is infused with economic reductionism; that it derives the legal form wrongly from commodity exchange; that it classifies the legal form incorrectly as an attribute of capitalism only; that it lacks the generality required of a general theory of law; and that it is imbricated in the growth of anarchism and Stalinism. Following a brief exegetical exercise, the bulk of the essay is devoted to demonstrating in detail that each of the six objections to the general theory is without merit, and that none makes any serious incursion into its integrity as a theory of the legal form. The central submission of the essay is that the Pashukanist general theory of law is rooted in the first principles of classical Marxism and hence may lay claim legitimately to being the Marxist theory of law.

  14. In Defence of the Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    In response to the lecture format coming under "attack" and being replaced by online materials and smaller tutorials, this paper attempts to offer not only a defence but also to assert that the potential value of the lecture is difficult to replicate through other learning formats. Some of the criticisms against lectures will be…

  15. SELF-DEFENCE IN SPECIAL SITUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamya-Diana HĂRĂTĂU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the reality of practical cases and in certain special situations, self-defence may present some complex forms consisting either in accidental amplification of the issue in fact when self-defence is claimed, or in the correlation in fact of self-defence to other cases which remove the criminal nature of act1. For these reasons, we decided to analyse few of such special situations.

  16. Defence counsel in international criminal law

    OpenAIRE

    Wilt, de, HGJ; Sluiter, G.K.; Temminck Tuinstra, J.P.W.

    2009-01-01

    The field of international criminal law is relatively new and rapidly developing. This dissertation examines whether international criminal courts enable defence counsel to conduct an effective defence. When the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda (the ad hoc Tribunals) were set up in the mid-nineties to prosecute those responsible for serious violations of international humanitarian law, not much thought had been given to the organisation of the defence. The...

  17. THE HARBOUR DEFENCE MOTOR LAUNCHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.H. Rice

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the handiest small craft to emerge from the Second World War was the 72 fet Harbour Defence Motor Launch. It's purpose was to patrol harbours and their approaches and to guard against attack by swimmers or underwater vehicles such as 'chariots' or even submarines. For this task the craft was fitted with a small ASDIC outfit and carried eight depth charges. Surface armament comprised a three-pounder gun on the foredeck, twin Lewis guns on the bridge and a 20 mm Oerlikon aft.

  18. Smart officers for Smart Defence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John

    2014-01-01

    , Sweden, and Finland—have conducted joint training courses for decades and are considering ways to facilitate cooperation in the education of the field-grade officers that would populate the staff of any future NATO-led expeditionary operation. We suggest three alternative paths that increased cooperation...... in PME at the level of the command and staff course could take: a Nordic Defence College, standardized national command and staff courses, and a core curriculum of common courses for common purposes. We conclude with a discussion of how the Alliance can facilitate clusters of cooperation between...

  19. Defence electro-optics: European perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartikainen, Jari

    2011-11-01

    In 2009 the United States invested in defence R&T 3,6 times and in defence research and development 6,8 times as much as all member states of the European Defence Agency (EDA) combined while the ratio in the total defence expenditure was 2,6 in the US' favour. The European lack of investments in defence research and development has a negative impact on the competitiveness of European defence industry and on the European non-dependence. In addition, the efficiency of investment is reduced due to duplication of work in different member states. The Lisbon Treaty tasks EDA to support defence technology research, and coordinate and plan joint research activities and the study of technical solutions meeting future operational needs. This paper gives an overview how EDA meets the challenge of improving the efficiency of European defence R&T investment with an emphasis on electro-optics and describes shortly the ways that governmental and industrial partners can participate in the EDA cooperation. Examples of joint R&T projects addressing electro-optics are presented.

  20. Defence counsel in international criminal law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P.W. Temminck Tuinstra

    2009-01-01

    The field of international criminal law is relatively new and rapidly developing. This dissertation examines whether international criminal courts enable defence counsel to conduct an effective defence. When the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda (the ad hoc Tribun

  1. Radiation meters for civil defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical requirements for the radiation meters used in civil defence are specified in the guide. The aim of the requirements is to quarantee sufficient measurement accuracy and reliable operation even in extreme environmental conditions. The guide is based on the following standards: (1) IEC 846 'Beta, X and gamma radiation dose equivalent and dose equivalent rate meters for use in radiation protection', (2) IEC 1017-1 'Portable, transportable of installed X or gamma radiation ratemeters for environmental monitoring, part 1: Ratemeters', and (3) IEC 45 B (Secretariat) 104 'Direct reading, personnel dose equivalent and/or dose equivalent rate monitors for X, gamma and high energy beta radiation'. (12 refs., 5 tabs.)

  2. Altruistic defence behaviours in aphids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodeur Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altruistic anti-predatory behaviours pose an evolutionary problem because they are costly to the actor and beneficial to the recipients. Altruistic behaviours can evolve through indirect fitness benefits when directed toward kin. The altruistic nature of anti-predatory behaviours is often difficult to establish because the actor can obtain direct fitness benefits, or the behaviour could result from selfish coercion by others, especially in eusocial animals. Non-eusocial parthenogenetically reproducing aphids form colonies of clone-mates, which are ideal to test the altruistic nature of anti-predatory defence behaviours. Many aphids release cornicle secretions when attacked by natural enemies such as parasitoids. These secretions contain an alarm pheromone that alerts neighbours (clone-mates of danger, thereby providing indirect fitness benefits to the actor. However, contact with cornicle secretions also hampers an attacker and could provide direct fitness to the actor. Results We tested the hypothesis that cornicle secretions are altruistic by assessing direct and indirect fitness consequences of smearing cornicle secretions onto an attacker, and by manipulating the number of clone-mates that could benefit from the behaviour. We observed parasitoids, Aphidius rhopalosiphi, foraging singly in patches of the cereal aphid Sitobion avenae of varied patch size (2, 6, and 12 aphids. Aphids that smeared parasitoids did not benefit from a reduced probability of parasitism, or increase the parasitoids' handling time. Smeared parasitoids, however, spent proportionately more time grooming and less time foraging, which resulted in a decreased host-encounter and oviposition rate within the host patch. In addition, individual smearing rate increased with the number of clone-mates in the colony. Conclusions Cornicle secretions of aphids were altruistic against parasitoids, as they provided no direct fitness benefits to secretion

  3. Network security defence methods in IHEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is about the network security defence method and technique at IHEP. Including: the experience, research result and application in network outlet security, server security, local network security, network security monitoring and collecting evidence, anti-virus etc

  4. Biotechnology in defence (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lazar Mathew

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Biotechnology, in its present perspective, encompasses activities, such as recombination of genes; cloning, or making genetically identical copies of a living thing; and splicing of genes from DNA of one organism into the genome of unrelated species, to create new, self-reproducing forms of life. The vast potential of biotechnology is being increasingly realised, and efforts are in progress to harness it for improving quality and quantity of bio-weapons, The bio-weapons, as such, are highly attractive because of their non-detection by routine security systems, ease of access, low production cost and easy transportation, A wide range of genetically manipulated organisms and their by-products are considered to have an added advantage, because these genetically manipulated biologics not only accentuate the existing properties of bio-weapons, but also could be made target-specific. Biotechnology, if used prudently, can play a significant role to counter such threats of biologics, viz., by producing (i bio-armoury comprising powerful antibiotics, antisera toxoids and vaccines to neutralise and eliminate a wide range of diseases, and (ii bio-sensors for rapid detection, identification and neutralisation of biological warfare agents. This article elucidates some facets of biological warfare, legal protective strategies emphasised through international consultation, cooperation and adherence to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention, and discusses how biotechnology could be effectively used to strengthen countries' defence and combat the threat of biological warfare.

  5. Host defences against Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Romero, G; Quintero, J; Astiazarán-García, H; Velazquez, C

    2015-08-01

    Giardia spp. is a protozoan parasite that inhabits the upper small intestine of mammals and other species and is the aetiological agent of giardiasis. It has been demonstrated that nitric oxide, mast cells and dendritic cells are the first line of defence against Giardia. IL-6 and IL-17 play an important role during infection. Several cytokines possess overlapping functions in regulating innate and adaptive immune responses. IgA and CD4(+) T cells are fundamental to the process of Giardia clearance. It has been suggested that CD4(+) T cells play a double role during the anti-Giardia immune response. First, they activate and stimulate the differentiation of B cells to generate Giardia-specific antibodies. Second, they act through a B-cell-independent mechanism that is probably mediated by Th17 cells. Several Giardia proteins that stimulate humoral and cellular immune responses have been described. Variant surface proteins, α-1 giardin, and cyst wall protein 2 can induce host protective responses to future Giardia challenges. The characterization and evaluation of the protective potential of the immunogenic proteins that are associated with Giardia will offer new insights into host-parasite interactions and may aid in the development of an effective vaccine against the parasite. PMID:26072999

  6. Quality Management System for Defence Aeronautical Industry

    OpenAIRE

    K.T. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Indian defence aeronautical industry, while becoming a global business, demands a largeeffort to monitor quality management system (QMS) and to ensure quality of aeronauticalproducts. An effort is being made to look for an effective QMS for aeronautical industry in India,which will also meet the requirements of the regulatory authority.The essential features of an effective QMS are described and compared with the presentlyavailable QMS standards for defence aeronautical industry such as QCSR:...

  7. On Cuneo's Defence of The Parity Premise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.J.E. Rutten

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In his book 'The Normative Web' Terence Cuneo provides a core argument for a paradigmatic instance of moral realism. At the heart of this instance lies the ontological thesis that there are irreducible moral facts. The parity premise is the first and main premise of Cuneo's core argument. It claims that 'if moral facts do not exist, then epistemic facts do not exist'. In this paper I first introduce and explain Cuneo's core argument. Subsequently I present and interpret his defence of the parity premise. It will be shown that Cuneo's defence, although intriguing, is not adequate and should therefore be refuted.

  8. Quality Management System for Defence Aeronautical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.T. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Indian defence aeronautical industry, while becoming a global business, demands a largeeffort to monitor quality management system (QMS and to ensure quality of aeronauticalproducts. An effort is being made to look for an effective QMS for aeronautical industry in India,which will also meet the requirements of the regulatory authority.The essential features of an effective QMS are described and compared with the presentlyavailable QMS standards for defence aeronautical industry such as QCSR: 2002 (DGAQA, India,Def Stan (MOD, UK, ISO, AQAPs (NATO and Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE aerospacestandards (AS. Evolution, relevance and review of the existing standards, to meet the requirementsof the industry as well as regulatory authority, have been made to bring out the special featuresand differences. The study leads to the most acceptable standard of SAE-AS-9100 (Rev B.With suitable modifications to include regulatory requirement of assistance for governmentquality assurance in the standard, when complied with, it will fully meet the QMS requirementsof the Indian defence aeronautical supply organisations as well as the requirements of theregulatory authority. Minor reorientation of the regulatory functions and inclusion of the QMSin the defence aeronautical supply orders are also suggested.

  9. Salicylic acid-independent plant defence pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    1999-01-01

    Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule involved in both locally and systemically induced disease resistance responses. Recent advances in our understanding of plant defence signalling have revealed that plants employ a network of signal transduction pathways, some of which are independen

  10. The Man-in-the-Middle Defence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ross

    The man-in-the-middle defence is all about rehabilitating Charlie. For 20 years we’ve worried about this guy in the middle, Charlie, who’s forever intercalating himself into the communications between Alice and Bob, and people have been very judgemental about poor Charlie, saying that Charlie is a wicked person. Well, we’re not entirely convinced.

  11. Public Private Business Models for Defence Acquisition - A Multiple Case Study of Defence Acquisition Projects in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Ekström, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Since the ending of the Cold War, the defence sector, particularly the areas of military logistics and defence acquisition, has been undergoing a comprehensive transformation. There are several factors that explain this transformation: changes in defence and security policies for nations and organisations; reductions in defence expenditure; participation in Peace Support Operations; Lessons Learned from these operations, especially in the area of logistics; revolutionary development in the ar...

  12. The European Security and Defence Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    -making capacities and capabilities. For many years, a genuine European defence policy remained a distant dream for an exclusive group of political leaders from federally oriented states such as Belgium and Luxembourg. Yet since 1999, the EU has carried out 23 military missions in the Balkans, Africa and Asia. The...... Union is thus gradually emerging as an important player on the international scene, with a strategic vision, as well as diplomatic, civilian and military crisis-management instruments that complement the existing economic, commercial, humanitarian and development policies on which the EU has hitherto...... built its reputation as a ‘soft power'. Despite its rapid development, many still regard the EU as weak and ineffi cient when it comes to security and defence policy. Moreover, the EU struggles with internal divisions and has a strained relationship with NATO. Nonetheless, there are good reasons to...

  13. Atopic dermatitis : Aspects of defence defects

    OpenAIRE

    Hagströmer, Lena

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease, typically with a chronic relapsing course and a defective skin barrier function. Recently, mutations of the skin barrier gene encoding filaggrin have been reported in a portion of the patients. In this thesis some aspects of defence defects in AD were studied. In paper I, the risk of developing any cancer was increased by 13%. Excess risks were observed for cancers of the esophagus, pancreas, brain, and lung and for...

  14. Collection Development in Defence Science Library

    OpenAIRE

    Sumati Sharma; Anil Kumar Singh; Vijay Lakshmi Kakkar

    2002-01-01

    Basic elements of collection development process are presented in this paper. Collection development of Defence Science Library is discussed in detail. Data presented in the paper reflects that there is a steep fall in the number of titles subscribed during last six years. On the other hand reference collection of library has become richer during past few years. Resource sharing is discussed as a solution to overcome the problem of increased cost of publications and present financial crunch.h...

  15. Collection Development in Defence Science Library

    OpenAIRE

    Sumati Sharma; Anil Kumar Singh; Vijay Lakshmi Kakkar

    1994-01-01

    Basic elements of collection development process are presented in this paper. Collection development of Defence Science Library is discussed in detail. Data presented in the paper reflects that there is a steep fall in the number of titles subscribed during last six years. On the other hand reference collection of library has become richer during past few years. Resource sharing is discussed as a solution to overcome the problem of increased cost of publications and present financial crunch.

  16. Bacterial strategies to overcome insect defences.

    OpenAIRE

    Vallet-Gely, Isabelle; Lemaitre, Bruno; Boccard, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    Recent genetic and molecular analyses have revealed how several strategies enable bacteria to persist and overcome insect immune defences. Genetic and genomic tools that can be used with Drosophila melanogaster have enabled the characterization of the pathways that are used by insects to detect bacterial invaders and combat infection. Conservation of bacterial virulence factors and insect immune repertoires indicates that there are common strategies of host invasion and pathogen eradication. ...

  17. The Man-in-the-Middle Defence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ross; Bond, Mike

    Eliminating middlemen from security protocols helps less than one would think. EMV electronic payments, for example, can be made fairer by adding an electronic attorney - a middleman which mediates access to a customer’s card. We compare middlemen in crypto protocols and APIs with those in the real world, and show that a man-in-the-middle defence is helpful in many circumstances. We suggest that the middleman has been unfairly demonised.

  18. Fungi Encountered on Footwear and Defence Articles

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, O. P.; Sharma, K. D.

    1980-01-01

    A study of mycoflora on footwears and defence articles from Agra city was made. In all 38 fungi belonging to different genera were recorded. Out of these, 17 fungal species were isolated for the first on these articles. A new variety i.e., Aspergillus sydowii var. agraii Sharma and Sharma was also created. Species of Aspergillus, Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Drechslera, Alternaria, Fusarium and Trichoderma were found to be dominant in all the cases. Maximum species were recorded from gents foot...

  19. Radiation Protection and Civil defence Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference involves subjects of radiation protection, programming of civil defence, on the implementation of 1990 ICRP recommendation, thermoluminescence properties of bone equivalent calcium phosphate ceramics, potassium body burdens in occupational users of egyptian nuclear research centre, transport of radionuclides in fresh water stream, water treatment process for nuclear reactor, research activities related to internal contamination and bioassay and experience and environmental radiation monitoring in inshass. it contains of figures and tables

  20. The protein quality control system manages plant defence compound synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Pollier, J.; Moses, T.; González-Guzmán, M.; Geyter, N. De; Lippens, S; Bossche, R.V.; Marhavý, P.; Kremer, A; Morreel, K.; Guérin, C J; Tava, A.; Oleszek, W; J. M. Thevelein; Campos Martínez, Narciso; Goormachtig, S.

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonates are ubiquitous oxylipin-derived phytohormones that are essential in the regulation of many development, growth and defence processes. Across the plant kingdom, jasmonates act as elicitors of the production of bioactive secondarymetabolites that serve in defence against attackers. Knowledge of the conserved jasmonate perception and early signalling machineries is increasing, but the downstream mechanisms that regulate defence metabolism remain largely unknown. Herewe showthat, in th...

  1. Role of Host-Defence Peptides in Eye Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Kolar, Satya S.; McDermott, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    The eye and its associated tissues including the lacrimal system and lids have evolved several defence mechanisms to prevent microbial invasion. Included among this armory are several host-defence peptides. These multifunctional molecules are being studied not only for their endogenous antimicrobial properties but also for their potential therapeutic effects. Here the current knowledge of host-defence peptide expression in the eye will be summarized. The role of these peptides in eye disease ...

  2. Networks and network analysis for defence and security

    CERN Document Server

    Masys, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Networks and Network Analysis for Defence and Security discusses relevant theoretical frameworks and applications of network analysis in support of the defence and security domains. This book details real world applications of network analysis to support defence and security. Shocks to regional, national and global systems stemming from natural hazards, acts of armed violence, terrorism and serious and organized crime have significant defence and security implications. Today, nations face an uncertain and complex security landscape in which threats impact/target the physical, social, economic

  3. Would Brexit spell the end of European defence?

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    Alongside France, the UK is generally viewed as one of the most important actors in EU defence policy. Karen E. Smith assesses what impact the UK leaving the EU might have in the area of defence. She writes that a Brexit would not spell the end for common European defence as a whole, particularly given the UK’s gradual withdrawal from its leadership role on foreign security and defence matters. However she argues that it would nevertheless deprive the EU of a potential key player, while also ...

  4. Conversion policy principles of defence factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1.Research Production Association 'LUCH' (RPA 'LUCH') have worked at atomic industry for 51 years. Now it is one of the leading scientific production centers of Russia Ministry of Atomic Energy. Not long ago it was a complex of Scientific Research Institute, experimental plant and Obyedenennaya Expedicia at the Semipalatinsk test site (now it is the Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK). Basic directions of the complex activity are defence tasks. These tasks are to develop structure and technology of producing fuel assemblies for NRE (nuclear rocket engine) reactors. Also the tasks include testing the fuel assemblies at IWG-1, RWD and RA reactors. Also the tasks include structure and technology development, production and testing electric generating channels for nuclear thermal emission converters of nuclear energy into electric one (space board power engineering), power metal optics for powerful lasers, high temperature gas reactors. 2.Main directions of RPA 'LUCH' conversion were determined on the basis of possibilities for developing main achievements in defence technology directions.These directions are high temperature materials and constructions (carbides, refractory metals, measurements, optics, uranium compound, beryllium, molybdenum) 3.At present at RPA 'LUCH' there have been created experimental and industrial productions making temperature sensors for Atomic Electric Power Stations (AEPS). Also these manufactures release commercial products. They produce technological equipment of carbide-silicon for electronic industry as well as parts or X-ray tubes, vermiculite parts for cable driving of AEP stations (high temperature, fireproof ones) of thermal and electrical accumulators. Thus, a scientific-production center is being created. Core of it is a scientific engineers group and development directions, generated from orders of defence department, as well as new foreign technologies (along with investments).The example of the said above can be development of a

  5. Defence and illustration of nuclear deterrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having shown that nuclear deterrence has been efficient since 1945 (nuclear weapons prevented from war, nuclear deterrence contributed to the reduction of risks related to proliferation), the author discusses the amorality and illegality of nuclear deterrence (its ethics can indeed be a matter of discussion, as well as issues like self-defence and international humanitarian law). On another hand, he shows that deterrence costs remain acceptable and that substitutes to nuclear deterrence are not credible. He concludes that deterrence is therefore still useful and legitimate

  6. Bacterial strategies to overcome insect defences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet-Gely, Isabelle; Lemaitre, Bruno; Boccard, Frédéric

    2008-04-01

    Recent genetic and molecular analyses have revealed how several strategies enable bacteria to persist and overcome insect immune defences. Genetic and genomic tools that can be used with Drosophila melanogaster have enabled the characterization of the pathways that are used by insects to detect bacterial invaders and combat infection. Conservation of bacterial virulence factors and insect immune repertoires indicates that there are common strategies of host invasion and pathogen eradication. Long-term interactions of bacteria with insects might ensure efficient dissemination of pathogens to other hosts, including humans. PMID:18327270

  7. The trade-off between Innovation and Defence Industrial Policy - A Simulation Model Analysis of the Norwegian Defence Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Castellacci, Fulvio; Blom, Martin; Fevolden, Arne Martin

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates the trade-off between innovation and defence industrial policy. It presents an agent-based simulation model calibrated for the Norwegian defence industry that compares different policy scenarios and examines the effects of a pending EU market liberalization process. The paper points to two main results. (1) It finds that a pure scenario where national authorities focus on, and provide support exclusively for, either a) international competitiveness or b) national defenc...

  8. Civil defence information for every home

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Finland, the local authorities and the central government are responsible for the general planning of civil defence and for joint protection measures, while individual citizens and corporations are responsible for individual protection measures. In practice, housing companies and employers are required to carry out the statutory preparations needed for civil defence. Preparation for accidents can be improved, for instance, by awareness of correct actions in each situation. The most important individual protection measures are first aid, basic fire extinguishing skills, provision of shelter, and acquisition of a reserve stock of provisions at home. A reserve stock means that there is a sufficient supply of non-perishable foodstuffs, medication and water vessels for a couple of days' needs at home. A warning of imminent danger is usually given by sounding a general alarm signal. Even slight changes in radiation are reported immediately. Shelter should primarily be sought indoors. Instructions may be given on the radio, on TV and by means of loudspeakers. If there is a radiation risk, the thyroid may be protected against radioactive iodine by taking iodine tablets, but they should not be taken until so instructed by the authorities. (2 figs.)

  9. Space Debris Symposium (A6.) Measurements and Space Surveillance (1.): Measurements of the Small Particle Debris Cloud from the 11 January, 2007 Chinese Anti-satellite Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matney, Mark J.; Stansbery, Eugene; J.-C Liou; Stokely, Christopher; Horstman, Matthew; Whitlock, David

    2008-01-01

    On January 11, 2007, the Chinese military conducted a test of an anti-satellite (ASAT) system, destroying their own Fengyun-1C spacecraft with an interceptor missile. The resulting hypervelocity collision created an unprecedented number of tracked debris - more than 2500 objects. These objects represent only those large enough for the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN) to track - typically objects larger than about 5-10 cm in diameter. There are expected to be even more debris objects at sizes too small to be seen and tracked by the SSN. Because of the altitude of the target satellite (865 x 845 km orbit), many of the debris are expected to have long orbital lifetimes and contribute to the orbital debris environment for decades to come. In the days and weeks following the ASAT test, NASA was able to use Lincoln Laboratory s Haystack radar on several occasions to observe portions of the ASAT debris cloud. Haystack has the capability of detecting objects down to less than one centimeter in diameter, and a large number of centimeter-sized particles corresponding to the ASAT cloud were clearly seen in the data. While Haystack cannot track these objects, the statistical sampling procedures NASA uses can give an accurate statistical picture of the characteristics of the debris from a breakup event. For years computer models based on data from ground hypervelocity collision tests (e.g., the SOCIT test) and orbital collision experiments (e.g., the P-78 and Delta-180 on-orbit collisions) have been used to predict the extent and characteristics of such hypervelocity collision debris clouds, but until now there have not been good ways to verify these models in the centimeter size regime. It is believed that unplanned collisions of objects in space similar to ASAT tests will drive the long-term future evolution of the debris environment in near-Earth space. Therefore, the Chinese ASAT test provides an excellent opportunity to test the models used to predict the future debris

  10. Fallout: the defence, industrial and technological benefits of nuclear deterrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current climate of budgetary restrictions, it is fair to question the weight of military nuclear defence spending. Upon examination, however, nuclear deterrence has numerous military, industrial, and technological benefits. It is, in fact, totally intertwined with the other elements of our defence system. (author)

  11. Professor DS Kothari : The Architect of Defence Science in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Venkatesan

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available Defence science in India owes its origin and early growth to Professor DS Kothari. From humble beginnings the Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO has grown into a major national scientific agency over the last four and a half decades.

  12. Methodology to detect gaps in a soccer defence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nikolas Sten; Andersen, Thomas Bull

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to create a methodology which can provide information about gaps in an opposing team’s defence. To illustrate the methodology, a defence was tracked during a game in the danish Superliga using ZXY radio tracking and analysed using the methodology. Results show...

  13. EU Defence Industry Integration between Spillover and High Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluth, Michael Friederich

    raises the question: are we witnessing an incursion of spillover mechanisms into the ‘High Politics' domain of the defence industry? What are the drivers eroding the ‘High Politics' character of defence industry integration? Are market forces at play? Does it reflect pressures for institutional......Defence industry regulation falls in between the ‘Low Politics' of ensuring market efficiency and the ‘High Politics' of preserving the national defence industrial and technological base. It has been exempt from internal market regulation and integrative initiatives have been managed on an...... intergovernmental base. In the past 10 years, however, the defence industries of the major EU powers have instigated a move from cross national collaboration to cross national consolidation. Cross border mergers and acquisitions has been carried out and pressures for regulatory mainstreaming is mounting. This...

  14. A saponin-detoxifying enzyme mediates suppression of plant defences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouarab, K.; Melton, R.; Peart, J.; Baulcombe, D.; Osbourn, A.

    2002-08-01

    Plant disease resistance can be conferred by constitutive features such as structural barriers or preformed antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Additional defence mechanisms are activated in response to pathogen attack and include localized cell death (the hypersensitive response). Pathogens use different strategies to counter constitutive and induced plant defences, including degradation of preformed antimicrobial compounds and the production of molecules that suppress induced plant defences. Here we present evidence for a two-component process in which a fungal pathogen subverts the preformed antimicrobial compounds of its host and uses them to interfere with induced defence responses. Antimicrobial saponins are first hydrolysed by a fungal saponin-detoxifying enzyme. The degradation product of this hydrolysis then suppresses induced defence responses by interfering with fundamental signal transduction processes leading to disease resistance.

  15. Asymmetric selection and the evolution of extraordinary defences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Mark C; Bürger, Reinhard; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists typically predict future evolutionary responses to natural selection by analysing evolution on an adaptive landscape. Much theory assumes symmetric fitness surfaces even though many stabilizing selection gradients deviate from symmetry. Here we revisit Lande's adaptive landscape and introduce novel analytical theory that includes asymmetric selection. Asymmetric selection and the resulting skewed trait distributions bias equilibrium mean phenotypes away from fitness peaks, usually toward the flatter shoulder of the individual fitness surface. We apply this theory to explain a longstanding paradox in biology and medicine: the evolution of excessive defences against enemies. These so-called extraordinary defences can evolve in response to asymmetrical selection when marginal risks of insufficient defence exceed marginal costs of excessive defence. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks between population abundances and asymmetric selection further exaggerate these defences. Recognizing the effect of asymmetrical selection on evolutionary trajectories will improve the accuracy of predictions and suggest novel explanations for apparent sub-optimality. PMID:23820378

  16. Impact of antimissile defence on nuclear strategies in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As antimissile defence has become a mean to compensate the limitations of nuclear deterrence in Asia, notably within the frame of the US-North Korea relationship, but has also influence on the relationships between countries which do not possess an actual operational antimissile defence like Pakistan and India, the author proposes an assessment of the consequences antimissile defence may have on deterrence logics in Asia. He also notices that various issues must be taken into account: arsenal sizes, the slow rate of ballistic modernisation processes, the weaknesses of C4ISR systems and advanced alarm systems. He recalls the peculiarities of antimissile defence, and then addresses the cases of North Korea, India and Pakistan, and China. For each country, he analyses and discusses the influence of a choice or of the existence of an antimissile defence on the nuclear strategy and doctrine, but also on the posture of other countries like the USA

  17. Raise your defence: a baseline for security

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2011-01-01

    It is an unfair imbalance: the (computer) security of a system/service is only as strong as the weakest link in the chain of protection. This provides attackers with an incredible advantage: they can choose when to attack, where and with which means. The defence side is permanently under pressure: they must defend at all times all assets against all eventualities. For computer security, this means that every computer system, every account, every web site and every service must be properly protected --- always.   In particular, at CERN, those services visible to the Internet are permanently probed. Web sites and servers are permanently scanned by adversaries for vulnerabilities; attackers repeatedly try to guess user passwords on our remote access gateways like LXPLUS or CERNTS; computing services, e.g. for Grid computing, are analysed again and again by malicious attackers for weaknesses which can be exploited. Thanks to the vigilance of the corresponding system and service experts, these atta...

  18. Fungi Encountered on Footwear and Defence Articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Sharma

    1980-10-01

    Full Text Available A study of mycoflora on footwears and defence articles from Agra city was made. In all 38 fungi belonging to different genera were recorded. Out of these, 17 fungal species were isolated for the first on these articles. A new variety i.e., Aspergillus sydowii var. agraii Sharma and Sharma was also created. Species of Aspergillus, Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Drechslera, Alternaria, Fusarium and Trichoderma were found to be dominant in all the cases. Maximum species were recorded from gents footwear and books ankle in comparison to ladies footwear. All these fungi were grouped as (i active (15 isolates, (iimoderate (15 isolates and (iii slow leather deteriogens (8 isolates on the basis of screening.

  19. Romania and the European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP) / Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP)

    OpenAIRE

    Buºe Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    Romania has been involved in the field of security and defense, named until December 2009 ESDP (European Security and Defence Policy) and is now subject to the CSDP, even before joining the EU, recorded at the 1st of January 2007. Today, Romania is an active participant in CSDP, both political dimension, dedicated to support interests identified by Member States as common security and defense, as well as the operational, contributing in a large number of EU crisis management [1].

  20. Specificity in Mesograzer-Induced Defences in Seagrasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Martínez-Crego

    Full Text Available Grazing-induced plant defences that reduce palatability to herbivores are widespread in terrestrial plants and seaweeds, but they have not yet been reported in seagrasses. We investigated the ability of two seagrass species to induce defences in response to direct grazing by three associated mesograzers. Specifically, we conducted feeding-assayed induction experiments to examine how mesograzer-specific grazing impact affects seagrass induction of defences within the context of the optimal defence theory. We found that the amphipod Gammarus insensibilis and the isopod Idotea chelipes exerted a low-intensity grazing on older blades of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa, which reflects a weak grazing impact that may explain the lack of inducible defences. The isopod Synischia hectica exerted the strongest grazing impact on C. nodosa via high-intensity feeding on young blades with a higher fitness value. This isopod grazing induced defences in C. nodosa as indicated by a consistently lower consumption of blades previously grazed for 5, 12 and 16 days. The lower consumption was maintained when offered tissues with no plant structure (agar-reconstituted food, but showing a reduced size of the previous grazing effect. This indicates that structural traits act in combination with chemical traits to reduce seagrass palatability to the isopod. Increase in total phenolics but not in C:N ratio and total nitrogen of grazed C. nodosa suggests chemical defences rather than a modified nutritional quality as primarily induced chemical traits. We detected no induction of defences in Zostera noltei, which showed the ability to replace moderate losses of young biomass to mesograzers via compensatory growth. Our study provides the first experimental evidence of induction of defences against meso-herbivory that reduce further consumption in seagrasses. It also emphasizes the relevance of grazer identity in determining the level of grazing impact triggering resistance and

  1. Radiation accidents and defence of population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ), don't pollute the industry environ and surroundings, don't do real danger of reirradiation and pollution but demand investigation of their origin; accidents as a result when personal and persons from population have gotten a doze of outward irradiation (over PN); accidents as a result when industry or surroundings have been polluted (over PN);.accidents, as a result of outward and inside irradiation of personal, persons from population (over NPP-norms of radiation safety). Volume and character of measures by foregoing radiation accidents and their consequence depend on groups and scale of accident. They include investigation of the accident reasons; realization the radiation control for estimation degree of ionizing radiation pressure to personal and individual persons from population; rendering medical help to victims; definition of surroundings pollution level; equipment, industrial and habitable places; prevention of further influence of ionizing radiation to population and spreading radionuclides in surroundings; elimination of disrepairs and liquidation of radiation accident source. Radiation accident in the nuclear engineering establishments and industry have been divided into accident and proper-crash. At present international organizations have divided a school of crashes and accidents at NPP. According to that scale 3 levels of accidents and 4 levels of crashes have been chosen. The accidents have been qualified: insignificant (1 level), middle difficulty (2 level), serious (3 level), but crashes - within the NPP (4 level), at the risk of surroundings (5 level), difficult (6 level), global (7 level). Character, volume and forms of measures by defence of population in the crashes at NPP depend on both the level of crash and the concrete radiation situation and stage of crash development. Those measures include: notification about crash; rendering medical help to victims, primary measures of personal and population defence (cover, iodine precautions

  2. THREE INTELLIGENCE METHODOLOGIES FOR BORDER DEFENCE AND BORDER SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen Segell

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The main security problem that any state faces today is protecting itscitizens in countering organised crime and terrorism. Wars between states are lessfrequent than in previous eras. Border defence and border security are distinctmissions requiring different forces with different training and different equipment.Border defence is predominately against the armed forces of other states requiringtanks, aircraft and ships. Traditionally, border security includes the mission roles ofimmigration, crime, agriculture, finance, disease control and terrorism. Intelligencegathering and analysis using three methodologies - trends and patterns, frequency,and probability – provides a solution to the large and expensive armed forces forterritorial border defence and defines the ability to succeed in border security.

  3. Cellular Metals and Ceramics for Defence Applications (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol A. Gokhale

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Among cellular metals, aluminium foams are the most commonly produced, and provide a unique combination of properties such as: very low density, high energy absorption under static and dynamic compressions, blast amelioration, sound absorption, and flame resistance. Applications in automotive and defence sectors have been reported. Foams based on high melting point metals such as nickel and its alloys are also under active development throughout the world for applications requiring corrosion and oxidation resistance coupled with high temperature strength and relatively high thermal conductivity. Ceramic foams were developed elsewhere in the world primarily for biomedical applications, but are also suitable for defence applications for high temperature insulation. These cellular materials will provide new materials options to designers of aerospace, transport, and other defence systems.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(6, pp.567-575, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.640

  4. 4th International Conference in Software Engineering for Defence Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sillitti, Alberto; Succi, Giancarlo; Messina, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    This book presents high-quality original contributions on new software engineering models, approaches, methods, and tools and their evaluation in the context of defence and security applications. In addition, important business and economic aspects are discussed, with a particular focus on cost/benefit analysis, new business models, organizational evolution, and business intelligence systems. The contents are based on presentations delivered at SEDA 2015, the 4th International Conference in Software Engineering for Defence Applications, which was held in Rome, Italy, in May 2015. This conference series represents a targeted response to the growing need for research that reports and debates the practical implications of software engineering within the defence environment and also for software performance evaluation in real settings through controlled experiments as well as case and field studies. The book will appeal to all with an interest in modeling, managing, and implementing defence-related software devel...

  5. Advancement in Textile Technology for Defence Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Kandasubramanian

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The early development of textiles involved use of natural materials like cotton, wool and flax. The advent of the new technology revolutionized textiles which enables to develop synthetic fibers like lycra®, a segmented polyurethane-urea, which has exceptional elastic properties, Kevlar®, which has ultra high strength properties and is used as bulletproof vest. For the improvement of personal mobility, health care and rehabilitation, it requires to integrate novel sensing and actuating functions to textiles. Fundamental challenge in the development of smart textile is that drapability and manufacturability of smart textiles should not be affected. Textile fabrics embedded with sensors, piezoelectric materials, flame retardant materials, super hydrophobic materials, controlled drug release systems and temperature adaptable materials can play major role in the development of advanced and high-tech military clothes. Advancement in the textile materials has the capacity of improving comfort, mobility and protection in diverse hostile environment. In this study, the advancement in energy harvesting textiles, controlled release textiles and engineering textiles are presented.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(3, pp.331-339, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.2756

  6. Defence in Depth and Ageing Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accident prevention is the first safety priority of both designers and operators. It is achieved through the use of reliable structures, components, systems and procedures in a plant operated by personnel who are committed to a strong safety culture. For future nuclear power plants, consideration of multiple failures and severe accidents will be achieved in a more systematic and complete way from the design stage. Defence in depth (DID) consists of a hierarchical deployment of different levels of equipment and procedures in order to maintain the effectiveness of physical barriers placed between radioactive materials and workers, the public or the environment, in normal operation, anticipated operational occurrences and, for some barriers, in accidents at the plant. The primary way of preventing accidents is to achieve a high quality in design, construction and operation of the plant, and thereby to ensure that deviations from normal operation are infrequent. The best way to meet these premises of effectiveness of the barriers and the Systems, Structures and Components (SSCs) is to develop an ageing management programme to prevent potential failures and accidents. In this work we will refer to the ageing management programme for Atucha I and Atucha II power plants and to the Atucha I spent fuel storage. (author)

  7. China's nuclear arsenal and missile defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last few years, major focus of the nuclear debate has been turned towards the United States' proposal to erect a National Missile Defence (NMD) shield for itself. Of the existing nuclear weapon powers, China has been the most vociferous critic of this proposal. As and when this shield does become a reality, China will be the first to lose credibility as a deterrent against USA's existing nuclear arsenal. Therefore taking countermeasures against such a proposal is quite natural. China's approach towards non-proliferation mechanisms is steeped in realpolitik and its ability to manoeuvre them in its favour as a P5 and N5 power. Further, the Chinese leadership have been clear about the capabilities and limitations of nuclear weapons and treated them as diplomatic and political tools. The underlying aim is to preserve China's status as a dominant player in the international system while checkmating other possible challengers. Such a pragmatic approach is of far-reaching significance to all nations, especially those that possess nuclear weapons themselves. It will also be in India's long-term strategic interest to assess and take necessary corrective measures in its national security strategy, and make the composition of Indian nuclear strategy meet the desired goal. (author)

  8. UV radiation impairs the body's defence mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is usually divided into three wavelength ranges, which differ considerably from each other with respect to their effect on human health. UV-B radiation, in particular, weakens the body's resistance against cancer cells and thus increases cancer risk. Although virtually all UV-B radiation stops at the surface layer of skin, the whole body suffers from its adverse effects. UV radiation affects the body's defence mechanism relatively quickly. A reduction in the body's capacity to defend itself against alien substances can already be detected within a couple of days after the body has been exposed to a small amount of UV radiation. The risk of cancer increases slowly over the years. The skin cancers that are treated in hospitals today have their origin in the ways of life pursued in the 1960's and 70's. Factors affecting the amounts of UV doses received by Finns include trips to the South, solarium treatments and, to some extent, thinning of the ozone layer. (orig.) (4 figs.)

  9. Does Defence Spending Stimulate Economic Growth in India?

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari, Aviral; Shahbaz, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    The aim of present is to reinvestigate the effect of defence spending on economic growth using Zivot and Andrews (1992) and Lee and Strazicich, (2003) structural unit root tests and ARDL bounds testing approach to cointegration in augmented version of Keynesian model for Indian economy. Our analysis confirmed long run relationship between the variables and, results indicated positive effect of defence spending on economic growth (also negative impact after a threshold point). Investment and t...

  10. White-Collar Crime Defence Knowledge: Predictors of Lawyer Fame

    OpenAIRE

    Petter Gottschalk

    2014-01-01

    The white-collar crime attorney is a lawyer who is competent in general legal principles and in the substantive and procedural aspects of the law related to upper-class financial crime. Based on a sample of 310 convicted white-collar criminals and their defence lawyers, this paper presents results from statistical analysis of relationships between crime characteristics and defence characteristics to predict lawyer fame. Statistical regression analysis was applied to the sample, where amount o...

  11. Innate immune defences in the human endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Rodney W

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human endometrium is an important site of innate immune defence, giving protection against uterine infection. Such protection is critical to successful implantation and pregnancy. Infection is a major cause of preterm birth and can also cause infertility and ectopic pregnancy. Natural anti-microbial peptides are key mediators of the innate immune system. These peptides, between them, have anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-viral activity and are expressed at epithelial surfaces throughout the female genital tract. Two families of natural anti-microbials, the defensins and the whey acidic protein (WAP motif proteins, appear to be prominent in endometrium. The human endometrial epithelium expresses beta-defensins 1–4 and the WAP motif protein, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor. Each beta-defensin has a different expression profile in relation to the stage of the menstrual cycle, providing potential protection throughout the cycle. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor is expressed during the secretory phase of the cycle and has a range of possible roles including anti-protease and anti-microbial activity as well as having effects on epithelial cell growth. The leukocyte populations in the endometrium are also a source of anti-microbial production. Neutrophils are a particularly rich source of alpha-defensins, lactoferrin, lysozyme and the WAP motif protein, elafin. The presence of neutrophils during menstruation will enhance anti-microbial protection at a time when the epithelial barrier is disrupted. Several other anti-microbials including the natural killer cell product, granulysin, are likely to have a role in endometrium. The sequential production of natural anti-microbial peptides by the endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle and at other sites in the female genital tract will offer protection from many pathogens, including those that are sexually transmitted.

  12. Defence and Security Research Coexistence, Coherence, and Convergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breant, Christian; Karock, Ulrich

    Defence and security research have coexisted at the European Union level since the inception of the European Defence Agency (EDA). The agency was established under a Joint Action of the Council of Ministers on 12 July 2004, "to support the Member States and the Council in their effort to improve European defence capabilities in the field of crisis management and to sustain the European Security and Defence Policy as it stands now and develops in the future".1 The political decision to create the EDA was taken at the Thessaloniki European Council on 19 and 20 June 2003. Heads of State or Government tasked the Council bodies to undertake the requisite actions, in the course of 2004, to create an intergovernmental agency in the field of defence capabilities development, research, acquisition and armaments. The EDA has been located in Brussels right from the start. It is an intergovernmental EU agency under the Council's authority within the single institutional framework of the Union. It performs its mission in close cooperation with its participating Member States (pMS) and the European institutional actors.

  13. SOUTH AFRICAN DEFENCE EXPENDITURE IN THE 20TH CENTURY

    OpenAIRE

    Clive Coetzee

    2002-01-01

    In an economic sense defence expenditure is normally exogenously determined, that is economic forces do not play the leading role in determining the level of defense expenditure. Adam Smith, in his writing An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations states that "It is only by means of a standing army therefore that the civilization of any country can be perpetuated or even preserved for any considerable time" (Canon, E., ed, 1976). A country can thus not supply defence, i.e...

  14. Indigenous Women in Defence of Life and Land: An introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa Belausteguigoitia Rius; Mariana Gómez Alvarez Icaza; Iván González Márquez

    2011-01-01

    Marisa Belausteguigoitia Rius, Mariana Gómez Alvarez Icaza and Iván González Márquez argue that indigenous and rural women play a leading role in the fight for the defence of their territories and its natural resources. They introduce the essays and testimonies of this section of the journal in order to show the complexity of the situation lived in Mexico, related to land, territory and the defence of natural resources, especially for indigenous women. In this context, they propose that indig...

  15. Firms, Innovation, Export and the Policy Regime: An Agent-based model of the Defence Industry

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The defence industry has traditionally been a heavily regulated and protected market. A new EU Directive being implemented in Norway, January 2012, intends to reform the European defence market towards a higher degree of openness and liberalization. It is therefore vital for the Norwegian Government and national defence authorities to explore the impacts this new EU Directive will have in the near future. This thesis presents a computational agent-based model of the Norwegian defence industry...

  16. Herbivore induction of jasmonic acid and chemical defences reduce photosynthesis in Nicotiana attenuata

    OpenAIRE

    Nabity, Paul D.; Zavala, Jorge A.; DeLucia, Evan H.

    2013-01-01

    Herbivory initiates a shift in plant metabolism from growth to defence that may reduce fitness in the absence of further herbivory. However, the defence-induced changes in carbon assimilation that precede this reallocation in resources remain largely undetermined. This study characterized the response of photosynthesis to herbivore induction of jasmonic acid (JA)-related defences in Nicotiana attenuata to increase understanding of these mechanisms. It was hypothesized that JA-induced defences...

  17. Pareto Efficient Solutions of Attack-Defence Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslanyan, Zaruhi; Nielson, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    probability or cost of attacks and defences. In case of multiple parameters most analytical methods optimise one parameter at a time, e.g., minimise cost or maximise probability of an attack. Such methods may lead to sub-optimal solutions when optimising conflicting parameters, e.g., minimising cost while...

  18. Risk analysis of coastal flood defences: A Vietnam case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mai, C.V.; Van Gelder, P.H.A.J.M.; Vrijling, J.K.; Mai, T.C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims at risk analysis and the investigation of safety aspects of coastal flood defences in Vietnam. The sea dike system has been actually designed by a 20 to 25 years return period. From the current situation it seems that the dike system is not sufficient to withstand the actual sea boun

  19. Automated book acquistion system using Sanjay at Defence science library

    OpenAIRE

    Sumati Sharma

    1995-01-01

    This paper outlines various features of the acquisition module of Sanjay, an augmented CDS/ISIS ver 2.3 software package. It briefly describes the activities which are carried out using this software at Defence Science Library. It also suggests some features that need to be provided for book acquisition processing.

  20. The Right to use the Force in Self-Defence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázek, Josef

    -, č. 2 (2011), s. 33-56. ISBN 978-80-87488-17-1. ISSN 1805-0565 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70680506 Keywords : use of force * self-defence * the UN Charter Subject RIV: AG - Legal Sciences

  1. Successive Evolutions of the Defence in Depth Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following Fukushima Daiichi accident, the Defence-in-depth concept, which is usually defined as a combination of a number of consecutive and independent levels of protection that would have to fail before harmful effects could be caused, has been confirmed as an essential element to be applied in the design of a nuclear facility to protect people and the environment. However, and although the implementation of the defence in depth concept had been required for long, the Fukushima Daiichi accident and the “stress tests” conducted in different countries have revealed deficiencies in its implementation. Consequently within the review of the IAEA safety requirements requested by Member states, it was important to check whether this concept was appropriately defined in order to be properly understood and fully implemented by vendors and operating organizations. By screening the successive definitions of the defence in depth principle and concept, this paper emphasizes the few issues which have been gradually clarified and enhanced to ensure effectiveness of the defence in depth as expressed from its original statement. (author)

  2. A robust approach to the missile defence location problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, A.A.F.; Evers, L.; Barros, A.I.; Monsuur, H.; Wagelmans, A.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for determining a robust defence strategy against ballistic missile threat. Our approach takes into account a variety of possible future scenarios and different forms of robustness criteria, including the well-known absolute robustness criterion. We consider two problem v

  3. Semiochemicals of Social Insects: From Communication to Defence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valterová, Irena

    Seoul: The Korean Society for Applied Biological Chemistry, 2012, s. 84-86. [2012 International Symposium and Annual Meeting of the KSABC. Gwangju (KR), 08.11.2012-10.11.2012] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : insect communication * insect defence * pheromones Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  4. A Strong Remedy to a Weak Ethical Defence of Homeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David

    2015-12-01

    In this article, I indicate and illustrate several flaws in a recent "ethical defence" of homeopathy. It transpires that the authors' arguments have several features in common with homeopathic remedies, including strong claims, a lack of logic or evidence, and no actual effect. PMID:26659862

  5. How insects overcome two-component plant chemical defence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pentzold, Stefan; Zagrobelny, Mika; Rook, Frederik;

    2014-01-01

    , before and during feeding as well as during digestion, and at several levels such as the insects’ feeding behaviour, physiology and metabolism. Insect adaptations frequently circumvent or counteract the activity of the plant β-glucosidases, bioactivating enzymes that are a key element in the plant’s two......-component chemical defence. These adaptations include host plant choice, non-disruptive feeding guilds and various physiological adaptations as well as metabolic enzymatic strategies of the insect’s digestive system. Furthermore, insect adaptations often act in combination, may exist in both generalists and...... studies are suggested to investigate in detail how insect adaptations act in combination to overcome plant chemical defences and to allow ecologically relevant conclusions....

  6. A Comparative Analysis of Sonic Defences in Bombycoidea Caterpillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bura, Veronica L; Kawahara, Akito Y; Yack, Jayne E

    2016-01-01

    Caterpillars have long been used as models for studying animal defence. Their impressive armour, including flamboyant warning colours, poisonous spines, irritating sprays, and mimicry of plant parts, snakes and bird droppings, has been extensively documented. But research has mainly focused on visual and chemical displays. Here we show that some caterpillars also exhibit sonic displays. During simulated attacks, 45% of 38 genera and 33% of 61 species of silk and hawkmoth caterpillars (Bombycoidea) produced sounds. Sonic caterpillars are found in many distantly-related groups of Bombycoidea, and have evolved four distinct sound types- clicks, chirps, whistles and vocalizations. We propose that different sounds convey different messages, with some designed to warn of a chemical defence and others, to startle predators. This research underscores the importance of exploring acoustic communication in juvenile insects, and provides a model system to explore how different signals have evolved to frighten, warn or even trick predators. PMID:27510510

  7. The Morality and Economics of Safety in Defence Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Tim

    Ministry of Defence policy is to conform as closely as possible to UK health and safety legislation in all its operations. We consider the implications of the law and the guidance provided by the Health and Safety Executive for the arguments we need to make for the safety of defence procurements, and extract four general principles to help in answering the questions that arise when considering the safety of systems with complex behaviour. One of these principles is analysed further to identify how case law and the guidance interpret the requirement for risks to be reduced so far as is reasonably practicable. We then apply the principles to answer some questions that have arisen in our work as Independent Safety Auditors, including the limits to the tolerability of risk to armed forces personnel and civilians in wartime, and the acceptability of the transfer of risk from one group to another when controls on risk are introduced.

  8. Insects had it first: surfactants as a defence against predators

    OpenAIRE

    Rostás, Michael; Blassmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Insects have evolved an astonishing array of defences to ward off enemies. Well-known and widespread is the regurgitation of oral secretions (OS), fluids that repel attacking predators. In herbivores, the effectiveness of OS has been ascribed so far to the presence of deterrent secondary metabolites sequestered from the host plant. This notion implies, however, that generalists experience less protection on plants with low amounts of secondary metabolites or with compounds ineffective against...

  9. Insects had it first: surfactants as a defence against predators

    OpenAIRE

    Rostás, Michael; Blassmann, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    Insects have evolved an astonishing array of defences to ward off enemies. Well known and widespread is the regurgitation of oral secretion (OS), fluid that repels attacking predators. In herbivores, the effectiveness of OS has been ascribed so far to the presence of deterrent secondary metabolites sequestered from the host plant. This notion implies, however, that generalists experience less protection on plants with low amounts of secondary metabolites or with compounds ineffective against ...

  10. A Framework for the Automation of Air Defence Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Choenni, R.S.; Leijnse, C.

    1999-01-01

    The need for more efficiency in military organizations is growing. It is expected that a significant increase in efficiency can be obtained by an integration of communication and information technology. This integration may result in (sub)systems that are fully automated, i.e., systems that are unmanned, including unmanned vehicles. In this paper, we focus on the automation of air defence systems, in which integration of communication and information technology is a major issue. We propose an...

  11. Standardization for Defence Procurement - European Handbook, recommendations Electromagnetic Environmental Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Leferink, F.B.J.; Malabiau, R.

    2006-01-01

    The European Commission (EC) would like to improve the competitiveness of the European Defence Industry. The large number of (national) standards, more than 10.000, is recognised by EC as a major constraint and cost driver [1]. Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) and more generally Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (EEE) have been considered by the EC as a major topic, with 7 other topics such as NBC detectors, energetic materials, fuels and lubricants, batteries, packaging, electrical an...

  12. Standardization for Defence Procurement - European Handbook : CEN Workshop 10

    OpenAIRE

    Bresson, Alain; Hunt, Andy; Tuomainen, Ari; Granbom, Bo; Urbanovsky, Claudia; Tredici, Claudio; Kugler, Dietmar; Leferink, Frank; Unden, Göran; Klok, Henk; Huguenin, Herve; Dymarkowski, Krzysztof; Popkowski, Jaroslaw; Lyomio, Jukka; Lodge, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The European Commission (EC), DG Enterprise, endeavours the competitiveness of the European Defence Industry. The plethora of (national) standards, more than 10.000, are recognised by the EC as a major constraint and cost driver. Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) or Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (EEE) are considered by the EC as a major topic, with 7 other topics such as environmental engineering, energetic materials, batteries, electrical interfaces. An EMC expert group with repres...

  13. KYPO – A Platform for Cyber Defence Exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Čeleda Pavel; Čegan Jakub; Vykopal Jan; Tovarňák Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Correct and timely responses to cyber attacks are crucial for the effective implementation of cyber defence strategies and policies. The number of threats and ingenuity of attackers is ever growing, as is the need for more advanced detection tools, techniques and skilled cyber security professionals. KYPO – Cyber Exercise & Research Platform is focused on modelling and simulating complex computer systems and networks in a virtualized and separated environment. The platform enables realist...

  14. Defence System of Respiratory Tract and Clearence of Inhalation Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Nesrin Ocal

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that inhaled urban air contains many particles and gases. On the other hand, the anesthetic agents used in respiratory diseases comprise pharmaceutical particles. Deposition and cleaning processes of both the inhaled foreign particles and gases from room air, and inhalation agents from respiratory tract are very important clinically. These processes are carried out by the defense mechanisms of the respiratory system. In this review, the defence system of respiratory tract and...

  15. Automated book acquistion system using Sanjay at Defence science library

    OpenAIRE

    Sumati Sharma

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlines various features of the acquisition module of Sanjay, an augmented CDS/ISIS ver 2.3 software package. It briefly describes the activities which are carried out using this software at Defence Science Library. It also suggests some features that need to be provided for book acquisition processing.http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dbit.14.4.3103

  16. Insects had it first: surfactants as a defence against predators

    OpenAIRE

    Rostás, Michael; Blassmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Insects have evolved an astonishing array of defences to ward off enemies. Well known and widespread is the regurgitation of oral secretion (OS), fluid that repels attacking predators. In herbivores, the effectiveness of OS has been ascribed so far to the presence of deterrent secondary metabolites sequestered from the host plant. This notion implies, however, that generalists experience less protection on plants with low amounts of secondary metabolites or with compounds ineffective against ...

  17. Host Defence against Bacterial Biofilms: “Mission Impossible”?

    OpenAIRE

    Gertrud Maria Hänsch

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria living as biofilms have been recognised as the ultimate cause of persistent and destructive inflammatory processes. Biofilm formation is a well-organised, genetically-driven process, which is well characterised for numerous bacteria species. In contrast, the host response to bacterial biofilms is less well analysed, and there is the general believe that bacteria in biofilms escape recognition or eradication by the immune defence. In this review the host response to bacterial biofilms...

  18. A transcriptional reference map of defence hormone responses in potato

    OpenAIRE

    Lea Wiesel; Davis, Jayne L.; Linda Milne; Vanesa Redondo Fernandez; Herold, Miriam B.; Jill Middlefell Williams; Jenny Morris; Hedley, Pete E; Brian Harrower; Newton, Adrian C.; Birch, Paul R. J.; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Ingo Hein

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormones are involved in diverse aspects of plant life including the regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction, as well as governing biotic and abiotic stress responses. We have generated a comprehensive transcriptional reference map of the early potato responses to exogenous application of the defence hormones abscisic acid, brassinolides (applied as epibrassinolide), ethylene (applied as the ethylene precursor aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid), salicylic acid and jasmoni...

  19. Signalling network construction for modelling plant defence response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Miljkovic

    Full Text Available Plant defence signalling response against various pathogens, including viruses, is a complex phenomenon. In resistant interaction a plant cell perceives the pathogen signal, transduces it within the cell and performs a reprogramming of the cell metabolism leading to the pathogen replication arrest. This work focuses on signalling pathways crucial for the plant defence response, i.e., the salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene signal transduction pathways, in the Arabidopsis thaliana model plant. The initial signalling network topology was constructed manually by defining the representation formalism, encoding the information from public databases and literature, and composing a pathway diagram. The manually constructed network structure consists of 175 components and 387 reactions. In order to complement the network topology with possibly missing relations, a new approach to automated information extraction from biological literature was developed. This approach, named Bio3graph, allows for automated extraction of biological relations from the literature, resulting in a set of (component1, reaction, component2 triplets and composing a graph structure which can be visualised, compared to the manually constructed topology and examined by the experts. Using a plant defence response vocabulary of components and reaction types, Bio3graph was applied to a set of 9,586 relevant full text articles, resulting in 137 newly detected reactions between the components. Finally, the manually constructed topology and the new reactions were merged to form a network structure consisting of 175 components and 524 reactions. The resulting pathway diagram of plant defence signalling represents a valuable source for further computational modelling and interpretation of omics data. The developed Bio3graph approach, implemented as an executable language processing and graph visualisation workflow, is publically available at http://ropot.ijs.si/bio3graph/and can be

  20. Epichloe endophytes alter inducible indirect defences in host grasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    Full Text Available Epichloë endophytes are common symbionts living asymptomatically in pooid grasses and may provide chemical defences against herbivorous insects. While the mechanisms underlying these fungal defences have been well studied, it remains unknown whether endophyte presence affects the host's own defences. We addressed this issue by examining variation in the impact of Epichloë on constitutive and herbivore-induced emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC, a well-known indirect plant defence, between two grass species, Schedonorus phoenix (ex. Festuca arundinacea; tall fescue and Festuca pratensis (meadow fescue. We found that feeding by a generalist aphid species, Rhopalosiphum padi, induced VOC emissions by uninfected plants of both grass species but to varying extents, while mechanical wounding failed to do so in both species after one day of damage. Interestingly, regardless of damage treatment, Epichloë uncinata-infected F. pratensis emitted significantly lower quantities of VOCs than their uninfected counterparts. In contrast, Epichloë coenophiala-infected S. phoenix did not differ from their uninfected counterparts in constitutive VOC emissions but tended to increase VOC emissions under intense aphid feeding. A multivariate analysis showed that endophyte status imposed stronger differences in VOC profiles of F. pratensis than damage treatment, while the reverse was true for S. phoenix. Additionally, both endophytes inhibited R. padi population growth as measured by aphid dry biomass, with the inhibition appearing greater in E. uncinata-infected F. pratensis. Our results suggest, not only that Epichloë endophytes may play important roles in mediating host VOC responses to herbivory, but also that the magnitude and direction of such responses may vary with the identity of the Epichloë-grass symbiosis. Whether Epichloë-mediated host VOC responses will eventually translate into effects on higher trophic levels merits future investigation.

  1. Defence plutonium inventories and international safeguards in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK Ministry of Defence's (MOD) publication Plutonium and Aldermaston: An Historical Account is a valuable report because it increases transparency and openness with regard to the UK's military fissile material holdings. The report does not fulfil the precise mandate set out in the government's 1998 Strategic Defence Review. The MOD then committed itself to providing an account of fissile material production. Instead, it has reported on fissile material transfers to and from the Atomic Weapons Establishment at Aldermaston (AWE) in the period 1952 to 1999. On 31 March 1999, the UK defence stockpile of plutonium comprised 3.51 tonnes. The report also discloses that physical stocks of plutonium at Aldermaston exceed recorded net deliveries to the site by 0.29 tonne (the inventory difference). The study reveals that the AWE acted as the centre of plutonium processing for both civilian and military programmes in the UK. The civilian work was largely phased out in the 1970s. To further increase transparency and meet stated disarmament objectives, the Department of Trade and Industry and MOD should launch a joint study of defence fissile material production, encompassing both plutonium and highly enriched uranium. A new table shows that the coverage of international safeguards in the UK is extensive. France is the only other state with a recognised nuclear weapon programme that approaches the UK in its safeguards coverage. The UK's withdrawals of fissionable material from safeguards since 1978 have recently been made public. It would be a significant step to strengthen safeguards if the UK were to announce that in the future it will not withdraw any nuclear material from international safeguards. (author)

  2. Politics, pleasure, violence: Swedish defence propaganda in social media

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Ferrada Stoehrel

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the Swedish Armed Forces have produced and distributed highly edited video clips on YouTube that show moving images of military activity. Alongside this development, mobile phone apps have emerged as an important channel through which the user can experience and take an interactive part in the staging of contemporary armed conflict. This article examines the way in which the aesthetic and affective experience of Swedish defence and security policy is socially and (media-)cult...

  3. The economics of defence in France and the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Ron Smith

    2013-01-01

    France and the UK face similar geostrategic circumstances: both were once Great Powers and still retain their positions among the five permanent members of the UN Security Council. During the Cold War both were dwarfed by the super-powers and were thus extremely sensitive about their status: what the French called their grandeur and the British called their seat at the top table. Despite their strategic similarities, they have differed in many of their defence policy choices and in particular...

  4. Gastropod skeletal defences: land, freshwater, and sea compared

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeij, Geerat J.

    2015-01-01

    Predation is a primary agency of natural selection affecting the evolution of skeletal form in gastropods. The nature of antipredatory defence depends on how predators attack their prey as well as on the types and quantities of resources that are available to the potential victims. Here I review the five main methods of predation on shell-bearing gastropods (swallowing prey whole, apertural entry, drilling, shell breakage, and partial consumption) and 31 categories of shell and opercular defe...

  5. Induced resistance - orchestrating defence mechanisms through crosstalk and priming

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Ent, S.; Koornneef, A.; Ton, J.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    In nature, plants interact with a wide range of microbial pathogens and herbivorous insects. During the evolutionary arms race between plants and their attackers, primary and secondary immune responses evolved to recognise common or highly specialised features of the attacker encountered, resulting in sophisticated mechanisms of induced defence. Induced resistance mechanisms are characterised by a broad-spectrum effectiveness and often act systemically in plant parts distant from the site of ...

  6. The adaptiveness of defence strategies against cuckoo parasitism

    OpenAIRE

    Planqué, Robert; Britton, N. F.; Franks, N. R.; Peletier, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    Most bird species of the Eurasian Cuckoo, 'Cuculuscanorus', often display egg-discrimination behaviour butchick-rejection behaviour has never been reported.In this paper, we analyse ahost-cuckoo association in which both population dynamics andevolutionary dynamics are explored in a discrete-time model.We introduce four host types, each with their own defence behaviour, displayingeither egg or chick rejection, neither or both. We also introducefitness functions for each of these host types.Al...

  7. Defence in depth by 'Leittechnique' systems with graded intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, only two types of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control systems were in use in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG): safety systems and operational systems. Present nuclear power plant 'Leittechnique' systems in the FRG have been expanded from this 'black-and-white' status to multiple-grade systems with respect to safety, qualification requirements and intelligence. The extensive experience of the past has encouraged the rule-making committees - representing all parties working in the nuclear field - to differentiate between the protection limitations and condition limitations of the reactor protection system on one hand and the information systems (including the accident monitoring and alarm system) of different safety importance on the other, assuming additional extensive application of non-safety-grade operational Leittechnique systems. These definitions of categories are in accordance with international practice and enable designers to apply 'echelons of defence', composed of equipment of all categories, in accordance with 'defence-in-depth' concepts. They also simplify the introduction of computerized equipment, especially in the lower safety categories. Status, background and reasons of the introduction, as well as typical defence-in-depth modes, of the first running Leittechnique system of this kind (in the Grafenrheinfeld nuclear power plant) and especially their different tasks in disturbance handling are described. The international situation and future developments are briefly characterized. (author)

  8. The protein quality control system manages plant defence compound synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollier, Jacob; Moses, Tessa; González-Guzmán, Miguel; De Geyter, Nathan; Lippens, Saskia; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Marhavý, Peter; Kremer, Anna; Morreel, Kris; Guérin, Christopher J; Tava, Aldo; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Thevelein, Johan M; Campos, Narciso; Goormachtig, Sofie; Goossens, Alain

    2013-12-01

    Jasmonates are ubiquitous oxylipin-derived phytohormones that are essential in the regulation of many development, growth and defence processes. Across the plant kingdom, jasmonates act as elicitors of the production of bioactive secondary metabolites that serve in defence against attackers. Knowledge of the conserved jasmonate perception and early signalling machineries is increasing, but the downstream mechanisms that regulate defence metabolism remain largely unknown. Here we show that, in the legume Medicago truncatula, jasmonate recruits the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) quality control system to manage the production of triterpene saponins, widespread bioactive compounds that share a biogenic origin with sterols. An ERAD-type RING membrane-anchor E3 ubiquitin ligase is co-expressed with saponin synthesis enzymes to control the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), the rate-limiting enzyme in the supply of the ubiquitous terpene precursor isopentenyl diphosphate. Thus, unrestrained bioactive saponin accumulation is prevented and plant development and integrity secured. This control apparatus is equivalent to the ERAD system that regulates sterol synthesis in yeasts and mammals but that uses distinct E3 ubiquitin ligases, of the HMGR degradation 1 (HRD1) type, to direct destruction of HMGR. Hence, the general principles for the management of sterol and triterpene saponin biosynthesis are conserved across eukaryotes but can be controlled by divergent regulatory cues. PMID:24213631

  9. Compromised Rat Testicular Antioxidant Defence System by Hypothyroidism before Puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak K. Sahoo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered thyroid function during early stages of development is known to affect adversely testicular growth, physiology, and antioxidant defence status at adulthood. The objective of the present study is to investigate the modulation of antioxidant defence status in neonatal persistent hypothyroid rats before their sexual maturation and also to identify the specific testicular cell populations vulnerable to degeneration during neonatal hypothyroidism in immature rats. Hypothyroidism was induced in neonates by feeding the lactating mother with 0.05% 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU through the drinking water. From the day of parturition till weaning (25 day postpartum, the pups received PTU through mother's milk (or drinking water and then directly from drinking water containing PTU for the remaining period of experimentation. On the 31st day postpartum, the animals were sacrificed for the study. An altered antioxidant defence system marked by elevated SOD, CAT, and GR activities, with decreased GPx and GST activities were observed along with increased protein carbonylation, disturbed redox status in hypothyroid immature rat testis. This compromised testicular antioxidant status might have contributed to poor growth and development by affecting the spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in rats before puberty as indicated by reduced germ cell number, complete absence of round spermatids, decreased seminiferous tubule diameter, and decreased testosterone level.

  10. The Pragmatic Nature of Private Defence under Criminal Jurisprudencein Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oji, S. I.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at examining the practical operation of the right to private defence in Nigeria by virtue of the various constitutive legal instruments operating in the field of criminal jurisprudence. The sources of information relied upon here, are relevant statutes, texts, journals (both local and international and conference papers. The finding is that the enabling provisions on the subject matter are not smooth sailing. This is because the exercise of the right to private defence is further tied to the satisfaction of certain conditions which ordinarily the user will not advert his mind too and if case is not taken, in the attempt to prevent the commission of an offence which is about to be done to him, he becomes criminally liable in the reverse. In this regard, the study concluded that there is the problem of uncertainty as far as the instruments of self defence are concerned. In order to erase the problem of uncertainty, the user of the right must exercise caution in order to succeed in the courts, pending when an amendment is made.

  11. Defence nuclear waste disposal in Russia. International perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant amounts of liquid and solid radioactive waste have been generated in Russia during the production of nuclear weapons, and there is an urgent need to find suitable ways to manage these wastes in a way that protects both the current population and future generations. This book contains contributions from pure and applied scientists and other representatives from Europe, North America, and Russia, who are, or have been, actively involved in the field of radioactive waste management and disposal. First-hand experience of specific problems associated with defence-related wastes in the USA and the Russian Federation is presented, and current plans are described for the disposal of solid wastes arising from civilian nuclear power production programmes in other countries, including Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Germany and the UK. The book provides a good insight into ongoing research at local and national level within Russia, devoted to the safe disposal of defence-related radioactive waste. It also demonstrates how existing expertise and technology from civilian nuclear waste management programmes can be applied to solving the problems created by nuclear defence programmes. Contributions address methods of immobilisation, site selection methodology, site characterisation techniques and data interpretation, the key elements of safety/performance assessments of planned deep (geological) repositories for radioactive waste, and radionuclide transport modelling. Concerns associated with certain specific nuclear waste disposal concepts and repository sites are also presented. refs

  12. Networks and network analysis for defence and security - a book review

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Alberto M. Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    It is intended in this work to review the book"Networks and Network Analysis for Defence and Security", 978-3-319-04146-9 published in Springer Series “Lecture Notes in Social Networks”. In this book the following areas are covered: Defence and security risk analysis; Criminal intelligence; Cyber crime;Cognitive analysis; Counter-terrorism and Social Network Analysis; Transnational Crime; Critical infrastructure analysis; Support to defence and security intelligence, emphasizing the idea that...

  13. A review of the phytochemical support for the shifting defence hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Doorduin, Leonie J.; Vrieling, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    Several theories have been developed to explain why invasive species are very successful and develop into pest species in their new area. The shifting defence hypothesis (SDH) argues that invasive plant species quickly evolve towards new defence levels in the invaded area because they lack their specialist herbivores but are still under attack by local (new) generalist herbivores. The SDH predicts that plants should increase their cheap, toxic defence compounds and lower their expensive diges...

  14. European defence cooperation after the Lisbon treaty: The road is paved for increased momentum

    OpenAIRE

    Nissen, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This report takes stock of the changes made to the European Security and Defence Policy since the adoption of the Lisbon Treaty in 2009. The report also examines what impact such changes have on Denmark, and specifically whether the Danish opt-out from EU defence cooperation will have increased consequences after the implementation of the Lisbon Treaty changes. By examining the Lisbon Treaty changes to the CSDP, and assessing how these affect Danish security and defence policy, the report pro...

  15. Development of an affordability assessment framework for defence contracts at the bidding stage

    OpenAIRE

    Bankole, O O

    2011-01-01

    Defence contracting has changed from the traditional provision of spares and repairs to contracting long-term for availability and capability. In these long-term contracts, the customer decides to outsource services (that would have been provided in-house) to contractors by consenting to an arrangement whereby payment is made only for the period that the equipment is made available to satisfy the defence need. Availability contracts may last for 40 years and more, but the main defence custome...

  16. History As Policy: Framing the debate on the future of Australia's defence policy

    OpenAIRE

    Huisken, Ron; Thatcher, Meredith

    2007-01-01

    The fortieth anniversary of the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre’s founding provided the opportunity to assemble many of Australia’s leading analysts and commentators to review some of the more significant issues that should define Australian defence policy. In the first 20 years after its establishment, SDSC scholars played a prominent role in shaping the ideas and aspirations that eventually found official expression in the 1987 Defence of Australia White Paper. This policy sustaine...

  17. Competition induces allelopathy but suppresses growth and anti-herbivore defence in a chemically rich seaweed

    OpenAIRE

    Rasher, Douglas B; Hay, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Many seaweeds and terrestrial plants induce chemical defences in response to herbivory, but whether they induce chemical defences against competitors (allelopathy) remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether two tropical seaweeds induce allelopathy in response to competition with a reef-building coral. We also assessed the effects of competition on seaweed growth and seaweed chemical defence against herbivores. Following 8 days of competition with the coral Porites cylindrica, the chemica...

  18. The effect of energy reserves and food availability on optimal immune defence

    OpenAIRE

    Houston, Alasdair I; Mcnamara, John M.; Barta, Zoltán; Klasing, Kirk C

    2007-01-01

    In order to avoid both starvation and disease, animals must allocate resources between energy reserves and immune defence. We investigate the optimal allocation. We find that animals with low reserves choose to allocate less to defence than animals with higher reserves because when reserves are low it is more important to increase reserves to reduce the risk of starvation in the future. In general, investment in immune defence increases monotonically with energy reserves. An exception is when...

  19. Rosatom Corporation at the All-Russian civil defence training exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 80th anniversary of civil defence in Russia was marked by the All-Russian civil defence exercise attended by representatives of federal executive authorities, regional and local executive authorities. During the exercise performance of the following activities was verified: introduction of increased preparedness mode for local air-defence emergency-response forces, activities of emergency-response and fire safety commissions, information collection and exchange during implementation of top-priority civil defence measures, etc. The paper describes the activities carried out during the exercise

  20. Costs and benefits of chemical defence in the Red Alga Bonnemaisonia hamifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göran M Nylund

    Full Text Available A number of studies have shown that the production of chemical defences is costly in terrestrial vascular plants. However, these studies do not necessarily reflect the costs of defence production in macroalgae, due to structural and functional differences between vascular plants and macroalgae. Using a specific culturing technique, we experimentally manipulated the defence production in the red alga Bonnemaisonia hamifera to examine if the defence is costly in terms of growth. Furthermore, we tested if the defence provides fitness benefits by reducing harmful bacterial colonisation of the alga. Costly defences should provide benefits to the producer in order to be maintained in natural populations, but such benefits through protection against harmful bacterial colonisation have rarely been documented in macroalgae. We found that algae with experimentally impaired defence production, but with an externally controlled epibacterial load, grew significantly better than algae with normal defence production. We also found that undefended algae exposed to a natural epibacterial load experienced a substantial reduction in growth and a 6-fold increase in cell bleaching, compared to controls. Thus, this study provides experimental evidence that chemical defence production in macroalgae is costly, but that the cost is outweighed by fitness benefits provided through protection against harmful bacterial colonisation.

  1. Identification of plant defence regulators through transcriptional profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana cdd1 mutant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swadhin Swain; Nidhi Singh; Ashis Kumar Nandi

    2015-03-01

    A sustainable balance between defence and growth is essential for optimal fitness under pathogen stress. Plants activate immune response at the cost of normal metabolic requirements. Thus, plants that constitutively activate defence are deprived of growth. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant constitutive defence without defect in growth and development1 (cdd1) is an exception. The cdd1 mutant is constitutive for salicylic acid accumulation, signalling, and defence against biotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens, without having much impact on growth. Thus, cdd1 offers an ideal genetic background to identify novel regulators of plant defence. Here we report the differential gene expression profile between cdd1 and wild-type plants as obtained by microarray hybridization. Expression of several defence-related genes also supports constitutive activation of defence in cdd1. We screened T-DNA insertion mutant lines of selected genes, for resistance against virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). Through bacterial resistance, callose deposition and pathogenesis-associated expression analyses, we identified four novel regulators of plant defence. Resistance levels in the mutants suggest that At2g19810 and [rom] At5g05790 are positive regulators, whereas At1g61370 and At3g42790 are negative regulators of plant defence against bacterial pathogens.

  2. "Defence-in-Depth" Strategy in Transport Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanek, Andrzej

    Safety management is a kind of system management, that is management by purposes. Taking "defence-in-depth" strategy, DDS - there can be defined four main aims and four method groups of risk management in transport: 1. minimizing transport accidents risk; 2. minimizing number of undesirable transport events (incidents, conflicts, collisions, accidents). Above purposes relate stages of safety management in transport. At each level of management should be elaborated methods, procedures and technologies of minimizing transport accidents risk. According to DDS any management system of transport safety should have a structure of multilevel chain protections which supervise main transport processes. About those problems in the paper.

  3. Analysis of direct punch velocity in professional defence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapkova, Dora; Adamek, Milan

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on analysis of a direct punch. Nowadays, professional defence is basic part of effective protection of people and property. There are many striking techniques and the goal of this research was to analyze the direct punch. The analysis is aimed to measure the velocity with help of high speed camera Olympus i-Speed 2 and then find the dependences of this velocity on input parameters. For data analysis two pieces of software were used - i-Speed Control Software and MINITAB. 111 participants took part in this experiment. The results are presented in this paper - especially dependence of mean velocity on time and difference in velocity between genders.

  4. Cross Border EU Defence Industry Consolidation between Globalization and Europeanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluth, Michael Friederich

    The European Defence Industry is undergoing consolidation cutting across national borders. This is spurred by European Union policy initiatives and active encouragement by some national governments fearing a US-led global consolidation of the industry. The process in many ways proves challenging as...... paper will depart from these institutional peculiarities drawing on the varieties of capitalism literature. Different patterns in ownership, public-private R&D links and business promotion policies are a key constraint in cross-border mergers. This is compounded by sovereignty concerns hosted by the...

  5. Mutualistic ants as an indirect defence against leaf pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Kaltenpoth, Martin; Boland, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Mutualistic ants are commonly considered as an efficient indirect defence against herbivores. Nevertheless, their indirect protective role against plant pathogens has been scarcely investigated. We compared the protective role against pathogens of two different ant partners, a mutualistic and a parasitic ant, on the host plant Acacia hindsii (Fabaceae). The epiphytic bacterial community on leaves was evaluated in the presence and absence of both ant partners by cultivation and by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Pathogen-inflicted leaf damage, epiphytic bacterial abundance (colony-forming units) and number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were significantly higher in plants inhabited by parasitic ants than in plants inhabited by mutualistic ants. Unifrac unweighted and weighted principal component analyses showed that the bacterial community composition on leaves changed significantly when mutualistic ants were removed from plants or when plants were inhabited by parasitic ants. Direct mechanisms provided by ant-associated bacteria would contribute to the protective role against pathogens. The results suggest that the indirect defence of mutualistic ants also covers the protection from bacterial plant pathogens. Our findings highlight the importance of considering bacterial partners in ant-plant defensive mutualisms, which can contribute significantly to ant-mediated protection from plant pathogens. PMID:24392817

  6. In defence of utility: the medical humanities and medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blease, Charlotte

    2016-06-01

    The idea that a study of the humanities helps to humanise doctors has become a leitmotif within the field. It is argued that the humanities (especially, literature) help to foster insights beyond those provided by biomedical training. Healthy young medics, it is claimed, can thereby gain significant insights into patienthood, and obtain important skills that may be valuable for their professional life. But the instrumentality of the humanities is not the only justification proffered for its inclusion in medical curricula. In this paper I critically examine the two overarching justifications recurrently cited in the mainstream literature-namely, (1) the instrumental worth and (2) the intrinsic value of the medical humanities in educating doctors. Examining these theses (and focusing on the views of a leading medical humanities scholar) I show that the bifurcation into instrumental versus non-instrumental justifications is not supported by the argumentation. Instead, I find that the particulars of the supposedly intrinsic justifications amount to an unambiguously instrumental defence of the humanities. Contextualizing the present investigation to probe further, I describe a long history of debate about the role of the humanities in British education and find that it rests on unsupported dichotomies (utility vs non-utility, theoretical vs applied, educated vs trained). I conclude that the medical humanities' manifesto would be more intellectually honest and coherent, and provide a more robust defence of its value in medical education, if it chose to embrace a wholly instrumental rationale for its role. PMID:26842744

  7. How Strong Is Europeanisation, Really? The Danish Defence Administration and the Opt-Out from the European Security and Defence Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Gorm Rye

    2011-01-01

    thesis. The article shows that in spite of the opt-out, the administrative structures and the policy processes in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) have adapted to the common foreign and security policy (CFSP) and the European security and defence policy (ESDP). Surprisingly, the administrative......The article questions how strong Europeanisation is as an explanation of administrative changes in EU member states. Denmark has an opt-out from the European cooperation on defence, and, therefore, its defence administration represents a critical or a less likely case to test the Europeanisation...... structures and the decision-making processes in the Ministry of Defence (MoD) have also adapted to the ESDP. The latter example emphasises the strength of top-down Europeanisation as a possible explanation of domestic administrative changes in member states. It is argued that Europeanisation per se is not an...

  8. Are bacteriophage defence and virulence two sides of the same coin in Campylobacter jejuni?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.L. Louwen (Rogier); P. van Baarlen (Peter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe continuous battle for survival in the environment has led to the development or acquisition of sophisticated defence systems in bacteria. These defence systems have contributed to the survival of the bacterial species in the environment for millions of years. Some systems appear to h

  9. Are bacteriophage defence and virulence two sides of the same coin in Campylobacter jejuni?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwen, R.; Baarlen, van P.

    2013-01-01

    The continuous battle for survival in the environment has led to the development or acquisition of sophisticated defence systems in bacteria. These defence systems have contributed to the survival of the bacterial species in the environment for millions of years. Some systems appear to have evolved

  10. When ideals face reality: shaping the future of the South African Defence Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    In 2015 the South African Parliament finalised the long awaited new defence review. This document had been a long time in the making and was the result of more than four years of intensive work by the members of the Defence Review Committee. The recommendations envisage an extensive transformatio...

  11. NRT/PTR transporters are essential for translocation of glucosinolate defence compounds to seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Andersen, Tonni Grube; Burow, Meike;

    2012-01-01

    In plants, transport processes are important for the reallocation of defence compounds to protect tissues of high value, as demonstrated in the plant model Arabidopsis, in which the major defence compounds, glucosinolates, are translocated to seeds on maturation. The molecular basis for long-dist...

  12. Civil Defence Commission at the Federal German Ministry of the Interior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the Civil Defence Commission comprises also interdisciplinary questions of civil defence and disaster relief. The lectures are concerned with the causes and effects of radioactivity, medical practice in the event of disaster, toxicology and pathology, including even psychology in disaster as well as risk management and dosimetry. The subjects chemical accidents and disaster relief are marginally dealt with. (DG)

  13. Between a rock and a hard place: Environmental and engineering considerations when designing coastal defence structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firth, L.B.; Thompson, R.C.; Bohn, K.; Abbiati, M.; Airoldi, L.; Bouma, T.J.; Bozzeda, F.; Ceccherelli, V.U.; Colangelo, M.A.; Evans, A.; Ferrario, F.; Hanley, M.E.; Hinz, H.; Hoggart, S.P.G.; Jackson, J.E.; Moore, P.; Morgan, E.H.; Perkol-Finkel, S.; Skov, M.W.; Strain, E.M.; van Belzen, J.; Hawkins, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal defence structures are proliferating as a result of rising sea levels and stormier seas. With the realisation that most coastal infrastructure cannot be lost or removed, research is required into ways that coastal defence structures can be built to meet engineering requirements, whilst also

  14. An Exploratory Study of the Defence Mechanisms Used in Psychotherapy by Adults Who Have Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, D. W.; Beail, N.

    2010-01-01

    Problem: A significant concept in psychodynamic theory and practice is that of defence mechanisms. The identifications of defences is a key task of the therapist and these are then used in the formulation and form part of the therapist's interventions. Case studies of psychotherapy with adults who have intellectual disabilities (IDs) suggest that…

  15. A SNARE-protein has opposing functions in penetration resistance and defence signalling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ziguo; Feechan, Angela; Pedersen, Carsten;

    2007-01-01

    Penetration resistance is often the first line of defence against fungal pathogens. Subsequently induced defences are mediated by the programmed cell death (PCD) reaction pathway and the salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signalling pathways. We previously demonstrated...

  16. Male Rock Sparrow (Petronia petronia) Nest Defence Correlates with Female Ornament Size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griggio, Matteo; Matessi, Giuliano; Pilastro, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    -old nestlings, and measured the intensity of male and female defence reaction. We measured the frequency of attack flights, intensity of alarm calling and total time spent in view, and then combined these for each individual, in a single defence factor by principal component analysis. All the females arrived to...

  17. Simple growth patterns can create complex trajectories for the ontogeny of constitutive chemical defences in seaweeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Paul

    Full Text Available All of the theory and most of the data on the ecology and evolution of chemical defences derive from terrestrial plants, which have considerable capacity for internal movement of resources. In contrast, most macroalgae--seaweeds--have no or very limited capacity for resource translocation, meaning that trade-offs between growth and defence, for example, should be localised rather than systemic. This may change the predictions of chemical defence theories for seaweeds. We developed a model that mimicked the simple growth pattern of the red seaweed Asparagopsis armata which is composed of repeating clusters of somatic cells and cells which contain deterrent secondary chemicals (gland cells. To do this we created a distinct growth curve for the somatic cells and another for the gland cells using empirical data. The somatic growth function was linked to the growth function for defence via differential equations modelling, which effectively generated a trade-off between growth and defence as these neighbouring cells develop. By treating growth and defence as separate functions we were also able to model a trade-off in growth of 2-3% under most circumstances. However, we found contrasting evidence for this trade-off in the empirical relationships between growth and defence, depending on the light level under which the alga was cultured. After developing a model that incorporated both branching and cell division rates, we formally demonstrated that positive correlations between growth and defence are predicted in many circumstances and also that allocation costs, if they exist, will be constrained by the intrinsic growth patterns of the seaweed. Growth patterns could therefore explain contrasting evidence for cost of constitutive chemical defence in many studies, highlighting the need to consider the fundamental biology and ontogeny of organisms when assessing the allocation theories for defence.

  18. Defence-in-depth concept for the EU-ABWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Fuchs, Steffen; Takada, Toshiaki; Kataoka, Kazuyoshi [Toshiba International Limited (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The current defence-in-depth (DiD) concept has been established by the Reactor Harmonization Working Group (RHWG) of Western European Nuclear Regulators Association (WENRA). Principally the DiD concept was already part of the very early power reactor designs. However, additional considerations have been done in order to take plant conditions into account which are beyond the original design basis. The most recent advancements have been done based on major lessons learned from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi accident. Especially for new nuclear reactors it has to be demonstrated that DiD aspects have been considered in their design. Currently Toshiba is adapting its Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) for the European market, at first in Finland. This presentation aims to describe how the new DiD concept has been applied to achieve the safety goals for a modern reactor type and to ensure a design that can be licensed in Western Europe. (orig.)

  19. Antioxidant defence systems in the protozoan pathogen Giardia intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronicola, Daniela; Falabella, Micol; Forte, Elena; Testa, Fabrizio; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The microaerophilic protist Giardia intestinalis is the causative agent of giardiasis, one of the most common intestinal infectious diseases worldwide. The pathogen lacks not only respiratory terminal oxidases (being amitochondriate), but also several conventional antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. In spite of this, since living attached to the mucosa of the proximal small intestine, the parasite should rely on an efficient antioxidant system to survive the oxidative and nitrosative stress conditions found in this tract of the human gut. Here, we review current knowledge on the antioxidant defence systems in G. intestinalis, focusing on the progress made over the last decade in the field. The relevance of this research and future perspectives are discussed. PMID:26672398

  20. Circling the enemy: cyclic proteins in plant defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, David J

    2009-06-01

    Cyclotides are ultra-stable plant proteins that have a circular peptide backbone crosslinked by a cystine knot of disulfide bonds. They are produced in large quantities by plants of the Violaceae and Rubiaceae families and have a role in plant defence against insect predation. As I discuss here, recent studies have begun to reveal how their unique circular topology evolved. Cyclization is achieved by hijacking existing plant proteolytic enzymes and operating them in 'reverse' to form a peptide bond between the N- and C-termini of a linear precursor. Such studies suggest that circular proteins are more common in the plant kingdom than was previously thought, and their exceptional stability has led to their application as protein-engineering templates in drug design. PMID:19423383

  1. Target Detection: Remote Sensing Techniques for Defence Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Chaudhuri

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous development in remote sensing technology in the recent past has opened up new challenges in defence applications. On important area of such applications is in target detection. This paper describes both classical and newly developed approaches to detect the targets by using remotely-sensed digital images. The classical approach includes statistical classification methods and image processing techniques. The new approach deals with a relatively new sensor technology, namely, synthetic aperture radar (SAR systems and fast developing tools, like neural networks and multisource data integration for analysis and interpretation. With SAR images, it is possible to detect targets or features of a target that is otherwise not possible. Neural networks and multisource data integration tools also have a great potential in analysing and interpreting remote sensing data for target detection.

  2. State Aid as a Defence for Public Authorities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    court’s perception. As the contracts had been declared to be in force by a declaratory judgment that was res judicata, the dispute before the CJEU concerned the national interpretation of the principle of res judicata and its application in a State aid context. The CJEU first turned to the principle of......In the annotated judgment a public authority uses the existence of State aid as a defence in a legal action, where its contractual partner aimed to achieve damages and fulfilment of the contracts. The public authority claimed that the contracts were not on market terms, which also was the national...... consistent interpretation, which it considered could provide various solutions for the national court to draw all the necessary consequences of the possible breach of the duty to notify State aid. In the alternative, the CJEU considered the principle of effectiveness and found that due to the fundamental...

  3. Ionising radiation safety training in the Australian defence organisation (ADO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Training personnel in ionising radiation safety within the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) requires addressing some unique features of an organisation employing both military and civilian personnel. Activities may include those of a civil nature (such as industrial and medical radiography), specific military requirements (for training and emergency response) and scientific research and development. Some personnel may be assigned to full-time duties associated with radiation, while others may be designated as radiation protection officers in remote units with few duties to perform in this role. A further complication is that most military personnel are subjected to postings at regular intervals. The ADO's Directorate of Defence Occupational Health and Safety has established an Ionising Radiation Safety Subcommittee to monitor not only the adequacy of the internal Ionising Radiation Safety Manual but also the training requirements. A training course, responding to these requirements, has been developed to emphasise: basic radiation theory and protection; operation of radiation monitors available in the ADO; an understanding of the Safety Manual; day-to-day radiation safety in units and establishments; and appropriate responses to radiation accidents and emergencies. In addition, students are briefed on a limited number of peripheral topics and participate in some site visits. Currently, two Courses are held annually, each with about twenty students. Most of the material is presented by ADO personnel with external contractor support. The three Courses held to date have proved sufficiently successful, both for the students and the ADO generally, to seek national accreditation through the Australian National Training Authority and, as a first step, competency standards have been identified

  4. Ionising radiation safety training in the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Training personnel in ionising radiation safety within the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) requires addressing some unique features of an organisation employing both military and civilian personnel. Activities may include those of a civil nature (such as industrial and medical radiography), specific military requirements (for training and emergency response) and scientific research and development. Some personnel may be assigned to full-time duties associated with radiation. However, most are designated as radiation protection officers as a secondary duty. A further complication is that most military personnel are subjected to postings at regular intervals. The ADO's Directorate of Defence Occupational Health and Safety has established an Ionising Radiation Safety Subcommittee to monitor not only the adequacy of the internal Ionising Radiation Safety Manual but also the training requirements. A Training Course, responding to these requirements, has been developed to emphasize, basic radiation theory and protection, operation of radiation monitors available in the ADO, an understanding of the Ionising Radiation Safety Manual, day-to-day radiation safety in units and establishments, and appropriate responses to radiation accidents and emergencies. In addition, students are briefed on a limited number of peripheral topics and participate in some site visits. Currently, two Courses are held annually, each with about twenty students. Most of the material is presented by ADO personnel with external contractor support. The three Courses held to date have proved successful, both for the students and the ADO generally. To seek national accreditation of the course through the Australian National Training Authority, as a first step, competency standards have been proposed. (authors)

  5. Service to Science and Service to Defence : Moseley in the Light of the Centenary Year of his Landmark Publications in Defence of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Mukherjee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Three words ‘Moseley, Soldier & Science’ in which the last two are so deeply associated with the name of the English scientist Moseley that these have become virtually synonyms of Moseley in the context of remembrance of the professional contribution and character of the unique soldier-scientist Moseley because these two words are very special for him in the sense that they often are essential to understand the personality of iconic Moseley. His keen interest in the service of Science as researcher and on the other hand, his involvement in the Defence services as soldier is really unique example of personification of total commitment to the cause of defence of his country and his deep dedication for the cause of unfolding the scientific truth towards building up a way forward to enrich human history. Moseley’s dual personalities as a scientist and as a soldier rest on the framework of Science & Defence in which the ideas and appeal of Science is universal whereas the ideals of a soldier in Defence is purely national and personal; and that was manifested in his attitude and approach - so intimate and so intense that it would not be inappropriate to say that ‘Service to Science’ and ‘Service to Defence’ for this real world, as Moseley exemplified were in a way virtually two sides of the same coin. Thus, Moseley is truly a composite personality which can be understood from his passion for Science as essentially meant for global cause but his zeal as soldier for Defence was pristine and core to his heart. In fact, often such deeply motivated men contribute for creation of history of this real composite world.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(4, pp.343-345, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.4873

  6. Peer-to-Peer Enclaves for Improving Network Defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Archer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Information about cyberthreats within networks spreads slowly relative to the speed at which those threats spread. Typical "threat feeds" that are commercially available also disseminate information slowly relative to the propagation speed of attacks, and they often convey irrelevant information about imminent threats. As a result, hosts sharing a network may miss opportunities to improve their defence postures against imminent attack because needed information arrives too late or is lost in irrelevant noise. We envision timely, relevant peer-to-peer sharing of threat information – based on current technologies – as a solution to these problems and as a useful design pattern for defensive cyberwarfare. In our setting, network nodes form communities that we call enclaves, where each node defends itself while sharing information on imminent threats with peers that have similar threat exposure. In this article, we present our vision for this solution. We sketch the architecture of a typical node in such a network and how it might interact with a framework for sharing threat information; we explain why certain defensive countermeasures may work better in our setting; we discuss current tools that could be used as components in our vision; and we describe opportunities for future research and development.

  7. Terahertz technology in biological and chemical sensing for defence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Ruth M.

    2004-12-01

    The terahertz (1 THz = 1012 Hz, 3 mm or 33 cm-1) region of the electromagnetic spectrum is typically defined in the frequency range 100 GHz to 10 THz, corresponding to a wavelength range of 3 mm to 30 microns. Owing to a lack of suitable coherent sources and detectors, this region has only been investigated in earnest in the last ten years for terrestrial imaging and spectroscopy applications. Its role in the medical, pharmaceutical, non-destructive testing and more recently security industries is now being examined. The terahertz frequency range is of particular interest since it is able to probe several molecular interactions including the intermolecular vibrations, large amplitude vibrations and twisting and torsional modes. Molecules have also shown polarization sensitivity to the incident terahertz radiation. The ability of terahertz radiation to investigate conformational change makes it an important part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Terahertz radiation has the potential to provide additional information, which may complement other optically based sensing technologies. The use of terahertz technology in the security and defence industry is discussed, with a specific focus on biological and chemical sensing. The challenges faced in bringing terahertz technology into the market place will be discussed.

  8. Shipborne Laser Beam Weapon System for Defence against Cruise Missiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Dudeja

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Sea-skim~ing cruise missiles pose the greatest threat to a surface ship in the present-day war scenario. The convenitional close-in-weapon-systems (CIWSs are becoming less reliable against these new challenges requiring extremely fast reaction time. Naval Forces see a high energy laser as a feasible andjeffective directed energy weapon against sea-skimming antiship cruise missiles becauseof its .ability to deliver destructive energy at the speed of light on to a distant target. The paper comparesthe technology and capability of deuterium fluoride (DF and chemical-oxygen-iodine laser (COIL in effectively performing the role of a shipborne CIWS altainst sea-skimming missiles. Out of these twolasers, it is argued that DF laser wo.uld be more effective a,s a shipborne weapon for defence against sea-skimmin,g cruise missiles. Besides the high energy laser as the primary (killing laser, othersub-systems required in the complete weapon system would be: A beacon laser to sense phase distor'ions in the primary laser, adaptive optics to compensate the atmospheric distortions, beam-directing optics, illuminating lasers, IRST sensors, surveillance and tracking radars, interfacing system, etc.

  9. Risk management as a social defence against anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk J. Geldenhuys

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This article deals with the unconscious role of risk management in an African country.Research purpose: The aim of the study is to describe how risk management unconsciously influences behaviour when doing business in an African country.Motivation for the study: Operational risk management is a rational management imperative. However, this does not take cognisance of the unconscious role of risk management. A systems-psychodynamic perspective might be particularly relevant if the anxiety implied in risk management is not appropriately contained. Awareness of these dynamics may provide an opportunity for addressing them and allow for a more holistic way of managing risk.Research design, approach and method: The researchers conducted the study as a qualitative case study in an African country. They used purposive sampling and analysed the data using qualitative content analysis.Main findings: Viewing risk management from a systems-psychodynamic perspective allowed the researchers to identify the influence of risk management on the behaviour of people. The emerging hypothesis was that, if businesses do not address the anxiety underlying risk management, managing risk becomes a social defence against the anxiety.Practical/managerial implications: Awareness of the anxiety involved in risk management may assist businesses to manage risk in a more realistic way, making provision for, and even capitalising on, the human element.Contributions/value-add: The article provides a systems-psychodynamic, and hence a more complete, perspective of operational risk management when doing business in an African country.

  10. Symbiotic bacteria enable olive fly larvae to overcome host defences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yosef, Michael; Pasternak, Zohar; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Yuval, Boaz

    2015-07-01

    Ripe fruit offer readily available nutrients for many animals, including fruit fly larvae (Diptera: Tephritidae) and their associated rot-inducing bacteria. Yet, during most of their ontogeny, fruit remain chemically defended and effectively suppress herbivores and pathogens by high levels of secondary metabolites. Olive flies (Bactrocera oleae) are uniquely able to develop in unripe olives. Unlike other frugivorous tephritids, the larvae maintain bacteria confined within their midgut caeca. We examined the interaction between larvae, their associated bacteria, and fruit chemical defence, hypothesizing that bacterial contribution to larval development is contingent on the phenology of fruit defensive chemistry. We demonstrate that larvae require their natural complement of bacteria (Candidatus Erwinia dacicola: Enterobacteriaceae) in order to develop in unripe olives. Conversely, when feeding on ripe fruit, larval development proceeds independently of these bacteria. Our experiments suggest that bacteria counteract the inhibitory effect of oleuropein-the principal phenolic glycoside in unripe olives. In light of these results, we suggest that the unique symbiosis in olive flies, compared with other frugivorous tephritids, is understood by considering the relationship between the fly, bacteria and fruit chemistry. When applied in an evolutionary context, this approach may also point out the forces which shaped symbioses across the Tephritidae. PMID:26587275

  11. A transcriptional reference map of defence hormone responses in potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesel, Lea; Davis, Jayne L; Milne, Linda; Redondo Fernandez, Vanesa; Herold, Miriam B; Middlefell Williams, Jill; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E; Harrower, Brian; Newton, Adrian C; Birch, Paul R J; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Hein, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormones are involved in diverse aspects of plant life including the regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction, as well as governing biotic and abiotic stress responses. We have generated a comprehensive transcriptional reference map of the early potato responses to exogenous application of the defence hormones abscisic acid, brassinolides (applied as epibrassinolide), ethylene (applied as the ethylene precursor aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid), salicylic acid and jasmonic acid (applied as methyl jasmonate). Of the 39000 predicted genes on the microarray, a total of 2677 and 2473 genes were significantly differentially expressed at 1 h and 6 h after hormone treatment, respectively. Specific marker genes newly identified for the early hormone responses in potato include: a homeodomain 20 transcription factor (DMG400000248) for abscisic acid; a SAUR gene (DMG400016561) induced in epibrassinolide treated plants; an osmotin gene (DMG400003057) specifically enhanced by aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid; a gene weakly similar to AtWRKY40 (DMG402007388) that was induced by salicylic acid; and a jasmonate ZIM-domain protein 1 (DMG400002930) which was specifically activated by methyl jasmonate. An online database has been set up to query the expression patterns of potato genes represented on the microarray that can also incorporate future microarray or RNAseq-based expression studies. PMID:26477733

  12. Politics, pleasure, violence: Swedish defence propaganda in social media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ferrada Stoehrel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Swedish Armed Forces have produced and distributed highly edited video clips on YouTube that show moving images of military activity. Alongside this development, mobile phone apps have emerged as an important channel through which the user can experience and take an interactive part in the staging of contemporary armed conflict. This article examines the way in which the aesthetic and affective experience of Swedish defence and security policy is socially and (media-culturally (co-constructed and how the official representation of Swedish military intervention (reproduces political and economic effects when these activities are distributed through traditional and social media such as YouTube and digital apps. Based on Isabela and Norman Fairclough’s thoughts on political discourse, Michel Foucault’s dialectic idea of power/knowledge, and Sara Ahmed’s concept of the affective, I discuss how the Swedish digital military aesthetic is part of a broader political and economic practice which has consequences beyond the digital, the semiotic and what might at first glance appear to be pure entertainment. 

  13. Psychic skin: psychotic defences, borderline process and delusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, I apply the concept of psychic skin to analytic work with people suffering from personality disorders and psychoses. When psychoses emerge, the defensive skin which protects the ego is breached and violent unconscious forces rip through the personality. Some of the patients diagnosed as schizophrenic with whom I work have identified with archetypal characters such as Christ, Satan, John Lennon and the Queen. I attempt to show how the adoption of these inflated personas can serve as secondary psychic skins. Such delusional identifications can provide a protective shield to hide the denuded self and prevent intrusion from the external world. Through clinical example, I try to demonstrate how these archetypal 'second skins' can preserve life until internal and external conditions make it possible for the self to emerge. I contrast such psychotic identifications with 'thin-skinned' and 'thick-skinned' narcissism as well as 'defences of the self' in borderline states where the psychic skin may be damaged but does not disintegrate. I also look at the ways in which Jung's own personal experience was different from this and how he managed to avert psychotic breakdown. PMID:22288539

  14. Future scientific trends in radiation protection and civil defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study is to review current and future scientific trends in radiation protection and civil defence of the nuclear research center of the Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt. The main areas of interest are summarized as follows: 1. Organization and training: Up dating radiation protection legislation. Information transfer via translation to Arabic of latest IAEA and ICRP publications. Establishing data base for rad port services in egypt. Updating radiation protection training programmes, and application of decision-aiding techniques in radiation protection (justification and optimization). 2. Occupational radiation control: Mixed field external personnel dosimetry/detection. internal dosimetry/biophysics/W B counter / Bioassay. Area monitoring and surface, and updating radiation format. 3. Public radiation control: Environmental programme around inshass reactor. Transport of radioactive material. Transfer of radioactivity in aquatic environments. storage of radioactive waste, and annual exposure to members of the public-natural radiation, medical others. 4. Emergency: First aids decontamination, decontamination of personnel and equipment, dose calculation after accidents, and Handling radiation accidents/emergency planning. 5. Quality assurance: Calibration of radiation sources and measuring devices, and intercomparison personnel dosimetry programme. The proposed plan can be completed within 1992-1997 national plan with the support of IAEA technical assistance, research contract and proper funding from the atomic energy authority of egypt

  15. Trained immunity: A smart way to enhance innate immune defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Jos W M; Joosten, Leo A B; Riksen, Niels; Netea, Mihai G

    2015-11-01

    The innate arm of the immune system is generally viewed as primitive and non-specific and - in contrast to the adaptive immune arm - not to possess memory. However in plants and invertebrate animals that lack adaptive immunity, innate immunity will exhibit a prolonged enhanced functional state after adequate priming. A similar enhancement of function of the innate immunity has occasionally been described in vertebrates, including humans. Over the past few years we have studied this phenomenon in greater detail and we have coined the term 'Trained (innate) immunity' (TI). TI can be induced by a variety of stimuli, of which we have studied BCG and β-glucan in greater detail. The non-specific protective effects of BCG that have been observed in vaccination studies in the literature are probably due to TI. Monocytes and macrophages are among the main cells of the innate immune arm that can be trained. We have discovered that both BCG (via NOD2 signalling) and β-glucan (via dectin-1) induce epigenetic reprogramming, in particular stable changes in histone trimethylation at H3K4. These epigenetic changes lead to cellular activation, enhanced cytokine production and a change in the metabolic state of the cell with a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. TI is not only important for host defence and vaccine responses, but most probably also for diseases like atherosclerosis. Modulation of TI is a promising area for new treatments. PMID:26597205

  16. PRODUCTIVITY AND QUALITY: A STRATEGY FOR THE SA DEFENCE FORCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Eberlein

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent times the SA Defence Force (SADF has been bombarded with a variety of methods and approaches to the improvement of productivity, financial savings and, most recently, for quality of work life or quality assurance. Various approaches have included the concepts of Total Quality Management (TQM, Quality Circles (and variants in the guise of Triads and others, Methodology, Unit Management Systems, Cost Control Systems, Deterministic Productivity Accounting and the Iike. There have been many benefits to be found in these various approaches, each of which concentrates on certain aspects of productivity. That there have been great achievements in productivity in the SADF is a matter of record, a record which is reflected in a National Award for Productivity, a smaller more efficient SADF, and a reputation for submitting more recommendations for improvements than other departments in the Public Service. At a more personal level though, the writer has gained the impression that no or very little attempt has been made to integrate selected aspects of these approaches into an overall "productivity” strategy acceptable to the SADF. That there is a need for such an overall strategy is clear from the sentiments expressed recently by the members of the SADF's Productivity Co-ordination Committee when attempting to indicate the way ahead to even greater productivity in the SADF (Meeting, January 1991. In this paper a strategy for the improvement of productivity and the quality of work life which is acceptable to the SADF is proposed.

  17. Military Geoinformation System of the Ministry of Defence of the Republic of Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Zvonko Biljecki; Goran Gugić; Aida Osmanagić; Stipica Pavičić; Mladen Rapaić; Petra Sajko; Tomislav Tonković; Daniel Vencler; Željko Železnjak

    2005-01-01

    One of the goals that Partnership for Peace has set, within domain of geospatial information, is the implementation of a military geoinformation system. Besides this important strategic objective for the Republic of Croatia, the military geoinformation system will enhance activities of the Ministry of Defence and Armed Forces and in such way improve national defence and cooperation with NATO members and members of the Partnership for Peace. This paper describes overall system principles based...

  18. Trade-off among different anti-herbivore defence strategies along an altitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostálek, Tomáš; Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Maršík, Petr; Rezek, Jan; Skuhrovec, Jiří; Pavela, Roman; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    The type and intensity of plant-herbivore interactions are likely to be altered under climate change as a consequence of differential dispersal rates of plants and their herbivores. Here, we studied variation in herbivore damage on Salvia nubicola in the field and compared its growth and defence strategies against herbivores in controlled conditions using seeds from populations along a broad altitudinal gradient. Our work is one of the first studies to simultaneously measure complex intraspecific variation in plant growth, direct and indirect defences as well as plant tolerance (ability to regrow) as a consequence of herbivore attack simulated by clipping. In the field, we found that plants experienced higher herbivore pressure in lower altitudes. In the greenhouse, plants grown from seeds collected in lower-altitude populations grew better and produced a higher content of phenolic compounds (direct defence) and volatile organic compounds (indirect defence) in response to simulated herbivory. However, there were no differences in tolerance and effect of S. nubicola extracts on the model generalist herbivore Spodoptera littoralis (direct defence) along the altitudinal gradient. Although we found that S. nubicola developed a range of defence strategies, the strategies do not seem to be used simultaneously in all populations even though most of them are correlated with altitudinal gradient. Our finding is in agreement with the current knowledge that co-expression of multiple defences might be costly for a plant, since investment in defensive traits is assumed to reduce the resource availability for growth and reproduction. Our study thus shows the importance of simultaneous study of different defence strategies since understanding these trade-offs could be necessary for detecting the mechanisms by which plants are able to cope with future climate change. PMID:27169609

  19. The Training Environment Of The Irish Defence Forces:Integrated Training, Bullying and Sexual Harassment

    OpenAIRE

    Clonan, Tom

    2000-01-01

    The training environment of the Irish Defence Forces: integrated training and bullying in the workplace In this chapter I will refer to recruit and cadet training within the defence forces in light of international trends in integrated training. Following the consideration of ‘commitment’ in terms of numbers of women recruited to the organisation in chapter five, this chapter assesses the “education” component of the setting (Reskin and Padavic, 1994). Through an examination of archival dat...

  20. CONNECTIONS AND INTERFERENCES BETWEEN THE RIGHT TO DEFENCE AND THE RIGHT TO LEGAL ASSISTANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia ANDRITOI; Florentina LUPSA

    2014-01-01

    Between the right to defence and assistance and the civil rights a close connection has been identified. Sometimes the realisation and protection of these rights, such as the right to life, to personal dignity, to private life etc., in general are impossible without the right to defence and legal assistance. First, the right to legal assistance allows the individual to comprehend the powers conferred to him by this right. Second, the right to legal assistance allows the protection and enforce...

  1. Prey survival by predator intimidation: an experimental study of peacock butterfly defence against blue tits

    OpenAIRE

    Vallin, Adrian; Jakobsson, Sven; Lind, Johan; Wiklund, Christer

    2005-01-01

    Long-lived butterflies that hibernate as adults are expected to have well-developed antipredation devices as a result of their long exposure to natural enemies. The peacock butterfly, Inachis io, for instance, is a cryptic leaf mimic when resting, but shifts to active defence when disturbed, performing a repeated sequence of movements exposing major eyespots on the wings accompanied by a hissing noise. We studied the effect of visual and auditory defence by staging experiments in which wild-c...

  2. Evolution of separate predation- and defence-evoked venoms in carnivorous cone snails

    OpenAIRE

    Dutertre, Sébastien; Jin, Ai-Hua; Vetter, Irina; Hamilton, Brett; Sunagar, Kartik; Lavergne, Vincent; Dutertre, Valentin; Fry, Bryan G.; Antunes, Agostinho; Venter, Deon J.; Alewood, Paul F.; Lewis, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Venomous animals are thought to inject the same combination of toxins for both predation and defence, presumably exploiting conserved target pharmacology across prey and predators. Remarkably, cone snails can rapidly switch between distinct venoms in response to predatory or defensive stimuli. Here, we show that the defence-evoked venom of Conus geographus contains high levels of paralytic toxins that potently block neuromuscular receptors, consistent with its lethal effects on humans. In con...

  3. TLR-independent innate defence against Legionella pneumophila in human host cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vinzing, Maya

    2010-01-01

    The innate immunity is the first line defence against invading pathogens, such as the facultative intracellular, Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila. It senses microorganisms by so-called pattern recognition receptors, e.g. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and initiates subsequent defence mechanisms. Recent studies indicated an important role of type I interferons in bacterial infections. Moreover, genetic studies in different mice strains demonstrated that different alleles of the Nod-...

  4. Trade-off among different anti-herbivore defence strategies along an altitudinal gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostálek, Tomáš; Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Maršík, Petr; Rezek, Jan; Skuhrovec, Jiří; Pavela, Roman; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    The type and intensity of plant–herbivore interactions are likely to be altered under climate change as a consequence of differential dispersal rates of plants and their herbivores. Here, we studied variation in herbivore damage on Salvia nubicola in the field and compared its growth and defence strategies against herbivores in controlled conditions using seeds from populations along a broad altitudinal gradient. Our work is one of the first studies to simultaneously measure complex intraspecific variation in plant growth, direct and indirect defences as well as plant tolerance (ability to regrow) as a consequence of herbivore attack simulated by clipping. In the field, we found that plants experienced higher herbivore pressure in lower altitudes. In the greenhouse, plants grown from seeds collected in lower-altitude populations grew better and produced a higher content of phenolic compounds (direct defence) and volatile organic compounds (indirect defence) in response to simulated herbivory. However, there were no differences in tolerance and effect of S. nubicola extracts on the model generalist herbivore Spodoptera littoralis (direct defence) along the altitudinal gradient. Although we found that S. nubicola developed a range of defence strategies, the strategies do not seem to be used simultaneously in all populations even though most of them are correlated with altitudinal gradient. Our finding is in agreement with the current knowledge that co-expression of multiple defences might be costly for a plant, since investment in defensive traits is assumed to reduce the resource availability for growth and reproduction. Our study thus shows the importance of simultaneous study of different defence strategies since understanding these trade-offs could be necessary for detecting the mechanisms by which plants are able to cope with future climate change. PMID:27169609

  5. Transformation or Stagnation? The South African Defence Industry in the early 21st Century

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Dunne; Richard Haines

    2005-01-01

    In post-Apartheid South Africa, the ANC Government faced the challenge of restructuring an unsustainably large defence sector. This was in the context of economic and social problems and a declining international arms market. This paper considers the restructuring of the South African industry over that period and more recently, providing a valuable case study of defence industrial restructuring in a small industrialised economy. It considers how the public sector (DENEL) and private sector r...

  6. Diversity in susceptibility of Botrytis cinerea to biocontrol products inducing plant defence mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Bardin, Marc; Comby, Morgane; Lenaerts, Ruben; Nicot, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The development of plant defence stimulants to increase host resistance represents anattractive alternative to fungicides for the protection of crops against plant pathogens. In this study we evaluated the efficiency of 14 products presumed to induce plant defence mechanisms against Botrytis cinerea on tomato and lettuce. Two days after the application of the products, tomato and lettuce leaves were inoculated with B. cinerea and incubated in conditions conducive to disease development.Out...

  7. THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM OF THE SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL DEFENCE FORCE AT THE GRAHAMSTOWN MILITARY INSTALLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bheki Magagula

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents preliminary findings on current environmental management practices used by the South African National Defence Force (SANDF at the Grahamstown Military Installation (GMI. These findings comprise interviews with SANDF officials and an analysis of official documents, which include the first and second editions of the Environmental Management Plan for Defence (2001 & 2008 respectively. The study on which this article reports, found that the emphasis placed on environmental protection within defence force activities worldwide has compelled the South African Department of Defence and Military Veterans (SA DODMV to regulate the management of the environment within its properties. Yet, these efforts have faced numerous challenges that range from financial to human resources deficiencies. Consequently, the military installation at Grahamstown does not have environmentally knowledgeable and qualified personnel to deal with environmental issues. From the analysis of official documents as well as interviews with respondents, it was established that the SA DODMV itself does not have a budget for environmental services. The combination of all these drawbacks has led to the failure of the implementation of the Environmental Management System (EMS for Defence at this military installation (i.e. GMI of the SANDF. Undoubtedly, all these challenges have severely compromised the commitment of the SA DODMV to honour its environmental management obligations. Moreover, the deficiencies of all these resources undermine the sustainable utilisation of these national assets (natural resources entrusted to the defence force. The study reported here proposes an ideal model for the successful implementation of the EMS in SANDF military installations.

  8. Uncoupling of reactive oxygen species accumulation and defence signalling in the metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fones, Helen N; Eyles, Chris J; Bennett, Mark H; Smith, J Andrew C; Preston, Gail M

    2013-09-01

    The metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens is protected from disease by the accumulation of high concentrations of metals in its aerial tissues, which are toxic to many pathogens. As these metals can lead to the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), metal hyperaccumulator plants have developed highly effective ROS tolerance mechanisms, which might quench ROS-based signals. We therefore investigated whether metal accumulation alters defence signalling via ROS in this plant. We studied the effect of zinc (Zn) accumulation by N. caerulescens on pathogen-induced ROS production, salicylic acid accumulation and downstream defence responses, such as callose deposition and pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression, to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. The accumulation of Zn caused increased superoxide production in N. caerulescens, but inoculation with P. syringae did not elicit the defensive oxidative burst typical of most plants. Defences dependent on signalling through ROS (callose and PR gene expression) were also modified or absent in N. caerulescens, whereas salicylic acid production in response to infection was retained. These observations suggest that metal hyperaccumulation is incompatible with defence signalling through ROS and that, as metal hyperaccumulation became effective as a form of elemental defence, normal defence responses became progressively uncoupled from ROS signalling in N. caerulescens. PMID:23758201

  9. Parental risk management in relation to offspring defence: bad news for kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahr, Katharina; Riegler, Georg; Hoi, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Do parents defend their offspring whenever necessary, and do self-sacrificing parents really exist? Studies recognized that parent defence is dynamic, mainly depending on the threat predators pose. In this context, parental risk management should consider the threat to themselves and to their offspring. Consequently, the observed defence should be a composite of both risk components. Surprisingly, no study so far has determined the influence of these two threat components on parental decision rules. In a field experiment, we investigated parental risk taking in relation to the threat posed to themselves and their offspring. To disentangle the two threat components, we examined defence behaviours of parent blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus towards three different predators and during different nestling developmental stages. Nest defence strategies in terms of alarm call intensity and nearest predator approach differed between the three predators. Defence intensity was only partly explained by threat level. Most importantly, parental risk management varied in relation to their own, but not offspring risk. Parent defence investment was independent of nestling risk when parents followed a high-risk strategy. However, parents considered nestling as well as parental risk when following a low-risk strategy. Our findings could have general implications for the economy of risk management and decision-making strategies in living beings, including humans. PMID:25392467

  10. The second line of defence in the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most dangerous forms of terrorism is nuclear and radiological terrorism, including threats by terrorists to use so called dirty bombs. The Russian Federation?s national security concept recognizes the possibility of a terrorist threat arising in practically any sphere of State activity. The threat of nuclear or radiological terrorism is considered an integral part in the overall problem of ensuring national security. Without doubt, reliable physical protection of nuclear material and a reliable system of accounting for and control of nuclear material and radioactive substances play a key role in preventing and countering possible acts of nuclear and radiological terrorism. Clearly, however, the problem of combating the manifestations of nuclear and radiological terrorism cannot be solved by physical protection measures alone. Considering that the whole threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism is conditional upon the possibility of illicit trafficking in nuclear material and radioactive substances and their illegal possession or transport in a State?s territory, across its customs boundaries or in transit across its territory, national systems for responding to the threat of terrorism must be designed as an informational and logical whole integrated with the system for combating illicit trafficking in nuclear material and radioactive substances. Generally speaking, the term ?second line of defence? refers to the set of measures to combat illicit trafficking in nuclear material and radioactive substances at the next level above the nuclear facility. This level can be the territory of a country or its border. The ?second line of defence and countermeasures against nuclear and radiological terrorism? means coordinated actions taken by federal bodies of the executive power whose functional duties include the prevention of terrorist acts in general, and by law enforcement bodies, ministries, departments and organizations directly concerned with the use of

  11. Analysis of innate defences against Plasmodium falciparum in immunodeficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Rooijen Nico

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice with genetic deficiencies in adaptive immunity are used for the grafting of human cells or pathogens, to study human diseases, however, the innate immune responses to xenografts in these mice has received little attention. Using the NOD/SCID Plasmodium falciparum mouse model an analysis of innate defences responsible for the substantial control of P. falciparum which remains in such mice, was performed. Methods NOD/SCID mice undergoing an immunomodulatory protocol that includes, clodronate-loaded liposomes to deplete macrophages and an anti-polymorphonuclear leukocytes antibody, were grafted with human red blood cells and P. falciparum. The systematic and kinetic analysis of the remaining innate immune responses included the number and phenotype of peripheral blood leukocytes as well as inflammatory cytokines/chemokines released in periphery. The innate responses towards the murine parasite Plasmodium yoelii were used as a control. Results Results show that 1 P. falciparum induces a strong inflammation characterized by an increase in circulating leukocytes and the release of inflammatory cytokines; 2 in contrast, the rodent parasite P. yoelii, induces a far more moderate inflammation; 3 human red blood cells and the anti-inflammatory agents employed induce low-grade inflammation; and 4 macrophages seem to bear the most critical function in controlling P. falciparum survival in those mice, whereas polymorphonuclear and NK cells have only a minor role. Conclusions Despite the use of an immunomodulatory treatment, immunodeficient NOD/SCID mice are still able to mount substantial innate responses that seem to be correlated with parasite clearance. Those results bring new insights on the ability of innate immunity from immunodeficient mice to control xenografts of cells of human origin and human pathogens.

  12. Microcins in action: amazing defence strategies of Enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebuffat, Sylvie

    2012-12-01

    Probably the oldest and most widespread antimicrobial strategy in living organisms is the use of antimicrobial peptides. Bacteria secrete such defence peptides, termed bacteriocins, that they use for microbial competitions. Microcins are bacteriocins of less than 10 kDa produced by Escherichia coli and related enterobacteria through the ribosomal pathway. They are synthesized as linear precursors, which can further undergo complex post-translational modifications resulting from dedicated maturation enzymes encoded in the microcin gene clusters, and are processed by proteolytic cleavage. Microcins exert potent bactericidal activities that use subtle and clever mechanisms to cross outer and inner membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. To cross the outer membrane, siderophore-microcins hijack receptors involved in iron acquisition. The lasso-peptide microcin J25, which is characterized by a knotted arrangement where the C-terminal tail is threaded through an N-terminal macrolactam ring, uses a hydroxamate siderophore receptor and the inner-membrane protein SbmA for import in sensitive bacteria, where it inhibits bacterial transcription through binding to RNAP (RNA polymerase). Microcin C produced as a heptapeptide adenylate, requires an outer-membrane porin and an inner-membrane ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) transporter to reach the cytoplasm of target bacteria, where it is processed by proteases into a non-hydrolysable aspartyl-adenylate analogue. Therefore, despite showing different killing mechanisms and the absence of any structural homology, microcins have the common characteristic to use Trojan horse strategies to destroy their competitors. They offer new and promising tracks for further design and engineering of novel efficient antibiotics. PMID:23176498

  13. System Choice for Data Processing, Analysis and Applications in Defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Rajan

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available The design of a suitable system for image data processing, analysis and applications in Defence is governed by users' requirements during peace time and prehostility/hostility period. The users need timely information and image products for decision-making. The product specifications in terms of their scale, geometrical accuracy, information content, and turnaround time among other things are crucial for the design of systems. The systems are not complete without efficient software for information extraction and analysis and for aiding decision-making process. Usually, the base data is from high resolution remote sensing systems, both airborne and spaceborne, and also from conventional sources, like topomap and other intelligence gathering mechanisms. The database thus evolved is basic and vital for a decision support system. The sensors providing input to the database creation could be airborne high resolution camera systems, high resolution synthetic aperture radar systems and thermal imaging systems operating from a stand-off range of 50 to 100 km, or from high resolution spaceborne panchromatic optical and synthetic aperture radar imagery. High resolution stereo data from airborne and spaceborne sensors are also increasingly needed for image interpretation and analysis. The digital elevation data is another important information, derived from either existing topographic maps or high resolution space stereo imagery. The system also should cater to a large information archival/retrieval system and data dissimination system for the users spread far and wide. This may call for to and fro traffic between central operational system and units spread over different locations, preferably, through high speed satellite communication channels. Finally, the total system should have reliability, data security, adequate redundancy, user-friendliness and be efficient enough to provide timely information transfer for the decision makers. This paper discusses

  14. Eales′ disease: Oxidant stress and weak antioxidant defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Eales′ disease (ED is an idiopathic retinal periphlebitis characterized by capillary non-perfusion and neovascularization. In addition to the existing system, a new staging system has been proposed by Saxena et al . Immunological, molecular biological and biochemical studies have indicated the role of human leucocyte antigen, retinal S antigen autoimmunity, Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, free radical damage and possibly hyperhomocysteinemia in its etiopathogenesis, which appears multifactorial. Oxidant stress has been shown by increase in the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (lipid oxidation in the vitreous, erythrocytes, platelets, and monocytes. A decrease in vitamins E and C both in active and healed vasculitis, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, and glutathione peroxidase showed a weakened antioxidant defence. Epiretinal membrane from patients of ED who underwent surgery showed, by immunolocalization, presence of carboxy methyl lysine, an advanced glycation end product formed by glycoxidation and is involved in angiogenesis. OH· free radical accumulation in monocytes has been directly shown by electron spin resonance spectrometry. Free radical damage to DNA and of protein was shown by the accumulation of 8 hydroxy 2 deoxyguanosine (in leucocytes and nitrotyrosine (in monocytes, respectively. Nitrosative stress was shown by increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in monocytes in which levels of iron and copper were increased while those of zinc decreased. A novel 88 kDa protein was found in serum and vitreous in inflammatory condition and had antioxidant function. Platelet fluidity was also affected. Oral, methotrexate in low dosage (12.5 mg/week for 12 weeks as well as oral vitamin E (400 IU and C (500 mg daily for 8 weeks are reported to have beneficial effects.

  15. Evolution of behavioural and cellular defences against parasitoid wasps in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Z R; Schlenke, T A; de Roode, J C

    2016-05-01

    It may be intuitive to predict that host immune systems will evolve to counter a broad range of potential challenges through simultaneous investment in multiple defences. However, this would require diversion of resources from other traits, such as growth, survival and fecundity. Therefore, ecological immunology theory predicts that hosts will specialize in only a subset of possible defences. We tested this hypothesis through a comparative study of a cellular immune response and a putative behavioural defence used by eight fruit fly species against two parasitoid wasp species (one generalist and one specialist). Fly larvae can survive infection by melanotically encapsulating wasp eggs, and female flies can potentially reduce infection rates in their offspring by laying fewer eggs when wasps are present. The strengths of both defences varied significantly but were not negatively correlated across our chosen host species; thus, we found no evidence for a trade-off between behavioural and cellular immunity. Instead, cellular defences were significantly weaker against the generalist wasp, whereas behavioural defences were similar in strength against both wasps and positively correlated between wasps. We investigated the adaptive significance of wasp-induced oviposition reduction behaviour by testing whether wasp-exposed parents produce offspring with stronger cellular defences, but we found no support for this hypothesis. We further investigated the sensory basis of this behaviour by testing mutants deficient in either vision or olfaction, both of which failed to reduce their oviposition rates in the presence of wasps, suggesting that both senses are necessary for detecting and responding to wasps. PMID:26859227

  16. Considerations on Defence Thinking in Post-1994 South Africa with Special Reference to Post-conflict Reconstruction and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo Neethling

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article revisits some of the main arguments presented (in the South African context since the late 1990s in relation to the regional security demands placed on the South African National Defence Force (SANDF on the one hand, and the configuration of the force design imposed on the SANDF on the other.  These issues are of great relevance to the South African Department of Defence’s recent (2012 official pronouncements and related defence thinking on the current and future external role of the South African military, specifically with regard to post-conflict reconstruction and development.  The aim of the article is to examine the dynamics of recent years – philosophical and practical – that gave rise to the policy “move” or “shift” from defence in a democracy (1998 to defence, security and development (2012.[i] In addition, the article aims to analyse and discuss the new comprehensive guidelines for defence force design in the Draft Defence Review 2012 and reflects on some of the most important policy implications for the SANDF in this regard – specifically given the demands placed on the SANDF in the field of post-conflict reconstruction and development.  The author contends that the Department of Defence has now gained a clearer idea or perspective of what the future role(s of the South African military should be through the assessment of its function, principles and goals expounded in the Draft Defence Review 2012. [i] At the time of writing it was planned to replace the Defence Review 1998, which was published under the theme of Defence in a democracy, with a new Defence Review 2012, to be published under the theme Defence, security, development.

  17. Priming of Production in Maize of Volatile Organic Defence Compounds by the Natural Plant Activator cis-Jasmone

    OpenAIRE

    Oluwafemi, Sunday; Dewhirst, Sarah Y.; Veyrat, Nathalie; Powers, Stephen; Bruce, Toby J.A.; Caulfield, John C.; Pickett, John A; Birkett, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    cis-Jasmone (CJ) is a natural plant product that activates defence against herbivores in model and crop plants. In this study, we investigated whether CJ could prime defence in maize, Zea mays, against the leafhopper, Cicadulina storeyi, responsible for the transmission of maize streak virus (MSV). Priming occurs when a pre-treatment, in this case CJ, increases the potency and speed of a defence response upon subsequent attack on the plant. Here, we tested insect responses to plant volatile o...

  18. Targeted predation of extrafloral nectaries by insects despite localized chemical defences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gish, Moshe; Mescher, Mark C; De Moraes, Consuelo M

    2015-10-01

    Extrafloral (EF) nectaries recruit carnivorous arthropods that protect plants from herbivory, but they can also be exploited by nectar thieves. We studied the opportunistic, targeted predation (and destruction) of EF nectaries by insects, and the localized chemical defences that plants presumably use to minimize this effect. In field and laboratory experiments, we identified insects that were possibly responsible for EF nectary predation in Vicia faba (fava bean) and determined the extent and accuracy of the feeding damage done to the EF nectaries by these insects. We also performed biochemical analyses of plant tissue samples in order to detect microscale distribution patterns of chemical defences in the area of the EF nectary. We observed selective, targeted feeding on EF nectaries by several insect species, including some that are otherwise not primarily herbivorous. Biochemical analyses revealed high concentrations of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, a non-protein amino acid that is toxic to insects, near and within the EF nectaries. These results suggest that plants allocate defences to the protection of EF nectaries from predation, consistent with expectations of optimal defence theory, and that this may not be entirely effective, as insects limit their exposure to these defences by consuming only the secreting tissue of the nectary. PMID:26446809

  19. Mating with large males decreases the immune defence of females in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. Imroze; N. G. Prasad

    2011-12-01

    Mating has been widely reported to be a costly event for females. Studies indicate that female cost of mating in terms of fecundity and survivorship can be affected by their mates, leading to antagonistic coevolution between the sexes. However, as of now, there is no evidence that the female cost of mating in terms of immune defence is affected by their mates. We assess the effect of different sized males on antibacterial immune defence and reproductive fitness of their mates. We used a large outbred population of Drososphila melanogaster as the host and Serratia marcescens as the pathogen. We generated three different male phenotypes: small, medium and large, by manipulating larval densities. Compared to females mating with small males, those mating with large males had higher bacterial loads and lower fecundity. There was no significant effect of male phenotype on the fraction of females mated or copulation duration (an indicator of ejaculate investment). Thus, our study is the first clear demonstration that male phenotype can affect the cost of mating to females in terms of their antibacterial immune defence. Mating with large males imposes an additional cost of mating to females in terms of reduced immune defence. The observed results are very likely due to qualitative/quantitative differences in the ejaculates of the three different types of males. If the phenotypic variation that we observed in males in our study is mirrored by genetic variation, then, it can potentially lead to antagonistic coevolution of the sexes over immune defence.

  20. Rapid evolution of antioxidant defence in a natural population of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oexle, S; Jansen, M; Pauwels, K; Sommaruga, R; De Meester, L; Stoks, R

    2016-07-01

    Natural populations can cope with rapid changes in stressors by relying on sets of physiological defence mechanisms. Little is known onto what extent these physiological responses reflect plasticity and/or genetic adaptation, evolve in the same direction and result in an increased defence ability. Using resurrection ecology, we studied how a natural Daphnia magna population adjusted its antioxidant defence to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) during a period with increasing incident UVR reaching the water surface. We demonstrate a rapid evolution of the induction patterns of key antioxidant enzymes under UVR exposure in the laboratory. Notably, evolutionary changes strongly differed among enzymes and mainly involved the evolution of UV-induced plasticity. Whereas D. magna evolved a strong plastic up-regulation of glutathione peroxidase under UVR, it evolved a lower plastic up-regulation of glutathione S-transferase and superoxide dismutase and a plastic down-regulation of catalase. The differentially evolved antioxidant strategies were collectively equally effective in dealing with oxidative stress because they resulted in the same high levels of oxidative damage (to lipids, proteins and DNA) and lowered fitness (intrinsic growth rate) under UVR exposure. The lack of better protection against UVR may suggest that the UVR exposure did not increase between both periods. Predator-induced evolution to migrate to lower depths that occurred during the same period may have contributed to the evolved defence strategy. Our results highlight the need for a multiple trait approach when focusing on the evolution of defence mechanisms. PMID:27018861

  1. Comparative Assessment of Soil Quality at the Defence Establishments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satinder K. Brar

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to adjudge the soil quality of two sites at the defence establishments in India. Various soil samples were collected from the surface and up to 20 cm depth (subsurface as per apportioned gridding method. These samples were subjected to air drying for 15 days and were characterised for various parameters. The soil is clayey and loamy with granular blocky structure on both the sites.  The pH ranged from 7.1 to 7.72 0.1 for site I and from 5.5 to 8.0 f 0.1 for site 11; salinity and bulk density ranged from 0.1 per cent to 8 per cent and from 1.2 glcm3 to 1.5 g/cm3, respectively and soil moisture was about 0.4 f 1 per cent for both the sites. Similarly, total Kjeldahl nitrogen ranged from 1100 mg kg-' to 1900 mg kg-' for site I and 1700 mg kg-' to 9000 mg kg ' for site I1 and total organic carbon ranged from 18 mg g-' to 75 mg g ' for both the sites. A good correlation between nitrate concentration and various explosive process activities has been observed which gives substantial evidence in terms of contamination of the soil. High performance liquid chromatography analysis, which shows varied concentrations of RDX-HMX, NB, DNB, DNT, and TNT in the respective ranges 0.003-2.300 rng g-1, 0.002-0.350 mg g~1, 0.002-0.550 mg g-1, 0.004-0.041 mg g-1 and 0.010- 0.050 mg g-1 for site 1 and 0.002 - 0.013 mg g-1, 0.005 - 0.350 mg g-1, 0.003 - 0.080 mg g-1, 0.001- 0.100 mg g-1, 0.0001- 0.044 mg g ~a1n d 6*10-6- 0.080 mg g-1 for sites I1 has also indicated the contamination of soil by nitro-organics. These results serve as a valuable database for an ongoing project on the development of phytoremediation technology to detoxify such sites.

  2. Immigration of susceptible hosts triggers the evolution of alternative parasite defence strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabas, Hélène; van Houte, Stineke; Høyland-Kroghsbo, Nina Molin; Buckling, Angus; Westra, Edze R

    2016-08-31

    Migration of hosts and parasites can have a profound impact on host-parasite ecological and evolutionary interactions. Using the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 and its phage DMS3vir, we here show that immigration of naive hosts into coevolving populations of hosts and parasites can influence the mechanistic basis underlying host defence evolution. Specifically, we found that at high levels of bacterial immigration, bacteria switched from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas) to surface modification-mediated defence. This effect emerges from an increase in the force of infection, which tips the balance from CRISPR to surface modification-based defence owing to the induced and fixed fitness costs associated with these mechanisms, respectively. PMID:27581884

  3. Improvement interventions: To what extent are they manifestations of social defences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremias J. de Klerk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The statistical record of change and improvement interventions to deliver on expectations is notoriously poor. Yet, new interventions are started constantly.Research purpose: The aim is to provide an explanation to the lure behind interventions and to contribute to building a theory on plausible systems psychodynamic drivers and mechanisms of recurrent change interventions.Motivation for the study: This study provides insights into social defences in ways that did not receive much attention previously; specifically how defence mechanisms act as drivers for new change and improvement interventions.Research design, approach and method: A literature study, consisting of a literature review and a phenomenological analysis. The study was conducted from the systems psychodynamic approach.Main findings: Improvement interventions often represent defences that serve to contain anxieties or maintain fantasies. Four specific themes emerged: interventions defend the perception of being in control, they maintain the fantasy that one is busy with worthy actions to overcome challenges, they are defences against boredom or contain anxieties about incompetence, and they maintain the fantasy of being heroic leaders.Practical/managerial implications: The findings can assist leaders to understand their own defences in order to avoid embarking on non-essential interventions. This can free up much time, energy and effort to spend on other priorities, assisting organisations to achieve better results.Contribution/value-add: The study refutes the notion that improvement interventions are always rational coping mechanisms and highlights the role of improvement interventions as defences to reduce anxiety, even though they may contribute little to organisational survival in real terms.

  4. Infection biology and defence responses in sorghum against Colletotrichum sublineolum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puttalingaiah, Basavaraju; Shetty, Nandini Prasad; Shetty, H. S.;

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the infection biology of Colletotrichum sublineolum (isolate CP2126) and defence responses in leaves of resistant (SC146), intermediately resistant (SC326) and susceptible (BTx623) sorghum genotypes. Methods and Results: Infection biology and defence responses were studied...... decreases in formation of appressoria as well as accumulation of H2O2, HRGPs and phytoalexins. Concomitant with these inducible responses, fungal growth was stopped during or just after penetration in genotypes SC146 and SC326. High levels of H2O2 accumulating at late infection stages (5 days after...

  5. Design features to achieve defence-in-depth in small and medium sized reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broader incorporation of inherent and passive safety design features has become a 'trademark' of many advanced reactor concepts, including several evolutionary designs and nearly all innovative small and medium sized design concepts. Ensuring adequate defence-in-depth is important for reactors of smaller output because many of them are being designed to allow more proximity to the user, specifically, when non-electrical energy products are targeted. Based on the activities recently performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency, the paper provides a summary description of the design features used to achieve defence in depth in the innovative concepts of small and medium sized reactors with fast neutron spectrum. (author)

  6. Western European Nuclear Regulators’ Association (WENRA) Views on Defence-in-Depth for New Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WENRA published in 2010 a statement on safety objectives for new NPPs. Based on these objectives, WENRA decided to develop common positions, compiled in a booklet (available on www.wenra.org), on selected key safety issues for the design of new NPPs. One position presents WENRA’s Defence-in-Depth approach, describing WENRA’s expectation that multiple failure events and core melt accidents are considered in the original design of new nuclear power plants; another position presents expectations on the independence between different levels of Defence-in-Depth. (author)

  7. Male rock sparrows differentially allocate nest defence but not food provisioning to offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matessi, Giuliano; Carmagnani, Cristina; Griggio, Matteo;

    2009-01-01

    petronia), a monomorphic species in which both sexes have a yellow breast patch, the size of which correlates with individual reproductive quality. We reduced the breast patch in a sample of females and compared the parental care of their partners (chick feeding and nest defence) with the parental care of...... males paired to sham-manipulated controls. Nest defence was assessed by placing a dummy predator on the nest box. Males of ornament-reduced females defended the nest less but did not feed the chicks less than males paired to control females. Our results only partially support male differential...

  8. Sex-related differences in growth and carbon allocation to defence in Populus tremula as explained by current plant defence theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randriamanana, Tendry R; Nybakken, Line; Lavola, Anu; Aphalo, Pedro J; Nissinen, Katri; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2014-05-01

    Plant defence theories have recently evolved in such a way that not only the quantity but also the quality of mineral nutrients is expected to influence plant constitutive defence. Recently, an extended prediction derived from the protein competition model (PCM) suggested that nitrogen (N) limitation is more important for the production of phenolic compounds than phosphorus (P). We aimed at studying sexual differences in the patterns of carbon allocation to growth and constitutive defence in relation to N and P availability in Populus tremula L. seedlings. We compared the gender responses in photosynthesis, growth and whole-plant allocation to phenolic compounds at different combination levels of N and P, and studied how they are explained by the main plant defence theories. We found no sexual differences in phenolic concentrations, but interestingly, slow-growing females had higher leaf N concentration than did males, and genders differed in their allocation priority. There was a trade-off between growth and the production of flavonoid-derived phenylpropanoids on one hand, and between the production of salicylates and flavonoid-derived phenylpropanoids on the other. Under limited nutrient conditions, females prioritized mineral nutrient acquisition, flavonoid and condensed tannin (CT) production, while males invested more in above-ground biomass. Salicylate accumulation followed the growth differentiation balance hypothesis as low N mainly decreased the production of leaf and stem salicylate content while the combination of both low N and low P increased the amount of flavonoids and CTs allocated to leaves and to a lesser extent stems, which agrees with the PCM. We suggest that such a discrepancy in the responses of salicylates and flavonoid-derived CTs is linked to their clearly distinct biosynthetic origins and/or their metabolic costs. PMID:24852570

  9. Przegląd sojuszniczych zdolności obronnych z obszaru lotnictwa w kontekście inicjatywy Smart Defence

    OpenAIRE

    Zieliński, Tadeusz

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing economic crisis forces seeking solutions enabling the development of NATO's defence capabilities in the era of cuts in defence budgets. An example of this is Smart Defence initiative, which allows member states to participate in multinational projects oriented into the needs of the whole NATO. Capabilities in the area of aviation are considered as one of the key priorities of NATO, somany projects in Smart Defence initiative relate to aviation. The ar...

  10. In defence of constructive empiricism: Maxwell’s master argument and aberrant theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, F.A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past years, in books and journals (this journal included), N. Maxwell launched a ferocious attack on B. C. van Fraassen’s view of science called Constructive Empiricism (CE). This attack has been totally ignored. Must we conclude from this silence that no defence is possible and that a fort

  11. Infantile defences in parent-infant psychotherapy: The example of gaze avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomonsson, Björn

    2016-02-01

    Findings from parent-infant observational research have stimulated the development of intersubjective models of psychotherapeutic action. These models have brought out the infant as an interactive partner with the parent. Conversely, interest in describing the individual psyche of the baby has decreased, especially the unconscious levels of his/her experiences and representations. In parallel, clinicians and researchers have been less prone to apply classical psychoanalytic concepts when describing the internal world of the infant. The author argues that this is inconsistent with the fact that psychoanalytic theory, from its inception, was founded on speculations of the infant's mind. He investigates one such concept from classical theory; the defence. Specifically, he investigates if selective gaze avoidance in young babies may be described as a defence or even a defence mechanism. The investigation links with Selma Fraiberg's discussion of the phenomenon and also with Freud's conception of defence. The author also compares his views on the baby as a subject with those suggested by infant researchers, for example, Stern and Beebe. The discussion is illustrated by vignettes from a psychoanalytic therapy with a 3 month-old girl and her mother. PMID:25988970

  12. The Learning Management System at the Defence University: Awareness and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhary, Jowati

    2013-01-01

    This brief paper examines the issues of awareness and application of a Learning Management System (LMS) used at the National Defence University of Malaysia (NDUM), Kuala Lumpur Malaysia. The paper argues that due to the discouraging responses from academics at the university on using the LMS, proactive measures must be taken immediately in order…

  13. Interactive effects of above- and belowground herbivory and plant competition on plant growth and defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Jingying; Raaijmakers, Ciska; Kostenko, Olga; Kos, Martine; Mulder, P.P.J.; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Competition and herbivory are two major factors that can influence plant growth and plant defence. Although these two factors are often studied separately, they do not operate independently. We examined how aboveground herbivory by beet armyworm larvae (Spodoptera exigua) and belowground herbivory b

  14. The evolution of symmetrical snapping in termite soldiers need not lead to reduced chemical defence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyjaková, Pavlína; Dolejšová, Klára; Krasulová, Jana; Bednárová, Lucie; Hadravová, Romana; Pohl, Radek; Hanus, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 4 (2015), s. 818-825. ISSN 0024-4066 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-25354P Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : termites * soldiers * chemical defence * diterpene * cavitene * frontal gland Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.264, year: 2014

  15. Implementation of defence in depth for next generation light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication of this IAEA technical document represents the conclusion of a task, initiated in 1995, devoted to defence in depth in future reactors. It focuses mainly on the next generation of LWRs, although many general considerations may also apply to other types of reactors

  16. Jamali lauds PAEC contribution to scientific development defence needs of country

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The Prime Minister Mir Zafarullah Khan Jamali has appreciated role of Pakistan Atomic Energy Council (PAEC) for its contribution to the scientific development and defence needs of the country. He directed that all resources and energy be devoted to the development of human resource and infrastructure for socio-economic uplift of the nation" (1 page).

  17. The Multiple Strategies of an Insect Herbivore to Overcome Plant Cyanogenic Glucoside Defence

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Pentzold; Mika Zagrobelny; Pernille Sølvhøj Roelsgaard; Birger Lindberg Møller; Søren Bak

    2014-01-01

    Cyanogenic glucosides (CNglcs) are widespread plant defence compounds that release toxic hydrogen cyanide by plant bglucosidaseactivity after tissue damage. Specialised insect herbivores have evolved counter strategies and some sequesterCNglcs, but the underlying mechanisms to keep CNglcs intact during feeding and digestion are unknown. We show thatCNglc-sequestering Zygaena filipendulae larvae combine behavioural, morphological, physiological and biochemicalstrategies at different time point...

  18. Common Security and Defence Policy towards Implementing the Provisions of the Lisbon Treaty

    OpenAIRE

    Buºe Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP) represents the actual Security Policy of the European Union. The Lisbon Treaty represented a new chapter in strengthening the institutional framework to address this area, noting the establishment of the post of High Representative for Foreign and Security Policy, the establishment of the European External Action Service (EEAS) and concrete steps in implementing the provisions on CSDP objectives.

  19. In Vitro Activities against Cystic Fibrosis Pathogens of Synthetic Host Defence Propeptides Processed by Neutrophil Elastase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desgranges, Stephane

    2011-02-22

    The antimicrobial and haemolytic activities of a host defence peptide can be controlled by modification as a propeptide of reduced net charge which can be processed by neutrophil elastase, a serine protease involved in chronic airway inflammation and infections associated with cystic fibrosis.

  20. Civil Defence Pedagogies and Narratives of Democracy: Disaster Education in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadderton, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    "Disaster education" is a fledgling area of study in lifelong education. Many countries educate their populations for disasters, to mitigate potential damage and loss of life, as well as contribute to national security. In this paper, which draws on interview data from the German Federal Office for Civil Defence and Disaster Assistance…

  1. Processed Foods for Defence Needs-R & D Efforts at CFTRI

    OpenAIRE

    J. V. Shankar; V. H. Potty; S. P. Pillai

    1984-01-01

    The Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore, working under the council of Scientific & Industrial Research has developed a number of processes and techniques some of which are relevent to Defence needs. Items like spray dried egg powder and canned drinking water are already in use by the services while others may find application in future.

  2. Behavioural flexibility of the chemical defence in the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina heterotoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stökl, Johannes; Machacek, Zora; Ruther, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Many insects use chemical defence mechanisms to defend themselves against predators. However, defensive secretions are costly to produce and should thus only be used in cases of real danger. This would require that insects are able to discriminate between predators to adjust their chemical defence. Here, we show that females of the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina heterotoma adjust the intensity of their chemical defence to differently sized predators. If attacked by Myrmica ants, the females always released their defensive secretion, which consists mainly of (-)-iridomyrmecin. However, if attacked by smaller Cardiocondyla ants, most females did not release any defensive spray, irrespective of the duration of the ant's aggression. When in contact with non-aggressive Nasonia wasps, the females of L. heterotoma did not release any defensive secretion. Our data show that females of L. heterotoma are able to discriminate between two predators and suggest that a predator of a certain size or strength is necessary to trigger the chemical defence mechanism of L. heterotoma.

  3. Anticipatory action in self-defence: essence and limits under international law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Tibori Szabó

    2011-01-01

    The legality of preemptive strikes is one of the most controversial questions of contemporary international law. At the core of this controversy stands the temporal dimension of self-defence: when and for how long can a state defend itself against an armed attack? Can it resort to armed force before

  4. Turn the beat around: Richard Dyer's 'In defence of disco' revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kooijman

    2005-01-01

    Published in 1979, Richard Dyer’s ‘In Defence of Disco’ is one of the best-read but relatively little-used essays in pop music studies, queer studies and cultural studies. With his essay, not only does Dyer demystify the ‘authenticity’ of music genres such as folk and rock, but also validates and ce

  5. The Australian Defence Force Mental Health Prevalence and Wellbeing Study: design and methods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, M.V.; McFarlane, A.C.; Davies, C.E.; Searle, A.K.; Fairweather-Schmidt, A.K.; Verhagen, A.F.; Benassi, H.; Hodson, S.E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Australian Defence Force (ADF) Mental Health Prevalence and Wellbeing Study (MHPWS) is the first study of mental disorder prevalence in an entire military population. OBJECTIVE: The MHPWS aims to establish mental disorder prevalence, refine current ADF mental health screening methods

  6. Cytokinins as key regulators in plant-microbe-insect interactions: connecting plant growth and defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giron, D.; Frago, E.; Glevarec, G.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Dicke, M.

    2013-01-01

    Plant hormones play important roles in regulating plant growth and defence by mediating developmental processes and signalling networks involved in plant responses to a wide range of parasitic and mutualistic biotic interactions. Plants are known to rapidly respond to pathogen and herbivore attack b

  7. Cytokinins as key regulators in plant–microbe–insect interactions: connecting plant growth and defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giron, D.; Frago, E.; Glevarec, G.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Dicke, M.

    2013-01-01

    1. Plant hormones play important roles in regulating plant growth and defence by mediating developmental processes and signalling networks involved in plant responses to a wide range of parasitic and mutualistic biotic interactions. 2. Plants are known to rapidly respond to pathogen and herbivore at

  8. The defence architecture of the superficial cells of the oral mucosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Asikainen; T.J. Ruotsalainen; J.J.W. Mikkonen; A. Koistinen; C. ten Bruggenkate; A.M. Kullaa

    2012-01-01

    The oral epithelium together with the saliva and its components forms a complex structure which is the first line of defence in the oral cavity. The surface of superficial cells of the oral epithelium contains ridge-like folds, microplicae (MPL), which are typical of the surfaces of areas covered wi

  9. The Effectiveness, Costs and Coastal Protection Benefits of Natural and Nature-Based Defences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Siddharth; Beck, Michael W; Reguero, Borja G; Losada, Iñigo J; van Wesenbeeck, Bregje; Pontee, Nigel; Sanchirico, James N; Ingram, Jane Carter; Lange, Glenn-Marie; Burks-Copes, Kelly A

    2016-01-01

    There is great interest in the restoration and conservation of coastal habitats for protection from flooding and erosion. This is evidenced by the growing number of analyses and reviews of the effectiveness of habitats as natural defences and increasing funding world-wide for nature-based defences-i.e. restoration projects aimed at coastal protection; yet, there is no synthetic information on what kinds of projects are effective and cost effective for this purpose. This paper addresses two issues critical for designing restoration projects for coastal protection: (i) a synthesis of the costs and benefits of projects designed for coastal protection (nature-based defences) and (ii) analyses of the effectiveness of coastal habitats (natural defences) in reducing wave heights and the biophysical parameters that influence this effectiveness. We (i) analyse data from sixty-nine field measurements in coastal habitats globally and examine measures of effectiveness of mangroves, salt-marshes, coral reefs and seagrass/kelp beds for wave height reduction; (ii) synthesise the costs and coastal protection benefits of fifty-two nature-based defence projects and; (iii) estimate the benefits of each restoration project by combining information on restoration costs with data from nearby field measurements. The analyses of field measurements show that coastal habitats have significant potential for reducing wave heights that varies by habitat and site. In general, coral reefs and salt-marshes have the highest overall potential. Habitat effectiveness is influenced by: a) the ratios of wave height-to-water depth and habitat width-to-wavelength in coral reefs; and b) the ratio of vegetation height-to-water depth in salt-marshes. The comparison of costs of nature-based defence projects and engineering structures show that salt-marshes and mangroves can be two to five times cheaper than a submerged breakwater for wave heights up to half a metre and, within their limits, become more cost

  10. The Effectiveness, Costs and Coastal Protection Benefits of Natural and Nature-Based Defences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Narayan

    Full Text Available There is great interest in the restoration and conservation of coastal habitats for protection from flooding and erosion. This is evidenced by the growing number of analyses and reviews of the effectiveness of habitats as natural defences and increasing funding world-wide for nature-based defences-i.e. restoration projects aimed at coastal protection; yet, there is no synthetic information on what kinds of projects are effective and cost effective for this purpose. This paper addresses two issues critical for designing restoration projects for coastal protection: (i a synthesis of the costs and benefits of projects designed for coastal protection (nature-based defences and (ii analyses of the effectiveness of coastal habitats (natural defences in reducing wave heights and the biophysical parameters that influence this effectiveness. We (i analyse data from sixty-nine field measurements in coastal habitats globally and examine measures of effectiveness of mangroves, salt-marshes, coral reefs and seagrass/kelp beds for wave height reduction; (ii synthesise the costs and coastal protection benefits of fifty-two nature-based defence projects and; (iii estimate the benefits of each restoration project by combining information on restoration costs with data from nearby field measurements. The analyses of field measurements show that coastal habitats have significant potential for reducing wave heights that varies by habitat and site. In general, coral reefs and salt-marshes have the highest overall potential. Habitat effectiveness is influenced by: a the ratios of wave height-to-water depth and habitat width-to-wavelength in coral reefs; and b the ratio of vegetation height-to-water depth in salt-marshes. The comparison of costs of nature-based defence projects and engineering structures show that salt-marshes and mangroves can be two to five times cheaper than a submerged breakwater for wave heights up to half a metre and, within their limits, become

  11. Spatial scales of foraging in fallow deer: Implications for associational effects in plant defences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautio, Pasi; Kesti, Kari; Bergvall, Ulrika A.; Tuomi, Juha; Leimar, Olof

    2008-07-01

    Large herbivores select food at several spatial scales: plant communities are chosen at a landscape scale, plant patches are chosen within a plant community, and individual plants within a patch. Foraging decision at the patch level can result in associational effects in plant communities and populations. Several studies have shown that herbivore attack and consumption rates may not only depend on a plant's own defence traits, but also on the defence traits of its neighbours. In the present experiment we investigated whether the spatial scale of the food distribution affects food selection by fallow deer and whether the foraging behaviour gives rise to associational effects in plant defences. In a population of captured wild fallow deer we simulated a natural situation where two separate plant patches are exposed to intense herbivory pressure. We presented different spatial arrangements of low- and high-tannin food to the deer, varying the frequency of the feeder types within and between patches. We found that the deer consumed palatable food among the unpalatable food on average as much as they consumed palatable food among other palatable feeders. However, when unpalatable food occurred among the palatable food it was more consumed than among other unpalatable feeders. Hence, we did not find support for associational defence, but our results supported associational susceptibility. At the between patch level a patch of mainly high-tannin feeders was consumed less when presented near to a patch of mainly low-tannin feeders, suggesting that for well-defended plants having palatable neighbours in a nearby patch might accentuate the effectiveness of their defence.

  12. Deimatic display in the European swallowtail butterfly as a secondary defence against attacks from great tits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Olofsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many animals reduce the risk of being attacked by a predator through crypsis, masquerade or, alternatively, by advertising unprofitability by means of aposematic signalling. Behavioural attributes in prey employed after discovery, however, signify the importance of also having an effective secondary defence if a predator uncovers, or is immune to, the prey's primary defence. In butterflies, as in most animals, secondary defence generally consists of escape flights. However, some butterfly species have evolved other means of secondary defence such as deimatic displays/startle displays. The European swallowtail, Papilio machaon, employs what appears to be a startle display by exposing its brightly coloured dorsal wing surface upon disturbance and, if the disturbance continues, by intermittently protracting and relaxing its wing muscles generating a jerky motion of the wings. This display appears directed towards predators but whether it is effective in intimidating predators so that they refrain from attacks has never been tested experimentally. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we staged encounters between a passerine predator, the great tit, Parus major, and live and dead swallowtail butterflies in a two-choice experiment. Results showed that the dead butterfly was virtually always attacked before the live butterfly, and that it took four times longer before a bird attacked the live butterfly. When the live butterfly was approached by a bird this generally elicited the butterfly's startle display, which usually caused the approaching bird to flee. We also performed a palatability test of the butterflies and results show that the great tits seemed to find them palatable. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the swallowtail's startle display of conspicuous coloration and jerky movements is an efficient secondary defence against small passerines. We also discuss under what conditions predator-prey systems are likely to

  13. A herbivorous mite down-regulates plant defence and produces web to exclude competitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato A Sarmento

    Full Text Available Herbivores may interact with each other through resource competition, but also through their impact on plant defence. We recently found that the spider mite Tetranychus evansi down-regulates plant defences in tomato plants, resulting in higher rates of oviposition and population growth on previously attacked than on unattacked leaves. The danger of such down-regulation is that attacked plants could become a more profitable resource for heterospecific competitors, such as the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Indeed, T. urticae had an almost 2-fold higher rate of oviposition on leaf discs on which T. evansi had fed previously. In contrast, induction of direct plant defences by T. urticae resulted in decreased oviposition by T. evansi. Hence, both herbivores affect each other through induced plant responses. However, when populations of T. evansi and T. urticae competed on the same plants, populations of the latter invariably went extinct, whereas T. evansi was not significantly affected by the presence of its competitor. This suggests that T. evansi can somehow prevent its competitor from benefiting from the down-regulated plant defence, perhaps by covering it with a profuse web. Indeed, we found that T. urticae had difficulties reaching the leaf surface to feed when the leaf was covered with web produced by T. evansi. Furthermore, T. evansi produced more web when exposed to damage or other cues associated with T. urticae. We suggest that the silken web produced by T. evansi serves to prevent competitors from profiting from down-regulated plant defences.

  14. Actin as deathly switch? How auxin can suppress cell-death related defence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chang

    Full Text Available Plant innate immunity is composed of two layers--a basal immunity, and a specific effector-triggered immunity, which is often accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Initiation of cell death depends on a complex network of signalling pathways. The phytohormone auxin as central regulator of plant growth and development represents an important component for the modulation of plant defence. In our previous work, we showed that cell death is heralded by detachment of actin from the membrane. Both, actin response and cell death, are triggered by the bacterial elicitor harpin in grapevine cells. In this study we investigated, whether harpin-triggered actin bundling is necessary for harpin-triggered cell death. Since actin organisation is dependent upon auxin, we used different auxins to suppress actin bundling. Extracellular alkalinisation and transcription of defence genes as the basal immunity were examined as well as cell death. Furthermore, organisation of actin was observed in response to pharmacological manipulation of reactive oxygen species and phospholipase D. We find that induction of defence genes is independent of auxin. However, auxin can suppress harpin-induced cell death and also counteract actin bundling. We integrate our findings into a model, where harpin interferes with an auxin dependent pathway that sustains dynamic cortical actin through the activity of phospholipase D. The antagonism between growth and defence is explained by mutual competition for signal molecules such as superoxide and phosphatidic acid. Perturbations of the auxin-actin pathway might be used to detect disturbed integrity of the plasma membrane and channel defence signalling towards programmed cell death.

  15. Security Policy in the European Union and the United States through the issue of their Defence Expenditures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Theodore Metaxas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to clarify how the level of defence expenditures affected security poli-cy in the post-World War II Europe and the United States till the present day. We first analyze theoretically the issue of a nation’s power through its defence outlays. We then proceed to the examination of how security policy was formulated during Cold War and afterwards for both Europe and the United States through their defence ex-penditures. By comparing European to United States defence budgets ceilings we found that the European military capabilities are undermined by the low level of the defence budget which is provided by the European Union member states as a whole, as well as by the lack of homogeneity in military means. By contrast, we noticed that the historically large US defence expenditures were one of the major reasons for the US global hegemony during Cold war and afterwards. We also examine the implica-tions that defence expenditures have on military industry, macroeconomic perfor-mance and geopolitics and the correlation that arises among them.

  16. Self-Defence as a Circumstance Precluding the Wrongfulness of the Use of Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliff Farhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Ago, the International Law Commission’s second Special Rapporteur on the topic of state responsibility for internationally wrongful acts, defined self-defence as a faculté of a state to use force in response to an act of another state through which a breach of the principal obligation under Article 2(4 Charter is committed. On this basis, he then inserted a provision in Chapter V to Part One of the Draft Articles on State Responsibility expressing self-defence as a specific factual circumstance precluding the wrongfulness of the use of force which constitutes a response to state aggression. This conception of self-defence, although misunderstood from the onset, remained in the backdrop of the study of the law of state responsibility for a considerable period. It was only dismantled during the reign of the last Special Rapporteur on the topic of state responsibility, James Crawford. The last Rapporteur, at the onset, submitted that it is not the function of the Draft Articles to specify the content of the primary rules, including that referred to in Article 51 Charter. He then redefined the function of the circumstance of self-defence as that of precluding the wrongfulness of non-performance of certain obligations other than the general prohibition insofar as such non-performance is connected with the exercise of the right under Article 51 Charter.This contribution first scrutinises this paradigmatic shift and finds it to be symptomatic of the conviction on the part of Crawford that the notion of self-defence could also encompass the use of force against speculative threats of state origin as well as actual threats that emanate from individuals or groups which are disconnected from the organisation of any state. It then uses this finding as a springboard towards the examination of the controversy surrounding the notion of self-defence under international law. In that connection, it first outlines the findings of the World Court on the

  17. Risk-informed assessment of defence in depth, LOCA example. Phase 1: Mapping of conditions and definition of quantitative measures for the defence in depth levels. Rev 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of defence-in-depth (DID) is fundamental to the safety of nuclear power plants. It calls for multiple successive methods or barriers against radioactive release to the environment. DID principle is partly reflected in a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), but not all of the DID levels are included in the model. In addition, events included in PSA are not typically labelled with DID information. PSA could however be a powerful tool to assess the status of various DID levels in an NPP. This work is a start of a development of the PSA-methodology towards an assessment of DID levels. It includes: 1) mapping of conditions that should be considered for the defence in depth levels, and 2) definition of quantitative measures that should be considered for the defence in depth levels. The work has been limited to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) and DID levels 1 and 2, i.e., prevention of abnormal operation and failures and control of abnormal operation and detection of failures. Examples are chosen both from power operation LOCAs and LOCAs during cold shutdown. The methods that are used today in PSA are applicable for evaluating defence-in-depth levels 1 and 2. In the framework of these methodologies there are many different conditions and measures used. Failure data can be determined through: human reliability analysis (HRA), risk-informed in-service-inspection (RI-ISI) methodology, system reliability analysis and directly from plant specific failure data for the components. Many DID activities against LOCA are not explicitly modelled in typical PSA-studies. The risk importance of in-service-inspection is analysed and quantified in RI-ISI applications but so far results from RI-ISI have not been incorporated into PSA. Very few leakage detection systems are modelled in PSA-studies. Normally leakage detection systems that is part of the automatic actuation system are modelled while leakage detection systems in DID levels 1 and 2 typically are omitted. DID

  18. The Effectiveness, Costs and Coastal Protection Benefits of Natural and Nature-Based Defences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Siddharth; Beck, Michael W.; Reguero, Borja G.; Losada, Iñigo J.; van Wesenbeeck, Bregje; Pontee, Nigel; Sanchirico, James N.; Ingram, Jane Carter; Lange, Glenn-Marie; Burks-Copes, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    There is great interest in the restoration and conservation of coastal habitats for protection from flooding and erosion. This is evidenced by the growing number of analyses and reviews of the effectiveness of habitats as natural defences and increasing funding world-wide for nature-based defences–i.e. restoration projects aimed at coastal protection; yet, there is no synthetic information on what kinds of projects are effective and cost effective for this purpose. This paper addresses two issues critical for designing restoration projects for coastal protection: (i) a synthesis of the costs and benefits of projects designed for coastal protection (nature-based defences) and (ii) analyses of the effectiveness of coastal habitats (natural defences) in reducing wave heights and the biophysical parameters that influence this effectiveness. We (i) analyse data from sixty-nine field measurements in coastal habitats globally and examine measures of effectiveness of mangroves, salt-marshes, coral reefs and seagrass/kelp beds for wave height reduction; (ii) synthesise the costs and coastal protection benefits of fifty-two nature-based defence projects and; (iii) estimate the benefits of each restoration project by combining information on restoration costs with data from nearby field measurements. The analyses of field measurements show that coastal habitats have significant potential for reducing wave heights that varies by habitat and site. In general, coral reefs and salt-marshes have the highest overall potential. Habitat effectiveness is influenced by: a) the ratios of wave height-to-water depth and habitat width-to-wavelength in coral reefs; and b) the ratio of vegetation height-to-water depth in salt-marshes. The comparison of costs of nature-based defence projects and engineering structures show that salt-marshes and mangroves can be two to five times cheaper than a submerged breakwater for wave heights up to half a metre and, within their limits, become more

  19. Priming, induction and modulation of plant defence responses by bacterial lipopolysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Mari-Anne; Dow, J. Maxwell; Molinaro, Antonio;

    2007-01-01

    the triggering of defence responses or to the priming of the plant to respond more rapidly and/or to a greater degree to subsequent pathogen challenge. LPS from symbiotic bacteria can have quite different effects on plants to those of pathogens. Some details are emerging of the structures within LPS...... that are responsible for induction of these different plant responses. The lipid A moiety is not solely responsible for all of the effects of LPS in plants; core oligosaccharide and O-antigen components can elicit specific responses. Here, we review the effects of LPS in induction of defence......-related responses in plants, the structures within LPS responsible for eliciting these effects and discuss the possible nature of the (as yet unidentified) LPS receptors in plants....

  20. Military Geoinformation System of the Ministry of Defence of the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonko Biljecki

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the goals that Partnership for Peace has set, within domain of geospatial information, is the implementation of a military geoinformation system. Besides this important strategic objective for the Republic of Croatia, the military geoinformation system will enhance activities of the Ministry of Defence and Armed Forces and in such way improve national defence and cooperation with NATO members and members of the Partnership for Peace. This paper describes overall system principles based on relevant standards from domain of geospatial information. The emphasis is on the design of the conceptual data model and the object catalogue as main objective in the first phase of the whole project. Within this first phase of the project not only conceptual data model and object catalogue were created, but also a GML application scheme that will serve as basis for data exchange with all anticipated users of the system.

  1. Major bacterial lineages are essentially devoid of CRISPR-Cas viral defence systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, David; Sun, Christine L.; Brown, Christopher T.; Sharon, Itai; Anantharaman, Karthik; Probst, Alexander J.; Thomas, Brian C.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2016-01-01

    Current understanding of microorganism–virus interactions, which shape the evolution and functioning of Earth's ecosystems, is based primarily on cultivated organisms. Here we investigate thousands of viral and microbial genomes recovered using a cultivation-independent approach to study the frequency, variety and taxonomic distribution of viral defence mechanisms. CRISPR-Cas systems that confer microorganisms with immunity to viruses are present in only 10% of 1,724 sampled microorganisms, compared with previous reports of 40% occurrence in bacteria and 81% in archaea. We attribute this large difference to the lack of CRISPR-Cas systems across major bacterial lineages that have no cultivated representatives. We correlate absence of CRISPR-Cas with lack of nucleotide biosynthesis capacity and a symbiotic lifestyle. Restriction systems are well represented in these lineages and might provide both non-specific viral defence and access to nucleotides. PMID:26837824

  2. Quorum-sensing blockade as a strategy for enhancing host defences against bacterial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2007-01-01

    Conventional antibiotics target the growth and the basal life processes of bacteria leading to growth arrest and cell death. The selective force that is inherently linked to this mode of action eventually selects out antibiotic-resistant variants. The most obvious alternative to antibiotic...... rise to a new 'drug target rush'. Recently, QS has been shown to be involved in the development of tolerance to various antimicrobial treatments and immune modulation. The regulation of virulence via QS confers a strategic advantage over host defences. Consequently, a drug capable of blocking QS is...... likely to increase the susceptibility of the infecting organism to host defences and its clearance from the host. The use of QS signal blockers to attenuate bacterial pathogenicity, rather than bacterial growth, is therefore highly attractive, particularly with respect to the emergence of multi...

  3. Quorum-Sensing Blockade As A Strategy for Enhancing Host Defences Against Bacterial Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2007-01-01

    Conventional antibiotics target the growth and the basal life processes of bacteria leading to growth arrest and cell death. The selective force that is inherently linked to this mode of action eventually selects out antibiotic-resistant variants. The most obvious alternative to antibiotic...... rise to a new 'drug target rush'. Recently, QS has been shown to be involved in the development of tolerance to various antimicrobial treatments and immune modulation. The regulation of virulence via QS confers a strategic advantage over host defences. Consequently, a drug capable of blocking QS is...... likely to increase the susceptibility of the infecting organism to host defences and its clearance from the host. The use of QS signal blockers to attenuate bacterial pathogenicity, rather than bacterial growth, is therefore highly attractive, particularly with respect to the emergence of multi...

  4. Health protection during the Ebola crisis: the Defence Medical Services approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricknell, Martin; Terrell, A; Ross, D; White, D

    2016-06-01

    This paper is a narrative of the policies, procedures, mitigations and observations of the application of Force Health Protection measures applied by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) for the deployment of military personnel to West Africa as part of the UK contribution to the international response to the Ebola crisis from July 2014 to July 2015. The MOD divided the threat into three risk categories: risk from disease and non-battle injury, Ebola risk for non-clinical duties and Ebola risk for healthcare workers. Overall risk management was directed and monitored by the OP GRITROCK Force Health Protection Board. There were six cases of malaria, four outbreaks of gastrointestinal disease, two needlestick injuries in Ebola-facing healthcare workers, one MOD Ebola case and five non-needlestick, high-risk exposures. This experience reinforces the requirement for the Defence Medical Services to have a high level of organisational competence to advise on Force Health Protection for the MOD. PMID:26744191

  5. Prevention is Better than Prosecution: Deepening the Defence against Cyber Crime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Fick

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the author proposes that effectively and efficiently addressing cyber crime requires a shift in paradigm. For businesses and government departments alike the focus should be on prevention, rather than the prosecution of cyber criminals. The Defence in Depth strategy poses a practical solution for achieving Information Assurance in today’s highly networked environments. In a world where “absolute security” is an unachievable goal, the concept of Information Assurance poses significant benefits to securing one of an organization’s most valuable assets: Information. It will be argued that the approach of achieving Information Assurance within an organisation, coupled with the implementation of a Defence in Depth strategy can ensure that information is kept secure and readily available and provides a competitive advantage to those willing to invest and maintain such a strategy.

  6. A concise history of the South African Defence Force (1912-1987

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Dorning

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available As the SA Defence Force celebrates its 75th anniversary, it can look back with pride at a truly remarkable history. Established just two years after Union, the fledging force was to be severely tested within the first two years of its existence to a degree perhaps unparalleled in the history of modern armies. Just over a year after its formation, when it still existed more on paper than in fact, the Union Defence Force (UDF was called upon to suppress a violent industrial strike on the Reef. Having passed its first test with flying colours, the UDF was confronted a few months later by the far more serious crises of internal rebellion and World War. Once again, however, the young organization proved equal to the occasion, and by the end of the Great War the UDF had developed into a battle-hardened, professional force respected the world over for its prowess, courage and endurance in the field.

  7. Cooperation in Terms of Defence between Spain and the Countries of the Maghreb Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Echeverría Jesús

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Cooperation between Spain and the Maghreb states in the area of defence represents a sphere that includes long-term historical links (for example, with Morocco with other relations that have been developing in recent years, and at varying rates of intensity. Theprogressive normalising of the situation in Algeria since the 1990s, the raising of the UN embargo against Libya and the rise of what are called “new dangers” (all kinds of illegal trading and a style of terrorism that is increasingly transnational and lethal has led the states together with Mauritania and Tunisia to call for aid and cooperation from members such as Spain. Meanwhile, the revitalisation of the 5+5 group, even though it does not involve greater sub-regional cooperation in the Maghreb region, is encouraging North-South links which had until then been bilateralised, and since December 2004 the group has included the issue of defence on its agenda.

  8. The evolution of plant chemical defence - new roles for hydroxynitrile glucosides in Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Camilla

    function and evolution. Further, it contributes to our understanding of the formation and role of biosynthetic gene clusters in plant chemical defence. The bifurcation in hydroxynitrile glucoside biosynthesis and catabolism observed in Lotus japonicus makes it a very suitable model system to study the......Plants are sessile organisms well-known to produce a vast array of chemical compounds of which many are used in chemical defence against herbivores and pathogens. The biosynthesis of these plant chemical defence compounds poses a considerable risk of self-toxicity for the plant itself. Several...... types of adaptations enable plants to avoid the potential lethal effects of their own defence compounds. These adaptations include detoxification and stabilization by glycosylation and the genomic clustering of biosynthetic pathway genes. These two types are the main focus of this PhD thesis on...

  9. The Australian Defence Force Mental Health Prevalence and Wellbeing Study: design and methods

    OpenAIRE

    Van Hooff, Miranda; McFarlane, Alexander C; Christopher E. Davies; Searle, Amelia K.; Fairweather-Schmidt, A Kate; Verhagen, Alan; Benassi, Helen; Stephanie E Hodson

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Australian Defence Force (ADF) Mental Health Prevalence and Wellbeing Study (MHPWS) is the first study of mental disorder prevalence in an entire military population.Objective: The MHPWS aims to establish mental disorder prevalence, refine current ADF mental health screening methods, and identify specific occupational factors that influence mental health. This paper describes the design, sampling strategies, and methodology used in this study.Method: At Phase 1, approximately ...

  10. Defence force activities in marine protected areas: environmental management of Shoalwater Bay Training Area, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Wang, Xiaohua; Paull, David; Kesby, Julie

    2010-05-01

    Environmental management of military activities is of growing global concern by defence forces. As one of the largest landholders in Australia, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) is increasingly concerned with sustainable environmental management. This paper focuses on how the ADF is maintaining effective environmental management, especially in environmentally sensitive marine protected areas. It uses Shoalwater Bay Training Area (SWBTA) as a research example to examine environmental management strategies conducted by the ADF. SWBTA is one of the most significant Defence training areas in Australia, with a large number of single, joint and combined military exercises conducted in the area. With its maritime component contained in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP), the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA), and abutting Queensland’s State Marine Parks, it has high protection values. It is therefore vital for the ADF to adopt environmentally responsible management while they are conducting military activities. As to various tools employed to manage environmental performance, the ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) is widely used by the ADF. This paper examines military activities and marine environmental management within SWBTA, using the Talisman Saber (TS) exercise series as an example. These are extensive joint exercises conducted by the ADF and the United States defence forces. The paper outlines relevant legislative framework and environmental policies, analyses how the EMS operates in environmental management of military activities, and how military activities comply with these regulations. It discusses the implementation of the ADF EMS, including risk reduction measures, environmental awareness training, consultation and communication with stakeholders. A number of environmental management actions used in the TS exercises are presented to demonstrate the EMS application. Our investigations to this point indicate that the ADF is

  11. Deterrent activities in the crude lipophilic fractions of Antarctic benthic organisms: chemical defences against keystone predators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Núñez-Pons

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Generalist predation constitutes a driving force for the evolution of chemical defences. In the Antarctic benthos, asteroids and omnivore amphipods are keystone opportunistic predators. Sessile organisms are therefore expected to develop defensive mechanisms mainly against such consumers. However, the different habits characterizing each predator may promote variable responses in prey. Feeding-deterrence experiments were performed with the circumpolar asteroid macropredator Odontaster validus to evaluate the presence of defences within the apolar lipophilic fraction of Antarctic invertebrates and macroalgae. A total of 51% of the extracts were repellent, yielding a proportion of 17 defended species out of the 31 assessed. These results are compared with a previous study in which the same fractions were offered to the abundant circum-Antarctic amphipod Cheirimedon femoratus. Overall, less deterrence was reported towards asteroids (51% than against amphipods (80.8%, principally in sponge and algal extracts. Generalist amphipods, which establish casual host–prey sedentary associations with biosubstrata (preferentially sponges and macroalgae, may exert more localized predation pressure than sea stars on certain sessile prey, which would partly explain these results. The nutritional quality of prey may interact with feeding deterrents, whose production is presumed to be metabolically expensive. Although optimal defence theory posits that chemical defences are managed and distributed as to guarantee protection at the lowest cost, we found that only a few organisms localized feeding deterrents towards most exposed and/or valuable body regions. Lipophilic defensive metabolites are broadly produced in Antarctic communities to deter opportunistic predators, although several species combine different defensive traits.

  12. Della proteins modulate arabidopsis defences induced in response to caterpillar herbivory

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Z.Y.; Krosse, S.; Achard, P.; Van Dam, N.M.; Bede, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Upon insect herbivory, many plant species change the direction of metabolic flux from growth into defence. Two key pathways modulating these processes are the gibberellin (GA)/DELLA pathway and the jasmonate pathway. In this study, the effect of caterpillar herbivory on plant-induced responses was compared between wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and quad-della mutants that have constitutively elevated GA responses. The labial saliva (LS) of caterpillars of the beet armyworm, Spodop...

  13. THE RIGHT TO A DEFENCE IN THE CRIMINAL PROCEDURE OF THE YOUNG SPANISH DEMOCRACY

    OpenAIRE

    Juan-Luis GOMEZ COLOMER

    2013-01-01

    Although the designated topic for discussion is the technical right to a defence in Spain, I consider it opportune to give a brief overview of the current criminal procedural situation in my country. Spain is a young democracy of only 35 years in which sovereignty was returned to the people with the 1978 constitution, the moment that marked the beginning of a period during which we have enjoyed the full range of freedoms.

  14. Statistical frameworks for detecting tunnelling in cyber defence using big data

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, Daniel John; Rubin-Delanchy, Patrick T G; Heard, Nicholas A.; Adams, Niall M.

    2014-01-01

    How can we effectively use costly statistical models in the defence of large computer networks? Statistical modelling and machine learning are potentially powerful ways to detect threats as they do not require a human level understanding of the attack. However, they are rarely applied in practice as the computational cost of deploying all but the most simple algorithms can become implausibly large. Here we describe a multilevel approach to statistical modelling in which descriptions of the no...

  15. A human-in-the-loop approach to understanding situation awareness in cyber defence analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Tyworth; Nicklaus A. Giacobe; Vincent F. Mancuso; Michael. D. McNeese; Hall, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we argue for a human-in-the-loop approach to the study of situation awareness in computer defence analysis (CDA). The cognitive phenomenon of situation awareness (SA) has received significant attention in cybersecurity/CDA research. Yet little of this work has attended to the cognitive aspects of situation awareness in the CDA context; instead, the human operator has been treated as an abstraction within the larger human-technology system. A more human-centric approach that seek...

  16. Oxidative stress, antioxidative defence and outcome of gestation in experimental diabetic pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Cederberg, Jonas

    2001-01-01

    Maternal type 1 diabetes is associated with an increased risk for foetal malformations. The mechanism by which diabetes is teratogenic is not fully known. Previous studies have demonstrated that radical oxygen species can contribute to the teratogenicity of glucose and diabetes. The aim of the present work was to study different aspects of free radical damage and antioxidant defence in experimental diabetic pregnancy. The activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase and the mRNA levels of an...

  17. Phase Change Materials: Technology Status and Potential Defence Applications (Review Papers)

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindra Kumar; Manoj Kumar Misra; Rohitash Kumar; Deepak Gupta; P. K. Khatri; B. B. Tak; S. R. Meena

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) are being utilised world over for energy storage and temperature smoothening applications. Defence Laboratory Jodhpur (DLJ) has initiated a R&D programme to apply PCM in solving many heat related problems being faced by Indian forces during desert operations specially failure of mission-critical components. Under the programme, special organic PCM (Patent application no. 2258/DEL/2007 and low melting metal alloys have been developed well tuned to desert diurna...

  18. Chemical defences in leaf beetles and their larvae: The ecological, evolutionary and taxonomic significance

    OpenAIRE

    Pasteels, Jacques M.; Rowell-Rahier, Martine; Braekman Jean-Claude; Daloze, Désiré

    2009-01-01

    The chemical defences of the Chrysomelinae are reviewed. Defensive glandular secretions have evolved independently in larvae and adults, and faster than the morphology of the glands. Both characters are used in a phylogenetic study of the Chrysomelini, disclosing suprageneric affinities. First, a close relationship between the Chrysomelina and Phratora is proposed. Secondly, Leptinotarsa and Gonioctena are probably more closely related to the Chrysolinina than to the Chrysomelina and Phratora...

  19. Educational effectiveness: the development of the discipline, the critiques, the defence, and the present debate

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, David; Chapman, Christopher; Kelly, Anthony; Muijs, Daniel; Sammons, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Educational effectiveness research (EER) has made a significant contribution to our understanding of the characteristics and processes associated with more and less effective schools in a diverse range of contexts. However, this remains a contested field of inquiry and has been subjected to significant critique. This paper examines the origins and development of EER and summarises the key critiques and defences of the field during the past 30 years. It then moves on to examine the recent crit...

  20. Cyclic lipopeptides from Bacillus subtilis activate distinct patterns of defence responses in grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Giovanni; Fernandez, Olivier; Jacquens, Lucile; Coutte, François; Krier, François; Jacques, Philippe; Clément, Christophe; Barka, Essaid Ait; Jacquard, Cédric; Dorey, Stéphan

    2015-02-01

    Non-self-recognition of microorganisms partly relies on the perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) and leads to the activation of an innate immune response. Bacillus subtilis produces three main families of cyclic lipopeptides (LPs), namely surfactins, iturins and fengycins. Although LPs are involved in induced systemic resistance (ISR) activation, little is known about defence responses induced by these molecules and their involvement in local resistance to fungi. Here, we showed that purified surfactin, mycosubtilin (iturin family) and plipastatin (fengycin family) are perceived by grapevine plant cells. Although surfactin and mycosubtilin stimulated grapevine innate immune responses, they differentially activated early signalling pathways and defence gene expression. By contrast, plipastatin perception by grapevine cells only resulted in early signalling activation. Gene expression analysis suggested that mycosubtilin activated salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling pathways, whereas surfactin mainly induced an SA-regulated response. Although mycosubtilin and plipastatin displayed direct antifungal activity, only surfactin and mycosubtilin treatments resulted in a local long-lasting enhanced tolerance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea in grapevine leaves. Moreover, challenge with specific strains overproducing surfactin and mycosubtilin led to a slightly enhanced stimulation of the defence response compared with the LP-non-producing strain of B. subtilis. Altogether, our results provide the first comprehensive view of the involvement of LPs from B. subtilis in grapevine plant defence and local resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Bo. cinerea. Moreover, this work is the first to highlight the ability of mycosubtilin to trigger an immune response in plants. PMID:25040001

  1. Scenarios and Road Mapping for KeyTechnologies: Flood and Coastal Defence in Great Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Ian Miles

    2008-01-01

    The Flood and Coastal Defence (FCD) project of the United Kingdom Foresight Programme was involved a scenario exercise that has been very influential on UK policy. The scenario approach had an extensive prehistory, and its use in a water management context predates FCD. It continues to evolve and influence decision-making in many fields. This study presents an overview of the approach and how it has come to be so influential. The FCD project features by an integrated scenario analysis of the ...

  2. Clinical Audit of Diabetes Care in the Bahrain Defence Forces Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Baharna, Marwa M.; Whitford, David L

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Primary care audits in Bahrain have consistently revealed a failure to meet recognised standards of delivery of process and outcome measures to patients with diabetes. This study aimed to establish for the first time the quality of diabetes care in a Bahraini hospital setting. Methods: A retrospective clinical audit was conducted of a random sample of patients attending the Diabetes and Endocrine Center at the Bahrain Defence Forces Hospital over a 15-month period which ended in J...

  3. The gut microbiota plays a protective role in the host defence against pneumococcal pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Schuijt, T. J.; Lankelma, J.M.; Scicluna, B.P.; Melo, E; Roelofs, J.J.; Boer, de, J.W.; Hoogendijk, A.J.; Beer, de, VHJ Vincent; De Vos; Belzer, C.; Poll, van der, T.; Wiersinga, W.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pneumonia accounts for more deaths than any other infectious disease worldwide. The intestinal microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of the systemic immune system. The precise role of the gut microbiota in bacterial pneumonia, however, is unknown. Here, we investigate the function of the gut microbiota in the host defence against Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. DESIGN: We depleted the gut microbiota in C57BL/6 mice ...

  4. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Offsets as a Mechanism for Promoting Malaysian Defence Industrial and Technological Development

    OpenAIRE

    Balakrishnan, Kogila

    2008-01-01

    Offsets have taken centre stage in defence trade. To date, more than 78 countries around the world practice offsets and outstanding offsets obligations run into billions of US dollars However, why have offsets gained such a momentum? Increasingly, both sellers and buyers in the arms trade view offsets as an efficient and effective economic compensation tool to justify arms deals. Buyers, consider offsets as a catalyst for industrial and technological development, employment, cr...

  5. THE RIGHT TO A DEFENCE IN THE CRIMINAL PROCEDURE OF THE YOUNG SPANISH DEMOCRACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Luis GOMEZ COLOMER

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the designated topic for discussion is the technical right to a defence in Spain, I consider it opportune to give a brief overview of the current criminal procedural situation in my country. Spain is a young democracy of only 35 years in which sovereignty was returned to the people with the 1978 constitution, the moment that marked the beginning of a period during which we have enjoyed the full range of freedoms.

  6. Specific Cues Associated With Honey Bee Social Defence against Varroa destructor Infested Brood

    OpenAIRE

    Fanny Mondet; Seo Hyun Kim; Joachim R. de Miranda; Dominique Beslay; Yves Le Conte; Mercer, Alison R.

    2016-01-01

    Social immunity forms an essential part of the defence repertoire of social insects. In response to infestation by the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its associated viruses, honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) have developed a specific behaviour (varroa-sensitive hygiene, or VSH) that helps protect the colony from this parasite. Brood cells heavily infested with mites are uncapped, the brood killed, and the cell contents removed. For this extreme sacrifice to be beneficial to the colony, the...

  7. Effects of elevated [CO2] on maize defence against mycotoxigenic Fusarium verticillioides

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Martha M; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A.; Dafoe, Nicole J; Christensen, Shawn; Sims, James; Martins, Vitor F; Swerbilow, Jay; Romero, Maritza; Hans T. Alborn; Allen, Leon HARTWELL; Teal, Peter EA

    2014-01-01

    Maize is by quantity the most important C4 cereal crop; however, future climate changes are expected to increase maize susceptibility to mycotoxigenic fungal pathogens and reduce productivity. While rising atmospheric [CO2] is a driving force behind the warmer temperatures and drought, which aggravate fungal disease and mycotoxin accumulation, our understanding of how elevated [CO2] will effect maize defences against such pathogens is limited. Here we report that elevated [CO2] increases maiz...

  8. Drought-induced trans-generational tradeoff between stress tolerance and defence: consequences for range limits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsdurf, Jacob D; Ripley, Tayler J; Matzner, Steven L; Siemens, David H

    2013-01-01

    Areas just across species range boundaries are often stressful, but even with ample genetic variation within and among range-margin populations, adaptation towards stress tolerance across range boundaries often does not occur. Adaptive trans-generational plasticity should allow organisms to circumvent these problems for temporary range expansion; however, range boundaries often persist. To investigate this dilemma, we drought stressed a parent generation of Boechera stricta (A.Gray) A. Löve & D. Löve, a perennial wild relative of Arabidopsis, representing genetic variation within and among several low-elevation range margin populations. Boechera stricta is restricted to higher, moister elevations in temperate regions where generalist herbivores are often less common. Previous reports indicate a negative genetic correlation (genetic tradeoff) between chemical defence allocation and abiotic stress tolerance that may prevent the simultaneous evolution of defence and drought tolerance that would be needed for range expansion. In growth chamber experiments, the genetic tradeoff became undetectable among offspring sib-families whose parents had been drought treated, suggesting that the stress-induced trans-generational plasticity may circumvent the genetic tradeoff and thus enable range expansion. However, the trans-generational effects also included a conflict between plastic responses (environmental tradeoff); offspring whose parents were drought treated were more drought tolerant, but had lower levels of glucosinolate toxins that function in defence against generalist herbivores. We suggest that either the genetic or environmental tradeoff between defence allocation and stress tolerance has the potential to contribute to range limit development in upland mustards. PMID:24307931

  9. Cancer susceptibility and reproductive trade-offs: a model of the evolution of cancer defences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddy, Amy M; Kokko, Hanna; Breden, Felix; Wilkinson, Gerald S; Aktipis, C Athena

    2015-07-19

    The factors influencing cancer susceptibility and why it varies across species are major open questions in the field of cancer biology. One underexplored source of variation in cancer susceptibility may arise from trade-offs between reproductive competitiveness (e.g. sexually selected traits, earlier reproduction and higher fertility) and cancer defence. We build a model that contrasts the probabilistic onset of cancer with other, extrinsic causes of mortality and use it to predict that intense reproductive competition will lower cancer defences and increase cancer incidence. We explore the trade-off between cancer defences and intraspecific competition across different extrinsic mortality conditions and different levels of trade-off intensity, and find the largest effect of competition on cancer in species where low extrinsic mortality combines with strong trade-offs. In such species, selection to delay cancer and selection to outcompete conspecifics are both strong, and the latter conflicts with the former. We discuss evidence for the assumed trade-off between reproductive competitiveness and cancer susceptibility. Sexually selected traits such as ornaments or large body size require high levels of cell proliferation and appear to be associated with greater cancer susceptibility. Similar associations exist for female traits such as continuous egg-laying in domestic hens and earlier reproductive maturity. Trade-offs between reproduction and cancer defences may be instantiated by a variety of mechanisms, including higher levels of growth factors and hormones, less efficient cell-cycle control and less DNA repair, or simply a larger number of cell divisions (relevant when reproductive success requires large body size or rapid reproductive cycles). These mechanisms can affect intra- and interspecific variation in cancer susceptibility arising from rapid cell proliferation during reproductive maturation, intrasexual competition and reproduction. PMID:26056364

  10. The single functional blast resistance gene Pi54 activates a complex defence mechanism in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Rai, Amit Kumar; Kanwar, Shamsher Singh; Chand, Duni; Singh, Nagendera Kumar; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2012-01-01

    The Pi54 gene (Pi-k(h)) confers a high degree of resistance to diverse strains of the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. In order to understand the genome-wide co-expression of genes in the transgenic rice plant Taipei 309 (TP) containing the Pi54 gene, microarray analysis was performed at 72 h post-inoculation of the M. oryzae strain PLP-1. A total of 1154 differentially expressing genes were identified in TP-Pi54 plants. Of these, 587 were up-regulated, whereas 567 genes were found to be down-regulated. 107 genes were found that were exclusively up-regulated and 58 genes that were down- regulated in the case of TP-Pi54. Various defence response genes, such as callose, laccase, PAL, and peroxidase, and genes related to transcription factors like NAC6, Dof zinc finger, MAD box, bZIP, and WRKY were found to be up-regulated in the transgenic line. The enzymatic activities of six plant defence response enzymes, such as peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, β-glucosidase, β-1,3-glucanase, and chitinase, were found to be significantly high in TP-Pi54 at different stages of inoculation by M. oryzae. The total phenol content also increased significantly in resistant transgenic plants after pathogen inoculation. This study suggests the activation of defence response and transcription factor-related genes and a higher expression of key enzymes involved in the defence response pathway in the rice line TP-Pi54, thus leading to incompatible host-pathogen interaction. PMID:22058403

  11. Do metal-rich plants deter herbivores? A field test of the defence hypothesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Noret,Nausicaa; Meerts, Pierre Jacques; Vanhaelen, Mathieu; Dos Santos, Anabelle; Escarre Blanch, José

    2007-01-01

    Some plant species growing on metalliferous soils are able to accumulate heavy metals in their shoots up to very high concentrations, but the selective advantage of this behaviour is still unknown. The most popular hypothesis, that metals protect plants against herbivores, has been tested several times in laboratory conditions, with contradictory results. We carried out the first large-scale test of the defence hypothesis in eight natural populations of the model Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi c...

  12. Effects of fludioxonil on Botrytis cinerea and on grapevine defence response

    OpenAIRE

    Petit, Anne Noelle; Vaillant-Gaveau, Nathalie; Walker, Anne Sophie; Leroux, Pierre; Baillieul, Fabienne; Panon, Marie-Laure; Clément, Christophe; Fontaine, Florence

    2011-01-01

    Botrytis bunch rot of grapes is mainly controlled by applying fungicides at three crop stages: the end of flowering (BBCH 68), bunch closure (BBCH 77) and the beginning of veraison (BBCH 81). The phenylpyrroles derivative fludioxonil is among the most effective fungicides registered to control Botrytis cinerea. Its effectiveness was investigated in relation to spray timing, fungicide resistance and defence responses of grapevine. Frequencies of B. cinerea strains which were resistant to fungi...

  13. Hypericum perforatum cultures as a tool to study plant defence mechanisms against anthracnose (colletotrichum gloeosporioides)

    OpenAIRE

    Conceição, Luís F. R.; Franklin, Gregory; Ribeiro, Catarina; Dias, Alberto Carlos Pires

    2006-01-01

    To elucidate the defence mechanisms of Hypericum perforatum L. against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, we utilized cell suspension cultures. When primed with methyl jasmonate, H. perforatum cells showed a double oxidative burst upon Colletotrichum gloeosporioides elicitation typical of a hypersensitive response. Phenolic profile of the cells was modified upon various stimuli such as salicylic acid, MeJ and C. gloeosporioides. The possible importance of reactive oxygen species production an...

  14. Obsolescence Challenges for Product-Service Systems in Aerospace and Defence Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Rojo, Francisco Javier; Roy, Rajkumar; Shehab, Essam; Wardle, P. J.

    2009-01-01

    The aerospace and defence industries are moving towards new types of agreement such as availability contracts based on Product-Service System (PSS) business models. Obsolescence has become one of the main problems that will impact on many areas of the system during its life cycle. This paper presents the major challenges to managing obsolescence for availability contracts, identified by means of a comprehensive literature review and several interviews and forums with experts in ob...

  15. Complex interactions with females and rival males limit the evolution of sperm offence and defence

    OpenAIRE

    Bjork, Adam; Starmer, William T.; Higginson, Dawn M.; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Pitnick, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Postcopulatory sexual selection favours males which are strong offensive and defensive sperm competitors. As a means of identifying component traits comprising each strategy, we used an experimental evolution approach. Separate populations of Drosophila melanogaster were selected for enhanced sperm offence and defence. Despite using a large outbred population and evidence of substantive genetic variation for each strategy, neither trait responded to selection in the two replicates of this exp...

  16. Investigating How Newly Appointed CEO’s Enact Corporate Turnaround in the Aerospace & Defence Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Duncan

    2009-01-01

    Increased literary attention and debate has been directed at business turnaround in recent years; albeit as Furman & McGahan (2002, p.238) suggest; ‘despite their centrality, little is still known about their prevalence or trajectory’. This case study departs from most other turnaround research by addressing the global Aerospace and Defence sector; of which has remained unexplored until this point. Specifically, it looks to ascertain ‘how new top management enact successful turnaround’ and co...

  17. A Protocol for the Longitudinal Study of Psychological Resilience in the Australian Defence Force

    OpenAIRE

    Monique F. Crane; Virginia Lewis; Andrew Cohn; Hodson, Stephanie E.; Ruth Parslow; Bryant, Richard A; Cate Chesney; David Forbes

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades there has been increasing attention directed at the analysis of psychological resilience. The number of modern-day veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan has sparked great interest in identifying mechanisms that can either erode or facilitate psychological resilience. In November 2009, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) in collaboration with the Australian Centre for Post-traumatic Mental Health (ACPMH) launched a longitudinal study of psychological resilience du...

  18. THE LEGAL DEFENCE OF VICTIMS OF TRAFFICKING LEGISLATIVE AND JURISDICTIONAL PROBLEMS AND GAPS

    OpenAIRE

    Laura GUERCIO

    2011-01-01

    Although in the last 10 years in Italy there has been a greater sensitivity by the legislature to the trafficking, including in relation to international commitments such as the Palermo Protocol, there are still difficulties and deficiencies in affording effective jurisdictional protection for victims of this shameful social phenomenon. Italy has started to pay a sensitive normative attention to the defence of the victims of trafficking through the art. 18 of the DLvo 286/98I that stipulates ...

  19. Role of stress-related hormones in plant defence during early infection of the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Kammerhofer, N.; Radakovic, Z.; Regis, J.M.A.; Dobrev, P.; Vaňková, R. (Radomíra); Grundler, F. M. W.; Siddique, S.; Hofmann, J.; Wieczorek, K.

    2015-01-01

    Heterodera schachtii, a plant-parasitic cyst nematode, invades host roots and induces a specific syncytial feeding structure, from which it withdraws all required nutrients, causing severe yield losses. The system H. schachtii–Arabidopsis is an excellent research model for investigating plant defence mechanisms. Such responses are suppressed in well-established syncytia, whereas they are induced during early parasitism. However, the mechanisms by which the defence responses are modulated and ...

  20. Maternally derived chemical defences are an effective deterrent against some predators of poison frog tadpoles (Oophaga pumilio)

    OpenAIRE

    Stynoski, Jennifer L.; Shelton, Georgia; Stynoski, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Parents defend their young in many ways, including provisioning chemical defences. Recent work in a poison frog system offers the first example of an animal that provisions its young with alkaloids after hatching or birth rather than before. But it is not yet known whether maternally derived alkaloids are an effective defence against offspring predators. We identified the predators of Oophaga pumilio tadpoles and conducted laboratory and field choice tests to determine whether predators are d...

  1. Effect of probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici on antioxidant defences and oxidative stress of Litopenaeus stylirostris under Vibrio nigripulchritudo challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Castex, Mathieu; Lemaire, Pierrette; Wabete, Nelly; Chim, Liet

    2010-01-01

    Antioxidant defences and induced oxidative stress tissue damage of the blue shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris, under challenge with Vibrio nigriputchritudo, were investigated for a 72-h period. For this purpose, L stylirostris were first infected by immersion with pathogenic V. nigripulchritudo strain SFn1 and then antioxidant defences: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), Total antioxidant status (TAS), glutathiones and induced tissue damage (MDA and carbon...

  2. New immune systems: pathogen-specific host defence, life history strategies and hypervariable immune-response genes of invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    L Bowden; NM Dheilly; DA Raftos; SV Nair

    2007-01-01

    Our understanding of invertebrate immune systems is undergoing a paradigm shift. Until recently, the host defence responses of invertebrates were thought to rely on limited molecular diversity that could not tailor reactions toward specific microbes. This view is now being challenged. Highly discriminatory defence responses, and hypervariable gene systems with the potential to drive them, have been identified in a number of invertebrate groups. These systems seem to be quite distinct, suggest...

  3. Effect of nitrogen fertilisation of strawberry plants on the efficacy of defence-stimulating biocontrol products against Botrytis cinerea

    OpenAIRE

    Nicot, Philippe; Bardin, Marc; Debruyne, François; Duffaud, Magali; Lecompte, François; Neu, Laurent; Pascal, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Although Nitrogen (N) is a key component in many compounds implicated in host-pathogen interactions, little is known on the possible effect of N fertilisation of the plant on the efficacy of defence-stimulating biocontrol agents. In the present work we examined the effect of five levels of N nutrition on the susceptibility of strawberry leaves to Botrytis cinerea and on the protective efficacy of two biocontrol products presumed to induce plant defence mechanisms. Two days after the app...

  4. Tri-Trophic Interactions: Impact of Russet Mite on the Induced Defences of Tomato against Spider Mites

    OpenAIRE

    Bouneb, Mabrouk

    2014-01-01

    Plant and herbivores coexist for millions of years and have developed an arsenal of complex interactions. They can be mutually beneficial or antagonistic. In antagonistic interaction, plants have evolved a wide array of constitutive morphological, biochemical and molecular defences to defend themselves from herbivore attacks (Karban and Baldwin, 1997; Walling, 2000). In addition, plants can activate induced direct defences that often act systemically throughout the plant and are typically eff...

  5. Chemical Diversity and Defence Metabolism: How Plants Cope with Pathogens and Ozone Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Faoro

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemical defences represent a main trait of the plant innate immune system. Besides regulating the relationship between plants and their ecosystems, phytochemicals are involved both in resistance against pathogens and in tolerance towards abiotic stresses, such as atmospheric pollution. Plant defence metabolites arise from the main secondary metabolic routes, the phenylpropanoid, the isoprenoid and the alkaloid pathways. In plants, antibiotic compounds can be both preformed (phytoanticipins and inducible (phytoalexins, the former including saponins, cyanogenic glycosides and glucosinolates. Chronic exposure to tropospheric ozone (O3 stimulates the carbon fluxes from the primary to the secondary metabolic pathways to a great extent, inducing a shift of the available resources in favour of the synthesis of secondary products. In some cases, the plant defence responses against pathogens and environmental pollutants may overlap, leading to the unspecific synthesis of similar molecules, such as phenylpropanoids. Exposure to ozone can also modify the pattern of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC, emitted from plant in response to herbivore feeding, thus altering the tritrophic interaction among plant, phytophagy and their natural enemies. Finally, the synthesis of ethylene and polyamines can be regulated by ozone at level of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM, the biosynthetic precursor of both classes of hormones, which can, therefore, mutually inhibit their own biosynthesis with consequence on plant phenotype.

  6. Missile Defence and Interceptor Allocation by LVQ-RBFMulti-agent Hybrid Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thamarai Selvi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a solution methodology for a missile defence problem using theatremissile defence (TMD concept. In the missile defence scenario, the concept of TMD is generallyused for the optimal allocation of interceptors to counter the attack missiles. The problem iscomputationally complex due to the presence of enormous state space. The Learning vectorquantiser–Radial basis function (LVQ-RBF multi-agent hybrid neural architecture is used as thelearning structure, and Q-learning as the learning method. The LVQ-RBF multi-agent hybridneural architecture overcomes the complex state space issue using the partitioning and weightedlearning approach. The proposed LVQ-RBF multi- agent hybrid architecture improvises thelearning performance by the local and global error criterion. The state space is explored withinitial coarse partitioning by LVQ neural network. The fine partitioning of the state space isperformed using the multi-agent RBF neural network. The discrete reward scheme is used forLVQ-RBF multi-agent hybrid neural architecture. It has a hierarchical architecture which enablesquicker convergence without the loss of accuracy. The simulation of the TMD is performed with500 assets and six priority of assets.

  7. A chloroplast-localized protein LESION AND LAMINA BENDING affects defence and growth responses in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiru, Muluneh; Takagi, Hiroki; Abe, Akira; Yokota, Takao; Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Haruko; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Fujisaki, Koki; Oikawa, Kaori; Uemura, Aiko; Natsume, Satoshi; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Umemura, Kenji; Terry, Matthew J; Terauchi, Ryohei

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how plants allocate their resources to growth or defence is of long-term importance to the development of new and improved varieties of different crops. Using molecular genetics, plant physiology, hormone analysis and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS)-based transcript profiling, we have isolated and characterized the rice (Oryza sativa) LESION AND LAMINA BENDING (LLB) gene that encodes a chloroplast-targeted putative leucine carboxyl methyltransferase. Loss of LLB function results in reduced growth and yield, hypersensitive response (HR)-like lesions, accumulation of the antimicrobial compounds momilactones and phytocassanes, and constitutive expression of pathogenesis-related genes. Consistent with these defence-associated responses, llb shows enhanced resistance to rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae) and bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae). The lesion and resistance phenotypes are likely to be caused by the over-accumulation of jasmonates (JAs) in the llb mutant including the JA precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. Additionally, llb shows an increased lamina inclination and enhanced early seedling growth due to elevated brassinosteroid (BR) synthesis and/or signalling. These findings show that LLB functions in the chloroplast to either directly or indirectly repress both JA- and BR-mediated responses, revealing a possible mechanism for controlling how plants allocate resources for defence and growth. PMID:26864209

  8. Status of services, overexposure and QAC in TLD PMS to defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individual monitoring has always played an important role in radiological protection. There is continuous development in the field of dosimetry systems and many changes have taken place in last many years. The use of radiation for peaceful purposes is increasing with advancement of technological growth in the country. Thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLDs) have emerged as one of the best alternatives for personal monitoring. Defence sector has nearly 2100 persons, who are working in various Military Hospitals, Military Colleges, DRDO Labs, Defence Ordinance factories and many others CPMFs like CISF, BSF, who are likely to receive radiation doses. Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur is providing the TLD personal monitoring service since Jan 1999 as per the guideline by B.A.R.C. to all the institutions mentioned above. This paper brings out salient features of this service in terms of facility available, procedures fulfilling the requirement of accreditation, over exposure reported, quality measures adopted and quality assurance results conducted by BARC, utility and suggestions for such type of services. (author)

  9. United States Department of Energy defence low level waste classification: Basis and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the revision of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2, Chapter III, a process for developing a site specific low level radioactive waste (LLW) classification system for DOE defence LLW is being considered. Waste classification is a mechanism that can help ensure that overall performance objectives established to protect public health and ensure public safety will be met. The DOE follows the guidance of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) to the fullest extent practicable with respect to radiation protection standards. The NCRP endorses most of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Thus, the DOE has adopted ICRP 30 and ICRP 48 as the basis for all internal dose calculations. For LLW management practices, the DOE is requiring equivalence with US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements. However, system-wide classification will be less practical for the DOE than the NRC because of dissimilarities of waste mixtures and disposal methods between DOE sites. Site specific waste stream characterization, source term determination and radiological performance assessment will be required for DOE disposal facilities to determine the maximum disposal capacity and the most efficient disposal practices for defence LLW. This process will also demonstrate compliance with the overall performance objectives, thus providing the public health and safety. The paper discusses the procedure that the DOE is considering in the development of a site and waste specific LLW classification system for DOE defence wastes. (author). 10 refs, 1 tab

  10. MIMIVIRE is a defence system in mimivirus that confers resistance to virophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Anthony; Bekliz, Meriem; Chabrière, Eric; Pontarotti, Pierre; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-03-10

    Since their discovery, giant viruses have revealed several unique features that challenge the conventional definition of a virus, such as their large and complex genomes, their infection by virophages and their presence of transferable short element transpovirons. Here we investigate the sensitivity of mimivirus to virophage infection in a collection of 59 viral strains and demonstrate lineage specificity in the resistance of mimivirus to Zamilon, a unique virophage that can infect lineages B and C of mimivirus but not lineage A. We hypothesized that mimiviruses harbour a defence mechanism resembling the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas system that is widely present in bacteria and archaea. We performed de novo sequencing of 45 new mimivirus strains and searched for sequences specific to Zamilon in a total of 60 mimivirus genomes. We found that lineage A strains are resistant to Zamilon and contain the insertion of a repeated Zamilon sequence within an operon, here named the 'mimivirus virophage resistance element' (MIMIVIRE). Further analyses of the surrounding sequences showed that this locus is reminiscent of a defence mechanism related to the CRISPR-Cas system. Silencing the repeated sequence and the MIMIVIRE genes restores mimivirus susceptibility to Zamilon. The MIMIVIRE proteins possess the typical functions (nuclease and helicase) involved in the degradation of foreign nucleic acids. The viral defence system, MIMIVIRE, represents a nucleic-acid-based immunity against virophage infection. PMID:26934229

  11. HVEM signalling at mucosal barriers provides host defence against pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Jr-Wen; Larange, Alexandre; Kim, Gisen; Vela, Jose Luis; Zahner, Sonja; Cheroutre, Hilde; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2012-08-01

    The herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM), a member of the tumour-necrosis factor receptor family, has diverse functions, augmenting or inhibiting the immune response. HVEM was recently reported as a colitis risk locus in patients, and in a mouse model of colitis we demonstrated an anti-inflammatory role for HVEM, but its mechanism of action in the mucosal immune system was unknown. Here we report an important role for epithelial HVEM in innate mucosal defence against pathogenic bacteria. HVEM enhances immune responses by NF-κB-inducing kinase-dependent Stat3 activation, which promotes the epithelial expression of genes important for immunity. During intestinal Citrobacter rodentium infection, a mouse model for enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection, Hvem−/− mice showed decreased Stat3 activation, impaired responses in the colon, higher bacterial burdens and increased mortality. We identified the immunoglobulin superfamily molecule CD160 (refs 7 and 8), expressed predominantly by innate-like intraepithelial lymphocytes, as the ligand engaging epithelial HVEM for host protection. Likewise, in pulmonary Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, HVEM is also required for host defence. Our results pinpoint HVEM as an important orchestrator of mucosal immunity, integrating signals from innate lymphocytes to induce optimal epithelial Stat3 activation, which indicates that targeting HVEM with agonists could improve host defence. PMID:22801499

  12. Food supplementation mitigates dispersal-dependent differences in nest defence in a passerine bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Récapet, Charlotte; Daniel, Grégory; Taroni, Joëlle; Bize, Pierre; Doligez, Blandine

    2016-05-01

    Dispersing and non-dispersing individuals often differ in phenotypic traits (e.g. physiology, behaviour), but to what extent these differences are fixed or driven by external conditions remains elusive. We experimentally tested whether differences in nest-defence behaviour between dispersing and non-dispersing individuals changed with local habitat quality in collared flycatchers, by providing additional food during the nestling rearing period. In control (non-food-supplemented) nests, dispersers were less prone to defend their brood compared with non-dispersers, whereas in food-supplemented nests, dispersing and non-dispersing individuals showed equally strong nest defence. We discuss the importance of dispersal costs versus adaptive flexibility in reproductive investment in shaping these differences in nest-defence behaviour between dispersing and non-dispersing individuals. Irrespective of the underlying mechanisms, our study emphasizes the importance of accounting for environmental effects when comparing traits between dispersing and non-dispersing individuals, and in turn assessing the costs and benefits of dispersal. PMID:27194287

  13. Evolution of separate predation- and defence-evoked venoms in carnivorous cone snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutertre, Sébastien; Jin, Ai-Hua; Vetter, Irina; Hamilton, Brett; Sunagar, Kartik; Lavergne, Vincent; Dutertre, Valentin; Fry, Bryan G; Antunes, Agostinho; Venter, Deon J; Alewood, Paul F; Lewis, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Venomous animals are thought to inject the same combination of toxins for both predation and defence, presumably exploiting conserved target pharmacology across prey and predators. Remarkably, cone snails can rapidly switch between distinct venoms in response to predatory or defensive stimuli. Here, we show that the defence-evoked venom of Conus geographus contains high levels of paralytic toxins that potently block neuromuscular receptors, consistent with its lethal effects on humans. In contrast, C. geographus predation-evoked venom contains prey-specific toxins mostly inactive at human targets. Predation- and defence-evoked venoms originate from the distal and proximal regions of the venom duct, respectively, explaining how different stimuli can generate two distinct venoms. A specialized defensive envenomation strategy is widely evolved across worm, mollusk and fish-hunting cone snails. We propose that defensive toxins, originally evolved in ancestral worm-hunting cone snails to protect against cephalopod and fish predation, have been repurposed in predatory venoms to facilitate diversification to fish and mollusk diets. PMID:24662800

  14. Armed rollers: does nestling's vomit function as a defence against predators?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deseada Parejo

    Full Text Available Chemical defences against predators are widespread in the animal kingdom although have been seldom reported in birds. Here, we investigate the possibility that the orange liquid that nestlings of an insectivorous bird, the Eurasian roller (Coracias garrulus, expel when scared at their nests acts as a chemical defence against predators. We studied the diet of nestling rollers and vomit origin, its chemical composition and deterrent effect on a mammal generalist predator. We also hypothesized that nestling rollers, as their main prey (i.e. grasshoppers do from plants, could sequester chemicals from their prey for their use. Grasshoppers, that also regurgitate when facing to a threat, store the harmful substances used by plants to defend themselves against herbivores. We found that nestling rollers only vomit after being grasped and moved. The production of vomit depended on food consumption and the vomit contained two deterrent chemicals (hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acids stored by grasshoppers and used by plants to diminish herbivory, suggesting that they originate from the rollers' prey. Finally, we showed for the first time that the oral secretion of a vertebrate had a deterrent effect on a model predator because vomit of nestling rollers made meat distasteful to dogs. These results support the idea that the vomit of nestling rollers is a chemical defence against predators.

  15. Environmental performance policy indicators for the public sector: the case of the defence sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Tomás B; Alves, Inês; Subtil, Rui; Joanaz de Melo, João

    2007-03-01

    The development of environmental performance policy indicators for public services, and in particular for the defence sector, is an emerging issue. Despite a number of recent initiatives there has been little work done in this area, since the other sectors usually focused on are agriculture, transport, industry, tourism and energy. This type of tool can be an important component for environmental performance evaluation at policy level, when integrated in the general performance assessment system of public missions and activities. The main objective of this research was to develop environmental performance policy indicators for the public sector, specifically applied to the defence sector. Previous research included an assessment of the environmental profile, through the evaluation of how environmental management practices have been adopted in this sector and an assessment of environmental aspects and impacts. This paper builds upon that previous research, developing an indicator framework--SEPI--supported by the selection and construction of environmental performance indicators. Another aim is to discuss how the current environmental indicator framework can be integrated into overall performance management. The Portuguese defence sector is presented and the usefulness of this methodology demonstrated. Feasibility and relevancy criteria are applied to evaluate the set of indicators proposed, allowing indicators to be scored and indicators for the policy level to be obtained. PMID:16580128

  16. Gastrointestinal host defence: importance of gut closure in control of macromolecular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, W A

    An important adaptation of the gastrointestinal tract to the extrauterine environment is its development of a mucosal barrier against the penetration of harmful substances (bacteria, toxins and antigens) present within the intestinal lumen. At birth, the newborn infant must be prepared to deal with bacterial colonization of the gut, with formation of toxic byproducts of bacteria and viruses (enterotoxins and endotoxins) and with the ingestion of antigens (milk proteins). These potentially noxious substances if allowed to penetrate the mucosal epithelial barrier under pathological conditions can cause inflammatory and allergic reactions which may result in gastrointestinal and systemic disease states. To combat the potential danger of invasion across the mucosal barrier the infant must develop an elaborate system of defence mechanisms within the lumen and on the luminal mucosal surface which act to control and maintain the epithelium as an impermeable barrier to uptake of macromolecular antigens. These defences include a unique immunological system adapted to function in the complicated milieu of the intestine as well as other non-immunological processes such as a gastric barrier, intestinal surface secretions, peristaltic movement and natural antibacterial substances (lysozyme, bile salts) which also help to provide maximum protection for the intestinal surface. Unfortunately, during the immediate postpartum period, particularly for premature and small-for-dates infants, this elaborate local defence system is incompletely developed. As a result of the delay in the maturation of the mucosal barrier newborn infants are particularly vulnerable to pathological penetration by harmful intraluminal substances. The consequences of altered defence are susceptibility to infection and the potential for hypersensitivity reactions and for formation of immune complexes. With these reactions comes the potential for developing life-threatening diseases such as necrotizing

  17. Plasticity of the β-Trefoil Protein Fold in the Recognition and Control of Invertebrate Predators and Parasites by a Fungal Defence System

    OpenAIRE

    Schubert, Mario; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Butschi, Alex; Wälti, Martin A.; Egloff, Pascal; Stutz, Katrin; Yan, Shi; Wilson, Iain B. H.; Hengartner, Michael O.; Aebi, Markus; Allain, Frédéric H-T; Künzler, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Discrimination between self and non-self is a prerequisite for any defence mechanism; in innate defence, this discrimination is often mediated by lectins recognizing non-self carbohydrate structures and so relies on an arsenal of host lectins with different specificities towards target organism carbohydrate structures. Recently, cytoplasmic lectins isolated from fungal fruiting bodies have been shown to play a role in the defence of multicellular fungi against predators and parasites. Here, w...

  18. Separating defence and civilian radioactive waste programs in Nevada: can the public navigate the maze?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevada is at the centre of public policy debate with regards to high and low level radioactive waste disposal. Nevada's Yucca Mountain is the only site under consideration for a US geologic repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and defence high level waste. The Nevada Test Site (NTS) has long been a low level waste (LLW) disposal facility for the Department of Energy (DOE) defence waste and is now expected to take even more LLW as the preferred site for a regional or centralised disposal facility. Furthermore, the primary mission at NTS, defence, continues to add more contamination to the site. Combined, these facts present a public policy enigma, confused further by the intentional separation of the programs by DOE, even though all are essentially conducted at the same site. Involving the public in policy decisions for these programs is a dilemma because the public does not make the same artificial distinctions between them as DOE, DOE credibility suffers from past public involvement efforts conducted during an era of Cold War secrecy and because DOE public involvement programs are operated independently, with little or no co-operation between programs. The public does not know where it fits into the DOE decision-making process or if it impacts the policy decisions being made that affect it. This paper examines the complex maze of radioactive policy and bureaucracy in order to unveil the enigma Nevada residents face. Are they able to navigate this maze to effectively participate in government policy and decision-making? Or, will they remain confused by the government bureaucracy which deliberately makes a mess of the situation and seeks to exploit a politically weak state with large tracts of federally controlled land? lt further evaluates the effect this enigma has in producing acceptable public policy for radioactive waste disposal in the US, the role of public participation in that policy, and the reason the public is disillusioned and disengaged in the

  19. Glyphosate-based herbicide exposure causes antioxidant defence responses in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar, Lais Mattos; Figueira, Fernanda Hernandes; Gottschalk, Marco Silva; da Rosa, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a non-selective and post-emergent herbicide that affects plant growth. Animal exposure to this herbicide can lead to adverse effects, such as endocrine disruption, oxidative stress and behavioural disorders. Drosophilids have been utilized previously as an effective tool in toxicological tests. In the present study, the effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide (Roundup [Original]) were investigated regarding oxidative stress, the antioxidant defence system and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in Drosophila melanogaster. Flies (of both genders) that were 1 to 3days old were exposed to different glyphosate concentrations (0.0mg/L=control, 1.0mg/L, 2.0mg/L, 5.0mg/L and 10.0mg/L) in the diet for 24h and 96h. After the exposure periods, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels were quantified. In addition, the mRNA expression of antioxidant genes (i.e., keap1, sod, sod2, cat, irc, gclc, gclm, gss, trxt, trxr-1 and trxr-2) was evaluated via RT-PCR. Additionally, AChE activity was evaluated only after the 96h exposure period. The results indicated that Roundup exposure leads to a reduction in ROS levels in flies exposed for 96h. ACAP levels and gene expression of the antioxidant defence system exhibited an increase from 24h, while LPO did not show any significant alterations in both exposure periods. AChE activity was not affected following Roundup exposure. Our data suggest that Roundup exposure causes an early activation of the antioxidant defence system in D. melanogaster, and this can prevent subsequent damage caused by ROS. PMID:26980113

  20. Priming of protein expression in the defence response of Zantedeschia aethiopica to Pectobacterium carotovorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzatto-Knaan, Tal; Kerem, Zohar; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Yedidia, Iris

    2014-05-01

    The defence response of Zantedeschia aethiopica, a natural rhizomatous host of the soft rot bacterium Pectobacterium carotovorum, was studied following the activation of common induced resistance pathways—systemic acquired resistance and induced systemic resistance. Proteomic tools were used, together with in vitro quantification and in situ localization of selected oxidizing enzymes. In total, 527 proteins were analysed by label-free mass spectrometry (MS) and annotated against the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) nonredundant (nr) protein database of rice (Oryza sativa). Of these, the fore most differentially expressed group comprised 215 proteins that were primed following application of methyl jasmonate (MJ) and subsequent infection with the pathogen. Sixty-five proteins were down-regulated following MJ treatments. The application of benzothiadiazole (BTH) increased the expression of 23 proteins; however, subsequent infection with the pathogen repressed their expression and did not induce priming. The sorting of primed proteins by Gene Ontology protein function category revealed that the primed proteins included nucleic acid-binding proteins, cofactor-binding proteins, ion-binding proteins, transferases, hydrolases and oxidoreductases. In line with the highlighted involvement of oxidoreductases in the defence response, we determined their activities, priming pattern and localization in planta. Increased activities were confined to the area surrounding the pathogen penetration site, associating these enzymes with the induced systemic resistance afforded by the jasmonic acid signalling pathway. The results presented here demonstrate the concerted priming of protein expression following MJ treatment, making it a prominent part of the defence response of Z. aethiopica to P. carotovorum. PMID:24822269

  1. The Union Defence Force Between the Two World Wars, 1919-1940

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Van der Waag

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available South Africa was ill prepared for the Second World War. Her war potential was limited and Hitler is reputed to have laughed when the South African declaration came on 6 September 1939. The Permanent and Active Citizen Forces were under strength: the first comprised only 350 officers and some five thousand men. There were a further 122 000 men in the Commandos, of whom only 18 000 were reasonably equipped, and, being rurally based and overwhelmingly Afrikaans, many of these men did not support the war effort. Furthermore, training and training facilities were inadequate, there was a shortage of uniforms and equipment and, like the rest of the British Commonwealth, much of the doctrine had not kept pace with technological developments. This predicament developed over the preceding twenty years. The mechanisation of ground forces and the application of new technology for war contrasted sharply with developments in Europe. Although South Africa had the industrial capacity for the development of armour and mechanised forces, arguments based upon the nature of potential enemy forces, poor infrastructure and terrain inaccessibility combined with government policy and financial stringency resulted in nothing being done. Southern Africa, the focus of South African defence policy, was also thought to be unfavourable for mechanised warfare. Inadequate roads and multifarious geographic features concentrated energy on the development of the air arm for operations in Africa and a system of coastal defences to repel a sea assault, as well as a mix of British and Boer-type infantry supported by field artillery. As a result, an expeditionary force had to be prepared from scratch and the first South Africans to serve in the Second World War only left the country in July 1940. Yet the close relationship between the projected role of the Union Defence Force (UDF and the low priority given to force maintenance and weapons acquisition has been perceived by few

  2. Dry up and survive: the role of antioxidant defences in anhydrobiotic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Rebecchi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the evolution of life has turned oxygen into a vital chemical for aerobic organisms, this element can also have deleterious effects on living systems through the production of oxidative stress. This is a process resulting from an imbalance between the excessive production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS and the limited action of antioxidant defences. It is a particularly harmful health risk factor, involved in the development of several chronic human pathologies and believed to play a major role in the ageing process. Consequently aerobic metabolism needs a stringent control of ROS. Water too is essential for life, but some organisms widespread throughout nature have the ability to survive complete desiccation by entering an anhydrobiotic state. The loss of water induces changes in metabolism, cell membrane organization, and molecular composition. In the anhydrobiotic state, high temperatures, high humidity, light exposure, and high oxygen partial pressure negatively affect organism survival and directly influence the time required to reactivate the metabolism after a period of desiccation. These abiotic factors induce damages that are accumulated in proportion to the time spent in the desiccated state, potentially leading to organism death. Oxidative stress seems to be one of the most deleterious damages due to water depletion, therefore anhydrobiosis also needs a stringent control of ROS production. Anhydrobiotic organisms seem to apply two main strategies to cope with the danger of oxygen toxicity, namely an increased efficiency of antioxidant defences and a metabolic control of both energy-production and energy-consuming processes. Experimental studies provide evidence that antioxidant defences such as ROS scavenging enzymes (e.g. peroxidases, catalases, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidases and other molecules (e.g. glutathione, carotenoids, vitamins C and E represent a key group of molecules required for desiccation

  3. In Defence of Culture? Racialised Sexual Violence and Agency in Legal and Judicial Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Dagistanli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a rich body of work in critical race and feminist theories that have criticised as Euro/Anglo-centric, and hence exclusionary, the liberal foundations of Western democratic legal systems. The basis of such critiques is that legal personhood is premised on an atomistic individual agent that purports to be neutral but in actuality reflects and maintains the hegemonic gendered and raced status quo privileging the white, middle to upper-class man to the exclusion of women and all racial and cultural Others. Some approaches, such as cultural defences in criminal law, have sought to address this via a recognition and incorporation of the difference of Other groups and their different moral norms, proclivities and circumstances. To illustrate, this discussion will draw on a cultural defence that was advanced in a series of group sexual violence cases that involved four Pakistani, Muslim brothers. While concluding that culture permeates the actions of all individuals, this article seeks to show how cultural recognition approaches in law often overlook the individual agency of those differentiated through their racial, ethnic and religious visibility. Instead of asserting the primacy of individual free will and a rational agent as the main driver of criminal behaviour cultural defences, in particular, appear to attribute criminal action to the morally aberrant traditions and practices of non-Western cultures. At the same time, such approaches to cultural recognition fail to acknowledge that culture, and not just the culture of Others, is necessarily the backdrop for all (group sexual violence. With these points in mind, the paper ends with some suggestions for accommodating alternative narratives that seek to avoid the reductive scripts that currently appear to characterise legal and judicial musings on culture

  4. Gastrointestinal-sparing effects of novel NSAIDs in rats with compromised mucosal defence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory Blackler

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are among the most commonly used prescription and over-the-counter medications, but they often produce significant gastrointestinal ulceration and bleeding, particularly in elderly patients and patients with certain co-morbidities. Novel anti-inflammatory drugs are seldom tested in animal models that mimic the high risk human users, leading to an underestimate of the true toxicity of the drugs. In the present study we examined the effects of two novel NSAIDs and two commonly used NSAIDs in models in which mucosal defence was expected to be impaired. Naproxen, celecoxib, ATB-346 (a hydrogen sulfide- and naproxen-releasing compound and NCX 429 (a nitric oxide- and naproxen-releasing compound were evaluated in healthy, arthritic, obese, and hypertensive rats and in rats of advanced age (19 months and rats co-administered low-dose aspirin and/or omeprazole. In all models except hypertension, greater gastric and/or intestinal damage was observed when naproxen was administered in these models than in healthy rats. Celecoxib-induced damage was significantly increased when co-administered with low-dose aspirin and/or omeprazole. In contrast, ATB-346 and NCX 429, when tested at doses that were as effective as naproxen and celecoxib in reducing inflammation and inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity, did not produce significant gastric or intestinal damage in any of the models. These results demonstrate that animal models of human co-morbidities display the same increased susceptibility to NSAID-induced gastrointestinal damage as observed in humans. Moreover, two novel NSAIDs that release mediators of mucosal defence (hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide do not induce significant gastrointestinal damage in these models of impaired mucosal defence.

  5. Current strategies in the farm practices and post-harvest pesticidal defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Molinari

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Today, people often talk about biologic agriculture and Integrated Production (IP, even if the real meaning of these terms is altered. In both cases, they deal with production methods characterized by a particular attention to the reduction of the environmental impact of all the farm practices used, especially for defence from adversities, being the element of major concern for environment and consumers’ health.Farm practice evolution, especially those about pest defence, is based on important conceptual change, accurate scientific analysis and organization of technical assistance, rationalization of agri-pharmaceutical product use is one of the main objective of Integrated Production Specifications (IPS. The quantitative reduction is the first objective, obtained by various means such as the use of efficient equipment and the qualitative selection based on the priority use of minor impact means, effectiveness being equal. At post-harvest, the anti-parasitary defence is undergoing deep changes in our country. Once, pesticides very toxic and persistent were used; however, in the last years the availability of active principles (a.p. usable on foodstuffs or in productive environments; for instance, methyl bromide use has been progressively reduced till its banishment because it is recognized to damage the ozone layer. Thus, on the whole we can talk about “integrated pest management” even for the post-harvest sector. However, substantial differences exist between agriculture and post-harvest, thus the integrated pest management in food production environment has to be designed in a different way. The fundamental element of this technique is to identify a tolerance threshold to pest attack but for the defence of food industries and stored foodstuffs is very difficult, if not impossible, to fix a limit to insect presence after which intervening is compulsory. Monitoring of pest attacks and the implementation of prevention practices is

  6. The Security and Defence Policy of Romania between Atlantism and Europeanism

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei DINU

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to make a brief assessment of Romania’s parallel processes of integration within NATO and EU-ESDP using as a compass the competitive/complementary dynamic between Europeanism and atlanticism, as well as Romania’s manifest preferences regarding national security and defence. The first part will track the evolution of the accession processes, of the initiatives and reforms put into place on Romania’s behalf in order to comply with euro-Atlantic standards. Next, the NATO-ESDP...

  7. Prevention is Better than Prosecution: Deepening the Defence against Cyber Crime

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline Fick

    2009-01-01

    In the paper the author proposes that effectively and efficiently addressing cyber crime requires a shift in paradigm. For businesses and government departments alike the focus should be on prevention, rather than the prosecution of cyber criminals. The Defence in Depth strategy poses a practical solution for achieving Information Assurance in today’s highly networked environments. In a world where “absolute security†is an unachievable goal, the concept of Information Assurance poses si...

  8. Reinforcement of Defence-in-Depth: Modification Practice After the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident revealed the importance and demand for further reinforcement of defence in- depth. CGN (China General Nuclear Power Group) has made a complete safety assessment on CPR1000 nuclear power plants under construction in China. Dozens of modifications have been implemented based on the assessment findings and lessons learned from Fukushima nuclear accident, taking into account of PSA (Probabilistic Safety Analysis) and comparison analysis of the latest regulations and standards. These modifications help to enhance nuclear safety significantly for nuclear power plants under construction in China, and provide helpful modification guidance for nuclear power plants in operation of the same type. (author)

  9. SUICIDE PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT IN THE SA NATIONAL DEFENCE FORCE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL DISCUSSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Koopman

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Suicidal behaviour is a challenge for military forces around the world. Suicide can be a reaction in peacekeeping operations or conventional warfare, because the stressful nature of both types of operations can force military members to such a catastrophic end. This article focuses on the necessary knowledge and skills for a better understanding of suicidal behaviour in the South African National Defence Force (SANDF for members on different levels. It discusses the operational environment, with specific reference to peacekeeping operations or conventional warfare as contributing factors, risk factors, and the prevention and proper management of suicide by means of educating commanders and members of the multi-professional team (MPT.

  10. Skill-Based Differences in Spatio-Temporal Team Behavior in Defence of The Ancients 2

    OpenAIRE

    Drachen, Anders; Yancey, Matthew; Maguire, John; Chu, Derrek; Wang, Iris Yuhui; Mahlmann, Tobias; Schubert, Matthias; Klabjan, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (MOBA) games are among the most played digital games in the world. In these games, teams of players fight against each other in arena environments, and the gameplay is focused on tactical combat. Mastering MOBAs requires extensive practice, as is exemplified in the popular MOBA Defence of the Ancients 2 (DotA 2). In this paper, we present three data-driven measures of spatio-temporal behavior in DotA 2: 1) Zone changes; 2) Distribution of team members and: 3) T...

  11. Cell Surface Receptor Theory of Disease Infectivity; Body's Defence and Normal Body Functioning in Living Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utoh-Nedosa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: A study of the pattern of Candida spp. infection of the human body and the mode and pattern of reaction of the human body to this infection showed that disease infectivity and self healing by plants followed the same procedures and patterns. Approach: A comparism of these procedures and patterns of natural self- healing of disease infection by the human body and plants/plant parts with the cutaneous Candida spp. killing and elimination procedures and patterns of Vernonia amygdalina leaf extract, showed that cell surface receptors are the sites through which disease infects the body and also the sites at which the body is defended. They are also the sites where activities which result in normal body functioning are carried out. The mode and patterns of Cutaneous Candida infection in a human subject and its containment by the body was examined and photographed. The disease infection and self healing procedures and patterns of plants were also examined in comparism with those of their healthy counterparts and photographed. The findings from the observations on disease infectivity and natural body’s defence patterns and procedures of the plant parts studied and those of the human body in reaction to Candida spp. infection were compared with those of the Candida spp. killing procedures and patterns of aqueous and Arachis hypogeal oil extract of Vernonia amygdalina leaf. Results: The findings of this study also showed that disease-infective organisms gain access to the body of a host through attachment to the cell surface receptors of that host which are placed linearly and are interconnected by channels. The results of the study also indicated that living organisms have a main endogenous substance that mediates both their body’s defence and their normal physiological functioning which is therefore the owner of the cell surface receptor. Other endogenous substances which participate in normal body functioning/body’s defence or in

  12. In defence of constructive empiricism: Maxwell’s master argument and aberrant theories

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, F.A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past years, in books and journals (this journal included), N. Maxwell launched a ferocious attack on B. C. van Fraassen’s view of science called Constructive Empiricism (CE). This attack has been totally ignored. Must we conclude from this silence that no defence is possible and that a fortiori Maxwell has buried CE once and for all? Or is the attack too obviously flawed as not to merit exposure? A careful dissection of Maxwell’s reasoning will make it clear that neither is the case....

  13. 强制辩护制度探究%Research into the compulsory defence system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨群

    2012-01-01

    The defence right of the criminal proceeding is a basic right of the prosecuted.Whether the defence right is fully used not only concerns the right of the prosecuted,but also influences the justice and public credibility.At the present stag,the defence rate of criminal cases has gradually dropped year by year.The lack of defender results in imbanlance of power between the prosecutor and the defender,leading to the frequent infringement of the prosecuted' just right and the wrong cases.In order to improve the judgement of criminal cases,it is necessary to borrow the compulsory defence system to normalize the criminal proceeding for the sake of the protection of the prosecuted' basic right,which is of great significance for the development of our criminal law.%刑事诉讼中的辩护权是被追诉人的一项基本权利,辩护权行使的充分与否,不仅关涉被追诉人的切身利益,更影响着司法的公正性和公信力。现阶段我国刑事案件辩护率低且逐年下降,辩护人的缺席导致控辩力量对比失衡,控辩平等对抗近乎空谈,被告人的正当权益屡遭侵害,冤假错案时有发生。为突破这一困境,提高刑事案件审判水平,借鉴引入强制辩护制度尤为重要,通过强制辩护制度,制衡控方公权力行使,规范刑事诉讼活动,切实维护刑事被追诉人的基本权利,对我国刑事诉讼法的发展具有重要意义。

  14. Effects of beta-1,3-glucan from Septoria tritici on structural defence responses in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shetty, N.P.; Jensen, J.D.; Knudsen, A.;

    2009-01-01

    -1,3-glucanase and chitinase transcripts followed by a subsequent reduction in level. Resistance was also associated with high activity of beta-1,3-glucanase, especially in the apoplastic fluid, in accordance with the biotrophic/endophytic lifestyle of the pathogen in the apoplastic spaces, thus...... of callose. Collectively, these data indicate that resistance is dependent on a fast, initial recognition of the pathogen, probably due to beta-1,3-glucan in the fungal cell walls, and this results in the accumulation of beta-1,3-glucanase and structural defence responses, which may directly inhibit...... the pathogen and protect the host against fungal enzymes and toxins....

  15. Automating patient safety incident reporting to improve healthcare quality in the defence medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Di; Piper, N

    2015-12-01

    There are many reasons for poor compliance with patient safety incident reporting in the UK. The Defence Medical Services has made a significant investment to address the culture and process by which risk to patient safety is managed within its organisation. This paper describes the decision process and technical considerations in the design of an automated reporting system together with the implementation procedure aimed to maximise compliance. The elimination of inherent weaknesses in feedback mechanisms from the three Armed Forces, which had been uniquely different, ensured the quality of data improved, which enabled resources to be prioritised that would also have a direct impact upon the quality of patient care. PMID:26400974

  16. Sexroles in Great Reed Warbler nest defence against a brood parasite, the Common Cuckoo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Požgayová, Milica; Procházka, Petr; Honza, Marcel

    Brno : Ústav biologie obratlovců AV ČR, 2008 - (Bryja, J.; Nedvěd, O.; Sedláček, F.; Zukal, J.). s. 165-166 ISBN 978-80-87189-00-9. [Zoologické dny. 14.02.2008-15.02.2008, České Budějovice] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600930605; GA ČR(CZ) GD524/05/H536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : nest defence * brood parasitism * cuckoo Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  17. Mechanisms involved in the evasion of the host defence by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A

    1991-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an extracellular opportunistic pathogen, utilizes two major mechanisms to evade the host defence system. One of these mechanisms is the production of a large number of extracellular products, such as proteases, toxins, and lipases. The two proteases, alkaline protease and...... elastase, inhibit the function of the cells of the immune system (phagocytes, NK cells, T cells), inactivate several cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IFN-r, TNF), cleave immunoglobulins and inactivate complement. Inhibition of the local immune response by bacterial proteases provides an environment for the...

  18. Cooperation in Terms of Defence between Spain and the Countries of the Maghreb Region

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Echeverría Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Cooperation between Spain and the Maghreb states in the area of defence represents a sphere that includes long-term historical links (for example, with Morocco) with other relations that have been developing in recent years, and at varying rates of intensity. Theprogressive normalising of the situation in Algeria since the 1990s, the raising of the UN embargo against Libya and the rise of what are called “new dangers” (all kinds of illegal trading and a style of terrorism that is increasingly...

  19. Developments in aspects of ecological phytochemistry: the role of cis-jasmone in inducible defence systems in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, John A; Birkett, Michael A; Bruce, Toby J A; Chamberlain, Keith; Gordon-Weeks, Ruth; Matthes, Michaela C; Napier, Johnathan A; Smart, Lesley E; Woodcock, Christine M

    2007-01-01

    The challenges and opportunities for protecting agricultural production of food and other materials will be met through exploiting the induction of defence pathways in plants to control pests, diseases and weeds. These approaches will involve processes that can be activated by application of natural products, patented in terms of this use, to "switch on" defence pathways. Already, a number of secondary metabolite defence compounds are known for which the pathways are conveniently clustered genomically, e.g. the benzoxazinoids (hydroxamic acids) and the avenacins. For the former, it is shown that the small molecular weight lipophilic activator cis-jasmone can induce production of these compounds and certain genes within the pathway. Numerous groups around the world work on inducible defence systems. The science is rapidly expanding and involves studying the interacting components of defence pathways and the switching mechanisms activated by small molecular weight lipophilic compounds. Examples are described of how plant breeding can exploit these systems and how heterologous gene expression will eventually give rise to a new range of GM crops for food and energy, without the need for external application of synthetic pesticides. PMID:18023830

  20. An Overview of Seasonal Changes in Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defence Parameters in Some Invertebrate and Vertebrate Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Bihari Nityananda Chainy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant defence system, a highly conserved biochemical mechanism, protects organisms from harmful effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS, a by-product of metabolism. Both invertebrates and vertebrates are unable to modify environmental physical factors such as photoperiod, temperature, salinity, humidity, oxygen content, and food availability as per their requirement. Therefore, they have evolved mechanisms to modulate their metabolic pathways to cope their physiology with changing environmental challenges for survival. Antioxidant defences are one of such biochemical mechanisms. At low concentration, ROS regulates several physiological processes, whereas at higher concentration they are toxic to organisms because they impair cellular functions by oxidizing biomolecules. Seasonal changes in antioxidant defences make species able to maintain their correct ROS titre to take various physiological functions such as hibernation, aestivation, migration, and reproduction against changing environmental physical parameters. In this paper, we have compiled information available in the literature on seasonal variation in antioxidant defence system in various species of invertebrates and vertebrates. The primary objective was to understand the relationship between varied biological phenomena seen in different animal species and conserved antioxidant defence system with respect to seasons.

  1. Lying down with protective setae as an alternative antipredator defence in a non-webbing spider mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shuichi; Shirotsuka, Kanako

    2013-01-01

    An antipredator defence in the citrus red mite Panonychus citri, which does not produce protective webs, was examined experimentally. P. citri adult females lie down on citrus leaf surfaces with their dorsal setae (hair) directed in all upper directions. They seldom move in response to physical stimuli. Compared to normal lying females, both manipulated non-lying females and hair-removed females suffered higher predation by predatory mites. A predator approaching the body surface of a lying female inevitably created elasticity with a confronting seta, which eventually repelled the predator away from the female. These observations indicated that lying down with protective setae functions as an antipredator defence in P. citri females. This inflexible defence could also explain why the mite rarely runs away, even when it is consumed together with host plant leaves (via coincidental intraguild predation) by gigantic swallowtail caterpillars, against which protective setae are totally ineffective. PMID:24312748

  2. Investment in seed physical defence is associated with species' light requirement for regeneration and seed persistence: evidence from Macaranga species in Borneo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimonrat Tiansawat

    Full Text Available The seed stage is often critical in determining the regeneration success of plants. Seeds must survive an array of seed predators and pathogens and germinate under conditions favourable for seedling establishment. To maximise recruitment success plants protect seeds using a diverse set of chemical and physical defences. However, the relationship between these defence classes, and their association with other life history traits, is not well understood. Data on seed coat thickness and fracture resistance, and the abundance and diversity of potential defensive compounds were collected for 10 tree species of Macaranga from Borneo. The data were used to test whether there is a trade-off in physical versus chemical defence investment, and to determine how investment varies with seed mass, and light requirement for regeneration. Across species there was no correlation between seed coat thickness and abundance of potential defensive compounds, indicating the absence of a direct trade-off between defence classes. While chemical defences were not correlated to other traits, physical defences were positively correlated with light requirement for regeneration. For a subset of five Macaranga species we evaluated the relative investment in chemical and physical defence to seed persistence in the soil, measured as the time to half initial seed viability (seed half-life. Half-life was negatively related to the ratio of potential defensive compound abundance to seed coat thickness, suggesting that species with long persistence invested in physical defence more than stored chemical defences. These results indicate that investment in seed defences are associated with species' light requirements for regeneration, rather than scaling positively with seed mass. Furthermore, chemical defences, although highly variable among species, do not appear to be critical to long term persistence of Macaranga seeds, and may be important in defending seeds from natural enemies

  3. AlGaInN laser diode technology and systems for defence and security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najda, Stephen P.; Perlin, Piotr; Suski, Tadek; Marona, Lujca; Boćkowski, Mike; Leszczyński, Mike; Wisniewski, Przemek; Czernecki, Robert; Kucharski, Robert; Targowski, Grzegorz; Watson, Scott; Kelly, Antony E.

    2015-10-01

    AlGaInN laser diodes is an emerging technology for defence and security applications such as underwater communications and sensing, atomic clocks and quantum information. The AlGaInN material system allows for laser diodes to be fabricated over a very wide range of wavelengths from u.v., ~380nm, to the visible ~530nm, by tuning the indium content of the laser GaInN quantum well. Thus AlGaInN laser diode technology is a key enabler for the development of new disruptive system level applications in displays, telecom, defence and other industries. Ridge waveguide laser diodes are fabricated to achieve single mode operation with optical powers up to 100mW with the 400-440nm wavelength range with high reliability. Visible free-space and underwater communication at frequencies up to 2.5GHz is reported using a directly modulated 422nm GaN laser diode. Low defectivity and highly uniform GaN substrates allow arrays and bars to be fabricated. High power operation operation of AlGaInN laser bars with up to 20 emitters have been demonstrated at optical powers up to 4W in a CS package with common contact configuration. An alternative package configuration for AlGaInN laser arrays allows for each individual laser to be individually addressable allowing complex free-space or optical fibre system integration with a very small form-factor.

  4. Polyphenol Stilbenes: Molecular Mechanisms of Defence against Oxidative Stress and Aging-Related Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisalo, Mika; Kårlund, Anna; Koskela, Ali; Kaarniranta, Kai; Karjalainen, Reijo O

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the key roles of oxidative stress and inflammation in aging-related diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In aging cells, the natural antioxidant capacity decreases and the overall efficiency of reparative systems against cell damage becomes impaired. There is convincing data that stilbene compounds, a diverse group of natural defence phenolics, abundant in grapes, berries, and conifer bark waste, may confer a protective effect against aging-related diseases. This review highlights recent data helping to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in the stilbene-mediated protection against oxidative stress. The impact of stilbenes on the nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) mediated cellular defence against oxidative stress as well as the potential roles of SQSTM1/p62 protein in Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and autophagy will be summarized. The therapeutic potential of stilbene compounds against the most common aging-related diseases is discussed. PMID:26180583

  5. Glial-cell-derived neuroregulators control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and gut defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibiza, Sales; García-Cassani, Bethania; Ribeiro, Hélder; Carvalho, Tânia; Almeida, Luís; Marques, Rute; Misic, Ana M; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Larson, Denise M; Pavan, William J; Eberl, Gérard; Grice, Elizabeth A; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-07-21

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) are major regulators of inflammation and infection at mucosal barriers. ILC3 development is thought to be programmed, but how ILC3 perceive, integrate and respond to local environmental signals remains unclear. Here we show that ILC3 in mice sense their environment and control gut defence as part of a glial–ILC3–epithelial cell unit orchestrated by neurotrophic factors. We found that enteric ILC3 express the neuroregulatory receptor RET. ILC3-autonomous Ret ablation led to decreased innate interleukin-22 (IL-22), impaired epithelial reactivity, dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to bowel inflammation and infection. Neurotrophic factors directly controlled innate Il22 downstream of the p38 MAPK/ERK-AKT cascade and STAT3 activation. Notably, ILC3 were adjacent to neurotrophic-factor-expressing glial cells that exhibited stellate-shaped projections into ILC3 aggregates. Glial cells sensed microenvironmental cues in a MYD88-dependent manner to control neurotrophic factors and innate IL-22. Accordingly, glial-intrinsic Myd88 deletion led to impaired production of ILC3-derived IL-22 and a pronounced propensity towards gut inflammation and infection. Our work sheds light on a novel multi-tissue defence unit, revealing that glial cells are central hubs of neuron and innate immune regulation by neurotrophic factor signals. PMID:27409807

  6. Gene coevolution and regulation lock cyclic plant defence peptides to their targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilding, Edward K; Jackson, Mark A; Poth, Aaron G; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Prentis, Peter J; Mahatmanto, Tunjung; Craik, David J

    2016-04-01

    Plants have evolved many strategies to protect themselves from attack, including peptide toxins that are ribosomally synthesized and thus adaptable directly by genetic polymorphisms. Certain toxins in Clitoria ternatea (butterfly pea) are cyclic cystine-knot peptides of c. 30 residues, called cyclotides, which have co-opted the plant's albumin-1 gene family for their production. How butterfly pea albumin-1 genes were commandeered and how these cyclotides are utilized in defence remain unclear. The role of cyclotides in host plant ecology and biotechnological applications requires exploration. We characterized the sequence diversity and expression dynamics of precursor and processing proteins implicated in butterfly pea cyclotide biosynthesis by expression profiling through RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). Peptide-enriched extracts from various organs were tested for activity against insect-like membranes and the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that the evolution and deployment of cyclotides involved their diversification to exhibit different chemical properties and expression between organs facing different defensive challenges. Cyclotide-enriched fractions from soil-contacting organs were effective at killing nematodes, whereas similar enriched fractions from aerial organs contained cyclotides that exhibited stronger interactions with insect-like membrane lipids. Cyclotides are employed as versatile and combinatorial mediators of defence in C. ternatea and have specialized to affect different classes of attacking organisms. PMID:26668107

  7. Unpacking insanity defence standards: An experimental study of rationality and control tests in criminal law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca K. Helm

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the impact of different legal standards on mock juror decisions concerning whether a defendant was guilty or not guilty by reason of insanity. Undergraduate students (N = 477 read a simulated case summary involving a murder case and were asked to make an insanity determination. The cases differed in terms of the condition of the defendant (rationality deficit or control deficit and the legal standard given to the jurors to make the determination (Model Penal Code, McNaughten or McNaughten plus a separate control determination. The effects of these variables on the insanity determination were investigated. Jurors also completed questionnaires measuring individualism and hierarchy attitudes and perceptions of facts in the case. Results indicate that under current insanity standards jurors do not distinguish between defendants with rationality deficits and defendants with control deficits regardless of whether the legal standard requires them to do so. Even defendants who lacked control were found guilty at equal rates under a legal standard excusing rationality deficits only and a legal standard excluding control and rationality deficits. This was improved by adding a control test as a partial defence, to be determined after a rationality determination. Implications for the insanity defence in the Criminal Justice System are discussed.

  8. Differential shell strength of Cepaea nemoralis colour morphs--implications for their anti-predator defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, Zuzanna M; Kobak, Jarosław; Lesicki, Andrzej; Tryjanowski, Piotr

    2013-09-01

    One of the most spectacular evolutionary forces is predation, evidenced to stimulate polymorphism in many prey species. Shell colour polymorphism of the land snail Cepaea nemoralis is a well-known model in evolutionary research. Nevertheless, the knowledge on the ecological causes driving its evolution remains incomplete and proximal factors shaping predatory pressure on C. nemoralis morphs are unknown. We evaluated shell crushing resistance and thickness, constituting crucial snail anti-predator defences in two shell areas (the apex and labium) of eight C. nemoralis morphotypes differing in shell colour and banding pattern. A GLM showed a significant effect of shell colour, banding pattern and shell thickness on shell strength. Pink shells were stronger than yellow ones, and banded forms had stronger shells than unbanded snails. The labium (usually attacked by mice) was generally thicker and more resistant than the apex (usually crushed by birds). Thicker shells were more resistant to crushing, and the rate of shell strength increase per unit of shell thickness was greater in pink and banded individuals compared to yellow and unbanded ones. Yellow and unbanded morphs have been found to be preferred by mice in the previous studies, which suggests that shell strength may be an important trait used in prey selection by these shell-crushing predators. The differences in potential anti-predator defences among snail morphs, found in the present study, justify future research on direct effect of C. nemoralis morphs shell strength on predator selectivity. PMID:23921905

  9. Differential shell strength of Cepaea nemoralis colour morphs—implications for their anti-predator defence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, Zuzanna M.; Kobak, Jarosław; Lesicki, Andrzej; Tryjanowski, Piotr

    2013-09-01

    One of the most spectacular evolutionary forces is predation, evidenced to stimulate polymorphism in many prey species. Shell colour polymorphism of the land snail Cepaea nemoralis is a well-known model in evolutionary research. Nevertheless, the knowledge on the ecological causes driving its evolution remains incomplete and proximal factors shaping predatory pressure on C. nemoralis morphs are unknown. We evaluated shell crushing resistance and thickness, constituting crucial snail anti-predator defences in two shell areas (the apex and labium) of eight C. nemoralis morphotypes differing in shell colour and banding pattern. A GLM showed a significant effect of shell colour, banding pattern and shell thickness on shell strength. Pink shells were stronger than yellow ones, and banded forms had stronger shells than unbanded snails. The labium (usually attacked by mice) was generally thicker and more resistant than the apex (usually crushed by birds). Thicker shells were more resistant to crushing, and the rate of shell strength increase per unit of shell thickness was greater in pink and banded individuals compared to yellow and unbanded ones. Yellow and unbanded morphs have been found to be preferred by mice in the previous studies, which suggests that shell strength may be an important trait used in prey selection by these shell-crushing predators. The differences in potential anti-predator defences among snail morphs, found in the present study, justify future research on direct effect of C. nemoralis morphs shell strength on predator selectivity.

  10. Air pollution and epigenetics: effects on SP-A and innate host defence in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveyra, Patricia; Floros, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    An appropriate immune and inflammatory response is key to defend against harmful agents present in the environment, such as pathogens, allergens and inhaled pollutants, including ozone and particulate matter. Air pollution is a serious public health concern worldwide, and cumulative evidence has revealed that air pollutants contribute to epigenetic variation in several genes, and this in turn can contribute to disease susceptibility. Several groups of experts have recently reviewed findings on epigenetics and air pollution [1-6]. Surfactant proteins play a central role in pulmonary host defence by mediating pathogen clearance, modulating allergic responses and facilitating the resolution of lung inflammation. Recent evidence indicates that surfactant proteins are subject to epigenetic regulation under hypoxia and other conditions. Oxidative stress caused by ozone, and exposure to particulate matter have been shown to affect the expression of surfactant protein A (SP-A), an important lung host defence molecule, as well as alter its functions. In this review, we discuss recent findings in the fields of epigenetics and air pollution effects on innate immunity, with the focus on SP-A, and the human SP-A variants in particular. Their function may be differentially affected by pollutants and specifically by ozone-induced oxidative stress, and this in turn may differentially affect susceptibility to lung disease. PMID:22553125

  11. Blood or needle phobia as a defence under the Road Traffic Act 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, K J

    1996-12-01

    A man was charged with driving over the prescribed alcohol limit. Both specimens of breath contained less than 50 micrograms of alcohol per 100 ml and he refused to submit to a blood test. His defence was that he had a phobia of blood and that he should have been allowed to claim to replace the breath specimens with a specimen of urine. Evidence that he had a phobia was accepted by the prosecution. A woman was arrested on suspicion of driving whilst unfit through drink or drugs. She was charged with refusing to provide a specimen of blood. It was her defence that she had a phobia of needles. Evidence that she had a phobia was not accepted by the prosecution. In both cases the court was asked to decide whether or not the forensic medical examiner had been seriously wrong in deciding that there was no medical reason for refusing a specimen of blood. The man was acquitted and the woman was found guilty. These cases are used to describe the law relating to blood or needle phobias and to suggest how such cases should be approached by the police and forensic medical examiners. PMID:15335604

  12. Defence sugarcane glycoproteins disorganize microtubules and prevent nuclear polarization and germination of Sporisorium scitamineum teliospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Elordi, Elena; Baluška, František; Echevarría, Clara; Vicente, Carlos; Legaz, M Estrella

    2016-08-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are involved in the germination of Sporisorium scitamineum teliospores. Resistant varieties of sugar cane plants produce defence glycoproteins that prevent the infection of the plants by the filamentous fungi Sporisorium scitamineum. Here, we show that a fraction of these glycoproteins prevents the correct arrangement of MTs and causes nuclear fragmentation defects. As a result, nuclei cannot correctly migrate through the growing hyphae, causing germinative failure. Arginase activity contained in defence glycoproteins is already described for preventing fungal germination. Now, its enzymatically active form is presented as a link between the defensive capacity of glycoproteins and the MT disorganization in fungal cells. Active arginase is produced in healthy and resistant plants; conversely, it is not detected in the juice from susceptible varieties, which explains why MT depolarization, nuclear disorganization as well as germination of teliospores are not significantly affected by glycoproteins from non-resistant plants. Our results also suggest that susceptible plants try to increase their levels of arginase after detecting the presence of the pathogen. However, this signal comes "too late" and such defensive mechanism fails. PMID:27372179

  13. Defence transcriptome profiling of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith by mRNA differential display

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P G Kavitha; George Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Soft rot is a serious disease in ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe), imposing a considerable economic loss annually in all ginger-producing countries. In this study, mRNA differential display was employed to identify genes whose expression was altered in a soft rot-resistant accession of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith, a wild relative of ginger, in response to Pythium aphanidermatum (Edson) Fitzp., which is the principal causative agent of soft-rot disease in ginger. Analysis using 68 primer combinations identified 70 differentially expressed transcript-derived fragments (TDFs), of which 34 TDFs were selected for further analysis following reverse northern screening. Cloning and sequence characterization of the 34 TDFs yielded a total of 54 distinct clones. Functional categorization of these clones revealed seven categories, of which the defence/stress/signalling group was the largest, with clones homologous to genes known to be actively involved in various pathogenesis-related functions in other plant species. The significance of these genes in relation to the resistance response in Z. zerumbet is discussed. This study has provided a pool of candidate genes for detailed molecular dissection of the defence mechanisms in Z. zerumbet and for accessing wild genetic resources for the transgenic improvement of ginger.

  14. Uncovering ultrastructural defences in Daphnia magna--an interdisciplinary approach to assess the predator-induced fortification of the carapace.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Rabus

    Full Text Available The development of structural defences, such as the fortification of shells or exoskeletons, is a widespread strategy to reduce predator attack efficiency. In unpredictable environments these defences may be more pronounced in the presence of a predator. The cladoceran Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Cladocera has been shown to develop a bulky morphotype as an effective inducible morphological defence against the predatory tadpole shrimp Triops cancriformis (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Notostraca. Mediated by kairomones, the daphnids express an increased body length, width and an elongated tail spine. Here we examined whether these large scale morphological defences are accompanied by additional ultrastructural defences, i.e. a fortification of the exoskeleton. We employed atomic force microscopy (AFM based nanoindentation experiments to assess the cuticle hardness along with tapping mode AFM imaging to visualise the surface morphology for predator exposed and non-predator exposed daphnids. We used semi-thin sections of the carapace to measure the cuticle thickness, and finally, we used fluorescence microscopy to analyse the diameter of the pillars connecting the two carapace layers. We found that D. magna indeed expresses ultrastructural defences against Triops predation. The cuticle in predator exposed individuals is approximately five times harder and two times thicker than in control daphnids. Moreover, the pillar diameter is significantly increased in predator exposed daphnids. These predator-cue induced changes in the carapace architecture should provide effective protection against being crushed by the predator's mouthparts and may add to the protective effect of bulkiness. This study highlights the potential of interdisciplinary studies to uncover new and relevant aspects even in extensively studied fields of research.

  15. Circumstances short of global war: British defence, colonial internal security, and decolonisation in Kenya, 1945-65

    OpenAIRE

    Percox, David A.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis fills a significant gap in current secondary literature on post-war British defence and internal security policy. Hitherto, post-war British defence policy in Kenya has only been considered in passing, in relation to the larger question of Middle East strategy. Very little attention has been paid to Kenya's particular importance in the post-1956 ‘east of Suez’ role. Current works on British internal security policy in Kenya concentrate either on post-war policing in general or, mo...

  16. 43. and 44. annual meeting of the Civil Defence Commission of the Federal Ministry of the Interior. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the conditions governing international safety call for a re-orientation in civil defence policy. The 23 papers presented to the meetings address aspects such as external hazards, including illicit trafficking with nuclear materials, novel risks emanating from the population growth rates, the international refugee problem, environmental issues, and new approaches in civil defence policy also encompassing emergency preparedness under the responsibility of the Laender. Futher topics discussed are proposals for improvement of first-aid medical care, or new approaches in concepts for risk identification and management as well as preventive action. (DG)

  17. Maritime defence and the South African Navy to the cancellation of the Simon's Town agreement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Potgieter

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, the maritime defence of South Africa was a colonial responsibility. First performed by the Dutch, the British took over the task after they wrestled the Cape of Good Hope from the Dutch. The Cape was of supreme strategic value to Britain as the link with India and a great part of her empire. Therefore for more than a century and a half (from 1806 to the abrogation of the Simon's Town Agreement the Royal Navy had a constant presence in South African territorial waters. Furthermore when the first flickers of an indigenous maritime defence organisation appeared in South Africa it was British in character. The South African Division of the part-time Royal Naval Voluntary Reserve (RNVR came into being long before the country had a navy. The origin of the South African Navy dates back to 1922, when, the South African Naval Service was created with the arrival of three small ships from Britain. Unfortunately, the budget cuts during the Depression meant that these ships and their crews were paid off (in 1933-4 and only a skeleton staff remained. This was still the position at the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939. The Union of South Africa's declaration of war against Germany on 6 September 1939, meant that the country's utterly neglected Navy had to suddenly prepare for war. Ships had to be found, and as purpose-build warships were out of the question, ships from the country's fishing fleet and trade had to suffice. A small ocean-going navy was created for the defence of the Union's ports and coastline. Following an urgent request from the British Admiralty in November 1940, South Africa sent four anti-submarine vessels to join the Royal Navy in the Mediterranean. As the war progressed, more ships of the South African Naval Forces arrived in the Mediterranean. They were used for a variety of tasks, ranging from minesweeping to salvage work. South African ships and crews earned themselves quite a reputation, participating in most

  18. Role of stress-related hormones in plant defence during early infection of the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kammerhofer, N.; Radakovic, Z.; Regis, J.M.A.; Dobrev, Petre; Vaňková, Radomíra; Grundler, F.M.W.; Siddique, S.; Hofmann, J.; Wieczorek, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 207, č. 3 (2015), s. 778-789. ISSN 0028-646X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD14120 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : defence responses * early infection * ethylene Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 7.672, year: 2014

  19. A Golden Age of Security and Education? Adult Education for Civil Defence in the United States 1950-1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, John

    2015-01-01

    A number of authors consider that the early period of US security and education (1950-1970) was in some way a "golden age" where there was a prevailing societal orientation towards civil defence. This is supported, to some extent, through "Duck and Cover" type activities in schools and in community preparedness efforts. This…

  20. NMSG-039/TG-027 Preliminary Analysis of Tactical Data Link Representation in Extended Air Defence Simulation Federations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, D.; Huiskamp, W.; Kvernsveen, K.; Wood, C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of the NATO Modelling and Simulation Group 039 / Task Group 027 “Modelling and Simulation Support of Extended Air Defence Command and Control Interoperability”. This activity is the second of three phases of NMSG Technical Activity Programs (TAP) that bega

  1. Molecular basis of Colorado potato beetle adaptation to potato plant defence at the level of digestive cysteine proteinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruden, K.; Kuipers, A.G.J.; Guncar, G.; Slapar, N.; Strukelj, B.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Potato synthesises high levels of proteinase inhibitors in response to insect attack. This can adversely affect protein digestion in the insects, leading to reduced growth, delayed development and lowered fecundity. Colorado potato beetle overcomes this defence mechanism by changing the composition

  2. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus differentially influences plant defence responses to a vector and a non-vector herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qi; Mescher, Mark C; Wang, Shaoli; Chen, Gong; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Wenkai; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-03-01

    Plants frequently engage in simultaneous interactions with diverse classes of biotic antagonists. Differential induction of plant defence pathways by these antagonists, and interactions between pathways, can have important ecological implications; however, these effects are currently not well understood. We explored how Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) influenced the performance of its vector (Bemisia tabaci) and a non-vector herbivore (Tetranychus urticae) occurring separately or together on tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum). TYLCV enhanced the performance of B. tabaci, although this effect was statistically significant only in the absence of T. urticae, which adversely affected B. tabaci performance regardless of infection status. In contrast, the performance of T. urticae was enhanced (only) by the combined presence of TYLCV and B. tabaci. Analyses of phytohormone levels and defence gene expression in wild-type tomatoes and various plant-defence mutants indicate that the enhancement of herbivore performance (for each species) entails the disruption of downstream defences in the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway. For T. urticae, this disruption appears to involve antagonistic effects of salicylic acid (SA), which is cumulatively induced to high levels by B. tabaci and TYLCV. In contrast, TYLCV was found to suppress JA-mediated responses to B. tabaci via mechanisms independent of SA. PMID:26436779

  3. [The Central Military Hospital of the People's Commissariat for Defence during the Great Patriotic War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonenko, V B; Abashin, V G; Polovinka, V S

    2014-05-01

    The article is devoted to activity of the Central Military Hospital of the People's Commissariat for Defence during the Great Patriotic War. The research is based on declassified orders of PCD and orders of the chef of hospital. Authors presented the role of the hospital in organization of medical aid for officers of PCD, members of their families, Red Army soldiers, junior and senior Red Army commanders; the role of the hospital in organization of medical facilities for combat army; medical supply for evacuation of family members of PCD's officers ( en route and in evacuation places); delivery of child health care to children of officers of PCD in the hospital and education in kindergartens of PCD. PMID:25286563

  4. A human-in-the-loop approach to understanding situation awareness in cyber defence analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Tyworth

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we argue for a human-in-the-loop approach to the study of situation awareness in computer defence analysis (CDA. The cognitive phenomenon of situation awareness (SA has received significant attention in cybersecurity/CDA research. Yet little of this work has attended to the cognitive aspects of situation awareness in the CDA context; instead, the human operator has been treated as an abstraction within the larger human-technology system. A more human-centric approach that seeks to understand the socio-cognitive work of human operators as they perform CDA will yield greater insights into the design of tools and interfaces for CDA. As support for this argument, we present our own work employing the Living Lab Framework through which we ground our experimental findings in contextual knowledge of real-world practice.

  5. Defence in Depth by Design for the Advanced GIII NPP in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design of the advanced nuclear power plant ACP1000 in China that keeps the principle of defence in depth. To enhance the safety of the new generation NPPs, passive and active engineering safety features are used. The reactor will be kept safe under design basis accidents by using active engineering safety features, such as the medium and low pressure safety injection systems, and the emergency feedwater system. Under beyond DBAs, the passive safety systems will be actuated to keep removing residual heat for more than 72 hours, and to keep the core melt retained and cooled in the vessel. After the Fukushima nuclear accident, there are six main design enhancements in ACP1000 to meet the demands of the China authorities. (author)

  6. The multiple strategies of an insect herbivore to overcome plant cyanogenic glucoside defence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pentzold, Stefan; Zagrobelny, Mika; Roelsgaard, Pernille Sølvhøj;

    2014-01-01

    Cyanogenic glucosides (CNglcs) are widespread plant defence compounds that release toxic hydrogen cyanide by plant bglucosidase activity after tissue damage. Specialised insect herbivores have evolved counter strategies and some sequester CNglcs, but the underlying mechanisms to keep CNglcs intact...... during feeding and digestion are unknown. We show that CNglc-sequestering Zygaena filipendulae larvae combine behavioural, morphological, physiological and biochemical strategies at different time points during feeding and digestion to avoid toxic hydrolysis of the CNglcs present in their Lotus food......, a highly alkaline midgut lumen inhibited the activity of ingested plant b-glucosidases significantly. Moreover, insect b-glucosidases from the saliva and gut tissue did not hydrolyse the CNglcs present in Lotus. The strategies disclosed may also be used by other insect species to overcome CNglc...

  7. Changes in pulmonary antioxidant defence mechanisms during separate and combined treatment with paraquat and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-hundred-fifty white male Wistar rats were poisoned with a daily dose of 1/100 LD50 paraquat water solution, five days weekly, over a period of 4 months. Immediately after that the animals were exposed to a single whole-body irradiation with a dose rate of 2 and 4 Gy on a linear accelerator with photon energy 9 MeV and radiation power 2 Gy/min. The biological effects of the isolated and combined two factors on the pulmonary antioxidant defence mechanisms were studied from the 1st up to the 60th post-irradiation days. It was established that paraquat and ionizing radiation inhibited the enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and decreased the content of non-protein weight groups in lung homogenate at an early stage. The combined application of both factors had a significant synergic effect

  8. EDAC: Epithelial defence against cancer-cell competition between normal and transformed epithelial cells in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Mihoko; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2015-07-01

    During embryonic development or under certain pathological conditions, viable but suboptimal cells are often eliminated from the cellular society through a process termed cell competition. Cell competition was originally identified in Drosophila where cells with different properties compete for survival; 'loser' cells are eliminated from tissues and consequently 'winner' cells become dominant. Recent studies have shown that cell competition also occurs in mammals. While apoptotic cell death is the major fate for losers in Drosophila, outcompeted cells show more variable phenotypes in mammals, such as cell death-independent apical extrusion and cellular senescence. Molecular mechanisms underlying these processes have been recently revealed. Especially, in epithelial tissues, normal cells sense and actively eliminate the neighbouring transformed cells via cytoskeletal proteins by the process named epithelial defence against cancer (EDAC). Here, we introduce this newly emerging research field: cell competition in mammals. PMID:25991731

  9. Specific Cues Associated With Honey Bee Social Defence against Varroa destructor Infested Brood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondet, Fanny; Kim, Seo Hyun; de Miranda, Joachim R; Beslay, Dominique; Le Conte, Yves; Mercer, Alison R

    2016-01-01

    Social immunity forms an essential part of the defence repertoire of social insects. In response to infestation by the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its associated viruses, honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) have developed a specific behaviour (varroa-sensitive hygiene, or VSH) that helps protect the colony from this parasite. Brood cells heavily infested with mites are uncapped, the brood killed, and the cell contents removed. For this extreme sacrifice to be beneficial to the colony, the targeting of parasitized brood for removal must be accurate and selective. Here we show that varroa-infested brood produce uniquely identifiable cues that could be used by VSH-performing bees to identify with high specificity which brood cells to sacrifice. This selective elimination of mite-infested brood is a disease resistance strategy analogous to programmed cell death, where young bees likely to be highly dysfunctional as adults are sacrificed for the greater good of the colony. PMID:27140530

  10. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: interactions with organisms in the environment and cells of the immune defence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skindersø, Mette Elena

    2008-01-01

    of growth, has the immediate advantage that it does not impose a harsh selection pressure for resistance which is the main drawback of conventional antibiotics. The first two articles included in the present thesis (article 1 and 2) describe the screening of extracts of eukaryotic organisms...... enzymes and components capable of impairing the hosts’ immunity. P. aeruginosa readily assumes the biofilm lifestyle which confers efficient protection against the activity of the host defence system. In addition, P. aeruginosa exhibit an inherent tolerance to many of the antibiotics most commonly used...... times by selective forces. Most of the antibiotics used today originate from natural sources. The general assumption is that antibiotics have evolved in nature to counteract growth of competitors; however, this idea has recently been challenged, and it has been suggested that the ecological role of...

  11. ASSESSING THE INTEGRATION OF GAYS AND LESBIANS INTO THE SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL DEFENCE FORCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot Canaday

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During the apartheid era, the South African military maintained a dual policy onhomosexuality – prohibited among members of the permanent force, homosexualitywas officially tolerated among conscripts. When the regime fell, the newgovernment committed itself to human rights considerations, and after the SouthAfrican Constitution adopted a provision of non-discrimination on the basis ofsexual orientation in 1996, the South African military followed suit. In 1998, theSouth African National Defence Force (SANDF implemented the Policy on EqualOpportunity and Affirmative Action that declared that there would no longer bediscrimination against gays and lesbians. This article draws together military andgovernment documents, secondary research, press coverage and interviews withindividuals with knowledge on this topic to assess the effects of this policy change.The evidence suggests that the integration of gay and lesbian personnel has not had anegative impact on recruitment and retention, morale, unit cohesion or operationaleffectiveness in the SANDF.

  12. The South African Defence Force and Horse Mounted Infantry Operations, 1974-1985

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques J. P. De Vries

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The South African Defence Force (SADF made effective use of the horse mounted soldier in the Namibian Independence War or ‘Border War’, 1966 to 1989, in Namibia (South West African and Angola, in a conflict usually depicted as a series of high profile mechanised infantry operations. Nevertheless, the legacy of the horse-mounted infantryman of the South African War era commando was evident in this unit, which proved competent in the counter-insurgency patrol in the Area of Operations, and subsequently domestic deployment during civilian struggle during the State of Emergency. This article offers an exploration of the Potchefstroom Equestrian Centre’s contribution to horse and rider training and the military use of horses in counterinsurgency and urban peace enforcement operations in the period c.1974-1985.

  13. A Not-So-Gentle Refutation of the Defence of Homeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawiła-Niedźwiecki, Jakub; Olender, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    In a recent paper, Levy, Gadd, Kerridge, and Komesaroff attempt to defend the ethicality of homeopathy by attacking the utilitarian ethical framework as a basis for medical ethics and by introducing a distinction between evidence-based medicine and modern science. This paper demonstrates that their argumentation is not only insufficient to achieve that goal but also incorrect. Utilitarianism is not required to show that homeopathic practice is unethical; indeed, any normative basis of medical ethics will make it unethical, as a defence of homeopathic practice requires the rejection of modern natural sciences, which are an integral part of medical ethics systems. This paper also points out that evidence-based medicine lies at the very core of modern science. Particular arguments made by Levy et al. within the principlist medical ethics normative system are also shown to be wrong. PMID:26732397

  14. REVOLUTION IN MILITARY AFFAIRS, MISSILE DEFENCE AND WEAPONS IN SPACE: THE US STRATEGIC TRIAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelien Pretorius

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available American plans for Missile Defence (MD and the weaponisation of space should be analysed in the larger framework of the contemporary Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA.1 Soviet military analysts have written about this revolution from as early as the 1970s, but it was the application of information age technology (IT in the 1991 Gulf War that captured the imagination of military planners and policy makers, especially in the US. The US is actively pursuing an RMA, conceptualised as integrating new IT into weapons systems and integrated command, control, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR and, in turn, doctrinal, operational and organisational change in the military to take advantage of information dominance on the battlefield. This relates to MD and the weaponisation of space in two ways. Firstly, very few countries have the financial and technological capability to modernise their defence forces along the lines of a US-defined RMA, which means that they may resort to so-called asymmetric means to exploit the vulnerabilities or weaknesses of a strong, conventional power. Ballistic missiles (in association with chemical, biological or nuclear payloads are one of the asymmetrical threats most commonly cited in speeches and military documents of the US and used as justification of MD. Secondly, the RMA increases the US military’s reliance on space-based military assets for C4ISR. Placing weapons in space to protect these assets is seen as a logical step to ensure a key aspect of US dominance on the battlefield. This paper

  15. Phase Change Materials: Technology Status and Potential Defence Applications (Review Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kumar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Phase change materials (PCM are being utilised world over for energy storage and temperature smoothening applications. Defence Laboratory Jodhpur (DLJ has initiated a R&D programme to apply PCM in solving many heat related problems being faced by Indian forces during desert operations specially failure of mission-critical components. Under the programme, special organic PCM (Patent application no. 2258/DEL/2007 and low melting metal alloys have been developed well tuned to desert diurnal cycle. The PCM panels, when applied as an internal lining in buildings, structures and vehicles can moderate the extreme temperature within human tolerable range (below 40 °C without the use of any external power for cooling. The panels can also act as power saver in air conditioned buildings. A cool vest has also been developed with chargeable PCM packs to provide comfortable microenvironment to a soldier on field duty (below 30 °C for 2-3 hrs. To improve reliability of mission critical electronic instruments during desert operation, technology of absorptive PCM heat sinks is under development at DLJ. The special heat sink will absorb heat generated by component for critical mission (up to 1 hr independent of environment temperature and thus ensure smooth functioning of critical components even in extreme hot conditions. In present paper status of PCM technology world over has been reviewed along with the brief account of research on PCM at DLJ.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(6, pp.576-582, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.363

  16. Immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid cells compromise neonatal host defence against infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Shokrollah; Ertelt, James M.; Kinder, Jeremy M.; Jiang, Tony T.; Zhang, Xuzhe; Xin, Lijun; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Strong, Beverly S.; Qualls, Joseph E.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Kalfa, Theodosia A.; Shaaban, Aimen F.; Way, Sing Sing

    2013-12-01

    Newborn infants are highly susceptible to infection. This defect in host defence has generally been ascribed to the immaturity of neonatal immune cells; however, the degree of hyporesponsiveness is highly variable and depends on the stimulation conditions. These discordant responses illustrate the need for a more unified explanation for why immunity is compromised in neonates. Here we show that physiologically enriched CD71+ erythroid cells in neonatal mice and human cord blood have distinctive immunosuppressive properties. The production of innate immune protective cytokines by adult cells is diminished after transfer to neonatal mice or after co-culture with neonatal splenocytes. Neonatal CD71+ cells express the enzyme arginase-2, and arginase activity is essential for the immunosuppressive properties of these cells because molecular inhibition of this enzyme or supplementation with L-arginine overrides immunosuppression. In addition, the ablation of CD71+ cells in neonatal mice, or the decline in number of these cells as postnatal development progresses parallels the loss of suppression, and restored resistance to the perinatal pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. However, CD71+ cell-mediated susceptibility to infection is counterbalanced by CD71+ cell-mediated protection against aberrant immune cell activation in the intestine, where colonization with commensal microorganisms occurs swiftly after parturition. Conversely, circumventing such colonization by using antimicrobials or gnotobiotic germ-free mice overrides these protective benefits. Thus, CD71+ cells quench the excessive inflammation induced by abrupt colonization with commensal microorganisms after parturition. This finding challenges the idea that the susceptibility of neonates to infection reflects immune-cell-intrinsic defects and instead highlights processes that are developmentally more essential and inadvertently mitigate innate immune protection. We anticipate that these

  17. Defence Sites: Experiences from France, the Russian Federation and the United States of America. Appendix VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defence based decommissioning problems relate largely to power plants in submarines and the decommissioning of fuel facilities. Since the practice of dumping nuclear reactors in the sea was internationally agreed to be environmentally unsound in 1993, the construction of well structured, effective mechanisms for disposing of military nuclear waste has been necessary. However, this has raised some additional hurdles besides the more common problems faced by civil waste management. Military programmes are impacted by a number of factors concerning interim storage facilities, submarine storage and over classification issues. These can cause sufficient problems to slow or halt a process aimed at minimizing the potential environmental hazards of radioactive wastes as well as the security threats which may also be involved if these facilities are not decommissioned properly. A resultant problem of military programmes is the secret nature of the reactors, owing to competition between different designs and the need to keep information concerning the performance of the vehicles highly confidential. This can create problems where off-the-shelf components are often over classified; that is, with information being classified as restricted or confidential even in the case of equipment whose role does not contribute to the critical abilities of the vessel, such as a backup diesel generator. This can cause problems with decommissioning as the regulatory framework will obstruct otherwise menial tasks, which could have been easily avoided if the correct classification levels had been applied at design. The US programme has been largely able to find disposal routes for its own defence nuclear waste. This waste is stored at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the reactor compartments are stored in Hanford. The main advantages over other States (e.g. the Russian Federation and the United Kingdom) are the finances allocated to the programme, as well as the vast land resources available

  18. Susceptibility and Immune Defence Mechanisms of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae against Entomopathogenic Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abid Hussain

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Insects infected with entomopathogenic fungi, experience physiological changes that influence their growth and immune defence. The potential of nine isolates of entomopathogenic fungi was evaluated after determining percent germination and relative conidial hydrophobicity. However, nutritional indices were evaluated after immersing eighth-instar Rhynchophorus ferrugineus larvae into each isolate suspension (1 × 107 conidia/mL. The results showed that isolates B6884 and M9374 had 44.51% and 39.02% higher conidial hydrophobicity compared with isolate I03011 (least virulent. The results of nutritional index assays revealed a significant reduction in growth indices after infection with different isolates. Compared with control, B6884 and M9374 greatly decreased larval growth by reducing the efficacy of conversion of ingested food (36%–47% and Efficacy of conversion of digested food (50%–63%. Furthermore, only isolate B6884 induced 100% mortality within 12 days. Compared with control, isolate I03011, possessing the lowest conidial hydrophobicity, only reduced 0.29% of the efficacy of conversion of ingested food (ECI and 0.48% of the efficacy of conversion of digested food (ECD. Similarly, transcriptomic analysis of genes related to the Red palm weevil (RPW immune response, including pathogen recognition receptors (C-type lectin and endo-beta-1,4-glucanse, signal modulator (Serine protease-like protein, signal transductors (Calmodulin-like protein and EF-hand domain containing protein and effectors (C-type lysozyme, Cathepsin L., Defensin-like protein, Serine carboxypeptidase, and Thaumatin-like protein, was significantly increased in larval samples infected with B6884 and M9374. These results suggest that for an isolate to be virulent, conidial hydrophobicity and germination should also be considered during pathogen selection, as these factors could significantly impact host growth and immune defence mechanisms.

  19. The health and cost implications of high body mass index in Australian defence force personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peake Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frequent illness and injury among workers with high body mass index (BMI can raise the costs of employee healthcare and reduce workforce maintenance and productivity. These issues are particularly important in vocational settings such as the military, which require good physical health, regular attendance and teamwork to operate efficiently. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of injury and illness, absenteeism, productivity, healthcare usage and administrative outcomes among Australian Defence Force personnel with varying BMI. Methods Personnel were grouped into cohorts according to the following ranges for (BMI: normal (18.5 − 24.9 kg/m2; n = 197, overweight (25–29.9 kg/m2; n = 154 and obese (≥30 kg/m2 with restricted body fat (≤28% for females, ≤24% for males (n = 148 and with no restriction on body fat (n = 180. Medical records for each individual were audited retrospectively to record the incidence of injury and illness, absenteeism, productivity, healthcare usage (i.e., consultation with medical specialists, hospital stays, medical investigations, prescriptions and administrative outcomes (e.g., discharge from service over one year. These data were then grouped and compared between the cohorts. Results The prevalence of injury and illness, cost of medical specialist consultations and cost of medical scans were all higher (p  Conclusions High BMI in the military increases healthcare usage, but does not disrupt workforce maintenance. The greater prevalence of injury and illness, greater healthcare usage and lower productivity in obese Australian Defence Force personnel is not related to higher levels of body fat.

  20. Endophytic Bacillus spp. produce antifungal lipopeptides and induce host defence gene expression in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gond, Surendra K; Bergen, Marshall S; Torres, Mónica S; White, James F

    2015-03-01

    Endophytes are mutualistic symbionts within healthy plant tissues. In this study we isolated Bacillus spp. from seeds of several varieties of maize. Bacillus amyloliquifaciens or Bacillus subtilis were found to be present in all maize varieties examined in this study. To determine whether bacteria may produce antifungal compounds, generally lipopeptides in Bacillus spp., bacterial cultures were screened for production of lipopeptides. Lipopeptides were extracted by acid precipitation from liquid cultures of Bacillus spp. Lipopeptide extracts from Bacillus spp. isolated from Indian popcorn and yellow dent corn showed inhibitory activity against Fusarium moniliforme at 500μg per disk. Using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry we detected the presence of antifungal iturin A, fengycin and bacillomycin in these isolates. PCR amplification also showed the presence of genes for iturin A and fengycin. B. subtilis (SG_JW.03) isolated from Indian popcorn showed strong inhibition of Arabidopsis seed mycoflora and enhanced seedling growth. We tested for the induction of defence gene expression in the host plant after treatment of plants with B. subtilis (SG_JW.03) and its lipopeptide extract using RT-qPCR. Roots of Indian popcorn seedlings treated with a suspension of B. subtilis (SG_JW.03) showed the induction of pathogenesis-related genes, including PR-1 and PR-4, which relate to plant defence against fungal pathogens. The lipopeptide extract alone did not increase the expression of these pathogenesis-related genes. Based on our study of maize endophytes, we hypothesize that, bacterial endophytes that naturally occur in many maize varieties may function to protect hosts by secreting antifungal lipopeptides that inhibit pathogens as well as inducing the up-regulation of pathogenesis-related genes of host plants (systemic acquired resistance). PMID:25497916

  1. ‘His home is his castle. And mine is a cage’: a new partial defence for primary victims who kill

    OpenAIRE

    Wake, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an in-depth analysis of the Crimes Amendment (Abolition of Defensive Homicide) Act 2014 which had the effect of repealing Victoria’s only general ‘partial defence’ of defensive homicide, and replaced the existing statutory self-defence in murder/manslaughter provisions and general common law self- defence rules with a single test. The abolition of defensive homicide means there is now no general ‘partial defence’ to accommodate cases falling short of self-defence. The ch...

  2. Oswald Pirow's Five-Year Plan for the Reorganisation of the Union Defence Force, 1933-1939

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Ellis

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Union Defence Force (UDF experienced constant changes in its size and organisation during the first few decades of existence since being established on 1 July 1912. During the First World War it's size increased, 2 only to decrease again with demobilisation after the War. Another upward trend was experienced over the period 1922-1926, with the first line of defence increasing in number during 1924 from 10 000 to 25 000.3 The Depression of 1929-1933 stopped this tendency' resulting in the disbandment of no less than 49 Active Citizen Force (ACF units. During 1933 however, it became clear that the Depression was drawing to an end and economic revival within South Africa became a reality. At the same time, that is during 1933, the top management within the Ministry of Defence as well as the UDF were replaced. Advocate Oswald Pirow was appointed as Minister of Defence and Maj. Gen. A.J.E. Brink as Secretary of Defence. Sir Pierre van Reyneveld was appointed as Chief of the General Staff (CGS.5 The expectation of economic prosperity urged the new top management, to consider the reorganisation and expansion of the UDF. These expectations led to an announcement to Cabinet by Oswald Pirow on 16 October 1933 of his intend to re-evaluate the Union's security situation and to implement the expected reorganisation resulting from the re-evaluation by means of a five-year plan.6 The five-year plan was announced in Parliament on 2 May 1934 and with time, became known as "Oswald Pirow's Five-year Plan". On studying the sources however it is clear that Pierre van Reyneveld and not Oswald Pirow was the true driving force behind the plan. Pierre van Reyneveld as CGS however was responsible for most of the planning and for drawing up the plan. As Minister of Defence Oswald Pirow was the public figure with whom the plan was associated, hence the name: "Oswald Pirow's Five-year Plan".

  3. EST sequencing and gene expression profiling of defence-related genes from Persea americana infected with Phytophthora cinnamomi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahomed Waheed

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avocado (Persea americana belongs to the Lauraceae family and is an important commercial fruit crop in over 50 countries. The most serious pathogen affecting avocado production is Phytophthora cinnamomi which causes Phytophthora root rot (PRR. Root pathogens such as P. cinnamomi and their interactions with hosts are poorly understood and despite the importance of both the avocado crop and the effect Phytophthora has on its cultivation, there is a lack of molecular knowledge underpinning our understanding of defence strategies against the pathogen. In order to initiate a better understanding of host-specific defence we have generated EST data using 454 pyrosequencing and profiled nine defence-related genes from Pc-infected avocado roots. Results 2.0 Mb of data was generated consisting of ~10,000 reads on a single lane of the GS FLX platform. Using the Newbler assembler 371 contigs were assembled, of which 367 are novel for Persea americana. Genes were classified according to Gene Ontology terms. In addition to identifying root-specific ESTs we were also able to identify and quantify the expression of nine defence-related genes that were differentially regulated in response to P. cinnamomi. Genes such as metallothionein, thaumatin and the pathogenesis related PsemI, mlo and profilin were found to be differentially regulated. Conclusions This is the first study in elucidating the avocado root transcriptome as well as identifying defence responses of avocado roots to the root pathogen P. cinnamomi. Our data is currently the only EST data that has been generated for avocado rootstocks, and the ESTs identified in this study have already been useful in identifying defence-related genes as well as providing gene information for other studies looking at processes such as ROS regulation as well as hypoxia in avocado roots. Our EST data will aid in the elucidation of the avocado transcriptome and identification of markers for improved

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Cell Death: The Major Defences Relative Roles and Consequences in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Lionel; Dukan, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a mathematical model for predicting reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration and macromolecules oxidation in vivo. We constructed such a model using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. In order to evaluate the major defences relative roles against hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2), we investigated the relative contributions of the various reactions to the dynamic system and searched for approximate analytical solutions for the explicit expression of changes in H2 O2 internal or external concentrations. Although the key actors in cell defence are enzymes and membrane, a detailed analysis shows that their involvement depends on the H2 O2 concentration level. Actually, the impact of the membrane upon the H2 O2 stress felt by the cell is greater when micromolar H2 O2 is present (9-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell) than when millimolar H2 O2 is present (about 2-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell). The ratio between maximal external H2 O2 and internal H2 O2 concentration also changes, reducing from 8 to 2 while external H2 O2 concentration increases from micromolar to millimolar. This non-linear behaviour mainly occurs because of the switch in the predominant scavenger from Ahp (Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase) to Cat (catalase). The phenomenon changes the internal H2 O2 maximal concentration, which surprisingly does not depend on cell density. The external H2 O2 half-life and the cumulative internal H2 O2 exposure do depend upon cell density. Based on these analyses and in order to introduce a concept of dose response relationship for H2 O2-induced cell death, we developed the concepts of “maximal internal H2 O2 concentration” and “cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration” (e.g. the total amount of H2 O2). We predict that cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration is responsible for the H2 O2-mediated death of bacterial cells. PMID:27494019

  5. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Cell Death: The Major Defences Relative Roles and Consequences in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Lionel; Dukan, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a mathematical model for predicting reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration and macromolecules oxidation in vivo. We constructed such a model using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. In order to evaluate the major defences relative roles against hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2), we investigated the relative contributions of the various reactions to the dynamic system and searched for approximate analytical solutions for the explicit expression of changes in H2 O2 internal or external concentrations. Although the key actors in cell defence are enzymes and membrane, a detailed analysis shows that their involvement depends on the H2 O2 concentration level. Actually, the impact of the membrane upon the H2 O2 stress felt by the cell is greater when micromolar H2 O2 is present (9-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell) than when millimolar H2 O2 is present (about 2-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell). The ratio between maximal external H2 O2 and internal H2 O2 concentration also changes, reducing from 8 to 2 while external H2 O2 concentration increases from micromolar to millimolar. This non-linear behaviour mainly occurs because of the switch in the predominant scavenger from Ahp (Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase) to Cat (catalase). The phenomenon changes the internal H2 O2 maximal concentration, which surprisingly does not depend on cell density. The external H2 O2 half-life and the cumulative internal H2 O2 exposure do depend upon cell density. Based on these analyses and in order to introduce a concept of dose response relationship for H2 O2-induced cell death, we developed the concepts of "maximal internal H2 O2 concentration" and "cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration" (e.g. the total amount of H2 O2). We predict that cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration is responsible for the H2 O2-mediated death of bacterial cells. PMID:27494019

  6. An Indirect Defence Trait Mediated through Egg-Induced Maize Volatiles from Neighbouring Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutyambai, Daniel M; Bruce, Toby J A; van den Berg, Johnnie; Midega, Charles A O; Pickett, John A; Khan, Zeyaur R

    2016-01-01

    . sesamiae parasitic wasps indicated that these parasitoids preferred volatiles from oviposited and neighbouring landrace plants compared to those from the control plants. This effect was absent in the standard commercial hybrid we tested. There was no HIPV induction and no difference in parasitoid attraction in neighbouring and control hybrid maize plants. These results show plant-plant signalling: 'Nyamula' maize plants emitting oviposition-induced volatiles attractive to the herbivore's natural enemies can induce this indirect defence trait in conspecific neighbouring undamaged maize plants. Maize plants growing in a field may thus benefit from this indirect defence through airborne signalling which may enhance the fitness of the volatile-emitting plant by increasing predation pressure on herbivores. PMID:27392034

  7. Brothers in arms or peace? The media representation of Swedish and Norwegian defence- and military co-operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stig Arne Nohrstedt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the relevance of Johan Galtung's model for peace journalism and critical discourse analysis (CDA in light of the media coverage of Swedish and Norwegian defence cooperation. By analysing the proposal for closer military cooperation between the Nato-member Norway and the non-aligned Sweden the article emphasises the paradox that the fact that both Sweden and Norway have forces fighting in Afghanistan was not mentioned when the heads of the Norwegian and Swedish Defence in a joint article justified the need for a closer cooperation between the two countries. Thus this analysis illustrates some limitations of the peace journalism perspective and the necessity to take a contextual approach in which also the possibility of "peace talk" being part of a war discourse is considered.

  8. Managing Australian Defence Force Activities in Marine Protected Areas:Using Jervis Bay as a Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian Lees

    2008-01-01

    <正>Australian Defence Force has done training activities in marine areas even some marine protected areas for a long time.These activities may cause pollution to the environment and related animals both directly and indirectly.So it is necessary to do some research on the environmenta1 influence of ADF activities and try our best to protect the natural environment.In this essay,we take Jervis Bay Marine Park as a case study to study the methods of environmental management of Australian Defence Force Activities.Through our spot investigation,we found that the ADF has some special power in JBMP and their activities certainly did negative impact on not only the environment but also the surrounding communities.To solve these problems,the common citizens and the authority of ADF must shape a good relationship to reduce misunderstanding and the environmental management in Jervis Bay Marine Park should be increased in the future.

  9. Lying down with protective setae as an alternative antipredator defence in a non-webbing spider mite

    OpenAIRE

    Yano, Shuichi; Shirotsuka, Kanako

    2013-01-01

    An antipredator defence in the citrus red mite Panonychus citri, which does not produce protective webs, was examined experimentally. P. citri adult females lie down on citrus leaf surfaces with their dorsal setae (hair) directed in all upper directions. They seldom move in response to physical stimuli. Compared to normal lying females, both manipulated non-lying females and hair-removed females suffered higher predation by predatory mites. A predator approaching the body surface of a lying f...

  10. Safety principles, safety requirements and implementations of Defence-in-depth - introduction to major novel designs and their safety cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An OECD NEA Workshop on Advanced Nuclear Reactor Safety Issues and Research Needs was organized from 18 to 20 February 2002. This paper presents, for each sessions of the workshop, a summary of the presentations. Session one is devoted to the safety principles, safety requirements and implementation of defence-in-depth; session two deals with the issues important for safety and their assessment. Session three answers the question: how to deal with safety issues, questions and concerns? (A.L.B.)

  11. Brassinosteroids alleviate high-temperature injury in Ficus concinna seedlings via maintaining higher antioxidant defence and glyoxalase systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Song Heng; Li, Xue Qin; Wang, G. Geoff; Zhu, Xiang Tao

    2015-01-01

    Although brassinosteroids (BRs) play crucial roles in plant development and stress tolerance, the mechanisms by which they have these effects are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the possible mechanism of exogenously applied BRs on reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidant defence and methylglyoxal (MG) detoxification systems in Ficus concinna seedlings grown under high-temperature (HT) stress for 48 h. Our results showed that the activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide ...

  12. An ecological perspective on the deployment and design of low- crested and other hard coastal defence structures

    OpenAIRE

    Airoldi, L.; Abbiati, M.; Beck, M.W.; Hawkins, S J; Jonsson, P. R.; Martin, Daniel; Moschella, P. S.; Sundelöf, A.; Thompson, R. C.; Åberg, P.

    2005-01-01

    Coastal areas play a crucial role in the economical, social and political development of most countries; they support diverse and productive coastal ecosystems that provide valuable goods and services. Globally flooding and coastal erosion represent serious threats along many coastlines, and will become more serious as a consequence of human-induced changes and accelerated sea-level rise. Over the past century, hard coastal defence structures have become ubiquitous features of coastal landsca...

  13. Conceptual Solution for the Military Geoinformation System of the Ministry of Defence of the Republic of Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Zvonko Biljecki; Mladen Rapaić; Tomislav Tonković

    2006-01-01

    The Ministry of Defence of the Republic of Croatia, with the project "Military Geoinformation System - VoGIS" started to build a unique geoinformation system for the Ministry and Armed Forces. This system will be in accordance with Croatian and international geoinformation standards and will fully conform to the NATO standards. According to the Preliminary Design, the goal of the VoGIS is the implementation of a geoinformation system that will be the basis for development of all further activ...

  14. Defence mechanisms of Brassicaceae: implications for plant-insect interactions and potential for integrated pest management. A review

    OpenAIRE

    Ahuja, Ishita; Rohloff, Jens; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2010-01-01

    Brassica crops are grown worldwide for oil, food and feed purposes, and constitute a significant economic value due to their nutritional, medicinal, bioindustrial, biocontrol and crop rotation properties. Insect pests cause enormous yield and economic losses in Brassica crop production every year, and are a threat to global agriculture. In order to overcome these insect pests, Brassica species themselves use multiple defence mechanisms, which can be constitutive, inducible, induced, direct or...

  15. Social immune defence in ants - Different aspects of hygienic behaviour and the infestation with Laboulbeniales in Lasius neglectus ants

    OpenAIRE

    Tragust, Simon

    2013-01-01

    To study how immunity is achieved in insect societies I investigated the antiparasite defence of mainly the invasive garden ant Lasius neglectus when exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. In the first three chapters I focused on behavioural aspects of the social immune system with special reference to hygienic actions toward brood. In Chapter I I could first demonstrate a potential protective function of the cocoon-enclosure around pupae in ants when exposed to fun...

  16. Popular Sentiment and Constitutional Problems in the Great East Japan Earthquake : Self-Defence Forces, the Emperor System and Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Umeda, Yurika

    2015-01-01

    This essay examines the political aspects of the Japanese Constitution, especially following Carl Schmitt's critique of liberalism and the logic of the civil constitutional state to reconsider issues with the Self-Defence Forces, the Emperor system and national emergency rights that were made apparent by the Great East Japan Earthquake of 11 March 2011. The Constitution of Japan written in 1946 is a framework which was embodied in the agreement of the 1951 Peace Treaty with Japan. Although th...

  17. Induced indirect defence in a lycaenid-ant association: the regulation of a resource in a mutualism.

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, A. A.; Fordyce, J A

    2000-01-01

    Indirect defences involve the protection of a host organism by a mutualistic partner. Threat of predation to the host organism may induce the production of rewards and/or signals that attract the mutualistic partner. In laboratory and field experiments we show that threatened lycaenid butterfly larvae (Plebejus acmon) produce more nectar rewards from their gland and were tended by protective ants twice as much as controls. Ant attendance did not affect the leaf consumption or feeding behaviou...

  18. NEA’S Plans for Strengthening International Implementation of the Application of Defence in Depth Philosophies in Nuclear Power Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Following the Fukushima Daiichi Accident the OECD NEA established and delivered three tasks related to Defence in Depth for its member states. These consisted of: • A review of member state and NEA activities directly related to the accident by the Fukushima Senior Task Group set up by the OECD NEA Committee for Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA). • An international expert review of the NEA’s wide ranging joint nuclear safety research portfolio. • A joint workshop on ‘Challenges and Enhancements to Defence in Depth (DiD) in light of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident’ on 5th June 2013 by both the OECD NEA Committee for Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) and Committee for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI). These tasks encompassed firstly, how the NEA member states understand the concept of DiD and its value within Nuclear Safety. Secondly, how DiD is implemented at present, focussing on how it is implemented to deal with external events, and finally what future areas the NEA members considered NEA as a whole should be carrying forward to enhance the understanding and implementation of Defence-in-Depth. Such areas included: • Exploring what the DiD safety goal concept ”practically eliminate large and early offsite releases” means and how is it implemented. • Independence and margins in the implementation of DiD. • Human interventions considering catastrophic external events effects on emergency response and recovery. • Detailed identification of additional safety research after Fukushima. This presentation provides a summary of those tasks and NEA’s international programme of activities to bring its members together in those areas they highlighted to deliver enhancement in the understanding and implementation of defence in depth. (author)

  19. THE ROLE OF MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY IN PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS: THE SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL DEFENCE FORCE AS AN EXAMPLE

    OpenAIRE

    G. A. J. Van Dyk

    2011-01-01

    This article is an interdisciplinary publication focusing on the role anddevelopment of military psychology in the South African context. Peacekeepingoperations and the results of the first and fifth deployment of the South AfricanNational Defence Force (SANDF) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) areused as background to illustrate the relevance of military psychology in suchoperations. Peacekeeping operations involve military and often civilian personnel.The nature of peacekeeping oper...

  20. Nest defence in a cuckoo host: great reed warblers risk themselves equally for their own and parasitic chicks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honza, Marcel; Procházka, Petr; Šicha, Václav; Požgayová, Milica

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 147, 5-6 (2010), s. 741-756. ISSN 0005-7959 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600930903; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : brood parasitism * chick discrimination * cuckoo * mobbing * nest defence * nestlingnestling recognition * parental investment Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.480, year: 2010

  1. Review of physiotherapy records to characterise musculoskeletal injury in Australian soldiers in the 16th Air Defence Regiment

    OpenAIRE

    Rolf Sellentin; Penny Sanchez

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is scant information on the types of musculoskeletal injuries, their causes and injury patterns that are sustained by Australian garrison soldiers (a permanent military post or place where troops are stationed). Rigorous physical training, manually emplacing weapon systems and daily military duties carried out by soldiers of the 16th Air Defence Regiment reflect the types of injuries observed in this study. It defines the injury patterns for trained soldiers and addresses t...

  2. Interactive effects of early and later nutritional conditions on the adult antioxidant defence system in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, José C; Monaghan, Pat; Metcalfe, Neil B

    2015-07-01

    In vertebrates, antioxidant defences comprise a mixture of endogenously produced components and exogenously obtained antioxidants that are derived mostly from the diet. It has been suggested that early-life micronutritional conditions might influence the way in which the antioxidant defence system operates, which could enable individuals to adjust the activity of the endogenous and exogenous components in line with their expected intake of dietary antioxidants if the future environment resembles the past. We investigated this possibility by experimentally manipulating the micronutrient content of the diet during different periods of postnatal development in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). Birds that had a low micronutrient diet during the growth phase initially had a lower total antioxidant capacity (TAC) than those reared under a high micronutrient diet, but then showed a compensatory response, so that by the end of the growth phase, the TAC of the two groups was the same. Interestingly, we found an interactive effect of micronutrient intake early and late in development: only those birds that continued with the same dietary treatment (low or high) throughout development showed a significant increase in their TAC during the period of sexual maturation. A similar effect was also found in the level of enzymatic antioxidant defences (glutathione peroxidase; GPx). No significant effects were found in the level of oxidative damage in lipids [malondialdehyde (MDA) levels]. These findings demonstrate the importance of early and late developmental conditions in shaping multiple aspects of the antioxidant system. Furthermore, they suggest that young birds may adjust their antioxidant defences to enable them to 'thrive' on diets rich or poor in micronutrients later in life. PMID:25987737

  3. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference ...

  4. Comparison of defence responses to Botrytis cinerea infection in tomato plants propagated in vitro and grown in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Jacek Patykowski; Elżbieta Kuźniak; Henryk Urbaniak

    2013-01-01

    Defence reactions: O2 - generation, superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase activities after B. cinerea infection in tomato plants propagated in vitro and grown in vivo have been compared. Infection resulted in rapid O2 - generation. Superoxide dismutase activity increase was slower than O2 - response. In plants propagated in vitro catalase and guaiacol peroxidase activities after infection were induced less strongly than in plants grown in vivo. K2HPO4 pr...

  5. Rhizosphere fungus Penicillium chrysogenum promotes growth and induces defence-related genes and downy mildew disease resistance in pearl millet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, M; Sudisha, J; Amruthesh, K N; Ito, S-I; Shetty, H S

    2013-01-01

    Susceptible pearl millet seeds (cv 7042S) were treated with the plant growth promoting fungus Penicillium chrysogenum (PenC-JSB9) at 1 × 10(8) spores·ml(-1) to examine mRNA expression profiles of five defence responsive genes and test its ability to induce resistance to downy mildew caused by Sclerospora graminicola. PenC-JSB9 treatment at 1 × 10(8) CFU·ml(-1) for 6 h significantly enhanced seed germination (9.8- 89%), root length (4.08% to 5.1 cm), shoot length (18.9% to 7.77 cm) and reduced disease incidence (28%) in comparison with untreated controls. In planta colonisation of PenC-JSB9 showed that all three root segments (0-6 cm) and soil dilutions incubated on PDA produced extensive mycelial growth, however colonisation frequency of PenC-JSB9 was significantly higher in soil than in root segments. Spatiotemporal studies revealed that induction of resistance was triggered as early as 24 h and a minimum 2-3 days was optimal for total resistance to build up between inducer treatment and challenge inoculation in both experiments. In Northern blot analysis, transcript accumulation of resistant and PenC-JSB9 induced susceptible cultivars showed higher basal levels of defence gene expression than non-pretreated susceptible controls. Transcript accumulation in resistant seedlings challenge-inoculated with the pathogen showed maximum expression of CHS (3.5-fold increase) and Pr-1a (threefold increase) at 24 and 12 h, respectively. While PenC-JSB9 pretreated susceptible seedlings challenge-inoculated showed rapid and enhanced expression of LOX and POX at 48 h and for CHT at 24 h, whereas non-pretreated susceptible seedlings after pathogen inoculation showed weak expression of hybridised defence genes. Enhanced activation of defence genes by PenC-JSB9 suggests its role in elevated resistance against S. graminicola. PMID:22672261

  6. Consequences of climate disruption for the Ministry of Defence - EPS 2013-55 - Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled some important results of the fifth IPCC report, this report aims at providing a mapping of biases by which climate disruption impacts the different activities, functions, and missions of the French Ministry of Defence. This disruption results in new risks and threats, but could also be the background of new legal and administrative standards and constraints which may affect military capacities. The authors first study how climate disruption is addressed by American and British allies, analyse direct and indirect risks and threats which are created or strengthened by climate disruption, identify the impact of climate disruption on operational capacities as a whole, at the industrial level (in product elaboration), and also in the use of hardware on locations which could be modified under the action of climate change. They also propose crisis scenarios on the near and on the long term, in relationship with climate disruption but also with other issues. They state a set of operational recommendations for the Ministry for a better anticipation of impact on the short, medium and long term

  7. Lessons Learned from Process Safety Management: A Practical Guide to Defence in Depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Beginning with the experiences of Alfred Nobel, the chemical enterprise has learned from failures and implemented layers of protection to prevent unwanted incidents. Nobel developed dynamite as a more stable alternative to nitroglycerin, a process we would today call “inherently safer technology”. In recent years, the USA has issued regulations requiring formal “risk management plans” to identify and mitigate production risks. The USA set up the “Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board” as an independent investigator of serious chemical enterprise incidents with a mission to issue recommendations aimed at preventing repeated incidents based on lessons learned. Following a particularly violent explosion in Texas in 1989, the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued the “Process Safety Management” (PSM) rule. PSM is a singular guide to defence in depth for preventing large-scale production incidents. The formalism is equally applicable to the chemical enterprise and the nuclear installation enterprise. This presentation will discuss the key elements of PSM and offer suggestions on using PSM as a guide to developing multiple layers of protection. The methods of PSM are applicable to Nuclear Generating Stations, research reactors, fuel reprocessing plants and fissile material storage and handling. Examples from both the chemical and nuclear enterprises will be used to illustrate key points. (author)

  8. The multifunctional artificial reef and its role in the defence of the Mediterranean coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, I; Tinoco, H; Aragonés, L; García-Barba, J

    2016-04-15

    Multifunctional artificial reefs (MFAR) are being implemented around the world, due to their ability to provide an environment where a sports-economic-recreational use and environmental improvement is implemented, and are also elements of coastal defence. However, a lot of failures have been recorded, possibly due to disregarded local factors in the formulations used, and there is no method that has encompassed all these factors, in order to take them into account in its design. The aim of this paper was to provide the coastal engineer with a method that would be used for the design of such reefs. To do this, the Babilonia beach of Guardamar del Segura, Alicante (Spain), was chosen because it is a fully anthropised area (with houses in the Maritime-Terrestrial Public Domain, marina, channelling and river mouth) with continuous regression, in which all the elements considered in this study, were treated. Based on the performance obtained in studies and projects worldwide, the climatic characteristics, biocenosis, sediment transport, settlements and liquefaction and the evolution of the coastline, were analysed. The multidisciplinary study carried out showed that with the implementation of a MFAR, the problem was reversed. Furthermore, the area was provided with a playful-economic use, and could be used 60% of the time, by surfers whose skill level were low to intermediate, without forgetting that the diversity of the marine ecosystem in the area was increased. PMID:26851763

  9. Defence-in-depth in the design of the nuclear desalination plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines several concepts to identify the appropriate defence-in-depth (DID) strategy for the SMART reactor which is being developed for desalination application in Korea. This paper analyzes the DID concepts for existing reactors, advanced reactors, and small and medium reactors, the multiple physical barriers design concepts for DID strategy, and the implementation measures for each DID level. In general, nuclear desalination plants are designed with two additional physical barriers compared to existing nuclear plants. The first is the safeguard vessel that surrounds the reactor vessel and minimizes radiological release to the environment following accidents. The second is the intermediate circuit which is located between the nuclear plant and the desalination plant, and prevents the radioactivity contamination of the fresh water. In particular, the design concepts such as an inherent safety, simplicity of design, and modular design of major equipment are considered for improving accident prevention capability. Passive safety systems for improving the capability to mitigate accident consequences and strengthened containment for limiting radiological release are also taken into account. Therefore, the safety and reliability of nuclear desalination plants including the SMART reactor is expected to be improved by establishing and implementing a systematic DID strategy

  10. MILITARY LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT: A MODEL FOR THE SA NATIONAL DEFENCE FORCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Uys

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The result of this article is an alternative model for leadership character development in the South African National Defence Force (SANDF. The SANDF reflects the racial and cultural diversity of South Africa as a nation. The need for a unifying leadership related mechanism, which will provide for the military milieu in which humane leadership development will flourish, is evident. This statement is based on the premise that no evidence was found that any previous efforts by the SANDF to instil a leadership philosophy or policy as a way of military life was successful. The model also addresses further shortcomings in the current SANDF leadership development model as the selection process of officer candidates needs improvement because political guidance and participation in the development of military leaders are absent. Officer formative training consequently reflects emaciated attention to the development of the character side of leaders, and the SANDF has no military leadership institution to ensure that its leadership development policies and practices are based on sound academic research.

  11. Influence of podophyllum hexandrum on antioxidant defence system in mice: possible role in radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podophyllum hexandrum, a Himalayan herb, having revealed its radioprotective and anti-tumor properties was investigated for its mechanism of action. Glutathione S-transferase (GST), catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and lipid peroxidation (LPx) were determined in the liver, jejunum and ileum at various time intervals, with and without the aqueous extract of P. hexandrum rhizome (200 mg/kg b.w.i.p.) in unirradiated and whole body irradiated (10 Gy, -2 h) male Swiss albino mice. Pre-irradiation treatment with P. hexandrum, enhanced liver GST (p < 0.01) and SOD (p < 0.05) at 12 h post irradiation, the jejunal SOD (p < 0.00005) at 84 h post irradiation was significantly elevated. However, no significant change was manifested in the catalase activity in the liver, at any of the post irradiation intervals (0, 12 and 84 h). The antioxidant defence due to P. hexandrum treatment in mice can explain to some extent its protective action manifested in terms of survival against whole body lethal irradiation. However, some other possible mechanisms that may strengthen radioprotective action of the P. hexandrum extract need to be investigated further. (author)

  12. Antioxidant defences role during post anoxic recovery in bivalve mollusc Scapharca inaequivalvis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Foschi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Euryoxic organisms are able to withstand hypoxic conditions until the restoration of normal O2 levels, when the re-introduction of oxygen causes a decisive burst in reactive oxygen species (ROS. The consequent oxidative damage is countered by defence systems constituted by antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD, CAT, Se-GPx and G6PDH. Specimens of Scapharca inaequivalvis were exposed to anoxia for 3, 6 and 24 hours and subsequent reoxygenation for 1, 3, 5 and 24 hours. It has been investigated SOD, CAT, Se-GPx and G6PDH activity and MnSOD and CuZnSOD expression in the digestive gland. The results showed SODs activity to be high during both anoxia and reoxygenation. CAT and Se-GPx increase significantly overall during recovery. Only CuZnSOD expression was greater after 6 and 24 hours of anoxia. The presence of high levels of antioxidant enzymes during anozia suggests that the response of S. inaequivalvis is typical of euryoxic animals and represents an interesting model for studying the processes of ischaemia/reperfusion in mammals.

  13. Preemptive Circular Defence of Immature Insects: Definition and Occurrences of Cycloalexy Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume J. Dury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cycloalexy was coined by Vasconcellos-Neto and Jolivet in 1988 and further defined by Jolivet and collaborators in 1990 in reference to a specific type of circular defence. The term has been applied to numerous organisms, including adult insects, nymphs, and even vertebrates, but has lost precision with the accumulation of anecdotal reports not addressing key elements of the behaviour as first defined. We review the literature and propose three criteria that are sufficient and necessary to define the behaviour: (1 individuals form a circle; (2 defensive attributes of the individuals are positioned on the periphery of the circle, and as a result, the periphery of the circle uniformly contains either heads or abdomens; (3 animals preemptively adopt the circle as a resting formation, meaning it is not necessary to observe predation. When these considerations are taken into account, cycloalexy appears less common in nature than the literature suggests. We argue that unequivocal cases of cycloalexy have been found only in sawflies (Tenthredinoidea: Pergidae, Argidae, leaf beetles (Chrysolemidae: Galerucinae, Cassidinae, Chrysomelinae, Criocerinae, weevils (Curculionidae: Phelypera distigma, and midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae, Forcipomyia. Reports of cycloalexy in caterpillars (Saturniidae: Hemileucinae: Lonomia, Papilionidae require further documentation. We report one new case of cycloalexy in thrips (Thysanoptera and question reports of cycloalexic behaviour in other taxa.

  14. Strategies to increase Vitamin C in plants: from plant defence perspective to food biofortification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittoria eLocato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C participates in several physiological processes, among others, immune stimulation, synthesis of collagen, hormones, neurotransmitters and iron absorption. Severe deficiency leads to scurvy, whereas a limited vitamin C intake causes general symptoms, such as increased susceptibility to infections, fatigue, insomnia and weight loss. Surprisingly vitamin C deficiencies are spread in both developing and developed countries, with the latter actually trying to overcome this lack through dietary supplements and food fortification. Therefore new strategies aimed to increase vitamin C in food plants would be of interest to improve human health. Interestingly, plants are not only living bioreactors for vitamin C production in optimal growing conditions, but also they can increase their vitamin C content as consequence of stress conditions. An overview of the different approaches aimed at increasing vitamin C level in plant food is given. They include genotype selection by classical breeding, bio-engineering and changes of the agronomic conditions, on the basis of the emerging concepts that plant can enhance vitamin C synthesis as part of defence responses.

  15. Real-time threat evaluation in a ground based air defence environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JN Roux

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In a military environment a ground based air defence operator is required to evaluate the tactical situation in real-time and protect Defended Assets (DAs on the ground against aerial threats by assigning available Weapon Systems (WSs to engage enemy aircraft. Since this aerial environment requires rapid operational planning and decision making in stress situations, the associated responsibilities are typically divided between a number of operators and computerized systems that aid these operators during the decision making processes. One such a Decision Support System (DSS, a threat evaluation and weapon assignment system, assigns threat values to aircraft (with respect to DAs in real-time and uses these values to propose possible engagements of observed enemy aircraft by anti-aircraft WSs. In this paper a design of the threat evaluation part of such a DSS is put forward. The design follows the structured approach suggested in [Roux JN & van Vuuren JH, 2007, Threat evaluation and weapon assignment decision support: A review of the state of the art, ORiON, 23(2, pp. 151-187], phasing in a suite of increasingly complex qualitative and quantitative model components as more (reliable data become available.

  16. Malaria Prevention, Mefloquine Neurotoxicity, Neuropsychiatric Illness, and Risk-Benefit Analysis in the Australian Defence Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart McCarthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Defence Force (ADF has used mefloquine for malaria chemoprophylaxis since 1990. Mefloquine has been found to be a plausible cause of a chronic central nervous system toxicity syndrome and a confounding factor in the diagnosis of existing neuropsychiatric illnesses prevalent in the ADF such as posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. Overall health risks appear to have been mitigated by restricting the drug’s use; however serious risks were realised when significant numbers of ADF personnel were subjected to clinical trials involving the drug. The full extent of the exposure, health impacts for affected individuals, and consequences for ADF health management including mental health are not yet known, but mefloquine may have caused or aggravated neuropsychiatric illness in large numbers of patients who were subsequently misdiagnosed and mistreated or otherwise failed to receive proper care. Findings in relation to chronic mefloquine neurotoxicity were foreseeable, but this eventuality appears not to have been considered during risk-benefit analyses. Thorough analysis by the ADF would have identified this long-term risk as well as other qualitative risk factors. Historical exposure of ADF personnel to mefloquine neurotoxicity now also necessitates ongoing risk monitoring and management in the overall context of broader health policies.

  17. Defence Research and Development Canada: Suffield research on nuclear methods for detection of buried bulk explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFee, John E.; Faust, Anthony A.

    2011-06-01

    Defence R&D Canada - Suffield has conducted research and development on nuclear methods for detection of bulk explosives since 1994. Initial efforts were directed at confirmation of the presence of bulk explosives in land mines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). In close collaboration with a few key Canadian companies, methods suitable for vehicle-mounted or fixed position applications and those suitable for person- or small robotportable roles have been studied. Vehicle-mounted systems mainly employ detection of characteristic radiation, whereas person-portable systems use imaging of back scattered radiation intensity distributions. Two key design tenets have been reduction of personnel shielding by the use of teleoperation and custom design of sensors to address the particular problem, rather than adapting an existing sensor to a problem. This is shown in a number of recent research examples. Among vehicle-mounted systems, recent research to improve the thermal neutron analysis (TNA) sensors, which were put into service with the Canadian Forces in 2002, are discussed. Research on fast neutron analysis (FNA) and associated particle imaging (API), which can augment or replace TNA, depending on the application, are described. Monoenergetic gamma ray induced photoneutron spectroscopy is a novel method which has a number of potential advantages and disadvantages over TNA and FNA. Sources, detectors and geometries have been identified and modelling studies have suggested feasibility. Among person-portable systems, research on neutron backscatter imaging and X-ray coded aperture backscatter imaging are discussed.

  18. APPLYING REINFORCEMENT LEARNING TO THE WEAPON ASSIGNMENT PROBLEM IN AIR DEFENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Le Roux

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The modern battlefield is a fast-paced, information-rich environment, where discovery of intent, situation awareness and the rapid evolution of concepts of operation and doctrine are critical success factors. A combination of the techniques investigated and tested in this work, together with other techniques in Artificial Intelligence (AI and modern computational techniques, may hold the key to relieving the burden of the decision-maker and aiding in better decision-making under pressure. The techniques investigated in this article were two methods from the machine-learning subfield of reinforcement learning (RL, namely a Monte Carlo (MC control algorithm with exploring starts (MCES, and an off-policy temporal-difference (TD learning-control algorithm, Q-learning. These techniques were applied to a simplified version of the weapon assignment (WA problem in air defence. The MCES control algorithm yielded promising results when searching for an optimal shooting order. A greedy approach was taken in the Q-learning algorithm, but experimentation showed that the MCES-control algorithm still performed significantly better than the Q-learning algorithm, even though it was slower.

  19. Comparison of enzymatic antioxidant defence systems in different metabolic types of yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, Dafinka I; Petrova, Ventsislava Y; Kujumdzieva, Anna V

    2008-11-01

    The enzymatic defence system in the 2 yeasts Kluyveromyces marxianus and Rhodotorula glutinis, differing in their mode of oxygen uptake and energy generation, was characterized and compared with the well-studied facultatively fermentative Crabtree-positive Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Twofold higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities were detected in K. marxianus and R. glutinis when cells were cultured on glucose. Further increases of 10%-15% in SOD activity and 30%-50% in catalase were measured in all studied yeasts strains after transfer to media containing ethanol. An evaluation of the ratio of Cu/Zn SOD / Mn SOD was performed as a measure of the oxidative metabolism. A 20% decrease was observed when the respiratory source of energy was ethanol, with the lowest ratio being observed for the oxidative type of K. marxianus yeasts. Electrophoretic analysis revealed that all tested strains possess active Cu/Zn and Mn SODs. A reverse electrophoretic mobility pattern of K. marxianus and R. glutinis SOD enzymes was observed in comparison with the same couple in S. cerevisiae. The investigation of electrophoretic profile of catalase enzymes showed that alongside their different taxonomic status and fermentative capacity, all tested strains possess 2 separate catalases. The role of antioxidant enzymes in preventing oxidant-induced cytotoxicity (treatment with hydrogen peroxide, paraquat, and menadione) was shown. PMID:18997852

  20. Defence responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to infection by Pseudomonas syringae are regulated by the circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Bhardwaj

    Full Text Available The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate predictable daily changes in abiotic stimuli, such as light; however, whether the clock similarly allows plants to anticipate interactions with other organisms is unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis has circadian clock-mediated variation in resistance to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000, with plants being least susceptible to infection in the subjective morning. We suggest that the increased resistance to Pst DC3000 observed in the morning in Col-0 plants results from clock-mediated modulation of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP-triggered immunity. Analysis of publicly available microarray data revealed that a large number of Arabidopsis defence-related genes showed both diurnal- and circadian-regulation, including genes involved in the perception of the PAMP flagellin which exhibit a peak in expression in the morning. Accordingly, we observed that PAMP-triggered callose deposition was significantly higher in wild-type plants inoculated with Pst DC3000 hrpA in the subjective morning than in the evening, while no such temporal difference was evident in arrhythmic plants. Our results suggest that PAMP-triggered immune responses are modulated by the circadian clock and that temporal regulation allows plants to anticipate and respond more effectively to pathogen challenges in the daytime.

  1. Effects of depleted uranium on oxidative stress, detoxification, and defence parameters of zebrafish Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnaire, Beatrice; Cavalie, Isabelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of depleted uranium (DU), the by-product of nuclear enrichment of uranium, on several parameters related to oxidative stress, detoxification, and the defence system in the zebrafish Danio rerio. Several parameters were recorded: phenoloxidase-like (PO) activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and 7-ethoxyresrufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity. Experiments were performed on adult and larvae D. rerio. Adult fish were exposed for 28 days at 20 μg U/L followed by a 27-day depuration period. Eggs of D. rerio were exposed for 4 days at 0, 20, 100, 250, 500, and 1,000 μg U/L. Results showed that DU increased ROS production both in adult and in larvae even at the low concentrations tested and even during the depuration period for adult D. rerio. DU also modified PO-like activity, both in the D. rerio adult and larvae experiments, but in a more transient manner. EROD activity was not modified by DU, but sex effects were shown. Results are discussed by way of comparison with other known effects of uranium in fish. Overall, these results show that the mechanisms of action of DU in fish tend to be similar to the ones existing for mammals. These results encourage the development and use of innate immune biomarkers to understand the effects of uranium and, more generally, radionuclides on the fish immune system. PMID:23052361

  2. In defence of andragogy. Part 2: An educational process consistent with modern nursing's aims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, F

    1997-12-01

    In 1987 the English National Board (1987) made it clear that it supported a move towards an andragogical approach to nurse education. Recently such moves have been questioned as has the validity of andragogy (Darbyshire 1993). In response to such challenges this paper extends some of the arguments made in the article 'In defence of andragogy' (Milligan 1995). It is argued that andragogy provides a framework within which care and other crucial aspects of the nurse-patient/client relationship can be mirrored and thereby facilitated in future practitioners. In the socialization processes inherent in nurse education, care is surely difficult to teach or facilitate unless the philosophy and methods are consistent with such ends. Furthermore, it is frequently argued that as educationalists we need to be consistent in our approach to students with that which we hope to see in their future practice (Bevis & Murray 1990). Andragogy offers a medium through which this can be facilitated. It is essentially a humanistic educational process that values the individual. The power relationship between the educator and student is much more horizontal than is found in the historically common hierarchical educational relationship. An educational process based upon andragogy therefore mirrors important parts of the nurse-patient/client relationship. It offers a theory of education consistent with the aims of modern day nursing practice. We should seek to improve our understanding of andragogy and no longer conceptualize it as one end of a false dichotomy with pedagogy. PMID:9470712

  3. Lysophosphatidylcholine acts in the constitutive immune defence against American foulbrood in adult honeybees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riessberger-Gallé, Ulrike; Hernández-López, Javier; Rechberger, Gerald; Crailsheim, Karl; Schuehly, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Honeybee (Apis mellifera) imagines are resistant to the Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus larvae (P. larvae), causative agent of American foulbrood (AFB), whereas honeybee larvae show susceptibility against this pathogen only during the first 48 h of their life. It is known that midgut homogenate of adult honeybees as well as a homogenate of aged larvae exhibit strong anti-P. larvae activity. A bioactivity-guided LC-HRMS analysis of midgut homogenate resulted in the identification of 1-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (LPC) pointing to a yet unknown immune defence in adult honeybees against P. larvae. Antimicrobial activity of LPC was also demonstrated against Melissococcus plutonius, causative agent of European Foulbrood. To demonstrate an AFB-preventive effect of LPC in larvae, artificially reared larvae were supplemented with LPC to evaluate its toxicity and to assess whether, after infection with P. larvae spores, LPC supplementation prevents AFB infection. 10 μg LPC per larva applied for 3 d significantly lowered mortality due to AFB in comparison to controls. A potential delivery route of LPC to the larvae in a colony via nurse bees was assessed through a tracking experiment using fluorescent-labelled LPC. This yet undescribed and non-proteinous defense of honeybees against P. larvae may offer new perspectives for a treatment of AFB without the utilization of classic antibiotics. PMID:27480379

  4. Risk assessment of radioactive and hazardous materials in DOE defence package transport accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A programme is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the risks to the public from domestic transport of radioactive and hazardous materials associated with nuclear defence materials. The programme will identify, quantify and manage potential risks to public health and safety including potential radiological and toxicological health consequences, particularly for those transport packages that may not meet the 10 CFR 71.73 (US Code of Federal Regulations) test criteria because of configuration or content. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Utah will provide the DOE with the bases and methodology for establishing rigorous, quantitative acceptance criteria for evaluating and certifying highway transport activities by DOE contractors. The Highway Transportation Risk Assessment (HITRA) model is described which is based upon probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology and utilises transport route specific data. The HITRA model provides detailed, location and time specific data and analysis for assessing projected risks to public health and safety from DOE shipments along a given specific highway transport route and for other site-specific factors. (Author)

  5. The role of trade fairs in industrial marketing: a research on defence industry trade fairs

    OpenAIRE

    Cop, Ruziye; Kara, Rifat Tekin

    2014-01-01

       The  purpose  of  this  paper  is  to  explore  the  attitudes  towards  trade  fairs  that  are  the  most  important  marketing  tool  influencing  buying  decisions  in  industrial  markets  and  to  search  whether  or  not  these  attitudes  are  different  from  those  in  sub  sectors.    Since  trade  fairs  are   primary,   effective   and   common   marketing   activities   in   defence   industries,   this  industry   has   been   selected   as   a   research   area.   In   this...

  6. Revisioning Fordham's 'Defences of the self' in light of modern relational theory and contemporary neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsched, Donald E

    2015-09-01

    This paper explores the evolution of Michael Fordham's ideas concerning 'defences of the self', including his application of this concept to a group of 'difficult' adult patients in his famous 1974 paper by the same name. After tracing the relevance of Fordham's ideas to my own discovery of a 'self-care system' in the psychological material of early trauma patients (Kalsched ), I describe how Fordham's seminal notions might be revisioned in light of contemporary relational theory as well as early attachment theory and affective neuroscience. These revisionings involve an awareness that the severe woundings of early unremembered trauma are not transformable through interpretation but will inevitably be repeated in the transference, leading to mutual 'enactments' between the analytic partners and, hopefully, to a new outcome. A clinical example of one such mutual enactment between the author and his patient is provided. The paper concludes with reflections on the clinical implications of this difficult case and what it means to become a 'real person' to our patients. Finally, Jung's alchemical views on transference are shown to be useful analogies in our understanding of the necessary mutuality in the healing process with these patients. PMID:26274848

  7. ADMIRAL ELPHINSTONE AND THE CONQUEST AND DEFENCE OF THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE, 1795-96

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thean Potgieter

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Vice Admiral of the Blue the Honourable Sir George Keith Elphinstone(1746-1823 was appointed as commander of the British force dispatched to capturethe Cape of Good Hope in 1795. As an experienced naval officer and a capablecommander acquainted with the Cape and the Far East, he was the correct choice tocommand the expedition. Due to the strategic location of the Cape of Good Hope –literally halfway on the sea route to the East – it was vital for maritimecommunications, and Britain had to ensure that the Cape did not fall into Frenchhands. To secure a safe base on the sea route to the East, a British expeditionary forcewas sent to the Cape. The British task force arrived in False Bay on 11 June 1795 andwhen negotiations with the Dutch authorities at the Cape failed, a military campaigncommenced that resulted in the capitulation of the Cape on 16 September 1795. InAugust 1796, when a Dutch squadron under the command of Rear Admiral E. Lucasanchored in Saldanha Bay, Elphinstone speedily neutralised the threat, forcing Lucasto surrender. After a very successful service period at the Cape, Elphinstone returnedto Britain on 7 October 1796. He conducted the defence of the Cape with vigour andactively sought out his enemy, confirming British control of the Cape and the virtualimpossibility of taking back the Cape with force of arms.

  8. Defence in depth for electric power supplies in Indian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of electric power supply system in a nuclear power plant is to supply and distribute reliable electric power to safety related systems and systems important to safety in various forms, arrangements and combinations of redundancy and diversity in order to perform safety functions required during operational states and design basis events (DBE) such as shutting down the reactor, maintaining the reactor in safe shutdown state, containment isolation and reactor core cooling preventing significant release of radioactive material to the environment. Hence the design basis of electric power supply systems includes identification of DBE that require power supplies, adequacy of redundancy and diversity, environmental conditions to which electric equipment are qualified, identification of loads requiring interrupted and uninterrupted power supplies, time sequence in which emergency loads are to be supplied in case of interruption, provisions for maintaining and testing, consideration for minimum duration capability of emergency power supplies during station blackout etc. Based on operation experience, results of probability safety assessment and certain weaknesses noticed in defence in depth of electric power supply systems, several continuous design improvements have been made in Indian nuclear power plants during operating phase and life extension. Instituting various tests during initial commissioning, subsequent operation and life extension has ensured high standards of performance of electric power supplies. Some of these aspects are highlighted in this paper

  9. AlGaInN laser diode technology for defence, security and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najda, Stephen P.; Perlin, Piotr; Suski, Tadek; Marona, Lucja; Boćkowski, Mike; Leszczyński, Mike; Wisniewski, Przemek; Czernecki, Robert; Kucharski, Robert; Targowski, Grzegorz; Watson, Scott; Kelly, Antony E.

    2014-10-01

    The latest developments in AlGaInN laser diode technology are reviewed for defence, security and sensing applications. The AlGaInN material system allows for laser diodes to be fabricated over a very wide range of wavelengths from u.v., i.e, 380nm, to the visible, i.e., 530nm, by tuning the indium content of the laser GaInN quantum well. Advantages of using Plasma assisted MBE (PAMBE) compared to more conventional MOCVD epitaxy to grow AlGaInN laser structures are highlighted. Ridge waveguide laser diode structures are fabricated to achieve single mode operation with optical powers of reported. High power operation of AlGaInN laser diodes is demonstrated with a single chip, AlGaInN laser diode `mini-array' with a common p-contact configuration at powers up to 2.5W cw at 410nm. Low defectivity and highly uniform GaN substrates allow arrays and bars of nitride lasers to be fabricated. GaN laser bars of up to 5mm with 20 emitters, mounted in a CS mount package, give optical powers up to 4W cw at ~410nm with a common contact configuration. An alternative package configuration for AlGaInN laser arrays allows for each individual laser to be individually addressable allowing complex free-space and/or fibre optic system integration within a very small form-factor.or.

  10. Combining personal with social information facilitates host defences and explains why cuckoos should be secretive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorogood, Rose; Davies, Nicholas B

    2016-01-01

    Individuals often vary defences in response to local predation or parasitism risk. But how should they assess threat levels when it pays their enemies to hide? For common cuckoo hosts, assessing parasitism risk is challenging: cuckoo eggs are mimetic and adult cuckoos are secretive and resemble hawks. Here, we show that egg rejection by reed warblers depends on combining personal and social information of local risk. We presented model cuckoos or controls at a pair's own nest (personal information of an intruder) and/or on a neighbouring territory, to which they were attracted by broadcasts of alarm calls (social information). Rejection of an experimental egg was stimulated only when hosts were alerted by both social and personal information of cuckoos. However, pairs that rejected eggs were not more likely to mob a cuckoo. Therefore, while hosts can assess risk from the sight of a cuckoo, a cuckoo cannot gauge if her egg will be accepted from host mobbing. Our results reveal how hosts respond rapidly to local variation in parasitism, and why it pays cuckoos to be secretive, both to avoid alerting their targets and to limit the spread of social information in the local host neighbourhood. PMID:26794435

  11. CNS Orientations, Safety Objectives and Implementation of the Defence in Depth Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The 6th Review Meeting of the Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS) is convened in Vienna next year for two weeks from Monday March 24th to Friday April 4th 2014. The consequences and the lessons learnt from the accident that occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant will be a major issue. The 2nd Extraordinary Meeting of the CNS in August 2012 was totally devoted to the Fukushima Daiichi accident. One of its main conclusions was Conclusion 17 included in the summary report which says: ''Nuclear power plants should be designed, constructed and operated with the objectives of preventing accidents and, should an accident occur, mitigating its effects and avoiding off-site contamination. The Contracting Parties also noted that regulatory authorities should ensure that these objectives are applied in order to identify and implement appropriate safety improvements at existing plants''. The wording of the sentences of Conclusion 17 dedicated, the first one to new built reactors, the second one to existing plants, can be improved and clarified. But obviously the issue of the off-site consequences of an accident is fundamental. So the in-depth question comes: what can and should be done to achieve these safety objectives? And in particular how to improve the definition and then the implementation of the Defence in Depth Concept? From my point of view, this is clearly the main issue of this Conference. (author)

  12. Defence responses of arabidopsis thaliana to infection by pseudomonas syringae are regulated by the circadian clock

    KAUST Repository

    Bhardwaj, Vaibhav

    2011-10-31

    The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate predictable daily changes in abiotic stimuli, such as light; however, whether the clock similarly allows plants to anticipate interactions with other organisms is unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) has circadian clock-mediated variation in resistance to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), with plants being least susceptible to infection in the subjective morning. We suggest that the increased resistance to Pst DC3000 observed in the morning in Col-0 plants results from clock-mediated modulation of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity. Analysis of publicly available microarray data revealed that a large number of Arabidopsis defence-related genes showed both diurnal- and circadian-regulation, including genes involved in the perception of the PAMP flagellin which exhibit a peak in expression in the morning. Accordingly, we observed that PAMP-triggered callose deposition was significantly higher in wild-type plants inoculated with Pst DC3000 hrpA in the subjective morning than in the evening, while no such temporal difference was evident in arrhythmic plants. Our results suggest that PAMP-triggered immune responses are modulated by the circadian clock and that temporal regulation allows plants to anticipate and respond more effectively to pathogen challenges in the daytime. © 2011 Bhardwaj et al.

  13. Impacts of low doses of pesticide mixtures on liver cell defence systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouimi, Patrick; Zucchini-Pascal, Nathalie; Dupont, Gwendoline; Razpotnik, Andrej; Fouché, Edwin; De Sousa, Georges; Rahmani, Roger

    2012-08-01

    Low amounts of residual pesticides are present in the environment, often as mixtures of chemicals which contaminate drinking water and food, being a source of chronic exposure for humans and a growing matter of concern in public health policy. Despite of the needs and growing investigation, little is known about the impact of low doses and mixtures of these chemicals on human health. The purpose of this study was to enlighten if modifications of liver cell metabolic- and/or defence-related capacities could occur under such exposures. In vitro perturbations of several metabolic, stress and survival pathways in human and mice cultured hepatocytes and liver cells were evaluated under exposure to low doses of single molecules or equimolecular combinations of the three pesticides, atrazine, chlorpyrifos and endosulfan. Mainly phases I and II enzymes of detoxification were found modulated, together with apoptotic process deregulation. Hence, CYP3A4 and CYP3A11 were upregulated in primary cultured human and mouse hepatocytes, respectively. These inductions were correlated to an anti-apoptotic process (increased Bcl-xL/Bax ratio, inhibition of the PARP protein cleavage). Such disturbances in pathways involved in cell protection may possibly account for initiation of pathologies or decrease in drugs efficiency in humans exposed to multiple environmental contaminants. PMID:22515965

  14. Effects of elevated [CO2 ] on maize defence against mycotoxigenic Fusarium verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Martha M; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A; Dafoe, Nicole J; Christensen, Shawn; Sims, James; Martins, Vitor F; Swerbilow, Jay; Romero, Maritza; Alborn, Hans T; Allen, Leon Hartwell; Teal, Peter E A

    2014-12-01

    Maize is by quantity the most important C4 cereal crop; however, future climate changes are expected to increase maize susceptibility to mycotoxigenic fungal pathogens and reduce productivity. While rising atmospheric [CO2 ] is a driving force behind the warmer temperatures and drought, which aggravate fungal disease and mycotoxin accumulation, our understanding of how elevated [CO2 ] will effect maize defences against such pathogens is limited. Here we report that elevated [CO2 ] increases maize susceptibility to Fusarium verticillioides proliferation, while mycotoxin levels are unaltered. Fumonisin production is not proportional to the increase in F. verticillioides biomass, and the amount of fumonisin produced per unit pathogen is reduced at elevated [CO2 ]. Following F. verticillioides stalk inoculation, the accumulation of sugars, free fatty acids, lipoxygenase (LOX) transcripts, phytohormones and downstream phytoalexins is dampened in maize grown at elevated [CO2 ]. The attenuation of maize 13-LOXs and jasmonic acid production correlates with reduced terpenoid phytoalexins and increased susceptibility. Furthermore, the attenuated induction of 9-LOXs, which have been suggested to stimulate mycotoxin biosynthesis, is consistent with reduced fumonisin per unit fungal biomass at elevated [CO2 ]. Our findings suggest that elevated [CO2 ] will compromise maize LOX-dependent signalling, which will influence the interactions between maize and mycotoxigenic fungi. PMID:24689748

  15. Renal pathology in working dogs in the South African National Defence Force : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P. Short

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Urine analysis, serumbiochemical profile and a cortical wedge biopsy for histopathological examination was performed on 42 South African National Defence Force (SANDF dogs from around the country. The only significant finding on urine analysis and serum biochemistry was a relatively large number (16/42 of dogs with elevated serum inorganic phosphate levels. Histopathology revealed that only 9 of the animals had normal kidneys reflected in the wedge biopsy material, with over 50%of them showing signs of glomerular pathology (primarily mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. Other conditions detected histopathologically were haemosiderosis (47 % of animals, focal nephrosis (2.4 %, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (2.4 %, focal interstitial nephritis (4.7 % and acute tubular nephrosis (4.7 %. The lesions observed were of limited distribution and extent; this histopathological finding may account for the absence of significant abnormalities on urine analysis or serum biochemistry profiles. It appears from these results that a large percentage of the SANDF population would be expected to have mild renal lesions, but that these lesions are not severe enough to lead to clinical signs. The findings of this study are similar to those of randomly selected populations of non-military dogs performed in other areas of the world, which also demonstrated an unexpectedly high incidence of histopathological renal pathology in dogs considered healthy. These lesions may well, however, play a role in later life, and it is recommended that military veterinarians maintain an index of suspicion for renal disease, particularly glomerular disease. The aetiology of the histopathological lesions is unknown.

  16. Design features to achieve defence-in-depth in small and medium sized reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the categorization adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), small and medium sized reactors are those with the equivalent electric output less than 700 MW. In most of the cases, deployment potential of SMRs is supported by their ability to fill niches in which they would address market situations different from those of currently operated large-capacity nuclear power plants. Ensuring adequate defence-in-depth (DID) is important for reactors of smaller output because many of them are being designed to allow more proximity to the user, specifically, when non-electrical energy products are targeted. Based on the activities recently performed by IAEA, the paper provides a summary description of the design features used to achieve DID in the eleven representative concepts of SMRs. The SMRs considered included reactors of different types - pressurized water reactors, pressurized boiling light water cooled heavy water moderated reactors, high temperature gas cooled reactors, fast reactors,and non conventional very high temperature designs. The design descriptions were structured to follow the definitions and recommendations of the IAEA safety standardNS-R-1 'Safety of the Nuclear Power Plants: Design Requirements'. The focus of this paper would be on sodium cooled and lead cooled fast reactors -the 4S-LMR (Japan) and the SSTAR and the STAR-LM (USA)

  17. An ancestral allele of grapevine transcription factor MYB14 promotes plant defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Dong; Fischer, Sabine; Merz, Patrick; Bogs, Jochen; Riemann, Michael; Nick, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Stilbene synthase is a key enzyme for the production of the phytoalexin resveratrol. Some clones of Vitis sylvestris, a wild European grapevine species which is almost extinct, have been shown to accumulate more resveratrol in response to different forms of stress. In the current study, we asked whether the induction of stilbene synthase transcripts in Hoe29, one of the V. sylvestris clones with elevated stilbene inducibility, might result from the elevated induction of the transcription factor MYB14. The MYB14 promoter of Hoe29 and of Ke83 (a second stilbene-inducible genotype) harboured distinct regions and were applied to a promoter-reporter system. We show that stilbene synthase inducibility correlates with differences in the induction of MYB14 transcripts for these two genotypes. Both alleles were induced by UV in a promoter-reporter assay, but only the MYB14 promoter from Hoe29 was induced by flg22, consistent with the stilbene synthase expression of the donor genotypes, where both respond to UV but only Hoe29 is responsive to Plasmopara viticola during defence. We mapped upstream signals and found that a RboH-dependent oxidative burst, calcium influx, a MAPK cascade, and jasmonate activated the MYB14 promoter, whereas salicylic acid was ineffective. Our data suggest that the Hoe29 allele of the MYB14 promoter has potential as a candidate target for resistance breeding. PMID:26842984

  18. [70th anniversary of 111th Main Federal Center of medical and forensic examination of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, P V; Fokin, A A

    2013-03-01

    The article is devoted to 70th anniversary of the head state forensic expert institution of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation--111th Main state center of medicolegal and criminalistic examination of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. Some information about historical aspects of functioning of the institution and its activity at the present stage and in conditions of the reform of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation is given. PMID:23808218

  19. An integrated service excellence model for strategic military test and evaluation facilities : the case of the South African National Department of Defence / Gerhard L. de Coning

    OpenAIRE

    De Coning, Gerhard Lourens

    2009-01-01

    Capital-intensive military test and evaluation facilities that are governed within the public entity domain need to deliver effective and efficient services in meeting or exceeding the Department of Defence's requirements and in retaining strategic defence capabilities and technologies. Various business and operational processes currently exist in these facilities, without any common quality assurance, control and performance management systems. The primary objective of this study was to deve...

  20. Catholicism and Judaism in the Catholic Defence against Alfred Rosenberg, 1934—1938: Anti-Jewish Images in an Age of Race Science

    OpenAIRE

    Ehret, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the images of Jews and Judaism in the popular Catholic defence against Alfred Rosenberg’s anticlericalism and ‘neo-paganism’ between 1934 and 1938. It contributes to the debate on Catholic attitudes to Jews, and National Socialist anti-Semitism and racism during the Third Reich. Looking at the grassroots level of this defence, the article demonstrates how the hierarchy communicated traditional religious views on Jews and Judaism to a Catholic public, taking into account ...

  1. Investment in Seed Physical Defence Is Associated with Species' Light Requirement for Regeneration and Seed Persistence: Evidence from Macaranga Species in Borneo

    OpenAIRE

    Pimonrat Tiansawat; Davis, Adam S.; Berhow, Mark A.; Paul-Camilo Zalamea; Dalling, James W.

    2014-01-01

    The seed stage is often critical in determining the regeneration success of plants. Seeds must survive an array of seed predators and pathogens and germinate under conditions favourable for seedling establishment. To maximise recruitment success plants protect seeds using a diverse set of chemical and physical defences. However, the relationship between these defence classes, and their association with other life history traits, is not well understood. Data on seed coat thickness and fracture...

  2. Fight-flight or freeze-hide? Personality and metabolic phenotype mediate physiological defence responses in flatfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupia, Emmanuel J; Binning, Sandra A; Roche, Dominique G; Lu, Weiqun

    2016-07-01

    Survival depends on appropriate behavioural and physiological responses to danger. In addition to active 'fight-flight' defence responses, a passive 'freeze-hide' response is adaptive in some contexts. However, the physiological mechanisms determining which individuals choose a given defence response remain poorly understood. We examined the relationships among personality, metabolic performance and physiological stress responses across an environmental gradient in the olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. We employed four behavioural assays to document the existence of two distinct behavioural types ('bold' and 'shy') in this species. We found consistent metabolic differences between individuals of a given behavioural type across an environmental gradient: shy individuals had overall lower aerobic scope, maximum metabolic rate and standard metabolic rate than bold individuals in both high (25 ppt) and low (3 ppt) salinity. These behavioural and metabolic differences translated into divergent physiological responses during acute stress: shy individuals adopted a passive 'freeze-hide' response by reducing their oxygen consumption rates (akin to shallow breathing) whereas bold individuals adopted an active 'fight-flight' response by increasing their rates of respiration. These distinct defence strategies were repeatable within individuals between salinity treatments. Although it has been suggested theoretically, this is the first empirical evidence that the metabolic response to stressful situations differs between bold and shy individuals. Our results emphasize the importance of incorporating physiological measures to understand the mechanisms driving persistent inter-individual differences in animals. PMID:27044558

  3. Role of the Regulatory Body in Implementing Defence in Depth in Nuclear Installations - Regulatory Oversight in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that nuclear facilities are operated at all times in an acceptably safe manner including the safe conduct of decommissioning activities. Defence in depth is recognized as one of the fundamental safety principles that underlie the safety of nuclear power plants. Defence in depth is implemented to provide a graded protection against a wide variety of transients, incidents and accidents, including equipment failures and human errors within nuclear power plants and events initiated outside plants. The Regulator Body plays an important role in implementing defence in depth in nuclear installations in the context of a clear allocation of responsibilities with an operating organization. This role starting with setting safety objectives and by its own independent review and technical assessment of the safety justifications provided by the operating organization in addition to safety culture investigating within relevant organizations. This paper briefly reviews this role in normal operation and post accidents, and its effects on overall nuclear safety in nuclear installations with reference to Egyptian regulatory oversight. (author)

  4. Phyllosticta musarum Infection-Induced Defences Suppress Anthracnose Disease Caused by Colletotrichum musae in Banana Fruits cv ‘Embul’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Abayasekara

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthracnose development by Colletotrichum musae was observed to be significantly less in the fruits of the banana cultivar ‘Embul’ (Mysore, AAB infected with Phyllosticta musarum than in fruits without such infections. Anthracnose disease originates from quiescent C. musae infections in the immature fruit. P. musarum incites minute, scattered spots, referred to as freckles, in the superficial tissues of immature banana peel which do not expand during maturation or ripening. P. musarum does not appear to have a direct suppressive effect on C. musae as conidia of C. musae germinate on both freckled and non-freckled fruit forming quiescent infections. Our investigations have shown that P. musarum infection induced several defence responses in fruit including the accumulation of five phytoalexins, upregulation of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL activity and cell wall lignification. ¹H and ¹³C NMR spectral data of one purified phytoalexin compared closely with 4′-hydroxyanigorufone. Some of the P. musarum-induced defences that retained during ripening, restrict C. musae development at the ripe stage. This paper examines the potential of P. musarum-induced defences, in the control of anthracnose, the most destructive postharvest disease in banana.

  5. CHIRAC'S GAULLISM - WHY FRANCE HAS BECOME THE DRIVING FORCE BEHIND THE EFFORT TO BUILD AN AUTONOMOUS EUROPEAN DEFENCE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel H. Van Herpen

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The author analyses Chirac’s European defence policy and how it fits into the Gaullist tradition. He starts by sketching the original Gaullism of General De Gaulle which is based on four pillars: a national industrial policy, an independent foreign policy, the possession of a French nuclear deterrent and the ambition to build an independent European defence. His efforts in the last realm, however, are blocked by the US and its European NATO allies. In the Non-Gaullist Interregnum between 1974-1995 President Giscard d’Estaing jeopardised the Gaullist legacy, but President François Mitterrand became – against all expectations – a ‘Socialist Gaullist’ and it was he who realised one of De Gaulle’s objectives by creating the Eurocorps. His successor, Jacques Chirac has conducted a highly volatile European policy. The author distinguishes no less than six different and often contradictory phases in Chirac’s European defence policy. Despite the failures, some successes, however, have been booked, especially after the Saint-Malo Summit with Tony Blair. But much will depend in the coming years on how Chirac will succeed his balancing act between the EU-25, the French-German tandem and the ‘Big Three’.

  6. Did fleshy fruit pulp evolve as a defence against seed loss rather than as a dispersal mechanism?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew L Mack

    2000-03-01

    Relatively few studies have examined the evolution of the mutualism between endozoochorous plants and seed dispersers. Most seed dispersal studies are ecological and examine the role of fruit pulp in promoting seed dispersal. This interaction is often assumed to have originated due to selection stemming from seed dispersers. Here I suggest a ``defence scenario” wherein fleshy fruits originated as mechanisms to defend seeds and secondarily became structures to promote seed dispersal. I suggest that frugivory followed from herbivores that specialized on consuming seed defensive tissues and that enhanced seed dispersal was initially a consequence of seed defence. The proposed defence scenario is not posited as an explanation for the sequence that led to all modern frugivores. However, it is suggested that seed predation was the initial source of selection that led to fleshy fruits; the necessary precursor to frugivory. Support is described from the fossil record and from modern structures and interactions. Testable predictions are made in hope that greater interest will be focused on the defensive role of fleshy fruit pulp both in modern interactions and historically.

  7. Phyllosticta musarum Infection-Induced Defences Suppress Anthracnose Disease Caused by Colletotrichum musae in Banana Fruits cv 'Embul'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayasekara, C L; Adikaram, N K B; Wanigasekara, U W N P; Bandara, B M R

    2013-03-01

    Anthracnose development by Colletotrichum musae was observed to be significantly less in the fruits of the banana cultivar 'Embul' (Mysore, AAB) infected with Phyllosticta musarum than in fruits without such infections. Anthracnose disease originates from quiescent C. musae infections in the immature fruit. P. musarum incites minute, scattered spots, referred to as freckles, in the superficial tissues of immature banana peel which do not expand during maturation or ripening. P. musarum does not appear to have a direct suppressive effect on C. musae as conidia of C. musae germinate on both freckled and non-freckled fruit forming quiescent infections. Our investigations have shown that P. musarum infection induced several defence responses in fruit including the accumulation of five phytoalexins, upregulation of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity and cell wall lignification. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral data of one purified phytoalexin compared closely with 4'-hydroxyanigorufone. Some of the P. musarum-induced defences that retained during ripening, restrict C. musae development at the ripe stage. This paper examines the potential of P. musarum-induced defences, in the control of anthracnose, the most destructive postharvest disease in banana. PMID:25288931

  8. Phyllosticta musarum Infection-Induced Defences Suppress Anthracnose Disease Caused by Colletotrichum musae in Banana Fruits cv ‘Embul’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayasekara, C. L.; Adikaram, N. K. B.; Wanigasekara, U. W. N. P.; Bandara, B. M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Anthracnose development by Colletotrichum musae was observed to be significantly less in the fruits of the banana cultivar ‘Embul’ (Mysore, AAB) infected with Phyllosticta musarum than in fruits without such infections. Anthracnose disease originates from quiescent C. musae infections in the immature fruit. P. musarum incites minute, scattered spots, referred to as freckles, in the superficial tissues of immature banana peel which do not expand during maturation or ripening. P. musarum does not appear to have a direct suppressive effect on C. musae as conidia of C. musae germinate on both freckled and non-freckled fruit forming quiescent infections. Our investigations have shown that P. musarum infection induced several defence responses in fruit including the accumulation of five phytoalexins, upregulation of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity and cell wall lignification. 1H and 13C NMR spectral data of one purified phytoalexin compared closely with 4′-hydroxyanigorufone. Some of the P. musarum-induced defences that retained during ripening, restrict C. musae development at the ripe stage. This paper examines the potential of P. musarum-induced defences, in the control of anthracnose, the most destructive postharvest disease in banana. PMID:25288931

  9. Review of physiotherapy records to characterise musculoskeletal injury in Australian soldiers in the 16th Air Defence Regiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Sellentin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is scant information on the types of musculoskeletal injuries, their causes and injury patterns that are sustained by Australian garrison soldiers (a permanent military post or place where troops are stationed. Rigorous physical training, manually emplacing weapon systems and daily military duties carried out by soldiers of the 16th Air Defence Regiment reflect the types of injuries observed in this study. It defines the injury patterns for trained soldiers and addresses those aspects of injury and mechanism of injury, forming the basis for further research targetted at injury prevention. Purpose: To identify the predominant musculoskeletal injuries sustained by soldiers of the 16th Air Defence Regiment and to explore the relationship between the type of injury and subunit as well as the relationship between type of injury and cause. This is important so that remedial measures can be engaged in an attempt to reduce the incidence of musculoskeletal injury to Australian soldiers, to maintain the regimental fighting strength and deployable status and to reduce the financial burden of rehabilitation and compensation borne by the Australian Defence Force and the Federal Government. Materials and Methods: All patients were trained serving soldiers of the 16th Air Defence Regiment and were referred by the Medical Officer for physiotherapy treatment. On conclusion of a course of treatment, a physiotherapy patient discharge summary (PM 528 was written and it is from these summaries that the demographic data for this study was extracted, which included the type of musculoskeletal injury (diagnosis, cause of that injury and the subunit that the soldier belonged to in the 16th Air Defence Regiment during the years 2008 to 2010. Tests of significance based on the chi-square test statistic were carried out at the 0.05 significance level using Minitab 16 statistical software. When the chi-square test of independence was significant, then the

  10. The Swedish National Defence Research Establishment and the plans for Swedish nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyses the Swedish nuclear weapons research since 1945 carried out by the Swedish National Defence Research Establishment (FOA). The most important aspect of this research was dealing with protection in broad terms against nuclear weapons attacks. However, another aspect was also important from early on - to conduct research aiming at a possible production of nuclear weapons. FOA performed an extended research up to 1968, when the Swedish Government signed the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which meant the end of these production plans. Up to this date, five main investigations about the technical conditions were made, 1948, 1953, 1955, 1957 and 1965, which all together expanded the Swedish know-how to produce a bomb. The Swedish plans to procure nuclear weapons were not an issue in the debate until the mid 50's. The reason for this was simple, prior to 1954 the plans were secretly held within a small group of involved politicians, military and researchers. The change of this procedure did take place when the Swedish Supreme Commander in a public defence report in 1954 favoured a Swedish Nuclear weapons option. In 1958 FOA had reached a technical level that allowed the Parliament to make a decision. Two programs were proposed - the L-programme (the Loading Programme), to be used if the parliament would say yes to a production of nuclear weapons, and the S-programme (the Protection Programme), if the Parliament would say no. The debate on the issue had now created problems for the Social Democratic Government. The Prime Minister, Tage Erlander, who had earlier defended a procurement of nuclear weapons, was now forced to reach a compromise. The compromise was presented to the parliament in a creative manner that meant that only the S-programme would be allowed. The Government argued that the technical level did allow a 'freedom of action' up to at least the beginning of the 60's when Sweden was mature to make a decision on the issue. During this period

  11. First Announcement and Call for Papers SECOND INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON FLOOD DEFENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Beijing, Sep. 10-13, 2002 Organized by: Tsinghua University of China & International Research and Training Center on Erosion and Sedimentation (IRTCES)Sponsored by: National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) International Association for Hydraulic Research (IAHR) United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) Kassel University of Germany Chinese Hydraulic Engineering Society (CHES) German-Sino Unsteady Sediment Transport (GESINOS) http://vww.irtces.org http://www. Tsinghua.edu.cn INTRODUCTION In the past decade frequently occurring floods claimed thousands of lives and caused economic loss of billions of US dollars. Among them the Mississippi River flood in 1993, the Rhine River flood in 1995, the Yangtze River flood in 1998, the Haihe River flood in 1996, and the storm surges in Bangladesh in 1991 are the most devastating. It is evident that both the frequency and intensity of flooding are increasing. The Dirst International Symposium on Flood Defence in Sep. 2000, initiated by Profs. Toensmann and Koch,attracted more than 200 scientists and engineers gathering in Kassel University discussing the ever-increasing concerned problems and sharing experiences and strategies for flood defence. Many scientists suggested to continue the technical forum and the Tsinghua University (one of the top universities of China) and the International Research and Training Center on Erosion and Sedimentation (IRTCES) are organizing the Second International Symposium on Flood Defence (ISFD'2002) scheduled on Sep. 10-13, 2002. The purpose of the conference is to review the state-of-the-art of the studies on flooding and engineering and non-engineering strategies. The symposium will focus on a better understanding laws of flooding and environmental problems involved, different perspectives evolved,climate change and its impact on extreme hydrological events, and reporting new approaches to the

  12. Advancing Ruggedness of Nuclear Stations By Expanding Defence In Depth in Critical Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    than increasing redundancy. There are several events both external and internal that could cause the failure of AC motor driven cooling systems. DC operated steam driven systems and diesel driven cooling systems have avoided several near core melt conditions. Containment Integrity is the last defence for protecting the people and the environment. Diversity in containment cooling is essential for keeping the pressure transients under control. Design provisions to connect potable cooling systems for heat removal and capability to flood the reactor cavity are essential. Recognizing the remote possibility of a severe accident, reliable containment venting (capability to operate with potable energy sources) and filtering could be explored as an option for ensuring an additional layer of protection. These four critical areas need to be viewed as layers in the defence of depth and consequently would require a design that fully removes and common cause failures. Ruggedness of these layers can be achieved only when the process signal sources, power supply and processing of the logic is executed independently. The electrical power system should be re-evaluated for bringing flexibility and adaptability for achieving greater level of safety. (author)

  13. Implementation of Defence in Depth at Nuclear Power Plants. Lessons Learnt from the Fukushima Daiichi Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defence in depth (DiD) is a concept that has been used for many years alongside tools to optimise nuclear safety in reactor design, assessment and regulation. The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident raised many questions and gave unique insight into nuclear safety issues, including DiD. In June 2013, the NEA held a Joint Workshop on Challenges and Enhancements to DiD in Light of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident (NEA, 2014), organised by the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA). It was noted at the time that further work would be beneficial to enhance nuclear safety worldwide, especially with regard to the implementation of DiD. Accordingly, a senior-level task group (STG) was set up to produce a regulatory guidance booklet that would assist member countries in the use of DiD, taking into account lessons learnt from the 2011 accident. This regulatory guidance booklet builds on the work of this NEA workshop, of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Western European Nuclear Regulators Association (WENRA) and of other members of the STG. It uses as its basis the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group's Defence in Depth in Nuclear Safety study (INSAG-10) (IAEA, 1996). The booklet provides insights into the implementation of DiD by regulators and emergency management authorities after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, aiming to enhance global harmonisation by providing guidance on: - the background to the DiD concept; - the need for independent effectiveness among the safety provisions for the various DiD levels, to the extent practicable; - the need for greater attention to reinforce prevention and mitigation at the various levels; - the vital importance of ensuring that common cause and common mode failures, especially external events acting in combination, do not lead to breaches of safety provisions at several DiD levels, taking note of the

  14. Antioxidant defence of colostrum and milk in consecutive lactations in sows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipko-Przybylska Justyna

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parturition is supposed to be related to oxidative stress, not only for the mother, but also for the newborn. Moreover, it is not clear whether consecutive pregnancies, parturitions, and lactations are similar to each other in regards to intensity of metabolic processes or differ from each other. The aim of the study was to compare dynamic changes of antioxidative parameters in colostrum and milk of sows taken during 72 h postpartum from animals in consecutive lactations. Activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, glutathione transferase (GSH-Tr, and superoxide dismutase (SOD, and amount of vitamin A and C were measured. Healthy pregnant animals were divided into 4 groups according to the assessed lactation: A -1st lactation (n = 10, B - 2nd and 3rd lactation (n = 7, C - 4th and 5th lactation (n = 11, D - 6th - 8th lactation (n = 8. The colostrum was sampled immediately after parturition and after 6, 12, 18 and 36 h while the milk was assessed at 72 h after parturition. Spectrophotometric methods were used for measurements. Results The activity of antioxidative enzymes and the concentration of vitamin A increased with time postpartum. The concentration of vitamin C was the highest between the 18th and 36th h postpartum. Conclusions Dynamic changes in the values of antioxidant parameters measured during the study showed that sows milk provides the highest concentration of antioxidants in the 2nd and 3rd and 4th and 5th lactation giving the best defence against reactive oxygen species to newborns and mammary glands.

  15. Gas Market deverticalization and liberalization: simulate the effect of different attack and defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Autorita' per l'Energia Elettrica e il Gas (Aeeg-Italian Electricity Regulator) and The Autorita' Garante per la Concorrenza e il Mercato (Agcm - Italian Competition and Market Regulator) have pointed out that, despite the process of deverticalization and liberalization started with the 'Decreto Letta', oligopolistic blocks still exist in the up stream segment of the natural gas supply chain. Such a liberalization process apparently did not bring about those expected, outstanding benefits for the final users, to such extent that it took action from the Aeeg itself to regulate the final prices, thus dramatically hampering the complete opening of the market and ultimately undermining its expected results. Furthermore, the natural gas industry operators are all aware that competition in the down stream segment (distribution) will be, as it is righi now, limited only to the more attractive industrial use. This parer analyzes and simulates, based on empirical data, the effect of different attack and defence strategies between incumbents and competitors, whose identification is based more on the financial solidity they show in developing competition strategies than their management efficiency level. Il is our intent to add a contribution to the national debate in terms of simulation of a price competition between incumbent and competitor, in order to evaluate how likely it is far oligopolistic blocks to occur. As a second step, a simplified competition analysis, applied to a real-life situation, has been carried out. The questions tackled in this simulation, which is based on the game theory, concern, first and foremost, the demonstration that an oligopolistic block in the up stream affects the down stream, and how such effects bear on the various categories of users. As a final corollary, a question of industrial policy: are the effects of an asymmetric liberalization such as to induce a supply side concentration which is rather based on the exploitation of the up

  16. Investigations into the suppression of the nonspecific defence system by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While nonspecific mechanisms such as activity of NK-cells and induction of interferon were not suppressed after inhomogenous total body irradiation of mice with 1,95/3,90 and 5,85 Gy, an extreme decrease in spleen weight, in the yield of lymphocytes from the spleen and their response to mitogenic stimulation was observed. The general effect of these influences on the interaction of the numerous factors and mechanisms of the nonspecific part of defence was investigated in an antigen-challenge model with stomatitis vesicularis virus in babymice after total body irradiation (3,90 Gy) of the babymice or their pregnant mothers. Irradiation of the babymice showed no significant influence on mortality after infection, while irradiation of their pregnant mothers caused an astonishing decrease of mortality compared to that of animals with no exposure to X-rays. In the same model it was demonstrated that the protective effect of the paramunity inducer 'PIND ORF' on mortality after infection was impaired neither by irradiation of the babymice nor by irradiating their pregnant mothers. The antigen-challenge model Aujeszky virus/adult mouse (exposure to 1,95/3,90 and 5,85 Gy) proved that the influence of irradiation not only depends on the dose but also on the moment of the exposure. The behaviour of opportunistic germs (P. multocida, Ps. aeruginosa) and vaccination viruses (Vaccinia virus, strain Elstree and MVA) in mice remained unchanged after irradiation with 1,95/3,90 Gy, whereas irradiation with 5,85 Gy caused a varying increase of mortality after infection with P. multocida and Ps. aeruginosa. (orig./MG) With 5 refs., 11 tabs

  17. The popularisation of Positive Psychology as a defence against behavioural complexity in research and organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Cilliers

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Positive Psychology’s focus on positive behaviour has resulted in research and organisational consultants to focus relatively more on positive behaviour, thus avoiding negative and often unconscious behaviour and its manifestations.Research purpose: The aim of the study was to explore the systems psychodynamic nature of the manifesting defensive structures operating in Positive Psychology.Motivation for the study: The study investigated the popularity of Positive Psychology amongst academics, students and organisational consultants and the tendency to avoid the complexity of the relatedness between positive and negative as part of the human condition.Research design, approach and method: Qualitative research by means of a Listening Post was used, consisting of six psychologists in their roles as lecturers and organisational consultants. Thematic analyses led to the formulation of various working hypotheses, integrated into a research hypothesis.Main findings: Four themes manifested – namely, the manifesting defence mechanisms, a reluctance to relinquish positive psychology as an object of hope, a need to guard against being too hasty in breaking down positive psychology and a need for a psychology that can engage us in a conversation about integrating the complexities of the human condition.Practical/managerial implications: The findings were linked to Deo Strümpfer’s work, indicating that Positive Psychology originated in early 20th century psychology, which is indeed not about simplification, but is imbedded in the complexity of various behavioural continua.Contribution/value-add: Academics, students and organisational consultants are encouraged to revisit Strümpfer’s work to ensure that this psychology is appreciated for its depth and quality.

  18. [Flight into the imaginary world and dependence: personality trait or opportunist defence mechanism in the transsexual].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, A; Mormont, C

    2004-01-01

    While analysing the psychological functioning of sex reassignment candidates, it appeared that they frequently use the mechanism which consist in taking refuge in passivity and fantasies so that they can avoid displeasing situations, responsibilities and decisions making. This unconscious process, identified by Exner in the Rorschach as the Snow-White Syndrome seems to take place in a specific way regarding the real situation faced by the sex reassignment candidates: the achievement of their aim (the sex reassignment) actually depends on the medical crew (doctors, psychologists, surgeons). We wondered if this fact consisted in a stylistic component, that is to say a stable feature of transsexuals' personality or in an opportunist defence. The dependence on the third, executor and decision-maker could be seen either as the indication of this feature being a favourable condition to the construction of the transsexual Issue or a consequence the transsexual's real situation. The hypothesis of the situational use of this process is studied by comparing the frequency of the Snow-White Syndrome during the moment before giving the surgical response with its appearance frequency after the sex reassignment. The individuals' retest (7MF/7FM) after the operation brings favourable arguments to the second interpretation since the process stops being used as soon as the passive dependence position doesn't exist anymore (the Snow-White Syndrome disappears in 70% of cases). So, as the goals are reached (the medico-surgical transformation materialising the desire), the flight in fantasies and passivity is not necessary anymore and the dependence on contributors disappears. During the psychological follow-up, attention should be paid to this psychic impact of anatomical reality so that it favours an earliest access to autonomy the transsexual is able to prove. In regard of a psychological view (in opposition with a surgical view), this autonomy could be researched before the body

  19. Surviving cave bats: auditory and behavioural defences in the Australian noctuid moth, Speiredonia spectans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullard, James H; Jackson, Matt E; Jacobs, David S; Pavey, Chris R; Burwell, Chris J

    2008-12-01

    The Australian noctuid moth, Speiredonia spectans shares its subterranean day roosts (caves and abandoned mines) with insectivorous bats, some of which prey upon it. The capacity of this moth to survive is assumed to arise from its ability to listen for the bats' echolocation calls and take evasive action; however, the auditory characteristics of this moth or any tropically distributed Australian moth have never been examined. We investigated the ears of S. spectans and determined that they are among the most sensitive ever described for a noctuid moth. Using playbacks of cave-recorded bats, we determined that S. spectans is able to detect most of the calls of two co-habiting bats, Rhinolophus megaphyllus and Miniopterus australis, whose echolocation calls are dominated by frequencies ranging from 60 to 79 kHz. Video-recorded observations of this roost site show that S. spectans adjusts its flight activity to avoid bats but this defence may delay the normal emergence of the moths and leave some 'pinned down' in the roosts for the entire night. At a different day roost, we observed the auditory responses of one moth to the exceptionally high echolocation frequencies (150-160 kHz) of the bat Hipposideros ater and determined that S. spectans is unable to detect most of its calls. We suggest that this auditory constraint, in addition to the greater flight manoeuvrability of H. ater, renders S. spectans vulnerable to predation by this bat to the point of excluding the moth from day roosts where the bat occurs. PMID:19043053

  20. INTEROPERABILITY AND STANDARDISATION IN THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. De Waal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The political changes in South Africa have extended its international obligations by actively involving it in the social wellbeing of troubled African states. Under the auspices of the United Nations, this role is manifested in peacekeeping operations and other standard international practices. The ability of African allied forces to train, exercise, and operate efficiently, effectively, and economically together depends on the interoperability of their operational procedures, doctrine, administration, materiel and technology. This implies that all parties must have the same interpretation of ‘interoperability’. In this study, a conceptual model that explains interoperability and standardisation in terms of a systems hierarchy and the systems engineering process is developed. The study also explores the level of understanding of interoperability in the South African Department of Defence in terms of the levels of standardisation and its relationship to the concepts of systems, systems hierarchy, and systems engineering.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die politieke veranderinge in Suid-Afrika het daartoe aanleiding gegee dat verdere internasionale verpligtinge die land opgelê is. Suid-Afrika, in samewerking met mede-Afrika lande en onder toesig van die Verenigde Nasies, moet deur middel van vredesoperasies by onstabiele Afrika lande betrokke raak. Die vermoë om gesamentlik aan vredesopleiding, vredesoefeninge en vredesoperasies op ‘n effektiewe, doeltreffende en ekonomiese wyse deel te neem, vereis dat daar versoenbaarheid tussen onderlinge operasionele prosedures, doktrine, administrasie, materieel en tegnologie is. Dit beteken dat alle partye eens omtrent die begrip ‘versoenbaarheid’ moet wees. In hierdie studie is ‘n konseptuele model wat versoenbaarheid en standaardisasie verduidelik in terme van die stelselhiërargie en die stelselingenieursweseproses ontwikkel. Hierdie studie het ook die vlak van begrip en

  1. Defence responses in Rpv3-dependent resistance to grapevine downy mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, Karen; Falginella, Luigi; Castellarin, Simone Diego; Testolin, Raffaele; Di Gaspero, Gabriele

    2011-12-01

    The Rpv3 locus determines the ability to operate an isolate-specific hypersensitive response (HR) against Plasmopara viticola in grapevines that carry a resistant Rpv3 (+) haplotype. Artificial infection was performed on leaf discs of Rpv3 (+) and Rpv3 (-) grapevines with two distinct isolates of the pathogen (avrRpv3 (+) and avrRpv3 (-)). The plant response, including the establishment of HR and changes in expression of 33 genes, was compared to the development of the pathogen. HR was induced exclusively in the Rpv3 (+) host upon inoculation with the avrRpv3 (+) isolate of the pathogen, which is assumed to use avrRpv3 (+) effectors that are recognised by/through the plant Rpv3 (+) gene product. The limitation imposed on pathogen growth was the result of inducible responses elicited by the Rpv3 (+)-avrRpv3 (+) interaction. This host reaction relied on transcriptional induction of the HR-associated gene HSR1 and salicylic acid-induced pathogenesis-related (PR) genes PR-1 and PR-2 during the initial 24-48 h post-inoculation. These events had no parallel in the Rpv3 (-) host or upon infection with the avrRpv3 (-) isolate. The emerging model for Rpv3-mediated defence, which is dependent upon race-specific recognition, associated with up-regulation of PR-1 and PR-2 genes, and enforced by localised HR-type necrosis, is compatible with the cascade of events initiated by the products of NB-LRR and LRR-kinase receptor-like genes, such as those residing in the Rpv3 locus. PMID:21735199

  2. The Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Type-3 Effector XopB Inhibits Plant Defence Responses by Interfering with ROS Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priller, Johannes Peter Roman; Reid, Stephen; Konein, Patrick; Dietrich, Petra

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria 85–10 (Xcv) translocates about 30 type-3 effector proteins (T3Es) into pepper plants (Capsicum annuum) to suppress plant immune responses. Among them is XopB which interferes with PTI, ETI and sugar-mediated defence responses, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and direct targets are unknown so far. Here, we examined the XopB-mediated suppression of plant defence responses in more detail. Infection of susceptible pepper plants with Xcv lacking xopB resulted in delayed symptom development compared to Xcv wild type infection concomitant with an increased formation of salicylic acid (SA) and expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Expression of xopB in Arabidopsis thaliana promoted the growth of the virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 strain. This was paralleled by a decreased SA-pool and a lower induction of SA-dependent PR gene expression. The expression pattern of early flg22-responsive marker genes indicated that MAPK signalling was not altered in the presence of XopB. However, XopB inhibited the flg22-triggered burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Consequently, the transcript accumulation of AtOXI1, a ROS-dependent marker gene, was reduced in xopB-expressing Arabidopsis plants as well as callose deposition. The lower ROS production correlated with a low level of basal and flg22-triggered expression of apoplastic peroxidases and the NADPH oxidase RBOHD. Conversely, deletion of xopB in Xcv caused a higher production of ROS in leaves of susceptible pepper plants. Together our results demonstrate that XopB modulates ROS responses and might thereby compromise plant defence. PMID:27398933

  3. Mitochondrial uncoupler 2, 4-dinitrophenol (DNP) counters radiation induced cell death by stimulating anti-oxidant defence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial uncoupling has been shown to be cyto-protective under various stress conditions and studies with uncouplers suggest that mitochondrial uncoupling could be an attractive approach to promote lifespan extension by preventing the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our earlier studies have established that uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration to attain high glycolytic rate in cancer cells increased cellular radio-resistance. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that mild mitochondrial uncoupling using DNP protects normal cells from radiation induced cell death by reducing oxidative stress. Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK293) and Mouse Monocytic (RAW264.7) cells were treated with DNP (10 μM),1 hour prior to radiation exposure (gamma rays, Cobalt-60). Cells treated with DNP before irradiation showed enhanced cell number (1.4 fold) as compared to radiation alone. We also observed 40 % decrease (significant level) in radiation induced ROS, 4 hours after exposure in DNP pre-treated cells with concomitant increase in anti-oxidant defence potential. The decreased ROS production and increased antioxidant defence potential correlated well with enhanced MnSOD and catalase expression. Although, DNP increased mitochondrial biogenesis, radiation induced mitochondrial biogenesis, (a consequence of mitochondrial damage), was not increased further in these cells, thereby suggesting that DNP protects the mitochondria from radiation induced damage, possibly by increasing MnSOD expression. These findings provide evidence that mild mitochondrial uncoupling using DNP attributes to the highly coordinated activation of the anti oxidant defence system in cells and provides survival advantage. Further mechanistic studies to understand the DNP induced radioprotection of cells is under progress. (author)

  4. The Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Type-3 Effector XopB Inhibits Plant Defence Responses by Interfering with ROS Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Peter Roman Priller

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria 85-10 (Xcv translocates about 30 type-3 effector proteins (T3Es into pepper plants (Capsicum annuum to suppress plant immune responses. Among them is XopB which interferes with PTI, ETI and sugar-mediated defence responses, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and direct targets are unknown so far. Here, we examined the XopB-mediated suppression of plant defence responses in more detail. Infection of susceptible pepper plants with Xcv lacking xopB resulted in delayed symptom development compared to Xcv wild type infection concomitant with an increased formation of salicylic acid (SA and expression of pathogenesis-related (PR genes. Expression of xopB in Arabidopsis thaliana promoted the growth of the virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000 strain. This was paralleled by a decreased SA-pool and a lower induction of SA-dependent PR gene expression. The expression pattern of early flg22-responsive marker genes indicated that MAPK signalling was not altered in the presence of XopB. However, XopB inhibited the flg22-triggered burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Consequently, the transcript accumulation of AtOXI1, a ROS-dependent marker gene, was reduced in xopB-expressing Arabidopsis plants as well as callose deposition. The lower ROS production correlated with a low level of basal and flg22-triggered expression of apoplastic peroxidases and the NADPH oxidase RBOHD. Conversely, deletion of xopB in Xcv caused a higher production of ROS in leaves of susceptible pepper plants. Together our results demonstrate that XopB modulates ROS responses and might thereby compromise plant defence.

  5. Cathelicidin host defence peptide augments clearance of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by its influence on neutrophil function in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula E Beaumont

    Full Text Available Cathelicidins are multifunctional cationic host-defence peptides (CHDP; also known as antimicrobial peptides and an important component of innate host defence against infection. In addition to microbicidal potential, these peptides have properties with the capacity to modulate inflammation and immunity. However, the extent to which such properties play a significant role during infection in vivo has remained unclear. A murine model of acute P. aeruginosa lung infection was utilised, demonstrating cathelicidin-mediated enhancement of bacterial clearance in vivo. The delivery of exogenous synthetic human cathelicidin LL-37 was found to enhance a protective pro-inflammatory response to infection, effectively promoting bacterial clearance from the lung in the absence of direct microbicidal activity, with an enhanced early neutrophil response that required both infection and peptide exposure and was independent of native cathelicidin production. Furthermore, although cathelicidin-deficient mice had an intact early cellular inflammatory response, later phase neutrophil response to infection was absent in these animals, with significantly impaired clearance of P. aeruginosa. These findings demonstrate the importance of the modulatory properties of cathelicidins in pulmonary infection in vivo and highlight a key role for cathelicidins in the induction of protective pulmonary neutrophil responses, specific to the infectious milieu. In additional to their physiological roles, CHDP have been proposed as future antimicrobial therapeutics. Elucidating and utilising the modulatory properties of cathelicidins has the potential to inform the development of synthetic peptide analogues and novel therapeutic approaches based on enhancing innate host defence against infection with or without direct microbicidal targeting of pathogens.

  6. How to Reinforce the “Defence-in-Depth” in NPP by Taking into Account Natural Hazards?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The “defence-in-depth” (DiD) principle is the fundamental safety principle for the design and operation of nuclear power plants. This principle aims to prevent as far as possible initiating events and managing their consequences if preventive provisions failed. It has to be applied to the protection against hazards so as to limit their likelihood and/or their consequences by the implementation of prevention, control and mitigation provisions in NPPs consistently with provisions for internal events. So far, the protection of nuclear power plants against external hazards follows a “load-cases” approach, which differs from the approach used for internal events. In 2011, the Fukushima accident showed that, for a beyond design hazard or a combination of hazards not considered at the design stage, all levels of defence may be swept away simultaneously and may lead to a disaster. Natural hazards can therefore be considered as a potential common cause of failure affecting at the same time all levels of the “defence-in-depth”. In France, the definition and the implementation of a post-Fukushima “Hardened Safety Core” for operating NPPs should compensate for some weaknesses in the current approach and improve significantly the robustness of the installations against natural hazards. For future reactors, a new approach based on the definition of two domains, “design basis” and “design extension” for natural hazards, is examined in order to fulfil ambitious general plant safety objectives. It turns out that safety assessments related to natural hazards raise some challenges and difficulties, especially to characterize events with very low frequencies in a context of limited data, to define combinations of hazards (eventually with internal events) and to consider events that go beyond the design basis. For these issues, international guidance and discussions may be fruitful. (author)

  7. Are ineffective defence reactions potential target for induced resistance during the compatible wheat-powdery mildew interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayeh, Ch; Randoux, B; Tisserant, B; Khong, G; Jacques, Ph; Reignault, Ph

    2015-11-01

    Powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici, an obligate aerial biotrophic fungus, would be one of the most damaging wheat (Triticum aestivum) diseases without the extensive use of conventional fungicides. In our study, the expression levels of some basal defence-related genes were investigated during a compatible interaction in order to evaluate wheat reactions to infection, along with the different stages of the infectious process in planta. As fungal conidia initiated their germination and developed appressorial germ tube (AGT), early defence reactions involved the expression of a lipoxygenase (LOX)- and an oxalate oxidase (OXO)-encoding genes, followed by activations of corresponding LOX (EC 1.13.11.12) and OXO (EC 1.2.3.4) activities, respectively. When penetration of AGT took place, up-regulation of chitinases (CHI) and PR1-encoding genes expression occurred along with an increase of CHI (EC 3.2.1.14) activity. Meanwhile, expression of a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase-encoding gene also took place. Up-regulation of a phospholipase C- and lipid transfer proteins-encoding genes expression occurred during the latest stages of infection. Neither the phi glutathione S-transferase (GST)-encoding gene expression nor the GST (EC 2.5.1.13) activity was modified upon wheat infection by powdery mildew. Whether these defence reactions during such a compatible interaction are markers of immunity or susceptibility, and whether they have the ability to contribute to protection upon modulation of their timing and their intensity by resistance inducers are discussed. PMID:26218548

  8. Effect of dietary probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici on antioxidant defences and oxidative stress status of shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris

    OpenAIRE

    Castex, Mathieu; Lemaire, Pierrette; Wabete, Nelly; Chim, Liet

    2009-01-01

    in this study we evaluated the effects of the probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici MA18/5M on shrimp, Litopenaeus stylirostris (also called Penaeus stylirostris), first on antioxidant defences and secondly on the oxidative stress status in the shrimps' haemolymph and digestive gland. We conducted two experiments with the same protocol in which shrimps were fed two diets for three weeks: a control diet and a probiotic diet containing 1 g of live P. acidilactici MA18/5M kg(-1). In the first exper...

  9. Effect of probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici on antioxidant defences and oxidative stress of Litopenaeus stylirostris under Vibrio nigripulchritudo challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, Mathieu; Lemaire, Pierrette; Wabete, Nelly; Chim, Liet

    2010-04-01

    Antioxidant defences and induced oxidative stress tissue damage of the blue shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris, under challenge with Vibrio nigripulchritudo, were investigated for a 72-h period. For this purpose, L. stylirostris were first infected by immersion with pathogenic V. nigripulchritudo strain SFn1 and then antioxidant defences: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), Total antioxidant status (TAS), glutathiones and induced tissue damage (MDA and carbonyl proteins) were determined in the digestive gland at 0, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h post-infection (h.p.i.). In the meantime, TAS was also measured in the blood. Infection level of the shrimps during the challenge was followed by determining V. nigripulchritudo prevalence and load in the haemolymph of the shrimps. Changes in all these parameters during the 72-h.p.i. period were recorded for control shrimps and shrimps previously fed for one month with probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici MA18/5M at 10(7) CFU g(-1) of feed. Our results showed that immersion with V. nigripulchritudo led to maximal infection level in the haemolymph at 24 h.p.i. preceding the mortality peak recorded at 48 h.p.i. Significant decreases in the antioxidant defences were detected from 24 h.p.i. and beyond that time infection leaded to increases in oxidative stress level and tissue damage. Compared to control group, shrimps fed the probiotic diet showed lower infection (20% instead of 45% at 24 h.p.i. in the control group) and mortality (25% instead of 41.7% in the control group) levels. Moreover, infected shrimp fed the probiotic compared to uninfected control shrimps exhibited very similar antioxidant status and oxidative stress level. Compared to the infected control group, shrimps fed the probiotic sustained higher antioxidant defences and lower oxidative stress level. This study shows that bacterial infection leads to oxidative stress in L. stylirostris and highlighted a beneficial effect of P

  10. Common foreign and security policy, European security and defence policy of the European Union after the Lisbon treaty

    OpenAIRE

    Leška, Dušan

    2011-01-01

    The Lisbon Treaty opens a new era in the development of the European Union, in creation of a common foreign, security and defence policy. On the basis of the Treaty, the Union got its legal status which allows it to represent itself in the international relations. It anchored a lot of institutional changes which make it possible not only to solve the matter of personification of the Union, but above all to enable a deeper interconnection between the communitaire and inter-governmental cooper...

  11. Expression profiles of defence related cDNAs in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) inoculated with mycorrhizae and Trichoderma harzianum Rifai T32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yung-Chie; Wong, Mui-Yun; Ho, Chai-Ling

    2015-11-01

    Basal stem rot is one of the major diseases of oil palm (Elaies guineensis Jacq.) caused by pathogenic Ganoderma species. Trichoderma and mycorrhizae were proposed to be able to reduce the disease severity. However, their roles in improving oil palm defence system by possibly inducing defence-related genes in the host are not well characterized. To better understand that, transcript profiles of eleven putative defence-related cDNAs in the roots of oil palm inoculated with Trichoderma harzianum T32 and mycorrhizae at different time points were studied. Transcripts encoding putative Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor (EgBBI2) and defensin (EgDFS) increased more than 2 fold in mycorrhizae-treated roots at 6 weeks post inoculation (wpi) compared to those in controls. Transcripts encoding putative dehydrin (EgDHN), glycine-rich RNA binding protein (EgGRRBP), isoflavone reductase (EgIFR), type 2 ribosome inactivating protein (EgT2RIP), and EgDFS increased in the oil palm roots treated with T. harzianum at 6 and/or 12 wpi compared to those in the controls. Some of these genes were also expressed in oil palm roots treated with Ganoderma boninense. This study provides an insight of some defence-related genes induced by Trichoderma and mycorrhizae, and their roles as potential agents to boost the plant defence system. PMID:26322853

  12. Macrophages and cytokines in the early defence against herpes simplex virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellermann-Eriksen Svend

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herpes simplex virus (HSV type 1 and 2 are old viruses, with a history of evolution shared with humans. Thus, it is generally well-adapted viruses, infecting many of us without doing much harm, and with the capacity to hide in our neurons for life. In rare situations, however, the primary infection becomes generalized or involves the brain. Normally, the primary HSV infection is asymptomatic, and a crucial element in the early restriction of virus replication and thus avoidance of symptoms from the infection is the concerted action of different arms of the innate immune response. An early and light struggle inhibiting some HSV replication will spare the host from the real war against huge amounts of virus later in infection. As far as such a war will jeopardize the life of the host, it will be in both interests, including the virus, to settle the conflict amicably. Some important weapons of the unspecific defence and the early strikes and beginning battle during the first days of a HSV infection are discussed in this review. Generally, macrophages are orchestrating a multitude of anti-herpetic actions during the first hours of the attack. In a first wave of responses, cytokines, primarily type I interferons (IFN and tumour necrosis factor are produced and exert a direct antiviral effect and activate the macrophages themselves. In the next wave, interleukin (IL-12 together with the above and other cytokines induce production of IFN-γ in mainly NK cells. Many positive feed-back mechanisms and synergistic interactions intensify these systems and give rise to heavy antiviral weapons such as reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. This results in the generation of an alliance against the viral enemy. However, these heavy weapons have to be controlled to avoid too much harm to the host. By IL-4 and others, these reactions are hampered, but they are still allowed in foci of HSV replication, thus focusing the activity to only relevant sites

  13. Nuclear radiation monitoring instruments for personnel in nuclear disaster for defence needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever since the tragedy of nuclear device exploding over Japan by USA in 1945 awareness exists amongst the armed forces personnel all over the world that a requirement of implementing radiological protection is imminent. Towards this adoption of radiological safety programme is a criterion. In a nuclear war disaster scenario, one encounters initial nuclear radiation (gamma and neutron radiations), gamma radiations from fallout, heat and blast. At certain distances Tanks/ armoured vehicles will survive and 4 R/s radiation level sensing to actuate relays for closing the ports of vehicles is essential, leading to reduction in inhalation, ingestion of fallout radioactivity and reduction in radiation dose received by occupants of the vehicle. Towards this sturdy radiation monitors to indicate gamma dose rate of the order of 1000 R/h, gamma and neutron dosimeters of the order of 1000 cGy with reading instruments are to be developed. These must work in harsh environment and sustain JSS 55555 conditions of army. Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur over past one decade has been involved in developing personnel, area and field monitoring instruments like dosimeters, survey meters, which are useful, acceptable to army personnel, armoured and personnel carrier vehicles, field structures/shelters. Technology transfer after satisfaction of armed forces, product ionisation and supply, maintenance, training has been the endeavor of the DRDO. Herein it is proposed to highlight the techno electronics nuclear radiation monitoring sensors and associated electronics systems developed first time in the country and productionised in bulk for Services for implementing personnel protection. The sensors developed and described are - Radiophotoluminescent Glass (RPLG) for gamma radiation dosimetry , neutron sensitive PIN diode for fast neutron dosimetry, gamma radiation sensitive PIN diode, superheated liquid neutron and gamma sensors. The dosimeter, dose rate meter and field/area instruments are

  14. THE SOUTH AFRICAN DEFENCE FORCE AND OPERATION HOOPER, SOUTHEAST ANGOLA, DECEMBER 1987 TO MARCH 1988

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    Gerhard JJ Oosthuizen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The South African Defence Force (SADF supported UNITA during Operation Modular (June to December 1987 to stop an extensive FAPLA offensive, known as Operation Saludando a Octubre (‘Salute October’. FAPLA and its Cuban–Russian allies intended to eliminate the ‘UNITA problem’ once and for all, and they set the conquest of Mavinga and Jamba as their first target. The SADF–UNITA alliance was, however, able to stop this advance during the Battle of the Lomba River (3 October 1987 successfully, and thereby achieved the first objective of Operation Modular. The remaining phases of Operation Modular (October to December 1987 were unsuccessfully aimed at the primary objective, namely to destroy the FAPLA brigades east of the Cuito River, or at least to force them west, across the Cuito River. The SADF–UNITA allies therefore agreed to continue military operations in the Sixth Military Region in an attempt to achieve this goal. After Operation Modular had formally come to an end early in December 1987, the planning of follow-up Operation Hooper was continued in all earnest. This article focuses on the claim of General Jannie Geldenhuys, head of the SADF (1985–1990, that Operation Hooper was an unqualified success and also on his controversial claim that Operation Hooper entered its last phase with successful attacks by the UNITA–SADF forces on 13 January, and 14 and 25 February 1988. Only the offensive/battle of 14 February 1988 was a success, however, and the SADF–UNITA alliance was unable to destroy the FAPLA brigades east of the Cuito River or to force them across the river at least. Thus, once again, not all the objectives pursued after Operation Modular could be achieved. Within a period of approximately two weeks, two unsuccessful attacks were launched against Tumpo – each time from the same direction or line of approach. The FAPLA forces were very well entrenched and equipped, and they furthermore dominated the air. In contrast

  15. Compact, diode-pumped, solid-state lasers for next generation defence and security sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, M.; Lee, S. T.; Borthwick, A.; McRae, I.; Jackson, D.; Alexander, W.

    2015-06-01

    Low-cost semiconductor laser diode pump sources have made a dramatic impact in sectors such as advanced manufacturing. They are now disrupting other sectors, such as defence and security (D&S), where Thales UK is a manufacturer of sensor systems for application on land, sea, air and man portable. In this talk, we will first give an overview of the market trends and challenges in the D&S sector. Then we will illustrate how low cost pump diodes are enabling new directions in D&S sensors, by describing two diode pumped, solid- state laser products currently under development at Thales UK. The first is a new generation of Laser Target Designators (LTD) that are used to identify targets for the secure guiding of munitions. Current systems are bulky, expensive and require large battery packs to operate. The advent of low cost diode technology, merged with our novel solid-state laser design, has created a designator that will be the smallest, lowest cost, STANAG compatible laser designator on the market. The LTD delivers greater that 50mJ per pulse up to 20Hz, and has compact dimensions of 125×70×55mm. Secondly, we describe an ultra-compact, eye-safe, solid-state laser rangefinder (LRF) with reduced size, weight and power consumption compared to existing products. The LRF measures 100×55×34mm, weighs 200g, and can range to greater than 10km with a single laser shot and at a reprate of 1Hz. This also leverages off advances in laser pump diodes, but also utilises low cost, high reliability, packaging technology commonly found in the telecoms sector. As is common in the D&S sector, the products are designed to work in extreme environments, such as wide temperature range (-40 to +71°C) and high levels of shock and vibration. These disruptive products enable next- generation laser sensors such as rangefinders, target designators and active illuminated imagers.

  16. The influence of space and time on the evolution of altruistic defence: the case of ant slave rebellion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, D; Jordan, F; Pamminger, T; Foitzik, S

    2016-05-01

    How can antiparasite defence traits evolve even if they do not directly benefit their carriers? An example of such an indirect defence is rebellion of enslaved Temnothorax longispinosus ant workers against their social parasite Temnothorax americanus, a slavemaking ant. Ant slaves have been observed to kill their oppressors' offspring, a behaviour from which the sterile slaves cannot profit directly. Parasite brood killing could, however, reduce raiding pressure on related host colonies nearby. We analyse with extensive computer simulations for the Temnothorax slavemaker system under what conditions a hypothetical rebel allele could invade a host population, and in particular, how host-parasite dynamics and population structure influence the rebel allele's success. Exploring a wide range of model parameters, we only found a small number of parameter combinations for which kin selection or multilevel selection could allow a slave rebellion allele to spread in the host population. Furthermore, we did not detect any cases in which the reduction of raiding pressure in the close vicinity of the slavemaker nest would substantially contribute to the inclusive fitness of rebels. This suggests that slave rebellion is not costly and perhaps a side-effect of some other beneficial trait. In some of our simulations, however, even a costly rebellion allele could spread in the population. This was possible when host-parasite interactions led to a metapopulation dynamic with frequent local extinctions and recolonizations of demes by the offspring of few immigrants. PMID:26873305

  17. Maternally derived chemical defences are an effective deterrent against some predators of poison frog tadpoles (Oophaga pumilio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stynoski, Jennifer L; Shelton, Georgia; Stynoski, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Parents defend their young in many ways, including provisioning chemical defences. Recent work in a poison frog system offers the first example of an animal that provisions its young with alkaloids after hatching or birth rather than before. But it is not yet known whether maternally derived alkaloids are an effective defence against offspring predators. We identified the predators of Oophaga pumilio tadpoles and conducted laboratory and field choice tests to determine whether predators are deterred by alkaloids in tadpoles. We found that snakes, spiders and beetle larvae are common predators of O. pumilio tadpoles. Snakes were not deterred by alkaloids in tadpoles. However, spiders were less likely to consume mother-fed O. pumilio tadpoles than either alkaloid-free tadpoles of the red-eyed treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas, or alkaloid-free O. pumilio tadpoles that had been hand-fed with A. callidryas eggs. Thus, maternally derived alkaloids reduce the risk of predation for tadpoles, but only against some predators. PMID:24850895

  18. Operation GRITROCK: the Defence Medical Services' story and emerging lessons from supporting the UK response to the Ebola crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricknell, Martin; Hodgetts, T; Beaton, K; McCourt, A

    2016-06-01

    This paper is a record of the UK Defence Medical Services (DMS) contribution to the UK response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa from the start of planning in July 2014 to the closure of the Ministry of Defence Ebola Virus Disease Treatment Unit at the end of June 2015. The context and wider UK government decisions are summarised. This paper describes the decisions and processes that resulted in the deployment of a DMS delivered Ebola Treatment Unit in conjunction with the Department for International Development and Save the Children. It covers arrangements for medical care for disease and non-battle injury, the Air Transportable Isolator and Force Health Protection policy, and finally, considers the medical lessons from this deployment. The core message is that the UK DMS are the only part of the UK health sector that is trained, equipped, manned and available to rapidly deploy and operate a complete medical unit as part of an international response to a health crisis. PMID:26487710

  19. γ-Aminobutyric acid induces resistance against Penicillium expansum by priming of defence responses in pear fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chen; Zeng, Lizhen; Sheng, Kuang; Chen, Fangxia; Zhou, Tao; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ting

    2014-09-15

    The results from this study showed that treatment with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), at 100-1000 μg/ml, induced strong resistance against blue mould rot caused by Penicillium expansum in pear fruit. Moreover, the activities of five defence-related enzymes (including chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalnine ammonialyase, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase) and the expression of these corresponding genes were markedly and/or promptly enhanced in the treatment with GABA and inoculation with P. expansum compared with those that were treated with GABA or inoculated with pathogen alone. In addition, the treatment of pear with GABA had little adverse effect on the edible quality of the fruit. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that GABA can effectively reduce fungal disease of harvested fruit. Its mechanisms may be closely correlated with the induction of fruit resistance by priming activation and expression of defence-related enzymes and genes upon challenge with pathogen. PMID:24767023

  20. Sulphur dioxide evokes a large scale reprogramming of the grape berry transcriptome associated with oxidative signalling and biotic defence responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Estelle; Ivanova, Aneta; Gordon, Colin S; Whelan, James; Considine, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    The grape and wine industries are heavily reliant on sulphite preservatives. However, the view that sulphites act directly on bacterial and fungal pathogens may be simplistic. Mechanisms of sulphur-enhanced defences are largely unknown; many sulphur-rich compounds enhance plant defences and sulphite can also have oxidative consequences via production of H(2)O(2) or sulphitolysis. To investigate the effects of sulphur dioxide (SO(2) ) on fresh table grapes (Vitis vinifera L. 'Crimson Seedless'), transcriptome analysis was carried out on berries treated with SO(2) under commercial conditions for 21 d. We found a broad perturbation of metabolic processes, consistent with a large-scale stress response. Transcripts encoding putative sulphur-metabolizing enzymes indicated that sulphite was directed towards chelation and conjugation, and away from oxidation to sulphate. The results indicated that redox poise was altered dramatically by SO(2) treatment, evidenced by alterations in plastid and mitochondrial alternative electron transfer pathways, up-regulation of fermentation transcripts and numerous glutathione S-transferases, along with a down-regulation of components involved in redox homeostasis. Features of biotic stress were up-regulated, notably signalling via auxin, ethylene and jasmonates. Taken together, this inventory of transcriptional responses is consistent with a long-term cellular response to oxidative stress, similar to the effects of reactive oxygen species. PMID:21689113

  1. The South African Defence Review (2012 and Private Military / Security Companies (PMSCs: Heralding a Shift from Prohibition to Regulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Juma

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possibility of South Africa enacting a new law regulating private military/security companies (PMSCs beyond the Prohibition of Mercenary Activities and Regulation of Certain Activities in Country of Armed Conflict Act of 2006. It argues that such a possibility arises from the policy direction expressed in the Defence Review of 2012, and the recent developments at the international level, which indicate a shift towards accommodation of PMSCs as legitimate players in the security sector. The article surveys the current state of national and international law relating to PMSCs and illustrates how the emerging shift from prohibition to regulation has affirmed the need for legislative intervention in this field. It concludes that since the future is on the side of regulation and not prohibition, legislation that furthers the policy agenda envisioned by the Defence Review 2012 may be the best tool to unlock the inhibitions of the past and create a viable climate for reframing the debate on domestic law governing private militarism in South Africa.

  2. Systemic resistance and lipoxygenase-related defence response induced in tomato by Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dommes Jacques

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed the ability of Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1 to promote induced systemic resistance (ISR in different host plants. Since ISR is long-lasting and not conducive for development of resistance of the targeted pathogen, this phenomenon can take part of disease control strategies. However, in spite of the numerous examples of ISR induced by PGPR in plants, only a few biochemical studies have associated the protective effect with specific host metabolic changes. Results In this study, we showed the protective effect of this bacterium in tomato against Botrytis cinerea. Following treatment by P. putida BTP1, analyses of acid-hydrolyzed leaf extracts showed an accumulation of antifungal material after pathogen infection. The fungitoxic compounds thus mainly accumulate as conjugates from which active aglycones may be liberated through the activity of hydrolytic enzymes. These results suggest that strain BTP1 can elicit systemic phytoalexin accumulation in tomato as one defence mechanism. On another hand, we have shown that key enzymes of the lipoxygenase pathway are stimulated in plants treated with the bacteria as compared with control plants. Interestingly, this stimulation is observed only after pathogen challenge in agreement with the priming concept almost invariably associated with the ISR phenomenon. Conclusion Through the demonstration of phytoalexin accumulation and LOX pathway stimulation in tomato, this work provides new insights into the diversity of defence mechanisms that are inducible by non-pathogenic bacteria in the context of ISR.

  3. Opisthobranchia (Mollusca, Gastropoda) - more than just slimy slugs. Shell reduction and its implications on defence and foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wägele, Heike; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2005-02-16

    BACKGROUND: In general shell-less slugs are considered to be slimy animals with a rather dull appearance and a pest to garden plants. But marine slugs usually are beautifully coloured animals belonging to the less-known Opisthobranchia. They are characterized by a large array of interesting biological phenomena, usually related to foraging and/or defence. In this paper our knowledge of shell reduction, correlated with the evolution of different defensive and foraging strategies is reviewed, and new results on histology of different glandular systems are included. RESULTS: Based on a phylogeny obtained by morphological and histological data, the parallel reduction of the shell within the different groups is outlined. Major food sources are given and glandular structures are described as possible defensive structures in the external epithelia, and as internal glands. CONCLUSION: According to phylogenetic analyses, the reduction of the shell correlates with the evolution of defensive strategies. Many different kinds of defence structures, like cleptocnides, mantle dermal formations (MDFs), and acid glands, are only present in shell-less slugs. In several cases, it is not clear whether the defensive devices were a prerequisite for the reduction of the shell, or reduction occurred before. Reduction of the shell and acquisition of different defensive structures had an implication on exploration of new food sources and therefore likely enhanced adaptive radiation of several groups. PMID:15715915

  4. Opisthobranchia (Mollusca, Gastropoda – more than just slimy slugs. Shell reduction and its implications on defence and foraging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wägele Heike

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general shell-less slugs are considered to be slimy animals with a rather dull appearance and a pest to garden plants. But marine slugs usually are beautifully coloured animals belonging to the less-known Opisthobranchia. They are characterized by a large array of interesting biological phenomena, usually related to foraging and/or defence. In this paper our knowledge of shell reduction, correlated with the evolution of different defensive and foraging strategies is reviewed, and new results on histology of different glandular systems are included. Results Based on a phylogeny obtained by morphological and histological data, the parallel reduction of the shell within the different groups is outlined. Major food sources are given and glandular structures are described as possible defensive structures in the external epithelia, and as internal glands. Conclusion According to phylogenetic analyses, the reduction of the shell correlates with the evolution of defensive strategies. Many different kinds of defence structures, like cleptocnides, mantle dermal formations (MDFs, and acid glands, are only present in shell-less slugs. In several cases, it is not clear whether the defensive devices were a prerequisite for the reduction of the shell, or reduction occurred before. Reduction of the shell and acquisition of different defensive structures had an implication on exploration of new food sources and therefore likely enhanced adaptive radiation of several groups.

  5. Influence of Rhizoctonia solani and Trichoderma spp. in growth of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, L. and in the induction of plant defence-related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eMayo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many Trichoderma species are well-known for their ability to promote plant growth and defence. We study how the interaction of bean plants with R. solani and/or Trichoderma affect the plants growth and the level of expression of defence-related genes. Trichoderma isolates were evaluated in vitro for their potential to antagonize R. solani. Bioassays were performed in climatic chambers and development of the plants was evaluated. The effect of Trichoderma treatment and/or R. solani infection on the expression of bean defence-related genes was analysed by real-time PCR and the production of ergosterol and squalene was quantified. In vitro growth inhibition of R. solani was between 86% and 58%. In In in vivo assays, the bean plants treated with Trichoderma harzianum T019 always had an increased size respect to control and the plants treated with this isolate did not decrease their size in presence of R. solani. The interaction of plants with R. solani and/or Trichoderma affects the level of expression of seven defence-related genes. Squalene and ergosterol production differences were found among the Trichoderma isolates, T019 showing the highest values for both compounds. T. harzianum T019 shows a positive effect on the level of resistance of bean plants to R. solani. This strain induces the expression of plant defence-related genes and produces a higher level of ergosterol, indicating its ability to grow at a higher rate in the soil, which would explain its positive effects on plant growth and defence in the presence of the pathogen.

  6. Influence informatively-wave therapies by a vehicle tuning «Fork» on the basic links of immune defence of organism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalmykova E.A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the real research was an estimation of action of vehicle tuning FORK on the basic links of immune defence of organism (phagocyter activity, cellular and humoral immunity for patients. Under a supervision there were patients with different violations of the immune system in the sharp and chronic stage in complex therapy of internal illnesses. 27 patients took part in research. It is teenagers in age from 12 to 15 years. It is recommended to utillize informatively-wave therapy for the improvement of function of the immune system of organism, for defence and prophylaxis of different heterospecific somatopathies.

  7. Monitoring the development of intertidal habitats on former agricultural land after the managed realignment of coastal defences at Tollesbury, Essex, UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbutt, RA; Reading, CJ; Wolters, M; Gray, AJ; Rothery, P

    2006-01-01

    The managed realignment of coastal defences and subsequent creation of intertidal habitats is one of several 'soft' engineering options that Could reduce the costs of maintaining embankments and at the same time deliver environmental benefits. The managed realignment at Tollesbury was one of the fir

  8. Analysis of defence systems and a conjugative IncP-1 plasmid in the marine polyaromatic hydrocarbons-degrading bacterium Cycloclasticus sp. 78-ME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimov, Michail M; Crisafi, Francesca; Messina, Enzo; Smedile, Francesco; Lopatina, Anna; Denaro, Renata; Pieper, Dietmar H; Golyshin, Peter N; Giuliano, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Marine prokaryotes have evolved a broad repertoire of defence systems to protect their genomes from lateral gene transfer including innate or acquired immune systems and infection-induced programmed cell suicide and dormancy. Here we report on the analysis of multiple defence systems present in the genome of the strain Cycloclasticus sp. 78-ME isolated from petroleum deposits of the tanker 'Amoco Milford Haven'. Cycloclasticus are ubiquitous bacteria globally important in polyaromatic hydrocarbons degradation in marine environments. Two 'defence islands' were identified in 78-ME genome: the first harbouring CRISPR-Cas with toxin-antitoxin system, while the second was composed by an array of genes for toxin-antitoxin and restriction-modification proteins. Among all identified spacers of CRISPR-Cas system only seven spacers match sequences of phages and plasmids. Furthermore, a conjugative plasmid p7ME01, which belongs to a new IncP-1θ ancestral archetype without any accessory mobile elements was found in 78-ME. Our results provide the context to the co-occurrence of diverse defence mechanisms in the genome of Cycloclasticus sp. 78-ME, which protect the genome of this highly specialized PAH-degrader. This study contributes to the further understanding of complex networks established in petroleum-based microbial communities. PMID:27345842

  9. Extraction and quantification of "condensed tannins" as a measure of plant anti-herbivore defence? Revisiting an old problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Martin; Baumann, Birgit; Andary, Claude; Linsenmair, Eduard; McKey, Doyle

    2002-10-01

    Contents of phenolic compounds in leaf extracts often serve as a measure of plant anti-herbivore defence. This method suffers from the multifunctionality of phenolics and from problems with their colorimetric quantification. Here we present further evidence for the pertinence of these problems. Contents of condensed tannins (CCT) were spectrophotometrically quantified in leaf extracts of 11 closely related mimosoid species, and Spodoptera littoralis caterpillars were reared on artificial diet containing these extracts. The relationship of CCT with caterpillar growth differed considerably among plant species, since both positive and negative correlations were detected. There was, however, a negative correlation of CCT with fungal spore germination, indicating a role of these compounds in resistance to fungi. Detailed knowledge on the structure and biological function of defensive compounds and on the overall composition of leaves is required to estimate a plant's defensive efficacy against a particular group of enemies.

  10. A possible role for polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the defence against recrudescent herpes simplex virus infection in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 51Cr release assay has been used to demonstrate that human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) can damage herpes simplex infected target cells sensitized with antiviral antibody. Effective sensitizing antibodies were found in both serum and saliva of all those persons tested who were subject to recurrent cold sores. PMNL were much less effective as killer cells than peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but as they are the predominant inflammatory cell within the HSVl lesion they may be, quantitatively, more important. The cytotoxic effects of both PMNL and mononuclear cells were significantly reduced by prostaglandin El as well as by several drugs that were tested. It is suggested that antibody dependent PMNL-mediated cytotoxicity may play a role in the human host defences against recrudescent herpes simplex infection. (author)

  11. THE ROLE OF MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY IN PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS: THE SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL DEFENCE FORCE AS AN EXAMPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A.J. Van Dyk

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is an interdisciplinary publication focusing on the role anddevelopment of military psychology in the South African context. Peacekeepingoperations and the results of the first and fifth deployment of the South AfricanNational Defence Force (SANDF in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC areused as background to illustrate the relevance of military psychology in suchoperations. Peacekeeping operations involve military and often civilian personnel.The nature of peacekeeping operations has become increasingly complex andstressful. It is hypothesised that the stressors that members experience may have adestructive effect on their morale and on the cohesion of the force, and that it couldlead to alcohol and drug abuse (Ballone 2000.This article discusses peacekeeping stress theoretically and evaluates thestressors experienced by members of the first and fifth deployment of the SANDF inthe Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC. The contribution of military psychologyin these and other peacekeeping operations in the South African context is alsoexplored.

  12. Michoacanas self-defence, a regional variation of the “war on drugs trafficking” in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Pérez Caballero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The following study analyses the nature of the self-defence forces that arose in February 2013 in Michoacán, a Mexican state located on the Pacific coast. The novelty of this movement is underlined: its ambiguity with respect to the law, its use of modern tactics and its continuity with the ideological assumptions of the “war on drugs”. Furthermore, questions are posed about the similarities and differences from forms of violence such as paramilitarism and insurgency, and from other groups such as the community police operating in Guerrero state, which orders the Michoacán. Finally, the paper concludes with the issues that the rise, tolerance and legalisation of this type of movement raise for the country.

  13. Long wave infrared metamaterials and nano-materials design, simulation, and laboratory test for target camouflage in the defence application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertoni, Alessandro

    2011-11-01

    The thermal analysis (TA) of the wave propagation in the long-wave (LWIR) infrared bands, performed on metamaterials and nano-materials, is suitable for manufacturing a new type of infrared (IR) thermal vision camouflage, useful for defence, military and security application and to evaluate the capability of new kind of materials to block night vision (NV) thermal sighting capabilities as new countermeasure technology. This is mainly generated by the very detailed signature characterization database, available in most automatic vision systems that are able to detect targets by the IR spectral signature provided by the IR sensor. These metamaterials, called photonics band gap devices (PBG) or more in general photonic crystal (PhC), works on IR photons providing absorbing, transmission and reflecting bands. All the optical properties are function of the specific nano design tuned in the thermal wavelength.

  14. Understanding the Role of Bureaucracy in the European Security and Defence Policy: The State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurer Heidi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of the European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP in 1999 has led to the creation of a whole range of bureaucratic bodies in Brussels and the national capitals. These bodies support the crisis management operations of the European Union. This review article presents the state of the art of academic research on the role of bureaucracy in this recent policy area. It argues that the growing institutional complexity and the constant interaction between actors at the national and European level require scholars to go beyond the dominant approaches of International Relations. Using insights from comparative politics, public administration and multi-level governance, this article considers four important questions: who these civil servants are, why they matter, how they interact, and how they are controlled politically and democratically.

  15. Comparison of defence responses to Botrytis cinerea infection in tomato plants propagated in vitro and grown in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Patykowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Defence reactions: O2 - generation, superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase activities after B. cinerea infection in tomato plants propagated in vitro and grown in vivo have been compared. Infection resulted in rapid O2 - generation. Superoxide dismutase activity increase was slower than O2 - response. In plants propagated in vitro catalase and guaiacol peroxidase activities after infection were induced less strongly than in plants grown in vivo. K2HPO4 pretreatment of plants grown in vitro enhanced significantly the activities of catalase and guaiacol peroxidase after infection. Slight restriction of B. cinerea infection development in in vitro propagated plants pretreated with K2HP04 was observed.

  16. Konsekwencjalizm a tajemnica: obrona ezoterycznej moralności [SECRECY IN CONSEQUENTIALISM: A DEFENCE OF ESOTERIC MORALITY

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    Katarzyna de Lazari Radek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sidgwick’s defence of esoteric morality has been heavily criticized, for examplein Bernard Williams’s condemnation of it as a ‘Government House utilitarianism’.It is also at odds with the idea of morality defended by Kant, Rawls, Bernard Gert,Brad Hooker, and T.M. Scanlon. Yet it does seem to be an implication of consequentialismthat it is sometimes right to do in secret what it would not be right todo openly, or to advocate publicly. We defend Sidgwick on this issue, and showthat accepting the possibility of esoteric morality makes it possible to explain whywe should accept consequentialism, even while we may feel disapproval towardssome of its implications.

  17. Lactobacillus acidophilus induces virus immune defence genes in murine dendritic cells by a Toll-like receptor-2-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Gudrun; Rasmussen, Simon; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Nielsen, Birgit Nøhr; Jarmer, Hanne; Jespersen, Lene; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2010-10-01

    Lactobacilli are probiotics that, among other health-promoting effects, have been ascribed immunostimulating and virus-preventive properties. Certain Lactobacillus spp. have been shown to possess strong interleukin-12 (IL-12) -inducing properties. As IL-12 production depends on the up-regulation of type I interferons (IFNs), we hypothesized that the strong IL-12-inducing capacity of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM in murine bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) is caused by an up-regulation of IFN-β, which subsequently induces IL-12 and the double-stranded RNA binding Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR-3). The expression of the genes encoding IFN-β, TLR-3, IL-12 and IL-10 in DCs upon stimulation with L. acidophilus NCFM was determined. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM induced a much stronger expression of Ifn-β, Il-12 and Il-10 compared with the synthetic double-stranded RNA ligand Poly I:C, whereas the levels of expressed Tlr-3 were similar. Whole genome microarray gene expression analysis revealed that other genes related to viral defence were significantly up-regulated and among the strongest induced genes in DCs stimulated with L. acidophilus NCFM. The ability to induce IFN-β was also detected in another L. acidophilus strain (X37), but was not a property of other probiotic strains tested, i.e. Bifidobacterium bifidum Z9 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. The IFN-β expression was markedly reduced in TLR-2(-/-) DCs, dependent on endocytosis, and the major cause of the induction of Il-12 and Tlr-3 in DCs stimulated with L. acidophilus NCFM. Collectively, our results reveal that certain lactobacilli trigger the expression of viral defence genes in DCs in a TLR-2 manner dependent on IFN-β. PMID:20545783

  18. An evaluation of the defence in depth concept in the light of the Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the fundamental bases of reactor safety has been the 'defence in depth' concept. Valuable lessons for plants outside the USA can be learned by studying both the strengths and weaknesses of all the various lines of defence in the light of the TMI findings. These lessons can be summarized as follows: Quality: lack of quality led to the initiation of the event through frequent trips, one of which eventually led to the sticking open of the PORV. It also led to wrong diagnosis of the fault. Multiple failures during the many hours the incident lasted distracted the operator and made a careful diagnosis of its causes and progress impossible. Reactor protection system: the Babcock and Wilcox PWR, with its once-through steam generators (OTSG), responds more rapidly than other LWRs to some operating transients. This does not necessarily result in a less safe system provided that the reactor protection system is designed with the fast response in mind, e.g. by providing anticipatory trips. This emphasizes the importance of a systems approach to design rather than too much reliance on codes and standards, which may not recognize important plant differences. Safety systems: For similar reasons the low water content of the OTSG could have been compensated for by a higher reliability in the emergency feed system. In US practice the operator plays an important role in aligning safety systems, whereas in Europe there is more extensive automation. The latter system leads to an analysis of a wider spectrum of faults to ensure that the automatics respond correctly in all circumstances. Containment: The TMI incident showed that the containment can be very valuable for situations where far more core damage and hydrogen production occurs than is predicted for design basis accidents. Continuing containment integrity depends on core cooling and on the correct operation or isolation of many other systems, whose role in such accidents has not always been recognized

  19. The almost invisible league: crypsis and association between minute fishes and shrimps as a possible defence against visually hunting predators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Nobre Carvalho

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Camouflage is one of the most widespread defence modes used by substrate-dwelling animals, whereas transparency is generally found in open-water organisms. Both these defence types are regarded as effective against visually guided predators. We present here three assemblages of similarly-sized freshwater fish and shrimp species which apparently rely on camouflage and transparency to evade some of their potential predators. In one of the associations, there is a transition from cryptic colours and translucency to transparency of the component species according to the position each of them occupies in the habitat. The likeness between the fishes and the shrimps is here regarded as a type of protective association similar to numerical or social mimicry. Additionally, we suggest that the assemblage may contain Batesian-like mimicry components.Camuflagem é um dos tipos de defesa mais bem distribuídos entre os animais que vivem no substrato, sendo a transparência geralmente encontrada em organismos pelágicos. Ambos os tipos de defesa são considerados como eficientes contra predadores visualmente orientados. Apresentamos três conjuntos de espécies de peixes e camarões de tamanhos similares, que aparentemente dependem da camuflagem e transparência para escapar de potenciais predadores. Em uma das associações, há uma transição de coloração críptica ou translúcida para transparente, de acordo com a posição que cada espécie ocupa no habitat. A semelhança entre peixes e camarões é aqui considerada como um tipo de associação protetiva, similar a mimetismo numérico ou social. Além disso, sugerimos que o conjunto pode conter elementos similares ao mimetismo Batesiano.

  20. Investigations into the influence of therapeutic measures on the repair of spontaneous mechanisms of defence following radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations into the influence of therapeutic measures on the repair of spontaneous mechanisms of defence following radiation injury. The aim of this project was to develop procedures for the repair of the body's own mechanisms of defence following radiation injury and to test these on the basis of animal models. After consultation of the relevant literature and in vivo experiments as a preliminary to the in vivo studies in dogs, recombinant human colony-stimulating factor rhGM-CSF was chosen from among a series of different cytokinins. The influence of rhGM-CSF on granulocytopoiesis and monocytophoiesis was at first studied in an animal having undisturbed bone marrow function. Treatment with daily doses of 30 μg/kg on five consecutive days led to a markedly pronounced increase of granulocytopoiesis and an only modest increase of the monocyte concentration of the blood. For the studies in irradiated dogs, treatment was carried out over a period of 21 days. Each of 2 dogs received daily doses of 10 μg/kg or 30 μg/kg administered by subcutaneous injection. These were in each case divided into two equal fractions being given in the morning and at night. The results lead to the conclusion that the treatment of irradiated individuals with rhGM-CSF alone (monotherapy) may be expected to have favourable effects in respect of granulocytopoiesis and monocytopoiesis. This appears, however, to hold only for cases where the radiation damage to the bone marrow is not much more pronounced than that from homogeneous wholebody irradiation using doses in the range between 3 and 3.5 Gy. It is still open to discussion, if and to which extent such treatments with rhGM-CSF are associated with untoward effects on certain hematological parameters. (orig./MG)

  1. Foliar treatments with Gaultheria procumbens essential oil induce defence responses and resistance against a fungal pathogen in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eVergnes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil from Gaultheria procumbens is mainly composed of methylsalicylate (>96%, a compound which can be metabolized in plant tissues to salicylic acid, a phytohormone inducing plant immunity against microbial pathogens. The potential use of G. procumbens essential oil as a biocontrol agent was evaluated on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of a selection of defence genes was detected 1, 6 and 24 hours after essential oil treatment (0.1 ml/L using a high-throughput qPCR-based microfluidic technology. Control treatments included methyl jasmonate and a commercialized salicylic acid analog, benzo(1,2,3-thiadiazole-7carbothiolic acid (BTH. Strong induction of defence markers known to be regulated by the salicylic acid pathway was observed after the treatment with G. procumbens essential oil. Treatment induced the accumulation of total salicylic acid in the wild -type Arabidopsis line Col-0 and analysis of the Arabidopsis line sid2, mutated in a salicylic acid biosynthetic gene, revealed that approximately 30% of methylsalicylate sprayed on the leaves penetrated inside plant tissues and was demethylated by endogenous esterases. Induction of plant resistance by G. procumbens essential oil was tested following inoculation with a GFP-expressing strain of the Arabidopsis fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. Flurorescence measurement of infected tissues revealed that treatments led to a strong reduction (60% of pathogen development and that the efficacy of the G. procumbens essential oil was similar to the commercial product BION®. Together, these results show that the G. procubens essential oil is a natural source of methylsalicylate which can be formulated to develop new biocontrol products.

  2. Functional analysis of Arabidopsis immune-related MAPKs uncovers a role for MPK3 as negative regulator of inducible defences

    KAUST Repository

    Frei dit Frey, Nicolas

    2014-06-30

    Background Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key regulators of immune responses in animals and plants. In Arabidopsis, perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) activates the MAPKs MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6. Increasing information depicts the molecular events activated by MAMPs in plants, but the specific and cooperative contributions of the MAPKs in these signalling events are largely unclear. Results In this work, we analyse the behaviour of MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6 mutants in early and late immune responses triggered by the MAMP flg22 from bacterial flagellin. A genome-wide transcriptome analysis reveals that 36% of the flg22-upregulated genes and 68% of the flg22-downregulated genes are affected in at least one MAPK mutant. So far MPK4 was considered as a negative regulator of immunity, whereas MPK3 and MPK6 were believed to play partially redundant positive functions in defence. Our work reveals that MPK4 is required for the regulation of approximately 50% of flg22-induced genes and we identify a negative role for MPK3 in regulating defence gene expression, flg22-induced salicylic acid accumulation and disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. Among the MAPK-dependent genes, 27% of flg22-upregulated genes and 76% of flg22-downregulated genes require two or three MAPKs for their regulation. The flg22-induced MAPK activities are differentially regulated in MPK3 and MPK6 mutants, both in amplitude and duration, revealing a highly interdependent network. Conclusions These data reveal a new set of distinct functions for MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6 and indicate that the plant immune signalling network is choreographed through the interplay of these three interwoven MAPK pathways.

  3. Change in phenotypic plasticity of a morphological defence in Daphnia galeata (Crustacea: Cladocera in a selection experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi FUJII

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Some water fleas Daphnia change their head morphology to reduce predation risk in response to chemical substances (kairomones released from larvae of the invertebrate predator Chaoborus (Insecta: Diptera. We tested for evidence of the costs associated with elongation of the head spine in Daphnia galeata and the consequences of these costs on the inducibility of head spine elongation in predictable and unpredictable environments. We exposed D. galeata in outdoor experimental ponds to conditions under which predation pressure by Chaoborus larvae and the concentration of kairomones from this predator were controlled for about 70 days. In the laboratory, we then used Daphnia clones collected from the outdoor ponds to investigate the inducibility of head spine formation in response to Chaoborus kairomones. The inducibility of head spine formation increased in D. galeata from the ponds that had contained both predators and kairomones, whereas in water fleas from the ponds containing only kairomones the plasticity (inducibility of head spine formation decreased compared with that in the control ponds. These results suggest that the production of a defensive head spine, its phenotypic plasticity, or both entail some costs. Contrary to our predictions, exposure to Chaoborus kairomones in the laboratory resulted in head lengths that were not significantly different among any of the clones from the three outdoor treatments. We found no evidence for costs associated with head spine elongation in terms of fecundity, time to maturity, or intrinsic rate of natural population increase. Average within-clone partial correlations calculated for head length and intrinsic rate of natural population increase, corrected for body length, were not significantly negative, indicating no cost of defence. This was probably because food conditions in the laboratory were so good that the costs of defence could not be detected. Furthermore, community-level changes, such as

  4. Temporal Dynamics of Antioxidant Defence System in Relation to Polyamine Catabolism in Rice under Direct-Seeded and Transplanted Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manisha KUMARI; Bavita ASTHIR; Navtej Singh BAINS

    2014-01-01

    Six rice cultivars viz. PR120, PR116, Feng Ai Zan, PR115, PAU201 and Punjab Mehak 1 under the direct-seeded and transplanted conditions were used to investigate the involvement of antioxidative defence system in relation to polyamine catabolism in temporal regulation of developing grains. Activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APx), guaiacol peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), polyamine oxidases (PAO) and contents of ascorbate,α-tocopherol, proline and polyamines increased gradually until mid-milky stage and then declined towards maturity stage under both planting conditions. The transplanted condition led to higher activities of antioxidative enzymes (APx, GPx and CAT) and contents of ascorbate,α-tocopherol and proline whereas the direct-seeded condition had elevated levels of PAO and SOD activities and contents of polyamines, lipid peroxide and hydrogen peroxide. Cultivars Feng Ai Zan and PR120 exhibited superior tolerance over other cultivars by accumulating higher contents of ascorbate,α-tocopherol and proline with increasing level of PAO and SOD activities under the direct-seeded condition. However, under the transplanted condition PR116 and PAU201 showed higher activities of antioxidative enzymes with decreasing content of lipid peroxide. Therefore, we concluded that under the direct-seeded condition, enhancements of polyamines content and PAO activity enabled rice cultivars more tolerant to oxidative stress, while under the transplanted condition, antioxidative defence with decreasing of lipid peroxide content was closely associated with the protection of grains by maintaining membrane integrity during rice grain filling. The results indicated that temporal dynamics of H2O2 metabolic machinery was strongly up-regulated especially at the mid-milky stage.

  5. Rapid metabolic profiling of Nicotiana tabacum defence responses against Phytophthora nicotianae using direct infrared laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and principal component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weis Engelbert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful defence of tobacco plants against attack from the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae includes a type of local programmed cell death called the hypersensitive response. Complex and not completely understood signaling processes are required to mediate the development of this defence in the infected tissue. Here, we demonstrate that different families of metabolites can be monitored in small pieces of infected, mechanically-stressed, and healthy tobacco leaves using direct infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The defence response was monitored for 1 - 9 hours post infection. Results Infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry allows rapid and simultaneous detection in both negative and positive ion mode of a wide range of naturally occurring primary and secondary metabolites. An unsupervised principal component analysis was employed to identify correlations between changes in metabolite expression (obtained at different times and sample treatment conditions and the overall defence response. A one-dimensional projection of the principal components 1 and 2 obtained from positive ion mode spectra was used to generate a Biological Response Index (BRI. The BRI obtained for each sample treatment was compared with the number of dead cells found in the respective tissue. The high correlation between these two values suggested that the BRI provides a rapid assessment of the plant response against the pathogen infection. Evaluation of the loading plots of the principal components (1 and 2 reveals a correlation among three metabolic cascades and the defence response generated in infected leaves. Analysis of selected phytohormones by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry verified our findings. Conclusion The described methodology allows for rapid assessment of infection-specific changes in the plant metabolism, in particular

  6. 欧盟《国防指令》及中国针对欧盟装备采购的准备工作%EU Defence Directive:Content and Impl ied Preparatory Work to Be Done for Defence Procurement from EU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王加为; 侯莉萍

    2016-01-01

    The Defence Directive is a directive disciplining all the Member States in defence pro-curement,which has been transferred to the national law of all the Member States by 2013.For a bet-ter perception of EU defence procurement policy,and to get ready in future defence procurement from EU,the weak points of China’s research into EU law of defence procurement are listed and the con-tent of Defence Directive is discussed in five aspects,namely coverage,procurement procedures,se-curity of supply and information,offsets and subcontracts,and finally,review and remedies.It is ar-gued that China should,as well as of personnel cultivation,reinforce the study of EU laws of public procurement and defence procurement,including the EU position of offsets in military trade,review and remedies,and competitive dialogue,to take a vantage point in the defence procurement from EU.%《国防指令》是欧盟成员国进行国防采购时必须遵守的指令,各成员国已于2013年全部实现《国防指令》向国内法的转变。为更好地了解欧盟国防采购政策并在未来对欧盟装备采购中做好准备工作,针对目前我国对欧盟国防采购研究的不足,对欧盟《国防指令》的内容按适用范围、采购方式、供货与信息安全、抵消贸易与分包、复议与救济的顺序进行了分析。指出为了做好未来对欧盟装备采购工作,应当加强对欧盟公共采购制度和军事采购制度的研究,如欧盟在军事贸易中对抵消贸易的态度、复议和救济制度和竞争性对话等,并有针对性地做好人才培养工作。

  7. ZmMPK5 is required for the NADPH oxidase-mediated self-propagation of apoplastic H2O2 in brassinosteroid-induced antioxidant defence in leaves of maize

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Aying; Zhang, Jun; Ye, Nenghui; Cao, Jianmei; Tan, Mingpu; Zhang, Jianhua; Jiang, Mingyi

    2010-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) have been shown to induce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation, and BR-induced H2O2 up-regulates antioxidant defence systems in plants. However, the mechanisms by which BR-induced H2O2 regulates antioxidant defence systems in plants remain to be determined. In the present study, the role of ZmMPK5, a mitogen-activated protein kinase, in BR-induced anitioxidant defence and the relationship between the activation of ZmMPK5 and H2O2 production in BR signalling were invest...

  8. Plasticity of the β-trefoil protein fold in the recognition and control of invertebrate predators and parasites by a fungal defence system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Schubert

    Full Text Available Discrimination between self and non-self is a prerequisite for any defence mechanism; in innate defence, this discrimination is often mediated by lectins recognizing non-self carbohydrate structures and so relies on an arsenal of host lectins with different specificities towards target organism carbohydrate structures. Recently, cytoplasmic lectins isolated from fungal fruiting bodies have been shown to play a role in the defence of multicellular fungi against predators and parasites. Here, we present a novel fruiting body lectin, CCL2, from the ink cap mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea. We demonstrate the toxicity of the lectin towards Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster and present its NMR solution structure in complex with the trisaccharide, GlcNAcβ1,4[Fucα1,3]GlcNAc, to which it binds with high specificity and affinity in vitro. The structure reveals that the monomeric CCL2 adopts a β-trefoil fold and recognizes the trisaccharide by a single, topologically novel carbohydrate-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of CCL2 and identification of C. elegans mutants resistant to this lectin show that its nematotoxicity is mediated by binding to α1,3-fucosylated N-glycan core structures of nematode glycoproteins; feeding with fluorescently labeled CCL2 demonstrates that these target glycoproteins localize to the C. elegans intestine. Since the identified glycoepitope is characteristic for invertebrates but absent from fungi, our data show that the defence function of fruiting body lectins is based on the specific recognition of non-self carbohydrate structures. The trisaccharide specifically recognized by CCL2 is a key carbohydrate determinant of pollen and insect venom allergens implying this particular glycoepitope is targeted by both fungal defence and mammalian immune systems. In summary, our results demonstrate how the plasticity of a common protein fold can contribute to the recognition and control of antagonists by an innate

  9. Jasmonate and ethylene dependent defence gene expression and suppression of fungal virulence factors: two essential mechanisms of Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottwald Sven

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fusarium head blight (FHB caused by Fusarium species like F. graminearum is a devastating disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum worldwide. Mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol produced by the fungus affect plant and animal health, and cause significant reductions of grain yield and quality. Resistant varieties are the only effective way to control this disease, but the molecular events leading to FHB resistance are still poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling was conducted for the winter wheat cultivars Dream (moderately resistant and Lynx (susceptible. The gene expressions at 32 and 72 h after inoculation with Fusarium were used to trace possible defence mechanisms and associated genes. A comparative qPCR was carried out for selected genes to analyse the respective expression patterns in the resistant cultivars Dream and Sumai 3 (Chinese spring wheat. Results Among 2,169 differentially expressed genes, two putative main defence mechanisms were found in the FHB-resistant Dream cultivar. Both are defined base on their specific mode of resistance. A non-specific mechanism was based on several defence genes probably induced by jasmonate and ethylene signalling, including lipid-transfer protein, thionin, defensin and GDSL-like lipase genes. Additionally, defence-related genes encoding jasmonate-regulated proteins were up-regulated in response to FHB. Another mechanism based on the targeted suppression of essential Fusarium virulence factors comprising proteases and mycotoxins was found to be an essential, induced defence of general relevance in wheat. Moreover, similar inductions upon fungal infection were frequently observed among FHB-responsive genes of both mechanisms in the cultivars Dream and Sumai 3. Conclusions Especially ABC transporter, UDP-glucosyltransferase, protease and protease inhibitor genes associated with the defence mechanism against fungal virulence factors are apparently active in different resistant

  10. CYP94-mediated jasmonoyl-isoleucine hormone oxidation shapes jasmonate profiles and attenuates defence responses to Botrytis cinerea infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Yann; Widemann, Emilie; Miesch, Laurence; Pinot, Franck; Heitz, Thierry

    2015-07-01

    Induced resistance to the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea depends on jasmonate metabolism and signalling in Arabidopsis. We have presented here extensive jasmonate profiling in this pathosystem and investigated the impact of the recently reported jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) catabolic pathway mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP94) enzymes. Using a series of mutant and overexpressing (OE) plant lines, we showed that CYP94B3 and CYP94C1 are integral components of the fungus-induced jasmonate metabolic pathway and control the abundance of oxidized conjugated but also some unconjugated derivatives, such as sulfated 12-HSO4-JA. Despite causing JA-Ile overaccumulation due to impaired oxidation, CYP94 deficiency had negligible impacts on resistance, associated with enhanced JAZ repressor transcript levels. In contrast, plants overexpressing (OE) CYP94B3 or CYP94C1 were enriched in 12-OH-JA-Ile or 12-COOH-JA-Ile respectively. This shift towards oxidized JA-Ile derivatives was concomitant with strongly impaired defence gene induction and reduced disease resistance. CYP94B3-OE, but unexpectedly not CYP94C1-OE, plants displayed reduced JA-Ile levels compared with the wild type, suggesting that increased susceptibility in CYP94C1-OE plants may result from changes in the hormone oxidation ratio rather than absolute changes in JA-Ile levels. Consistently, while feeding JA-Ile to seedlings triggered strong induction of JA pathway genes, induction was largely reduced or abolished after feeding with the CYP94 products 12-OH-JA-Ile and 12-COOH-JA-Ile, respectively. This trend paralleled in vitro pull-down assays where 12-COOH-JA-Ile was unable to promote COI1-JAZ9 co-receptor assembly. Our results highlight the dual function of CYP94B3/C1 in antimicrobial defence: by controlling hormone oxidation status for signal attenuation, these enzymes also define JA-Ile as a metabolic hub directing jasmonate profile complexity. PMID:25903915

  11. Creatine-induced activation of antioxidative defence in myotube cultures revealed by explorative NMR-based metabonomics and proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Niels

    2010-02-01

    antioxidative defence system. The suggested improvement of the antioxidative defence was confirmed by a reduced intracellular DCFH2 oxidation with increasing concentrations of CMH in the 24 h pre-incubation medium. Conclusions The explorative approach of this study combined with the determination of a decreased intracellular DCFH2 oxidation revealed an additional stimulation of cellular antioxidative mechanisms when myotubes were exposed to CMH. This may contribute to an increased exercise performance mediated by increased ability to cope with training-induced increases in oxidative stress.

  12. The Study and Design of the Defence System of the Hacker Attacks%黑客入侵防护体系研究与设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宝旭; 徐菁; 许榕生

    2001-01-01

    This article introduces a basic background of crackers and what they have done do harm to users on the internet at first;then some well known attack tools are enumerated and introduced. At last a highly efficient defence system that integrates author's experience and research results is described in detail,on the base of a complete analysis of cracker's attack methods and defence ways against these attacks.%该文全面地介绍了黑客及黑客攻击造成的危害,列举了一些著名的黑客攻击工具,在详细分析黑客攻击手段及其防范措施的基础上,结合实践经验和研究成果,给出一个有效的黑客入侵防护体系的设计与实现。

  13. Silencing of acidic pathogenesis-related PR-1 genes increases extracellular beta-(1 -> 3)-glucanase activity at the onset of tobacco defence reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riviere, M.P.; Marais, A.; Ponchet, M.;

    2008-01-01

    silenced. Plants lacking extracellular PR-1s were more susceptible than wild-type plants to the oomycete Phytophthora parasitica but displayed unaffected systemic acquired resistance and developmental resistance to this pathogen. Treatment with salicylic acid up-regulates the PR-1g gene, encoding a basic...... protein of the PR-1 family, in PR-1-deficient tobacco, indicating that PR-1 expression may repress that of PR-1g. This shows that acidic PR-1s are dispensable for expression of salicylic acid-dependent acquired resistances against P. parasitica and may reveal a functional overlap in tobacco defence......The class 1 pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are thought to be involved in plant defence responses, but their molecular functions are unknown. The function of PR-1 was investigated in tobacco by generating stable PR-1a-silenced lines in which other acidic PR-1 genes (PR-1b and PR-1c) were...

  14. Justice not revenge: the international criminal court and the ‘grounds to exclude criminal responsibility’: defences or negation of criminality?

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Jérémie

    2006-01-01

    Human rights law has evolved based on the idea of fait trial and protection of the accused, however with the development of international criminal law human rights law has focused on the notion of prosecution. During the drafting of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court there was a large debate on whether the Statute should include a reference to defences that exclude the responsibility of the accused. This article explores the debates during the drafting of Article 31 of th...

  15. The genome-defence gene Tex19.1 suppresses LINE-1 retrotransposons in the placenta and prevents intra-uterine growth retardation in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Reichmann, Judith; Reddington, James P.; Best, Diana; Read, David; Ollinger, Rupert; Meehan, Richard R.; Adams, Ian R.

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in suppressing retrotransposon activity in mammalian genomes, yet there are stages of mammalian development where global hypomethylation puts the genome at risk of retrotransposition-mediated genetic instability. Hypomethylated primordial germ cells appear to limit this risk by expressing a cohort of retrotransposon-suppressing genome-defence genes whose silencing depends on promoter DNA methylation. Here, we investigate whether similar mechanisms opera...

  16. Increased genetic diversity as a defence against parasites is undermined by social parasites: Microdon mutabilis hoverflies infesting Formica lemani ant colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, M. G.; Schönrogge, K.; Elmes, G. W.; Thomas, J A

    2006-01-01

    Genetic diversity can benefit social insects by providing variability in immune defences against parasites and pathogens. However, social parasites of ants infest colonies and not individuals, and for them a different relationship between genetic diversity and resistance may exist. Here, we investigate the genetic variation, assessed using up to 12 microsatellite loci, of workers in 91 Formica lemani colonies in relation to their infestation by the specialist social parasite Microdon mutabili...

  17. Antioxidant defence-related genetic variants are not associated with higher risk of secondary thyroid cancer after treatment of malignancy in childhood or adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodusek Ana Lina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is one of the most common secondary cancers after treatment of malignancy in childhood or adolescence. Thyroid gland is very sensitive to the carcinogenic effect of ionizing radiation, especially in children. Imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidant factors may play a role in thyroid carcinogenesis. Our study aimed to assess the relationship between genetic variability of antioxidant defence-related genes and the risk of secondary thyroid cancer after treatment of malignancy in childhood or adolescence.

  18. The Relationship between Role Conception, Judicial Behaviour and Perceived Procedural Justice: Some Explorative Remarks in the Context of Dutch Post-Defence Hearings

    OpenAIRE

    Hilke A.M. Grootelaar; Tjalling A. Waterbolk; Jakoline Winkels

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of eight case studies of post-defence hearings in a Dutch court, in which the judge was questioned about his role conception, judicial behaviour at the hearing was observed and parties were interviewed about their perception of procedural justice after the hearing. A large part of the findings are in line with former research on procedural justice. Nevertheless, self-generated answers by the respondents revealed interesting miscellaneous findings. The main aim ...

  19. A critical analysis of anti-Islamisation and anti-immigration discourse:the case of the English Defence League and Britain First

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel Kader, Noha

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the discursive strategies employed by two of the far-right movements in the UK, specifically in the English Defence League (EDL) and Britain First, when dealing with immigration and what they term as the “Islamisation of Britain”. The paper will demonstrate how these movements frame their arguments by employing strategies of positive-self and negative-other representation. The analysis will rely on the Discourse Historical Approach (DHA) as a framework for examining the mi...

  20. The English Defence League’s ‘rational Islamophobia’ is a racist discourse, but it is not confined to the EDL

    OpenAIRE

    Kassimeris, George; Jackson, Leonie

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of the English Defence League in 2009 led to renewed discussion of the extent and nature of Islamophobia in British society. George Kassimeris and Leonie Jackson have studied the discourse and ideology of the EDL based on the organisation’s public statements. They find that the ‘rational Islamophobia’ espoused by the EDL does constitute racism, but of a socially acceptable form that is also common among the media, politicians and intellectuals.

  1. The predictive validity of the selection battery used for junior leader training within the South African national defence force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Muller

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of the study was to determine the predictive validity of the test battery used for the selection of junior leaders in the South African National Defence Force. A sample of 96 respondents completed certain indices of the SPEEX-Battery as well as the Advanced Ravens Progressive Matrices test. The test results were compared with the course results. Using canonical correlation analysis, a highly significant relationship was found between the independent variables and the dependent variables (r = 0,787; p is less than 0,00005. The predictors with the highest loadings were cognitive ability, conceptualisation, reading comprehension, listening potential, physical stress, and mental stress. Opsomming Die hoofdoelwit van die studie was om die voorspellingsgeldigheid van die toetsbattery vir keuring van junior leiers in die Suid Afrikaanse Nasionale Weermag te evalueer. ’n Steekproef van 96 respondente het sekere indekse van die SPEEX-Battery asook die Advanced Ravens Progressive Matrices toets voltooi. Die toetsresultate is vervolgens vergelyk met die kursusuitslae. Die veranderlikes is aan kanoniese korrelasie-ontleding onderwerp wat ’n betekenisvolle verwantskap opgelewer het tussen die onafhanklike veranderlikes en die afhanklike veranderlikes (r = 0,787; p is kleiner as 0,00005. Die voorspellers met die hoogste ladings was kognitiewe vermoë, konseptualisering, leesbegrip, luisterpotensiaal, fisieke stres en psigiese stres.

  2. Performance Appraisal in Medium Scale Defence Store Manufacturing Firms in and Around Hyderabad : A Perspective and an Approach

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    Sunil Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Performance Appraisal (PA is defined as a systematic, periodic and an impartial rating of an employee’s excellence in matters pertaining to his present job and to his potentialities for a better job, more precisely, featuring systematic/ periodic process, evaluating process, future oriented, determining employee’s potentialities / development with objectives of providing feedback, facilitating promotions/lay-off decisions, encouraging performance improvement, motivating superior performance, setting and measuring goals, counselling poor performers, determining compensation changes, encouraging coaching and mentoring, supporting manpower planning, determining individual/organizational training and development needs and improving overall organizational performance. This paper aims, by further improvements of existing PA system, for betterment of employees and the medium scale defence store manufacturing firms in and around Hyderabad. There is also scope of undertaking of empirical research/study based on primary and secondary data, in future, by adopting suitable research methodology/statistical analysis tools. This paper is purely an approach one and discusses current perspectives of performance appraisal in the firms. Therefore, no statistical date has been used

  3. Oral secretions from Mythimna separata insects specifically induce defence responses in maize as revealed by high-dimensional biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jinfeng; Sun, Guiling; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Chunxia; Hettenhausen, Christian; Schuman, Meredith C; Baldwin, Ian T; Li, Jing; Song, Juan; Liu, Zhudong; Xu, Guowang; Lu, Xin; Wu, Jianqiang

    2016-08-01

    Attack from insect herbivores poses a major threat to plant survival, and accordingly, plants have evolved sophisticated defence systems. Maize is cultivated as a staple crop worldwide, and insect feeding causes large production losses. Despite its importance in agriculture, little is known about how maize reacts to insect herbivory. Taking advantage of advances in sequencing and mass spectrometry technology, we studied the response of maize to mechanical wounding and simulated Mythimna separata (a specialist insect) herbivory by applying its oral secretions (OS) to wounds. In comparison to the responses induced by mechanical wounding, OS elicited larger and longer-lasting changes in the maize transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and phytohormones. Specifically, many genes, proteins and metabolites were uniquely induced or repressed by OS. Nearly 290 transcription factor genes from 39 families were involved in OS-induced responses, and among these, more transcription factor genes were specifically regulated by OS than by wounding. This study provides a large-scale omics dataset for understanding maize response to chewing insects and highlights the essential role of OS in plant-insect interactions. PMID:26991784

  4. Conceptual Solution for the Military Geoinformation System of the Ministry of Defence of the Republic of Croatia

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    Zvonko Biljecki

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The Ministry of Defence of the Republic of Croatia, with the project "Military Geoinformation System - VoGIS" started to build a unique geoinformation system for the Ministry and Armed Forces. This system will be in accordance with Croatian and international geoinformation standards and will fully conform to the NATO standards. According to the Preliminary Design, the goal of the VoGIS is the implementation of a geoinformation system that will be the basis for development of all further activities in domain of military spatial data, with special emphasis on creation of military cartographic database and military maps, along with the fulfilment of the Partnership Goals. VoGIS is based on the Croatian Topographic Information System made by the CROTIS data model. In the first phase of the project, the object data model of the basic military topographic database is developed. In the second phase, the original conceptual design of the system is developed and the whole cartographic production workflow based on spatial databases is developed and implemented. The concept encompasses standardization of collection of special "military" content with upload into a basic topographic database, design of cartographic database model, map generalization, sheet line system, map design, production and printing.

  5. The third trophic level of plant defence: neotropical social wasps' use of odours of freshly damaged leaves when hunting

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    Anthony Raw

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available An important aspect of the hunting strategy of neotropical social wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae is where they hunt. Three species used two behavioural components in their selection of a place to search for prey. The wasps uti lizcd the odour of freshly damaged leaves as cues (which could be synomones to select which leaves to inspect and also they remembered a place to which they were strongly attracted to hunt recently and returned there. Polybia ignobilis (Haliday, 1836 and Polistes satan Bequaert, 1940 hunted on a lawn of Digitaria diversinervis Stapf immediately after it was mown in significantly larger numbers than at other times. P. ignobilis and Polistes versicolor (Olivier, 1791 hunted in significantly greater numbers on freshly cut leaves of passion vine (Passiflora edulis Sims than on uncut leaves. Sometimes wasps inspected cards rubbed with freshly crushed leaves of P. edulis, but not control cards. Preliminary data suggest that several other species of social wasps around Brasilia hunt in a similar manner on native and exotic plants. Apparently the production of ephemeral odours by freshly cut leaves attract generalist insectivorous predators which perceive these scents and the social wasps investigated are members of the third trophic level of the plants' defence against attacks by herbivores. Available information suggests a difference between the behaviour of generalists and that of specialist arthropod predators which arc attracted to the odour emitted after their particular prey have damaged the leaves.

  6. The Effect of Organizational Justice on Organi zational Citizenship Behavior: A Researc h i n Defence Sector

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    Alptekin Sönmez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Under the intense competition conditions of our era, the real power that businesses need to survive, stands out as the quality of human resources working within the business instead of the financial resources they have. And in parallel with this, the concepts of organizational justice and organizational citizenship behavior take place as two of the most popular topics of organizational behavior by means of their positive effect on employee productivity and due to the importance and value they have on subjects of ensuring the organizations’ adaptation to changes in business environment. The main goal of the present study is to determine whether or not perception of organizational justice affect employees’ organizational citizenship behavior. In accordance with these stated purposes, developement of managerial strategies that increase levels of employees’ organizational citizenship behaviors by organizing and improving the structure of organizational justice in businesses is intended.Under this study carried out in defence sector company on 341 employees, according to the results of correlation analyses between organizational justice and organizational citizenship behavior, it has been determined that there are statistically positive and meaningful correlations between all the dimensions of these two concepts. In addition, according to the analyses which are carried out with St ructural Equation Modelling, it has also been found that employees’ distributive justice perceptions positively affect conscientiousness, sportsmanship and courtesy dimensions of organizational citizenship behavior

  7. Jasmonate Signalling and Defence Responses in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula—A Focus on Responses to Fusarium Wilt Disease

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    Louise F. Thatcher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmonate (JA-mediated defences play important roles in host responses to pathogen attack, in particular to necrotrophic fungal pathogens that kill host cells in order to extract nutrients and live off the dead plant tissue. The root-infecting fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum initiates a necrotrophic growth phase towards the later stages of its lifecycle and is responsible for devastating Fusarium wilt disease on numerous legume crops worldwide. Here we describe the use of the model legume Medicago truncatula to study legume–F. oxysporum interactions and compare and contrast this against knowledge from other model pathosystems, in particular Arabidopsis thaliana–F. oxysporum interactions. We describe publically-available genomic, transcriptomic and genetic (mutant resources developed in M. truncatula that enable dissection of host jasmonate responses and apply aspects of these herein during the M. truncatula-–F. oxysporum interaction. Our initial results suggest not all components of JA-responses observed in M. truncatula are shared with Arabidopsis in response to F. oxysporum infection.

  8. Domestication and defence: Foliar tannins and C/N ratios in cassava and a close wild relative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondolot, Laurence; Marlas, Amandine; Barbeau, Damien; Gargadennec, Annick; Pujol, Benoît; McKey, Doyle

    2008-09-01

    Plant domestication is accompanied by shifts in resource allocation, as a result of farmer selection for genotypes that give high yields in agricultural habitats. Relaxed natural selection for chemical and physical defences in these habitats could facilitate resource allocation to yield. We compared the concentrations of tannins, and C/N ratios, which are often correlated with investment in cell-wall compounds, in leaves of landraces of domesticated cassava ( Manihot esculenta) and a close wild relative in French Guiana. Foliar concentrations of tannins were about 1.9 times higher in the wild relative than in domesticated cassava. Histochemical analyses showed that tannins were present in nearly all palisade and spongy parenchyma cells of the wild taxon, but in only some cells of these tissues in M. esculenta. C/N ratios were also 1.9 times higher in leaves of the wild relative than in those of domesticated cassava. Tannins accounted for only a small proportion of total carbon, and the higher C/N ratio in wild than in domesticated cassava may reflect higher investment in carbon-containing compounds additional to tannins, such as cell-wall compounds. The divergence in these traits between cassava and this close wild relative mirrors a broad pattern observed in wild plant species across habitats varying in resource availability. One explanation for our results is that domestication in cassava may have favoured a shift from a resource conservation strategy to a resource acquisition strategy.

  9. Induction of defence gene expression by oligogalacturonic acid requires increases in both cytosolic calcium and hydrogen peroxide in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Yang HU; Steven J NEILL; Wei Ming CAI; Zhang Cheng TANG

    2004-01-01

    Responses to oligogalacturonic acid (OGA) were determined in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings expressing the calcium reporter protein aequorin. OGA stimulated a rapid, substantial and transient increase in the concentration of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) that peaked after ca. 15 s. This increase was dose-dependent, saturating at ca. 50 μg Gal equiv/ml of OGA. OGA also stimulated a rapid generation of H2O2. A small, rapid increase in H2O2 content was followed by a much larger oxidative burst, with H2O2 content peaking after ca. 60 min and declining thereafter. Induction of the oxidative burst by OGA was also dose-dependent, with a maximum response again being achieved at ca. 50 μg Gal equiv/mL. Inhibitors of calcium fluxes inhibited both increases in [Ca2+]cyt and [H2O2], whereas inhibitors of NADPH oxidase blocked only the oxidative burst. OGA increased strongly the expression of the defence-related genes CHS,GST, PAL and PR-1. This induction was suppressed by inhibitors of calcium flux or NADPH oxidase, indicating that increases in both cytosolic calcium and H2O2 are required for OGA-induced gene expression.

  10. Defence against methylglyoxal in Group A Streptococcus: a role for Glyoxylase I in bacterial virulence and survival in neutrophils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, May M; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y; Walker, Mark J; McEwan, Alastair G

    2016-03-01

    Methylglyoxal is a dicarbonyl compound that acts as a toxic electrophile in biological systems. Methylglyoxal is produced in certain bacteria as a byproduct of glycolysis through methylglyoxal synthase. Like many bacteria, Group A Streptococcus (GAS), a Gram-positive human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases, uses a two-step glyoxalase system to remove methylglyoxal. However, bioinformatic analysis revealed that no homologue of methylglyoxal synthase is present in GAS, suggesting that the role of the glyoxalase system is to detoxify methylglyoxal produced by the host. In this study, we investigated the role of methylglyoxal detoxification in the pathogenesis of GAS. A mutant (5448ΔgloA), deficient in glyoxylase I (S-lactoylglutathione lyase), was constructed and tested for susceptibility to methylglyoxal, human neutrophil survival and virulence in a murine model of infection. 5448ΔgloA was more sensitive to methylglyoxal and was also more susceptible to human neutrophil killing. Inhibition of neutrophil myeloperoxidase rescued the gloA-deficient mutant indicating that this enzyme was required for methylglyoxal production. Furthermore, the 5448ΔgloA mutant was slower at disseminating into the blood in the murine model. These data suggest that neutrophils produce methylglyoxal as an antimicrobial agent during bacterial infection, and the glyoxalase system is part of the GAS defence against the innate immune system during pathogenesis. PMID:26702634

  11. Proteomic analysis of grapevine resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum T39 reveals specific defence pathways activated against downy mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Maria Cristina; Perazzolli, Michele; Matafora, Vittoria; Moretto, Marco; Bachi, Angela; Pertot, Ilaria

    2012-10-01

    Downy mildew is caused by the oomycete Plasmopara viticola and is one of the most serious diseases of grapevine. The beneficial microorganism Trichoderma harzianum T39 (T39) has previously been shown to induce plant-mediated resistance and to reduce the severity of downy mildew in susceptible grapevines. In order to better understand the cellular processes associated with T39-induced resistance, the proteomic and histochemical changes activated by T39 in grapevine were investigated before and 1 day after P. viticola inoculation. A comprehensive proteomic analysis of T39-induced resistance in grapevine was performed using an eight-plex iTRAQ protocol, resulting in the identification and quantification of a total of 800 proteins. Most of the proteins directly affected by T39 were found to be involved in signal transduction, indicating activation of a complete microbial recognition machinery. Moreover, T39-induced resistance was associated with rapid accumulation of reactive oxygen species and callose at infection sites, as well as changes in abundance of proteins involved in response to stress and redox balance, indicating an active defence response to downy mildew. On the other hand, proteins affected by P. viticola in control plants mainly decreased in abundance, possibly reflecting the establishment of a compatible interaction. Finally, the high-throughput iTRAQ protocol allowed de novo peptide sequencing, which will be used to improve annotation of the Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir proteome. PMID:23105132

  12. The possibilities to develop the logistics of electrical and electronic waste in the military defence system of the Republic of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragutin V. Jovanović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The military defence system of the Republic of Serbia (the Ministry of Defence and the Serbian Army represents a complex organisational and technical-technological system. The nature of its operations imposes it to be equipped with a considerable amount of electrical and electronic equipment and devices. Such equipment and devices during operation, over time, lose their primary function, become useless and turn into electrical and electronic equipment waste; therefore, they must be handled properly. This article discusses the problems and possible directions of the logistics of development and implementation of electrical and electronic waste generated in the defence as the logistics of waste and reverse waste logistics, which is, in a narrower sense, a part of waste materials management. For the purpose of this paper, the logistics of electrical and electronic waste in the defence is regarded as the process of planning, implementation, control and realisation of flows, processes and activities of electrical and electronic waste materials from their place of origin to their place of disposal, through collecting and transportation to the final destination (places of  treatment, reuse, disposal and destruction in order to meet the requirements of all stakeholders at minimal cost. The legislation and European initiatives in the area of electrical and electronic waste In 2003, the European Union, stimulated by the rapid emergence and amount of e-waste, as well as its hazardous influence on the environment, adopted two directives: Directive 2002/96/EC of the European Parliament and the European Council on 27.01.2003 on the management of electrical and electronic waste (WEEE - Waste from Electrical and Electronic Equipment and Directive 2002/95/EC of the European Parliament and the Council of Europe 27.01.2003 on the restrictions on the use of hazardous substances in electronic and electrical equipment (RoHS - Restriction of the use of hazardous

  13. The importance of aboveground-belowground interactions on the evolution and maintenance of variation in plant defence traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moniek evan Geem

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades a growing body of empirical research has shown that many ecological processes are mediated by a complex array of indirect interactions occurring between rhizosphere-inhabiting organisms and those found on aboveground plant parts. Aboveground - belowground studies have thus far focused on elucidating processes and underlying mechanisms that mediate the behavior and performance of invertebrates in opposite compartments. Less is known about genetic variation in plant traits as this applies to an above- belowground framework. For instance, although the field of genetic variation in aboveground plant traits on community-level interactions is well developed, most studies have ignored genetic variation in plant traits – such as defence - that may have evolved in response to pressures from the combined effects of above- and below ground interactions from antagonists and mutualists. Here, we discuss gaps in our understanding of genetic variation in plant- and consumer-related traits as they relate to aboveground and belowground multitrophic interactions. When metabolic resources are limiting, then multiple attack by antagonists in both domains may lead to trade-offs in where these resources are optimally invested. In nature, these trade-offs may critically depend upon their effects on plant fitness. Natural enemies of herbivores may also influence selection for different traits via top-down control. At larger scales these interactions may generate evolutionary ‘hotspots’ where the expression of various plant traits is the result of strong reciprocal selection via direct and indirect interactions. The role of abiotic factors in driving genetic variation in plant traits is also discussed.

  14. The fight-or-flight response is associated with PBMC expression profiles related to immune defence and recovery in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Michael; Scheel, Mathias; Muráni, Eduard; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Zebunke, Manuela; Puppe, Birger; Wimmers, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Defining phenotypes according to molecular features would promote the knowledge of functional traits like behaviour in both human and animal research. Beside physiological states or environmental factors, an innate predisposition of individual coping strategies was discussed, including the proactive and reactive pattern. According to backtest reactivity, animals assigned as high-resisting (proactive) and low-resisting (reactive) were immune challenged with tetanus toxoid in a time course experiment. Using the Affymetrix platform and qPCR, individual coping characteristics were reflected as gene expression signatures in porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at naïve state (day 0) and in response to the model antigen (day 14, day 28, and day 140). Further, the blood cell count was analysed at all stages. On the transcriptional level, processes acting on cell communication, vasculogenesis, and blood coagulation were highlighted in high-resisting animals at naïve state (day 0), temporarily blurred due to immune challenge (day 14) but subsequently restored and intensified (day 28). Notably, similar amounts of white and red blood cells, platelets and haematocrit between high-resisting and low-resisting samples suggest coping-specific expression patterns rather than alterations in blood cell distribution. Taken together, the gene expression patterns indicate that proactive pigs might favour molecular pathways enabling an effective strategy for defence and recovery. This corroborates the previously suggested belief, that proactive animals are prone to an increased number of injuries as an evolutionary inherited mechanism. In contrast to previous assumptions, coping-specific immunity in pigs lacks inherited shifts between cellular and humoral immune responses. PMID:25793368

  15. The potential roles of bacterial communities in coral defence: A case study at Talang-talang reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuek, Felicity W. I.; Lim, Li-Fang; Ngu, Lin-Hui; Mujahid, Aazani; Lim, Po-Teen; Leaw, Chui-Pin; Müller, Moritz

    2015-06-01

    highlight the role of the coral SML bacterial community in the coral's defence.

  16. Further analysis and evaluation of the results of the NATO common shield-DAT#7 experiment: defence against terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Stephan; Peichl, Markus; Jirousek, Matthias; Süß, Helmut

    2009-09-01

    The contactless control of persons and the remote surveillance of sensitive infrastructures are important tasks in order to provide the required security measures to protect the human population against the threads of international terrorism. Passive microwave imaging allows a daytime independent observation and examination of objects and persons under nearly all adverse ambient conditions without artificial exposure, hence fully avoiding health risks. The penetration capability of microwaves provides the detection of objects through atmospheric obstacles like bad weather, fog or dust, vapour and smoke, as well as through thin non-metallic materials and clothing. For the latter the detection of hidden objects like weapons, explosives, and contraband is possible by monitoring dielectric anomalies. The experiment "Common Shield" is part of a perennial investigation series leaded by the "Center for Transformation of the German armed forces (Bundeswehr)". In 2008 the protection of soldiers and facilities was experimentally investigated under the aspect of a networked operational leadership. In this context as well a harbour protection trial was carried out in August/September 2008 at the naval base Eckernfoerde in Germany. This trial was part of the NATO CNADs program of work for "Defence Against Terrorism (DAT)" starting in 2003, and Germany is the lead nation for item 7 on "Technology for Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance & Target Acquisition of Terrorists (ISRTA)". One main activity in the Eckernfoerde trial was the simulation of a military entrance control facility by a tent including various imaging and a chemical sensor suite in order to provide security for a military camp. Besides commercial optical and infrared cameras various passive millimeter-wave imagers have been used from different German research institutions. The DLR Microwaves and Radar Institute, Department for Reconnaissance and Security (HR-AS), provided an imaging radiometer scanner

  17. Expression profiles of putative defence-related proteins in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) colonized by Ganoderma boninense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yung-Chie; Yeoh, Keat-Ai; Wong, Mui-Yun; Ho, Chai-Ling

    2013-11-01

    Basal stem rot (BSR) is a major disease of oil palm caused by a pathogenic fungus, Ganoderma boninense. However, the interaction between the host plant and its pathogen is not well characterized. To better understand the response of oil palm to G. boninense, transcript profiles of eleven putative defence-related genes from oil palm were measured by quantitative reverse-transcription (qRT)-PCR in the roots of oil palms treated with G. boninense from 3 to 12 weeks post infection (wpi). These transcripts encode putative Bowman-Birk serine protease inhibitors (EgBBI1 and 2), defensin (EgDFS), dehydrin (EgDHN), early methionine-labeled polypeptides (EgEMLP1 and 2), glycine-rich RNA binding protein (EgGRRBP), isoflavone reductase (EgIFR), metallothionein-like protein (EgMT), pathogenesis-related-1 protein (EgPRP), and type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein (EgT2RIP). The transcript abundance of EgBBI2 increased in G. boninense-treated roots at 3 and 6wpi compared to those of controls; while the transcript abundance of EgBBI1, EgDFS, EgEMLP1, EgMT, and EgT2RIP increased in G. boninense-treated roots at 6 or 12wpi. Meanwhile, the gene expression of EgDHN was up-regulated at all three time points in G. boninense-treated roots. The expression profiles of the eleven transcripts were also studied in leaf samples upon inoculation of G. boninense and Trichoderma harzianum to identify potential biomarkers for early detection of BSR. Two candidate genes (EgEMLP1 and EgMT) that have different profiles in G. boninense-treated leaves compared to those infected by T. harzianum may have the potential to be developed as biomarkers for early detection of G. boninense infection. PMID:23769496

  18. Evolutionary malignant resistance of cells to damaging factors as common biological defence mechanism in neoplastic development. Review of conception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monceviciute-Eringiene, E

    2000-09-01

    Cells have some inborn resistance to harmful factors, which could be called physiological or natural resistance. The mechanisms of multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) and multidrug resistance (MDR) have common features in the formation of acquired resistance in microorganisms, carcinogenesis, tumour metastases and chemotherapy or irradiation. ATP-dependent membrane P-glycoprotein, as an MDR efflux pump, glutathione S-transferases and other products of evolutionary resistance-related genes arised for exportation and detoxification of cytotoxic xenobiotics and drugs are transmitted from bacteria to man. On the one hand, this evolutionary MXR as a common biological defence mechanism is a "driving" power to conserve homeostasis of cells, tissues and organs. On the other hand, mutation, selection and simplification of properties are the causes of functional and morphological changes in tumour cells which regress to a more primitive mode of existence (atavism) for adaptation to survival. In the present work are presented data on the forms of E. coli resistant to antibiotics and of sarcoma 45 resistant to alkylic preparations. They may be helpful in revealing the causes of resistance and acquired accelerated growth of cells. The development of tumours as fibromas 14-15 years following injection of a vital dye trypan blue into human skin supports our conception that neoplastic growth is a particular case of the evolutionary resistance of cells adapted to the damaging factors. So, tumour cells adopting the enhancement mechanisms of general biological persistent resistance, i. e. undergoing repeated cycles of malignancy enhancement, adapt themselves to survive under the changed unfavourable conditions. PMID:11144527

  19. The fight-or-flight response is associated with PBMC expression profiles related to immune defence and recovery in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oster

    Full Text Available Defining phenotypes according to molecular features would promote the knowledge of functional traits like behaviour in both human and animal research. Beside physiological states or environmental factors, an innate predisposition of individual coping strategies was discussed, including the proactive and reactive pattern. According to backtest reactivity, animals assigned as high-resisting (proactive and low-resisting (reactive were immune challenged with tetanus toxoid in a time course experiment. Using the Affymetrix platform and qPCR, individual coping characteristics were reflected as gene expression signatures in porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC at naïve state (day 0 and in response to the model antigen (day 14, day 28, and day 140. Further, the blood cell count was analysed at all stages. On the transcriptional level, processes acting on cell communication, vasculogenesis, and blood coagulation were highlighted in high-resisting animals at naïve state (day 0, temporarily blurred due to immune challenge (day 14 but subsequently restored and intensified (day 28. Notably, similar amounts of white and red blood cells, platelets and haematocrit between high-resisting and low-resisting samples suggest coping-specific expression patterns rather than alterations in blood cell distribution. Taken together, the gene expression patterns indicate that proactive pigs might favour molecular pathways enabling an effective strategy for defence and recovery. This corroborates the previously suggested belief, that proactive animals are prone to an increased number of injuries as an evolutionary inherited mechanism. In contrast to previous assumptions, coping-specific immunity in pigs lacks inherited shifts between cellular and humoral immune responses.

  20. Impact of the dual defence system of Plantago lanceolata (Plantaginaceae) on performance, nutrient utilisation and feeding choice behaviour of Amata mogadorensis larvae (Lepidoptera, Erebidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankoke, Helga; Gehring, René; Müller, Caroline

    2015-11-01

    Iridoid glycosides are plant defence compounds with potentially detrimental effects on non-adapted herbivores. Some plant species possess β-glucosidases that hydrolyse iridoid glycosides and thereby release protein-denaturing aglycones. To test the hypothesis that iridoid glycosides and plant β-glucosidases form a dual defence system, we used Plantago lanceolata and a polyphagous caterpillar species. To analyse the impact of leaf-age dependent differences in iridoid glycoside concentrations and β-glucosidase activities on insect performance, old or young leaves were freeze-dried and incorporated into artificial diets or were provided freshly to the larvae. We determined larval consumption rates and the amounts of assimilated nitrogen. Furthermore, we quantified β-glucosidase activities in artificial diets and fresh leaves and the amount of iridoid glycosides that larvae feeding on fresh leaves ingested and excreted. Compared to fresh leaves, caterpillars grew faster on artificial diets, on which larval weight gain correlated positively to the absorbed amount of nitrogen. When feeding fresh young leaves, larvae even lost weight and excreted only minute proportions of the ingested iridoid glycosides intact with the faeces, indicating that the hydrolysis of these compounds might have interfered with nitrogen assimilation and impaired larval growth. To disentangle physiological effects from deterrent effects of iridoid glycosides, we performed dual choice feeding assays. Young leaves, their methanolic extracts and pure catalpol reduced larval feeding in comparison to the respective controls, while aucubin had no effect on larval consumption. We conclude that the dual defence system of P. lanceolata consisting of iridoid glycosides and β-glucosidases interferes with the nutrient utilisation via the hydrolysis of iridoid glycosides and also mediates larval feeding behaviour in a concentration- and substance-specific manner. PMID:26306994