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Sample records for anti-lipolytic g-protein-coupled receptor

  1. G Protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Elliott M.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors and heterotrimeric G proteins can diffuse laterally in the plasma membrane such that one receptor can catalyze the activation (GDP/GTP exchange) of multiple G proteins. In some cases, these processes are fast enough to support molecular signal amplification, where a single receptor maintains the activation of multiple G proteins at steady-state. Amplification in cells is probably highly regulated. It depends upon the identities of the G receptor and G protein - som...

  2. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Shavit, Rachel; Maoz, Myriam; Kancharla, Arun; Nag, Jeetendra Kumar; Agranovich, Daniel; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina; Uziely, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest signal-conveying receptor family and mediate many physiological processes, their role in tumor biology is underappreciated. Numerous lines of evidence now associate GPCRs and their downstream signaling targets in cancer growth and development. Indeed, GPCRs control many features of tumorigenesis, including immune cell-mediated functions, proliferation, invasion and survival at the secondary site. Technological advances have further substantiated GPCR modifications in human tumors. Among these are point mutations, gene overexpression, GPCR silencing by promoter methylation and the number of gene copies. At this point, it is imperative to elucidate specific signaling pathways of “cancer driver” GPCRs. Emerging data on GPCR biology point to functional selectivity and “biased agonism”; hence, there is a diminishing enthusiasm for the concept of “one drug per GPCR target” and increasing interest in the identification of several drug options. Therefore, determining the appropriate context-dependent conformation of a functional GPCR as well as the contribution of GPCR alterations to cancer development remain significant challenges for the discovery of dominant cancer genes and the development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27529230

  3. G-protein coupling of cannabinoid receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Since the cloning of the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors in the early 1990's extensive research has focused on understanding their signal transduction pathways. While it has been known for sometime that both receptors can couple to intracellular signalling via pertussis toxin sensitive G-proteins (Gi/Go), the specificity and kinetics of these interactions have only recently been elucidated. We have developed an in situ reconstitution approach to investigating receptor-G-protein interactions. This approach involves chaotropic extraction of receptor containing membranes in order to inactivate or remove endogenous G-proteins. Recombinant or isolated brain G-proteins can then be added back to the receptors, and their activation monitored through the binding of [35S]-GTPγS. This technique has been utilised for an extensive study of cannabinoid receptor mediated activation of G-proteins. In these studies we have established that CB1 couples with high affinity to both Gi and Go type G-proteins. In contrast, CB2 couples strongly to Gi, but has a very low affinity for Go. This finding correlated well with the previous findings that while CB1 and CB2 both couple to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, CB1 but not CB2 could also inhibit calcium channels. We then examined the ability of a range of cannabinoid agonists to activate the Gi and Go via CB1. Conventional receptor theory suggests that a receptor is either active or inactive with regard to a G-protein and that the active receptor activates all relevant G-proteins equally. However, in this study we found that agonists could produce different degrees of activation, depending on which G-protein was present. Further studies have compared the ability of the two endocannabinoids to drive the activation of Gi or Go. These studies show that agonists can induce multiple forms of activated receptor that differ in their ability to catalyse the activation of Gi or Go. The ability of an agonist to drive a receptor

  4. G-protein-coupled receptors: past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest and most versatile group of cell surface receptors. Drugs active at these receptors have therapeutic actions across a wide range of human diseases ranging from allergic rhinitis to pain, hypertension and schizophrenia. This review provides a brief historical overview of the properties and signalling characteristics of this important family of receptors.

  5. Quantifying Agonist Activity at G Protein-coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlert, Frederick J.; Suga, Hinako; Griffin, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    When an agonist activates a population of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), it elicits a signaling pathway that culminates in the response of the cell or tissue. This process can be analyzed at the level of a single receptor, a population of receptors, or a downstream response. Here we describe how to analyze the downstream response to obtain an estimate of the agonist affinity constant for the active state of single receptors.

  6. G protein-coupled receptor modulation with pepducins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimond, Patricia; Carlson, Kenneth; Bouvier, Michel;

    2011-01-01

    At the 2nd Pepducin Science Symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on November 4-5, 2010, investigators working in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) research convened to discuss progress since last year's inaugural conference. This year's symposium focused on increasing knowledge of the...

  7. The structure and function of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Kobilka, Brian K

    2009-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate most of our physiological responses to hormones, neurotransmitters and environmental stimulants, and so have great potential as therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. They are also fascinating molecules from the perspective of membrane-protein...

  8. A monoclonal antibody for G protein-coupled receptor crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Peter W; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Parnot, Charles;

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of signaling proteins in mammals, mediating responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and senses of sight, smell and taste. Mechanistic insight into GPCR signal transduction is limited by a paucity of high-resolution structural...

  9. *607449 G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR 74; GPR74 [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FIELD NO 607449 FIELD TI 607449 G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR 74; GPR74 ;;NEUROPEPTIDE FF2; NPFF2;; ... with well-defined criteria for either longstanding lean ness or severe obesity. The results were confirmed ... gainst obesity in 2 samples selected for obese and lean ... phenotypes. In a population-based sample, it was a ...

  10. Structural insights into G-protein-coupled receptor activation☆

    OpenAIRE

    Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2008-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of eukaryotic plasma membrane receptors, and are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to external signals. GPCRs share a common architecture comprising seven transmembrane (TM) helices. Binding of an activating ligand enables the receptor to catalyze the exchange of GTP for GDP in a heterotrimeric G protein. GPCRs are in a conformational equilibrium between inactive and activating states. Crystallographic and spectroscop...

  11. Structure and Function of Serotonin G protein Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    McCorvy, John D.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin receptors are prevalent throughout the nervous system and the periphery, and remain one of the most lucrative and promising drug discovery targets for disorders ranging from migraine headaches to neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. There are 14 distinct serotonin receptors, of which 13 are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are targets for approximately 40% of the approved medicines. Recent crystallographic and biochemical evidence has provided a...

  12. Oligomeric forms of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)

    OpenAIRE

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Oligomerization is a general characteristic of cell membrane receptors that is shared by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) together with their G protein partners. Recent studies of these complexes, both in vivo and in purified reconstituted forms, unequivocally support this contention for GPCRs, perhaps with only rare exceptions. As evidence has evolved from experimental cell lines to more relevant in vivo studies and from indirect biophysical approaches to well defined isolated complexes o...

  13. Applications of molecular replacement to G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Manglik, Aashish; Kobilka, Brian K., E-mail: kobilka@stanford.edu [Stanford University, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Weis, William I., E-mail: kobilka@stanford.edu [Stanford University, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Fairchild Building, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The use of molecular replacement in solving the structures of G protein-coupled receptors is discussed, with specific examples being described in detail. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large class of integral membrane proteins involved in regulating virtually every aspect of human physiology. Despite their profound importance in human health and disease, structural information regarding GPCRs has been extremely limited until recently. With the advent of a variety of new biochemical and crystallographic techniques, the structural biology of GPCRs has advanced rapidly, offering key molecular insights into GPCR activation and signal transduction. To date, almost all GPCR structures have been solved using molecular-replacement techniques. Here, the unique aspects of molecular replacement as applied to individual GPCRs and to signaling complexes of these important proteins are discussed.

  14. Applications of molecular replacement to G protein-coupled receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of molecular replacement in solving the structures of G protein-coupled receptors is discussed, with specific examples being described in detail. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large class of integral membrane proteins involved in regulating virtually every aspect of human physiology. Despite their profound importance in human health and disease, structural information regarding GPCRs has been extremely limited until recently. With the advent of a variety of new biochemical and crystallographic techniques, the structural biology of GPCRs has advanced rapidly, offering key molecular insights into GPCR activation and signal transduction. To date, almost all GPCR structures have been solved using molecular-replacement techniques. Here, the unique aspects of molecular replacement as applied to individual GPCRs and to signaling complexes of these important proteins are discussed

  15. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin: A Prospectus

    OpenAIRE

    Filipek, Sławomir; Stenkamp, Ronald E.; Teller, David C.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2002-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a retinal photoreceptor protein of bipartite structure consisting of the transmembrane protein opsin and a light-sensitive chromophore 11-cis-retinal, linked to opsin via a protonated Schiff base. Studies on rhodopsin have unveiled many structural and functional features that are common to a large and pharmacologically important group of proteins from the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, of which rhodopsin is the best-studied member. In this work, we focus on struct...

  16. Structural basis for activation of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Ulrik; Asmar, Fazila; Meinild, Anne Kristine;

    2002-01-01

    Our understanding of how G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) operate at the molecular level has been considerably improved over the last few years. The application of advanced biophysical techniques as well as the availability of high-resolution structural information has allowed insight both int......-expression with the cAMP sensitive Cl- channel CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) and electrophysiological measurements....

  17. Minireview: Nutrient Sensing by G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Wauson, Eric M; Lorente-Rodríguez, Andrés; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane proteins that recognize molecules in the extracellular milieu and transmit signals inside cells to regulate their behaviors. Ligands for many GPCRs are hormones or neurotransmitters that direct coordinated, stereotyped adaptive responses. Ligands for other GPCRs provide information to cells about the extracellular environment. Such information facilitates context-specific decision making that may be cell autonomous. Among ligands that are impor...

  18. Therapeutic antibodies directed at G protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchings, Catherine J; Koglin, Markus; Marshall, Fiona H.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most important classes of targets for small molecule drug discovery, but many current GPCRs of interest are proving intractable to small molecule discovery and may be better approached with bio-therapeutics. GPCRs are implicated in a wide variety of diseases where antibody therapeutics are currently used. These include inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn disease, as well as metabolic disease and cancer. Raising antibo...

  19. The repertoire of trace amine G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David E.; Bjarnadóttir, Thóra K; Yan, Yi-Lin;

    2005-01-01

    Trace amines, such as tyramine, beta-phenylethylamine, tryptamine, and octopamine, are present in trace levels in nervous systems and bind a specific family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), but the function or origin of this system is not well understood. We searched the genomes of several...... melanogaster), indicating that the ability to bind TA have evolved at least twice in animal evolution. We collected in total over 100 vertebrate TA-receptor sequences, and our phylogenetic analysis shows that several TA-receptors have evolved rapidly with remarkable species variation and that the common...

  20. G protein-coupled receptors as promising cancer targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; An, Su; Ward, Richard; Yang, Yang; Guo, Xiao-Xi; Li, Wei; Xu, Tian-Rui

    2016-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate an array of fundamental biological processes, such as growth, metabolism and homeostasis. Specifically, GPCRs are involved in cancer initiation and progression. However, compared with the involvement of the epidermal growth factor receptor in cancer, that of GPCRs have been largely ignored. Recent findings have implicated many GPCRs in tumorigenesis, tumor progression, invasion and metastasis. Moreover, GPCRs contribute to the establishment and maintenance of a microenvironment which is permissive for tumor formation and growth, including effects upon surrounding blood vessels, signaling molecules and the extracellular matrix. Thus, GPCRs are considered to be among the most useful drug targets against many solid cancers. Development of selective ligands targeting GPCRs may provide novel and effective treatment strategies against cancer and some anticancer compounds are now in clinical trials. Here, we focus on tumor related GPCRs, such as G protein-coupled receptor 30, the lysophosphatidic acid receptor, angiotensin receptors 1 and 2, the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors and gastrin releasing peptide receptor. We also summarize their tissue distributions, activation and roles in tumorigenesis and discuss the potential use of GPCR agonists and antagonists in cancer therapy. PMID:27000991

  1. Allosteric modulation of G-protein coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, Tracy A

    2004-01-01

    The superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has more than 1000 members and is the largest family of proteins in the body. GPCRs mediate signalling of stimuli as diverse as light, ions, small molecules, peptides and proteins and are the targets for many pharmaceuticals. Most GPCR ligands...... are believed to activate (agonists) or inhibit (competitive antagonists) receptor signalling by binding the receptor at the same site as the endogenous agonist, the orthosteric site. In contrast, allosteric ligands modulate receptor function by binding to different regions in the receptor, allosteric...... outlines the current status and perspectives of allosteric modulation of GPCR function with emphasis on the pharmacology of endogenous and synthesised modulators, their receptor interactions and the therapeutic prospects of allosteric ligands compared to orthosteric ligands....

  2. Serial femtosecond crystallography datasets from G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; Zhang, Haitao; Gati, Cornelius; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Basu, Shibom; Oberthür, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Yoon, Chun Hong; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Messerschmidt, Marc; Koglin, Jason E; Boutet, Sébastien; Weierstall, Uwe; Cherezov, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    We describe the deposition of four datasets consisting of X-ray diffraction images acquired using serial femtosecond crystallography experiments on microcrystals of human G protein-coupled receptors, grown and delivered in lipidic cubic phase, at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The receptors are: the human serotonin receptor 2B in complex with an agonist ergotamine, the human δ-opioid receptor in complex with a bi-functional peptide ligand DIPP-NH2, the human smoothened receptor in complex with an antagonist cyclopamine, and finally the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor in complex with the selective antagonist ZD7155. All four datasets have been deposited, with minimal processing, in an HDF5-based file format, which can be used directly for crystallographic processing with CrystFEL or other software. We have provided processing scripts and supporting files for recent versions of CrystFEL, which can be used to validate the data. PMID:27479354

  3. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Gao; Tongyu Wu; Kirby D. Johnson; Jamie L. Lahvic; Erik A. Ranheim; Leonard I. Zon; Emery H. Bresnick

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5) enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5−/− AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common t...

  4. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xin; Wu, Tongyu; Johnson, Kirby D.; Lahvic, Jamie L.; Ranheim, Erik A.; Zon, Leonard I.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5) enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5−/− AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common t...

  5. G-protein-coupled receptors for free fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond; Murdoch, Hannah; Hudson, Brian D

    It is becoming evident that nutrients and metabolic intermediates derived from such nutrients regulate cellular function by activating a number of cell-surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Until now, members of the GPCR family have largely been considered as the molecular targets that...... communicate cellular signals initiated by hormones and neurotransmitters. Recently, based on tissue expression patterns of these receptors and the concept that they may elicit the production of a range of appetite- and hunger-regulating peptides, such nutrient sensing GPCRs are attracting considerable...... diseases, major challenges remain to exploit their potential for therapeutic purposes. Mostly, this is due to limited characterisation and validation of these receptors because of paucity of selective and high-potency/affinity pharmacological agents to define the detailed function and regulation of these...

  6. Human G protein-coupled receptor studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongfang; Wong, Winsy; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest families of membrane proteins, with approximately 800 different GPCRs in the human genome. Signaling via GPCRs regulates many biological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. In addition, many receptors have a pivotal role in immunophysiology. Many hormones and neurotransmitters are ligands for these receptors, and hence it is not surprising that many drugs, either mimicking or blocking the action of the bodily substances, have been developed. It is estimated that 30-40% of current drugs on the market target GPCRs. Further identifying and elucidating the functions of GPCRs will provide opportunities for novel drug discovery, including for immunotherapy. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) is a very important and useful platform in this respect. There are many advantages of using a yeast assay system, as it is cheap, safe and stable; it is also convenient for rapid feasibility and optimization studies. Moreover, it offers a "null" background when studying human GPCRs. New developments regarding human GPCRs expressed in a yeast platform are providing insight into GPCR activation and signaling, and facilitate agonist and antagonist identification. In this review we summarize the latest findings regarding human G-protein-coupled receptors in studies using S. cerevisiae, ever since the year 2005 when we last published a review on this topic. We describe 11 families of GPCRs in detail, while including the principles and developments of each yeast system applied to these different GPCRs and highlight and generalize the experimental findings of GPCR function in these systems. PMID:26920251

  7. GPCRDB: an information system for G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, F; Weare, J; Beukers, M W; Hörsch, S; Bairoch, A; Chen, W; Edvardsen, O; Campagne, F; Vriend, G

    1998-01-01

    The GPCRDB is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) database system aimed at the collection and dissemination of GPCR related data. It holds sequences, mutant data and ligand binding constants as primary (experimental) data. Computationally derived data such as multiple sequence alignments, three dimensional models, phylogenetic trees and two dimensional visualization tools are added to enhance the database's usefulness. The GPCRDB is an EU sponsored project aimed at building a generic molecular class specific database capable of dealing with highly heterogeneous data. GPCRs were chosen as test molecules because of their enormous importance for medical sciences and due to the availability of so much highly heterogeneous data. The GPCRDB is available via the WWW at http://www.gpcr.org/7tm PMID:9399852

  8. Structure and function of serotonin G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorvy, John D; Roth, Bryan L

    2015-06-01

    Serotonin receptors are prevalent throughout the nervous system and the periphery, and remain one of the most lucrative and promising drug discovery targets for disorders ranging from migraine headaches to neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. There are 14 distinct serotonin receptors, of which 13 are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are targets for approximately 40% of the approved medicines. Recent crystallographic and biochemical evidence has provided a converging understanding of the basic structure and functional mechanics of GPCR activation. Currently, two GPCR crystal structures exist for the serotonin family, the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptor, with the antimigraine and valvulopathic drug ergotamine bound. The first serotonin crystal structures not only provide the first evidence of serotonin receptor topography but also provide mechanistic explanations into functional selectivity or biased agonism. This review will detail the findings of these crystal structures from a molecular and mutagenesis perspective for driving rational drug design for novel therapeutics incorporating biased signaling. PMID:25601315

  9. Role of G protein-coupled receptors in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei SUN; Richard DYE

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important roles in inflammation.Inflammatory cells such as polymorphonuclear leuko-cytes (PMN),monocytes and macrophages express a large number of GPCRs for classic chemoattractants and chemokines.These receptors are critical to the migration of phagocytes and their accumulation at sites of inflammation,where these cells can exacer-bate inflammation but also contribute to its resolution.Besides chemoattractant GPCRs,protease activated receptors (PARs) such as PAR1 are involved in the regulation of vascular endothelial permeability.Prostaglandin receptors play different roles in inflam-matory cell activation,and can mediate both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions.Many GPCRs present in inflammatory cells also mediate transcription factor activation,resulting in the synthesis and secretion of inflammatory factors and,in some cases,molecules that suppress inflammation.An understanding of the signaling paradigms of GPCRs in inflammatory cells is likely to facilitate translational research and development of improved anti-inflammatory therapies.

  10. Interaction of G protein coupled receptors and cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimpl, Gerald

    2016-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest receptor superfamily in eukaryotic cells. Owing to their seven transmembrane helices, large parts of these proteins are embedded in the cholesterol-rich plasma membrane bilayer. Thus, GPCRs are always in proximity to cholesterol. Some of them are functionally dependent on the specific presence of cholesterol. Over the last years, enormous progress on receptor structures has been achieved. While lipophilic ligands other than cholesterol have been shown to bind either inside the helix bundle or at the receptor-lipid interface, the binding site of cholesterol was either a single transmembrane helix or a groove between two or more transmembrane helices. A clear preference for one of the two membrane leaflets has not been observed. Not surprisingly, many hydrophobic residues (primarily leucine and isoleucine) were found to be involved in cholesterol binding. In most cases, the rough β-face of cholesterol contacted the transmembrane helix bundle rather than the surrounding lipid matrix. The polar hydroxy group of cholesterol was localized near the water-membrane interface with potential hydrogen bonding to residues in receptor loop regions. Although a canonical motif, designated as CCM site, was detected as a specific cholesterol binding site in case of the β2AR, this site was not found to be occupied by cholesterol in other GPCRs possessing the same motif. Cholesterol-receptor interactions can increase the compactness of the receptor structure and are able to enhance the conformational stability towards active or inactive receptor states. Overall, all current data suggest a high plasticity of cholesterol interaction sites in GPCRs. PMID:27108066

  11. Towards predictive docking at aminergic G-protein coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, Esam E; Doležal, Vladimír

    2015-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are hard to crystallize. However, attempts to predict their structure have boomed as a result of advancements in crystallographic techniques. This trend has allowed computer-aided molecular modeling of GPCRs. We analyzed the performance of four molecular modeling programs in pose evaluation of re-docked antagonists / inverse agonists to 11 original crystal structures of aminergic GPCRs using an induced fit-docking procedure. AutoDock and Glide were used for docking. AutoDock binding energy function, GlideXP, Prime MM-GB/SA, and YASARA binding function were used for pose scoring. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the best pose ranged from 0.09 to 1.58 Å, and median RMSD of the top 60 poses ranged from 1.47 to 3.83 Å. However, RMSD of the top pose ranged from 0.13 to 7.33 Å and ranking of the best pose ranged from the 1st to 60th out of 60 poses. Moreover, analysis of ligand-receptor interactions of top poses revealed substantial differences from interactions found in crystallographic structures. Bad ranking of top poses and discrepancies between top docked poses and crystal structures render current simple docking methods unsuitable for predictive modeling of receptor-ligand interactions. Prime MM-GB/SA optimized for 3NY9 by multiple linear regression did not work well at 3NY8 and 3NYA, structures of the same receptor with different ligands. However, 9 of 11 trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations by Desmond of top poses converged with trajectories of crystal structures. Key interactions were properly detected for all structures. This procedure also worked well for cross-docking of tested β2-adrenergic antagonists. Thus, this procedure represents a possible way to predict interactions of antagonists with aminergic GPCRs. PMID:26453085

  12. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Wu, Tongyu; Johnson, Kirby D; Lahvic, Jamie L; Ranheim, Erik A; Zon, Leonard I; Bresnick, Emery H

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5) enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5(-/-) AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common targets for FDA-approved drugs, we analyzed the GPCR gene ensemble to identify GATA-2-regulated GPCRs. Of the 20 GATA-2-activated GPCR genes, four were GATA-1-activated, and only Gpr65 expression resembled Gata2. Contrasting with the paradigm in which GATA-2-activated genes promote hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell genesis/function, our mouse and zebrafish studies indicated that GPR65 suppressed hematopoiesis. GPR65 established repressive chromatin at the +9.5 site, restricted occupancy by the activator Scl/TAL1, and repressed Gata2 transcription. Thus, a Gata2 cis element creates a GATA-2-GPCR circuit that limits positive regulators that promote hematopoiesis. PMID:26905203

  13. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Gao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5 enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5−/− AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are the most common targets for FDA-approved drugs, we analyzed the GPCR gene ensemble to identify GATA-2-regulated GPCRs. Of the 20 GATA-2-activated GPCR genes, four were GATA-1-activated, and only Gpr65 expression resembled Gata2. Contrasting with the paradigm in which GATA-2-activated genes promote hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell genesis/function, our mouse and zebrafish studies indicated that GPR65 suppressed hematopoiesis. GPR65 established repressive chromatin at the +9.5 site, restricted occupancy by the activator Scl/TAL1, and repressed Gata2 transcription. Thus, a Gata2 cis element creates a GATA-2-GPCR circuit that limits positive regulators that promote hematopoiesis.

  14. Alpha-Bulges in G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob van der Kant

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Agonist binding is related to a series of motions in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs that result in the separation of transmembrane helices III and VI at their cytosolic ends and subsequent G protein binding. A large number of smaller motions also seem to be associated with activation. Most helices in GPCRs are highly irregular and often contain kinks, with extensive literature already available about the role of prolines in kink formation and the precise function of these kinks. GPCR transmembrane helices also contain many α-bulges. In this article we aim to draw attention to the role of these α-bulges in ligand and G-protein binding, as well as their role in several aspects of the mobility associated with GPCR activation. This mobility includes regularization and translation of helix III in the extracellular direction, a rotation of the entire helix VI, an inward movement of the helices near the extracellular side, and a concerted motion of the cytosolic ends of the helices that makes their orientation appear more circular and that opens up space for the G protein to bind. In several cases, α-bulges either appear or disappear as part of the activation process.

  15. A modeling strategy for G-protein coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell responses can be triggered via G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs that interact with small molecules, peptides or proteins and transmit the signal over the membrane via structural changes to activate intracellular pathways. GPCRs are characterized by a rather low sequence similarity and exhibit structural differences even for functionally closely related GPCRs. An accurate structure prediction for GPCRs is therefore not straightforward. We propose a computational approach that relies on the generation of several independent models based on different template structures, which are subsequently refined by molecular dynamics simulations. A comparison of their conformational stability and the agreement with GPCR-typical structural features is then used to select a favorable model. This strategy was applied to predict the structure of the herpesviral chemokine receptor US28 by generating three independent models based on the known structures of the chemokine receptors CXCR1, CXCR4, and CCR5. Model refinement and evaluation suggested that the model based on CCR5 exhibits the most favorable structural properties. In particular, the GPCR-typical structural features, such as a conserved water cluster or conserved non-covalent contacts, are present to a larger extent in the model based on CCR5 compared to the other models. A final model validation based on the recently published US28 crystal structure confirms that the CCR5-based model is the most accurate and exhibits 80.8% correctly modeled residues within the transmembrane helices. The structural agreement between the selected model and the crystal structure suggests that our modeling strategy may also be more generally applicable to other GPCRs of unknown structure.

  16. G protein coupled receptors as targets for next generation pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audsley, Neil; Down, Rachel E

    2015-12-01

    There is an on-going need for the discovery and development of new pesticides due to the loss of existing products through the continuing development of resistance, the desire for products with more favourable environmental and toxicological profiles and the need to implement the principles of integrated pest management. Insect G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in modulating biology, physiology and behaviour, including reproduction, osmoregulation, growth and development. Modifying normal receptor function by blocking or over stimulating its actions may either result in the death of a pest or disrupt its normal fitness or reproductive capacity to reduce pest populations. Hence GPCRs offer potential targets for the development of next generation pesticides providing opportunities to discover new chemistries for invertebrate pest control. Such receptors are important targets for pharmaceutical drugs, but are under-exploited by the agro-chemical industry. The octopamine receptor agonists are the only pesticides with a recognized mode of action, as described in the classification scheme developed by the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee, that act via a GPCR. The availability of sequenced insect genomes has facilitated the characterization of insect GPCRs, but the development and utilization of screening assays to identify lead compounds has been slow. Various studies using knock-down technologies or applying the native ligands and/or neuropeptide analogues to pest insects in vivo, have however demonstrated that modifying normal receptor function can have an insecticidal effect. This review presents examples of potential insect neuropeptide receptors that are potential targets for lead compound development, using case studies from three representative pest species, Tribolium castaneum, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and Drosophila suzukii. Functional analysis studies on T. castaneum suggest that GPCRs involved in growth and development (eclosion

  17. Conformational Fluctuations in G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael F.

    2014-03-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise almost 50% of pharmaceutical drug targets, where rhodopsin is an important prototype and occurs naturally in a lipid membrane. Rhodopsin photoactivation entails 11-cis to all-trans isomerization of the retinal cofactor, yielding an equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Two important questions are: (1) Is rhodopsin is a simple two-state switch? Or (2) does isomerization of retinal unlock an activated conformational ensemble? For an ensemble-based activation mechanism (EAM) a role for conformational fluctuations is clearly indicated. Solid-state NMR data together with theoretical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations detect increased local mobility of retinal after light activation. Resultant changes in local dynamics of the cofactor initiate large-scale fluctuations of transmembrane helices that expose recognition sites for the signal-transducing G-protein. Time-resolved FTIR studies and electronic spectroscopy further show the conformational ensemble is strongly biased by the membrane lipid composition, as well as pH and osmotic pressure. A new flexible surface model (FSM) describes how the curvature stress field of the membrane governs the energetics of active rhodopsin, due to the spontaneous monolayer curvature of the lipids. Furthermore, influences of osmotic pressure dictate that a large number of bulk water molecules are implicated in rhodopsin activation. Around 60 bulk water molecules activate rhodopsin, which is much larger than the number of structural waters seen in X-ray crystallography, or inferred from studies of bulk hydrostatic pressure. Conformational selection and promoting vibrational motions of rhodopsin lead to activation of the G-protein (transducin). Our biophysical data give a paradigm shift in understanding GPCR activation. The new view is: dynamics and conformational fluctuations involve an ensemble of substates that activate the cognate G-protein in the amplified visual

  18. A day in the life of a G protein-coupled receptor: the contribution to function of G protein-coupled receptor dimerization

    OpenAIRE

    Milligan, G.

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are one of the most actively studied families of proteins. However, despite the ubiquity of protein dimerization and oligomerization as a structural and functional motif in biology, until the last decade they were generally considered as monomeric, non-interacting polypeptides. For the metabotropic glutamate-like group of G protein-coupled receptors, it is now firmly established that they exist and function as dimers or, potentially, even within higher-order struct...

  19. A ligand channel through the G protein coupled receptor opsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Hildebrand

    Full Text Available The G protein coupled receptor rhodopsin contains a pocket within its seven-transmembrane helix (TM structure, which bears the inactivating 11-cis-retinal bound by a protonated Schiff-base to Lys296 in TM7. Light-induced 11-cis-/all-trans-isomerization leads to the Schiff-base deprotonated active Meta II intermediate. With Meta II decay, the Schiff-base bond is hydrolyzed, all-trans-retinal is released from the pocket, and the apoprotein opsin reloaded with new 11-cis-retinal. The crystal structure of opsin in its active Ops* conformation provides the basis for computational modeling of retinal release and uptake. The ligand-free 7TM bundle of opsin opens into the hydrophobic membrane layer through openings A (between TM1 and 7, and B (between TM5 and 6, respectively. Using skeleton search and molecular docking, we find a continuous channel through the protein that connects these two openings and comprises in its central part the retinal binding pocket. The channel traverses the receptor over a distance of ca. 70 A and is between 11.6 and 3.2 A wide. Both openings are lined with aromatic residues, while the central part is highly polar. Four constrictions within the channel are so narrow that they must stretch to allow passage of the retinal beta-ionone-ring. Constrictions are at openings A and B, respectively, and at Trp265 and Lys296 within the retinal pocket. The lysine enforces a 90 degrees elbow-like kink in the channel which limits retinal passage. With a favorable Lys side chain conformation, 11-cis-retinal can take the turn, whereas passage of the all-trans isomer would require more global conformational changes. We discuss possible scenarios for the uptake of 11-cis- and release of all-trans-retinal. If the uptake gate of 11-cis-retinal is assigned to opening B, all-trans is likely to leave through the same gate. The unidirectional passage proposed previously requires uptake of 11-cis-retinal through A and release of photolyzed all

  20. Dissecting signaling and functions of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araç, Demet; Aust, Gabriela; Calebiro, Davide;

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise an expanded superfamily of receptors in the human genome. Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs) form the second largest class of GPCRs. Despite the abundance, size, molecular structure, and functions in facilitating cell and matri...

  1. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Huso; Puchades, Maja;

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed that lactate is a “volume transmitter” in the brain and underpinned this by showing that the lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81, also known as HCA1 or HCAR1), which promotes lipid storage in adipocytes, is also active in the mammalian brain. This includes the ...

  2. Mechanisms of regulation and function of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Yang; Shi-Hai Xia

    2006-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) interact with the agonist-activated form of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) to affect receptor phosphorylation and to initiate profound impairment of receptor signaling,or desensitization. GPCR forms the largest family of cell surface receptors, and defects in GRK function have the potential consequence to affect GPCR-stimulated biological responses in many pathological situations.

  3. G-Protein-Coupled Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptors and Their Regulation of AKT Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Anjum Riaz; Ying Huang; Staffan Johansson

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is their ability to recognize and respond to chemically diverse ligands. Lysophospholipids constitute a relatively recent addition to these ligands and carry out their biological functions by activating G-proteins coupled to a large family of cell-surface receptors. This review aims to highlight salient features of cell signaling by one class of these receptors, known as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors, in the context of phosphatidylinos...

  4. The G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, C; Smajilovic, S; Wellendorph, P;

    2014-01-01

    GPRC6A (G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A) is a class C G protein-coupled receptor, that has been cloned from human, mouse and rat. Several groups have shown that the receptor is activated by a range of basic and small aliphatic L-α-amino acids of which L-arginine, L......, there is increasing evidence that the receptor is involved in regulation of inflammation, metabolism and endocrine functions. GPRC6A could thus be an interesting target for new drugs in these therapeutic areas....

  5. Chronic regulation of colonic epithelial secretory function by activation of G protein-coupled receptors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toumi, F

    2011-02-01

    Enteric neurotransmitters that act at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well known to acutely promote epithelial Cl(-) and fluid secretion. Here we examined if acute GPCR activation might have more long-term consequences for epithelial secretory function.

  6. Regulation of G protein-coupled receptors by palmitoylation and cholesterol

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard Alan D; Watts Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Due to their membrane location, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are subject to regulation by soluble and integral membrane proteins as well as membrane components, including lipids and sterols. GPCRs also undergo a variety of post-translational modifications, including palmitoylation. A recent article by Zheng et al. in BMC Cell Biology demonstrates cooperative roles for receptor palmitoylation and cholesterol binding in GPCR dimerization and G protein coupling, underlining the c...

  7. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Stem Cells and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer R. Lynch; Jenny Yingzi Wang

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of cell-surface signaling proteins that bind extracellular ligands and transduce signals into cells via heterotrimeric G proteins. GPCRs are highly tractable drug targets. Aberrant expression of GPCRs and G proteins has been observed in various cancers and their importance in cancer stem cells has begun to be appreciated. We have recently reported essential roles for G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) and G protein subunit Gαq in ...

  8. A Rapid and Efficient Immunoenzymatic Assay to Detect Receptor Protein Interactions: G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Zappelli; Simona Daniele; Abbracchio, Maria P.; Claudia Martini; Maria Letizia Trincavelli

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the largest families of cell surface receptors, and are the target of at least one-third of the current therapeutic drugs on the market. Along their life cycle, GPCRs are accompanied by a range of specialized GPCR-interacting proteins (GIPs), which take part in receptor proper folding, targeting to the appropriate subcellular compartments and in receptor signaling tasks, and also in receptor regulation processes, such as desensitization and...

  9. DMPD: G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17456803 G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macropha...2007 Apr 24. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signali...ng in macrophages. PubmedID 17456803 Title G-protein-coupled receptor expression,

  10. Application of G Protein-Coupled Receptor-Heteromer Identification Technology to Monitor β-Arrestin Recruitment to G Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromers

    OpenAIRE

    Heng B See; Seeber, Ruth M.; Kocan, Martina; Eidne, Karin A.; Pfleger, Kevin D.G.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the role of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR; also known as a 7 transmembrane receptor) heteromerization in the physiology and pathophysiology of cellular function has now become a major research focus. However, there is currently a lack of cell-based assays capable of profiling the specific functional consequences of heteromerization in a ligand-dependent manner. Understanding the pharmacology specifically associated with heteromer function in contrast to monomer or homomer fun...

  11. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    -alpha;-amino acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABA(B1...

  12. Secretin family (Class B) G protein-coupled receptors – from molecular to clinical perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Poyner, David R; Hay, Debbie L

    2012-01-01

    Family B G protein-coupled receptors represent an important but under-researched group of receptors. This edition of the British Journal of Pharmacology considers the roles and pharmacology of a number of these receptors. Whilst common themes emerge, it is clear that more work is needed to understand the details of each receptor in order to properly exploit them therapeutically.

  13. Computational methods for studying G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Rutkowska, Ewelina; Bartuzi, Damian; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The functioning of GPCRs is classically described by the ternary complex model as the interplay of three basic components: a receptor, an agonist, and a G protein. According to this model, receptor activation results from an interaction with an agonist, which translates into the activation of a particular G protein in the intracellular compartment that, in turn, is able to initiate particular signaling cascades. Extensive studies on GPCRs have led to new findings which open unexplored and exciting possibilities for drug design and safer and more effective treatments with GPCR targeting drugs. These include discovery of novel signaling mechanisms such as ligand promiscuity resulting in multitarget ligands and signaling cross-talks, allosteric modulation, biased agonism, and formation of receptor homo- and heterodimers and oligomers which can be efficiently studied with computational methods. Computer-aided drug design techniques can reduce the cost of drug development by up to 50%. In particular structure- and ligand-based virtual screening techniques are a valuable tool for identifying new leads and have been shown to be especially efficient for GPCRs in comparison to water-soluble proteins. Modern computer-aided approaches can be helpful for the discovery of compounds with designed affinity profiles. Furthermore, homology modeling facilitated by a growing number of available templates as well as molecular docking supported by sophisticated techniques of molecular dynamics and quantitative structure-activity relationship models are an excellent source of information about drug-receptor interactions at the molecular level. PMID:26928552

  14. Towards predictive docking at aminergic G-protein coupled receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 11 (2015), s. 284. ISSN 1610-2940 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : induced-fit docking * pose scoring * molecular dynamics * ligand-receptor interaction Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.736, year: 2014

  15. GPCRdb: the G protein-coupled receptor database - an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, C; Isberg, V; Mordalski, S; Harpsøe, K; Rataj, K; Hauser, A S; Kolb, P; Bojarski, A J; Vriend, G; Gloriam, D E

    2016-07-01

    GPCRs make up the largest family of human membrane proteins and of drug targets. Recent advances in GPCR pharmacology and crystallography have shed new light on signal transduction, allosteric modulation and biased signalling, translating into new mechanisms and principles for drug design. The GPCR database, GPCRdb, has served the community for over 20 years and has recently been extended to include a more multidisciplinary audience. This review is intended to introduce new users to the services in GPCRdb, which meets three overall purposes: firstly, to provide reference data in an integrated, annotated and structured fashion, with a focus on sequences, structures, single-point mutations and ligand interactions. Secondly, to equip the community with a suite of web tools for swift analysis of structures, sequence similarities, receptor relationships, and ligand target profiles. Thirdly, to facilitate dissemination through interactive diagrams of, for example, receptor residue topologies, phylogenetic relationships and crystal structure statistics. Herein, these services are described for the first time; visitors and guides are provided with good practices for their utilization. Finally, we describe complementary databases cross-referenced by GPCRdb and web servers with corresponding functionality. PMID:27155948

  16. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet;

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix-a structural feature of all GPCRs-the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region...

  17. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet;

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic ...

  18. Mechanisms of G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Spinal Nociception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deliu, Elena; Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.;

    2012-01-01

    Human and animal studies suggest that estrogens are involved in the processing of nociceptive sensory information and analgesic responses in the central nervous system. Rapid pronociceptive estrogenic effects have been reported, some of which likely involve G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER...

  19. Identification of the first surrogate agonists for the G protein-coupled receptor GPR132

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shehata, Mohamed A.; Christensen, Hanna Belcik; Isberg, Vignir; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer; Bender, Andreas; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Gloriam, David E.

    2015-01-01

    GPR132 is an orphan class A G protein-coupled receptor. It has been proposed to be activated by protons and to regulate apoptosis, atherosclerosis and inflammation, but these results are still preliminary. In the current work, we designed and screened a focused compound library using a β...

  20. G-protein coupled receptors of the renin-angiotensin system: new targets against breast cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues-Ferreira, Sylvie; Nahmias, Clara

    2015-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane receptors, with high potential for drug discovery. These receptors can be activated by a panel of different ligands including ions, hormones, small molecules, and vasoactive peptides. Among those, angiotensins [angiotensin II (AngII) and angiotensin 1–7] are the major biologically active products of the classical and alternative renin-angiotensin system (RAS). These peptides bind and activate three different subtype...

  1. Mechanisms Governing the Activation and Trafficking of Yeast G Protein-coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan, Christopher J.; Overton, Mark C.; Blumer, Kendall J.

    1998-01-01

    We have addressed the mechanisms governing the activation and trafficking of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) by analyzing constitutively active mating pheromone receptors (Ste2p and Ste3p) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Substitution of the highly conserved proline residue in transmembrane segment VI of these receptors causes constitutive signaling. This proline residue may facilitate folding of GPCRs into native, inactive conformations, and/or mediate a...

  2. Dimers of G-Protein Coupled Receptors as Versatile Storage and Response Units

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Michael S.; Renu Sah; Ambikaipakan Balasubramaniam; Park, Edwards A.; Sallee, Floyd R.; Parker, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    The status and use of transmembrane, extracellular and intracellular domains in oligomerization of heptahelical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are reviewed and for transmembrane assemblies also supplemented by new experimental evidence. The transmembrane-linked GPCR oligomers typically have as the minimal unit an asymmetric ~180 kDa pentamer consisting of receptor homodimer or heterodimer and a G-protein αβγ subunit heterotrimer. With neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors, this assembly is c...

  3. G protein-coupled receptors as new therapeutic targets for type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the gut–brain–pancreatic axis are key players in the postprandial control of metabolism and food intake. A number of intestinally located receptors have been implicated in the chemo-detection of ingested nutrients, and in the pancreatic islets and nervous system GPCRs play essential roles in the detection of many hormones and neurotransmitters. Because of the diversity, cell-specific expression and ‘druggability’ of the GPCR superfamily, these receptors ...

  4. Molecular identification of a Drosophila G protein-coupled receptor specific for crustacean cardioactive peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Hauser, Frank; Kobberup, Sune;

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila Genome Project website (www.flybase.org) contains the sequence of an annotated gene (CG6111) expected to code for a G protein-coupled receptor. We have cloned this receptor and found that its gene was not correctly predicted, because an annotated neighbouring gene (CG14547) was als...... head. Furthermore, we identified a gene sequence in the genomic database from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae that very likely codes for a crustacean cardioactive peptide receptor....

  5. Instability of a Class A G Protein-Coupled Receptor Oligomer Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Jacqueline M.; Lambert, Nevin A.

    2009-01-01

    The quaternary structure of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can influence their trafficking and ability to transduce signals. GPCR oligomers are generally portrayed as long-lived entities, although the stability of these complexes has not been studied. Here we show that D2 dopamine receptor protomers interact transiently at a specific oligomer interface. Selective immobilization of cyan fluorescent protein-D2 receptors (C-D2Rs) in the plasma membrane failed to comp...

  6. Recent Progress in Understanding Subtype Specific Regulation of NMDA Receptors by G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs are the largest family of receptors whose ligands constitute nearly a third of prescription drugs in the market. They are widely involved in diverse physiological functions including learning and memory. NMDA receptors (NMDARs, which belong to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, are likewise ubiquitously expressed in the central nervous system (CNS and play a pivotal role in learning and memory. Despite its critical contribution to physiological and pathophysiological processes, few pharmacological interventions aimed directly at regulating NMDAR function have been developed to date. However, it is well established that NMDAR function is precisely regulated by cellular signalling cascades recruited downstream of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR stimulation. Accordingly, the downstream regulation of NMDARs likely represents an important determinant of outcome following treatment with neuropsychiatric agents that target selected GPCRs. Importantly, the functional consequence of such regulation on NMDAR function varies, based not only on the identity of the GPCR, but also on the cell type in which relevant receptors are expressed. Indeed, the mechanisms responsible for regulating NMDARs by GPCRs involve numerous intracellular signalling molecules and regulatory proteins that vary from one cell type to another. In the present article, we highlight recent findings from studies that have uncovered novel mechanisms by which selected GPCRs regulate NMDAR function and consequently NMDAR-dependent plasticity.

  7. G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Extranuclear Mediators for the Non-Genomic Actions of Steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Steroids hormones possess two distinct actions, a delayed genomic effect and a rapid non-genomic effect. Rapid steroid-triggered signaling is mediated by specific receptors localized most often to the plasma membrane. The nature of these receptors is of great interest and accumulated data suggest that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are appealing candidates. Increasing evidence regarding the interaction between steroids and specific membrane proteins, as well as the involvement of G protein and corresponding downstream signaling, have led to identification of physiologically relevant GPCRs as steroid extranuclear receptors. Examples include G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30 for estrogen, membrane progestin receptor for progesterone, G protein-coupled receptor family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A and zinc transporter member 9 (ZIP9 for androgen, and trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1 for thyroid hormone. These receptor-mediated biological effects have been extended to reproductive development, cardiovascular function, neuroendocrinology and cancer pathophysiology. However, although great progress have been achieved, there are still important questions that need to be answered, including the identities of GPCRs responsible for the remaining steroids (e.g., glucocorticoid, the structural basis of steroids and GPCRs’ interaction and the integration of extranuclear and nuclear signaling to the final physiological function. Here, we reviewed the several significant developments in this field and highlighted a hypothesis that attempts to explain the general interaction between steroids and GPCRs.

  8. Activation of the A2A adenosine G-protein-coupled receptor by conformational selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Libin; Van Eps, Ned; Zimmer, Marco; Ernst, Oliver P; Prosser, R Scott

    2016-05-12

    Conformational selection and induced fit are two prevailing mechanisms to explain the molecular basis for ligand-based activation of receptors. G-protein-coupled receptors are the largest class of cell surface receptors and are important drug targets. A molecular understanding of their activation mechanism is critical for drug discovery and design. However, direct evidence that addresses how agonist binding leads to the formation of an active receptor state is scarce. Here we use (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance to quantify the conformational landscape occupied by the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), a prototypical class A G-protein-coupled receptor. We find an ensemble of four states in equilibrium: (1) two inactive states in millisecond exchange, consistent with a formed (state S1) and a broken (state S2) salt bridge (known as 'ionic lock') between transmembrane helices 3 and 6; and (2) two active states, S3 and S3', as identified by binding of a G-protein-derived peptide. In contrast to a recent study of the β2-adrenergic receptor, the present approach allowed identification of a second active state for A2AR. Addition of inverse agonist (ZM241385) increases the population of the inactive states, while full agonists (UK432097 or NECA) stabilize the active state, S3', in a manner consistent with conformational selection. In contrast, partial agonist (LUF5834) and an allosteric modulator (HMA) exclusively increase the population of the S3 state. Thus, partial agonism is achieved here by conformational selection of a distinct active state which we predict will have compromised coupling to the G protein. Direct observation of the conformational equilibria of ligand-dependent G-protein-coupled receptor and deduction of the underlying mechanisms of receptor activation will have wide-reaching implications for our understanding of the function of G-protein-coupled receptor in health and disease. PMID:27144352

  9. Regulation of C3a Receptor Signaling in Human Mast Cells by G Protein Coupled Receptor Kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Guo; Hariharan Subramanian; Kshitij Gupta; Hydar Ali

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The complement component C3a activates human mast cells via its cell surface G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) C3aR. For most GPCRs, agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation leads to receptor desensitization, internalization as well as activation of downstream signaling pathways such as ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Previous studies in transfected COS cells overexpressing G protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) demonstrated that GRK2, GRK3, GRK5 and GRK6 participate in agonist-induced...

  10. Targeting G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Brinks, Henriette; Koch, Walter J

    2010-01-01

    In the human body, over 1000 different G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate a broad spectrum of extracellular signals at the plasma membrane, transmitting vital physiological features such as pain, sight, smell, inflammation, heart rate and contractility of muscle cells. Signaling through these receptors is primarily controlled and regulated by a group of kinases, the GPCR kinases (GRKs), of which only seven are known and thus, interference with these common downstream GPCR regulators ...

  11. Large-scale production and protein engineering of G protein-coupled receptors for structural studies

    OpenAIRE

    Milić, Dalibor; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.

    2015-01-01

    Structural studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) gave insights into molecular mechanisms of their action and contributed significantly to molecular pharmacology. This is primarily due to technical advances in protein engineering, production and crystallization of these important receptor targets. On the other hand, NMR spectroscopy of GPCRs, which can provide information about their dynamics, still remains challenging due to difficulties in preparation of isotopically labeled recepto...

  12. Common and distinct mechanisms of activation of rhodopsin and other G protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Sumire Nakamura; Takeshi Itabashi; Daisuke Ogawa; Tetsuji Okada

    2013-01-01

    Detailed and systematic examination of high-resolution structural data is a rational strategy for understanding the function of biological macromolecules. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are an exceptionally valuable superfamily of proteins for such analysis. The most intriguing question is how a variety of extracellular stimuli evoke structural changes in the intracellular surface of the receptors. The recent active-like crystal structures of GPCRs provide information for uncovering comm...

  13. Large-scale polymorphism discovery in macaque G-protein coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, Dharmendra B; Ogawa, Lisa M; Ward, Joshua M.; Miller, Gregory M.; Vallender, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Background G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) play an inordinately large role in human health. Variation in the genes that encode these receptors is associated with numerous disorders across the entire spectrum of disease. GPCRs also represent the single largest class of drug targets and associated pharmacogenetic effects are modulated, in part, by polymorphisms. Recently, non-human primate models have been developed focusing on naturally-occurring, functionally-parallel polymorphisms in can...

  14. Large-scale polymorphism discovery in macaque G-protein coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, Dharmendra B; Ogawa, Lisa M; Ward, Joshua M.; Miller, Gregory M.; Vallender, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) play an inordinately large role in human health. Variation in the genes that encode these receptors is associated with numerous disorders across the entire spectrum of disease. GPCRs also represent the single largest class of drug targets and associated pharmacogenetic effects are modulated, in part, by polymorphisms. Recently, non-human primate models have been developed focusing on naturally-occurring, functionally-parallel polymorphisms in ca...

  15. Constitutive Activity among Orphan Class-A G Protein Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Adam L.; Michael A Steurer; Aronstam, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of constitutive activity among orphan class-A G protein coupled receptors within the cAMP signaling pathway. Constitutive signaling was revealed by changes in gene expression under control of the cAMP response element. Gene expression was measured in Chinese hamster ovary cells transiently co-transfected with plasmids containing a luciferase reporter and orphan receptor. Criteria adopted for defining constitutive activation were: 1) 200% el...

  16. Trace amines: Identification of a family of mammalian G protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Borowsky, Beth; Adham, Nika; Jones, Kenneth A.; Raddatz, Rita; Artymyshyn, Roman; Ogozalek, Kristine L.; Durkin, Margaret M.; Lakhlani, Parul P.; Bonini, James A.; Pathirana, Sudam; Boyle, Noel; Pu, Xiaosui; Kouranova, Evguenia; Lichtblau, Harvey; Ochoa, F. Yulina

    2001-01-01

    Tyramine, β-phenylethylamine, tryptamine, and octopamine are biogenic amines present in trace levels in mammalian nervous systems. Although some “trace amines” have clearly defined roles as neurotransmitters in invertebrates, the extent to which they function as true neurotransmitters in vertebrates has remained speculative. Using a degenerate PCR approach, we have identified 15 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) from human and rodent tissues. Together with the orphan receptor PNR, these rece...

  17. The Origins of Diversity and Specificity in G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen; Luttrell, Louis M

    2005-01-01

    The modulation of transmembrane signaling by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitutes the single most important therapeutic target in medicine. Drugs acting on GPCRs have traditionally been classified as agonists, partial agonists, or antagonists based on a two-state model of receptor function embodied in the ternary complex model. Over the past decade, however, many lines of investigation have shown that GPCR signaling exhibits greater diversity and “texture” than previously appreciat...

  18. A new crystal structure fragment-based pharmacophore method for G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidom, Kimberley; Isberg, Vignir; Hauser, Alexander Sebastian; Mordalski, Stefan; Lehto, Thomas; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Gloriam, David E

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new method for the building of pharmacophores for G protein-coupled receptors, a major drug target family. The method is a combination of the ligand- and target-based pharmacophore methods and founded on the extraction of structural fragments, interacting ligand moiety and...... ligands are known. 47% of the class A G protein-coupled receptors can be targeted with at least four-element pharmacophores. The fragment libraries can also be used to grow known ligands or for rotamer refinement of homology models. Researchers can download the complete fragment library or a subset...... receptor residue pairs, from crystal structure complexes. We describe the procedure to collect a library with more than 250 fragments covering 29 residue positions within the generic transmembrane binding pocket. We describe how the library fragments are recombined and inferred to build pharmacophores for...

  19. Identification of the first surrogate agonists for the G protein-coupled receptor GPR132

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shehata, Mohamed A.; Christensen, Hanna Belcik; Isberg, Vignir;

    2015-01-01

    GPR132 is an orphan class A G protein-coupled receptor. It has been proposed to be activated by protons and to regulate apoptosis, atherosclerosis and inflammation, but these results are still preliminary. In the current work, we designed and screened a focused compound library using a β-arrestin......GPR132 is an orphan class A G protein-coupled receptor. It has been proposed to be activated by protons and to regulate apoptosis, atherosclerosis and inflammation, but these results are still preliminary. In the current work, we designed and screened a focused compound library using a β......-arrestin recruitment assay, and thereby identified the first disclosed surrogate GPR132 agonist 1 with a potency of 3.4 μM. This constitutes the first available pharmacological tool for the in vitro characterization of the orphan receptor GPR132. The testing of 32 analogs furthermore identified a number of compounds...

  20. Heterotrimeric G proteins precouple with G protein-coupled receptors in living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nobles, M.; Benians, A.; Tinker, A

    2005-01-01

    Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy, we investigate how heterotrimeric G proteins interact with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the absence of receptor activation, the alpha 2A adrenergic and muscarinic M4 receptors are present on the cell membrane as dimers. Furthermore, there is an interaction between the G protein subunits alpha o, beta 1, and gamma 2 and a number of GPCRs including M4, a2A, the adenosine All receptor, and the dopamine D2 receptor under r...

  1. Inhibition of WNT Signaling by G Protein-Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Kinase 2 (GRK2)

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, LIMING; Gesty-Palmer, Diane; Fields, Timothy A.; Spurney, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of Wnt signaling pathways causes release and stabilization of the transcription regulator β-catenin from a destruction complex composed of axin and the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein (canonical signaling pathway). Assembly of this complex is facilitated by a protein-protein interaction between APC and a regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain in axin. Because G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) has a RGS domain that is closely related to the RGS domain in axi...

  2. Biophysical characterization of G-protein coupled receptor-peptide ligand binding

    OpenAIRE

    Langelaan, David N.; Ngweniform, Pascaline; Rainey, Jan K.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are ubiquitous membrane proteins allowing intracellular response to extracellular factors that range from photons of light to small molecules to proteins. Despite extensive exploitation of GRCRs as therapeutic targets, biophysical characterization of GPCR-ligand interactions remains challenging. In this minireview, we focus on techniques which have been successfully employed for structural and biophysical characterization of peptide ligands binding to their...

  3. Computing Highly Correlated Positions Using Mutual Information and Graph Theory for G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Fatakia, Sarosh N.; Costanzi, Stefano; Chow, Carson C.

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a superfamily of seven transmembrane-spanning proteins involved in a wide array of physiological functions and are the most common targets of pharmaceuticals. This study aims to identify a cohort or clique of positions that share high mutual information. Using a multiple sequence alignment of the transmembrane (TM) domains, we calculated the mutual information between all inter-TM pairs of aligned positions and ranked the pairs by mutual information. A ...

  4. Enhanced expression of G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jala Venkatakrishna Rao; Radde Brandie N; Haribabu Bodduluri; Klinge Carolyn M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) was reported to bind 17β-estradiol (E2), tamoxifen, and ICI 182,780 (fulvestrant) and promotes activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling in breast, endometrial and thyroid cancer cells. Although lung adenocarcinomas express estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ), the expression of GPER in lung cancer has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of GPER in...

  5. Visualizing G protein-coupled receptors in action through confocal microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Cabrera-Wrooman, Alejandro; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute one of the most abundant entities in cellular communication. Elucidation of their structure and function as well as of their regulation began 30-40 years ago and the advance has markedly increased during the last 15 years. They participate in a plethora of cell functions such as regulation of metabolic fluxes, contraction, secretion, differentiation, or proliferation, and in essentially all activities of our organism; these receptors are targets of a large proportion of prescribed and illegal drugs. Fluorescence techniques have been used to study receptors for many years. The experimental result was usually a two-dimensional (2D) micrograph. Today, the result can be a spatiotemporal (four-dimensional, 4D) movie. Advances in microscopy, fluorescent protein design, and computer-assisted analysis have been of great importance to increase our knowledge on receptor regulation and function and create opportunities for future research. In this review we briefly depict the state of the art of the G protein-coupled receptor field and the methodologies used to study G protein-coupled receptor location, trafficking, dimerization, and other types of receptor-protein interaction. Fluorescence techniques now permit the capture of receptor images with high resolution and, together with a variety of fluorescent dyes that color organelles (such as the plasma membrane or the nucleus) or the cytoskeleton, allow researchers to obtain a much clearer idea of what is taking place at the cellular level. These developments are changing the way we explore cell communication and signal transduction, permitting deeper understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID:24751328

  6. Characterization of G-protein coupled receptor kinase interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Holliday, Nicholas D; Hansen, Jakob L;

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase-inactive muta......To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase...

  7. Understanding the Added Value of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Franco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs constitute the most populated family of proteins within the human genome. Since the early sixties work on GPCRs and on GPCR-mediated signaling has led to a number of awards, the most recent being the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2012. The future of GPCRs research is surely based on their capacity for heteromerization. Receptor heteromers offer a series of challenges that will help in providing success in academic/basic research and translation into more effective and safer drugs.

  8. Autoantibodies against G-Protein-Coupled Receptors Modulate Heart Mast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ludmila Okruhlicova; Rosemarie Morwinski; Wolfgang Schulze; Sabine Bartel; Peter Weismann; Narcisa Tribulova; Gerd Wallukat

    2007-01-01

    Mast cells are believed to be involved in myocardial tissue remodelling under pathophysiological conditions. We examined the effects of autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors in sera of patients with heart diseases on myocardial mast cells in the cultured neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat heart cells. Cells collected at day 3 and 10 of the culture were preincubated with autoantibodies against α1-adrenoceptor and angiotensin Ⅱ AT1-receptor,agonist phenylephrine and angiotensin Ⅱ, and control IgG. The pretreated cultured cells were stained for selected mast cell markers tryptase, chymase and TNF-α. The cultured cells were also processed for observation with electron microscopy. The autoantibodies-treatment of the 3-day cultured cells caused both increased intensity of immunofluorescence (p<0.05) and their enlarged diameters of the mast cells when compared to age-matched ones.In contrast, the fluorescence of preincubated 10-day-old mast cells was decreased compared with controls (p<0.01).In control samples, the fluorescence of 10-day-old mast cells was significantly higher than that of 3-day-old ones (p<0.001). Results of electron microscopy examination demonstrated there was an increased granulation of treated 3-day-old mast cells, while a degranulation of mast cells at day 10 of application. The results suggest the modulation effect of the autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors on mast cells, indicating a potential functional link between the autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors and the mast cells in progression of heart disease.

  9. Monitoring endosomal trafficking of the G protein-coupled receptor somatostatin receptor 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower-Gilchrist, Cristy; Styers, Melanie L.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Berbari, Nicolas F.; Sztul, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Endocytic trafficking of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulates the number of cell surface receptors available for activation by agonists and serves as one mechanism that controls the intensity and duration of signaling. Deregulation of GPCR-mediated signaling pathways results in a multitude of diseases, and thus extensive efforts have been directed toward understand the pathways and molecular events that regulate endocytic trafficking of these receptors. The general paradigms associated with internalization and recycling, as well as many of the key regulators involved in endosomal trafficking of GPCRs have been identified. This knowledge provides goalposts to facilitate the analysis of endosomal pathways traversed by previously uncharacterized GPCRs. Some of the most informative markers associated with GPCR transit are the Rab members of the Ras-related family of small GTPases. Individual Rabs show high selectivity for distinct endosomal compartments, and thus co-localization of a GPCR with a particular Rab informs on the internalization pathway traversed by the receptor. Progress in our knowledge of endosomal trafficking of GPCRs has been achieved through advances in our ability to tag GPCRs and Rabs with fluorescent proteins and perform live cell imaging of multiple fluorophores, allowing real-time observation of receptor trafficking between subcellular compartments in a cell culture model. PMID:24359959

  10. Spectral methods for study of the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin. II. Magnetic resonance methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struts, A. V.; Barmasov, A. V.; Brown, M. F.

    2016-02-01

    This article continues our review of spectroscopic studies of G-protein-coupled receptors. Magnetic resonance methods including electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provide specific structural and dynamical data for the protein in conjunction with optical methods (vibrational, electronic spectroscopy) as discussed in the accompanying article. An additional advantage is the opportunity to explore the receptor proteins in the natural membrane lipid environment. Solid-state 2H and 13C NMR methods yield information about both the local structure and dynamics of the cofactor bound to the protein and its light-induced changes. Complementary site-directed spin-labeling studies monitor the structural alterations over larger distances and correspondingly longer time scales. A multiscale reaction mechanism describes how local changes of the retinal cofactor unlock the receptor to initiate large-scale conformational changes of rhodopsin. Activation of the G-protein-coupled receptor involves an ensemble of conformational substates within the rhodopsin manifold that characterize the dynamically active receptor.

  11. G protein-coupled receptor 39 deficiency is associated with pancreatic islet dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Jin, Chunyu;

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-39 is a seven-transmembrane receptor expressed mainly in endocrine and metabolic tissues that acts as a Zn(++) sensor signaling mainly through the G(q) and G(12/13) pathways. The expression of GPR39 is regulated by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1alpha and HNF-4a...... insulin in response to glucose stimulation than islets from wild-type littermates. It is concluded that GPR39 is involved in the control of endocrine pancreatic function, and it is suggested that this receptor could be a novel potential target for the treatment of diabetes.......G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-39 is a seven-transmembrane receptor expressed mainly in endocrine and metabolic tissues that acts as a Zn(++) sensor signaling mainly through the G(q) and G(12/13) pathways. The expression of GPR39 is regulated by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1alpha and HNF-4......alpha, and in the present study, we addressed the importance of GPR39 for glucose homeostasis and pancreatic islets function. The expression and localization of GPR39 were characterized in the endocrine pancreas and pancreatic cell lines. Gpr39(-/-) mice were studied in vivo, especially in respect of...

  12. Basic evidence for class A G-protein-coupled receptor heteromerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael eFranco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell membrane receptors rarely work on isolation, often they form oligomeric complexes with other receptor molecules and they may directly interact with different proteins of the signal transduction machinery. For a variety of reasons, rhodopsin-like class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs seem an exception to the general rule of receptor-receptor direct interaction. In fact, controversy surrounds their potential to form homo- hetero-dimers/oligomers with other class A GPCRs; in a sense, the field is going backwards instead of forward. This review focuses on the convergent, complementary and telling evidence showing that homo- and heteromers of class A GPCRs exist in transfected cells and, more importantly, in natural sources. It is time to decide between questioning the occurrence of heteromers or, alternatively, facing the vast scientific and technical challenges that class A receptor-dimer/oligomer existence pose to Pharmacology and to Drug Discovery.

  13. Monomeric G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin in solution activates its G protein transducin at the diffusion limit

    OpenAIRE

    Ernst, Oliver P.; Gramse, Verena; Kolbe, Michael; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Heck, Martin

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate biological signals by stimulating nucleotide exchange in heterotrimeric G proteins (Gαβγ). Receptor dimers have been proposed as the functional unit responsible for catalytic interaction with Gαβγ. To investigate whether a G protein-coupled receptor monomer can activate Gαβγ, we used the retinal photoreceptor rhodopsin and its cognate G protein transducin (Gt) to determine the stoichiometry of rhodopsin/Gt binding and the rate of catalyzed nucleotide exchan...

  14. Insights into the structural biology of G-protein coupled receptors impacts drug design for central nervous system neurodegenerative processes

    OpenAIRE

    Dalet, Farfán-García Eunice; Guadalupe, Trujillo-Ferrara José; María del Carmen, Castillo-Hernández; Humberto, Guerra-Araiza Christian; Antonio, Soriano-Ursúa Marvin

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, there have been important new insights into the structural biology of G-protein coupled receptors. It is now known that allosteric binding sites are involved in the affinity and selectivity of ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, and that signaling by these receptors involves both G-protein dependent and independent pathways. The present review outlines the physiological and pharmacological implications of this perspective for the design of new drugs to treat disord...

  15. Molecular evolution of a chordate specific family of G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leese Florian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chordate evolution is a history of innovations that is marked by physical and behavioral specializations, which led to the development of a variety of forms from a single ancestral group. Among other important characteristics, vertebrates obtained a well developed brain, anterior sensory structures, a closed circulatory system and gills or lungs as blood oxygenation systems. The duplication of pre-existing genes had profound evolutionary implications for the developmental complexity in vertebrates, since mutations modifying the function of a duplicated protein can lead to novel functions, improving the evolutionary success. Results We analyzed here the evolution of the GPRC5 family of G protein-coupled receptors by comprehensive similarity searches and found that the receptors are only present in chordates and that the size of the receptor family expanded, likely due to genome duplication events in the early history of vertebrate evolution. We propose that a single GPRC5 receptor coding gene originated in a stem chordate ancestor and gave rise by duplication events to a gene family comprising three receptor types (GPRC5A-C in vertebrates, and a fourth homologue present only in mammals (GPRC5D. Additional duplications of GPRC5B and GPRC5C sequences occurred in teleost fishes. The finding that the expression patterns of the receptors are evolutionarily conserved indicates an important biological function of these receptors. Moreover, we found that expression of GPRC5B is regulated by vitamin A in vivo, confirming previous findings that linked receptor expression to retinoic acid levels in tumor cell lines and strengthening the link between the receptor expression and the development of a complex nervous system in chordates, known to be dependent on retinoic acid signaling. Conclusions GPRC5 receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptors with unique sequence characteristics, may represent a molecular novelty that helped non

  16. A Molecular Mechanism for Sequential Activation of a G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grundmann, Manuel; Tikhonova, Irina G; Hudson, Brian D; Smith, Nicola J; Mohr, Klaus; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme; Kenakin, Terry; Kostenis, Evi

    2016-01-01

    Ligands targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are currently classified as either orthosteric, allosteric, or dualsteric/bitopic. Here, we introduce a new pharmacological concept for GPCR functional modulation: sequential receptor activation. A hallmark feature of this is a stepwise ligand...... binding mode with transient activation of a first receptor site followed by sustained activation of a second topographically distinct site. We identify 4-CMTB (2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-methyl-N-(thiazol-2-yl)butanamide), previously classified as a pure allosteric agonist of the free fatty acid receptor 2, as...... mutational and pharmacological perturbations along with computational methods, and propose a kinetic model applicable to the analysis of sequential receptor activation. We envision this form of dynamic agonism as a common principle of nature to spatiotemporally encode cellular information....

  17. Assessment and Challenges of Ligand Docking into Comparative Models of G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, E.D.; Meiler, J.; Norn, C.; Frimurer, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing number of high-resolution X-ray structures of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) creates a unique opportunity to employ comparative modeling and docking to provide valuable insight into the function and ligand binding determinants of novel receptors, to assist in virtual...... screening and to design and optimize drug candidates. However, low sequence identity between receptors, conformational flexibility, and chemical diversity of ligands present an enormous challenge to molecular modeling approaches. It is our hypothesis that rapid Monte-Carlo sampling of protein backbone and...... identification of correct ligand-receptor interactions. On average, top ranked receptor models built on template structures over 50% sequence identity are within 2.9 Å of the experimental structure, with an average root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 2.2 Å for the transmembrane region and 5 Å for the second...

  18. The mapping of yeast's G-protein coupled receptor with an atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Musashi; Miyachi, Yusuke; Ishii, Jun; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-03-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) can measure the adhesion force between a sample and a cantilever while simultaneously applying a rupture force during the imaging of a sample. An AFM should be useful in targeting specific proteins on a cell surface. The present study proposes the use of an AFM to measure the adhesion force between targeting receptors and their ligands, and to map the targeting receptors. In this study, Ste2p, one of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), was chosen as the target receptor. The specific force between Ste2p on a yeast cell surface and a cantilever modified with its ligand, α-factor, was measured and found to be approximately 250 pN. In addition, through continuous measuring of the cell surface, a mapping of the receptors on the cell surface could be performed, which indicated the differences in the Ste2p expression levels. Therefore, the proposed AFM system is accurate for cell diagnosis.

  19. Transcriptional and Functional Characterization of the G Protein-Coupled Receptor Repertoire of Gastric Somatostatin Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Kristoffer L; Engelstoft, Maja S; Lund, Mari L;

    2015-01-01

    In the stomach, somatostatin (SST) acts as a general paracrine negative regulator of exocrine secretion of gastric acid and pepsinogen and endocrine secretion of gastrin, ghrelin, and histamine. Using reporter mice expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) under control of the SST promotor, we have...... characterized the G protein-coupled receptors expressed in gastric Sst-RFP-positive cells and probed their effects on SST secretion in primary cell cultures. Surprisingly, besides SST, amylin and PYY were also highly enriched in the SST cells. Several receptors found to regulate SST secretion were highly...... receptor were all positive regulators. 4) The neuropeptide receptors for calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide acted as positive regulators, no effect was observed using galanin and nociceptin although transcripts for the corresponding receptors appeared highly...

  20. Basic Pharmacological and Structural Evidence for Class A G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rafael; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Lanciego, José L.; Navarro, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Cell membrane receptors rarely work on isolation, often they form oligomeric complexes with other receptor molecules and they may directly interact with different proteins of the signal transduction machinery. For a variety of reasons, rhodopsin-like class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) seem an exception to the general rule of receptor–receptor direct interaction. In fact, controversy surrounds their potential to form homo- hetero-dimers/oligomers with other class A GPCRs; in a sense, the field is going backward instead of forward. This review focuses on the convergent, complementary and telling evidence showing that homo- and heteromers of class A GPCRs exist in transfected cells and, more importantly, in natural sources. It is time to decide between questioning the occurrence of heteromers or, alternatively, facing the vast scientific and technical challenges that class A receptor-dimer/oligomer existence pose to Pharmacology and to Drug Discovery. PMID:27065866

  1. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED); (Toronto); (BMS); (UAB, Spain)

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  2. Imaging G protein-coupled receptors while quantifying their ligand-binding free-energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsteens, David; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Zhang, Cheng; Spoerri, Patrizia M; Coughlin, Shaun R; Kobilka, Brian K; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    Imaging native membrane receptors and testing how they interact with ligands is of fundamental interest in the life sciences but has proven remarkably difficult to accomplish. Here, we introduce an approach that uses force-distance curve-based atomic force microscopy to simultaneously image single native G protein-coupled receptors in membranes and quantify their dynamic binding strength to native and synthetic ligands. We measured kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for individual protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) molecules in the absence and presence of antagonists, and these measurements enabled us to describe PAR1's ligand-binding free-energy landscape with high accuracy. Our nanoscopic method opens an avenue to directly image and characterize ligand binding of native membrane receptors. PMID:26167642

  3. Function of G-Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-1 in Reproductive System Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hongyan; Xuan, Jingxiu; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER-1), also known as GPR30, is a novel estrogen receptor mediating estrogen receptor signaling in multiple cell types. The progress of estrogen-related cancer is promoted by GPER-1 activation through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and phospholipase C (PLC) signaling pathways. However, this promoting effect of GPER-1 is nonclassic estrogen receptor (ER) dependent manner. In addition, clinical evidences revealed that GPER-1 is associated with estrogen resistance in estrogen-related cancer patients. These give a hint that GPER-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the estrogen-related cancers. However, preclinical studies also found that GPER-1 activation of its special agonist G-1 inhibits cancer cell proliferation. This review aims to summarize the characteristics and complex functions of GPER-1 in cancers.

  4. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev; Bender, Julia; Bach, Anders; Jacky, Birgitte P S; Strømgaard, Kristian; Deussing, Jan M; Schwartz, Thue W; Martinez, Karen L

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present a...... colocalization of the full-length proteins in cells and with previous studies, we suggest that the range of relevant interactions might extend to interactions with K i = 450 µM in the in vitro assays. Within this range, we identify novel PSD-95 interactions with the chemokine receptor CXCR2, the neuropeptide Y...... receptor Y2, and four of the somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). The interaction with SSTR1 was further investigated in mouse hippocampal neurons, where we found a clear colocalization between the endogenously expressed proteins, indicating a potential for further investigation of the role of this interaction...

  5. A robust and rapid method of producing soluble, stable, and functional G-protein coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Corin

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins, particularly G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, are notoriously difficult to express. Using commercial E. coli cell-free systems with the detergent Brij-35, we could rapidly produce milligram quantities of 13 unique GPCRs. Immunoaffinity purification yielded receptors at >90% purity. Secondary structure analysis using circular dichroism indicated that the purified receptors were properly folded. Microscale thermophoresis, a novel label-free and surface-free detection technique that uses thermal gradients, showed that these receptors bound their ligands. The secondary structure and ligand-binding results from cell-free produced proteins were comparable to those expressed and purified from HEK293 cells. Our study demonstrates that cell-free protein production using commercially available kits and optimal detergents is a robust technology that can be used to produce sufficient GPCRs for biochemical, structural, and functional analyses. This robust and simple method may further stimulate others to study the structure and function of membrane proteins.

  6. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1. PMID:27235398

  7. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (Whitehead); (MIT)

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  8. Prediction of G Protein-Coupled Receptors with SVM-Prot Features and Random Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhijun; Ju, Ying; Zou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest receptor superfamily. In this paper, we try to employ physical-chemical properties, which come from SVM-Prot, to represent GPCR. Random Forest was utilized as classifier for distinguishing them from other protein sequences. MEME suite was used to detect the most significant 10 conserved motifs of human GPCRs. In the testing datasets, the average accuracy was 91.61%, and the average AUC was 0.9282. MEME discovery analysis showed that many motifs aggregated in the seven hydrophobic helices transmembrane regions adapt to the characteristic of GPCRs. All of the above indicate that our machine-learning method can successfully distinguish GPCRs from non-GPCRs. PMID:27529053

  9. G-protein-Coupled Receptors and Their (Bio Chemical Significance Win 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsi-Hsien Lin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are seven transmembrane cell surface proteins specialized in cellular communication. These receptors represent a major gateway through which cells convert external cues into intracellular signals and respond with appropriate actions. While the effects of hormones, neurotransmitters, and drugs on cells, tissues, organs, and even whole organisms are well described, the molecular identity of the direct targets and the diverse signaling mechanisms of these biological ligands have been slow and hard to define. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2012 acknowledges the importance of GPCRs in these processes, especially for the contribution of Profs Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka to the studies of GPCRs. In this brief review, the seminal works accomplished by the two GPCR pioneers are summarized and the (bio chemical significance of GPCRs in health and disease is discussed.

  10. Allosteric Optical Control of a Class B G-Protein-Coupled Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broichhagen, Johannes; Johnston, Natalie R; von Ohlen, Yorrick; Meyer-Berg, Helena; Jones, Ben J; Bloom, Stephen R; Rutter, Guy A; Trauner, Dirk; Hodson, David J

    2016-05-01

    Allosteric regulation promises to open up new therapeutic avenues by increasing drug specificity at G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, drug discovery efforts are at present hampered by an inability to precisely control the allosteric site. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and testing of PhotoETP, a light-activated positive allosteric modulator of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), a class B GPCR involved in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis in humans. PhotoETP potentiates Ca(2+) , cAMP, and insulin responses to glucagon-like peptide-1 and its metabolites following illumination of cells with blue light. PhotoETP thus provides a blueprint for the production of small-molecule class B GPCR allosteric photoswitches, and may represent a useful tool for understanding positive cooperativity at the GLP-1R. PMID:27059784

  11. Prediction of G Protein-Coupled Receptors with SVM-Prot Features and Random Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Ying

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest receptor superfamily. In this paper, we try to employ physical-chemical properties, which come from SVM-Prot, to represent GPCR. Random Forest was utilized as classifier for distinguishing them from other protein sequences. MEME suite was used to detect the most significant 10 conserved motifs of human GPCRs. In the testing datasets, the average accuracy was 91.61%, and the average AUC was 0.9282. MEME discovery analysis showed that many motifs aggregated in the seven hydrophobic helices transmembrane regions adapt to the characteristic of GPCRs. All of the above indicate that our machine-learning method can successfully distinguish GPCRs from non-GPCRs. PMID:27529053

  12. Orphan G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs):biological functions and potential drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-long TANG; Ying WANG; Da-li LI; Jian LUO; Ming-yao LIU

    2012-01-01

    The superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) includes at least 800 seven-transmembrane receptors that participate in diverse physiological and pathological functions.GPCRs are the most successful targets of modern medicine,and approximately 36%of marketed pharmaceuticals target human GPCRs.However,the endogenous ligands of more than 140 GPCRs remain unidentified,leaving the natural functions of those GPCRs in doubt.These are the so-called orphan GPCRs,a great source of drug targets.This review focuses on the signaling transduction pathways of the Adhesion GPCR family,the LGR subfamily,and the PSGR subfamily,and their potential functions in immunology,development,and cancers.In this review,we present the current approaches and difficulties of orphan GPCR deorphanization and characterization.

  13. EGFR Transactivation by Peptide G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Terry W; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Nakamura, Taichi; Jensen, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer kills approximately 1.3 million citizens in the world annually. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) erlotinib and gefitinib are effective anti-tumor agents especially in lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. The goal is to increase the potency of TKI in lung cancer patients with wild type EGFR. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) transactivate the wild type EGFR in lung cancer cells. The GPCR can be activated by peptide agonists causing phosphatidylinositol turnover or stimulation of adenylylcyclase. Recently, nonpeptide antagonists were found to inhibit the EGFR transactivation caused by peptides. Nonpeptide antagonists for bombesin (BB), neurotensin (NTS) and cholecystokinin (CCK) inhibit lung cancer growth and increase the cytotoxicity of gefitinib. The results suggest that GPCR transactivation of the EGFR may play an important role in cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25563590

  14. Role of post-translational modifications on structure, function and pharmacology of class C G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2015-01-01

    taste receptors (T1R1-3), one calcium-sensing (CaS) receptor, one GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6) receptor, and seven orphan receptors. G protein-coupled receptors undergo a number of post-translational modifications, which regulate their structure, function and/or pharmacology. Here, we...

  15. Biased signaling through G-protein-coupled PROKR2 receptors harboring missense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbai, Oualid; Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Various missense mutations in the gene coding for prokineticin receptor 2 (PROKR2), a G-protein-coupled receptor, have been identified in patients with Kallmann syndrome. However, the functional consequences of these mutations on the different signaling pathways of this receptor have not been studied. We first showed that the wild-type PROKR2 can activate different G-protein subtypes (Gq, Gs, and Gi/o) and recruit β-arrestins in transfected HEK-293 cells. We then examined, for each of these signaling pathways, the effects of 9 mutations that did not significantly impair cell surface targeting or ligand binding of the receptor. Four mutant receptors showing defective Gq signaling (R85C, R85H, R164Q, and V331M) could still recruit β-arrestins on ligand activation, which may cause biased signaling in vivo. Conversely, the R80C receptor could activate the 3 types of G proteins but could not recruit β-arrestins. Finally, the R268C receptor could recruit β-arrestins and activate the Gq and Gs signaling pathways but could not activate the Gi/o signaling pathway. Our results validate the concept that mutations in the genes encoding membrane receptors can bias downstream signaling in various ways, possibly leading to pathogenic and, perhaps in some cases, protective (e.g., R268C) effects. PMID:24830383

  16. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed. PMID:27284048

  17. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in nervous system development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenhan, Tobias; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R

    2016-09-01

    Members of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR) class have emerged as crucial regulators of nervous system development, with important implications for human health and disease. In this Review, we discuss the current understanding of aGPCR functions during key steps in neural development, including cortical patterning, dendrite and synapse formation, and myelination. We focus on aGPCR modulation of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and signalling to control these varied aspects of neural development, and we discuss how impaired aGPCR function leads to neurological disease. We further highlight the emerging hypothesis that aGPCRs can be mechanically activated and the implications of this property in the nervous system. PMID:27466150

  18. Computational Modeling for the Activation Cycle of G-proteins by G-protein-coupled Receptors

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Yifei; Glavy, Joseph; White, Tommy; 10.4204/EPTCS.40.4

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we survey five different computational modeling methods. For comparison, we use the activation cycle of G-proteins that regulate cellular signaling events downstream of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as a driving example. Starting from an existing Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) model, we implement the G-protein cycle in the stochastic Pi-calculus using SPiM, as Petri-nets using Cell Illustrator, in the Kappa Language using Cellucidate, and in Bio-PEPA using the Bio-PEPA eclipse plug in. We also provide a high-level notation to abstract away from communication primitives that may be unfamiliar to the average biologist, and we show how to translate high-level programs into stochastic Pi-calculus processes and chemical reactions.

  19. G protein-coupled receptor160 regulates mycobacteria entry into macrophages by activating ERK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Liu, Haipeng; Chen, Hao; Mo, Haiping; Chen, Jianxia; Huang, Xiaocheng; Zheng, Ruijuan; Liu, Zhonghua; Feng, Yonghong; Liu, Feng; Ge, Baoxue

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, invades and replicates within susceptible hosts by disturbing host antimicrobial mechanisms. Although G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in most physiological and pathological activities of mammalian cells, the roles of GPCRs in Mtb invasion into host cell remain elusive. Here, we report that GPR160 expression is elevated at both mRNA and protein level in macrophages in response to BCG infection. Both the PiggyBac (PB) transposon-mediated mutation of gpr160 gene in mouse primary macrophages and siRNA-mediated knockdown of GPR160 in the human macrophage cell line THP-1 markedly reduced the entry of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing BCG (BCG-GFP), also operative in vivo. BCG infection-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was significantly reduced in gpr160 mutated (gpr160(-/-)) macrophages relative to levels observed in wild type macrophages, while inhibition of ERK by specific inhibitor or knockdown ERK1/2 by specific siRNA markedly reduced entry of BCG. Finally, lower bacteria burdens and attenuated pathological impairments were observed in the lungs of BCG-infected gpr160(-/-) mice. Furthermore, gpr160(-/-) macrophages also exhibits reduced uptake of Escherichia coli and Francisella tularensis. Taken together, these findings suggest an important role of GPR160 in regulating the entry of BCG into macrophages by targeting the ERK signaling pathway. As GPCRs have proven to be successful drug targets in pharmaceutical industry, it's tempting to speculate that compounds targeting GPR160, a G protein-coupled receptor, could intervene in Mtb infection. PMID:27259691

  20. Structural basis for modulation of a G-protein-coupled receptor by allosteric drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Ron O.; Green, Hillary F.; Valant, Celine; Borhani, David W.; Valcourt, James R.; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Canals, Meritxell; Lane, J. Robert; Rahmani, Raphaël; Baell, Jonathan B.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Shaw, David E.

    2013-11-01

    The design of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) allosteric modulators, an active area of modern pharmaceutical research, has proved challenging because neither the binding modes nor the molecular mechanisms of such drugs are known. Here we determine binding sites, bound conformations and specific drug-receptor interactions for several allosteric modulators of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor), a prototypical family A GPCR, using atomic-level simulations in which the modulators spontaneously associate with the receptor. Despite substantial structural diversity, all modulators form cation-π interactions with clusters of aromatic residues in the receptor extracellular vestibule, approximately 15Å from the classical, `orthosteric' ligand-binding site. We validate the observed modulator binding modes through radioligand binding experiments on receptor mutants designed, on the basis of our simulations, either to increase or to decrease modulator affinity. Simulations also revealed mechanisms that contribute to positive and negative allosteric modulation of classical ligand binding, including coupled conformational changes of the two binding sites and electrostatic interactions between ligands in these sites. These observations enabled the design of chemical modifications that substantially alter a modulator's allosteric effects. Our findings thus provide a structural basis for the rational design of allosteric modulators targeting muscarinic and possibly other GPCRs.

  1. The amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae genome contains a highly diversified set of G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiöth Helgi B

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are one of the largest families of genes in mammals. Branchiostoma floridae (amphioxus is one of the species most closely related species to vertebrates. Results Mining and phylogenetic analysis of the amphioxus genome showed the presence of at least 664 distinct GPCRs distributed among all the main families of GPCRs; Glutamate (18, Rhodopsin (570, Adhesion (37, Frizzled (6 and Secretin (16. Surprisingly, the Adhesion GPCR repertoire in amphioxus includes receptors with many new domains not previously observed in this family. We found many Rhodopsin GPCRs from all main groups including many amine and peptide binding receptors and several previously uncharacterized expansions were also identified. This genome has however no genes coding for bitter taste receptors (TAS2, the sweet and umami (TAS1, pheromone (VR1 or VR2 or mammalian olfactory receptors. Conclusion The amphioxus genome is remarkably rich in various GPCR subtypes while the main GPCR groups known to sense exogenous substances (such as Taste 2, mammalian olfactory, nematode chemosensory, gustatory, vomeronasal and odorant receptors in other bilateral species are absent.

  2. The repertoire of G-protein-coupled receptors in Xenopus tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Yinghe

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR superfamily represents the largest protein family in the human genome. These proteins have a variety of physiological functions that give them well recognized roles in clinical medicine. In Xenopus tropicalis, a widely used animal model for physiology research, the repertoire of GPCRs may help link the GPCR evolutionary history in vertebrates from teleost fish to mammals. Results We have identified 1452 GPCRs in the X. tropicalis genome. Phylogenetic analyses classified these receptors into the following seven families: Glutamate, Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Frizzled, Secretin, Taste 2 and Vomeronasal 1. Nearly 70% of X. tropicalis GPCRs are represented by the following three types of receptors thought to receive chemosensory information from the outside world: olfactory, vomeronasal 1 and vomeronasal 2 receptors. Conclusion X. tropicalis shares a more similar repertoire of GPCRs with mammals than it does with fish. An examination of the three major groups of receptors related to olfactory/pheromone detection shows that in X. tropicalis, these groups have undergone lineage specific expansion. A comparison of GPCRs in X. tropicalis, teleost fish and mammals reveals the GPCR evolutionary history in vertebrates.

  3. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor as a modulator of neoplastic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacenik, Damian; Cygankiewicz, Adam I; Krajewska, Wanda M

    2016-07-01

    Estrogens play a crucial role in the regulation of physiological and pathophysiological processes. These hormones act through specific receptors, most notably the canonical estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ) and their truncated forms as well as the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Several studies have shown that GPER is expressed in many normal and cancer cells, including those of the breast, endometrium, ovary, testis and lung. Hormonal imbalance is one possible cause of cancer development. An accumulating body of evidence indicates that GPER is involved in the regulation of cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion, it may act as a mediator of microRNA, and is believed to modulate the inflammation associated with neoplastic transformation. Furthermore, used in various treatment regimens anti-estrogens such as tamoxifen, raloxifen and fulvestrant (ICI 182.780), antagonists/modulators of canonical estrogen receptors, were found to be GPER agonists. This review presents the current knowledge about the potential role of GPER in neoplastic transformation. PMID:27107933

  4. Structural modeling of G-protein coupled receptors: An overview on automatic web-servers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busato, Mirko; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    Despite the significant efforts and discoveries during the last few years in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) expression and crystallization, the receptors with known structures to date are limited only to a small fraction of human GPCRs. The lack of experimental three-dimensional structures of the receptors represents a strong limitation that hampers a deep understanding of their function. Computational techniques are thus a valid alternative strategy to model three-dimensional structures. Indeed, recent advances in the field, together with extraordinary developments in crystallography, in particular due to its ability to capture GPCRs in different activation states, have led to encouraging results in the generation of accurate models. This, prompted the community of modelers to render their methods publicly available through dedicated databases and web-servers. Here, we present an extensive overview on these services, focusing on their advantages, drawbacks and their role in successful applications. Future challenges in the field of GPCR modeling, such as the predictions of long loop regions and the modeling of receptor activation states are presented as well. PMID:27102413

  5. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric (Van Andel)

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  6. Engineered G-protein coupled receptors are powerful tools to investigate biological processes and behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D Nichols

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how discreet tissues and neuronal circuits function in relation to the whole organism to regulate physiological processes and behaviors is a fundamental goal of modern biological science. Powerful and important new tools in this discovery process are modified G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as ‘Receptors Activated Solely by Synthetic Ligands (RASSLs,’ and ‘Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by a Designer Drug (DREADDs.’ Collectively, these are GPCRs modified either through rational design or directed molecular evolution, that do not respond to native ligand, but functionally respond only to synthetic ligands. Importantly, the utility of these receptors is not limited to examination of the role of GPCR-coupled effector signal transduction pathways. Due to the near ubiquitous expression of GPCRs throughout an organism, this technology, combined with whole animal transgenics to selectively target expression, has the ability to regulate activity of discreet tissues and neuronal circuits through effector pathway modulation to study function and behavior throughout the organism. Advantages over other systems currently used to modify in vivo function include the ability to rapidly, selectively and reversibly manipulate defined signal transduction pathways both in short term and long term studies, and no need for specialized equipment due to convenient systemic treatment with activating ligand.

  7. Cloning and characterization of a human orphan family C G-protein coupled receptor GPRC5D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, H; Jensen, A A; Sheppard, P O;

    2001-01-01

    Recently three orphan G-protein coupled receptors, RAIG1, GPRC5B and GPRC5C, with homology to members of family C (metabotropic glutamate receptor-like) have been identified. Using the protein sequences of these receptors as queries we identified overlapping expressed sequence tags which were...

  8. Differential Requirement of the Extracellular Domain in Activation of Class B G Protein-coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Hua; Yin, Yanting; Yang, Dehua; Liu, Bo; Hou, Li; Wang, Xiaoxi; Pal, Kuntal; Jiang, Yi; Feng, Yang; Cai, Xiaoqing; Dai, Antao; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Ming-Wei; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-07-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from the secretin-like (class B) family are key players in hormonal homeostasis and are important drug targets for the treatment of metabolic disorders and neuronal diseases. They consist of a large N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) and a transmembrane domain (TMD) with the GPCR signature of seven transmembrane helices. Class B GPCRs are activated by peptide hormones with their C termini bound to the receptor ECD and their N termini bound to the TMD. It is thought that the ECD functions as an affinity trap to bind and localize the hormone to the receptor. This in turn would allow the hormone N terminus to insert into the TMD and induce conformational changes of the TMD to activate downstream signaling. In contrast to this prevailing model, we demonstrate that human class B GPCRs vary widely in their requirement of the ECD for activation. In one group, represented by corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R), parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R), and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide type 1 receptor (PAC1R), the ECD requirement for high affinity hormone binding can be bypassed by induced proximity and mass action effects, whereas in the other group, represented by glucagon receptor (GCGR) and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), the ECD is required for signaling even when the hormone is covalently linked to the TMD. Furthermore, the activation of GLP-1R by small molecules that interact with the intracellular side of the receptor is dependent on the presence of its ECD, suggesting a direct role of the ECD in GLP-1R activation. PMID:27226600

  9. Extracellular Ca2+ is a danger signal activating the NLRP3 inflammasome through G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossol, Manuela; Pierer, Matthias; Raulien, Nora; Quandt, Dagmar; Meusch, Undine; Rothe, Kathrin; Schubert, Kristin; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schaefer, Michael; Krügel, Ute; Smajilovic, Sanela; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Baerwald, Christoph; Wagner, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    calcium activates the NLRP3 inflammasome via stimulation of G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors. Activation is mediated by signalling through the calcium-sensing receptor and GPRC6A via the phosphatidyl inositol/Ca(2+) pathway. The resulting increase in the intracellular calcium concentration...... this effect was inhibited in GPRC6A(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that G-protein-coupled receptors can activate the inflammasome, and indicate that increased extracellular calcium has a role as a danger signal and amplifier of inflammation....

  10. G-protein coupled receptor BAI3 promotes myoblast fusion in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamoud, Noumeira; Tran, Viviane; Croteau, Louis-Philippe; Kania, Artur; Côté, Jean-François

    2014-03-11

    Muscle fibers form as a result of myoblast fusion, yet the cell surface receptors regulating this process are unknown in vertebrates. In Drosophila, myoblast fusion involves the activation of the Rac pathway by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Myoblast City and its scaffolding protein ELMO, downstream of cell-surface cell-adhesion receptors. We previously showed that the mammalian ortholog of Myoblast City, DOCK1, functions in an evolutionarily conserved manner to promote myoblast fusion in mice. In search for regulators of myoblast fusion, we identified the G-protein coupled receptor brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor (BAI3) as a cell surface protein that interacts with ELMO. In cultured cells, BAI3 or ELMO1/2 loss of function severely impaired myoblast fusion without affecting differentiation and cannot be rescued by reexpression of BAI3 mutants deficient in ELMO binding. The related BAI protein family member, BAI1, is functionally distinct from BAI3, because it cannot rescue the myoblast fusion defects caused by the loss of BAI3 function. Finally, embryonic muscle precursor expression of a BAI3 mutant unable to bind ELMO was sufficient to block myoblast fusion in vivo. Collectively, our findings provide a role for BAI3 in the relay of extracellular fusion signals to their intracellular effectors, identifying it as an essential transmembrane protein for embryonic vertebrate myoblast fusion. PMID:24567399

  11. Tre1, a G protein-coupled receptor, directs transepithelial migration of Drosophila germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat S Kunwar

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target.

  12. IUPHAR-DB: the IUPHAR database of G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmar, Anthony J; Hills, Rebecca A; Rosser, Edward M; Jones, Martin; Buneman, O Peter; Dunbar, Donald R; Greenhill, Stuart D; Hale, Valerie A; Sharman, Joanna L; Bonner, Tom I; Catterall, William A; Davenport, Anthony P; Delagrange, Philippe; Dollery, Colin T; Foord, Steven M; Gutman, George A; Laudet, Vincent; Neubig, Richard R; Ohlstein, Eliot H; Olsen, Richard W; Peters, John; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Ruffolo, Robert R; Searls, David B; Wright, Mathew W; Spedding, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The IUPHAR database (IUPHAR-DB) integrates peer-reviewed pharmacological, chemical, genetic, functional and anatomical information on the 354 nonsensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), 71 ligand-gated ion channel subunits and 141 voltage-gated-like ion channel subunits encoded by the human, rat and mouse genomes. These genes represent the targets of approximately one-third of currently approved drugs and are a major focus of drug discovery and development programs in the pharmaceutical industry. IUPHAR-DB provides a comprehensive description of the genes and their functions, with information on protein structure and interactions, ligands, expression patterns, signaling mechanisms, functional assays and biologically important receptor variants (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms and splice variants). In addition, the phenotypes resulting from altered gene expression (e.g. in genetically altered animals or in human genetic disorders) are described. The content of the database is peer reviewed by members of the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification (NC-IUPHAR); the data are provided through manual curation of the primary literature by a network of over 60 subcommittees of NC-IUPHAR. Links to other bioinformatics resources, such as NCBI, Uniprot, HGNC and the rat and mouse genome databases are provided. IUPHAR-DB is freely available at http://www.iuphar-db.org. PMID:18948278

  13. Tre1, a G Protein-Coupled Receptor, Directs Transepithelial Migration of Drosophila Germ Cells

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    Kunwar Prabhat S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target.

  14. Identifying G-protein Coupled Receptors Using Weighted Levenshtein Distance and Nearest Neighbor Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hua Xu

    2005-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a class of seven-helix transmembrane proteins that have been used in bioinformatics as the targets to facilitate drug discovery for human diseases. Although thousands of GPCR sequences have been collected, the ligand specificity of many GPCRs is still unknown and only one crystal structure of the rhodopsin-like family has been solved. Therefore, identifying GPCR types only from sequence data has become an important research issue. In this study, a novel technique for identifying GPCR types based on the weighted Levenshtein distance between two receptor sequences and the nearest neighbor method (NNM) is introduced, which can deal with receptor sequences with different lengths directly. In our experiments for classifying four classes(acetylcholine, adrenoceptor, dopamine, and serotonin) of the rhodopsin-like family of GPCRs, the error rates from the leave-one-out procedure and the leave-half-out procedure were 0.62% and 1.24%, respectively. These results are prior to those of the covariant discriminant algorithm, the support vector machine method, and the NNM with Euclidean distance.

  15. Synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 is a modulator of multiple G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nidhi; Yadav, Manisha; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Kumar, Harish; Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar Dhar; Mishra, Jay Sharan; Gurjar, Anagha; Manhas, Amit; Chandra, Sharat; Yadav, Prem Narayan; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Sanyal, Sabyasachi

    2014-05-01

    The synthetic nuclear bile acid receptor (farnesoid X receptor [FXR]) agonist GW4064 is extensively used as a specific pharmacological tool to illustrate FXR functions. We noticed that GW4064 activated empty luciferase reporters in FXR-deficient HEK-293T cells. We postulated that this activity of GW4064 might be routed through as yet unknown cellular targets and undertook an unbiased exploratory approach to identify these targets. Investigations revealed that GW4064 activated cAMP and nuclear factor for activated T-cell response elements (CRE and NFAT-RE, respectively) present on these empty reporters. Whereas GW4064-induced NFAT-RE activation involved rapid intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and NFAT nuclear translocation, CRE activation involved soluble adenylyl cyclase-dependent cAMP accumulation and Ca(2+)-calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation of transducers of regulated CRE-binding protein 2. Use of dominant negative heterotrimeric G-protein minigenes revealed that GW4064 caused activation of Gαi/o and Gq/11 G proteins. Sequential pharmacological inhibitor-based screening and radioligand-binding studies revealed that GW4064 interacted with multiple G protein-coupled receptors. Functional studies demonstrated that GW4064 robustly activated H1 and H4 and inhibited H2 histamine receptor signaling events. We also found that MCF-7 breast cancer cells, reported to undergo GW4064-induced apoptosis in an FXR-dependent manner, did not express FXR, and the GW4064-mediated apoptosis, also apparent in HEK-293T cells, could be blocked by selective histamine receptor regulators. Taken together, our results demonstrate identification of histamine receptors as alternate targets for GW4064, which not only necessitates cautious interpretation of the biological functions attributed to FXR using GW4064 as a pharmacological tool but also provides a basis for the rational designing of new pharmacophores for histamine receptor modulation. PMID:24597548

  16. Constitutive phospholipid scramblase activity of a G protein-coupled receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Michael A.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Menon, Indu; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2014-10-01

    Opsin, the rhodopsin apoprotein, was recently shown to be an ATP-independent flippase (or scramblase) that equilibrates phospholipids across photoreceptor disc membranes in mammalian retina, a process required for disc homoeostasis. Here we show that scrambling is a constitutive activity of rhodopsin, distinct from its light-sensing function. Upon reconstitution into vesicles, discrete conformational states of the protein (rhodopsin, a metarhodopsin II-mimic, and two forms of opsin) facilitated rapid (>10,000 phospholipids per protein per second) scrambling of phospholipid probes. Our results indicate that the large conformational changes involved in converting rhodopsin to metarhodopsin II are not required for scrambling, and that the lipid translocation pathway either lies near the protein surface or involves membrane packing defects in the vicinity of the protein. In addition, we demonstrate that β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A receptors scramble lipids, suggesting that rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors may play an unexpected moonlighting role in re-modelling cell membranes.

  17. Revisiting the homology modeling of G-protein coupled receptors: β1-adrenoceptor as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengyuan; Li, Minyong

    2012-06-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are recognized to constitute the largest family of membrane proteins. Due to the disproportion in the quantity of crystal structures and their amino acid sequences, homology modeling contributes a reasonable and feasible approach to GPCR theoretical coordinates. With the brand new crystal structures resolved recently, herein we deliberated how to designate them as templates to carry out homology modeling in four aspects: (1) various sequence alignment methods; (2) protein weight matrix; (3) different sets of multiple templates; (4) active and inactive state of templates. The accuracy of models was evaluated by comparing the similarity of stereo conformation and molecular docking results between models and the experimental structure of Meleagris gallopavo β(1)-adrenergic receptor (Mg_Adrb1) that we desired to develop as an example. Our results proposed that: (1) Cobalt and MAFFT, two algorithms of sequence alignment, were suitable for single- and multiple-template modeling, respectively; (2) Blosum30 is applicable to align sequences in the case of low sequence identity; (3) multiple-template modeling is not always better than single-template one; (4) the state of template is an influential factor in simulating the GPCR structures as well. PMID:22454032

  18. Functional modulation of G-protein coupled receptors during Parkinson disease-like neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Bruce G; Zhu, Aijun; Poutiainen, Pekka; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Kil, Kun-Eek; Zhang, Zhaoda; Kuruppu, Darshini; Aytan, Nurgul; Dedeoglu, Alpaslan; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2016-09-01

    G-protein coupled dopamine and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu) can modulate neurotransmission during Parkinson's disease (PD)-like neurodegeneration. PET imaging studies in a unilateral dopamine denervation model (6-OHDA) showed a significant inverse correlation of presynaptic mGlu4 and postsynaptic mGlu5 expression in the striatum and rapidly declining mGlu4 and enhanced mGlu5 expression in the hippocampus during progressive degeneration over time. Immunohistochemical studies verified the decreased mGlu4 expression in the hippocampus on the lesion side but did not show difference in mGlu5 expression between lesion and control side. Pharmacological MRI studies showed enhanced hemodynamic response in several brain areas on the lesion side compared to the control side after challenge with mGlu4 positive allosteric modulator or mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator. However, mGlu4 response was biphasic having short enhancement followed by negative response on both sides of brain. Studies in mGlu4 expressing cells demonstrated that glutamate induces cooperative increase in binding of mGlu4 ligands - especially at high glutamate levels consistent with in vivo concentration. This suggests that mGlu allosteric modulators as drug candidates will be highly sensitive to changes in glutamate concentration and hence metabolic state. These experiments demonstrate the importance of the longitudinal imaging studies to investigate temporal changes in receptor functions to obtain individual response for experimental drugs. PMID:26581500

  19. Drug discovery opportunities and challenges at G protein coupled receptors for long chain free fatty acids

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    Nicholas D Holliday

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of G protein coupled receptors for long chain free fatty acids (FFAs, FFA1 (GPR40 and GPR120, has expanded our understanding of these nutrients as signalling molecules. These receptors have emerged as important sensors for FFA levels in the circulation or the gut lumen, based on evidence from in vitro and rodent models, and an increasing number of human studies. Here we consider their promise as therapeutic targets for metabolic disease, including type 2 diabetes and obesity. FFA1 directly mediates acute FFA-induced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells, while GPR120 and FFA1 trigger release of incretins from intestinal endocrine cells, and so indirectly enhance insulin secretion and promote satiety. GPR120 signalling in adipocytes and macrophages also results in insulin sensitizing and beneficial anti-inflammatory effects. Drug discovery has focussed on agonists to replicate acute benefits of FFA receptor signalling, with promising early results for FFA1 agonists in man. Controversy surrounding chronic effects of FFA1 on beta-cells illustrates that long term benefits of antagonists also need exploring. It has proved challenging to generate highly selective potent ligands for FFA1 or GPR120 subtypes, given that both receptors have hydrophobic orthosteric binding sites, which are not completely defined and have modest ligand affinity. Structure activity relationships are also reliant on functional read outs, in the absence of robust binding assays to provide direct affinity estimates. Nevertheless synthetic ligands have already helped dissect specific contributions of FFA1 and GPR120 signalling from the many possible cellular effects of FFAs. Approaches including use of fluorescent ligand binding assays, and targeting allosteric receptor sites, may improve further preclinical ligand development at these receptors, to exploit their unique potential to target multiple facets of diabetes.

  20. Constitutive Activity among Orphan Class-A G Protein Coupled Receptors.

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    Adam L Martin

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of constitutive activity among orphan class-A G protein coupled receptors within the cAMP signaling pathway. Constitutive signaling was revealed by changes in gene expression under control of the cAMP response element. Gene expression was measured in Chinese hamster ovary cells transiently co-transfected with plasmids containing a luciferase reporter and orphan receptor. Criteria adopted for defining constitutive activation were: 1 200% elevation over baseline reporter gene expression; 2 40% inhibition of baseline expression; and 3 40% inhibition of expression stimulated by 3 μM forskolin. Five patterns of activity were noted: 1 inhibition under both baseline and forskolin stimulated expression (GPR15, GPR17, GPR18, GPR20, GPR25, GPR27, GPR31, GPR32, GPR45, GPR57, GPR68, GPR83, GPR84, GPR132, GPR150, GPR176; 2 no effect on baseline expression, but inhibition of forskolin stimulated expression (GPR4, GPR26, GPR61, GPR62, GPR78, GPR101, GPR119; 3 elevation of baseline signaling coupled with inhibition of forskolin stimulated expression (GPR6, GPR12; 4 elevation of baseline signaling without inhibition of forskolin stimulated expression (GPR3, GPR21, GPR52, GPR65; and 5 no effect on expression (GPR1, GPR19, GPR22, GPR34, GPR35, GPR39, GPR63, GPR82, GPR85, GPR87. Constitutive activity was observed in 75% of the orphan class-A receptors examined (30 of 40. This constitutive signaling cannot be explained by simple overexpression of the receptor. Inhibition of cAMP mediated expression was far more common (65% than stimulation of expression (15%. Orphan receptors that were closely related based on amino acid homology tended to have similar effects on gene expression. These results suggest that identification of inverse agonists may be a fruitful approach for categorizing these orphan receptors and targeting them for pharmacological intervention.

  1. Constitutive Activity among Orphan Class-A G Protein Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam L; Steurer, Michael A; Aronstam, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of constitutive activity among orphan class-A G protein coupled receptors within the cAMP signaling pathway. Constitutive signaling was revealed by changes in gene expression under control of the cAMP response element. Gene expression was measured in Chinese hamster ovary cells transiently co-transfected with plasmids containing a luciferase reporter and orphan receptor. Criteria adopted for defining constitutive activation were: 1) 200% elevation over baseline reporter gene expression; 2) 40% inhibition of baseline expression; and 3) 40% inhibition of expression stimulated by 3 μM forskolin. Five patterns of activity were noted: 1) inhibition under both baseline and forskolin stimulated expression (GPR15, GPR17, GPR18, GPR20, GPR25, GPR27, GPR31, GPR32, GPR45, GPR57, GPR68, GPR83, GPR84, GPR132, GPR150, GPR176); 2) no effect on baseline expression, but inhibition of forskolin stimulated expression (GPR4, GPR26, GPR61, GPR62, GPR78, GPR101, GPR119); 3) elevation of baseline signaling coupled with inhibition of forskolin stimulated expression (GPR6, GPR12); 4) elevation of baseline signaling without inhibition of forskolin stimulated expression (GPR3, GPR21, GPR52, GPR65); and 5) no effect on expression (GPR1, GPR19, GPR22, GPR34, GPR35, GPR39, GPR63, GPR82, GPR85, GPR87). Constitutive activity was observed in 75% of the orphan class-A receptors examined (30 of 40). This constitutive signaling cannot be explained by simple overexpression of the receptor. Inhibition of cAMP mediated expression was far more common (65%) than stimulation of expression (15%). Orphan receptors that were closely related based on amino acid homology tended to have similar effects on gene expression. These results suggest that identification of inverse agonists may be a fruitful approach for categorizing these orphan receptors and targeting them for pharmacological intervention. PMID:26384023

  2. The G protein-coupled receptor subset of the chicken genome.

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    Malin C Lagerström

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are one of the largest families of proteins, and here we scan the recently sequenced chicken genome for GPCRs. We use a homology-based approach, utilizing comparisons with all human GPCRs, to detect and verify chicken GPCRs from translated genomic alignments and Genscan predictions. We present 557 manually curated sequences for GPCRs from the chicken genome, of which 455 were previously not annotated. More than 60% of the chicken Genscan gene predictions with a human ortholog needed curation, which drastically changed the average percentage identity between the human-chicken orthologous pairs (from 56.3% to 72.9%. Of the non-olfactory chicken GPCRs, 79% had a one-to-one orthologous relationship to a human GPCR. The Frizzled, Secretin, and subgroups of the Rhodopsin families have high proportions of orthologous pairs, although the percentage of amino acid identity varies. Other groups show large differences, such as the Adhesion family and GPCRs that bind exogenous ligands. The chicken has only three bitter Taste 2 receptors, and it also lacks an ortholog to human TAS1R2 (one of three GPCRs in the human genome in the Taste 1 receptor family [TAS1R], implying that the chicken's ability and mode of detecting both bitter and sweet taste may differ from the human's. The chicken genome contains at least 229 olfactory receptors, and the majority of these (218 originate from a chicken-specific expansion. To our knowledge, this dataset of chicken GPCRs is the largest curated dataset from a single gene family from a non-mammalian vertebrate. Both the updated human GPCR dataset, as well the chicken GPCR dataset, are available for download.

  3. Feeding and the rhodopsin family G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs in nematodes and arthropods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Carlos dos Reis Cardoso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, receptors of the rhodopsin G-protein coupled superfamily (GPCRs play an important role in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis and are activated by peptide hormones produced in the brain-gut axis. These peptides regulate appetite and energy expenditure by promoting or inhibiting food intake. Sequence and function homologues of human GPCRs involved in feeding exist in the nematode roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans and the arthropod fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster, suggesting that the mechanisms that regulate food intake emerged early and have been conserved during metazoan radiation. Nematodes and arthropods are the most diverse and successful animal phyla on Earth. They can survive in a vast diversity of environments and have acquired distinct life styles and feeding strategies. The aim of the present review is to investigate if this diversity has affected the evolution of invertebrate GPCRs. Homologues of the C. elegans and D. melanogaster rhodopsin receptors were characterized in the genome of other nematodes and arthropods and receptor evolution compared. With the exception of bombesin receptors (BBR that are absent from nematodes, a similar gene complement was found. In arthropods, rhodopsin GPCR evolution is characterized by species-specific gene duplications and deletions and in nematodes by gene expansions in species with a free-living stage and gene deletions in representatives of obligate parasitic taxa. Based upon variation in GPCR gene number and potentially divergent functions within phyla we hypothesize that life style and feeding diversity practiced by nematodes and arthropods was one factor that contributed to rhodopsin GPCR gene evolution. Understanding how the regulation of food intake has evolved in invertebrates will contribute to the development of novel drugs to control nematodes and arthropods and the pests and diseases that use them as vectors.

  4. Feeding and the rhodopsin family g-protein coupled receptors in nematodes and arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C R; Félix, Rute C; Fonseca, Vera G; Power, Deborah M

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, receptors of the rhodopsin G-protein coupled superfamily (GPCRs) play an important role in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis and are activated by peptide hormones produced in the brain-gut axis. These peptides regulate appetite and energy expenditure by promoting or inhibiting food intake. Sequence and function homologs of human GPCRs involved in feeding exist in the nematode roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), and the arthropod fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster), suggesting that the mechanisms that regulate food intake emerged early and have been conserved during metazoan radiation. Nematodes and arthropods are the most diverse and successful animal phyla on Earth. They can survive in a vast diversity of environments and have acquired distinct life styles and feeding strategies. The aim of the present review is to investigate if this diversity has affected the evolution of invertebrate GPCRs. Homologs of the C. elegans and D. melanogaster rhodopsin receptors were characterized in the genome of other nematodes and arthropods and receptor evolution compared. With the exception of bombesin receptors (BBR) that are absent from nematodes, a similar gene complement was found. In arthropods, rhodopsin GPCR evolution is characterized by species-specific gene duplications and deletions and in nematodes by gene expansions in species with a free-living stage and gene deletions in representatives of obligate parasitic taxa. Based upon variation in GPCR gene number and potentially divergent functions within phyla we hypothesize that life style and feeding diversity practiced by nematodes and arthropods was one factor that contributed to rhodopsin GPCR gene evolution. Understanding how the regulation of food intake has evolved in invertebrates will contribute to the development of novel drugs to control nematodes and arthropods and the pests and diseases that use them as vectors. PMID:23264768

  5. Molecular Mechanism of Selectivity among G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thal, David M.; Yeow, Raymond Y.; Schoenau, Christian; Huber, Jochen; Tesmer, John J.G. (Sanofi); (Michigan)

    2012-07-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of cell physiology and control processes ranging from glucose homeostasis to contractility of the heart. A major mechanism for the desensitization of activated GPCRs is their phosphorylation by GPCR kinases (GRKs). Overexpression of GRK2 is strongly linked to heart failure, and GRK2 has long been considered a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Several lead compounds developed by Takeda Pharmaceuticals show high selectivity for GRK2 and therapeutic potential for the treatment of heart failure. To understand how these drugs achieve their selectivity, we determined crystal structures of the bovine GRK2-G{beta}{gamma} complex in the presence of two of these inhibitors. Comparison with the apoGRK2-G{beta}{gamma} structure demonstrates that the compounds bind in the kinase active site in a manner similar to that of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. Both balanol and the Takeda compounds induce a slight closure of the kinase domain, the degree of which correlates with the potencies of the inhibitors. Based on our crystal structures and homology modeling, we identified five amino acids surrounding the inhibitor binding site that we hypothesized could contribute to inhibitor selectivity. However, our results indicate that these residues are not major determinants of selectivity among GRK subfamilies. Rather, selectivity is achieved by the stabilization of a unique inactive conformation of the GRK2 kinase domain.

  6. G Protein-Coupled Receptors: What a Difference a ‘Partner’ Makes

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    Benoît T. Roux

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are important cell signaling mediators, involved in essential physiological processes. GPCRs respond to a wide variety of ligands from light to large macromolecules, including hormones and small peptides. Unfortunately, mutations and dysregulation of GPCRs that induce a loss of function or alter expression can lead to disorders that are sometimes lethal. Therefore, the expression, trafficking, signaling and desensitization of GPCRs must be tightly regulated by different cellular systems to prevent disease. Although there is substantial knowledge regarding the mechanisms that regulate the desensitization and down-regulation of GPCRs, less is known about the mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and cell-surface expression of newly synthesized GPCRs. More recently, there is accumulating evidence that suggests certain GPCRs are able to interact with specific proteins that can completely change their fate and function. These interactions add on another level of regulation and flexibility between different tissue/cell-types. Here, we review some of the main interacting proteins of GPCRs. A greater understanding of the mechanisms regulating their interactions may lead to the discovery of new drug targets for therapy.

  7. Ensemble Activation of G-Protein -Coupled Receptors Revealed by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Perera, Suchithranga; Shrestha, Utsab; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein -coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in visual light perception and occurs naturally in a membrane lipid environment. Rhodopsin photoactivation yields cis-trans isomerization of retinal giving equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Does photoactivation lead to a single Meta-II conformation, or do substates exist as described by an ensemble-activation mechanism (EAM)? We use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to investigate conformational changes in rhodopsin-detergent and rhodopsin-lipid complexes upon photoactivation. Meta-I state is stabilized in CHAPS-solubilized rhodopsin, while Meta-II is trapped in DDM-solubilized rhodopsin. SANS data are acquired from 80% D2O solutions and at contrast-matching points for both DDM and CHAPS samples. Our experiments demonstrate that for detergent-solubilized rhodopsin, SANS with contrast variation can detect structural differences between the rhodopsin dark-state, Meta-I, Meta-II, and ligand-free opsin states. Dark-state rhodopsin has more conformational flexibility in DDM micelles compared to CHAPS, which is consistent with an ensemble of activated Meta-II states. Furthermore, time-resolved SANS enables study of the time-dependent structural transitions between Meta-I and Meta-II, which is crucial to understanding the ensemble-based activation.

  8. Self-organized criticality in proteins: Hydropathic roughening profiles of G-protein-coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2013-03-01

    Proteins appear to be the most dramatic natural example of self-organized criticality (SOC), a concept that explains many otherwise apparently unlikely phenomena. Protein conformational functionality is often dominated by long-range hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions which both drive protein compaction and mediate protein-protein interactions. Superfamily transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of proteins in the human genome; their amino acid sequences form the largest database for protein-membrane interactions. While there are now structural data on the heptad transmembrane structures of representatives of several heptad families, here we show how fresh insights into global and some local chemical trends in GPCR properties can be obtained accurately from sequences alone, especially by algebraically separating the extracellular and cytoplasmic loops from transmembrane segments. The global mediation of long-range water-protein interactions occurs in conjunction with modulation of these interactions by roughened interfaces. Hydropathic roughening profiles are defined here solely in terms of amino acid sequences, and knowledge of protein coordinates is not required. Roughening profiles both for GPCR and some simpler protein families display accurate and transparent connections to protein functionality, and identify natural length scales for protein functionality.

  9. GPR55, a G-protein coupled receptor for lysophosphatidylinositol, plays a role in motor coordination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Shan Wu

    Full Text Available The G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55 is activated by lysophosphatidylinositols and some cannabinoids. Recent studies found prominent roles for GPR55 in neuropathic/inflammatory pain, cancer and bone physiology. However, little is known about the role of GPR55 in CNS development and function. To address this question, we performed a detailed characterization of GPR55 knockout mice using molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays. Quantitative PCR studies found that GPR55 mRNA was expressed (in order of decreasing abundance in the striatum, hippocampus, forebrain, cortex, and cerebellum. GPR55 deficiency did not affect the concentrations of endocannabinoids and related lipids or mRNA levels for several components of the endocannabinoid system in the hippocampus. Normal synaptic transmission and short-term as well as long-term synaptic plasticity were found in GPR55 knockout CA1 pyramidal neurons. Deleting GPR55 function did not affect behavioral assays assessing muscle strength, gross motor skills, sensory-motor integration, motor learning, anxiety or depressive behaviors. In addition, GPR55 null mutant mice exhibited normal contextual and auditory-cue conditioned fear learning and memory in a Pavlovian conditioned fear test. In contrast, when presented with tasks requiring more challenging motor responses, GPR55 knockout mice showed impaired movement coordination. Taken together, these results suggest that GPR55 plays a role in motor coordination, but does not strongly regulate CNS development, gross motor movement or several types of learned behavior.

  10. Acidic Tumor Microenvironment and pH-Sensing G protein-Coupled Receptors

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    Calvin R. Justus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells and stromal cells sense and respond to acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In this article the role of a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in tumor biology is reviewed. Recent studies show that the pH-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8, GPR68 (OGR1, and GPR132 (G2A, regulate cancer cell metastasis and proliferation, immune cell function, inflammation, and blood vessel formation. Activation of the proton-sensing GPCRs by acidosis transduces multiple downstream G protein signaling pathways. Since GPCRs are major drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated. Research on the pH-sensing GPCRs will continue to provide important insights into the molecular interaction between tumor and its acidic microenvironment and may identify new targets for cancer therapy and chemoprevention.

  11. Acidic tumor microenvironment and pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, Calvin R; Dong, Lixue; Yang, Li V

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells and stromal cells sense and respond to acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In this article the role of a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in tumor biology is reviewed. Recent studies show that the pH-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8), GPR68 (OGR1), and GPR132 (G2A), regulate cancer cell metastasis and proliferation, immune cell function, inflammation, and blood vessel formation. Activation of the proton-sensing GPCRs by acidosis transduces multiple downstream G protein signaling pathways. Since GPCRs are major drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated. Research on the pH-sensing GPCRs will continue to provide important insights into the molecular interaction between tumor and its acidic microenvironment and may identify new targets for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:24367336

  12. Lysophosphatidylinositol: a novel link between ABC transporters and G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, Emily L; Ferro, Riccardo; Arifin, Syamsul Ahmad; Falasca, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) is a well-known bioactive lipid that is able to activate signalling cascades relevant to cell proliferation, migration, survival and tumorigenesis. Our previous work suggested that LPI is involved in cancer progression since it can be released in the medium of Ras-transformed fibroblasts and can function as an autocrine modulator of cell growth. Different research groups have established that LPI is the specific and functional ligand for G-protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) and that this GPR55-LPI axis is able to activate signalling cascades that are relevant for different cell functions. Work in our laboratory has recently unravelled an autocrine loop, by which LPI synthesized by cytosolic phospholipase A₂ (cPLA₂) is pumped out of the cell by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter C1 (ABCC1)/multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), initiating a signalling cascade downstream of GPR55. Our current work suggests that blockade of this pathway may represent a novel strategy to inhibit cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25233417

  13. GPCR-Bench: A Benchmarking Set and Practitioners' Guide for G Protein-Coupled Receptor Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dahlia R; Bortolato, Andrea; Tehan, Benjamin; Mason, Jonathan S

    2016-04-25

    Virtual screening is routinely used to discover new ligands and in particular new ligand chemotypes for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). To prepare for a virtual screen, we often tailor a docking protocol that will enable us to select the best candidates for further screening. To aid this, we created GPCR-Bench, a publically available docking benchmarking set in the spirit of the DUD and DUD-E reference data sets for validation studies, containing 25 nonredundant high-resolution GPCR costructures with an accompanying set of diverse ligands and computational decoy molecules for each target. Benchmarking sets are often used to compare docking protocols; however, it is important to evaluate docking methods not by "retrospective" hit rates but by the actual likelihood that they will produce novel prospective hits. Therefore, docking protocols must not only rank active molecules highly but also produce good poses that a chemist will select for purchase and screening. Currently, no simple objective machine-scriptable function exists that can do this; instead, docking hit lists must be subjectively examined in a consistent way to compare between docking methods. We present here a case study highlighting considerations we feel are of importance when evaluating a method, intended to be useful as a practitioners' guide. PMID:26958710

  14. Advances in G-protein coupled receptor research and related bioinformatics study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) is one of the most important protein families for drug target. GPCR agonists and antagonists occupy approximately one third of the world small molecule drug market. Much effort has been invested in GPCR study by both academic institutions and pharmaceutical industries. With seven-transmembrane domains, GPCR plays significant roles in intercellular signal transduction and is involved in a variety of biological pathways. With the availability of sequence data of human and other mammalian genomes, as well as their expressed sequence tag (EST) data, the bioinformatics and genomics approaches can be applied to identifying novel GPCR in the post genomic era. Deorphanizing GPCR or matching ligands with GPCR greatly facilitates target validation process and automatically provides a possible compound screening assay. Similarly, bioinformatics data mining approach could also be applied to the identification of GPCR peptide or protein ligands. Here we give a general review of recent advances in the study of GPCR structure, function, as well as GPCR and ligand identification with the emphasis on the bioinformatics database mining of GPCR and their peptide or protein ligands.

  15. Latest development in drug discovery on G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2006-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the family of proteins with the highest impact from social, therapeutic and economic point of view. Today, more than 50% of drug targets are based on GPCRs and the annual worldwide sales exceeds 50 billion dollars. GPCRs are involved in all major disease areas such as cardiovascular, metabolic, neurodegenerative, psychiatric, cancer and infectious diseases. The classical drug discovery process has relied on screening compounds, which interact favorably with the GPCR of interest followed by further chemical engineering as a mean of improving efficacy and selectivity. In this review, methods for sophisticated chemical library screening procedures will be presented. Furthermore, development of cell-based assays for functional coupling of GPCRs to G proteins will be discussed. Finally, the possibility of applying structure-based drug design will be summarized. This includes the application of bioinformatics knowledge and molecular modeling approaches in drug development programs. The major efforts established through large networks of structural genomics on GPCRs, where recombinantly expressed GPCRs are subjected to purification and crystallization attempts with the intention of obtaining high-resolution structures, are presented as a promising future approach for tailor-made drug development. PMID:17073697

  16. Identification and Characterization of Amlexanox as a G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoff T. Homan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs have been implicated in human diseases ranging from heart failure to diabetes. Previous studies have identified several compounds that selectively inhibit GRK2, such as paroxetine and balanol. Far fewer selective inhibitors have been reported for GRK5, a target for the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy, and the mechanism of action of reported compounds is unknown. To identify novel scaffolds that selectively inhibit GRK5, a differential scanning fluorometry screen was used to probe a library of 4480 compounds. The best hit was amlexanox, an FDA-approved anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic immunomodulator. The crystal structure of amlexanox in complex with GRK1 demonstrates that its tricyclic aromatic ring system forms ATP-like interactions with the hinge of the kinase domain, which is likely similar to how this drug binds to IκB kinase ε (IKKε, another kinase known to be inhibited by this compound. Amlexanox was also able to inhibit myocyte enhancer factor 2 transcriptional activity in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes in a manner consistent with GRK5 inhibition. The GRK1 amlexanox structure thus serves as a springboard for the rational design of inhibitors with improved potency and selectivity for GRK5 and IKKε.

  17. G protein-coupled receptors as therapeutic targets for multiple sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changsheng Du; Xin Xie

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate most of our physiological responses to hormones,neurotransmitters and environmental stimulants.They are considered as the most successful therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases.Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease that is characterized by immune-mediated demyelination and degeneration of the central nervous system (CNS).It is the leading cause of non-traumatic disability in young adults.Great progress has been made over the past few decades in understanding the pathogenesis of MS.Numerous data from animal and clinical studies indicate that many GPCRs are critically involved in various aspects of MS pathogenesis,including antigen presentation,cytokine production,T-cell differentiation,T-cell proliferation,T-cell invasion,etc.In this review,we summarize the recent findings regarding the expression or functional changes of GPCRs in MS patients or animal models,and the influences of GPCRs on disease severity upon genetic or pharmacological manipulations.Hopefully some of these findings will lead to the development of novel therapies for MS in the near future.

  18. G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) inhibits final oocyte maturation in common carp, Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Suravi; Das, Sumana; Moulik, Sujata Roy; Mallick, Buddhadev; Pal, Puja; Mukherjee, Dilip

    2015-01-15

    GPR-30, now named as GPER (G protein-coupled estrogen receptor) was first identified as an orphan receptor and subsequently shown to be required for estrogen-mediated signaling in certain cancer cells. Later studies demonstrated that GPER has the characteristics of a high affinity estrogen membrane receptor on Atlantic croaker and zebra fish oocytes and mediates estrogen inhibition of oocyte maturation in these two distantly related teleost. To determine the broad application of these findings to other teleost, expression of GPER mRNA and its involvement in 17β-estradiol mediated inhibition of oocyte maturation in other cyprinid, Cyprinus carpio was investigated. Carp oocytes at pre-vitellogenic, late-vitellogenic and post-vitellogenic stages of development contained GPER mRNA and its transcribed protein with a maximum at late-vitellogenic oocytes. Ovarian follicular cells did not express GPER mRNA. Carp oocytes GPER mRNA was essentially identical to that found in other perciformes and cyprinid fish oocytes. Both spontaneous and 17,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20β-P)-induced oocyte maturation in carp was significantly decreased when they were incubated with either E2, or GPER agonist G-1. On the other hand spontaneous oocyte maturation was significantly increased when carp ovarian follicles were incubated with an aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, GPER antagonist, G-15 and enzymatic removal of the ovarian follicle cell layers. This increase in oocyte maturation was partially reversed by co-treatment with E2. Consistent with previous findings with human and fish GPR30, E2 treatment in carp oocytes caused increase in cAMP production and simultaneously decrease in oocyte maturation, which was inhibited by the addition of 17,20β-P. The results suggest that E2 and GPER play a critical role in regulating re-entry in to meiotic cell cycle in carp oocytes. PMID:25485460

  19. Dysfunction of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases in Alzheimer’'s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Z. Suo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although mutations and variations of several genes have been identified to be involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD, the efforts towards understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease still have a long journey to go. One such effort is to identify the signal transduction deficits, for which previous studies have suggested that the central problems appear to be at the interface between G proteins and their coupled receptors. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs are a small family of serine/threonine protein kinases primarily acting at the “receptor-G protein interface””. Recent studies have indicated the possible involvement of GRK, primarily GRK2 and GRK5, dysfunction in the pathogenesis of AD. It seems that mild, soluble, β-amyloid accumulation can lead to a reduced membrane (functional and an elevated cytosolic GRK2/5. The increased cytosolic GRK2 appears to be colocalized with damaged mitochondria and neurofibrillary tangles. Moreover, the total levels of GRK2, not only in the brain, but also in peripheral blood samples, are increased in a manner inversely correlated with the patient's cognitive levels. The deficiency of GRK5, on the other hand, impairs presynaptic M2 autoreceptor desensitization, which leads to a reduced acetylcholine release, axonal/synaptic degenerative changes, and associated amnestic, mild cognitive impairment. It also promotes an evil cycle to further increase Beta-amyloid accumulation and exaggerates brain inflammation, possibly even the basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration. Therefore, continuous efforts in this direction are necessary before translating the knowledge to any therapeutic strategies.

  20. The repertoire of G protein-coupled receptors in the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Narayanan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs constitute a large family of integral transmembrane receptor proteins that play a central role in signal transduction in eukaryotes. The genome of the protochordate Ciona intestinalis has a compact size with an ancestral complement of many diversified gene families of vertebrates and is a good model system for studying protochordate to vertebrate diversification. An analysis of the Ciona repertoire of GPCRs from a comparative genomic perspective provides insight into the evolutionary origins of the GPCR signalling system in vertebrates. Results We have identified 169 gene products in the Ciona genome that code for putative GPCRs. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that Ciona GPCRs have homologous representatives from the five major GRAFS (Glutamate, Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Frizzled and Secretin families concomitant with other vertebrate GPCR repertoires. Nearly 39% of Ciona GPCRs have unambiguous orthologs of vertebrate GPCR families, as defined for the human, mouse, puffer fish and chicken genomes. The Rhodopsin family accounts for ~68% of the Ciona GPCR repertoire wherein the LGR-like subfamily exhibits a lineage specific gene expansion of a group of receptors that possess a novel domain organisation hitherto unobserved in metazoan genomes. Conclusion Comparison of GPCRs in Ciona to that in human reveals a high level of orthology of a protochordate repertoire with that of vertebrate GPCRs. Our studies suggest that the ascidians contain the basic ancestral complement of vertebrate GPCR genes. This is evident at the subfamily level comparisons since Ciona GPCR sequences are significantly analogous to vertebrate GPCR subfamilies even while exhibiting Ciona specific genes. Our analysis provides a framework to perform future experimental and comparative studies to understand the roles of the ancestral chordate versions of GPCRs that predated the divergence of the urochordates and the vertebrates.

  1. Enhanced expression of G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) was reported to bind 17β-estradiol (E2), tamoxifen, and ICI 182,780 (fulvestrant) and promotes activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling in breast, endometrial and thyroid cancer cells. Although lung adenocarcinomas express estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ), the expression of GPER in lung cancer has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of GPER in lung cancer. The expression patterns of GPER in various lung cancer lines and lung tumors were investigated using standard quantitative real time PCR (at mRNA levels), Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods (at protein levels). The expression of GPER was scored and the pairwise comparisons (cancer vs adjacent tissues as well as cancer vs normal lung tissues) were performed. Analysis by real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed a significantly higher expression of GPER at both mRNA and protein levels in human non small cell lung cancer cell (NSCLC) lines relative to immortalized normal lung bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). The virally immortalized human small airway epithelial cell line HPL1D showed higher expression than HBECs and similar expression to NSCLC cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections of murine lung adenomas as well as human lung adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and non-small cell lung carcinomas showed consistently higher expression of GPER in the tumor relative to the surrounding non-tumor tissue. The results from this study demonstrate increased GPER expression in lung cancer cells and tumors compared to normal lung. Further evaluation of the function and regulation of GPER will be necessary to determine if GPER is a marker of lung cancer progression

  2. Enhanced expression of G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30 in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jala Venkatakrishna Rao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30 was reported to bind 17β-estradiol (E2, tamoxifen, and ICI 182,780 (fulvestrant and promotes activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-mediated signaling in breast, endometrial and thyroid cancer cells. Although lung adenocarcinomas express estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ, the expression of GPER in lung cancer has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of GPER in lung cancer. Methods The expression patterns of GPER in various lung cancer lines and lung tumors were investigated using standard quantitative real time PCR (at mRNA levels, Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC methods (at protein levels. The expression of GPER was scored and the pairwise comparisons (cancer vs adjacent tissues as well as cancer vs normal lung tissues were performed. Results Analysis by real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed a significantly higher expression of GPER at both mRNA and protein levels in human non small cell lung cancer cell (NSCLC lines relative to immortalized normal lung bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs. The virally immortalized human small airway epithelial cell line HPL1D showed higher expression than HBECs and similar expression to NSCLC cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections of murine lung adenomas as well as human lung adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and non-small cell lung carcinomas showed consistently higher expression of GPER in the tumor relative to the surrounding non-tumor tissue. Conclusion The results from this study demonstrate increased GPER expression in lung cancer cells and tumors compared to normal lung. Further evaluation of the function and regulation of GPER will be necessary to determine if GPER is a marker of lung cancer progression.

  3. Computing highly correlated positions using mutual information and graph theory for G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatakia, Sarosh N; Costanzi, Stefano; Chow, Carson C

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a superfamily of seven transmembrane-spanning proteins involved in a wide array of physiological functions and are the most common targets of pharmaceuticals. This study aims to identify a cohort or clique of positions that share high mutual information. Using a multiple sequence alignment of the transmembrane (TM) domains, we calculated the mutual information between all inter-TM pairs of aligned positions and ranked the pairs by mutual information. A mutual information graph was constructed with vertices that corresponded to TM positions and edges between vertices were drawn if the mutual information exceeded a threshold of statistical significance. Positions with high degree (i.e. had significant mutual information with a large number of other positions) were found to line a well defined inter-TM ligand binding cavity for class A as well as class C GPCRs. Although the natural ligands of class C receptors bind to their extracellular N-terminal domains, the possibility of modulating their activity through ligands that bind to their helical bundle has been reported. Such positions were not found for class B GPCRs, in agreement with the observation that there are not known ligands that bind within their TM helical bundle. All identified key positions formed a clique within the MI graph of interest. For a subset of class A receptors we also considered the alignment of a portion of the second extracellular loop, and found that the two positions adjacent to the conserved Cys that bridges the loop with the TM3 qualified as key positions. Our algorithm may be useful for localizing topologically conserved regions in other protein families. PMID:19262747

  4. Modeling structure of G protein-coupled receptors in huan genome

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-26

    G protein-coupled receptors (or GPCRs) are integral transmembrane proteins responsible to various cellular signal transductions. Human GPCR proteins are encoded by 5% of human genes but account for the targets of 40% of the FDA approved drugs. Due to difficulties in crystallization, experimental structure determination remains extremely difficult for human GPCRs, which have been a major barrier in modern structure-based drug discovery. We proposed a new hybrid protocol, GPCR-I-TASSER, to construct GPCR structure models by integrating experimental mutagenesis data with ab initio transmembrane-helix assembly simulations, assisted by the predicted transmembrane-helix interaction networks. The method was tested in recent community-wide GPCRDock experiments and constructed models with a root mean square deviation 1.26 Å for Dopamine-3 and 2.08 Å for Chemokine-4 receptors in the transmembrane domain regions, which were significantly closer to the native than the best templates available in the PDB. GPCR-I-TASSER has been applied to model all 1,026 putative GPCRs in the human genome, where 923 are found to have correct folds based on the confidence score analysis and mutagenesis data comparison. The successfully modeled GPCRs contain many pharmaceutically important families that do not have previously solved structures, including Trace amine, Prostanoids, Releasing hormones, Melanocortins, Vasopressin and Neuropeptide Y receptors. All the human GPCR models have been made publicly available through the GPCR-HGmod database at http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/GPCR-HGmod/ The results demonstrate new progress on genome-wide structure modeling of transmembrane proteins which should bring useful impact on the effort of GPCR-targeted drug discovery.

  5. Getting from A to B-exploring the activation motifs of the class B adhesion G protein-coupled receptor subfamily G member 4/GPR112

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peeters, Miriam C; Mos, Iris; Lenselink, Eelke B;

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs/class B2 G protein-coupled receptors) constitute an ancient family of G protein-coupled receptors that have recently been demonstrated to play important roles in cellular and developmental processes. Here, we describe a first insight into the struct......The adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs/class B2 G protein-coupled receptors) constitute an ancient family of G protein-coupled receptors that have recently been demonstrated to play important roles in cellular and developmental processes. Here, we describe a first insight...... identified several potential equivalent motifs and subjected those to mutational analysis. The importance of the mutated residues was evaluated by examining their effect on the high constitutive activity of the N-terminally truncated ADGRG4/GPR112 in a 1-receptor-1-G protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  6. Radio-peptides targeting g-protein coupled receptors in cancer: from bench to bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. In the development of targeted imaging and therapy agents the most important challenge and prerequisite is to identify and validate the molecular targets of any disease. The targets should be specific, relevant, easily accessible and highly expressed. In addition they should have no or at least very low expression in normal tissue. Among the many drug targets is the large family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). It is the most important family of marketed drugs and the basic accomplishments in the field were recognised by the award of the recent Nobel price in chemistry. GPCRs also play a role in cancer. Several of these receptors are massively over-expressed in different human tumors such as neuroendocrine tumors (over-expression of the somatostatin receptor family), prostate and breast tumors (bombesin receptor family), brain tumors (NK1 receptor) etc.. This allows to develop (nuclear, MRI, optical) probes for imaging and potentially targeted therapy (theragnostics). Natural ligands targeting GPCRs are often peptides. They need to be modified for metabolic stability, modified for labeling with radio-metals (conjugation of bifunctional chelators) or radio-halogens (prosthetic groups). Preserved biological integrity after modification and labeling needs to be assured, long retention times in the tumor is important, conferred by internalisation. Radio-metal labeling in particular needs to be reasonably fast and the radio metal complexes have to show high stability with regard to radio-metal release. These prerequisites will be discussed for somatostatin receptor based radio-peptides in particular. For a successful clinical application preclinical imaging and biodistribution in adequate animal models are mandatory. New tracers for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) will be presented for neuroendocrine tumors and prostate cancer. In particular radiolabeled antagonists will

  7. A monomeric G protein-coupled receptor isolated in a high-density lipoprotein particle efficiently activates its G protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whorton, Matthew R; Bokoch, Michael P; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup;

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to a diverse array of ligands, mediating cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, as well as the senses of smell and taste. The structures of the GPCR rhodopsin and several G proteins have been determined by x-ray crystallography, yet the...

  8. A Perspective on Studying G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling with Resonance Energy Transfer Biosensors in Living Organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unen, J. van; Woolard, J.; Rinken, A.; Hoffmann, C.; Hill, S.J.; Goedhart, J.; Bruchas, M.R.; Bouvier, M.; Adjobo-Hermans, M.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    The last frontier for a complete understanding of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) biology is to be able to assess GPCR activity, interactions, and signaling in vivo, in real time within biologically intact systems. This includes the ability to detect GPCR activity, trafficking, dimerization, prote

  9. A Perspective on Studying G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling with Resonance Energy Transfer Biosensors in Living Organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Unen; J. Woolard; A. Rinken; C. Hoffmann; S.J. Hill; J. Goedhart; M.R. Bruchas; M. Bouvier; M.J.W. Adjobo-Hermans

    2015-01-01

    The last frontier for a complete understanding of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) biology is to be able to assess GPCR activity, interactions, and signaling in vivo, in real time within biologically intact systems. This includes the ability to detect GPCR trafficking, dimerization, protein-protein

  10. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  11. Structure modeling of all identified G protein-coupled receptors in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, encoded by about 5% of human genes, comprise the largest family of integral membrane proteins and act as cell surface receptors responsible for the transduction of endogenous signal into a cellular response. Although tertiary structural information is crucial for function annotation and drug design, there are few experimentally determined GPCR structures. To address this issue, we employ the recently developed threading assembly refinement (TASSER method to generate structure predictions for all 907 putative GPCRs in the human genome. Unlike traditional homology modeling approaches, TASSER modeling does not require solved homologous template structures; moreover, it often refines the structures closer to native. These features are essential for the comprehensive modeling of all human GPCRs when close homologous templates are absent. Based on a benchmarked confidence score, approximately 820 predicted models should have the correct folds. The majority of GPCR models share the characteristic seven-transmembrane helix topology, but 45 ORFs are predicted to have different structures. This is due to GPCR fragments that are predominantly from extracellular or intracellular domains as well as database annotation errors. Our preliminary validation includes the automated modeling of bovine rhodopsin, the only solved GPCR in the Protein Data Bank. With homologous templates excluded, the final model built by TASSER has a global C(alpha root-mean-squared deviation from native of 4.6 angstroms, with a root-mean-squared deviation in the transmembrane helix region of 2.1 angstroms. Models of several representative GPCRs are compared with mutagenesis and affinity labeling data, and consistent agreement is demonstrated. Structure clustering of the predicted models shows that GPCRs with similar structures tend to belong to a similar functional class even when their sequences are diverse. These results demonstrate the usefulness

  12. Identification and Structure-Function Analysis of Subfamily Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Larimore, Kelly M.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J.G. [Michigan; (Oxford)

    2015-02-13

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson’s disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  13. Orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR116 regulates pulmonary surfactant pool size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James P; Ludwig, Marie-Gabrielle; Mueller, Matthias; Kinzel, Bernd; Sato, Atsuyasu; Xu, Yan; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Ikegami, Machiko

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary surfactant levels within the alveoli are tightly regulated to maintain lung volumes and promote efficient gas exchange across the air/blood barrier. Quantitative and qualitative abnormalities in surfactant are associated with severe lung diseases in children and adults. Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control surfactant metabolism have been studied intensively, the critical molecular pathways that sense and regulate endogenous surfactant levels within the alveolus have not been identified and constitute a fundamental knowledge gap in the field. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, GPR116, in the murine lung is developmentally regulated, reaching maximal levels 1 day after birth, and is highly expressed on the apical surface of alveolar type I and type II epithelial cells. To define the physiological role of GPR116 in vivo, mice with a targeted mutation of the Gpr116 locus, Gpr116(Δexon17), were generated. Gpr116(Δexon17) mice developed a profound accumulation of alveolar surfactant phospholipids at 4 weeks of age (12-fold) that was further increased at 20 weeks of age (30-fold). Surfactant accumulation in Gpr116(Δexon17) mice was associated with increased saturated phosphatidylcholine synthesis at 4 weeks and the presence of enlarged, lipid-laden macrophages, neutrophilia, and alveolar destruction at 20 weeks. mRNA microarray analyses indicated that P2RY2, a purinergic receptor known to mediate surfactant secretion, was induced in Gpr116(Δexon17) type II cells. Collectively, these data support the concept that GPR116 functions as a molecular sensor of alveolar surfactant lipid pool sizes by regulating surfactant secretion. PMID:23590306

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulates expression of the anti-lipolytic G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81/Gpr81)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeninga, Ellen H; Bugge, Anne Skovsø; Nielsen, Ronni;

    2009-01-01

    effect of TZDs on lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The coordinated PPARgamma-mediated regulation of the GPR81/Gpr81 and GPR109A/Gpr109A genes (and GPR109B in humans) presents a novel mechanism by which TZDs may reduce circulating free fatty acid levels and perhaps ameliorate insulin resistance in obese...

  15. High-resolution crystal structure of an engineered human beta2-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Hanson, Michael A;

    2007-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of eukaryotic signal transduction proteins that communicate across the membrane. We report the crystal structure of a human beta2-adrenergic receptor-T4 lysozyme fusion protein bound to t...... very similar to that of retinal in rhodopsin, structural differences in the ligand-binding site and other regions highlight the challenges in using rhodopsin as a template model for this large receptor family....

  16. Beta-arrestin-mediated activation of MAPK by inverse agonists reveals distinct active conformations for G protein-coupled receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Azzi, Mounia; Pascale G. Charest; Angers, Stéphane; Rousseau, Guy; Kohout, Trudy; Bouvier, Michel; Piñeyro, Graciela

    2003-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that signaling via G protein-coupled receptors is a diverse phenomenon involving receptor interaction with a variety of signaling partners. Despite this diversity, receptor ligands are commonly classified only according to their ability to modify G protein-dependent signaling. Here we show that beta2AR ligands like ICI118551 and propranolol, which are inverse agonists for Gs-stimulated adenylyl cyclase, induce partial agonist responses for the mitogen-activat...

  17. Shc adaptor proteins are key transducers of mitogenic signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled thrombin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y; Grall, D; Salcini, A E; Pelicci, P G; Pouysségur, J; Van Obberghen-Schilling, E

    1996-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin activates G protein signaling systems that lead to Ras activation and, in certain cells, proliferation. Whereas the steps leading to Ras activation by G protein-coupled receptors are not well defined, the mechanisms of Ras activation by receptor tyrosine kinases have...... kinase activation, gene induction and cell growth. From these data, we conclude that Shc represents a crucial point of convergence between signaling pathways activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors....... recently been elucidated biochemically and genetically. The present study was undertaken to determine whether common signaling components are used by these two distinct classes of receptors. Here we report that the adaptor protein Shc, is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues following stimulation of the...

  18. Expression and function of proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors in inflammatory pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chih-Shin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammatory pain, when not effectively treated, is a costly health problem and has a harmful effect on all aspects of health-related quality of life. Despite the availability of pharmacologic treatments, chronic inflammatory pain remains inadequately treated. Understanding the nociceptive signaling pathways of such pain is therefore important in developing long-acting treatments with limited side effects. High local proton concentrations (tissue acidosis causing direct excitation or modulation of nociceptive sensory neurons by proton-sensing receptors are responsible for pain in some inflammatory pain conditions. We previously found that all four proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are expressed in pain-relevant loci (dorsal root ganglia, DRG, which suggests their possible involvement in nociception, but their functions in pain remain unclear. Results In this study, we first demonstrated differential change in expression of proton-sensing GPCRs in peripheral inflammation induced by the inflammatory agents capsaicin, carrageenan, and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA. In particular, the expression of TDAG8, one proton-sensing GPCR, was increased 24 hours after CFA injection because of increased number of DRG neurons expressing TDAG8. The number of DRG neurons expressing both TDAG8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 was increased as well. Further studies revealed that TDAG8 activation sensitized the TRPV1 response to capsaicin, suggesting that TDAG8 could be involved in CFA-induced chronic inflammatory pain through regulation of TRPV1 function. Conclusion Each subtype of the OGR1 family was expressed differently, which may reflect differences between models in duration and magnitude of hyperalgesia. Given that TDAG8 and TRPV1 expression increased after CFA-induced inflammation and that TDAG8 activation can lead to TRPV1 sensitization, it suggests that high concentrations of protons after

  19. The G protein-coupled receptor subset of the rat genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredriksson Robert

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is one of the largest within most mammals. GPCRs are important targets for pharmaceuticals and the rat is one of the most widely used model organisms in biological research. Accurate comparisons of protein families in rat, mice and human are thus important for interpretation of many physiological and pharmacological studies. However, current automated protein predictions and annotations are limited and error prone. Results We searched the rat genome for GPCRs and obtained 1867 full-length genes and 739 pseudogenes. We identified 1277 new full-length rat GPCRs, whereof 1235 belong to the large group of olfactory receptors. Moreover, we updated the datasets of GPCRs from the human and mouse genomes with 1 and 43 new genes, respectively. The total numbers of full-length genes (and pseudogenes identified were 799 (583 for human and 1783 (702 for mouse. The rat, human and mouse GPCRs were classified into 7 families named the Glutamate, Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Frizzled, Secretin, Taste2 and Vomeronasal1 families. We performed comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of these families and provide detailed information about orthologues and species-specific receptors. We found that 65 human Rhodopsin family GPCRs are orphans and 56 of these have an orthologue in rat. Conclusion Interestingly, we found that the proportion of one-to-one GPCR orthologues was only 58% between rats and humans and only 70% between the rat and mouse, which is much lower than stated for the entire set of all genes. This is in mainly related to the sensory GPCRs. The average protein sequence identities of the GPCR orthologue pairs is also lower than for the whole genomes. We found these to be 80% for the rat and human pairs and 90% for the rat and mouse pairs. However, the proportions of orthologous and species-specific genes vary significantly between the different GPCR families. The largest diversification is

  20. An improved classification of G-protein-coupled receptors using sequence-derived features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhen-Ling

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs play a key role in diverse physiological processes and are the targets of almost two-thirds of the marketed drugs. The 3 D structures of GPCRs are largely unavailable; however, a large number of GPCR primary sequences are known. To facilitate the identification and characterization of novel receptors, it is therefore very valuable to develop a computational method to accurately predict GPCRs from the protein primary sequences. Results We propose a new method called PCA-GPCR, to predict GPCRs using a comprehensive set of 1497 sequence-derived features. The principal component analysis is first employed to reduce the dimension of the feature space to 32. Then, the resulting 32-dimensional feature vectors are fed into a simple yet powerful classification algorithm, called intimate sorting, to predict GPCRs at five levels. The prediction at the first level determines whether a protein is a GPCR or a non-GPCR. If it is predicted to be a GPCR, then it will be further predicted into certain family, subfamily, sub-subfamily and subtype by the classifiers at the second, third, fourth, and fifth levels, respectively. To train the classifiers applied at five levels, a non-redundant dataset is carefully constructed, which contains 3178, 1589, 4772, 4924, and 2741 protein sequences at the respective levels. Jackknife tests on this training dataset show that the overall accuracies of PCA-GPCR at five levels (from the first to the fifth can achieve up to 99.5%, 88.8%, 80.47%, 80.3%, and 92.34%, respectively. We further perform predictions on a dataset of 1238 GPCRs at the second level, and on another two datasets of 167 and 566 GPCRs respectively at the fourth level. The overall prediction accuracies of our method are consistently higher than those of the existing methods to be compared. Conclusions The comprehensive set of 1497 features is believed to be capable of capturing information about amino acid

  1. G-protein coupled receptor signaling architecture of mammalian immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Polouliakh

    Full Text Available A series of recent studies on large-scale networks of signaling and metabolic systems revealed that a certain network structure often called "bow-tie network" are observed. In signaling systems, bow-tie network takes a form with diverse and redundant inputs and outputs connected via a small numbers of core molecules. While arguments have been made that such network architecture enhances robustness and evolvability of biological systems, its functional role at a cellular level remains obscure. A hypothesis was proposed that such a network function as a stimuli-reaction classifier where dynamics of core molecules dictate downstream transcriptional activities, hence physiological responses against stimuli. In this study, we examined whether such hypothesis can be verified using experimental data from Alliance for Cellular Signaling (AfCS that comprehensively measured GPCR related ligands response for B-cell and macrophage. In a GPCR signaling system, cAMP and Ca2+ act as core molecules. Stimuli-response for 32 ligands to B-Cells and 23 ligands to macrophages has been measured. We found that ligands with correlated changes of cAMP and Ca2+ tend to cluster closely together within the hyperspaces of both cell types and they induced genes involved in the same cellular processes. It was found that ligands inducing cAMP synthesis activate genes involved in cell growth and proliferation; cAMP and Ca2+ molecules that increased together form a feedback loop and induce immune cells to migrate and adhere together. In contrast, ligands without a core molecules response are scattered throughout the hyperspace and do not share clusters. G-protein coupling receptors together with immune response specific receptors were found in cAMP and Ca2+ activated clusters. Analyses have been done on the original software applicable for discovering 'bow-tie' network architectures within the complex network of intracellular signaling where ab initio clustering has been

  2. Requirements for Recruitment of a G Protein-coupled Receptor to Clathrin-coated Pits in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Toshima, Junko Y.; Nakanishi, Jun-ichi; Mizuno, Kensaku; Toshima, Jiro; Drubin, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Endocytic internalization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) plays a critical role in down-regulation of GPCR signaling. The yeast mating pheromone receptor Ste2p has been used as a model to investigate mechanisms of signal transduction, modification, and endocytic internalization of GPCRs. We previously used a fluorescently labeled mating pheromone derivative to reveal unappreciated molecular and spatiotemporal features of GPCR endocytosis in budding yeast. Here, we identify recruitment ...

  3. Functional relevance of naturally occurring mutations in adhesion G protein-coupled receptor ADGRD1 (GPR133)

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Liane; Wilde, Caroline; Schöneberg, Torsten; Liebscher, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Background: A large number of human inherited and acquired diseases and phenotypes are caused by mutations in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have shown that variations in the ADGRD1 (GPR133) locus are linked with differences in metabolism, human height and heart frequency. ADGRD1 is a Gs protein-coupled receptor belonging to the class of adhesion GPCRs. Results: Analysis of more than 1000 sequenced human genomes revealed approximately 9000 single nu...

  4. Comparative analysis of the repertoire of G protein-coupled receptors of three species of the fungal genus Trichoderma

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, Sabine; Omann, Markus; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic organisms employ cell surface receptors such as the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as sensors to connect to the environment. GPCRs react to a variety of extracellular cues and are considered to play central roles in the signal transduction in fungi. Several species of the filamentous ascomycete Trichoderma are potent mycoparasites, i.e. can attack and parasitize other fungi, which turns them into successful bio-fungicides for the protection of pl...

  5. Expression of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER in endometriosis: a tissue microarray study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samartzis Nicolas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER is thought to be involved in non-genomic estrogen responses as well as processes such as cell proliferation and migration. In this study, we analyzed GPER expression patterns from endometriosis samples and normal endometrial tissue samples and compared these expression profiles to those of the classical sex hormone receptors. Methods A tissue microarray, which included 74 samples from different types of endometriosis (27 ovarian, 19 peritoneal and 28 deep-infiltrating and 30 samples from normal endometrial tissue, was used to compare the expression levels of the GPER, estrogen receptor (ER-alpha, ER-beta and progesterone receptor (PR. The immunoreactive score (IRS was calculated separately for epithelium and stroma as the product of the staining intensity and the percentage of positive cells. The expression levels of the hormonal receptors were dichotomized into low (IRS  =6 expression groups. Results The mean epithelial IRS (+/−standard deviation, range of cytoplasmic GPER expression was 1.2 (+/−1.7, 0–4 in normal endometrium and 5.1 (+/−3.5, 0–12 in endometriosis (p p = 0.71, of ER-alpha 10.6 (+/−2.4, 3–12 and 9.8 (+/−3.0, 2–12; p = 0.26, of ER-beta 2.4 (+/−2.2; 0–8 and 5.6 (+/−2.6; 0–10; p p p p = 0.001, of ER-beta 1.8 (+/−2.0; 0–8 and 5.4 (+/−2.5; 0–10; p p���= 0.044, respectively. Cytoplasmic GPER expression was not detectable in the stroma of endometrium and endometriosis. The observed frequency of high epithelial cytoplasmic GPER expression levels was 50% (n = 30/60 in the endometriosis and none (0/30 in the normal endometrium samples (p p = 0.01, as compared to peritoneal (9/18, 50% or deep-infiltrating endometriotic lesions (7/22, 31.8%. The frequency of high stromal nuclear GPER expression levels was 100% (n = 74/74 in endometriosis and 76.7% (n = 23/30 in normal endometrium (p

  6. σ1 Receptor Modulation of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling: Potentiation of Opioid Transduction Independent from Receptor Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Felix J.; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    σ Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned μ opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding, by σ1 receptors. σ Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither σ agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding. Yet σ receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC50 of opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. σ1 Receptors physically associate with μ opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, σ receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of σ1 in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated μ opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to μ and δ opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, σ1-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding, suggesting a broader role for σ receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  7. Sigma 1 receptor modulation of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling: potentiation of opioid transduction independent from receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Felix J; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2010-04-01

    sigma Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned mu opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP gamma S) binding, by sigma(1) receptors. sigma Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither sigma agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. Yet sigma receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC(50) of opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. sigma(1) Receptors physically associate with mu opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, sigma receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of sigma(1) in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated mu opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to mu and delta opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, sigma(1)-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding, suggesting a broader role for sigma receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  8. The patent situation concerning the treatment of diseases associated with autoantibodies directed against G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberland, Annekathrin; Wallukat, Gerd; Schimke, Ingolf

    2013-03-01

    Agonist-like autoantibodies against receptors of the G-protein-coupled signal cascade have been identified as the pathogenic principle for a variety of diseases, especially those of the heart and vascular system. Consequently, the elimination or neutralization of such autoantibodies is an advised goal for causal therapeutic intervention. This article provides a short, noncomplete overview about remarkable developmental strategies and technical solutions for the therapy of diseases, associated with G-protein-coupled receptor autoantibodies. According to the immunoglobulin nature of the therapeutic target, several strategies are possible, such as the use of the autoantibody epitope sequences as competitors or binding molecules for specific autoantibody-elimination by apheresis. Complete immunoglobulin elimination, as is currently being tested in autoantibody-positive cardiomyopathy patients, would be a nonspecific solution as would the use of immunosuppressant agents. The use of autoantibody-binding molecules on an aptamer basis for neutralization or elimination is a newly developed specific therapeutic option. PMID:24237028

  9. G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 interacting protein 1 (GIT1) is a novel regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in heart

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Jinjiang; Xu, Xiangbin; Getman, Michael R.; Shi, Xi; Belmonte, Stephen L.; Michaloski, Heidi; Mohan, Amy; Blaxall, Burns C.; Berk, Bradford C.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-kinase interacting protein-1 (GIT1) is a multi-function scaffold protein. However, little is known about its physiological role in the heart. Here we sought to identify the cardiac function of GIT1. Global GIT1 knockout (KO) mice were generated and exhibited significant cardiac hypertrophy that progressed to heart failure. Electron microscopy revealed that the hearts of GIT1 KO mice demonstrated significant morphological abnormities in mitochondria, including...

  10. Single-molecule observation of the ligand-induced population shift of rhodopsin, a g-protein-coupled receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Ryo; Hiroshima, Michio; Yamashita, Takahiro; Wada, Akimori; Nishimura, Shoko; Sako, Yasushi; Shichida, Yoshinori; Imamoto, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor, in which retinal chromophore acts as inverse-agonist or agonist depending on its configuration and protonation state. Photostimulation of rhodopsin results in a pH-dependent equilibrium between the active state (Meta-II) and its inactive precursor (Meta-I). Here, we monitored conformational changes of rhodopsin using a fluorescent probe Alexa594 at the cytoplasmic surface, which shows fluorescence increase upon the generation of active state, by sing...

  11. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen (Sanofi); (Michigan); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  12. Structure-function studies with G protein-coupled receptors as a paradigm for improving drug discovery and therapeutic development

    OpenAIRE

    McNeely, Patrick M.; Naranjo, Andrea N.; Robinson, Anne Skaja

    2012-01-01

    There are a great variety of human membrane proteins, which currently form the largest group of marketed drug targets. However, despite the advances in drug design, promiscuity between drug molecules and targets often leads to undesired signaling effects, which result in side effects from treatment. In this review, one family of membrane proteins – G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) – is used as a model to review experimental techniques that may be used to examine the activity of membrane pr...

  13. Biosensor-Based Approach Identifies Four Distinct Calmodulin-Binding Domains in the G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Quang-Kim; VerMeer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) has been demonstrated to participate in many cellular functions, but its regulatory inputs are not clearly understood. Here we describe a new approach that identifies GPER as a calmodulin-binding protein, locates interaction sites, and characterizes their binding properties. GPER coimmunoprecipitates with calmodulin in primary vascular smooth muscle cells under resting conditions, which is enhanced upon acute treatment with either specific liga...

  14. Role of G-protein-coupled Receptor-related Genes in Insecticide Resistance of the Mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus

    OpenAIRE

    Ting Li; Lena Liu; Lee Zhang; Nannan Liu

    2014-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors regulate signal transduction pathways and play diverse and pivotal roles in the physiology of insects, however, the precise function of GPCRs in insecticide resistance remains unclear. Using quantitative RT-PCR and functional genomic methods, we, for the first time, explored the function of GPCRs and GPCR-related genes in insecticide resistance of mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus. A comparison of the expression of 115 GPCR-related genes at a whole genome level be...

  15. A common haplotype in the G-protein-coupled receptor gene GPR74 is associated with leanness and increased lipolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlman, Ingrid; Dicker, Andrea; Jiao, Hong; Kere, Juha; Blomqvist, Lennart; van Harmelen, Vanessa; Hoffstedt, Johan; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Jorgensen, Torben; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Laakso, Markku; Arner, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor GPR74 is a novel candidate gene for body weight regulation. In humans, it is predominantly expressed in brain, heart, and adipose tissue. We report a haplotype in the GPR74 gene, ATAG, with allele frequency ~4% in Scandinavian cohorts, which was associated with prot...... adipose tissue. The latter involves a cross-talk between GPR74 and beta -adrenoceptor signaling to lipolysis in fat cells....

  16. Lack of association between genetic variation in G-protein-coupled receptor for asthma susceptibility and childhood asthma and atopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, H; Romieu, I; Sienra-Monge, J-J; del Rio-Navarro, BE; Burdett, L; Yuenger, J; Li, H; Chanock, SJ; London, SJ

    2008-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor for asthma susceptibility (GPRA or GPR154) was identified as an asthma and atopy candidate gene by positional cloning. Some subsequent studies suggest associations of GPRA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes with asthma or atopy susceptibility. However, the associated SNPs or haplotypes vary among studies. The role of GPRA genetic variation in asthma and atopy remains unsolved. Published data on GRPA variants and asthma come exclusively from Caucas...

  17. GPR119, a novel G protein-coupled receptor target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Overton, H. A.; Fyfe, M C T; Reynet, C

    2007-01-01

    GPR119 is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed predominantly in the pancreas (β-cells) and gastrointestinal tract (enteroendocrine cells) in humans. De-orphanization of GPR119 has revealed two classes of possible endogenous ligands, viz., phospholipids and fatty acid amides. Of these, oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is one of the most active ligands tested so far. This fatty acid ethanolamide is of particular interest because of its known effects of reducing food intake and body weight gain when a...

  18. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Ørgaard, Anne; Jørgensen, Rasmus;

    2012-01-01

    , GPCR oligomerization has been extensively studied using methods like bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and today, receptor-receptor interactions within the GPCR superfamily is a well-established phenomenon. Evidence of the impact of GPCR oligomerization on, e.g., ligand binding, receptor...

  19. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors. - Highlights: • Zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1, zGPR4) are proton-sensing receptors. • The signaling pathways activated by zOGR1 and zGPR4 are different. • Histidine residues critical for sensing protons are conserved

  20. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochimaru, Yuta [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Azuma, Morio [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Matsuda, Kouhei [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi [Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakakura, Takashi [Department of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University, 2-11-1 Kaga Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tomura, Hideaki, E-mail: tomurah@meiji.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors. - Highlights: • Zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1, zGPR4) are proton-sensing receptors. • The signaling pathways activated by zOGR1 and zGPR4 are different. • Histidine residues critical for sensing protons are conserved.

  1. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochimaru, Yuta; Azuma, Morio; Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Kouhei; Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu; Tomura, Hideaki

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors. PMID:25576873

  2. The Effect of Hypoxia on G Protein Coupled (CB1 Receptor Gene Expression in Cortical B50 Neurons in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Ibegbu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia adversely affects cells and tissues, and neuronal cells in particular have been shown to be more susceptible to the injurious effects of hypoxia in which they may begin to die when oxygen supply is reduced or completely eliminated. Cannabinoid (CB1 receptor agonists have been shown to elicit several Central Nervous System (CNS effects, mediated via G protein-coupled receptors. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of hypoxia on G protein coupled receptor (CB1 gene expression in cortical neuronal B50 cell lines in culture. The B50 cells were cultured in normoxia (21% O2; 5% CO2 and hypoxia (5% O2; 5% CO2, and were treated with cannabinoid agonists to determine their effects on hypoxia-induced changes. Three cannabinoid agonists [Win55,212-2 mesylate (Win, arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA and 2- arachidonylglycerol (2-AG], were administered to the cells as treatment for 48 hours after 48hours of initial culture for a total of 96hours of culture in hypoxic conditions at concentrations of 10, 50 and 100 nM . The levels of G-protein coupled receptor (CB1 mRNAs were assessed using RT-PCR. The results showed that hypoxia induced morphological changes in B5 0 cells in hypoxia while the CB1 RT-PCR mRNA levels showed no appreciable changes in normal, hypoxic and treated cells. The results show that B50 neuronal cells are susceptible to damage and injurious effects of hypoxia, as are most brain cells and the cannabinoid agonist treatments showed there were no changes in the level of CB1 receptor gene expression due to hypoxia or agonist treatment in neuronal B50 cells in culture.

  3. Chemogenomic analysis of G-protein coupled receptors and their ligands deciphers locks and keys governing diverse aspects of signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg D Wichard

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular mechanism of signalling in the important super-family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is causally related to questions of how and where these receptors can be activated or inhibited. In this context, it is of great interest to unravel the common molecular features of GPCRs as well as those related to an active or inactive state or to subtype specific G-protein coupling. In our underlying chemogenomics study, we analyse for the first time the statistical link between the properties of G-protein-coupled receptors and GPCR ligands. The technique of mutual information (MI is able to reveal statistical inter-dependence between variations in amino acid residues on the one hand and variations in ligand molecular descriptors on the other. Although this MI analysis uses novel information that differs from the results of known site-directed mutagenesis studies or published GPCR crystal structures, the method is capable of identifying the well-known common ligand binding region of GPCRs between the upper part of the seven transmembrane helices and the second extracellular loop. The analysis shows amino acid positions that are sensitive to either stimulating (agonistic or inhibitory (antagonistic ligand effects or both. It appears that amino acid positions for antagonistic and agonistic effects are both concentrated around the extracellular region, but selective agonistic effects are cumulated between transmembrane helices (TMHs 2, 3, and ECL2, while selective residues for antagonistic effects are located at the top of helices 5 and 6. Above all, the MI analysis provides detailed indications about amino acids located in the transmembrane region of these receptors that determine G-protein signalling pathway preferences.

  4. Fluorescence/bioluminescence resonance energy transfer techniques to study G-protein-coupled receptor activation and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Martin J; Nuber, Susanne; Hoffmann, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET and BRET) techniques allow the sensitive monitoring of distances between two labels at the nanometer scale. Depending on the placement of the labels, this permits the analysis of conformational changes within a single protein (for example of a receptor) or the monitoring of protein-protein interactions (for example, between receptors and G-protein subunits). Over the past decade, numerous such techniques have been developed to monitor the activation and signaling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in both the purified, reconstituted state and in intact cells. These techniques span the entire spectrum from ligand binding to the receptors down to intracellular second messengers. They allow the determination and the visualization of signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution. With these techniques, it has been demonstrated that GPCR signals may show spatial and temporal patterning. In particular, evidence has been provided for spatial compartmentalization of GPCRs and their signals in intact cells and for distinct physiological consequences of such spatial patterning. We review here the FRET and BRET technologies that have been developed for G-protein-coupled receptors and their signaling proteins (G-proteins, effectors) and the concepts that result from such experiments. PMID:22407612

  5. G protein-coupled receptor 30 is an estrogen receptor in the plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, GPR30 was reported to be a novel estrogen receptor; however, its intracellular localization has remained controversial. To investigate the intracellular localization of GPR30 in vivo, we produced four kinds of polyclonal antibodies for distinct epitopes on GPR30. Immunocytochemical observations using anti-GPR30 antibody and anti-FLAG antibody show that FLAG-GPR30 localizes to the plasma membrane 24 h after transfection. Treatment with estrogen (17β-estradiol or E2) causes an elevation in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) within 10 s in HeLa cells expressing FLAG-GPR30. In addition, E2 induces the translocation of GPR30 from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm by 1 h after stimulation. Immunohistochemical analysis shows that GPR30 exists on the cell surface of CA2 pyramidal neuronal cells. The images on transmission electron microscopy show that GPR30 is localized to a particular region associated with the plasma membranes of the pyramidal cells. These data indicate that GPR30, a transmembrane receptor for estrogen, is localized to the plasma membrane of CA2 pyramidal neuronal cells of the hippocampus in rat brain

  6. Note: Magnetic targeting for enhancement of the activation efficiency of G protein-coupled receptor with a two-pair coil system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Quanliang; Han, Xiaotao; Chun, Lei; Liu, Jianfeng; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient contact of drug with target cells is a primary reason for limited efficiency of G protein-coupled receptor activation. To overcome this limitation, a simple approach based on magnetic targeting for enhancing drug delivery towards the cell surfaces using magnetic nanoparticles and a two-pair coil system consisting of Helmholtz and Maxwell coils was reported. As a proof of the concept, comparative experiments on G protein-coupled receptor activation process were carried out and results show that the efficiency of G protein-coupled receptor activation can be increased about 6 times in the experiments with the aid of the proposed magnetic targeting system.

  7. Evolution of the thyrotropin receptor: a G protein coupled receptor with an intrinsic capacity to dimerize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczur, Viktória; Puskás, László G; Takács, Mária; Rácz, István András; Szendroi, Andrea; Tóth, Sára; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Szalai, Csaba; Balázs, Csaba; Falus, András; Knudsen, Bjarne; Farid, Nadir R

    2003-04-01

    The rapidly escalating number of genome sequences has emphasized the basic tenants of the schema of life. By the same token comparisons according to specialized function or niche within nature expose genomic strategies to optimize the use of resources and ensure biological success. Increasing complexity may result from diversification, shuffling, and re-arrangement of an otherwise limited functional genomic complement. To further test the concept of relative structural plasticity of the TSH receptor we sequenced the TSHR gene of two Old World monkey species Macaca mulatta and Cercopithecus aethiops, evolutionary removed from Homo sapiens by >20Myr. Both genes encoded a protein of 764 residues. This structure was 99% homologous between the two species of Old World monkeys while C. aethiops was 97% and M. mulatta was 96% homologous to H. sapiens. TSHR sequence comparisons were sought for an additional eight mammals as well as four (two Salmon, Tilapia, and Sea Bass) from teleosts. The amino-acid sequences of the 14 TSH receptors were similar. The most variable sequences were those of the intracellular tail and the distal cysteine-rich C-terminus flanking region of the ectodomain, whereas the trans-membrane domain was most preserved. Some sequences were decidedly H. sapiens specific, while others were primate specific or showed the changes expected of evolutionary descent. Others, however, exhibited "cross-species polymorphism," sometimes at quite remarkable evolutionary distances. As opposed to H. sapiens the sequence differences may have subtle influences on TSHR function or may affect long-range compensation for radical changes in adducts. The two Old World monkeys share with other lower mammals the absence of a glycosylation site at 113-115. Sea Bass and Tilapia have four glycosylation sites, whereas the two salmon receptors have only three. Changes in some critical residues raise questions about variation in function: thus S281 is conserved in all mammals and an

  8. Alteration in contractile G-protein coupled receptor expression by moist snuff and nicotine in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, Hardip; Xu, Cang-Bao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2011-01-01

    vasocontractile G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), such as endothelin ET(B), serotonin 5-HT(1B), and thromboxane A(2) TP receptors, in rat cerebral arteries. Studies show that these vasocontractile GPCR show alterations by lipid-soluble cigarette smoke particles via activation of mitogen-activated protein...... 5-carboxamidotryptamine, and TP receptor agonist U46619 were investigated by a sensitive myograph. The expression of ET(B), 5-HT(1B), and TP receptors was studied at mRNA and protein levels using quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Organ culture with WSS or DSS (25ng...... kept at plasma level of snus users (25ng nicotine/ml). A high dose (250ng nicotine/ml) was also included due to the previous results showing alteration in the GPCR expression by nicotine at this concentration. Contractile responses to the ET(B) receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c, 5-HT(1B) receptor agonist...

  9. The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor agonist G-1 suppresses proliferation of ovarian cancer cells by blocking tubulin polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, C; Lv, X.; C. He; Hua, G; Tsai, M-Y; Davis, J S

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) has recently been reported to mediate the non-genomic action of estrogen in different types of cells and tissues. G-1 (1-[4-(6-bromobenzo[1,3] dioxol-5yl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolin-8-yl]-ethanone) was developed as a potent and selective agonist for GPER. G-1 has been shown to induce the expression of genes and activate pathways that facilitate cancer cell proliferation by activating GPER. Here we demonstrate that G-1 has an ...

  10. Live Cell Bioluminescence Imaging in Temporal Reaction of G Protein-Coupled Receptor for High-Throughput Screening and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are notable targets of basic therapeutics. Many screening methods have been established to identify novel agents for GPCR signaling in a high-throughput manner. However, information related to the temporal reaction of GPCR with specific ligands remains poor. We recently developed a bioluminescence method for the quantitative detection of the interaction between GPCR and β-arrestin using split luciferase complementation. To monitor time-course variation of the interactions, a new imaging system contributes to the accurate evaluation of drugs for GPCRs in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27424906

  11. Cross genome phylogenetic analysis of human and Drosophila G protein-coupled receptors: application to functional annotation of orphan receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowdhamini Ramanathan

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell-membrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are one of the largest known superfamilies and are the main focus of intense pharmaceutical research due to their key role in cell physiology and disease. A large number of putative GPCRs are 'orphans' with no identified natural ligands. The first step in understanding the function of orphan GPCRs is to identify their ligands. Phylogenetic clustering methods were used to elucidate the chemical nature of receptor ligands, which led to the identification of natural ligands for many orphan receptors. We have clustered human and Drosophila receptors with known ligands and orphans through cross genome phylogenetic analysis and hypothesized higher relationship of co-clustered members that would ease ligand identification, as related receptors share ligands with similar structure or class. Results Cross-genome phylogenetic analyses were performed to identify eight major groups of GPCRs dividing them into 32 clusters of 371 human and 113 Drosophila proteins (excluding olfactory, taste and gustatory receptors and reveal unexpected levels of evolutionary conservation across human and Drosophila GPCRs. We also observe that members of human chemokine receptors, involved in immune response, and most of nucleotide-lipid receptors (except opsins do not have counterparts in Drosophila. Similarly, a group of Drosophila GPCRs (methuselah receptors, associated in aging, is not present in humans. Conclusion Our analysis suggests ligand class association to 52 unknown Drosophila receptors and 95 unknown human GPCRs. A higher level of phylogenetic organization was revealed in which clusters with common domain architecture or cellular localization or ligand structure or chemistry or a shared function are evident across human and Drosophila genomes. Such analyses will prove valuable for identifying the natural ligands of Drosophila and human orphan receptors that can lead to a better understanding

  12. PheVI:09 (Phe6.44) as a sliding microswitch in seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Louise; Holst, Birgitte; Frimurer, Thomas M;

    2012-01-01

    In seven-transmembrane (7TM), G protein-coupled receptors, highly conserved residues function as microswitches, which alternate between different conformations and interaction partners in an extended allosteric interface between the transmembrane segments performing the large scale conformational...

  13. Increased expression of the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor Gpr65 during retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ail, D; Rüfenacht, V; Caprara, C; Samardzija, M; Kast, B; Grimm, C

    2015-08-20

    The retina is a metabolically highly active tissue that is sensitive to pH changes. Blinding diseases of the retina are often characterized by degeneration of photoreceptor cells altering the acid-base homeostasis of the tissue microenvironment and by an accompanying inflammatory response. GPR4, GPR65 and GPR68 are G protein-coupled receptors that aid cells to sense and survive conditions of acidic pH and inflammatory cells express Gpr65 enhancing their viability. Hence, we investigated expression and function of these proton-sensing GPRs in the normal and degenerating retina. We observed increased retinal expression of Gpr65, but not of Gpr4 and Gpr68, in mouse models of both inherited (rd10) and induced (light damage) retinal degeneration. Lack of GPR65 slightly accelerated photoreceptor degeneration in rd10 mice and resulted in a strong activation of microglia after light-injury. Since GPR65 was dispensable for normal retinal development, function and aging as evidenced by the evaluation of Gpr65(-/-) mice, our results indicate that the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor GPR65 may be involved in a mechanism that supports survival of photoreceptors in the degenerating retina. PMID:26117715

  14. Whole proteome identification of plant candidate G-protein coupled receptors in Arabidopsis, rice, and poplar: computational prediction and in-vivo protein coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Gookin, Timothy E; Kim, Junhyong; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2008-01-01

    Background The classic paradigm of heterotrimeric G-protein signaling describes a heptahelical, membrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor that physically interacts with an intracellular Gα subunit of the G-protein heterotrimer to transduce signals. G-protein coupled receptors comprise the largest protein superfamily in metazoa and are physiologically important as they sense highly diverse stimuli and play key roles in human disease. The heterotrimeric G-protein signaling mechanism is conse...

  15. Expression of G protein-coupled receptor 56 is associated with tumor progression in non-small-cell lung carcinoma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Lingling

    2016-01-01

    Yanjie Song,1,* Aiqin Li,1,* Li Zhang,1 Lingling Duan2 1Department of Neurosurgery, Yidu Central Hospital of Weifang, Weifang Medical University, Qingzhou, 2Medical Care Department for Personnel, Jinan Central Hospital, Shangdong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: G protein-coupled receptor 56 (GPR56) is an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor with essential functions for cell physiology and ...

  16. Chapter Three - Ubiquitination and Protein Turnover of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases in GPCR Signaling and Cellular Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penela, P

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for regulating a wide variety of physiological processes, and distinct mechanisms for GPCR inactivation exist to guarantee correct receptor functionality. One of the widely used mechanisms is receptor phosphorylation by specific G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), leading to uncoupling from G proteins (desensitization) and receptor internalization. GRKs and β-arrestins also participate in the assembly of receptor-associated multimolecular complexes, thus initiating alternative G-protein-independent signaling events. In addition, the abundant GRK2 kinase has diverse "effector" functions in cellular migration, proliferation, and metabolism homeostasis by means of the phosphorylation or interaction with non-GPCR partners. Altered expression of GRKs (particularly of GRK2 and GRK5) occurs during pathological conditions characterized by impaired GPCR signaling including inflammatory syndromes, cardiovascular disease, and tumor contexts. It is increasingly appreciated that different pathways governing GRK protein stability play a role in the modulation of kinase levels in normal and pathological conditions. Thus, enhanced GRK2 degradation by the proteasome pathway occurs upon GPCR stimulation, what allows cellular adaptation to chronic stimulation in a physiological setting. β-arrestins participate in this process by facilitating GRK2 phosphorylation by different kinases and by recruiting diverse E3 ubiquitin ligase to the receptor complex. Different proteolytic systems (ubiquitin-proteasome, calpains), chaperone activities and signaling pathways influence the stability of GRKs in different ways, thus endowing specificity to GPCR regulation as protein turnover of GRKs can be differentially affected. Therefore, modulation of protein stability of GRKs emerges as a versatile mechanism for feedback regulation of GPCR signaling and basic cellular processes. PMID:27378756

  17. Homogeneous time-resolved G protein-coupled receptor-ligand binding assay based on fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Thomas; Ott, David; Ebell, Katharina; Hansen, Kerrin; Henry, Luc; Becker, Frank; Hannus, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate many important physiological functions and are considered as one of the most successful therapeutic target classes for a wide spectrum of diseases. Drug discovery projects generally benefit from a broad range of experimental approaches for screening compound libraries and for the characterization of binding modes of drug candidates. Owing to the difficulties in solubilizing and purifying GPCRs, assay formats have been so far mainly limited to cell-based functional assays and radioligand binding assays. In this study, we used fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) to analyze the interaction of detergent-solubilized receptors to various types of GPCR ligands: endogenous peptides, small molecules, and a large surrogate antagonist represented by a blocking monoclonal antibody. Our work demonstrates the suitability of the homogeneous and time-resolved FCCS assay format for a robust, high-throughput determination of receptor-ligand binding affinities and kinetic rate constants for various therapeutically relevant GPCRs. PMID:26954998

  18. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.;

    2015-01-01

    -coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L......Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium......-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca2+. In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca2+ response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing...

  19. Analysis of Drug Design for a Selection of G Protein-Coupled Neuro-Receptors Using Neural Network Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Claus; Mortensen, Rasmus M.; Bohr, Henrik G.

    2015-01-01

    mu-opioid, serotonin 2B (5-HT2B) and metabotropic glutamate D5. They are selected due to the availability of pharmacological drug-molecule binding data for these receptors. Feedback and deep belief artificial neural network architectures (NNs) were chosen to perform the task of aiding drug......-design. This is done by training on structural features, selected using a "minimum redundancy, maximum relevance"-test, and testing for successful prediction of categorized binding strength. An extensive comparison of the neural network performances was made in order to select the optimal architecture. Deep belief......A study is presented on how well possible drug-molecules can be predicted with respect to their function and binding to a selection of neuro-receptors by the use of artificial neural networks. The ligands investigated in this study are chosen to be corresponding to the G protein-coupled receptors...

  20. The G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor Agonist G-1 Inhibits Nuclear Estrogen Receptor Activity and Stimulates Novel Phosphoproteomic Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L Cody; Ralston-Hooper, Kimberly J; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2016-06-01

    Estrogen exerts cellular effects through both nuclear (ESR1 and ESR2) and membrane-bound estrogen receptors (G-protein coupled estrogen receptor, GPER); however, it is unclear if they act independently or engage in crosstalk to influence hormonal responses. To investigate each receptor's role in proliferation, transcriptional activation, and protein phosphorylation in breast cancer cells (MCF-7), we employed selective agonists for ESR1 propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT), ESR2 diarylpropionitrile (DPN), and GPER (G-1) and also determined the impact of xenoestrogens bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein on these effects. As anticipated, 17β-estradiol (E2), PPT, DPN, BPA, and genistein each enhanced proliferation and activation of an ERE-driven reporter gene whereas G-1 had no significant impact. However, G-1 significantly reduced E2-, PPT-, DPN-, BPA-, and genistein-induced proliferation and ERE activation at doses greater than 500 nM indicating that G-1 mediated inhibition is not ESR isotype specific. As membrane receptors initiate cascades of phosphorylation events, we performed a global phosphoproteomic analysis on cells exposed to E2 or G-1 to identify potential targets of receptor crosstalk via downstream protein phosphorylation targets. Of the 211 phosphorylated proteins identified, 40 and 13 phosphoproteins were specifically modified by E2 and G-1, respectively. Subnetwork enrichment analysis revealed several processes related to cell cycle were specifically enriched by G-1 compared with E2. Further there existed a number of newly identified proteins that were specifically phosphorylated by G-1. These phosphorylation networks highlight specific proteins that may modulate the inhibitory effects of G-1 and suggest a novel role for interference with nuclear receptor activity driven by E2 and xenoestrogens. PMID:27026707

  1. The Multiple Faces of Prostaglandin E2 G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling during the Dendritic Cell Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Cambi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Many processes regulating immune responses are initiated by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs and report biochemical changes in the microenvironment. Dendritic cells (DCs are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and crucial for the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The lipid mediator Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 via four GPCR subtypes (EP1-4 critically regulates DC generation, maturation and migration. The role of PGE2 signaling in DC biology was unraveled by the characterization of EP receptor subtype expression in DC progenitor cells and DCs, the identification of the signaling pathways initiated by these GPCR subtypes and the classification of DC responses to PGE2 at different stages of differentiation. Here, we review the advances in PGE2 signaling in DCs and describe the efforts still to be made to understand the spatio-temporal fine-tuning of PGE2 responses by DCs.

  2. Molecular Mechanism for Inhibition of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 by a Selective RNA Aptamer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lennarz, Sabine; Mayer, Günter; Tesmer, John J.G. (Bonn); (Michigan)

    2012-08-31

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is maintained in part by the rapid desensitization of activated heptahelical receptors that have been phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). However, during chronic heart failure GRK2 is upregulated and believed to contribute to disease progression. We have determined crystallographic structures of GRK2 bound to an RNA aptamer that potently and selectively inhibits kinase activity. Key to the mechanism of inhibition is the positioning of an adenine nucleotide into the ATP-binding pocket and interactions with the basic {alpha}F-{alpha}G loop region of the GRK2 kinase domain. Constraints imposed on the RNA by the terminal stem of the aptamer also play a role. These results highlight how a high-affinity aptamer can be used to selectively trap a novel conformational state of a protein kinase.

  3. Predicting the Coupling Specificity of G-protein Coupled Receptors to G-proteins by Support Vector Machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui-Ping Guan; Zhen-Ran Jiang; Yan-Hong Zhou

    2005-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the most important classes of drug targets for pharmaceutical industry and play important roles in cellular signal transduction. Predicting the coupling specificity of GPCRs to G-proteins is vital for further understanding the mechanism of signal transduction and the function of the receptors within a cell, which can provide new clues for pharmaceutical research and development. In this study, the features of amino acid compositions and physiochemical properties of the full-length GPCR sequences have been analyzed and extracted. Based on these features, classifiers have been developed to predict the coupling specificity of GPCRs to G-proteins using support vector machines. The testing results show that this method could obtain better prediction accuracy.

  4. Ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors in tethered cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Karen L.; Meyer, Bruno H.; Hovius, Ruud; Lundstrom, Kenneth; Vogel, Horst

    2003-01-01

    of receptor function and in turn for the design and development of novel therapeutic compound. Here we show how ligand-receptor interaction can be investigated in situ with high sensitivity on sensor surfaces by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) measurements. A generally applicable method...... streptavidin. TIRF measurements showed that a fluorescent agonist binds to the receptor on the sensor surface with similar affinity as to the receptor in live cells. This approach offers the possibility to investigate minute amounts of membrane protein in an active form and in its native environment without...

  5. High content screening for G protein-coupled receptors using cell-based protein translocation assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grånäs, Charlotta; Lundholt, Betina Kerstin; Heydorn, Arne;

    2005-01-01

    discovery is described, and proof-of-concept data from a pilot screen with a CXCR4 assay are presented. This chemokine receptor is a highly relevant drug target which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disease and also has been shown to be a co-receptor for entry of HIV into cells...

  6. Seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor repertoire of gastric ghrelin cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelstoft, Maja S; Park, Won-Mee; Sakata, Ichiro;

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating secretion of the orexigenic-glucoregulatory hormone ghrelin remain unclear. Based on qPCR analysis of FACS-purified gastric ghrelin cells, highly expressed and enriched 7TM receptors were comprehensively identified and functionally characterized using in vitro....../o pathway: FFAR2 (short chain fatty acid receptor; GPR43), FFAR4 (long chain fatty acid receptor; GPR120) and CasR (calcium sensing receptor). In addition to the common Gα subunits three non-common Gαi/o subunits were highly enriched in ghrelin cells: GαoA, GαoB and Gαz. Inhibition of Gαi/o signaling via...... ghrelin cell-selective pertussis toxin expression markedly enhanced circulating ghrelin. These 7TM receptors and associated Gα subunits constitute a major part of the molecular machinery directly mediating neuronal and endocrine stimulation versus metabolite and somatostatin inhibition of ghrelin...

  7. Comparison of MEK/ERK pathway inhibitors on the upregulation of vascular G-protein coupled receptors in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, Hardip; Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    Organ culture is an in vitro method for investigating cellular mechanisms involved in upregulation of vasocontractile G-protein coupled receptors. We hypothesize that mitogen-activated-protein kinase (MEK) and/or extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) specific inhibitors will attenuate the G-protein...... specific inhibitor U0126 is a potent inhibitor of G-protein coupled receptor alteration seen during organ culture. Given the ability to inhibit G-protein coupled receptor alteration at the clinically relevant time-point 6h post incubation makes it an attractive therapeutic agent for in vivo studies.......), prostanoid TP receptor, and angiotensin II receptor type 1 and type 2 were investigated. Results were verified by measurement of mRNA with real time PCR and by protein immunohistochemistry. Organ culture induced transcriptional upregulation of endothelin ET(B) receptor and of serotonin 5-HT(1B) receptor on...

  8. Modulation of firing and synaptic transmission of serotonergic neurons by intrinsic G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Takashi; Masseck, Olivia A; Mark, Melanie D; Herlitze, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Serotonergic neurons project to virtually all regions of the central nervous system and are consequently involved in many critical physiological functions such as mood, sexual behavior, feeding, sleep/wake cycle, memory, cognition, blood pressure regulation, breathing, and reproductive success. Therefore, serotonin release and serotonergic neuronal activity have to be precisely controlled and modulated by interacting brain circuits to adapt to specific emotional and environmental states. We will review the current knowledge about G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels involved in the regulation of serotonergic system, how their regulation is modulating the intrinsic activity of serotonergic neurons and its transmitter release and will discuss the latest methods for controlling the modulation of serotonin release and intracellular signaling in serotonergic neurons in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23734105

  9. Modulation of firing and synaptic transmission of serotonergic neurons by intrinsic G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eMaejima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic neurons project to virtually all regions of the CNS and are consequently involved in many critical physiological functions such as mood, sexual behavior, feeding, sleep/wake cycle, memory, cognition, blood pressure regulation, breathing and reproductive success. Therefore serotonin release and serotonergic neuronal activity have to be precisely controlled and modulated by interacting brain circuits to adapt to specific emotional and environmental states. We will review the current knowledge about G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels involved in the regulation of serotonergic system, how their regulation is modulating the intrinsic activity of serotonergic neurons and its transmitter release and will discuss the latest methods for controlling the modulation of serotonin release and intracellular signaling in serotonergic neurons in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Cell wall trapping of autocrine peptides for human G-protein-coupled receptors on the yeast cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ishii

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs regulate a wide variety of physiological processes and are important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery. Here, we describe a unique concept based on yeast cell-surface display technology to selectively track eligible peptides with agonistic activity for human GPCRs (Cell Wall Trapping of Autocrine Peptides (CWTrAP strategy. In our strategy, individual recombinant yeast cells are able to report autocrine-positive activity for human GPCRs by expressing a candidate peptide fused to an anchoring motif. Following expression and activation, yeast cells trap autocrine peptides onto their cell walls. Because captured peptides are incapable of diffusion, they have no impact on surrounding yeast cells that express the target human GPCR and non-signaling peptides. Therefore, individual yeast cells can assemble the autonomous signaling complex and allow single-cell screening of a yeast population. Our strategy may be applied to identify eligible peptides with agonistic activity for target human GPCRs.

  11. Endolysosomal trafficking of viral G protein-coupled receptor functions in innate immunity and control of viral oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaonan; Cheng, Adam; Zou, Zhongju; Yang, Yih-Sheng; Sumpter, Rhea M; Huang, Chou-Long; Bhagat, Govind; Virgin, Herbert W; Lira, Sergio A; Levine, Beth

    2016-03-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system degrades viral oncoproteins and other microbial virulence factors; however, the role of endolysosomal degradation pathways in these processes is unclear. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, and a constitutively active viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) contributes to the pathogenesis of KSHV-induced tumors. We report that a recently discovered autophagy-related protein, Beclin 2, interacts with KSHV GPCR, facilitates its endolysosomal degradation, and inhibits vGPCR-driven oncogenic signaling. Furthermore, monoallelic loss of Becn2 in mice accelerates the progression of vGPCR-induced lesions that resemble human Kaposi's sarcoma. Taken together, these findings indicate that Beclin 2 is a host antiviral molecule that protects against the pathogenic effects of KSHV GPCR by facilitating its endolysosomal degradation. More broadly, our data suggest a role for host endolysosomal trafficking pathways in regulating viral pathogenesis and oncogenic signaling. PMID:26929373

  12. G-protein-coupled receptor heteromers as key players in the molecular architecture of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugarolas, Marc; Navarro, Gemma; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Angelats, Edgar; Casadó, Vicent; Lanciego, José L; Franco, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    The overall architecture of the nervous system, especially the CNS, is remarkable. The anatomy of the nervous system is constituted not only by macroscopic and microscopy identifiable regions and neuronal cell types, but also by protein complexes whose identification and localization require sophisticated techniques. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute an example of proteins that are the key factors in the framework needed to sustain brain and nerve structure and function. The versatility underlying nervous system anatomy takes advantage of a recently discovered feature of GPCRs, the possibility to form heteromers that, placed at specific neuronal subsets and at specific locations (pre-, post-, or peri-synaptic), contribute to attain unique neural functions. PMID:24809909

  13. Identification of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs in Primary Cilia and Their Possible Involvement in Body Weight Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Omori

    Full Text Available Primary cilia are sensory organelles that harbor various receptors such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. We analyzed subcellular localization of 138 non-odorant GPCRs. We transfected GPCR expression vectors into NIH3T3 cells, induced ciliogenesis by serum starvation, and observed subcellular localization of GPCRs by immunofluorescent staining. We found that several GPCRs whose ligands are involved in feeding behavior, including prolactin-releasing hormone receptor (PRLHR, neuropeptide FF receptor 1 (NPFFR1, and neuromedin U receptor 1 (NMUR1, localized to the primary cilia. In addition, we found that a short form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2S is efficiently transported to the primary cilia, while a long form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2L is rarely transported to the primary cilia. Using an anti-Prlhr antibody, we found that Prlhr localized to the cilia on the surface of the third ventricle in the vicinity of the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus. We generated the Npy2r-Cre transgenic mouse line in which Cre-recombinase is expressed under the control of the promoter of Npy2r encoding a ciliary GPCR. By mating Npy2r-Cre mice with Ift80 flox mice, we generated Ift80 conditional knockout (CKO mice in which Npy2r-positive cilia were diminished in number. We found that Ift80 CKO mice exhibited a body weight increase. Our results suggest that Npy2r-positive cilia are important for body weight control.

  14. Identification of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in Primary Cilia and Their Possible Involvement in Body Weight Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Yoshihiro; Chaya, Taro; Yoshida, Satoyo; Irie, Shoichi; Tsujii, Toshinori; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that harbor various receptors such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We analyzed subcellular localization of 138 non-odorant GPCRs. We transfected GPCR expression vectors into NIH3T3 cells, induced ciliogenesis by serum starvation, and observed subcellular localization of GPCRs by immunofluorescent staining. We found that several GPCRs whose ligands are involved in feeding behavior, including prolactin-releasing hormone receptor (PRLHR), neuropeptide FF receptor 1 (NPFFR1), and neuromedin U receptor 1 (NMUR1), localized to the primary cilia. In addition, we found that a short form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2S) is efficiently transported to the primary cilia, while a long form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2L) is rarely transported to the primary cilia. Using an anti-Prlhr antibody, we found that Prlhr localized to the cilia on the surface of the third ventricle in the vicinity of the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus. We generated the Npy2r-Cre transgenic mouse line in which Cre-recombinase is expressed under the control of the promoter of Npy2r encoding a ciliary GPCR. By mating Npy2r-Cre mice with Ift80 flox mice, we generated Ift80 conditional knockout (CKO) mice in which Npy2r-positive cilia were diminished in number. We found that Ift80 CKO mice exhibited a body weight increase. Our results suggest that Npy2r-positive cilia are important for body weight control. PMID:26053317

  15. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic β-cell mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. → Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in β-cells. → In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. → GPCR candidates for imaging of β-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic β-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet β-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 ∼ GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution characteristics suggest several GPCRs as potential

  16. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bokoch, Michael P; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup;

    2010-01-01

    receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate...

  17. Conserved waters mediate structural and functional activation of family A (rhodopsin-like) G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, T.; Chance, M; Palczewski, K

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors with seven transmembrane {alpha}-helices (GPCRs) comprise the largest receptor superfamily and are involved in detecting a wide variety of extracellular stimuli. The availability of high-resolution crystal structures of five prototypical GPCRs, bovine and squid rhodopsin, engineered A2A-adenosine, {beta}1- and {beta}2-adrenergic receptors, permits comparative analysis of features common to these and likely all GPCRs. We provide an analysis of the distribution of water molecules in the transmembrane region of these GPCR structures and find conserved contacts with microdomains demonstrated to be involved in receptor activation. Colocalization of water molecules associating with highly conserved and functionally important residues in several of these GPCR crystal structures supports the notion that these waters are likely to be as important to proper receptor function as the conserved residues. Moreover, in the absence of large conformational changes in rhodopsin after photoactivation, we propose that ordered waters contribute to the functional plasticity needed to transmit activation signals from the retinal-binding pocket to the cytoplasmic face of rhodopsin and that fundamental features of the mechanism of activation, involving these conserved waters, are shared by many if not all family A receptors.

  18. The G protein-coupled receptors in the pufferfish Takifugu rubripes

    OpenAIRE

    Sundar Durai; Kumar Sonu; Sarkar Anita

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Guanine protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a eukaryotic transmembrane protein family and function as “molecular switches” in the second messenger cascades and are found in all organisms between yeast and humans. They form the single, biggest drug-target family due to their versatility of action and their role in several physiological functions, being active players in detecting the presence of light, a variety of smells and tastes, amino acids, nucleotides, lipid...

  19. LiCABEDS II. Modeling of ligand selectivity for G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Wang, Lirong; Yang, Peng; Myint, Kyaw Z; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2013-01-28

    The cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2) is a promising therapeutic target for blood cancer, pain relief, osteoporosis, and immune system disease. The recent withdrawal of Rimonabant, which targets another closely related cannabinoid receptor (CB1), accentuates the importance of selectivity for the development of CB2 ligands in order to minimize their effects on the CB1 receptor. In our previous study, LiCABEDS (Ligand Classifier of Adaptively Boosting Ensemble Decision Stumps) was reported as a generic ligand classification algorithm for the prediction of categorical molecular properties. Here, we report extension of the application of LiCABEDS to the modeling of cannabinoid ligand selectivity with molecular fingerprints as descriptors. The performance of LiCABEDS was systematically compared with another popular classification algorithm, support vector machine (SVM), according to prediction precision and recall rate. In addition, the examination of LiCABEDS models revealed the difference in structure diversity of CB1 and CB2 selective ligands. The structure determination from data mining could be useful for the design of novel cannabinoid lead compounds. More importantly, the potential of LiCABEDS was demonstrated through successful identification of newly synthesized CB2 selective compounds. PMID:23278450

  20. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A2A and D2 receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D2R-CFP or A2AR-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D2R-CFP and A2AR-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A2AR positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A2ARs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A2A receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  1. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guescini, M. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino (Italy); Leo, G.; Genedani, S. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); Carone, C. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); IRCCS San Camillo Lido, Venezia (Italy); Pederzoli, F. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); Ciruela, F. [Departament Patologia i Terapeutica Experimental, Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Guidolin, D. [Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology, University of Padua (Italy); Stocchi, V.; Mantuano, M. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino (Italy); Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Fuxe, K. [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Agnati, L.F., E-mail: luigiagnati@tin.it [IRCCS San Camillo Lido, Venezia (Italy)

    2012-03-10

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A{sub 2A} and D{sub 2} receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D{sub 2}R-CFP or A{sub 2A}R-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D{sub 2}R-CFP and A{sub 2A}R-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A{sub 2A}R positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A{sub 2A}Rs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A{sub 2A} receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  2. A Hybrid Approach to Structure and Function Modeling of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latek, Dorota; Bajda, Marek; Filipek, Sławomir

    2016-04-25

    The recent GPCR Dock 2013 assessment of serotonin receptor 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B, and smoothened receptor SMO targets, exposed the strengths and weaknesses of the currently used computational approaches. The test cases of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B demonstrated that both the receptor structure and the ligand binding mode can be predicted with the atomic-detail accuracy, as long as the target-template sequence similarity is relatively high. On the other hand, the observation of a low target-template sequence similarity, e.g., between SMO from the frizzled GPCR family and members of the rhodopsin family, hampers the GPCR structure prediction and ligand docking. Indeed, in GPCR Dock 2013, accurate prediction of the SMO target was still beyond the capabilities of most research groups. Another bottleneck in the current GPCR research, as demonstrated by the 5-HT2B target, is the reliable prediction of global conformational changes induced by activation of GPCRs. In this work, we report details of our protocol used during GPCR Dock 2013. Our structure prediction and ligand docking protocol was especially successful in the case of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B-ergotamine complexes for which we provide one of the most accurate predictions. In addition to a description of the GPCR Dock 2013 results, we propose a novel hybrid computational methodology to improve GPCR structure and function prediction. This computational methodology employs two separate rankings for filtering GPCR models. The first ranking is ligand-based while the second is based on the scoring scheme of the recently published BCL method. In this work, we prove that the use of knowledge-based potentials implemented in BCL is an efficient way to cope with major bottlenecks in the GPCR structure prediction. Thereby, we also demonstrate that the knowledge-based potentials for membrane proteins were significantly improved, because of the recent surge in available experimental structures. PMID:26978043

  3. Absorption of PCB126 by upper airways impairs G protein-coupled receptor-mediated immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Ana Lúcia B.; Cruz, Wesley S.; Loiola, Rodrigo A.; Drewes, Carine C.; Dörr, Fabiane; Figueiredo, Natália G.; Pinto, Ernani; Farsky, Sandra H. P.

    2015-10-01

    PCB126 is a dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) environmental pollutant with a significant impact on human health, as it bioaccumulates and causes severe toxicity. PCB126-induced immune toxicity has been described, although the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In this study, an in vivo protocol of PCB126 intoxication into male Wistar rats by intranasal route was used, which has not yet been described. The intoxication was characterised by PCB126 accumulation in the lungs and liver, and enhanced aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression in the liver, lungs, kidneys, and adipose tissues. Moreover, an innate immune deficiency was characterised by impairment of adhesion receptors on blood leukocytes and by reduced blood neutrophil locomotion and oxidative burst activation elicited by ex vivo G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Specificity of PCB126 actions on the GPCR pathway was shown by normal burst oxidative activation evoked by Toll-like receptor 4 and protein kinase C direct activation. Moreover, in vivo PCB180 intoxication did not alter adhesion receptors on blood leukocytes either blood neutrophil locomotion, and only partially reduced the GPCR-induced burst oxidative activation on neutrophils. Therefore, a novel mechanism of in vivo PCB126 toxicity is described which impairs a pivotal inflammatory pathway to the host defence against infections.

  4. Orthogonal Optical Control of a G Protein-Coupled Receptor with a SNAP-Tethered Photochromic Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broichhagen, Johannes; Damijonaitis, Arunas; Levitz, Joshua; Sokol, Kevin R; Leippe, Philipp; Konrad, David; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Trauner, Dirk

    2015-10-28

    The covalent attachment of synthetic photoswitches is a general approach to impart light sensitivity onto native receptors. It mimics the logic of natural photoreceptors and significantly expands the reach of optogenetics. Here we describe a novel photoswitch design-the photoswitchable orthogonal remotely tethered ligand (PORTL)-that combines the genetically encoded SNAP-tag with photochromic ligands connected to a benzylguanine via a long flexible linker. We use the method to convert the G protein-coupled receptor mGluR2, a metabotropic glutamate receptor, into a photoreceptor (SNAG-mGluR2) that provides efficient optical control over the neuronal functions of mGluR2: presynaptic inhibition and control of excitability. The PORTL approach enables multiplexed optical control of different native receptors using distinct bioconjugation methods. It should be broadly applicable since SNAP-tags have proven to be reliable, many SNAP-tagged receptors are already available, and photochromic ligands on a long leash are readily designed and synthesized. PMID:27162996

  5. cAMP biosensors applied in molecular pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    end-point assays for quantifying GPCR-mediated changes in intracellular cAMP levels exist. More recently, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensors that can quantify intracellular cAMP levels in real time have been developed. These FRET-based cAMP biosensors have been used...... primarily in single cell FRET microscopy to monitor and visualize changes in cAMP upon GPCR activation. Here, a similar cAMP biosensor with a more efficient mCerulean/mCitrine FRET pair is described for use in the 384-well plate format. After cloning and expression in HEK293 cells, the biosensor is...... characterized in the 384-well plate format and used for measuring the signaling of the G(s)-coupled ß(2)-adrenergic receptor. The procedures described may be applied for other FRET-based biosensors in terms of characterization and conversion to the 384-well plate format....

  6. Mouse taste cells with G protein-coupled taste receptors lack voltage-gated calcium channels and SNAP-25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medler Kathryn F

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli from the environment and relaying information to the nervous system. Bitter, sweet and umami stimuli utilize G-protein coupled receptors which activate the phospholipase C (PLC signaling pathway in Type II taste cells. However, it is not known how these cells communicate with the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that the subset of taste cells that expresses the T2R bitter receptors lack voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which are normally required for synaptic transmission at conventional synapses. Here we use two lines of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP from two taste-specific promoters to examine Ca2+ signaling in subsets of Type II cells: T1R3-GFP mice were used to identify sweet- and umami-sensitive taste cells, while TRPM5-GFP mice were used to identify all cells that utilize the PLC signaling pathway for transduction. Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents were assessed with Ca2+ imaging and whole cell recording, while immunocytochemistry was used to detect expression of SNAP-25, a presynaptic SNARE protein that is associated with conventional synapses in taste cells. Results Depolarization with high K+ resulted in an increase in intracellular Ca2+ in a small subset of non-GFP labeled cells of both transgenic mouse lines. In contrast, no depolarization-evoked Ca2+ responses were observed in GFP-expressing taste cells of either genotype, but GFP-labeled cells responded to the PLC activator m-3M3FBS, suggesting that these cells were viable. Whole cell recording indicated that the GFP-labeled cells of both genotypes had small voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents, but no evidence of Ca2+ currents. A subset of non-GFP labeled taste cells exhibited large voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents and a high threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ current. Immunocytochemistry indicated that SNAP-25 was expressed in a separate population of taste cells

  7. Confined Diffusion Without Fences of a G-Protein-Coupled Receptor as Revealed by Single Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumas, Frédéric; Destainville, Nicolas; Millot, Claire; Lopez, André; Dean, David; Salomé, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Single particle tracking is a powerful tool for probing the organization and dynamics of the plasma membrane constituents. We used this technique to study the μ-opioid receptor belonging to the large family of the G-protein-coupled receptors involved with other partners in a signal transduction pathway. The specific labeling of the receptor coupled to a T7-tag at its N-terminus, stably expressed in fibroblastic cells, was achieved by colloidal gold coupled to a monoclonal anti T7-tag antibody. The lateral movements of the particles were followed by nanovideomicroscopy at 40 ms time resolution during 2 min with a spatial precision of 15 nm. The receptors were found to have either a slow or directed diffusion mode (10%) or a walking confined diffusion mode (90%) composed of a long-term random diffusion and a short-term confined diffusion, and corresponding to a diffusion confined within a domain that itself diffuses. The results indicate that the confinement is due to an effective harmonic potential generated by long-range attraction between the membrane proteins. A simple model for interacting membrane proteins diffusion is proposed that explains the variations with the domain size of the short-term and long-term diffusion coefficients. PMID:12524289

  8. Salt Bridges Overlapping the Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Agonist Binding Site Reveal a Coincidence Detector for G Protein-Coupled Receptor Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Mosberg, Henry I.; Conn, P. Michael

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small s...

  9. Identification of G protein-coupled receptors for Drosophila PRXamide peptides, CCAP, corazonin, and AKH supports a theory of ligand-receptor coevolution

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yoonseong; KIM, YOUNG-JOON; Adams, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are ancient, ubiquitous sensors vital to environmental and physiological signaling throughout organismal life. With the publication of the Drosophila genome, numerous “orphan” GPCRs have become available for functional analysis. Here we characterize two groups of GPCRs predicted as receptors for peptides with a C-terminal amino acid sequence motif consisting of −PRXamide (PRXa). Assuming ligand-receptor coevolution, two alternative hypotheses were construct...

  10. Cloning and Characterization of Spliced Variants of the Porcine G Protein Coupled Receptor 120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongxing Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs receptor GPR120 exerts a significant impact on systemic nutrient homeostasis in human and rodents. However, the porcine GPR120 (pGPR120 has not been well characterized. In the current study, we found that pGPR120 had 3 spliced variants. Transcript 1 encoded 362-amino acids (aa wild type pGPR120-WT, which shared 88% homology with human short form GPR120. Transcript 1 was the mainly expressed transcript of pGPR120. It was expressed predominantly in ileum, jejunum, duodenum, spleen, and adipose. Transcript 3 (coding 320-aa isoform was detected in spleen, while the transcript 2 (coding 310-aa isoform was only slightly expressed in spleen. A selective agonist for human GPR120 (TUG-891 and PUFAs activated SRE-luc and NFAT-luc reporter in HEK293T cells transfected with construct for pGPR120-WT but not pGPR120-V2. However, 320-aa isoform was not a dominant negative isoform. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation levels in cells transfected with construct for pGPR120-WT were well activated by PUFAs, especially n-3 PUFA. These results showed that although pGPR120 had 3 transcripts, transcript 1 which encoded pGPR120-WT was the mainly expressed transcript. TUG-891 and PUFAs, especially n-3 PUFA, well activated pGPR120-WT. The current study contributed to dissecting the molecular regulation mechanisms of n-3 PUFA in pigs.

  11. Dual-Color Bioluminescence Analysis for Quantitatively Monitoring G-Protein-Coupled Receptor and β-Arrestin Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Misawa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are crucial elements in mammalian signal transduction, and are considered to represent potent drug targets. We have previously developed a GPCR assay system in cultured cells based on complementation of split fragments of click beetle (Pyrearinus termitilluminans luciferase. The interaction of GPCRs with its target, β-arrestin, resulted in strong emission of bioluminescence upon stimulation with its specific ligand. In this study, we improved precision of the GPCR assay system by using railroad worm (Phrixothrix hirtus luciferase as an internal control. We generated stable cell lines harboring the railroad worm luciferase and quantitatively evaluate the extent of GPCR-β-arrestin interactions. We showed concentration-dependent bioluminescence responses for four GPCRs: β2-adrenoceptor, endothelin receptor type A, α2-adrenoceptor and human μ-opioid receptor. We also demonstrated that the variation of responses was reduced significantly by normalizing the data with bioluminescence from railroad worm luciferase. This assay system represents a simple and reliable approach for screening drug candidates in a high throughput manner.

  12. Identification and expression profiles of neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Teng, Zi-Wen; Wu, Shun-Fan; Huang, Jia; Song, Qi-Sheng; Ye, Gong-Yin; Fang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In insects, neuropeptides play important roles in the regulation of multiple physiological processes by binding to their corresponding receptors, which are primarily G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The genes encoding neuropeptides and their associated GPCRs in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis were identified by a transcriptomic analysis and were used to identify potential targets for the disruption of physiological processes and the protection of crops. Forty-three candidate genes were found to encode the neuropeptide precursors for all known insect neuropeptides except for arginine-vasopressin-like peptide (AVLP), CNMamide, neuropeptide-like precursors 2-4 (NPLP2-4), and proctolin. In addition, novel alternative splicing variants of three neuropeptide genes (allatostatin CC, CCHamide 1, and short neuropeptide F) are reported for the first time, and 51 putative neuropeptide GPCRs were identified. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that 44 of these GPCRs belong to the A-family (or rhodopsin-like), 5 belong to the B-family (or secretin-like), and 2 are leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCRs. These GPCRs and their likely ligands were also described. qRT-PCR analyses revealed the expression profiles of the neuropeptide precursors and GPCR genes in various tissues of C. suppressalis. Our study provides fundamental information that may further our understanding of neuropeptidergic signaling systems in Lepidoptera and aid in the design of peptidomimetics, pseudopeptides or small molecules capable of disrupting the physiological processes regulated by these signaling molecules and their receptors. PMID:27353701

  13. Monitoring G protein-coupled receptor and β-arrestin trafficking in live cells using enhanced bystander BRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Yoon; Le Gouill, Christian; Lukashova, Viktoria; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Hogue, Mireille; Khoury, Etienne; Song, Mideum; Bouvier, Michel; Laporte, Stéphane A

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis and intracellular trafficking of receptors are pivotal to maintain physiological functions and drug action; however, robust quantitative approaches are lacking to study such processes in live cells. Here we present new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) sensors to quantitatively monitor G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and β-arrestin trafficking. These sensors are based on bystander BRET and use the naturally interacting chromophores luciferase (RLuc) and green fluorescent protein (rGFP) from Renilla. The versatility and robustness of this approach are exemplified by anchoring rGFP at the plasma membrane or in endosomes to generate high dynamic spectrometric BRET signals on ligand-promoted recruitment or sequestration of RLuc-tagged proteins to, or from, specific cell compartments, as well as sensitive subcellular BRET imaging for protein translocation visualization. These sensors are scalable to high-throughput formats and allow quantitative pharmacological studies of GPCR trafficking in real time, in live cells, revealing ligand-dependent biased trafficking of receptor/β-arrestin complexes. PMID:27397672

  14. A Tethered Agonist within the Ectodomain Activates the Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptors GPR126 and GPR133

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Liebscher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs comprise the second largest yet least studied class of the GPCR superfamily. aGPCRs are involved in many developmental processes and immune and synaptic functions, but the mode of their signal transduction is unclear. Here, we show that a short peptide sequence (termed the Stachel sequence within the ectodomain of two aGPCRs (GPR126 and GPR133 functions as a tethered agonist. Upon structural changes within the receptor ectodomain, this intramolecular agonist is exposed to the seven-transmembrane helix domain, which triggers G protein activation. Our studies show high specificity of a given Stachel sequence for its receptor. Finally, the function of Gpr126 is abrogated in zebrafish with a mutated Stachel sequence, and signaling is restored in hypomorphic gpr126 zebrafish mutants upon exogenous Stachel peptide application. These findings illuminate a mode of aGPCR activation and may prompt the development of specific ligands for this currently untargeted GPCR family.

  15. FRPR-4 Is a G-Protein Coupled Neuropeptide Receptor That Regulates Behavioral Quiescence and Posture in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Nelson

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides signal through G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs to regulate a broad array of animal behaviors and physiological processes. The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes approximately 100 predicted neuropeptide receptor GPCRs, but in vivo roles for only a few have been identified. We describe here a role for the GPCR FRPR-4 in the regulation of behavioral quiescence and locomotive posture. FRPR-4 is activated in cell culture by several neuropeptides with an amidated isoleucine-arginine-phenylalanine (IRF motif or an amidated valine-arginine-phenylalanine (VRF motif at their carboxy termini, including those encoded by the gene flp-13. Loss of frpr-4 function results in a minor feeding quiescence defect after heat-induced cellular stress. Overexpression of frpr-4 induces quiescence of locomotion and feeding as well as an exaggerated body bend posture. The exaggerated body bend posture requires the gene flp-13. While frpr-4 is expressed broadly, selective overexpression of frpr-4 in the proprioceptive DVA neurons results in exaggerated body bends that require flp-13 in the ALA neuron. Our results suggest that FLP-13 and other neuropeptides signal through FRPR-4 and other receptors to regulate locomotion posture and behavioral quiescence.

  16. Biosensor-based approach identifies four distinct calmodulin-binding domains in the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quang-Kim Tran

    Full Text Available The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER has been demonstrated to participate in many cellular functions, but its regulatory inputs are not clearly understood. Here we describe a new approach that identifies GPER as a calmodulin-binding protein, locates interaction sites, and characterizes their binding properties. GPER coimmunoprecipitates with calmodulin in primary vascular smooth muscle cells under resting conditions, which is enhanced upon acute treatment with either specific ligands or a Ca(2+-elevating agent. To confirm direct interaction and locate the calmodulin-binding domain(s, we designed a series of FRET biosensors that consist of enhanced cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins flanking each of GPER's submembrane domains (SMDs. Responses of these biosensors showed that all four submembrane domains directly bind calmodulin. Modifications of biosensor linker identified domains that display the strongest calmodulin-binding affinities and largest biosensor dynamics, including a.a. 83-93, 150-175, 242-259, 330-351, corresponding respectively to SMDs 1, 2, 3, and the juxta-membranous section of SMD4. These biosensors bind calmodulin in a strictly Ca(2+-dependent fashion and with disparate affinities in the order SMD2>SMD4>SMD3>SMD1, apparent K d values being 0.44 ± 0.03, 1.40 ± 0.16, 8.01 ± 0.29, and 136.62 ± 6.56 µM, respectively. Interestingly, simultaneous determinations of biosensor responses and suitable Ca(2+ indicators identified separate Ca(2+ sensitivities for their interactions with calmodulin. SMD1-CaM complexes display a biphasic Ca(2+ response, representing two distinct species (SMD1 sp1 and SMD1 sp2 with drastically different Ca(2+ sensitivities. The Ca(2+ sensitivities of CaM-SMDs interactions follow the order SMD1sp1>SMD4>SMD2>SMD1sp2>SMD3, EC50(Ca(2+ values being 0.13 ± 0.02, 0.75 ± 0.05, 2.38 ± 0.13, 3.71 ± 0.13, and 5.15 ± 0.25 µM, respectively. These data indicate that calmodulin may regulate GPER

  17. The repertoire of G protein-coupled receptors in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and the model organism Schmidtea mediterranea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamanian Mostafa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs constitute one of the largest groupings of eukaryotic proteins, and represent a particularly lucrative set of pharmaceutical targets. They play an important role in eukaryotic signal transduction and physiology, mediating cellular responses to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli. The phylum Platyhelminthes is of considerable medical and biological importance, housing major pathogens as well as established model organisms. The recent availability of genomic data for the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni and the model planarian Schmidtea mediterranea paves the way for the first comprehensive effort to identify and analyze GPCRs in this important phylum. Results Application of a novel transmembrane-oriented approach to receptor mining led to the discovery of 117 S. mansoni GPCRs, representing all of the major families; 105 Rhodopsin, 2 Glutamate, 3 Adhesion, 2 Secretin and 5 Frizzled. Similarly, 418 Rhodopsin, 9 Glutamate, 21 Adhesion, 1 Secretin and 11 Frizzled S. mediterranea receptors were identified. Among these, we report the identification of novel receptor groupings, including a large and highly-diverged Platyhelminth-specific Rhodopsin subfamily, a planarian-specific Adhesion-like family, and atypical Glutamate-like receptors. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out following extensive gene curation. Support vector machines (SVMs were trained and used for ligand-based classification of full-length Rhodopsin GPCRs, complementing phylogenetic and homology-based classification. Conclusions Genome-wide investigation of GPCRs in two platyhelminth genomes reveals an extensive and complex receptor signaling repertoire with many unique features. This work provides important sequence and functional leads for understanding basic flatworm receptor biology, and sheds light on a lucrative set of anthelmintic drug targets.

  18. Structures of Rhodopsin Kinase in Different Ligand States Reveal Key Elements Involved in G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase Activation

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    Singh, Puja; Wang, Benlian; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G. (Case Western); (Michigan)

    2008-10-08

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated heptahelical receptors, leading to their uncoupling from G proteins. Here we report six crystal structures of rhodopsin kinase (GRK1), revealing not only three distinct nucleotide-binding states of a GRK but also two key structural elements believed to be involved in the recognition of activated GPCRs. The first is the C-terminal extension of the kinase domain, which was observed in all nucleotide-bound GRK1 structures. The second is residues 5-30 of the N terminus, observed in one of the GRK1{center_dot}(Mg{sup 2+}){sub 2} {center_dot}ATP structures. The N terminus was also clearly phosphorylated, leading to the identification of two novel phosphorylation sites by mass spectral analysis. Co-localization of the N terminus and the C-terminal extension near the hinge of the kinase domain suggests that activated GPCRs stimulate kinase activity by binding to this region to facilitate full closure of the kinase domain.

  19. Biophysical and structural investigation of bacterially expressed and engineered CCR5, a G protein-coupled receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 belongs to the class of G protein-coupled receptors. Besides its role in leukocyte trafficking, it is also the major HIV-1 coreceptor and hence a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Here, we report Escherichia coli expression and a broad range of biophysical studies on E. coli-produced CCR5. After systematic screening and optimization, we obtained 10 mg of purified, detergent-solubilized, folded CCR5 from 1L culture in a triply isotope-labeled (2H/15N/13C) minimal medium. Thus the material is suitable for NMR spectroscopic studies. The expected α-helical secondary structure content is confirmed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The solubilized CCR5 is monodisperse and homogeneous as judged by transmission electron microscopy. Interactions of CCR5 with its ligands, RANTES and MIP-1β were assessed by surface plasmon resonance yielding KD values in the nanomolar range. Using size exclusion chromatography, stable monomeric CCR5 could be isolated. We show that cysteine residues affect both the yield and oligomer distribution of CCR5. HSQC spectra suggest that the transmembrane domains of CCR5 are in equilibrium between several conformations. In addition we present a model of CCR5 based on the crystal structure of CXCR4 as a starting point for protein engineering.

  20. Actions of translocator protein ligands on neutrophil adhesion and motility induced by G-protein coupled receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Camila Bento; Tamura, Eduardo K; Montero-Melendez, Trindad; Palermo-Neto, João; Perretti, Mauro; Markus, Regina P; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2012-01-13

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), mediates the transportation of cholesterol and anions from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane in different cells types. Although recent evidences indicate a potential role for TSPO in the development of inflammatory processes, the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. The present study investigated the ability of the specific TSPO ligands, the isoquinoline carboxamide PK11195 and benzodiazepine Ro5-4864, on neutrophil recruitment promoted by the N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine peptide (fMLP), an agonist of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). Pre-treatment with Ro5-4864 abrograted fMLP-induced leukocyte-endothelial interactions in mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo. Moreover, in vitro Ro5-4864 treatment prevented fMLP-induced: (i) L-selectin shedding and overexpression of PECAM-1 on the neutrophil cell surface; (ii) neutrophil chemotaxis and (iii) enhancement of intracellular calcium cations (iCa(+2)). Intriguingly, the two latter effects were augmented by cell treatment with PK11195. An allosteric agonist/antagonist relation may be suggested, as the effects of Ro5-4864 on fMLP-stimulated neutrophils were reverted by simultaneous treatment with PK11195. Taken together, these data highlight TSPO as a modulator of pathways of neutrophil adhesion and locomotion induced by GPCR, connecting TSPO actions and the onset of an innate inflammatory response. PMID:22209795

  1. Quantitative analysis of G-protein-coupled receptor internalization using DnaE intein-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Chen, Linjie; Zhang, Yaping; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest family of cell surface receptors, are involved in many physiological processes. They represent highly important therapeutic targets for drug discovery. Currently, there are numerous cell-based assays developed for the pharmacological profiling of GPCRs and the identification of novel agonists and antagonists. However, the development of new, faster, easier, and more cost-effective approaches to detect GPCR activity remains highly desirable. β-arrestin-dependent internalization has been demonstrated to be a common mechanism for most GPCRs. Here we describe a novel assay for quantitative analysis of GPCR internalization based on DnaE intein-mediated reconstitution of fragmented Renilla luciferase or Firefly luciferase when activated GPCRs interact with β-arrestin2 or Rab5. Further validation, using functionally divergent GPCRs, showed that EC50 values obtained for the known agonists and antagonists were in close agreement with the results of previous reports. This suggests that this assay is sensitive enough to permit quantification of GPCR internalization. Compared with conventional assays, this novel assay system is cost-effective, rapid, and easy to manipulate. These advantages may allow this assay to be used universally as a functional cell-based system for GPCR characterization and in the screening process of drug discovery. PMID:26928549

  2. Using immobilized G-protein coupled receptors to screen bioactive traditional Chinese medicine compounds with multiple targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinfeng; Li, Qian; Bian, Liujiao; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zheng, Jianbin; Zhang, Youyi; Li, Zijian

    2012-11-01

    Demand on high-throughput methods for multi-target compounds screening continues to increase nowadays due to the decline of new drugs on the market. Two kinds of G-protein-coupled receptors, alpha1-adrenoceptor (α(1A)-AR) and beta2-adrenoceptor (β(2)-AR), were purified and immobilized on the surface of macroporous silica gel to prepare new chromatographic stationary phases. Control drugs (e.g., prazosin, terazosin, salbutamol, and terbutaline) were used to characterize the retention behavior of the obtained α(1A)-AR and β(2)-AR columns. This study also coupled both columns with a six-way switching valve to construct an automatic two-dimensional system for multi-target compounds screening in complex mixtures. Adrenaline hydrochloride was used as a representative drug to evaluate the chromatographic performance of the two dimensional system. The aqueous extracts from Salvia miltiorrhiza and Coptis chinensis were also analyzed by the automatic system. The compounds in S. miltiorrhiza had no binding to both α(1A)-AR and β(2)-AR columns. But berberine, palmatine and jatrorrhizine were screened as the bioactive compounds in C. chinensis, targeting both the receptors. The proposed method is an alternative for recognizing and separating the compounds targeting different proteins from a complex matrix. PMID:22651959

  3. Involvement of the G-protein-coupled receptor 4 in RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okito, Asuka; Nakahama, Ken-Ichi; Akiyama, Masako; Ono, Takashi; Morita, Ikuo

    2015-03-01

    Osteoclast activity is enhanced in acidic environments following systemic or local inflammation. However, the regulatory mechanism of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblasts under acidic conditions is not fully understood. In the present paper, we detected the mRNA expression of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR) proton sensors GPR4 and GPR65 (T-cell death-associated gene 8, TDAG8), in osteoblasts. RANKL expression and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) level in osteoblasts were up-regulated under acidic culture conditions. Acidosis-induced up-regulation of RANKL was abolished by the protein kinase A inhibitor H89. To clarify the role of GPR4 in RANKL expression, GPR4 gain and loss of function experiments were performed. Gene knockdown and forced expression of GPR4 caused reduction and induction of RANKL expression, respectively. These results suggested that, at least in part, RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment was mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling resulting from GPR4 activation. A comprehensive microarray analysis of gene expression of osteoblasts revealed that, under acidic conditions, the phenotype of osteoblasts was that of an osteoclast supporting cell rather than that of a mineralizing cell. These findings will contribute to a molecular understanding of bone disruption in an acidic environment. PMID:25668130

  4. Biophysical and structural investigation of bacterially expressed and engineered CCR5, a G protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiktor, Maciej; Morin, Sebastien; Sass, Hans-Juergen [University of Basel, Focal Area Structural Biology and Biophysics, Biozentrum (Switzerland); Kebbel, Fabian [University of Basel, Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum (Switzerland); Grzesiek, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.grzesiek@unibas.ch [University of Basel, Focal Area Structural Biology and Biophysics, Biozentrum (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 belongs to the class of G protein-coupled receptors. Besides its role in leukocyte trafficking, it is also the major HIV-1 coreceptor and hence a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Here, we report Escherichia coli expression and a broad range of biophysical studies on E. coli-produced CCR5. After systematic screening and optimization, we obtained 10 mg of purified, detergent-solubilized, folded CCR5 from 1L culture in a triply isotope-labeled ({sup 2}H/{sup 15}N/{sup 13}C) minimal medium. Thus the material is suitable for NMR spectroscopic studies. The expected {alpha}-helical secondary structure content is confirmed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The solubilized CCR5 is monodisperse and homogeneous as judged by transmission electron microscopy. Interactions of CCR5 with its ligands, RANTES and MIP-1{beta} were assessed by surface plasmon resonance yielding K{sub D} values in the nanomolar range. Using size exclusion chromatography, stable monomeric CCR5 could be isolated. We show that cysteine residues affect both the yield and oligomer distribution of CCR5. HSQC spectra suggest that the transmembrane domains of CCR5 are in equilibrium between several conformations. In addition we present a model of CCR5 based on the crystal structure of CXCR4 as a starting point for protein engineering.

  5. Estrogen modulation of G-protein-coupled receptor activation of potassium channels in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martin J; Qiu, Jian; Rønnekleiv, Oline K

    2003-12-01

    Estrogen rapidly alters the excitability of hypothalamic neurons that are involved in regulating numerous homeostatic functions including reproduction, stress responses, feeding, and motivated behaviors. Neurosecretory neurons, such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and dopamine neurons, and local circuitry neurons, such as pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons, are among those involved. We have identified membrane-initiated, rapid-signaling pathways through which 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) alters synaptic responses in these neurons using whole-cell patch recording in hypothalamic slices from ovariectomized female guinea pigs. E(2) rapidly uncouples micro -opioid and GABA(B) receptors from G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) (GIRK) channels in POMC and dopamine neurons as manifested by a reduction in the potency of micro -opioid and GABA(B) receptor agonists to activate these channels. These effects are mimicked by the selective E(2) receptor modulators raloxifene and 4OH-tamoxifen, the membrane impermeable E(2)-bovine serum albumin (BSA), but not by 17alpha-estradiol. Furthermore, the anti-estrogen ICI 182,780 antagonizes these rapid effects of E(2). Inhibitors of phospholipase C, protein kinase C, and protein kinase A block the actions of E(2), indicating that the E(2) receptor is G-protein-coupled to activation of this cascade. Conversely, estrogen enhances the efficacy of alpha1-adrenergic receptor agonists to inhibit apamin-sensitive small-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) currents in preoptic GABAergic neurons; it does so in both a rapid and sustained fashion. Finally, we observed a direct, steroid-induced hyperpolarization of GnRH neurons. These findings indicate that E(2) can modulate K(+) channels in hypothalamic (POMC, dopamine, GABA, GnRH) neurons that are involved in regulating numerous homeostatic functions through multiple intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:14993035

  6. Alteration in contractile G-protein coupled receptor expression by moist snus and nicotine in rat cerebral arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cardiovascular risk for users of use of Swedish snus/American snuff (moist tobacco) has been debated for a long time. The present study was designed to examine the effects of water- or lipid-soluble (DMSO-soluble) snus and nicotine, the most important substance in tobacco, on the expression of vasocontractile G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), such as endothelin ETB, serotonin 5-HT1B, and thromboxane A2 TP receptors, in rat cerebral arteries. Studies show that these vasocontractile GPCR show alterations by lipid-soluble cigarette smoke particles via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). However, the effects of moist tobacco on the expression of GPCR are less studied. Rat middle cerebral arteries were isolated and organ cultured in serum-free medium for 24 h in the presence of water-soluble snus (WSS), DMSO-soluble snus (DSS), or nicotine. The dose of snus and nicotine was kept at plasma level of snus users (25 ng nicotine/ml). A high dose (250 ng nicotine/ml) was also included due to the previous results showing alteration in the GPCR expression by nicotine at this concentration. Contractile responses to the ETB receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c, 5-HT1B receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine, and TP receptor agonist U46619 were investigated by a sensitive myograph. The expression of ETB, 5-HT1B, and TP receptors was studied at mRNA and protein levels using quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Organ culture with WSS or DSS (25 ng nicotine/ml) lowered the 5-HT1B receptor-mediated contraction. Furthermore, DSS shifted the TP receptor-mediated contraction curve left-wards with a stronger contraction. High dose of nicotine (250 ng nicotine/ml) increased the ETB receptor-mediated contraction. The combined 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receptor-mediated contraction was increased, and both the 5-CT and TxA2 induced contractions were left-ward shifted by WSS, DSS, or nicotine (250 ng nicotine/ml). Only the DSS group showed that the

  7. Cell-free synthesis of isotopically labelled peptide ligands for the functional characterization of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joedicke, Lisa; Trenker, Raphael; Langer, Julian D; Michel, Hartmut; Preu, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free systems exploit the transcription and translation machinery of cells from different origins to produce proteins in a defined chemical environment. Due to its open nature, cell-free protein production is a versatile tool to introduce specific labels such as heavy isotopes, non-natural amino acids and tags into the protein while avoiding cell toxicity. In particular, radiolabelled peptides and proteins are valuable tools for the functional characterization of protein-protein interactions and for studying binding kinetics. In this study we evaluated cell-free protein production for the generation of radiolabelled ligands for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors are seven-transmembrane-domain receptors activated by a plethora of extracellular stimuli including peptide ligands. Many GPCR peptide ligands contain disulphide bonds and are thus inherently difficult to produce in bacterial expression hosts or in Escherichia coli-based cell-free systems. Here, we established an adapted E. coli-based cell-free translation system for the production of disulphide bond-containing GPCR peptide ligands and specifically introduce tritium labels for detection. The bacterial oxidoreductase DsbA is used as a chaperone to favour the formation of disulphide bonds and to enhance the yield of correctly folded proteins and peptides. We demonstrate the correct folding and formation of disulphide bonds and show high-affinity ligand binding of the produced radio peptide ligands to the respective receptors. Thus, our system allows the fast, cost-effective and reliable synthesis of custom GPCR peptide ligands for functional and structural studies. PMID:27047736

  8. Pancreatic Beta Cell G-Protein Coupled Receptors and Second Messenger Interactions: A Systems Biology Computational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin secretory in pancreatic beta-cells responses to nutrient stimuli and hormonal modulators include multiple messengers and signaling pathways with complex interdependencies. Here we present a computational model that incorporates recent data on glucose metabolism, plasma membrane potential, G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCR), cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics, cAMP and phospholipase C pathways that regulate interactions between second messengers in pancreatic beta-cells. The values of key model parameters were inferred from published experimental data. The model gives a reasonable fit to important aspects of experimentally measured metabolic and second messenger concentrations and provides a framework for analyzing the role of metabolic, hormones and neurotransmitters changes on insulin secretion. Our analysis of the dynamic data provides support for the hypothesis that activation of Ca2+-dependent adenylyl cyclases play a critical role in modulating the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and catecholamines. The regulatory properties of adenylyl cyclase isoforms determine fluctuations in cytoplasmic cAMP concentration and reveal a synergistic action of glucose, GLP-1 and GIP on insulin secretion. On the other hand, the regulatory properties of phospholipase C isoforms determine the interaction of glucose, acetylcholine and free fatty acids (FFA) (that act through the FFA receptors) on insulin secretion. We found that a combination of GPCR agonists activating different messenger pathways can stimulate insulin secretion more effectively than a combination of GPCR agonists for a single pathway. This analysis also suggests that the activators of GLP-1, GIP and FFA receptors may have a relatively low risk of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions whereas an activator of muscarinic receptors can increase this risk. This computational analysis demonstrates that study of second messenger

  9. Effective Application of Bicelles for Conformational Analysis of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S.; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K.; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., β2-adrenergic receptor [β2AR], μ-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of β2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of β2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in β2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS.

  10. Analysis of Drug Design for a Selection of G Protein-Coupled Neuro- Receptors Using Neural Network Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerskov, Claus; Mortensen, Rasmus M; Bohr, Henrik G

    2015-01-01

    A study is presented on how well possible drug-molecules can be predicted with respect to their function and binding to a selection of neuro-receptors by the use of artificial neural networks. The ligands investigated in this study are chosen to be corresponding to the G protein-coupled receptors µ-opioid, serotonin 2B (5-HT2B) and metabotropic glutamate D5. They are selected due to the availability of pharmacological drug-molecule binding data for these receptors. Feedback and deep belief artificial neural network architectures (NNs) were chosen to perform the task of aiding drugdesign. This is done by training on structural features, selected using a "minimum redundancy, maximum relevance"-test, and testing for successful prediction of categorized binding strength. An extensive comparison of the neural network performances was made in order to select the optimal architecture. Deep belief networks, trained with greedy learning algorithms, showed superior performance in prediction over the simple feedback NNs. The best networks obtained scores of more than 90 % accuracy in predicting the degree of binding drug molecules to the mentioned receptors and with a maximal Matthew`s coefficient of 0.925. The performance of 8 category networks (8 output classes for binding strength) obtained a prediction accuracy of above 60 %. After training the networks, tests were done on how well the systems could be used as an aid in designing candidate drug molecules. Specifically, it was shown how a selection of chemical characteristics could give the lowest observed IC50 values, meaning largest bio-effect pr. nM substance, around 0.03-0.06 nM. These ligand characteristics could be total number of atoms, their types etc. In conclusion, deep belief networks trained on drug-molecule structures were demonstrated as powerful computational tools, able to aid in drug-design in a fast and cheap fashion, compared to conventional pharmacological techniques. PMID:26463104

  11. Spectral methods for study of the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin: I. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struts, A. V.; Barmasov, A. V.; Brown, M. F.

    2015-05-01

    Here we review the application of modern spectral methods for the study of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) using rhodopsin as a prototype. Because X-ray analysis gives us immobile snapshots of protein conformations, it is imperative to apply spectroscopic methods for elucidating their function: vibrational (Raman, FTIR), electronic (UV-visible absorption, fluorescence) spectroscopies, and magnetic resonance (electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In the first of the two companion articles, we discuss the application of optical spectroscopy for studying rhodopsin in a membrane environment. Information is obtained regarding the time-ordered sequence of events in rhodopsin activation. Isomerization of the chromophore and deprotonation of the retinal Schiff base leads to a structural change of the protein involving the motion of helices H5 and H6 in a pH-dependent process. Information is obtained that is unavailable from X-ray crystallography, which can be combined with spectroscopic studies to achieve a more complete understanding of GPCR function.

  12. Metabolic parameters and emotionality are little affected in G-protein coupled receptor 12 (Gpr12 mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Frank

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: G-protein coupled receptors (GPR bear the potential to serve as yet unidentified drug targets for psychiatric and metabolic disorders. GPR12 is of major interest given its putative role in metabolic function and its unique brain distribution, which suggests a role in emotionality and affect. We tested Gpr12 deficient mice in a series of metabolic and behavioural tests and subjected them to a well-established high-fat diet feeding protocol. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Comparing the mutant mice with wild type littermates, no significant differences were seen in body weight, fatness or weight gain induced by a high-fat diet. The Gpr12 mutant mice displayed a modest but significant lowering of energy expenditure and a trend to lower food intake on a chow diet, but no other metabolic parameters, including respiratory rate, were altered. No emotionality-related behaviours (assessed by light-dark box, tail suspension, and open field tests were affected by the Gpr12 gene mutation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Studying metabolic and emotionality parameters in Gpr12 mutant mice did not reveal a major phenotypic impact of the gene mutation. Compared to previous results showing a metabolic phenotype in Gpr12 mice with a mixed 129 and C57Bl6 background, we suggest that a more pure C57Bl/6 background due to further backcrossing might have reduced the phenotypic penetrance.

  13. Oleic acid enhances G protein coupled receptor 43 expression in bovine intramuscular adipocytes but not in subcutaneous adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, K Y; Smith, S B; Choi, S H; Johnson, B J

    2016-05-01

    We hypothesized that fatty acids would differentially affect G protein coupled receptor (GPR) 43 mRNA expression and GPR43 protein concentrations in bovine intramuscular (IM) and subcutaneous (SC) adipocytes. The GPR43 protein was detected in bovine liver, pancreas, and semimembranosus (MUS) muscle in samples taken at slaughter. Similarly, GPR43 protein levels were similar in IM adipose tissue and SM muscle but was barely detectable in SC adipose tissue. Primary cultures of IM and SC stromal vascular cells were isolated from bovine adipose tissues. Oleic acid (100 μ) stimulated PPARγ gene expression and decreased stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene expression but had no effect on GPR43 gene expression, which was readily detectable in both IM and SC adipocytes. Differentiation cocktail (Diff; 10 μ insulin, 4 μ dexamethasone, and 10 μ ciglitizone) stimulated CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and PPARγ gene expression in SC but not IM adipocytes, but Diff increased SCD gene expression in both cell types. Linoleic acid (10 µ) increased PPARγ gene expression relative to Diff cocktail in SC adipocytes, whereas linoleic acid and α-linolenic decreased SCD gene expression relative to control adipocytes and adipocytes incubated with Diff ( < 0.05). Increasing concentrations of oleic acid (1, 10, 100, and 500 μM) increased GPR43 protein and mRNA expression in IM but not SC adipocytes. These data indicated that oleic acid alters mRNA and protein concentrations of GPR43 in bovine IM adipocytes. PMID:27285685

  14. Identification of G protein coupled receptors for opsines and neurohormones in Rhodnius prolixus. Genomic and transcriptomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ons, Sheila; Lavore, Andrés; Sterkel, Marcos; Wulff, Juan Pedro; Sierra, Ivana; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Rodriguez, Mario Henry; Rivera-Pomar, Rolando

    2016-02-01

    The importance of Chagas disease motivated the scientific effort to obtain the complete genomic sequence of the vector species Rhodnius prolixus, this information is also relevant to the understanding of triatomine biology in general. The central nervous system is the key regulator of insect physiology and behavior. Neurohormones (neuropeptides and biogenic amines) are the chemical messengers involved in the regulation and integration of neuroendocrine signals. In insects, this signaling is mainly mediated by the interaction of neurohormone ligands with G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The recently sequenced R. prolixus genome provides us with the opportunity to analyze this important family of genes in triatomines, supplying relevant information for further functional studies. Next-generation sequencing methods offer an excellent opportunity for transcriptomic exploration in key organs and tissues in the presence of a reference genome as well as when a reference genome is not available. We undertook a genomic analysis to obtain a genome-wide inventory of opsines and the GPCRs for neurohormones in R. prolixus. Furthermore, we performed a transcriptomic analysis of R. prolixus central nervous system, focusing on neuropeptide precursor genes and neurohormone and opsines GPCRs. In addition, we mined the whole transcriptomes of Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma infestans and Triatoma pallidipennis - three sanitary relevant triatomine species - to identify neuropeptide precursors and GPCRs genes. Our study reveals a high degree of sequence conservation in the molecular components of the neuroendocrine system of triatomines. PMID:25976540

  15. Knockdown of GPR137,G Protein-coupled receptor 137, Inhibits the Proliferation and Migration of Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jizhong; Pan, Xiuwu; Li, Lin; Huang, Yi; Huang, Hai; Gao, Yi; Xu, Hong; Qu, Fajun; Chen, Lu; Wang, Linhui; Hong, Yi; Cui, Xingang; Xu, Danfeng

    2016-05-01

    GPR137 belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor family involving the regulation of transmembrane signal transduction that launches pivotal cellular functions. However, its function in prostate cancer (PCa) has been rarely reported. It was found in this study that GPR137 was upregulated in PCa tissues as compared with that in paracancerous tissues. To see whether GPR137 could serve as a potential therapeutic target for PCa, GPR137 was knocked down to verify its biological function in PCa cells. Lentivirus-introduced short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was designed to silence GPR137 gene. It was found that silencing of GPR137 gene suppressed the proliferation and colony formation of PCa cell lines PC-3 and DU145. Further study indicated that growth inhibition by GPR137 knockdown was associated with cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, silencing of GPR137 repressed the invasion and migration abilities of PC-3 cells via downregulating slug and snail and upregulating E-cadherin. Collectively, these findings imply that GPR137 plays an important role in the occurrence and progression of PCa and may prove to be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of advanced PCa. PMID:26669804

  16. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 is involved in brain development during zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yanan; Liu, Xiaochun [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Institute of Aquatic Economic Animals and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory for Aquatic Economic Animals, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Zhu, Pei; Li, Jianzhen; Sham, Kathy W.Y. [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Cheng, Shuk Han [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Li, Shuisheng; Zhang, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Institute of Aquatic Economic Animals and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory for Aquatic Economic Animals, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Cheng, Christopher H.K., E-mail: chkcheng@cuhk.edu.hk [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Lin, Haoran, E-mail: lsslhr@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Institute of Aquatic Economic Animals and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory for Aquatic Economic Animals, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); College of Ocean, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, Hainan (China)

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •The Gper expression was detected in the developing brain of zebrafish. •Gper morpholino knockdown induced apoptosis of brain cells. •Gper morpholino knockdown reduced expression in neuron markers. •Zebrafish Gper may be involved in neuronal development. -- Abstract: G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (Gper, formerly known as GPR30) is found to be a trophic and protective factor in mediating action of estrogen in adult brain, while its role in developing brain remains to be elucidated. Here we present the expression pattern of Gper and its functions during embryogenesis in zebrafish. Both the mRNA and protein of Gper were detected throughout embryogenesis. Whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) revealed a wide distribution of gper mRNAs in various regions of the developing brain. Gper knockdown by specific morpholinos resulted in growth retardation in embryos and morphological defects in the developing brain. In addition, induced apoptosis, decreased proliferation of the brain cells and maldevelopment of sensory and motor neurons were also found in the morphants. Our results provide novel insights into Gper functions in the developing brain, revealing that Gper can maintain the survival of the brain cells, and formation and/or differentiation of the sensory and motor neurons.

  17. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 is involved in brain development during zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The Gper expression was detected in the developing brain of zebrafish. •Gper morpholino knockdown induced apoptosis of brain cells. •Gper morpholino knockdown reduced expression in neuron markers. •Zebrafish Gper may be involved in neuronal development. -- Abstract: G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (Gper, formerly known as GPR30) is found to be a trophic and protective factor in mediating action of estrogen in adult brain, while its role in developing brain remains to be elucidated. Here we present the expression pattern of Gper and its functions during embryogenesis in zebrafish. Both the mRNA and protein of Gper were detected throughout embryogenesis. Whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) revealed a wide distribution of gper mRNAs in various regions of the developing brain. Gper knockdown by specific morpholinos resulted in growth retardation in embryos and morphological defects in the developing brain. In addition, induced apoptosis, decreased proliferation of the brain cells and maldevelopment of sensory and motor neurons were also found in the morphants. Our results provide novel insights into Gper functions in the developing brain, revealing that Gper can maintain the survival of the brain cells, and formation and/or differentiation of the sensory and motor neurons

  18. Paroxetine Is a Direct Inhibitor of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 and Increases Myocardial Contractility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thal, David M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Homan, Kristoff T. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chen, Jun [Univ. of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wu, Emily K. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hinkle, Patricia M. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Huang, Z. Maggie [Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Chuprun, J. Kurt [Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Song, Jianliang [Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Gao, Erhe [Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Cheung, Joseph Y. [Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sklar, Larry A. [Univ. of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koch, Walter J. [Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Tesmer, John J.G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-08-10

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a well-established therapeutic target for the treatment of heart failure. In this paper we identify the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine as a selective inhibitor of GRK2 activity both in vitro and in living cells. In the crystal structure of the GRK2·paroxetine–Gβγ complex, paroxetine binds in the active site of GRK2 and stabilizes the kinase domain in a novel conformation in which a unique regulatory loop forms part of the ligand binding site. Isolated cardiomyocytes show increased isoproterenol-induced shortening and contraction amplitude in the presence of paroxetine, and pretreatment of mice with paroxetine before isoproterenol significantly increases left ventricular inotropic reserve in vivo with no significant effect on heart rate. Neither is observed in the presence of the SSRI fluoxetine. Our structural and functional results validate a widely available drug as a selective chemical probe for GRK2 and represent a starting point for the rational design of more potent and specific GRK2 inhibitors.

  19. Discovery and cardioprotective effects of the first non-Peptide agonists of the G protein-coupled prokineticin receptor-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Gasser

    Full Text Available Prokineticins are angiogenic hormones that activate two G protein-coupled receptors: PKR1 and PKR2. PKR1 has emerged as a critical mediator of cardiovascular homeostasis and cardioprotection. Identification of non-peptide PKR1 agonists that contribute to myocardial repair and collateral vessel growth hold promises for treatment of heart diseases. Through a combination of in silico studies, medicinal chemistry, and pharmacological profiling approaches, we designed, synthesized, and characterized the first PKR1 agonists, demonstrating their cardioprotective activity against myocardial infarction (MI in mice. Based on high throughput docking protocol, 250,000 compounds were computationally screened for putative PKR1 agonistic activity, using a homology model, and 10 virtual hits were pharmacologically evaluated. One hit internalizes PKR1, increases calcium release and activates ERK and Akt kinases. Among the 30 derivatives of the hit compound, the most potent derivative, IS20, was confirmed for its selectivity and specificity through genetic gain- and loss-of-function of PKR1. Importantly, IS20 prevented cardiac lesion formation and improved cardiac function after MI in mice, promoting proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells and neovasculogenesis. The preclinical investigation of the first PKR1 agonists provides a novel approach to promote cardiac neovasculogenesis after MI.

  20. G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Focus on BACE1 Related GPCRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eZhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs have been considered as one of the largest families of validated drug targets, which involve in almost overall physiological functions and pathological processes. Meanwhile, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most common type of dementia, affects thinking, learning, memory and behavior of elderly people, that has become the hotspot nowadays for its increasing risks and incurability. The above fields have been intensively studied, and the link between the two has been demonstrated, whereas the way how GPCRs perturb AD progress are yet to be further explored given their complexities. In this review, we summarized recent progress regarding the GPCRs interacted with β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, a key secretase in AD pathogenesis. Then we discussed the current findings on the regulatory roles of GPCRs on BACE1, and the possibility for pharmaceutical treatment of AD patients by the allosteric modulators and biased ligands of GPCRs. We hope this review can provide new insights into the understanding of mechanistic link between GPCRs and BACE1, and highlight the potential of GPCRs as therapeutic target for AD.

  1. Effects of ovarian cancer G protein coupled receptor 1 on the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of human ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Juan; ZHANG Long

    2011-01-01

    Background OGR1 was found as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and proton sensor. Our previous studies have found that OGR1 has inhibitory effect on the metastasis of prostate cancer. In order to investigate the roles of OGR1 gene in the biological activities of ovarian cancer, we studied the OGR1 effects on ovarian cancer cells, HEY cells.Methods OGR1 gene was transfected into HEY cell, in which endogenous expression is low. OGR1-overxepressed cells and vector-transfected cells were compared in different assays. Western blotting was employed to confirm the high expression level of OGR1. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and cell doubling time assay. Cell migration assay (transwell assay) and cell adhesion assay were performed to determine the migration and adhesion potential of cells. Student's t test was employed for statistical analysis.Results Proliferation of OGR1-overexpressed cells was significantly reduced (P <0.01); cell migration was significantly inhibited in the OGR1-transfected cells (P <0.01); cell adhesion to extracellular matrix including fibronectin, vitronectin,collagen Ⅰ/Ⅳ was significantly increased (P <0.01).Conclusions OGR1 expression in human ovarian cancer cells significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and migration,but significantly enhanced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. It indicated that OGR1 may be a tumor suppressor gene for ovarian cancer.

  2. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor agonist suppresses airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma through IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoga, Masamichi; Konno, Yasunori; Moritoki, Yuki; Saito, Yukiko; Ito, Wataru; Tamaki, Mami; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Kayaba, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yuta; Chihara, Junichi; Takeda, Masahide; Ueki, Shigeharu; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen influences the disease severity and sexual dimorphism in asthma, which is caused by complex mechanisms. Besides classical nuclear estrogen receptors (ERαβ), G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) was recently established as an estrogen receptor on the cell membrane. Although GPER is associated with immunoregulatory functions of estrogen, the pathophysiological role of GPER in allergic inflammatory lung disease has not been examined. We investigated the effect of GPER-specific agonist G-1 in asthmatic mice. GPER expression in asthmatic lung was confirmed by immunofluorescent staining. OVA-sensitized BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were treated with G-1 by daily subcutaneous injections during an airway challenge phase, followed by histological and biochemical examination. Strikingly, administration of G-1 attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness, accumulation of inflammatory cells, and levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) in BAL fluid. G-1 treatment also decreased serum levels of anti-OVA IgE antibodies. The frequency of splenic Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells and IL-10-producing GPER+CD4+ T cells was significantly increased in G-1-treated mice. Additionally, splenocytes isolated from G-1-treated mice showed greater IL-10 production. G-1-induced amelioration of airway inflammation and IgE production were abolished in IL-10-deficient mice. Taken together, these results indicate that extended GPER activation negatively regulates the acute asthmatic condition by altering the IL-10-producing lymphocyte population. The current results have potential importance for understanding the mechanistic aspects of function of estrogen in allergic inflammatory response. PMID:25826377

  3. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor agonist suppresses airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma through IL-10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamichi Itoga

    Full Text Available Estrogen influences the disease severity and sexual dimorphism in asthma, which is caused by complex mechanisms. Besides classical nuclear estrogen receptors (ERαβ, G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER was recently established as an estrogen receptor on the cell membrane. Although GPER is associated with immunoregulatory functions of estrogen, the pathophysiological role of GPER in allergic inflammatory lung disease has not been examined. We investigated the effect of GPER-specific agonist G-1 in asthmatic mice. GPER expression in asthmatic lung was confirmed by immunofluorescent staining. OVA-sensitized BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were treated with G-1 by daily subcutaneous injections during an airway challenge phase, followed by histological and biochemical examination. Strikingly, administration of G-1 attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness, accumulation of inflammatory cells, and levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13 in BAL fluid. G-1 treatment also decreased serum levels of anti-OVA IgE antibodies. The frequency of splenic Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells and IL-10-producing GPER+CD4+ T cells was significantly increased in G-1-treated mice. Additionally, splenocytes isolated from G-1-treated mice showed greater IL-10 production. G-1-induced amelioration of airway inflammation and IgE production were abolished in IL-10-deficient mice. Taken together, these results indicate that extended GPER activation negatively regulates the acute asthmatic condition by altering the IL-10-producing lymphocyte population. The current results have potential importance for understanding the mechanistic aspects of function of estrogen in allergic inflammatory response.

  4. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighton, Cheryl A; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E; Glass, Leslie L; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca(2+). In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca(2+) response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber-mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  5. Abnormalities in osteoclastogenesis and decreased tumorigenesis in mice deficient for ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1 has been shown to be a proton sensing receptor in vitro. We have shown that OGR1 functions as a tumor metastasis suppressor gene when it is over-expressed in human prostate cancer cells in vivo. To examine the physiological functions of OGR1, we generated conditional OGR1 deficient mice by homologous recombination. OGR1 deficient mice were viable and upon gross-inspection appeared normal. Consistent with in vitro studies showing that OGR1 is involved in osteoclastogenesis, reduced osteoclasts were detected in OGR1 deficient mice. A pH-dependent osteoclasts survival effect was also observed. However, overall abnormality in the bones of these animals was not observed. In addition, melanoma cell tumorigenesis was significantly inhibited in OGR1 deficient mice. OGR1 deficient mice in the mixed background produced significantly less peritoneal macrophages when stimulated with thioglycolate. These macrophages also showed altered extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK activation and nitric oxide (NO production in response to lipopolysaccharide. OGR1-dependent pH responses assessed by cAMP production and cell survival in macrophages or brown fat cells were not observed, presumably due to the presence of other proton sensing receptors in these cells. Our results indicate that OGR1's role in osteoclastogenesis is not strong enough to affect overall bone development and its role in tumorigenesis warrants further investigation. The mice generated can be potentially used for several disease models, including cancers or osteoclast-related diseases.

  6. Disease-causing Mutation in PKR2 Receptor Reveals a Critical Role of Positive Charges in the Second Intracellular Loop for G-protein Coupling and Receptor Trafficking*

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Zhen; Tang, Yong; Luo, Hunjin; Jiang, Fang; Yang, Jiannan; Sun, Lin; Li, Jia-Da

    2011-01-01

    Prokineticins are a pair of signal factors involved in many physiological processes by binding to two closely related G-protein-coupled receptors, PKR1 and PKR2. Recently, mutations in prokineticin 2 (PK2) and PKR2 are found to be associated with Kallmann syndrome and/or idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, disorders characterized by delayed puberty and infertility. However, little is known how PKRs interact and activate G-proteins to elicit signal transduction. In the present study, we ...

  7. New G-protein-coupled receptor structures provide insights into the recognition of CXCL12 and HIV-1 gp120 by CXCR4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhong; Jianping Ding

    2011-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily consists of thousands of integral membrane proteins that exert a wide variety of physiological functions and account for a large portion of the drag targets identified so far.However,structural knowledge of GPCRs is scarce, with crystal structures determined for only a few members including β1and β2 adrenergic receptors, adenosine receptor, rhodopsin,and dopamine D3 receptor [1].

  8. G-protein coupled receptor 18 (GPR18) in channel catfish: Expression analysis and efficacy as immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to determine the transcriptional profiles of G-protein coupled receptor 18 (GPR18) in channel catfish after infection with A. hydrophila compared to that in healthy catfish; 2) to determine whether over-expression of GPR18 in catfish gill cells will offer protec...

  9. High Efficacy but Low Potency of delta-Opioid Receptor-G Protein Coupling in Brij-58-Treated, Low-Density Plasma Membrane Fragments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roubalová, Lenka; Vošahlíková, Miroslava; Brejchová, Jana; Sýkora, Jan; Rudajev, Vladimír; Svoboda, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 8 (2015), e0135664. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/0919 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : delta - opioid receptor * G protein coupling * detergent * efficacy * potency Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  10. Computer-aided discovery of aromatic L-α-amino acids as agonists of the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR139

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ísberg, Vignir; Andersen, Kirsten Bayer; Bisig, Christoph;

    2014-01-01

    GPR139 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor expressed mainly in the central nervous system. We developed a pharmacophore model based on known GPR139 surrogate agonists which led us to propose aromatic-containing dipeptides as potential ligands. Upon testing, the dipeptides demonstrated agonism...

  11. Involvement of the G-protein-coupled receptor 4 in RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteoclast activity is enhanced in acidic environments following systemic or local inflammation. However, the regulatory mechanism of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblasts under acidic conditions is not fully understood. In the present paper, we detected the mRNA expression of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR) proton sensors GPR4 and GPR65 (T-cell death-associated gene 8, TDAG8), in osteoblasts. RANKL expression and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) level in osteoblasts were up-regulated under acidic culture conditions. Acidosis-induced up-regulation of RANKL was abolished by the protein kinase A inhibitor H89. To clarify the role of GPR4 in RANKL expression, GPR4 gain and loss of function experiments were performed. Gene knockdown and forced expression of GPR4 caused reduction and induction of RANKL expression, respectively. These results suggested that, at least in part, RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment was mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling resulting from GPR4 activation. A comprehensive microarray analysis of gene expression of osteoblasts revealed that, under acidic conditions, the phenotype of osteoblasts was that of an osteoclast supporting cell rather than that of a mineralizing cell. These findings will contribute to a molecular understanding of bone disruption in an acidic environment. - Highlights: • RANKL expression was increased in osteoblasts under acidosis via cAMP/PKA pathway. • GRP4 knockdown resulted in decrease of RANKL expression. • GRP4 overexpression resulted in increase of RANKL expression. • Osteoblast mineralization was reduced under acidic condition

  12. Involvement of the G-protein-coupled receptor 4 in RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okito, Asuka [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Orthodontic Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Nakahama, Ken-ichi, E-mail: nakacell@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Akiyama, Masako [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ono, Takashi [Department of Orthodontic Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-03-06

    Osteoclast activity is enhanced in acidic environments following systemic or local inflammation. However, the regulatory mechanism of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblasts under acidic conditions is not fully understood. In the present paper, we detected the mRNA expression of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR) proton sensors GPR4 and GPR65 (T-cell death-associated gene 8, TDAG8), in osteoblasts. RANKL expression and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) level in osteoblasts were up-regulated under acidic culture conditions. Acidosis-induced up-regulation of RANKL was abolished by the protein kinase A inhibitor H89. To clarify the role of GPR4 in RANKL expression, GPR4 gain and loss of function experiments were performed. Gene knockdown and forced expression of GPR4 caused reduction and induction of RANKL expression, respectively. These results suggested that, at least in part, RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment was mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling resulting from GPR4 activation. A comprehensive microarray analysis of gene expression of osteoblasts revealed that, under acidic conditions, the phenotype of osteoblasts was that of an osteoclast supporting cell rather than that of a mineralizing cell. These findings will contribute to a molecular understanding of bone disruption in an acidic environment. - Highlights: • RANKL expression was increased in osteoblasts under acidosis via cAMP/PKA pathway. • GRP4 knockdown resulted in decrease of RANKL expression. • GRP4 overexpression resulted in increase of RANKL expression. • Osteoblast mineralization was reduced under acidic condition.

  13. G-1 exerts neuroprotective effects through G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 following spinal cord injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qiang; Meng, Jia; Wang, Xin-shang; Kang, Wen-bo; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Jian-ning

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) always occurs accidently and leads to motor dysfunction because of biochemical and pathological events. Estrogen has been shown to be neuroprotective against SCI through estrogen receptors (ERs), but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of a newly found membrane ER, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPR30 or GPER1), and discussed the feasibility of a GPR30 agonist as an estrogen replacement. Forty adult female C57BL/6J mice (10–12 weeks old) were divided randomly into vehicle, G-1, E2, G-1 + G-15 and E2 + G-15 groups. All mice were subjected to SCI using a crushing injury approach. The specific GPR30 agonist, G-1, mimicked the effects of E2 treatment by preventing SCI-induced apoptotic cell death and enhancing motor functional recovery after injury. GPR30 activation regulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathways, increased GPR30 and anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), but decreased the pro-apoptosis factor Bax and cleaved caspase-3. However, the neuroprotective effects of G-1 and E2 were blocked by the specific GPR30 antagonist, G-15. Thus, GPR30 rather than classic ERs is required to induce estrogenic neuroprotective effects. Given that estrogen replacement therapy may cause unexpected side effects, especially on the reproductive system, GPR30 agonists may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating SCI. PMID:27407175

  14. Pro-aging effects of glucose signaling through a G protein-coupled glucose receptor in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine E Roux

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is the preferred carbon and energy source in prokaryotes, unicellular eukaryotes, and metazoans. However, excess of glucose has been associated with several diseases, including diabetes and the less understood process of aging. On the contrary, limiting glucose (i.e., calorie restriction slows aging and age-related diseases in most species. Understanding the mechanism by which glucose limits life span is therefore important for any attempt to control aging and age-related diseases. Here, we use the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model to study the regulation of chronological life span by glucose. Growth of S. pombe at a reduced concentration of glucose increased life span and oxidative stress resistance as reported before for many other organisms. Surprisingly, loss of the Git3 glucose receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor, also increased life span in conditions where glucose consumption was not affected. These results suggest a role for glucose-signaling pathways in life span regulation. In agreement, constitutive activation of the Galpha subunit acting downstream of Git3 accelerated aging in S. pombe and inhibited the effects of calorie restriction. A similar pro-aging effect of glucose was documented in mutants of hexokinase, which cannot metabolize glucose and, therefore, are exposed to constitutive glucose signaling. The pro-aging effect of glucose signaling on life span correlated with an increase in reactive oxygen species and a decrease in oxidative stress resistance and respiration rate. Likewise, the anti-aging effect of both calorie restriction and the Deltagit3 mutation was accompanied by increased respiration and lower reactive oxygen species production. Altogether, our data suggest an important role for glucose signaling through the Git3/PKA pathway to regulate S. pombe life span.

  15. Membrane orientation and binding determinants of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 as assessed by combined vibrational spectroscopic studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Yang

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are integral membrane proteins involved in a wide variety of biological processes in eukaryotic cells, and are targeted by a large fraction of marketed drugs. GPCR kinases (GRKs play important roles in feedback regulation of GPCRs, such as of β-adrenergic receptors in the heart, where GRK2 and GRK5 are the major isoforms expressed. Membrane targeting is essential for GRK function in cells. Whereas GRK2 is recruited to the membrane by heterotrimeric Gβγ subunits, the mechanism of membrane binding by GRK5 is not fully understood. It has been proposed that GRK5 is constitutively associated with membranes through elements located at its N-terminus, its C-terminus, or both. The membrane orientation of GRK5 is also a matter of speculation. In this work, we combined sum frequency generation (SFG vibrational spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR to help determine the membrane orientation of GRK5 and a C-terminally truncated mutant (GRK51-531 on membrane lipid bilayers. It was found that GRK5 and GRK51-531 adopt a similar orientation on model cell membranes in the presence of PIP2 that is similar to that predicted for GRK2 in prior studies. Mutation of the N-terminal membrane binding site of GRK5 did not eliminate membrane binding, but prevented observation of this discrete orientation. The C-terminus of GRK5 does not have substantial impact on either membrane binding or orientation in this model system. Thus, the C-terminus of GRK5 may drive membrane binding in cells via interactions with other proteins at the plasma membrane or bind in an unstructured manner to negatively charged membranes.

  16. G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptor TGR5 Activation Inhibits Kidney Disease in Obesity and Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxin X; Edelstein, Michal Herman; Gafter, Uzi; Qiu, Liru; Luo, Yuhuan; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Lucia, Scott; Adorini, Luciano; D'Agati, Vivette D; Levi, Jonathan; Rosenberg, Avi; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Gius, David R; Saleem, Moin A; Levi, Moshe

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and diabetes mellitus are the leading causes of renal disease. In this study, we determined the regulation and role of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5, previously shown to be regulated by high glucose and/or fatty acids, in obesity-related glomerulopathy (ORG) and diabetic nephropathy (DN). Treatment of diabetic db/db mice with the selective TGR5 agonist INT-777 decreased proteinuria, podocyte injury, mesangial expansion, fibrosis, and CD68 macrophage infiltration in the kidney. INT-777 also induced renal expression of master regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, inhibitors of oxidative stress, and inducers of fatty acid β-oxidation, including sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), and Nrf-1. Increased activity of SIRT3 was evidenced by normalization of the increased acetylation of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) observed in untreated db/db mice. Accordingly, INT-777 decreased mitochondrial H2O2 generation and increased the activity of SOD2, which associated with decreased urinary levels of H2O2 and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Furthermore, INT-777 decreased renal lipid accumulation. INT-777 also prevented kidney disease in mice with diet-induced obesity. In human podocytes cultured with high glucose, INT-777 induced mitochondrial biogenesis, decreased oxidative stress, and increased fatty acid β-oxidation. Compared with normal kidney biopsy specimens, kidney specimens from patients with established ORG or DN expressed significantly less TGR5 mRNA, and levels inversely correlated with disease progression. Our results indicate that TGR5 activation induces mitochondrial biogenesis and prevents renal oxidative stress and lipid accumulation, establishing a role for TGR5 in inhibiting kidney disease in obesity and diabetes. PMID:26424786

  17. The G protein-coupled receptor subset of the dog genome is more similar to that in humans than rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiöth Helgi B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dog is an important model organism and it is considered to be closer to humans than rodents regarding metabolism and responses to drugs. The close relationship between humans and dogs over many centuries has lead to the diversity of the canine species, important genetic discoveries and an appreciation of the effects of old age in another species. The superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is one of the largest gene families in most mammals and the most exploited in terms of drug discovery. An accurate comparison of the GPCR repertoires in dog and human is valuable for the prediction of functional similarities and differences between the species. Results We searched the dog genome for non-olfactory GPCRs and obtained 353 full-length GPCR gene sequences, 18 incomplete sequences and 13 pseudogenes. We established relationships between human, dog, rat and mouse GPCRs resolving orthologous pairs and species-specific duplicates. We found that 12 dog GPCR genes are missing in humans while 24 human GPCR genes are not part of the dog GPCR repertoire. There is a higher number of orthologous pairs between dog and human that are conserved as compared with either mouse or rat. In almost all cases the differences observed between the dog and human genomes coincide with other variations in the rodent species. Several GPCR gene expansions characteristic for rodents are not found in dog. Conclusion The repertoire of dog non-olfactory GPCRs is more similar to the repertoire in humans as compared with the one in rodents. The comparison of the dog, human and rodent repertoires revealed several examples of species-specific gene duplications and deletions. This information is useful in the selection of model organisms for pharmacological experiments.

  18. A novel fractal approach for predicting G-protein-coupled receptors and their subfamilies with support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Guoping; Li, Yong; Wang, Feichi; Wang, Siwen; Hu, Xuehai

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven membrane-spanning proteins and regulate many important physiological processes, such as vision, neurotransmission, immune response and so on. GPCRs-related pathways are the targets of a large number of marketed drugs. Therefore, the design of a reliable computational model for predicting GPCRs from amino acid sequence has long been a significant biomedical problem. Chaos game representation (CGR) reveals the fractal patterns hidden in protein sequences, and then fractal dimension (FD) is an important feature of these highly irregular geometries with concise mathematical expression. Here, in order to extract important features from GPCR protein sequences, CGR algorithm, fractal dimension and amino acid composition (AAC) are employed to formulate the numerical features of protein samples. Four groups of features are considered, and each group is evaluated by support vector machine (SVM) and 10-fold cross-validation test. To test the performance of the present method, a new non-redundant dataset was built based on latest GPCRDB database. Comparing the results of numerical experiments, the group of combined features with AAC and FD gets the best result, the accuracy is 99.22% and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) is 0.9845 for identifying GPCRs from non-GPCRs. Moreover, if it is classified as a GPCR, it will be further put into the second level, which will classify a GPCR into one of the five main subfamilies. At this level, the group of combined features with AAC and FD also gets best accuracy 85.73%. Finally, the proposed predictor is also compared with existing methods and shows better performances. PMID:26405954

  19. Sequence, Structure and Ligand Binding Evolution of Rhodopsin-Like G Protein-Coupled Receptors: A Crystal Structure-Based Phylogenetic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Steffen; Grünewald, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest family of membrane receptors in the human genome. Advances in membrane protein crystallization so far resulted in the determination of 24 receptors available as high-resolution atomic structures. We performed the first phylogenetic analysis of GPCRs based on the available set of GPCR structures. We present a new phylogenetic tree of known human rhodopsin-like GPCR sequences based on this structure set. We can distinguish the three separate ...

  20. Known regulators of nitric oxide synthase and arginase are agonists at the human G-protein-coupled receptor GPRC6A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bolette; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2006-01-01

    GPRC6A is a novel family C G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with so far unknown physiological function. It was the aim of our study to further characterize the ligand preferences of the receptor and elucidate structural requirements for activity. We have previously generated a functional chimeric...... systems, and interfering effects at GPRC6A should be regarded of relevance, especially as the physiological function of the receptor is not yet understood....

  1. GPR109A is a G-protein-coupled receptor for the bacterial fermentation product butyrate and functions as a tumor suppressor in colon

    OpenAIRE

    Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Cresci, Gail A.; Liu, Kebin; Ananth, Sudha; Gnanaprakasam, Jaya P.; Browning, Darren D.; Mellinger, John D.; Smith, Sylvia B.; Digby, Gregory J.; Lambert, Nevin A.; Prasad, Puttur D.; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2009-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids, generated in colon by bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber, protect against colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. Among these bacterial metabolites, butyrate is biologically most relevant. GPR109A is a G-protein-coupled receptor for nicotinate, but recognizes butyrate with low affinity. Millimolar concentrations of butyrate are needed to activate the receptor. Although concentrations of butyrate in colonic lumen are sufficient to activate the receptor m...

  2. Emerging roles for the pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors in response to acidotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanderlin EJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Edward J Sanderlin,1 Calvin R Justus,1 Elizabeth A Krewson,2 Li V Yang1,21Department of Internal Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA; 2Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA Abstract: Protons (hydrogen ions are the simplest form of ions universally produced by cellular metabolism including aerobic respiration and glycolysis. Export of protons out of cells by a number of acid transporters is essential to maintain a stable intracellular pH that is critical for normal cell function. Acid products in the tissue interstitium are removed by blood perfusion and excreted from the body through the respiratory and renal systems. However, the pH homeostasis in tissues is frequently disrupted in many pathophysiologic conditions such as in ischemic tissues and tumors where protons are overproduced and blood perfusion is compromised. Consequently, accumulation of protons causes acidosis in the affected tissue. Although acidosis has profound effects on cell function and disease progression, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to acidotic stress. Recently a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8, and GPR68 (OGR1, has been identified and characterized. These GPCRs can be activated by extracellular acidic pH through the protonation of histidine residues of the receptors. Upon activation by acidosis the pH-sensing GPCRs can transduce several downstream G protein pathways such as the Gs, Gq/11, and G12/13 pathways to regulate cell behavior. Studies have revealed the biological roles of the pH-sensing GPCRs in the immune, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, skeletal, endocrine, and nervous systems, as well as the involvement of these receptors in a variety of pathological conditions such as cancer, inflammation, pain, and cardiovascular disease. As GPCRs are

  3. G-protein-coupled Receptor Kinase-interacting Proteins Inhibit Apoptosis by Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Signal Regulation*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Songbai; Hisatsune, Chihiro; Matsu-ura, Toru; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) is an intracellular IP3-gated calcium (Ca2+) release channel and plays important roles in regulation of numerous Ca2+-dependent cellular responses. Many intracellular modulators and IP3R-binding proteins regulate the IP3R channel function. Here we identified G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting proteins (GIT), GIT1 and GIT2, as novel IP3R-binding proteins. We found that both GIT1 and GIT2 directly bind to all three subtypes of IP...

  4. The Proton-Sensing G-Protein Coupled Receptor GPR4 Promotes Angiogenesis in Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohong; Zhong, Qi; Huang, Junwei; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Wei; Yang, Zheng; Ding, Shuo; Chen, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is an aggressive disease with poor survival and is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Gastroesophageal reflux is a common event in SCCHN patients. GPR4 is a proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptor, which can be activated by acidosis. The objective of this study was to explore the role of GPR4 in acid exposure and tumor angiogenesis in SCCHN. In this study, we confirmed that overexpressing GPR4 in SCCHN cells could increase the expression and secretion of IL6, IL8 and VEGFA at pH 5.9. This effect could be inhibited by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). Western blot analysis indicated that phosphorylation of p38 increased in GPR4 infected cells at pH 5.9, which could be inhibited by SB203580. In tube formation assay, HMEC-1 cells were incubated with conditioned medium (CM, pH 5.9, 6.5, 7.4) derived from control and GPR4 infected SCCHN cells. Tube length was significantly increased in HMEC-1 cells incubated with CM from GPR4 infected cells compared with control cells at pH5.9, which indicated the pro-angiogenic effect of GPR4 in acidic pH. The neutralizing antibodies of IL6, IL8 and VEGFA could inhibit tube formation of HMEC-1 cells. In vivo, the effect of GPR4 on angiogenesis was investigated with the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. Control and GPR4 infected SCCHN cells were seeded onto the upper CAM surface (n = 5 in each group) and 5 μL DMEM/F12 (pH 5.9, 6.5, 7.4) was added to the surface of the cell every 24 h. Four days later, the upper CAM were harvested and the ratio of the vascular area to the CAM area was quantified using Image-Pro Plus 6.0 software. GPR4 infected cells could recruit more vascular than control cells at pH5.9. In conclusion, we suggested that GPR4 induces angiogenesis via GPR4-induced p38-mediated IL6, IL8 and VEGFA secretion at acidic extracellular pH in SCCHN. PMID:27078157

  5. G-Protein-Coupled Receptor MrgD Is a Receptor for Angiotensin-(1-7) Involving Adenylyl Cyclase, cAMP, and Phosphokinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzner, Anja; Gebolys, Kinga; Meinert, Christian; Klein, Sabine; Uhlich, Anja; Trebicka, Jonel; Villacañas, Óscar; Walther, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) has cardiovascular protective effects and is the opponent of the often detrimental Ang II within the renin-angiotensin system. Although it is well accepted that the G-protein-coupled receptor Mas is a receptor for the heptapeptide, the lack in knowing initial signaling molecules stimulated by Ang-(1-7) prevented definitive characterization of ligand/receptor pharmacology as well as identification of further hypothesized receptors for the heptapeptide. The study aimed to identify a second messenger stimulated by Ang-(1-7) allowing confirmation as well as discovery of the heptapeptide's receptors. Ang-(1-7) elevates cAMP concentration in primary cells, such as endothelial or mesangial cells. Using cAMP as readout in receptor-transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, we provided pharmacological proof that Mas is a functional receptor for Ang-(1-7). Moreover, we identified the G-protein-coupled receptor MrgD as a second receptor for Ang-(1-7). Consequently, the heptapeptide failed to increase cAMP concentration in primary mesangial cells with genetic deficiency in both Mas and MrgD Mice deficient in MrgD showed an impaired hemodynamic response after Ang-(1-7) administration. Furthermore, we excluded the Ang II type 2 receptor as a receptor for the heptapeptide but discovered that the Ang II type 2 blocker PD123319 can also block Mas and MrgD receptors. Our results lead to an expansion and partial revision of the renin-angiotensin system, by identifying a second receptor for Ang-(1-7), by excluding Ang II type 2 as a receptor for the heptapeptide, and by enforcing the revisit of such publications which concluded Ang II type 2 function by only using PD123319. PMID:27217404

  6. Selective Allosteric Antagonists for the G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPRC6A Based on the 2-Phenylindole Privileged Structure Scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Henrik; Boesgaard, Michael Worch; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Larsen, Inna; Kuhne, Sebastiaan; Gloriam, David E; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a biological target class of fundamental importance in drug therapy. The GPRC6A receptor is a newly deorphanized class C GPCR that we recently reported for the first allosteric antagonists based on the 2-arylindole privileged structure scaffold (e.g., 1......, and 34b as antagonists at the GPRC6A receptor in the low micromolar range and show that 7 and 34b display >9-fold selectivity for the GPRC6A receptor over related GPCRs, making 7 and 34b the most potent and selective antagonists for the GPRC6A receptor reported to date....

  7. Loss of the repressor REST in uterine fibroids promotes aberrant G protein-coupled receptor 10 expression and activates mammalian target of rapamycin pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese, Binny V.; Koohestani, Faezeh; McWilliams, Michelle; Colvin, Arlene; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Kinsey, William H.; Romana A Nowak; Nothnick, Warren B.; Chennathukuzhi, Vargheese M.

    2013-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are the most common tumors of the female reproductive tract, occurring in up to 77% of reproductive-aged women, yet molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. A role for atypically activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids has been suggested in several studies. We identified that G protein-coupled receptor 10 [GPR10, a putative signaling protein upstream of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase–protein kinase B/...

  8. G-Protein/β-Arrestin-Linked Fluctuating Network of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors for Predicting Drug Efficacy and Bias Using Short-Term Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Osamu Ichikawa; Kazushi Fujimoto; Atsushi Yamada; Susumu Okazaki; Kazuto Yamazaki

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy and bias of signal transduction induced by a drug at a target protein are closely associated with the benefits and side effects of the drug. In particular, partial agonist activity and G-protein/β-arrestin-biased agonist activity for the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, the family with the most target proteins of launched drugs, are key issues in drug discovery. However, designing GPCR drugs with appropriate efficacy and bias is challenging because the dynamic mechanism ...

  9. O10.08HIGH G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS 65 (GPR65) EXPRESSION PREDICTS A POORER SURGICAL OUTCOME OF GLIOBLASTOMA PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, T.; H. Wang; Yan, Y.; Qin, R; Jiang, Y.(Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China; Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China; School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China; Physics Department, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China); Lu, Y; Li, W; Xia, C.; J. Chen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the expression and prognostic value of G-protein-coupled receptors 65 (GPR65, also known as T-cell death-associated gene 8, TDAG8) in glioblastoma patients. METHODS: We determined the expression of GPR65 using immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays containing 102 GBM samples and 15 normal brain samples. Cumulative survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed by the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed by the stepw...

  10. From the Black Widow Spider to Human Behavior: Latrophilins, a Relatively Unknown Class of G Protein-Coupled Receptors, Are Implicated in Psychiatric Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Ariel F; Muenke, Maximilian; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    The findings of a recent study associate LPHN3, a member of the latrophilin family, with an increased risk of developing attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the most common psychiatric disorder in childhood and adolescence. Latrophilins comprise a new family of G protein-coupled receptors of unknown native physiological function that mediate the neurotoxic effects of α-latrotoxin, a potent toxin found in black widow spider venom. This receptor–toxin interaction has helped to eluc...

  11. Effects of the gut microbiota on host adiposity are modulated by the short-chain fatty-acid binding G protein-coupled receptor, Gpr41

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel, Buck S.; Shaito, Abdullah; Motoike, Toshiyuki; Rey, Federico E.; Backhed, Fredrik; Manchester, Jill K.; Hammer, Robert E.; Williams, S. Clay; Crowley, Jan; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Jeffrey I Gordon

    2008-01-01

    The distal human intestine harbors trillions of microbes that allow us to extract calories from otherwise indigestible dietary polysaccharides. The products of polysaccharide fermentation include short-chain fatty acids that are ligands for Gpr41, a G protein-coupled receptor expressed by a subset of enteroendocrine cells in the gut epithelium. To examine the contribution of Gpr41 to energy balance, we compared Gpr41−/− and Gpr41+/+ mice that were either conventionally-raised with a complete ...

  12. Identification of a G protein-coupled receptor for pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide from pheromone glands of the moth Helicoverpa zea

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Fuerst, Emily-Jean; Rafaeli, Ada; Jurenka, Russell

    2003-01-01

    Pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN), a peptide produced by the subesophageal ganglion, is used by a variety of moths to regulate pheromone production. PBAN acts directly on pheromone gland cells by using calcium and cAMP as second messengers. We have identified a gene encoding a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) from pheromone glands of the female moth Helicoverpa zea. The gene was identified based on sequence identity to a group of GPCRs from Drosoph...

  13. Large-scale RNAi screen of G protein-coupled receptors involved in larval growth, molting and metamorphosis in the red flour beetle

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Kapil; Zhu Fang; Bai Hua; Palli Subba

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) belong to the largest superfamily of integral cell membrane proteins and play crucial roles in physiological processes including behavior, development and reproduction. Because of their broad and diverse roles in cellular signaling, GPCRs are the therapeutic targets for many prescription drugs. However, there is no commercial pesticide targeting insect GPCRs. In this study, we employed functional genomics methods and used the red flo...

  14. Large-scale RNAi screen of G protein-coupled receptors involved in larval growth, molting and metamorphosis in the red flour beetle

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Hua; Zhu, Fang; Shah, Kapil; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2011-01-01

    Background The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) belong to the largest superfamily of integral cell membrane proteins and play crucial roles in physiological processes including behavior, development and reproduction. Because of their broad and diverse roles in cellular signaling, GPCRs are the therapeutic targets for many prescription drugs. However, there is no commercial pesticide targeting insect GPCRs. In this study, we employed functional genomics methods and used the red flour beetle...

  15. G protein-coupled chemokine receptor, a host range gene suitable for phylogenetic grouping of the Capripoxviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Capripoxvirus genus is comprised of sheeppovirus (SPV), goatpox virus (GPV) and lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV). The three separate diseases caused by capripoxviruses (CaPVs) in sheep, goat and cattle are most economically significant in large areas in Africa and Asia. CaPVs are generally considered to be host specific leading to outbreaks in the preferential host, even if experimental infections have shown that most strains can cause disease in more than one species. Sheeppox and goatpox exhibit similar clinical signs that can be confused with other exanthemas, i.e. orf. Lumpy skin disease is a subacute to acute cattle disease. The CaPVs are serologically impossible to differentiate. Specific identification of the genus inside the Poxviridae family relies mainly on molecular tools rather than on classical serology. In the last few years, restriction fragment pattern analysis, cross-hybridisation and more recently the complete genome sequencing of the three viruses showed that grouping of isolates correlated with the animal species from which the viruses were isolated: SPV, GPV and LSDV are phylogenetically distinguishable through conserved genes responsible for hostrange. For taxonomy and evolutionary studies we have worked on a non-essential gene for the virus growth encoding an homologue of a G protein-coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR) described by Cao et al (1995) on the genome of Kenya sheep isolate (KS1). The Q2/3L gene, known to be located in the terminal genomic region, is likely to affect the viral virulence. This poxvirus-encoded gene affects the host immune response to viral infection because of its homology to mammalian chemokine receptors. We describe here its suitability for host range phylogenetic grouping. The sequence analysis of the Q2/3L gene of KS1 vaccine strain led to the design of PCR primers to study the relationship among 23 CaPVs strains (including 13 virulent sheep isolates and 1 sheep vaccine strain, 5 goat isolates and 1 goat

  16. A role for O-1602 and G protein-coupled receptor GPR55 in the control of colonic motility in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Kun; Fichna, Jakub; Schicho, Rudolf; Saur, Dieter; Bashashati, Mohammad; Mackie, Ken; Li, Yongyu; Zimmer, Andreas; Göke, Burkhard; Keith A Sharkey; Storr, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Objective The G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is a novel cannabinoid (CB) receptor, whose role in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract remains unknown. Here we studied the significance of GPR55 in the regulation of GI motility. Design GPR55 mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The effects of the GPR55 agonist O-1602 and a selective antagonist cannabidiol (CBD) were studied in vitro and in vivo and compared to a non-selective cannabinoid receptor agoni...

  17. Ameliorative effect of membrane-associated estrogen receptor G protein coupled receptor 30 activation on object recognition memory in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takashi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kirino, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Membrane-associated estrogen receptor "G protein-coupled receptor 30" (GPR30) has been implicated in spatial recognition memory and protection against neuronal death. The present study investigated the role of GPR30 in object recognition memory in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model (5XFAD) by using novel object recognition (NOR) test. Impairment of long-term (24 h) recognition memory was observed in both male and female 5XFAD mice. Selective GPR30 agonist, G-1, ameliorated this impairment in female 5XFAD mice, but not in male mice. Our study demonstrated the ameliorative role of GPR30 in NOR memory impaired by AD pathology in female mice. PMID:27423484

  18. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G. (Case Western); (Michigan)

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  19. T cell homeostasis requires G protein-coupled receptor-mediated access to trophic signals that promote growth and inhibit chemotaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Cinalli, Ryan M.; Herman, Catherine E.; Lew, Brian O.; Wieman, Heather L.; Thompson, Craig B.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2005-01-01

    Signals that regulate T cell homeostasis are not fully understood. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), such as the chemokine receptors, may affect homeostasis by direct signaling or by guiding T cell migration to distinct location-restricted signals. Here, we show that blockade of Gαi-associated GPCR signaling by treatment with pertussis toxin led to T cell atrophy and shortened life-span in T cell-replete hosts and prevented T cell homeostatic growth and proliferation in T cell-deficient hos...

  20. Definition of the G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane bundle binding pocket and calculation of receptor similarities for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David Erik Immanuel; Foord, Steven M; Blaney, Frank E;

    2009-01-01

    currently available crystal structures. This was used to characterize pharmacological relationships of Family A/Rhodopsin family GPCRs, minimizing evolutionary influence from parts of the receptor that do not generally affect ligand binding. The resultant dendogram tended to group receptors according to...

  1. Distinct Phosphorylation Clusters Determine the Signaling Outcome of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4/G Protein-Coupled Receptor 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prihandoko, Rudi; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Hudson, Brian D; Butcher, Adrian J; Ulven, Trond; Miller, Ashley M; Tobin, Andrew B; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    phosphoacceptor sites to alanine completely prevented phosphorylation of mFFA4 but did not limit receptor coupling to extracellular signal regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) activation. Rather, an inhibitor of Gq/11proteins completely prevented receptor signaling to ERK1/2. By contrast, the recruitment of......It is established that long-chain free fatty acids includingω-3 fatty acids mediate an array of biologic responses through members of the free fatty acid (FFA) receptor family, which includes FFA4. However, the signaling mechanisms and modes of regulation of this receptor class remain unclear. Here...... arrestin 3, receptor internalization, and activation of Akt were regulated by mFFA4 phosphorylation. The analysis of mFFA4 phosphorylation-dependent signaling was extended further by selective mutations of the phosphoacceptor sites. Mutations within cluster 2 did not affect agonist activation of Akt but...

  2. Expression of G protein-coupled receptor 19 in human lung cancer cells is triggered by entry into S phase and supports G2/M cell cycle progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of cell surface receptors. However, only a fraction of the more than 800 receptors have been characterized to an extent that their physiological role is reasonably well understood. In fact, current pharmacotherapy only addresses some 60 receptors with a large collection of compounds that represent about 30% of the available drugs. It has long been known that GPCRs are subject to illegitimate expression in cancer cells. Presumably, hijacking the normal physiological functions of GPCRs contributes to all biological capabilities acquired during the multistep development of human cancers. With the goal of linking G protein-coupled receptors to malignant diseases, GPCRs were searched for that revealed high expression levels in small cell lung cancer (SCLC): The mRNA encoding orphan G protein-coupled receptor 19 (GPR19) was found to be frequently overexpressed in tissue samples obtained from patients with SCLC in contrast to samples derived from non-SCLC or normal lung. Several observations indicate that overexpression of Gpr19 confers a specific advantage to human lung cancer-derived cells regarding the transition through the cell cycle. Knockdown of Gpr19 mRNA by RNA interference reduced cell growth of human lung cancer cell lines and led to cell death. Cell cycle progression through G2/M phase was impaired and this was associated with increased protein levels of cyclin B1 and phosphorylated histone H3. Gpr19 exhibited a cell cycle-dependent expression pattern in lung cancer cell lines. When cell cycle distribution profiles of cells released from cell cycle arrest were related to Gpr19 mRNA levels, a peak Gpr19 expression was detected during S phase. The control of Gpr19 expression by E2F transcription factors, which drive gene expression of many genes important for cell cycle progression, was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation: Antibodies directed against E2F-1 to E2F-4 allowed for the recovery of

  3. Emerging role for leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptors LGR5 and LGR4 in cancer stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of cancer stem cells has gained considerable interest in the last few decades, partly because of their potential implication in therapy resistance. However, the lack of specific cellular surface markers for these cells has impeded their isolation, making the characterization of this cellular subpopulation technically challenging. Recent studies have indicated that leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 4 and 5 (LGR4 and LGR5) expression in multiple organs may represent a global marker of adult stem cells. This review aims to give an overview of LGR4 and LGR5 as cancer stem cell markers and their function in development

  4. “Systems-level G protein-coupled receptor therapy across a neurodegenerative continuum by the GLP-1 receptor system”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StuartMaudsley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With our increasing appreciation of the true complexity of diseases and pathophysiologies it is clear that this knowledge needs to inform the future development of pharmacotherapeutics. For many disorders the disease mechanism itself is a complex process spanning multiple signaling networks, tissues and organ systems. Identifying the precise nature and locations of the pathophysiology is crucial for the creation of systemically-effective drugs. Diseases once considered constrained to a limited range of organ systems, e.g. central neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and Huntington’ disease (HD, the role of multiple central and peripheral organ systems in the etiology of such diseases is now widely accepted. With this knowledge, it is increasingly clear that these seemingly distinct neurodegenerative disorders (AD, PD and HD possess multiple pathophysiological similarities thereby demonstrating an inter-related continuum of disease-related molecular alterations. With this systems-level appreciation of neurodegenerative disease it is now imperative to consider that pharmacotherapeutics should be developed specifically to address the systemic imbalances that create the disorders. Identification of potential systems-level signaling axes may facilitate the generation of therapeutic agents with synergistic remedial activity across multiple tissues, organ systems and even diseases. Here we discuss the potentially therapeutic systems-level interaction of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 ligand-receptor axis with multiple aspects of the AD, PD and HD neurodegenerative continuum.

  5. G protein-coupled receptor 30 ligand G-1 increases aryl hydrocarbon receptor signalling by inhibition of tubulin assembly and cell cycle arrest in human MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnow, Patrick; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory crosstalk between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and oestrogen receptor α (ERα) is well established. Apart from the nuclear receptors ERα and ERβ, oestrogen signalling further involves an unrelated G protein-coupled receptor termed GPR30. In order to investigate potential regulatory crosstalk, this study investigated the influence of G-1 as one of the few GPR30-specific ligands on the AHR regulon in MCF-7 cells. As a well-characterised model system, these human mammary carcinoma cells co-express all three receptors (AHR, ERα and GPR30) and are thus ideally suited to study corresponding regulatory pathway interactions on transcript level. Indeed, treatment with micromolar concentrations of the GPR30-specific agonist G-1 resulted in up-regulation of AHR as well as the transcripts for cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1B1, two well-known targets of the AHR regulon. While this was partly attributable to G-1-mediated inhibition of tubulin assembly and subsequent cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, the effects nevertheless required functional AHR. However, G-1-induced up-regulation of CYP 1A1 was not mediated by GPR30, as G15 antagonist treatment as well as a knockdown of GPR30 and AHR failed to inhibit this effect. PMID:26475489

  6. The Cell Surface Estrogen Receptor, G Protein- Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30, is Markedly Down Regulated During Breast Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Poola

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: GPR30 is a cell surface estrogen receptor that has been shown to mediate a number of non-genomic rapid effects of estrogen and appear to balance the signaling of estrogen and growth factors. In addition, progestins appear to use GPR30 for their actions. Therefore, GPR30 could play a critical role in hormonal regulation of breast epithelial cell integrity. Deregulation of the events mediated by GPR30 could contribute to tumorigenesis.Methods: To understand the role of GPR30 in the deregulation of estrogen signaling processes during breast carcinogenesis, we have undertaken this study to investigate its expression at mRNA levels in tumor tissues and their matched normal tissues. We compared its expression at mRNA levels by RT quantitative real-time PCR relative to GAPDH in ERα”—positive (n = 54 and ERα”—negative (n = 45 breast cancer tissues to their matched normal tissues.Results: We report here, for the first time, that GPR30 mRNA levels were significantly down-regulated in cancer tissues in comparison with their matched normal tissues (p 0.0001 by two sided paired t-test. The GPR30 expression levels were significantly lower in tumor tissues from patients (n = 29 who had lymph node metastasis in comparison with tumors from patients (n = 53 who were negative for lymph node metastasis (two sample t-test, p 0.02, but no association was found with ERα, PR and other tumor characteristics.Conclusions: Down-regulation of GPR30 could contribute to breast tumorigenesis and lymph node metastasis.

  7. G Protein-coupled Receptors and Resistance to Inhibitors of Cholinesterase-8A (Ric-8A) Both Regulate the Regulator of G Protein Signaling 14 (RGS14)·Gαi1 Complex in Live Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Vellano, Christopher P.; Maher, Ellen M.; Hepler, John R.; Blumer, Joe B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Regulator of G protein signaling 14 (RGS14) is a G protein regulatory (GPR) protein that participates in unconventional G protein signaling independent of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs).

  8. The human N-formylpeptide receptor. Characterization of two cDNA isolates and evidence for a new subfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two variants of the human N-formylpeptide chemoattractant receptor have been isolated from a CDM8 expression library prepared from mRNA of human myeloid HL-60 cells differentiated to the granulocyte phenotype with Bt2cAMP. Both recombinant receptors, fMLP-R26 and fMLP-R98, are 350 amino acids long (Mr 38 420); they differ from each other by two residue changes at positions 101 and 346 and by significant differences in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Both clones were able to transfer to COS-7 cells the capacity to specificaly bind a new and highly efficient hydrophilic derivative of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-Lys, referred to as fMLPK-Pep12. Photolabeling experiments revealed that the glycosylated form of the fMLP receptor in COS cells has a molecular weight (Mr 50 000-70 000) similar to that observed for the native receptor in differentiated HL-60 cells. Northern blot analysis revealed a major transcript of 1.6-1.7 kb and two minor hybridization signals of 2.3 and 3.1 kb, suggesting a related family of receptors. The complex hybridization pattern obtained with restricted genomic DNA was consistent with either two genes encoding fMLP receptor isoforms or a single gene with at least one intron in the coding sequence. Sequence comparison established that the fMLP receptor belongs to the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. The structural similarities observed with RDC1, a receptor isolated from a dog thyroid cDNA library, which shares weak homologies with other members of the family, suggests that the fMLP receptor is representative of a new subfamily

  9. The adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G2 (ADGRG2/GPR64) constitutively activates SRE and NFκB and is involved in cell adhesion and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelia Peeters, Miriam; Fokkelman, Michiel; Boogaard, Bob;

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs) are believed to be activated by auto-proteolytic cleavage of their very large extracellular N-terminal domains normally acting as a negative regulator of the intrinsically constitutively active seven transmembrane domain. ADGRG2 (or GPR64) which origin...... the adhesion GPCR ADGRG2 is critically involved in the adhesion and migration of certain breast cancer cells through mechanisms including a non-canonical NFkB pathway and that ADGRG2 could be a target for treatment of certain types of cancer.......Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs) are believed to be activated by auto-proteolytic cleavage of their very large extracellular N-terminal domains normally acting as a negative regulator of the intrinsically constitutively active seven transmembrane domain. ADGRG2 (or GPR64) which...... activity through the adhesion- and migration-related transcription factors serum response element (SRE) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) presumably via coupling to Gα12/13 and Gαq. However, activation of these two pathways appears to occur through distinct molecular...

  10. Targeted ubiquitination and degradation of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 by the DDB1-CUL4 ubiquitin ligase complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyan Wu

    Full Text Available The G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs phosphorylate agonist occupied G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and desensitize GPCR-mediated signaling. Recent studies indicate they also function non-catalytically via interaction with other proteins. In this study, a proteomic approach was used to screen interacting proteins of GRK5 in MDA-MB-231 cells and HUVEC cells. Mass spectrometry analysis reveals several proteins in the GRK5 immunocomplex including damaged DNA-binding protein 1 (DDB1, an adaptor subunit of the CUL4-ROC1 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the association of GRK5 with DDB1-CUL4 complex, and reveal that DDB1 acts as an adapter to link GRK5 to CUL4 to form the complex. Overexpression of DDB1 promoted, whereas knockdown of DDB1 inhibited the ubiquitination of GRK5, and the degradation of GRK5 was reduced in cells deficient of DDB1. Furthermore, the depletion of DDB1 decreased Hsp90 inhibitor-induced GRK5 destabilization and UV irradiation-induced GRK5 degradation. Thus, our study identified potential GRK5 interacting proteins, and reveals the association of GRK5 with DDB1 in cell and the regulation of GRK5 level by DDB1-CUL4 ubiquitin ligase complex-dependent proteolysis pathway.

  11. Truncated G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1 splice variants are targets for highly potent opioid analgesics lacking side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Susruta; Grinnell, Steven; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Burgman, Maxim; Polikar, Lisa; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2011-12-01

    Pain remains a pervasive problem throughout medicine, transcending all specialty boundaries. Despite the extraordinary insights into pain and its mechanisms over the past few decades, few advances have been made with analgesics. Most pain remains treated by opiates, which have significant side effects that limit their utility. We now describe a potent opiate analgesic lacking the traditional side effects associated with classical opiates, including respiratory depression, significant constipation, physical dependence, and, perhaps most important, reinforcing behavior, demonstrating that it is possible to dissociate side effects from analgesia. Evidence indicates that this agent acts through a truncated, six-transmembrane variant of the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1. Although truncated splice variants have been reported for a number of G protein-coupled receptors, their functional relevance has been unclear. Our evidence now suggests that truncated variants can be physiologically important through heterodimerization, even when inactive alone, and can comprise new therapeutic targets, as illustrated by our unique opioid analgesics with a vastly improved pharmacological profile. PMID:22106286

  12. Identification and functional comparison of seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled BILF1 receptors in recently discovered nonhuman primate lymphocryptoviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Fares, Suzan; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander H; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Jarvis, Michael A; Ehlers, Bernhard; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Coevolution of herpesviruses with their respective host has resulted in a delicate balance between virus-encoded immune evasion mechanisms and host antiviral immunity. BILF1 encoded by human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a 7-transmembrane (7TM) G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with...... multiple immunomodulatory functions, including attenuation of PKR phosphorylation, activation of G-protein signaling, and downregulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I surface expression. In this study, we explored the evolutionary and functional relationships between BILF1 receptor...... activity via G protein Gαi and induced activation of the NF-κB transcription factor. In contrast, only 3 of 5 were able to activate NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells); chimpanzee and orangutan BILF1 molecules were unable to activate NFAT. Similarly, although all receptors were internalized, BILF1...

  13. Cell transformation mediated by the Epstein-Barr virus G protein-coupled receptor BILF1 is dependent on constitutive signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte; Nørregaard, K.; Kristensen, Martin; Kubale, V.; Rosenkilde, M.M.; Kledal, Thomas N

    2010-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) open reading frame BILF1 encodes a seven trans-membrane (TM) G protein-coupled receptor that signals with high constitutive activity through G alpha(i) (Beisser et al., 2005; Paulsen et al., 2005). In this paper, the transforming potential of BILF1 is investigated in vitro...... an intermediately active triple-mutated receptor possessed an intermediate transforming potential. Furthermore, BILF1 expression induced vascular endothelial growth factor secretion in a constitutively active manner. In nude mice, BILF1 promoted tumor formation in 90% of cases, ORF74 (from Kaposi......'s sarcoma-associated herpes virus) in 100% of cases, whereas the signaling-deficient receptor resulted in tumor establishment in 40% of cases. These data suggest that BILF1, when expressed during EBV infection, could indeed be involved in the pathogenesis of EBV-associated diseases and malignancies...

  14. Rationally designed chemokine-based toxin targeting the viral G protein-coupled receptor US28 potently inhibits cytomegalovirus infection in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Jeppesen, Mads G.; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel; Krzywkowski, Karen; Dulal, Kalpana; Cheng, Tong; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Larsen, Olav; Burg, John S.; Jarvis, Michael A.; Christopher Garcia, K.; Zhu, Hua; Kledal, Thomas N; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2015-01-01

    target the human viral pathogen, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), on the basis of its expression of the 7TM G protein-coupled chemokine receptor US28. The virus origin of US28 provides an exceptional chemokine-binding profile with high selectivity and improved binding for the CX3C chemokine, CX3CL1......The use of receptor-ligand interactions to direct toxins to kill diseased cells selectively has shown considerable promise for treatment of a number of cancers and, more recently, autoimmune disease. Here we move the fusion toxin protein (FTP) technology beyond cancer/autoimmune therapeutics to....... Moreover, US28 is constitutively internalizing by nature, providing highly effective FTP delivery. We designed a synthetic CX3CL1 variant engineered to have ultra-high affinity for US28 and greater specificity for US28 than the natural sole receptor for CX3CL1, CX3CR1, and we fused the synthetic variant...

  15. From the black widow spider to human behavior: Latrophilins, a relatively unknown class of G protein-coupled receptors, are implicated in psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ariel F; Muenke, Maximilian; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    The findings of a recent study associate LPHN3, a member of the latrophilin family, with an increased risk of developing attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the most common psychiatric disorder in childhood and adolescence. Latrophilins comprise a new family of G protein-coupled receptors of unknown native physiological function that mediate the neurotoxic effects of α-latrotoxin, a potent toxin found in black widow spider venom. This receptor-toxin interaction has helped to elucidate the mechanistic aspects of neurotransmitter and hormone release in vertebrates. Such unprecedented discovery points to a new direction in the assessment of ADHD and suggest that further study of this receptor family may provide novel insights into the etiology and treatment of ADHD and other related psychiatric conditions. PMID:21184579

  16. Salt bridges overlapping the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist binding site reveal a coincidence detector for G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D; Mosberg, Henry I; Conn, P Michael

    2011-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small size among GPCRs, is amenable to molecular biological approaches and to computer modeling. These techniques and interspecies comparisons are used to identify structural features that are important for both intracellular trafficking and GnRHR activation yet distinguish between these processes. Our model features two salt (Arg(38)-Asp(98) and Glu(90)-Lys(121)) and two disulfide (Cys(14)-Cys(200) and Cys(114)-Cys(196)) bridges, all of which are required for the human GnRHR to traffic to the plasma membrane. This study reveals that both constitutive and ligand-induced activation are associated with a "coincidence detector" that occurs when an agonist binds. The observed constitutive activation of receptors lacking Glu(90)-Lys(121), but not Arg(38)-Asp(98) ionic bridge, suggests that the role of the former connection is holding the receptor in the inactive conformation. Both the aromatic ring and hydroxyl group of Tyr(284) and the hydrogen bonding of Ser(217) are important for efficient receptor activation. Our modeling results, supported by the observed influence of Lys(191) from extracellular loop 2 (EL2) and a four-residue motif surrounding this loop on ligand binding and receptor activation, suggest that the positioning of EL2 within the seven-α-helical bundle regulates receptor stability, proper trafficking, and function. PMID:21527534

  17. A novel chemogenomics analysis of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and their ligands: a potential strategy for receptor de-orphanization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmerich Michael TM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs represent a family of well-characterized drug targets with significant therapeutic value. Phylogenetic classifications may help to understand the characteristics of individual GPCRs and their subtypes. Previous phylogenetic classifications were all based on the sequences of receptors, adding only minor information about the ligand binding properties of the receptors. In this work, we compare a sequence-based classification of receptors to a ligand-based classification of the same group of receptors, and evaluate the potential to use sequence relatedness as a predictor for ligand interactions thus aiding the quest for ligands of orphan receptors. Results We present a classification of GPCRs that is purely based on their ligands, complementing sequence-based phylogenetic classifications of these receptors. Targets were hierarchically classified into phylogenetic trees, for both sequence space and ligand (substructure space. The overall organization of the sequence-based tree and substructure-based tree was similar; in particular, the adenosine receptors cluster together as well as most peptide receptor subtypes (e.g. opioid, somatostatin and adrenoceptor subtypes. In ligand space, the prostanoid and cannabinoid receptors are more distant from the other targets, whereas the tachykinin receptors, the oxytocin receptor, and serotonin receptors are closer to the other targets, which is indicative for ligand promiscuity. In 93% of the receptors studied, de-orphanization of a simulated orphan receptor using the ligands of related receptors performed better than random (AUC > 0.5 and for 35% of receptors de-orphanization performance was good (AUC > 0.7. Conclusions We constructed a phylogenetic classification of GPCRs that is solely based on the ligands of these receptors. The similarities and differences with traditional sequence-based classifications were investigated: our ligand

  18. Dual activation of the bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and G-protein-coupled receptor TGR5 protects mice against atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinobu Miyazaki-Anzai

    Full Text Available Bile acid signaling is a critical regulator of glucose and energy metabolism, mainly through the nuclear receptor FXR and the G protein-coupled receptor TGR. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether dual activation of FXR and TGR5 plays a significant role in the prevention of atherosclerosis progression. To evaluate the effects of bile acid signaling in atherogenesis, ApoE-/- mice and LDLR-/- mice were treated with an FXR/TGR5 dual agonist (INT-767. INT-767 treatment drastically reduced serum cholesterol levels. INT-767 treatment significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation in both ApoE-/- and LDLR-/- mice. INT-767 decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the aortas of ApoE-/- mice through the inactivation of NF-κB. In addition, J774 macrophages treated with INT-767 had significantly lower levels of active NF-κB, resulting in cytokine production in response to LPS through a PKA dependent mechanism. This study demonstrates that concurrent activation of FXR and TGR5 attenuates atherosclerosis by reducing both circulating lipids and inflammation.

  19. Estradiol attenuates EGF-induced rapid uPAR mobilization and cell migration via the G-protein-coupled receptor 30 in ovarian cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henic, Emir; Noskova, Vera; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla;

    2009-01-01

    : rapid mobilization of uPAR from detergent-resistant domains, increased mRNA, and decreased degradation. G-protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) is a newly identified membrane estrogen receptor (ER).The objective of this study was to explore the effects of 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) on uPAR expression and...... ERalpha, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Estradiol attenuates the stimulatory effect of EGF on cell migration and uPAR expression. Specifically, E(2) reduces the very rapid increase of detergent extractable uPAR, which occurs within minutes of EGF stimulation and probably represents...... mobilization of uPAR from detergent-resistant domains such as lipid rafts. Estradiol influenced neither the amount of uPAR mRNA nor the rate of uPAR degradation or solubilization. The nuclear ER antagonists ICI 182780 and tamoxifen, which are GPR30 agonists, as well as the specifically constructed GPR30...

  20. The viral G protein-coupled receptor ORF74 unmasks phospholipase C signaling of the receptor tyrosine kinase IGF-1R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munnik, Sabrina M; van der Lee, Rosan; Velders, Daniëlle M; van Offenbeek, Jody; Smits-de Vries, Laura; Leurs, Rob; Smit, Martine J; Vischer, Henry F

    2016-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes the constitutively active G protein-coupled receptor ORF74, which is expressed on the surface of infected host cells and has been linked to the development of the angioproliferative tumor Kaposi's sarcoma. Furthermore, the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor, a receptor tyrosine kinase, also plays an essential role in Kaposi's sarcoma growth and survival. In this study we examined the effect of the constitutively active viral receptor ORF74 on human IGF-1R signaling. Constitutive and CXCL1-induced ORF74 signaling did not transactivate IGF-1R. In contrast, IGF-1 stimulated phospholipase C (PLC) activation in an ORF74-dependent manner without affecting chemokine binding to ORF74. Inhibition of constitutive ORF74 activity by mutagenesis or the inverse agonist CXCL10, or neutralizing IGF-1R with an antibody or silencing IGF-1R expression using siRNA inhibited PLC activation by IGF-1. Transactivation of ORF74 in response to IGF-1 occurred independently of Src, PI3K, and secreted ORF74 ligands. Furthermore, tyrosine residues in the carboxyl-terminus and intracellular loop 2 of ORF74 are not essential for IGF-1-induced PLC activation. Interestingly, PLC activation in response to IGF-1 is specific for ORF74 as IGF-1 was unable to activate PLC in cells expressing the constitutively active human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded GPCR US28. Interestingly, IGF-1 does not induce β-arrestin recruitment to ORF74. The proximity ligation assay revealed close proximity between ORF74 and IGF-1R on the cell surface, but a physical interaction was not confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Unmasking IGF-1R signaling to PLC in response to IGF-1 is a previously unrecognized action of ORF74. PMID:26931381

  1. Identification of G protein-coupled receptors required for vitellogenin uptake into the oocytes of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hua; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that a membrane receptor might be involved in mediating vitellogenin (Vg) uptake and juvenile hormone (JH)-regulated remodeling of follicular epithelium (also called 'patency'). G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family is one of the largest membrane receptor protein families and controls many key physiological processes. To investigate the role of GPCRs in insect reproduction and juvenile hormone-regulated Vg uptake, we performed a comprehensive RNA interference (RNAi) screen targeting GPCRs in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Out of 112 GPCRs tested, knockdown of 41 GPCRs resulted in a reduction in fecundity. Interestingly, RNAi against two GPCRs (a Rhodopsin-like receptor and a Dopamine D2-like receptor) led to a significant reduction in Vg accumulation in developing oocytes. Functional assays of these two GPCRs showed that JH triggers a dose-dependent inhibition of intracellular cAMP levels in HEK293 cells expressing Tribolium Dopamine D2-like receptor. These data suggest that Dopamine D2-like receptor plays crucial roles in regulating Vg uptake and is a promising candidate membrane receptor mediating JH regulation of patency in the red flour beetle. PMID:27277501

  2. The G protein-coupled receptor GPR157 regulates neuronal differentiation of radial glial progenitors through the Gq-IP3 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeo, Yutaka; Kurabayashi, Nobuhiro; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Sanada, Kamon

    2016-01-01

    The ability of radial glial progenitors (RGPs) to generate cortical neurons is determined by local extracellular factors and signaling pathways intrinsic to RGPs. Here we find that GPR157, an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, localizes to RGPs' primary cilia exposed to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). GPR157 couples with Gq-class of the heterotrimeric G-proteins and signals through IP3-mediated Ca(2+) cascade. Activation of GPR157-Gq signaling enhances neuronal differentiation of RGPs whereas interfering with GPR157-Gq-IP3 cascade in RGPs suppresses neurogenesis. We also detect the presence of putative ligand(s) for GPR157 in the CSF, and demonstrate the increased ability of the CSF to activate GPR157 at neurogenic phase. Thus, GPR157-Gq signaling at the primary cilia of RGPs is activated by the CSF and contributes to neurogenesis. PMID:27142930

  3. Studies of relationships between variation of the human G protein-coupled receptor 40 Gene and Type 2 diabetes and insulin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Y H; Vissing, H; Holst, B;

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: Recently, a novel human G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40), which is predominantly expressed in pancreatic islets, was shown to mediate an amplifying effect of long-chain fatty acids on glucose-induced insulin secretion. The present aim was to examine the coding region of GPR40 for...... variation and to assess whether identified variants confer an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes or altered insulin release. METHODS: Mutation analysis was performed in 43 patients with Type 2 diabetes, 18 normal glucose-tolerant subjects, and 3 maturity-onset of diabetes in the young (MODY) X patients using...... direct sequencing. Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-generated primer extension products analysis by high throughput chip-based mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). The potential impact of GPR40 mutations on [(3)H]-myo-inositol turnover was estimated in COS-7 cells after...

  4. Pain- and morphine-associated transcriptional regulation of neuropeptide FF and the G-protein-coupled NPFF2 receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystedt, Johanna M; Lemberg, Kim; Lintunen, Minnamaija; Mustonen, Kaarin; Holma, Reetta; Kontinen, Vesa K; Kalso, Eija; Panula, Pertti

    2004-06-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) is involved in pain modulation, especially plasticity during inflammatory and neuropathic pain, and opiate interactions. Its nociceptive functions may be mediated by the NPFF2 receptor. To elucidate the role of the NPFF system in plasticity associated with pathologic pain, we studied the changes of NPFF mRNA and NPFF2 receptor mRNA in rat models of acute colonic inflammation, inflammatory pain, and neuropathic pain. Furthermore, we studied the mRNA levels of both NPFF and NPFF2 receptor in morphine-tolerant rats and after acute morphine injections. We found an activation of spinal NPFF and NPFF2 receptor during early inflammatory pain. Supraspinally, we found an up-regulation of NPFF2 receptor mRNA during acute colonic inflammation and neuropathic pain. Acute, but not chronic, morphine activated the genes supraspinally. The results give further evidence for the involvement of the NPFF system in pain modulation and may provide new therapeutic opportunities for pathologic pain. PMID:15207282

  5. Scalable Production of Highly Sensitive Nanosensors Based on Graphene Functionalized with a Designed G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Mitchell B.; Matsunaga, Felipe; Han, Gang Hee; Hong, Sung Ju; Xi, Jin; Crook, Alexander; Perez-Aguilar, Jose Manuel; Park, Yung Woo; Saven, Jeffery G.; Liu, Renyu; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a novel, all-electronic biosensor for opioids that consists of an engineered mu opioid receptor protein, with high binding affinity for opioids, chemically bonded to a graphene field-effect transistor to read out ligand binding. A variant of the receptor protein that provided chemical recognition was computationally redesigned to enhance its solubility and stability in an aqueous environment. A shadow mask process was developed to fabricate arrays of hundreds of graphene transistors with average mobility of ~1500 cm2 V-1 s-1 and yield exceeding 98%. The biosensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the target naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist, with a detection limit of 10 pg/mL.

  6. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Charu; Sadek, Bassem; Goyal, Sameer N; Sinha, Satyesh; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics. PMID:26664449

  7. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2 which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics.

  8. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases control expression of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Juliane; Lerche Hansen, Jakob; Haunsø, Stig;

    2002-01-01

    the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade to regulate GRK2 cellular levels. ERK activation by receptor stimulation elevated endogenous GRK2 while antagonist treatment decreased cellular GRK2. Activating ERK by overexpressing constitutive active MEK-1 or Ras elevated GRK2 protein levels while blocking...

  9. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Charu; Sadek, Bassem; Goyal, Sameer N.; Sinha, Satyesh; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics. PMID:26664449

  10. Rapid effects of estrogen on G protein-coupled receptor activation of potassium channels in the central nervous system (CNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martin J; Qiu, Jian; Wagner, Edward J; Rønnekleiv, Oline K

    2002-12-01

    Estrogen rapidly alters the excitability of hypothalamic neurons that are involved in regulating numerous homeostatic functions including reproduction, stress responses, feeding and motivated behaviors. Some of the neurons include neurosecretory neurons such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and dopamine neurons, and local circuitry neurons such as proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons. We have elucidated several non-genomic pathways through which the steroid alters synaptic responses in these hypothalamic neurons. We have examined the modulation by estrogen of the coupling of various receptor systems to inwardly-rectifying and small-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels using intracellular sharp-electrode and whole-cell recording techniques in hypothalamic slices from ovariectomized female guinea pigs. Estrogen rapidly uncouples mu-opioid receptors from G protein-gated inwardly-rectifying K(+) (GIRK) channels in POMC neurons and GABA(B) receptors from GIRK channels in dopamine neurons as manifested by a reduction in the potency of mu-opioid and GABA(B) receptor agonists to hyperpolarize their respective cells. This effect is blocked by inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC). In addition, after 24h following steroid administration in vivo, the GABA(B)/GIRK channel uncoupling observed in GABAergic neurons of the preoptic area is associated with reduced agonist efficacy. Conversely, estrogen enhances the efficacy of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor agonists to inhibit apamin-sensitive SK currents in these preoptic GABAergic neurons, and does so in both a rapid and sustained fashion. Finally, we observed a direct, steroid-induced hyperpolarization of GnRH neurons. These findings indicate a richly complex yet coordinated steroid modulation of K(+) channel activity in hypothalamic (POMC, dopamine, GABA, GnRH) neurons that are involved in regulating numerous homeostatic functions. PMID:12650715

  11. Transcriptome analysis of G protein-coupled receptors in distinct genetic subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia: identification of potential disease-specific targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiga, A; Lemieux, S; Pabst, C; Lavallée, V-P; Bouvier, M; Sauvageau, G; Hébert, J

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with poor clinical outcome and the development of more effective therapies is urgently needed. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent attractive therapeutic targets, accounting for approximately 30% of all targets of marketed drugs. Using next-generation sequencing, we studied the expression of 772 GPCRs in 148 genetically diverse AML specimens, normal blood and bone marrow cell populations as well as cord blood-derived CD34-positive cells. Among these receptors, 30 are overexpressed and 19 are downregulated in AML samples compared with normal CD34-positive cells. Upregulated GPCRs are enriched in chemokine (CCR1, CXCR4, CCR2, CX3CR1, CCR7 and CCRL2), adhesion (CD97, EMR1, EMR2 and GPR114) and purine (including P2RY2 and P2RY13) receptor subfamilies. The downregulated receptors include adhesion GPCRs, such as LPHN1, GPR125, GPR56, CELSR3 and GPR126, protease-activated receptors (F2R and F2RL1) and the Frizzled family receptors SMO and FZD6. Interestingly, specific deregulation was observed in genetically distinct subgroups of AML, thereby identifying different potential therapeutic targets in these frequent AML subgroups. PMID:27258612

  12. Structure and Function of Cross-class Complexes of G Protein-coupled Secretin and Angiotensin 1a Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Augustine, Mary Lou; Lee, Leo T O; Chow, Billy K C; Miller, Laurence J

    2016-08-12

    Complexes of secretin (SecR) and angiotensin 1a (Atr1a) receptors have been proposed to be functionally important in osmoregulation, providing an explanation for overlapping and interdependent functions of hormones that bind and activate different classes of GPCRs. However, the nature of these cross-class complexes has not been well characterized and their signaling properties have not been systematically explored. We now use competitive inhibition of receptor bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence complementation to establish the dominant functionally important state as a symmetrical homodimeric form of SecR decorated by monomeric Atr1a, interacting through lipid-exposed faces of Atr1a TM1 and TM4. Conditions increasing prevalence of this complex exhibited negative allosteric modulatory impact on secretin-stimulated cAMP responses at SecR. In contrast, activating Atr1a with full agonist in such a complex exhibited a positive allosteric modulatory impact on the same signaling event. This modulation was functionally biased, with secretin-stimulated calcium responses unaffected, whereas angiotensin-stimulated calcium responses through the complex were reduced or absent. Further supporting this interpretation, Atr1a with mutations of lipid-exposed faces of TM1 and TM4 that did not affect its ability to bind or signal, could be expressed in the same cell as SecR, yet not exhibit either the negative or positive allosteric impact on cAMP observed with the inactive or activated states of wild type Atr1a on function, and not interfere with angiotensin-stimulated calcium responses like complexes with Atr1a. This may provide a more selective means of exploring the physiologic functional impact of this cross-class receptor complex without interfering with the function of either component receptor. PMID:27330080

  13. TRPA1 is required for histamine-independent, Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor-mediated itch

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Sarah R.; Kristin A Gerhold; Bifolck-Fisher, Amber; Liu, Qin; Patel, Kush N.; Dong, Xinzhong; Bautista, Diana M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Itch, the unpleasant sensation that evokes a desire to scratch, accompanies numerous skin and nervous system disorders. In many cases, pathological itch is insensitive to antihistamine treatment. Recent studies have identified members of the Mas-related GPCR (Mrgpr) family that are activated by mast cell mediators and promote histamine-independent itch. MrgprA3 and MrgprC11 act as receptors for the pruritogens chloroquine and BAM8–22, respectively. However, the signaling pathways and ...

  14. Molecular cloning, expression, and sequence analysis of GPRC6A, a novel family C G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    surface. In this work, we report the existence of two additional GPRC6A isoforms (2 and 3) carrying in-frame deletions in the ATD. Except for the kidney, where isoforms 1 and 2 appear equally expressed, isoforms 2 and 3 are generally less abundant than isoform 1. Analysis of the intron-exon composition of...... from a human kidney cDNA (DNA complementary to RNA) library and shown to encode a protein of 926 amino acids (aa). Protein sequence analysis revealed the presence of a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain and an unusually long amino-terminal domain (ATD) of 590 amino acids. These traits, along with a...... significant homology to the human calcium-sensing receptor (CaR, 34% aa sequence identity), the taste receptor 1 (T1R1, 28%), and the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1, 24%), places GPRC6A in family C of the GPCRs. Interestingly, GPRC6A bears the highest resemblance with an odorant goldfish 5...

  15. Crystal structure of the PAC1R extracellular domain unifies a consensus fold for hormone recognition by class B G-protein coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Kumar

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP is a member of the PACAP/glucagon family of peptide hormones, which controls many physiological functions in the immune, nervous, endocrine, and muscular systems. It activates adenylate cyclase by binding to its receptor, PAC1R, a member of class B G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR. Crystal structures of a number of Class B GPCR extracellular domains (ECD bound to their respective peptide hormones have revealed a consensus mechanism of hormone binding. However, the mechanism of how PACAP binds to its receptor remains controversial as an NMR structure of the PAC1R ECD/PACAP complex reveals a different topology of the ECD and a distinct mode of ligand recognition. Here we report a 1.9 Å crystal structure of the PAC1R ECD, which adopts the same fold as commonly observed for other members of Class B GPCR. Binding studies and cell-based assays with alanine-scanned peptides and mutated receptor support a model that PAC1R uses the same conserved fold of Class B GPCR ECD for PACAP binding, thus unifying the consensus mechanism of hormone binding for this family of receptors.

  16. Bile acids trigger GLP-1 release predominantly by accessing basolaterally-located G-protein coupled bile acid receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brighton, Cheryl A; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Glass, Leslie L; Schoonjans,, Kristina; Holst, Jens Juul; Gribbe, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release, and whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1 secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L...... significant effect in non-polarised primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminalTDCA.Intestinal primary culturesandUssingchamber-mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA...

  17. A switch in G protein coupling for type 1 corticotropin-releasing factor receptors promotes excitability in epileptic brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Chakravarthi; Scidmore, Tanner; Jeong, Jaymin; Everest, Michelle; Chidiac, Peter; Poulter, Michael O

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and stress increase the frequency of epileptic seizures. These behavioral states induce the secretion of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a 40-amino acid neuropeptide neurotransmitter that coordinates many behavioral responses to stress in the central nervous system. In the piriform cortex, which is one of the most seizurogenic regions of the brain, CRF normally dampens excitability. By contrast, CRF increased the excitability of the piriform cortex in rats subjected to kindling, a model of temporal lobe epilepsy. In nonkindled rats, CRF activates its receptor, a G protein (heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate-binding protein)-coupled receptor, and signals through a Gαq/11-mediated pathway. After seizure induction, CRF signaling occurred through a pathway involving Gαs This change in signaling was associated with reduced abundance of regulator of G protein signaling protein type 2 (RGS2), which has been reported to inhibit Gαs-dependent signaling. RGS2 knockout mice responded to CRF in a similar manner as epileptic rats. These observations indicate that seizures produce changes in neuronal signaling that can increase seizure occurrence by converting a beneficial stress response into an epileptic trigger. PMID:27303056

  18. Conjugated Linoleic Acids Mediate Insulin Release through Islet G Protein-coupled Receptor FFA1/GPR40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes; Liebscher, Kathrin; Merten, Nicole;

    2011-01-01

    of insulin resistance and the risk of developing diabetes. However, the mechanisms accounting for the effects of CLAs on glucose homeostasis are incompletely understood. Herein we provide evidence that CLAs specifically activate the cell surface receptor FFA1, an emerging therapeutic target to treat...... type 2 diabetes. Using different recombinant cellular systems engineered to stably express FFA1 and a set of diverse functional assays including the novel, label-free non-invasive dynamic mass redistribution technology (Corning® Epic® biosensor), both CLA isomers cis-9, trans-11-CLA and trans-10, cis......-12-CLA were found to activate FFA1 in vitro at concentrations sufficient to also account for FFA1 activation in vivo. Each CLA isomer markedly increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in insulin-producing INS-1E cells that endogenously express FFA1 and in primary pancreatic β-cells of wild type...

  19. Activation biosensor for G protein-coupled receptors: a FRET-based m1 muscarinic activation sensor that regulates G(q.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwoo Chang

    Full Text Available We describe the design, construction and validation of a fluorescence sensor to measure activation by agonist of the m1 muscarinic cholinergic receptor, a prototypical class I G(q-coupled receptor. The sensor uses an established general design in which Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET from a circularly permuted CFP mutant to FlAsH, a selectively reactive fluorescein, is decreased 15-20% upon binding of a full agonist. Notably, the sensor displays essentially wild-type capacity to catalyze activation of Gα(q, and the purified and reconstituted sensor displays appropriate regulation of affinity for agonists by G(q. We describe the strategies used to increase the agonist-driven change in FRET while simultaneously maintaining regulatory interactions with Gα(q, in the context of the known structures of Class I G protein-coupled receptors. The approach should be generally applicable to other Class I receptors which include numerous important drug targets.

  20. G protein-coupled receptor 30 mediates estrogen-induced proliferation of primordial germ cells via EGFR/Akt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chutian; Yu, Minli; Zhang, Caiqiao

    2012-07-01

    In vertebrates, estrogens are required for the normal development and function of postnatal gonads. However, it remains unclear whether estrogens are able to modulate development of the fetal germ cells. Here, we show that, unexpectedly, chicken primordial germ cells (PGC) lacking estrogen receptor α/β still proliferate in response to 17β-estradiol (E(2)). This is due to the capacity of G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), existing on PGC, to directly bind E(2). Knockdown experiments suggest that GPR30 is required for E(2)-stimulated PGC proliferation. Furthermore, this estrogen-induced activation of GPR30 is revealed to occur through the Gβγ-subunit protein-dependent and through the matrix metalloproteinase-dependent transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation results in a series of intracellular events, including activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/serine-threonine kinase/β-catenin pathway, which are followed by the induction of c-fos, c-myc, cyclin D1/E, and B-cell lymphoma 2 expression, and the inhibition of B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein expression and caspase3/9 activity. This eventually leads to decreased apoptosis and increased PGC proliferation. Collectively, these findings offer novel insights into the dynamic mechanism of estrogen action on PGC proliferation and suggest that E(2)/GPR30 signaling might play an important role in regulating fetal germ cell development, particularly at the stage before sexual differentiation. PMID:22635679

  1. Acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in human lymphoma cells: a role for the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor TDAG8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Dong, Lixue; Dean, Eric; Yang, Li V

    2013-01-01

    Acidosis is a biochemical hallmark of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we report that acute acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in U937 human lymphoma cells. The level of c-Myc transcripts, but not mRNA or protein stability, contributes to c-Myc protein reduction under acidosis. The pH-sensing receptor TDAG8 (GPR65) is involved in acidosis-induced c-Myc downregulation. TDAG8 is expressed in U937 lymphoma cells, and the overexpression or knockdown of TDAG8 further decreases or partially rescues c-Myc expression, respectively. Acidic pH alone is insufficient to reduce c-Myc expression, as it does not decrease c-Myc in H1299 lung cancer cells expressing very low levels of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Instead, c-Myc is slightly increased by acidosis in H1299 cells, but this increase is completely inhibited by ectopic overexpression of TDAG8. Interestingly, TDAG8 expression is decreased by more than 50% in human lymphoma samples in comparison to non-tumorous lymph nodes and spleens, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor function of TDAG8 in lymphoma. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism of c-Myc regulation by acidosis in the tumor microenvironment and indicate that modulation of TDAG8 and related pH-sensing receptor pathways may be exploited as a new approach to inhibit Myc expression. PMID:24152439

  2. Acidosis Decreases c-Myc Oncogene Expression in Human Lymphoma Cells: A Role for the Proton-Sensing G Protein-Coupled Receptor TDAG8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Acidosis is a biochemical hallmark of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we report that acute acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in U937 human lymphoma cells. The level of c-Myc transcripts, but not mRNA or protein stability, contributes to c-Myc protein reduction under acidosis. The pH-sensing receptor TDAG8 (GPR65 is involved in acidosis-induced c-Myc downregulation. TDAG8 is expressed in U937 lymphoma cells, and the overexpression or knockdown of TDAG8 further decreases or partially rescues c-Myc expression, respectively. Acidic pH alone is insufficient to reduce c-Myc expression, as it does not decrease c-Myc in H1299 lung cancer cells expressing very low levels of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Instead, c-Myc is slightly increased by acidosis in H1299 cells, but this increase is completely inhibited by ectopic overexpression of TDAG8. Interestingly, TDAG8 expression is decreased by more than 50% in human lymphoma samples in comparison to non-tumorous lymph nodes and spleens, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor function of TDAG8 in lymphoma. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism of c-Myc regulation by acidosis in the tumor microenvironment and indicate that modulation of TDAG8 and related pH-sensing receptor pathways may be exploited as a new approach to inhibit Myc expression.

  3. Large-scale RNAi screen of G protein-coupled receptors involved in larval growth, molting and metamorphosis in the red flour beetle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Kapil

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs belong to the largest superfamily of integral cell membrane proteins and play crucial roles in physiological processes including behavior, development and reproduction. Because of their broad and diverse roles in cellular signaling, GPCRs are the therapeutic targets for many prescription drugs. However, there is no commercial pesticide targeting insect GPCRs. In this study, we employed functional genomics methods and used the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, as a model system to study the physiological roles of GPCRs during the larval growth, molting and metamorphosis. Results A total of 111 non-sensory GPCRs were identified in the T. castaneum genome. Thirty-nine of them were not reported previously. Large-scale RNA interference (RNAi screen was used to study the function of all these GPCRs during immature stages. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-mediated knockdown in the expression of genes coding for eight GPCRs caused severe developmental arrest and ecdysis failure (with more than 90% mortality after dsRNA injection. These GPCRs include dopamine-2 like receptor (TC007490/D2R and latrophilin receptor (TC001872/Cirl. The majority of larvae injected with TC007490/D2R dsRNA died during larval stage prior to entering pupal stage, suggesting that this GPCR is essential for larval growth and development. Conclusions The results from our study revealed the physiological roles of some GPCRs in T. castaneum. These findings could help in development of novel pesticides targeting these GPCRs.

  4. Novel G Protein-Coupled Oestrogen Receptor GPR30 Shows Changes in mRNA Expression in the Rat Brain over the Oestrous Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. Spary

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Oestrogen influences autonomic function via actions at classical nuclear oestrogen receptors α and β in the brain, and recent evidence suggests the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 may also function as a cytoplasmic oestrogen receptor. We investigated the expression of GPR30 in female rat brains throughout the oestrous cycle and after ovariectomy to determine whether GPR30 expression in central autonomic nuclei is correlated with circulating oestrogen levels. In the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, ventrolateral medulla (VLM and periaqueductal gray (PAG GPR30 mRNA, quantified by real-time PCR, was increased in proestrus and oestrus. In ovariectomised (OVX rats, expression in NTS and VLM appeared increased compared to metoestrus, but in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and PAG lower mRNA levels were seen in OVX. GPR30-like immunoreactivity (GPR30-LI colocalised with Golgi in neurones in many brain areas associated with autonomic pathways, and analysis of numbers of immunoreactive neurones showed differences consistent with the PCR data. GPR30-LI was found in a variety of transmitter phenotypes, including cholinergic, serotonergic, catecholaminergic and nitrergic neurones in different neuronal groups. These observations support the view that GPR30 could act as a rapid transducer responding to oestrogen levels and thus modulate the activity of central autonomic pathways.

  5. Butyrate increases intracellular calcium levels and enhances growth hormone release from rat anterior pituitary cells via the G-protein-coupled receptors GPR41 and 43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Consolata Miletta

    Full Text Available Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA closely related to the ketone body ß-hydroxybutyrate (BHB, which is considered to be the major energy substrate during prolonged exercise or starvation. During fasting, serum growth hormone (GH rises concomitantly with the accumulation of BHB and butyrate. Interactions between GH, ketone bodies and SCFA during the metabolic adaptation to fasting have been poorly investigated to date. In this study, we examined the effect of butyrate, an endogenous agonist for the two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR, GPR41 and 43, on non-stimulated and GH-releasing hormone (GHRH-stimulated hGH secretion. Furthermore, we investigated the potential role of GPR41 and 43 on the generation of butyrate-induced intracellular Ca2+ signal and its ultimate impact on hGH secretion. To study this, wt-hGH was transfected into a rat pituitary tumour cell line stably expressing the human GHRH receptor. Treatment with butyrate promoted hGH synthesis and improved basal and GHRH-induced hGH-secretion. By acting through GPR41 and 43, butyrate enhanced intracellular free cytosolic Ca2+. Gene-specific silencing of these receptors led to a partial inhibition of the butyrate-induced intracellular Ca2+ rise resulting in a decrease of hGH secretion. This study suggests that butyrate is a metabolic intermediary, which contributes to the secretion and, therefore, to the metabolic actions of GH during fasting.

  6. Kisspeptins are novel potent vasoconstrictors in humans, with a discrete localization of their receptor, G protein-coupled receptor 54, to atherosclerosis-prone vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Emma J; Maguire, Janet J; Kuc, Rhoda E; Davenport, Anthony P

    2007-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor GPR54 (also designated KISS1) is activated by cleavage products of the KiSS1 protein, the kisspeptins (KP), to act as a molecular switch for puberty. Additionally, KP are potent inhibitors of tumor metastasis and play a role in placentation, both processes involving angiogenesis. Our aim was to investigate whether GPR54 and KP are expressed within normal and diseased human vasculature and what their functional role may be. RT-PCR screening of human blood vessels revealed a discrete localization of GPR54 mRNA in smooth muscle of vessels with the same developmental origins, aorta, coronary artery, and umbilical vein, a pattern confirmed by immunocytochemistry and radioligand binding. Novel ligand [(125)I]KP-13 exhibited saturable and high-affinity binding in aorta smooth muscle sections (dissociation constant K(D) = 0.2 +/- 0.03 nM), and using confocal microscopy, we found colocalization of receptor and peptide to vascular endothelial cells and to the atherosclerotic plaque of coronary artery. RIA detected 13.04 +/- 2.94 and 20.50 +/- 5.00 fmol/g KP in human coronary artery and aorta, respectively. KP-10, KP-13, and KP-54 acted as vasoconstrictors with comparable potency and efficacy in isolated rings of coronary artery (negative logarithm of the EC(50) and maximal response, respectively, as follows: KP-10, 7.89 +/- 0.24 and 33.7 +/- 17.0; KP-13, 8.66 +/- 0.88 and 35.1 +/- 7.9; KP-54, 8.86 +/- 1.11 and 25.7 +/- 5.5) and umbilical vein (negative logarithm of the EC(50) and maximal response, respectively, as follows: KP-10, 8.44 +/- 022 and 24.3 +/- 3.7; KP-13, 8.43 +/- 0.88 and 28.4 +/- 8.6; KP-54, 8.93 +/- 0.39 and 36.9 +/- 5.2). In conclusion, we have detected expression of both peptide and receptor in aorta, coronary artery, and umbilical vein and have shown for the first time that the KP are vasoconstrictors in humans, suggesting a previously undescribed role for GPR54 and KP in the cardiovascular system. PMID:17023533

  7. G蛋白耦联雌激素受体-1与卵巢癌%G Protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor-1 and Ovarian Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋雪莉; 闫彦; 刘国艺

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER-1) is a novel estrogen receptor,which has been found to mediate the non-genomic effects of estrogen.GPER-1 has a high affinity to natural and synthetic estrogens.It is capable of activating multiple second messengers and rapid signaling pathways,and indirectly regulates transcriptional activities of estrogens.A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that GPER-1 is involved in the tumorigenesis and progression of female reproductive malignancies.GPER-1 is overexpressed in ovarian carcinomas,and predicts the poor outcome of the disease.GPER-1 might serve as a therapeutic target in the treatment of ovarian carcinomas.In the present review,the structure,location and signaling transduction of GPER-1,and its biological functions in ovarian carcinomas were discussed,and its prospect as a new therapeutic target of ovarian carcinomas was also previewed.%G蛋白耦联雌激素受体-1(G protein-coupled estrogen receptor l,GPER-1)是一种新型的雌激素受体,能够介导雌激素的快速非基因组效应.GPER-1与雌激素具有高亲和力,能与天然雌激素和人工合成雌激素结合,快速激活细胞内第二信使或级联信号通路,间接调节转录活动,从而介导雌激素的生物学效应.GPER-1的亚细胞定位存在争议,因其亚细胞定位可能取决于不同的细胞类型.另外,性别、年龄等内在因素以及细胞外刺激、损伤等外在因素也影响GPER-1在质膜的相对丰度.近年来研究表明GPER-1的表达与女性生殖系统肿瘤的发生、发展密切相关,在卵巢癌组织中高表达,参与卵巢癌的发生发展,并可能作为评价卵巢癌患者预后的指标,有望成为卵巢癌重要的治疗靶点.

  8. Modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels by G protein-coupled receptors in celiac-mesenteric ganglion neurons of septic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Farrag

    Full Text Available Septic shock, the most severe complication associated with sepsis, is manifested by tissue hypoperfusion due, in part, to cardiovascular and autonomic dysfunction. In many cases, the splanchnic circulation becomes vasoplegic. The celiac-superior mesenteric ganglion (CSMG sympathetic neurons provide the main autonomic input to these vessels. We used the cecal ligation puncture (CLP model, which closely mimics the hemodynamic and metabolic disturbances observed in septic patients, to examine the properties and modulation of Ca2+ channels by G protein-coupled receptors in acutely dissociated rat CSMG neurons. Voltage-clamp studies 48 hr post-sepsis revealed that the Ca2+ current density in CMSG neurons from septic rats was significantly lower than those isolated from sham control rats. This reduction coincided with a significant increase in membrane surface area and a negligible increase in Ca2+ current amplitude. Possible explanations for these findings include either cell swelling or neurite outgrowth enhancement of CSMG neurons from septic rats. Additionally, a significant rightward shift of the concentration-response relationship for the norepinephrine (NE-mediated Ca2+ current inhibition was observed in CSMG neurons from septic rats. Testing for the presence of opioid receptor subtypes in CSMG neurons, showed that mu opioid receptors were present in ~70% of CSMG, while NOP opioid receptors were found in all CSMG neurons tested. The pharmacological profile for both opioid receptor subtypes was not significantly affected by sepsis. Further, the Ca2+ current modulation by propionate, an agonist for the free fatty acid receptors GPR41 and GPR43, was not altered by sepsis. Overall, our findings suggest that CSMG function is affected by sepsis via changes in cell size and α2-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca2+ channel modulation.

  9. The Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Raloxifene Regulates Arginine-Vasopressin Gene Expression in Human Female Neuroblastoma Cells Through G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor and ERK Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Daniela; Ghorbanpoor, Samar; Acaz-Fonseca, Estefania; Ruiz-Palmero, Isabel; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2015-10-01

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene reduces blood pressure in hypertensive postmenopausal women. In the present study we have explored whether raloxifene regulates gene expression of arginine vasopressin (AVP), which is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The effect of raloxifene was assessed in human female SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, which have been recently identified as a suitable cellular model to study the estrogenic regulation of AVP. Raloxifene, within a concentration ranging from 10(-10) M to 10(-6) M, decreased the mRNA levels of AVP in SH-SY5Y cells with maximal effect at 10(-7) M. This effect of raloxifene was imitated by an agonist (±)-1-[(3aR*,4S*,9bS*)-4-(6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolin-8-yl]-ethanone of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER) and blocked by an antagonist (3aS*,4R*,9bR*)-4-(6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3a,4,5,9b-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinoline of GPER and by GPER silencing. Raloxifene induced a time-dependent increase in the level of phosphorylated ERK1 and ERK2, by a mechanism blocked by the GPER antagonist. The treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with either a MAPK/ERK kinase 1/2-specific inhibitor (1,4-diamino-2, 3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio)butadine) or a protein kinase C inhibitor (sotrastaurin) blocked the effects of raloxifene on the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and the regulation of AVP mRNA levels. These results reveal a mechanism mediating the regulation of AVP expression by raloxifene, involving the activation of GPER, which in turn activates protein kinase C, MAPK/ERK kinase, and ERK. The regulation of AVP by raloxifene and GPER may have implications for the treatment of blood hypertension(.). PMID:26200092

  10. G-protein-coupled receptor affinity prediction based on the use of a profiling dataset: QSAR design, synthesis, and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Catherine; Gozalbes, Rafael; Nicolaï, Eric; Paugam, Marie-France; Coussy, Laurent; Barbosa, Frédérique; Horvath, Dragos; Revah, Frédéric

    2005-10-20

    A QSAR model accounting for "average" G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) binding was built from a large set of experimental standardized binding data (1939 compounds systematically tested over 40 different GPCRs) and applied to the design of a library of "GPCR-predicted" compounds. Three hundred and sixty of these compounds were randomly selected and tested in 21 GPCR binding assays. Positives were defined by their ability to inhibit by more than 70% the binding of reference compounds at 10 microM. A 5.5-fold enrichment in positives was observed when comparing the "GPCR-predicted" compounds with 600 randomly selected compounds predicted as "non-GPCR" from a general collection. The model was efficient in predicting strongest binders, since enrichment was greater for higher cutoffs. Significant enrichment was also observed for peptidic GPCRs and receptors not included to develop the QSAR model, suggesting the usefulness of the model to design ligands binding with newly identified GPCRs, including orphan ones. PMID:16220973

  11. Lymphatic Reprogramming by Kaposi Sarcoma Herpes Virus Promotes the Oncogenic Activity of the Virus-Encoded G-protein Coupled Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Berenice; Choi, Inho; Choi, Dongwon; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Sunju; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Lee, Yong Suk; Maeng, Yong Sun; Lee, Ha Neul; Park, Eunkyung; Kim, Kyu Eui; Kim, Nam Yoon; Baik, Jae Myung; Jung, Jae U.; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), the most common cancer in HIV-positive individuals, is caused by endothelial transformation mediated by the KS herpes virus (KSHV)-encoded G-protein coupled receptor (vGPCR). Infection of blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) by KSHV reactivates an otherwise silenced embryonic program of lymphatic differentiation. Thus, KS tumors express numerous lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC)-signature genes. A key unanswered question is how lymphatic reprogramming by the virus promotes tumorigenesis leading to KS formation. In this study, we present evidence that this process creates an environment needed to license the oncogenic activity of vGPCR. We found that the G-protein regulator RGS4 is an inhibitor of vGPCR that is expressed in BECs, but not in LECs. RGS4 was downregulated by the master regulator of LEC differentiation PROX1, which is upregulated by KSHV and directs KSHV-induced lymphatic reprogramming. Moreover, we found that KSHV upregulates the nuclear receptor LRH1, which physically interacts with PROX1 and synergizes with it to mediate repression of RGS4 expression. Mechanistic investigations revealed that RGS4 reduced vGPCR-enhanced cell proliferation, migration, VEGF expression and Akt activation and to suppress tumor formation induced by vGPCR. Our findings resolve long-standing questions about the pathological impact of KSHV-induced reprogramming of host cell identity, and they offer biological and mechanistic insights supporting the hypothesis that a lymphatic microenvironment is more favorable for KS tumorigenesis. PMID:22942256

  12. Hypertension-Related Gene Polymorphisms of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 4 Are Associated with NT-proBNP Concentration in Normotensive Healthy Adults

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    Junichi Yatabe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 (GRK4 with activating polymorphisms desensitize the natriuric renal tubular D1 dopamine receptor, and these GRK4 polymorphisms are strongly associated with salt sensitivity and hypertension. Meanwhile, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP may be useful in detecting slight volume expansion. However, relations between hypertension-related gene polymorphisms including GRK4 and cardiovascular indices such as NT-proBNP are not clear, especially in healthy subjects. Therefore, various hypertension-related polymorphisms and cardiovascular indices were analyzed in 97 normotensive, healthy Japanese adults. NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher in subjects with two or more GRK4 polymorphic alleles. Other hypertension-related gene polymorphisms, such as those of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system genes, did not correlate with NT-proBNP. There was no significant association between any of the hypertension-related gene polymorphisms and central systolic blood pressure, cardioankle vascular index, augmentation index, plasma aldosterone concentration, or an oxidative stress marker, urinary 8-OHdG. Normotensive individuals with GRK4 polymorphisms show increased serum NT-proBNP concentration and may be at a greater risk of developing hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  13. The dynamics of the G protein-coupled neuropeptide Y2 receptor in monounsaturated membranes investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast to the static snapshots provided by protein crystallography, G protein-coupled receptors constitute a group of proteins with highly dynamic properties, which are required in the receptors’ function as signaling molecule. Here, the human neuropeptide Y2 receptor was reconstituted into a model membrane composed of monounsaturated phospholipids and solid-state NMR was used to characterize its dynamics. Qualitative static 15N NMR spectra and quantitative determination of 1H–13C order parameters through measurement of the 1H–13C dipolar couplings of the CH, CH2 and CH3 groups revealed axially symmetric motions of the whole molecule in the membrane and molecular fluctuations of varying amplitude from all molecular segments. The molecular order parameters (Sbackbone = 0.59–0.67, SCH2 = 0.41–0.51 and SCH3 = 0.22) obtained in directly polarized 13C NMR experiments demonstrate that the Y2 receptor is highly mobile in the native-like membrane. Interestingly, according to these results the receptor was found to be slightly more rigid in the membranes formed by the monounsaturated phospholipids than by saturated phospholipids as investigated previously. This could be caused by an increased chain length of the monounsaturated lipids, which may result in a higher helical content of the receptor. Furthermore, the incorporation of cholesterol, phosphatidylethanolamine, or negatively charged phosphatidylserine into the membrane did not have a significant influence on the molecular mobility of the Y2 receptor

  14. The dynamics of the G protein-coupled neuropeptide Y2 receptor in monounsaturated membranes investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Lars; Kahr, Julian; Schmidt, Peter; Krug, Ulrike; Scheidt, Holger A.; Huster, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.huster@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [University of Leipzig, Institute of Medical Physics and Biophysics (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    In contrast to the static snapshots provided by protein crystallography, G protein-coupled receptors constitute a group of proteins with highly dynamic properties, which are required in the receptors’ function as signaling molecule. Here, the human neuropeptide Y2 receptor was reconstituted into a model membrane composed of monounsaturated phospholipids and solid-state NMR was used to characterize its dynamics. Qualitative static {sup 15}N NMR spectra and quantitative determination of {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C order parameters through measurement of the {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C dipolar couplings of the CH, CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups revealed axially symmetric motions of the whole molecule in the membrane and molecular fluctuations of varying amplitude from all molecular segments. The molecular order parameters (S{sub backbone} = 0.59–0.67, S{sub CH2} = 0.41–0.51 and S{sub CH3} = 0.22) obtained in directly polarized {sup 13}C NMR experiments demonstrate that the Y2 receptor is highly mobile in the native-like membrane. Interestingly, according to these results the receptor was found to be slightly more rigid in the membranes formed by the monounsaturated phospholipids than by saturated phospholipids as investigated previously. This could be caused by an increased chain length of the monounsaturated lipids, which may result in a higher helical content of the receptor. Furthermore, the incorporation of cholesterol, phosphatidylethanolamine, or negatively charged phosphatidylserine into the membrane did not have a significant influence on the molecular mobility of the Y2 receptor.

  15. A broad G protein-coupled receptor internalization assay that combines SNAP-tag labeling, diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer, and a highly emissive terbium cryptate acceptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique eLEVOYE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR internalization has long been considered a major aspect of the desensitization process that tunes ligand responsiveness, internalization is also involved in receptor resensitization and signaling, as well as the ligand scavenging function of some atypical receptors. Internalization thus contributes to the diversity of GPCR-dependent signaling, and its dynamics and quantification in living cells has generated considerable interest. We developed a robust and sensitive assay to follow and quantify ligand-induced and constitutive GPCR internalization but also receptor recycling in living cells. This assay is based on diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer (DERET between cell surface GPCRs labeled with a luminescent terbium cryptate donor and a fluorescein acceptor present in the culture medium. GPCR internalization results in a quantifiable reduction of energy transfer. This method yields a high signal-to-noise ratio due to time-resolved measurements. For various GPCRs belonging to different classes, we demonstrated that constitutive and ligand-induced internalization could be monitored as a function of time and ligand concentration, thus allowing accurate quantitative determination of kinetics of receptor internalization but also half-maximal effective or inhibitory concentrations of compounds. In addition to its selectivity and sensitivity, we provided evidence that DERET-based internalization assay is particularly suitable for characterizing biased ligands. Furthermore, the determination of a Z’-factor value of 0.45 indicates the quality and suitability of DERET-based internalization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of compounds that may modulate GPCRs internalization.

  16. An evolutionarily conserved arginine is essential for Tre1 G protein-coupled receptor function during germ cell migration in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Angela R Kamps

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs play central roles in mediating cellular responses to environmental signals leading to changes in cell physiology and behaviors, including cell migration. Numerous clinical pathologies including metastasis, an invasive form of cell migration, have been linked to abnormal GPCR signaling. While the structures of some GPCRs have been defined, the in vivo roles of conserved amino acid residues and their relationships to receptor function are not fully understood. Trapped in endoderm 1 (Tre1 is an orphan receptor of the rhodopsin class that is necessary for primordial germ cell migration in Drosophila melanogaster embryos. In this study, we employ molecular genetic approaches to identify residues in Tre1 that are critical to its functions in germ cell migration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, we show that the previously reported scattershot mutation is an allele of tre1. The scattershot allele results in an in-frame deletion of 8 amino acids at the junction of the third transmembrane domain and the second intracellular loop of Tre1 that dramatically impairs the function of this GPCR in germ cell migration. To further refine the molecular basis for this phenotype, we assayed the effects of single amino acid substitutions in transgenic animals and determined that the arginine within the evolutionarily conserved E/N/DRY motif is critical for receptor function in mediating germ cell migration within an intact developing embryo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These structure-function studies of GPCR signaling in native contexts will inform future studies into the basic biology of this large and clinically important family of receptors.

  17. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 mediates Tazarotene-induced gene 1-induced growth suppression of human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazarotene-induced gene 1 (TIG1) is a retinoid-inducible type II tumour suppressor gene. The B isoform of TIG1 (TIG1B) inhibits growth and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of TIG1B is frequently downregulated in various cancer tissues; however, the expression and activities of the TIG1A isoform are yet to be reported. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of the TIG1A and TIG1B isoforms on cell growth and gene expression profiles using colon cancer cells. TIG1A and TIG1B stable clones derived from HCT116 and SW620 colon cancer cells were established using the GeneSwitch system; TIG1 isoform expression was induced by mifepristone treatment. Cell growth was assessed using the WST-1 cell proliferation and colony formation assays. RNA interference was used to examine the TIG1 mediating changes in cell growth. Gene expression profiles were determined using microarray and validated using real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analyses. Both TIG1 isoforms were expressed at high levels in normal prostate and colon tissues and were downregulated in colon cancer cell lines. Both TIG1 isoforms significantly inhibited the growth of transiently transfected HCT116 cells and stably expressing TIG1A and TIG1B HCT116 and SW620 cells. Expression of 129 and 55 genes was altered upon induction of TIG1A and TIG1B expression, respectively, in stably expressing HCT116 cells. Of the genes analysed, 23 and 6 genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, in both TIG1A and TIG1B expressing cells. Upregulation of the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) was confirmed using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses in both TIG1 stable cell lines. Silencing of TIG1A or GRK5 expression significantly decreased TIG1A-mediated cell growth suppression. Expression of both TIG1 isoforms was observed in normal prostate and colon tissues and was downregulated in colon cancer cell lines. Both TIG1 isoforms suppressed cell growth and

  18. Xanthurenic acid binds to neuronal G-protein-coupled receptors that secondarily activate cationic channels in the cell line NCB-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleb, Omar; Maammar, Mohammed; Brumaru, Daniel; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Schmitt, Martine; Klein, Christian; Kemmel, Véronique; Maitre, Michel; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe Guy

    2012-01-01

    Xanthurenic acid (XA) is a metabolite of the tryptophan oxidation pathway through kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine. XA was until now considered as a detoxification compound and dead-end product reducing accumulation of reactive radical species. Apart from a specific role for XA in the signaling cascade resulting in gamete maturation in mosquitoes, nothing was known about its functions in other species including mammals. Based upon XA distribution, transport, accumulation and release in the rat brain, we have recently suggested that XA may potentially be involved in neurotransmission/neuromodulation, assuming that neurons presumably express specific XA receptors. Recently, it has been shown that XA could act as a positive allosteric ligand for class II metabotropic glutamate receptors. This finding reinforces the proposed signaling role of XA in brain. Our present results provide several lines of evidence in favor of the existence of specific receptors for XA in the brain. First, binding experiments combined with autoradiography and time-course analysis led to the characterization of XA binding sites in the rat brain. Second, specific kinetic and pharmacological properties exhibited by these binding sites are in favor of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Finally, in patch-clamp and calcium imaging experiments using NCB-20 cells that do not express glutamate-induced calcium signals, XA elicited specific responses involving activation of cationic channels and increases in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Altogether, these results suggest that XA, acting through a GPCR-induced cationic channel modulatory mechanism, may exert excitatory functions in various brain neuronal pathways. PMID:23139790

  19. Xanthurenic acid binds to neuronal G-protein-coupled receptors that secondarily activate cationic channels in the cell line NCB-20.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Taleb

    Full Text Available Xanthurenic acid (XA is a metabolite of the tryptophan oxidation pathway through kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine. XA was until now considered as a detoxification compound and dead-end product reducing accumulation of reactive radical species. Apart from a specific role for XA in the signaling cascade resulting in gamete maturation in mosquitoes, nothing was known about its functions in other species including mammals. Based upon XA distribution, transport, accumulation and release in the rat brain, we have recently suggested that XA may potentially be involved in neurotransmission/neuromodulation, assuming that neurons presumably express specific XA receptors. Recently, it has been shown that XA could act as a positive allosteric ligand for class II metabotropic glutamate receptors. This finding reinforces the proposed signaling role of XA in brain. Our present results provide several lines of evidence in favor of the existence of specific receptors for XA in the brain. First, binding experiments combined with autoradiography and time-course analysis led to the characterization of XA binding sites in the rat brain. Second, specific kinetic and pharmacological properties exhibited by these binding sites are in favor of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. Finally, in patch-clamp and calcium imaging experiments using NCB-20 cells that do not express glutamate-induced calcium signals, XA elicited specific responses involving activation of cationic channels and increases in intracellular Ca(2+ concentration. Altogether, these results suggest that XA, acting through a GPCR-induced cationic channel modulatory mechanism, may exert excitatory functions in various brain neuronal pathways.

  20. Involvement of a putative intercellular signal-recognizing G protein-coupled receptor in the engulfment of Salmonella by the protozoan Tetrahymena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.N. Agbedanu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to investigate the molecular basis of protozoa engulfment-mediated hypervirulence of Salmonella in cattle, we evaluated protozoan G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs as transducers of Salmonella engulfment by the model protozoan Tetrahymena. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that non-pathogenic protozoa (including Tetrahymena engulf Salmonella and then exacerbate its virulence in cattle, but the mechanistic details of the phenomenon are not fully understood. GPCRs were investigated since these receptors facilitate phagocytosis of particulates by Tetrahymena, and a GPCR apparently modulates bacterial engulfment for the pathogenic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica. A database search identified three putative Tetrahymena GPCRs, based on sequence homologies and predicted transmembrane domains, that were the focus of this study. Salmonella engulfment by Tetrahymena was assessed in the presence of suramin, a non-specific GPCR inhibitor. Salmonella engulfment was also assessed in Tetrahymena in which expression of putative GPCRs was knocked-down using RNAi. A candidate GPCR was then expressed in a heterologous yeast expression system for further characterization. Our results revealed that Tetrahymena were less efficient at engulfing Salmonella in the presence of suramin. Engulfment was reduced concordantly with a reduction in the density of protozoa. RNAi-based studies revealed that knock-down of one the Tetrahymena GPCRs caused diminished engulfment of Salmonella. Tetrahymena lysates activated this receptor in the heterologous expression system. These data demonstrate that the Tetrahymena receptor is a putative GPCR that facilitates bacterial engulfment by Tetrahymena. Activation of the putative GPCR seemed to be related to protozoan cell density, suggesting that its cognate ligand is an intercellular signaling molecule.

  1. Non-Dioxin-Like Polychlorinated Biphenyls Inhibit G-Protein Coupled Receptor-Mediated Ca2+ Signaling by Blocking Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-Young Choi

    Full Text Available Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are ubiquitous pollutants which accumulate in the food chain. Recently, several molecular mechanisms by which non-dioxin-like (NDL PCBs mediate neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral toxicity have been elucidated. However, although the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR is a significant target for neurobehavioral disturbance, our understanding of the effects of PCBs on GPCR signaling remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of NDL-PCBs on GPCR-mediated Ca2+ signaling in PC12 cells. We found that ortho-substituted 2,2',6-trichlorinated biphenyl (PCB19 caused a rapid decline in the Ca2+ signaling of bradykinin, a typical Gq- and phospholipase Cβ-coupled GPCR, without any effect on its inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production. PCB19 reduced thapsigargin-induced sustained cytosolic Ca2+ levels, suggesting that PCB19 inhibits SOCE. The abilities of other NDL-PCBs to inhibit store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE were also examined and found to be of similar potencies to that of PCB19. PCB19 also showed a manner equivalent to that of known SOCE inhibitors. PCB19-mediated SOCE inhibition was confirmed by demonstrating the ability of PCB19 to inhibit the SOCE current and thapsigargin-induced Mn2+ influx. These results imply that one of the molecular mechanism by which NDL-PCBs cause neurobehavioral disturbances involves NDL-PCB-mediated inhibition of SOCE, thereby interfering with GPCR-mediated Ca2+ signaling.

  2. The G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 mediates the proliferative and invasive effects induced by hydroxytamoxifen in endometrial cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We assessed hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) effects in two endometrial cancer cell lines. ► GPR30 mediates the proliferative effects induced by OHT. ► GPR30 mediates the invasive effects induced by OHT. ► GPR30 expression was up-regulated by OHT in endometrial cancer cell line. -- Abstract: The selective ER modulator tamoxifen (TAM) is the most widely used ER antagonist for treatment of women with hormone-dependent breast tumor. However, long-term treatment is associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate new insight into the role of G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) in the activity of TAM, which promoted endometrial cancer. In endometrial cancer cell lines ISHIKAWA and KLE, the potential of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT), the active metabolite of TAM, 17β-estradiol (E2) and G1, a non-steroidal GPR30-specific agonist to promote cell proliferation and invasion was evaluated. All agents above induced high proliferative and invasive effects, while the down-regulation of GPR30 or the interruption of MAPK signal pathway partly or completely prevented the action of the regent. Moreover, the RNA and protein expression of GPR30 was up-regulated by G1, E2 or OHT in both cell lines. The present study provided a new insight into the mechanism involved in the agonistic activity exerted by TAM in the uterus.

  3. Loss of the repressor REST in uterine fibroids promotes aberrant G protein-coupled receptor 10 expression and activates mammalian target of rapamycin pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Binny V.; Koohestani, Faezeh; McWilliams, Michelle; Colvin, Arlene; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Kinsey, William H.; Nowak, Romana A.; Nothnick, Warren B.; Chennathukuzhi, Vargheese M.

    2013-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are the most common tumors of the female reproductive tract, occurring in up to 77% of reproductive-aged women, yet molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. A role for atypically activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids has been suggested in several studies. We identified that G protein-coupled receptor 10 [GPR10, a putative signaling protein upstream of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase–protein kinase B/AKT–mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT–mTOR) pathway] is aberrantly expressed in uterine fibroids. The activation of GPR10 by its cognate ligand, prolactin releasing peptide, promotes PI3K–AKT–mTOR pathways and cell proliferation specifically in cultured primary leiomyoma cells. Additionally, we report that RE1 suppressing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor (REST/NRSF), a known tumor suppressor, transcriptionally represses GPR10 in the normal myometrium, and that the loss of REST in fibroids permits GPR10 expression. Importantly, mice overexpressing human GPR10 in the myometrium develop myometrial hyperplasia with excessive extracellular matrix deposition, a hallmark of uterine fibroids. We demonstrate previously unrecognized roles for GPR10 and its upstream regulator REST in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids. Importantly, we report a unique genetically modified mouse model for a gene that is misexpressed in uterine fibroids. PMID:23284171

  4. Stereoselective synthesis, biological evaluation, and modeling of novel bile acid-derived G-protein coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GP-BAR1, TGR5) agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Donna D; Sousa, Kyle M; Mattern, Daniell L; Wagner, Jeffrey; Fu, Xianghui; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Forman, Barry M; Huang, Wendong

    2015-04-01

    GP-BAR1 (also known as TGR5), a novel G-protein coupled receptor regulating various non-genomic functions via bile acid signaling, has emerged as a promising target for metabolic disorders, including obesity and type II diabetes. However, given that many bile acids (BAs) are poorly tolerated for systemic therapeutic use, there is significant need to develop GP-BAR1 agonists with improved potency and specificity and there also is significant impetus to develop a stereoselective synthetic methodology for GP-BAR1 agonists. Here, we report the development of highly stereo-controlled strategies to investigate a series of naturally occurring bile acid derivatives with markedly enhanced GP-BAR1 activity. These novel GP-BAR1 agonists are evaluated in vitro using luciferase-based reporter and cAMP assays to elucidate their biological properties. In vivo studies revealed that the GP-BAR1 agonist 23(S)-m-LCA increased intestinal GLP-1 transcripts by 26-fold. Additionally, computational modeling studies of selected ligands that exhibit enhanced potency and specificity for GP-BAR1 provide information on potential binding sites for these ligands in GP-BAR1. PMID:25735208

  5. Acidosis promotes Bcl-2 family-mediated evasion of apoptosis: involvement of acid-sensing G protein-coupled receptor Gpr65 signaling to Mek/Erk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Christopher; McColl, Karen; Zhong, Fei; Distelhorst, Clark W

    2012-08-10

    Acidosis arises in solid and lymphoid malignancies secondary to altered nutrient supply and utilization. Tumor acidosis correlates with therapeutic resistance, although the mechanism behind this effect is not fully understood. Here we show that incubation of lymphoma cell lines in acidic conditions (pH 6.5) blocks apoptosis induced by multiple cytotoxic metabolic stresses, including deprivation of glucose or glutamine and treatment with dexamethasone. We sought to examine the role of the Bcl-2 family of apoptosis regulators in this process. Interestingly, we found that acidic culture causes elevation of both Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, while also attenuating glutamine starvation-induced elevation of p53-up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) and Bim. We confirmed with knockdown studies that these shifts direct survival decisions during starvation and acidosis. Importantly, the promotion of a high anti- to pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member ratio by acidosis renders cells exquisitely sensitive to the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL antagonist ABT-737, suggesting that acidosis causes Bcl-2 family dependence. This dependence appears to be mediated, in part, by the acid-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, GPR65, via a MEK/ERK pathway. PMID:22685289

  6. A minimal ligand binding pocket within a network of correlated mutations identified by multiple sequence and structural analysis of G protein coupled receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven helical transmembrane proteins that function as signal transducers. They bind ligands in their extracellular and transmembrane regions and activate cognate G proteins at their intracellular surface at the other side of the membrane. The relay of allosteric communication between the ligand binding site and the distant G protein binding site is poorly understood. In this study, GREMLIN, a recently developed method that identifies networks of co-evolving residues from multiple sequence alignments, was used to identify those that may be involved in communicating the activation signal across the membrane. The GREMLIN-predicted long-range interactions between amino acids were analyzed with respect to the seven GPCR structures that have been crystallized at the time this study was undertaken. We demonstrate the use of GREMLIN to reveal a network of statistically correlated and functionally important residues in class A GPCRs. GREMLIN identified that ligand binding pocket residues are extensively correlated with distal residues. An analysis of the GREMLIN edges across multiple structures suggests that there may be a minimal binding pocket common to the seven known GPCRs. Further, the activation of rhodopsin involves these long-range interactions between extracellular and intracellular domain residues mediated by the retinal domain.

  7. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of signaling downstream of the prostaglandin e2/g-protein coupled receptor in human synovial fibroblasts: potential antifibrotic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerarduzzi, Casimiro; He, QingWen; Antoniou, John; Di Battista, John A

    2014-11-01

    The Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling mechanism within fibroblasts is of growing interest as it has been shown to prevent numerous fibrotic features of fibroblast activation with limited evidence of downstream pathways. To understand the mechanisms of fibroblasts producing tremendous amounts of PGE2 with autocrine effects, we apply a strategy of combining a wide-screening of PGE2-induced kinases with quantitative phosphoproteomics. Our large-scale proteomic approach identified a PKA signal transmitted through phosphorylation of its substrates harboring the R(R/X)X(S*/T*) motif. We documented 115 substrates, of which 72 had 89 sites with a 2.5-fold phosphorylation difference in PGE2-treated cells than in untreated cells, where approximately half of such sites were defined as being novel. They were compiled by networking software to focus on highlighted activities and to associate them with a functional readout of fibroblasts. The substrates were associated with a variety of cellular functions including cytoskeletal structures (migration/motility), regulators of G-protein coupled receptor function, protein kinases, and transcriptional/translational regulators. For the first time, we extended the PGE2 pathway into an elaborate network of interconnecting phosphoproteins, providing vital information to a once restricted signalosome. These data provide new insights into eicosanoid-initiated cell signaling with regards to the regulation of fibroblast activation and the identification of new targets for evidenced-based pharmacotherapy against fibrosis. PMID:25223752

  8. The G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 mediates the proliferative and invasive effects induced by hydroxytamoxifen in endometrial cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Gui-Qiang; Zhou, Long; Chen, Xiao-Yue [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital of the China Welfare Institute Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 910, Hengshan Road, Shanghai (China); Wan, Xiao-Ping, E-mail: wanxiaoping61@126.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital of the China Welfare Institute Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 910, Hengshan Road, Shanghai (China); He, Yin-Yan [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) effects in two endometrial cancer cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GPR30 mediates the proliferative effects induced by OHT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GPR30 mediates the invasive effects induced by OHT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GPR30 expression was up-regulated by OHT in endometrial cancer cell line. -- Abstract: The selective ER modulator tamoxifen (TAM) is the most widely used ER antagonist for treatment of women with hormone-dependent breast tumor. However, long-term treatment is associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate new insight into the role of G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) in the activity of TAM, which promoted endometrial cancer. In endometrial cancer cell lines ISHIKAWA and KLE, the potential of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT), the active metabolite of TAM, 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) and G1, a non-steroidal GPR30-specific agonist to promote cell proliferation and invasion was evaluated. All agents above induced high proliferative and invasive effects, while the down-regulation of GPR30 or the interruption of MAPK signal pathway partly or completely prevented the action of the regent. Moreover, the RNA and protein expression of GPR30 was up-regulated by G1, E2 or OHT in both cell lines. The present study provided a new insight into the mechanism involved in the agonistic activity exerted by TAM in the uterus.

  9. NPR-9, a Galanin-Like G-Protein Coupled Receptor, and GLR-1 Regulate Interneuronal Circuitry Underlying Multisensory Integration of Environmental Cues in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason C Campbell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available C. elegans inhabit environments that require detection of diverse stimuli to modulate locomotion in order to avoid unfavourable conditions. In a mammalian context, a failure to appropriately integrate environmental signals can lead to Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and epilepsy. Provided that the circuitry underlying mammalian sensory integration can be prohibitively complex, we analyzed nematode behavioral responses in differing environmental contexts to evaluate the regulation of context dependent circuit reconfiguration and sensorimotor control. Our work has added to the complexity of a known parallel circuit, mediated by interneurons AVA and AIB, that integrates sensory cues and is responsible for the initiation of backwards locomotion. Our analysis of the galanin-like G-protein coupled receptor NPR-9 in C. elegans revealed that upregulation of galanin signaling impedes the integration of sensory evoked neuronal signals. Although the expression pattern of npr-9 is limited to AIB, upregulation of the receptor appears to impede AIB and AVA circuits to broadly prevent backwards locomotion, i.e. reversals, suggesting that these two pathways functionally interact. Galanin signaling similarly plays a broadly inhibitory role in mammalian models. Moreover, our identification of a mutant, which rarely initiates backwards movement, allowed us to interrogate locomotory mechanisms underlying chemotaxis. In support of the pirouette model of chemotaxis, organisms that did not exhibit reversal behavior were unable to navigate towards an attractant peak. We also assessed ionotropic glutamate receptor GLR-1 cell-specifically within AIB and determined that GLR-1 fine-tunes AIB activity to modify locomotion following reversal events. Our research highlights that signal integration underlying the initiation and fine-tuning of backwards locomotion is AIB and NPR-9 dependent, and has demonstrated the suitability of C. elegans for analysis of multisensory integration

  10. The G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-1, GPER-1, Promotes Fibrillogenesis via a Shc-Dependent Pathway Resulting in Anchorage-Independent Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magruder, Hilary T.; Quinn, Jeffrey A.; Schwartzbauer, Jean E.; Reichner, Jonathan; Huang, Allan

    2016-01-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1, GPER-1, coordinates fibronectin (FN) matrix assembly and release of heparan-bound epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF). This mechanism of action results in the recruitment of FN-engaged integrin α5β1 to fibrillar adhesions and the formation of integrin α5β1-Shc adaptor protein complexes. Here, we show that GPER-1 stimulation of murine 4 T1 or human SKBR3 breast cancer cells with 17β-estradiol (E2β) promotes the formation of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers and results in increased cellular adhesion and haptotaxis on FN, but not collagen. These actions are also induced by the xenoestrogen, bisphenol A, and the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, ICI 182, 780, but not the inactive stereoisomer, 17α-estradiol (E2α). In addition, we show that GPER-1 stimulation of breast cancer cells allows for FN-dependent, anchorage-independent growth and FN fibril formation in “hanging drop” assays, indicating that these GPER-1-mediated actions occur independently of adhesion to solid substrata. Stable expression of Shc mutant Y317F lacking its primary tyrosyl phosphorylation site disrupts E2β-induced focal adhesion and actin stress fiber formation and abolishes E2β-enhanced haptotaxis on FN and anchorage-dependent growth. Collectively, these data demonstrate that E2β action via GPER-1 enhances cellular adhesivity and FN matrix assembly and allows for anchorage-independent growth, cellular events that may allow for cellular survival, and tumor progression. PMID:25096985

  11. Peripheral G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are involved in delta opioid receptor-mediated anti-hyperalgesia in rat masseter muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Man-Kyo; Cho, Yi Sul; Bae, Young Chul; Lee, Jongseok; Zhang, Xia; Ro, Jin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the efficacy of peripherally administered opioid has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies, the underlying mechanisms of its anti-hyperalgesic effects are poorly understood. G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are linked to opioid receptors in the brain. However, the role of peripheral GIRK channels in analgesia induced by peripherally administered opioid, especially in trigeminal system, is not clear. Methods Expression of GIRK subunits in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) was examined with RT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Chemical profiles of GIRK expressing neurons in TG were further characterized. Behavioral and Fos experiments were performed to examine the functional involvement of GIRK channels in delta opioid receptor (DOR)-mediated anti-hyperalgesia under an acute myositis condition. Results TG expressed mRNA and proteins for GIRK1 and GIRK2 subunits. Majority of GIRK1- and GIRK2-expressing neurons were non-peptidergic afferents. Inhibition of peripheral GIRK using Tertiapin-Q (TPQ) attenuated anti-nociceptive effects of peripherally administered DOR agonist, DPDPE, on mechanical hypersensitivity in masseter muscle. Furthermore, TPQ attenuated the suppressive effects of peripheral DPDPE on neuronal activation in the subnucleus caudalis of the trigeminal nucleus (Vc) following masseteric injection of capsaicin. Conclusions Our data indicate that peripheral DOR agonist-induced suppression of mechanical hypersensitivity in the masseter muscle involves the activity of peripheral GIRK channels. These results could provide a rationale for developing a novel therapeutic approach using peripheral GIRK channel openers to mimic or supplement the effects of peripheral opioid agonist. PMID:23740773

  12. Developmental and adult expression patterns of the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR88 in the rat: Establishment of a dual nuclear-cytoplasmic localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, Renaud; Mignon, Virginie; Stanic, Jennifer; Munoz-Tello, Paola; Becker, Jerôme A J; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Darmon, Michèle; Sokoloff, Pierre; Diaz, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    GPR88 is a neuronal cerebral orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been linked to various psychiatric disorders. However, no extensive description of its localization has been provided so far. Here, we investigate the spatiotemporal expression of the GPR88 in prenatal and postnatal rat tissues by using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. GPR88 protein was initially detected at embryonic day 16 (E16) in the striatal primordium. From E16-E20 to adulthood, the highest expression levels of both protein and mRNA were observed in striatum, olfactory tubercle, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and neocortex, whereas in spinal cord, pons, and medulla GPR88 expression remains discrete. We observed an intracellular redistribution of GPR88 during cortical lamination. In the cortical plate of the developing cortex, GPR88 presents a classical GPCR plasma membrane/cytoplasmic localization that shifts, on the day of birth, to nuclei of neurons progressively settling in layers V to II. This intranuclear localization remains throughout adulthood and was also detected in monkey and human cortex as well as in the amygdala and hypothalamus of rats. Apart from the central nervous system, GPR88 was transiently expressed at high levels in peripheral tissues, including adrenal cortex (E16-E21) and cochlear ganglia (E19-P3), and also at moderate levels in retina (E18-E19) and spleen (E21-P7). The description of the GPR88 anatomical expression pattern may provide precious functional insights into this novel receptor. Furthermore, the GRP88 nuclear localization suggests nonclassical GPCR modes of action of the protein that could be relevant for cortical development and psychiatric disorders. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2776-2802, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26918661

  13. A Miniaturized Screen of a Schistosoma mansoni Serotonergic G Protein-Coupled Receptor Identifies Novel Classes of Parasite-Selective Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, John D; McCorvy, John D; Acharya, Sreemoyee; Johns, Malcolm E; Day, Timothy A; Roth, Bryan L; Marchant, Jonathan S

    2016-05-01

    Schistosomiasis is a tropical parasitic disease afflicting ~200 million people worldwide and current therapy depends on a single drug (praziquantel) which exhibits several non-optimal features. These shortcomings underpin the need for next generation anthelmintics, but the process of validating physiologically relevant targets ('target selection') and pharmacologically profiling them is challenging. Remarkably, even though over a quarter of current human therapeutics target rhodopsin-like G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), no library screen of a flatworm GPCR has yet been reported. Here, we have pharmacologically profiled a schistosome serotonergic GPCR (Sm.5HTR) implicated as a downstream modulator of PZQ efficacy, in a miniaturized screening assay compatible with high content screening. This approach employs a split luciferase based biosensor sensitive to cellular cAMP levels that resolves the proximal kinetics of GPCR modulation in intact cells. Data evidence a divergent pharmacological signature between the parasitic serotonergic receptor and the closest human GPCR homolog (Hs.5HTR7), supporting the feasibility of optimizing parasitic selective pharmacophores. New ligands, and chemical series, with potency and selectivity for Sm.5HTR over Hs.5HTR7 are identified in vitro and validated for in vivo efficacy against schistosomules and adult worms. Sm.5HTR also displayed a property resembling irreversible inactivation, a phenomenon discovered at Hs.5HTR7, which enhances the appeal of this abundantly expressed parasite GPCR as a target for anthelmintic ligand design. Overall, these data underscore the feasibility of profiling flatworm GPCRs in a high throughput screening format competent to resolve different classes of GPCR modulators. Further, these data underscore the promise of Sm.5HTR as a chemotherapeutically vulnerable node for development of next generation anthelmintics. PMID:27187180

  14. A Miniaturized Screen of a Schistosoma mansoni Serotonergic G Protein-Coupled Receptor Identifies Novel Classes of Parasite-Selective Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, John D.; McCorvy, John D.; Acharya, Sreemoyee; Day, Timothy A.; Roth, Bryan L.; Marchant, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a tropical parasitic disease afflicting ~200 million people worldwide and current therapy depends on a single drug (praziquantel) which exhibits several non-optimal features. These shortcomings underpin the need for next generation anthelmintics, but the process of validating physiologically relevant targets (‘target selection’) and pharmacologically profiling them is challenging. Remarkably, even though over a quarter of current human therapeutics target rhodopsin-like G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), no library screen of a flatworm GPCR has yet been reported. Here, we have pharmacologically profiled a schistosome serotonergic GPCR (Sm.5HTR) implicated as a downstream modulator of PZQ efficacy, in a miniaturized screening assay compatible with high content screening. This approach employs a split luciferase based biosensor sensitive to cellular cAMP levels that resolves the proximal kinetics of GPCR modulation in intact cells. Data evidence a divergent pharmacological signature between the parasitic serotonergic receptor and the closest human GPCR homolog (Hs.5HTR7), supporting the feasibility of optimizing parasitic selective pharmacophores. New ligands, and chemical series, with potency and selectivity for Sm.5HTR over Hs.5HTR7 are identified in vitro and validated for in vivo efficacy against schistosomules and adult worms. Sm.5HTR also displayed a property resembling irreversible inactivation, a phenomenon discovered at Hs.5HTR7, which enhances the appeal of this abundantly expressed parasite GPCR as a target for anthelmintic ligand design. Overall, these data underscore the feasibility of profiling flatworm GPCRs in a high throughput screening format competent to resolve different classes of GPCR modulators. Further, these data underscore the promise of Sm.5HTR as a chemotherapeutically vulnerable node for development of next generation anthelmintics. PMID:27187180

  15. The effect of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) on lactation and on proliferation of mammary epithelial cells from dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaoming; Hu, Hongliu; Lin, Ye; Qu, Bo; Gao, Xuejun; Li, Qingzhang

    2016-07-01

    Milk protein is an important component of milk and a nutritional source for human consumption. To better understand the molecular events underlying synthesis of milk proteins, the global gene expression patterns in mammary glands of dairy cow with high-quality milk (>3% milk protein; >3.5% milk fat) and low-quality milk (milk protein; milk fat) were examined via digital gene expression study. A total of 139 upregulated and 66 downregulated genes were detected in the mammary tissues of lactating cows with high-quality milk compared with the tissues of cows with low-quality milk. A pathway enrichment study of these genes revealed that the top 5 pathways that were differentially affected in the tissues of cows with high- versus low-quality milk involved metabolic pathways, cancer, cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and insulin signaling. We also found that the G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) was one of the most highly upregulated genes in lactating mammary tissue with low-quality milk compared with tissue with high-quality milk. The knockdown of GRK2 in cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells enhanced CSN2 expression and activated signaling molecules related to translation, including protein kinase B, mammalian target of rapamycin, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1), whereas overexpression of GRK2 had the opposite effects. However, expression of genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway was positively regulated by GRK2. Therefore, GRK2 seems to act as a negative mediator of milk-protein synthesis via the protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin signaling axis. Furthermore, GRK2 may negatively control milk-protein synthesis by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in dairy cow mammary epithelial cells. PMID:27132107

  16. JAK-STAT and G-protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways are frequently altered in epitheliotropic intestinal T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairismägi, M-L; Tan, J; Lim, J Q; Nagarajan, S; Ng, C C Y; Rajasegaran, V; Huang, D; Lim, W K; Laurensia, Y; Wijaya, G C; Li, Z M; Cutcutache, I; Pang, W L; Thangaraju, S; Ha, J; Khoo, L P; Chin, S T; Dey, S; Poore, G; Tan, L H C; Koh, H K M; Sabai, K; Rao, H-L; Chuah, K L; Ho, Y-H; Ng, S-B; Chuang, S-S; Zhang, F; Liu, Y-H; Pongpruttipan, T; Ko, Y H; Cheah, P-L; Karim, N; Chng, W-J; Tang, T; Tao, M; Tay, K; Farid, M; Quek, R; Rozen, S G; Tan, P; Teh, B T; Lim, S T; Tan, S-Y; Ong, C K

    2016-06-01

    Epitheliotropic intestinal T-cell lymphoma (EITL, also known as type II enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma) is an aggressive intestinal disease with poor prognosis and its molecular alterations have not been comprehensively characterized. We aimed to identify actionable easy-to-screen alterations that would allow better diagnostics and/or treatment of this deadly disease. By performing whole-exome sequencing of four EITL tumor-normal pairs, followed by amplicon deep sequencing of 42 tumor samples, frequent alterations of the JAK-STAT and G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathways were discovered in a large portion of samples. Specifically, STAT5B was mutated in a remarkable 63% of cases, JAK3 in 35% and GNAI2 in 24%, with the majority occurring at known activating hotspots in key functional domains. Moreover, STAT5B locus carried copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity resulting in the duplication of the mutant copy, suggesting the importance of mutant STAT5B dosage for the development of EITL. Dysregulation of the JAK-STAT and GPCR pathways was also supported by gene expression profiling and further verified in patient tumor samples. In vitro overexpression of GNAI2 mutants led to the upregulation of pERK1/2, a member of MEK-ERK pathway. Notably, inhibitors of both JAK-STAT and MEK-ERK pathways effectively reduced viability of patient-derived primary EITL cells, indicating potential therapeutic strategies for this neoplasm with no effective treatment currently available. PMID:26854024

  17. O10.08HIGH G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS 65 (GPR65) EXPRESSION PREDICTS A POORER SURGICAL OUTCOME OF GLIOBLASTOMA PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, T.; Wang, H.; Yan, Y.; Qin, R.; Jiang, Y.; Lu, Y.; Li, W.; Xia, C.; Chen, J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the expression and prognostic value of G-protein-coupled receptors 65 (GPR65, also known as T-cell death-associated gene 8, TDAG8) in glioblastoma patients. METHODS: We determined the expression of GPR65 using immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays containing 102 GBM samples and 15 normal brain samples. Cumulative survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed by the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed by the stepwise forward Cox regression model. RESULTS: GPR65 protein levels were significantly elevated in glioblastoma tissues compared with those of normal brain tissues for nearly 5 folds (P GPR65 protein expression had significantly shorter OS and PFS than those with low GPR65 expression (OS: 14.6 versus 22.6 months or 14.7 versus 22.6 months, p = 0.047 and 0.040, respectively; PFS: 12.5 versus 18.9 months or 12.8 versus 19.0 months, p = 0.089 and p = 0.085, respectively). In multivariate analysis, Cox regression model identified high GPR65 expression as an independent prognostic factor for OS and PFS (Hazard ration [HR] = 1.599 and 1.593; p = 0.037 and 0.034, respectively) of primary GBM patients. No adjuvant radiotherapy, small extent of resection were other three independent risk factors of poor prognosis in glioblastoma patients. CONCLUSION: High GPR65 expression occurs in a significant subset of glioblastoma patients and predicts a poorer outcome. The study identifies a potentially useful molecular marker for the categorization and targeted therapy of glioblastoma.

  18. Estrogen Enhances Linkage in the Vascular Endothelial Calmodulin Network via a Feedforward Mechanism at the G Protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Quang-Kim; Firkins, Rachel; Giles, Jennifer; Francis, Sarah; Matnishian, Vahe; Tran, Phuong; VerMeer, Mark; Jasurda, Jake; Burgard, Michelle Ann; Gebert-Oberle, Briana

    2016-05-13

    Estrogen exerts many effects on the vascular endothelium. Calmodulin (CaM) is the transducer of Ca(2+) signals and is a limiting factor in cardiovascular tissues. It is unknown whether and how estrogen modifies endothelial functions via the network of CaM-dependent proteins. Here we show that 17β-estradiol (E2) up-regulates total CaM level in endothelial cells. Concurrent measurement of Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-CaM indicated that E2 also increases free Ca(2+)-CaM. Pharmacological studies, gene silencing, and receptor expression-specific cell studies indicated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER/GPR30) mediates these effects via transactivation of EGFR and subsequent MAPK activation. The outcomes were then examined on four distinct members of the intracellular CaM target network, including GPER/GPR30 itself and estrogen receptor α, the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), and endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS). E2 substantially increases CaM binding to estrogen receptor α and GPER/GPR30. Mutations that reduced CaM binding to GPER/GPR30 in separate binding domains do not affect GPER/GPR30-Gβγ preassociation but decrease GPER/GPR30-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. E2 increases CaM-PMCA association, but the expected stimulation of Ca(2+) efflux is reversed by E2-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of PMCA. These effects sustain Ca(2+) signals and promote Ca(2+)-dependent CaM interactions with other CaM targets. Consequently, E2 doubles CaM-eNOS interaction and also promotes dual phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser-617 and Ser-1179. Calculations using in-cell and in vitro data revealed substantial individual and combined contribution of these effects to total eNOS activity. Taken together, E2 generates a feedforward loop via GPER/GPR30, which enhances Ca(2+)/CaM signals and functional linkage in the endothelial CaM target network. PMID:26987903

  19. Development of surface-based assays for transmembrane proteins: selective immobilization of functional CCR5, a G protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silin, Vitalii I; Karlik, Evan A; Ridge, Kevin D; Vanderah, David J

    2006-02-15

    A general method to develop surface-based assays for transmembrane (TM) receptor function(s) without the need to isolate, purify, and reconstitute the proteins is presented. Based on the formation of an active surface that selectively immobilizes membrane vesicles, the method is illustrated using the chemokine receptor CCR5, a member of the largest family of cell surface eukaryotic TM proteins, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The method begins with a protein-resistant surface containing a low percentage (1-5%) of surface-bound biotin on gold as the initial template. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data show specific immobilization of functional CCR5 after the initial template is activated by immobilization of rho 1D4 antibody, an anti-rhodopsin monoclonal antibody specific for the carboxyl terminal nine amino acids on bovine rhodopsin that had been engineered into the carboxyl terminus of CCR5, and exposure to vesicles obtained from mammalian cells transfected with a synthetic human CCR5 gene. Activation of the initial template is effected by sequential immobilization of avidin, which binds to the biotin in the initial template, a biotinylated goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin G (Bt-IgG), which binds to the avidin binding sites distal to the surface and the F(c) portion of the rho 1D4 antibody through its F(ab) region(s) and finally rho 1D4. This approach establishes a broad outline for the development and application of various assays for CCR5 functions. SPR data also showed that vesicle immobilization could be achieved through an integrin-integrin antibody interaction after activation of the initial template with a goat anti-human integrin beta1 antibody. These results suggest that the generic nature of the initial platform and flexibility of the subsequent surface activation for specific immobilization of membrane vesicles can be applied to the development of assays for other GPCRs or TM receptors for which antibodies are available or can be engineered to

  20. Bisphenol A at a low concentration boosts mouse spermatogonial cell proliferation by inducing the G protein-coupled receptor 30 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most prevalent chemicals in daily-use materials, therefore, human exposure to BPA is ubiquitous. We found that low concentrations of BPA stimulate the spermatogonial GC-1 cells proliferation by G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30)-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-c-Fos pathway. However, through the same pathway GPR30 expression has been shown to be induced by EGF, an EGFR ligand. Thus, we want to know if low concentrations of BPA are able to induce the GPR30 expression and the possible mechanism(s) in GC-1 cells. By transient transfection with expression plasmids, 10−9 M BPA significantly transactivates the Gpr30-5′-flanking region through activating the GPR30, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), estrogen receptor-α (ER-α), and EFGR-ERK pathways. Furthermore, an activator protein-1 (AP-1) site located within this region is found to be responsible for the transactivation of BPA. Expectedly, through the same pathways, BPA significantly induces the gene and protein expression of GPR30. c-Fos is further observed to be strongly recruited to the AP-1 site in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and its dysfunction on the AP-1 site markedly suppresses the expression of GPR30, p-ERK1/2, p-Ser118-ER-α and cell proliferation by BPA. Our results demonstrate that a low-concentration BPA induces GPR30 expression through the GPR30-EFGR-ERK-c-Fos, ER-α, and PKG pathways, presumably boosting the cells proliferation via a regulatory loop. The present study provides a novel insight into the potential role of GPR30 in the initiation and progression of male germ cell cancer induced by environmentally relevant BPA. - Highlights: ► Low concentrations of BPA activate the PKG and GPR30-EFGR-ERK-ER-α pathways. ► Low concentrations of BPA activate the AP-1 site of Gpr30-5′-flanking region. ► Low concentrations of BPA induce the expression of GPR30 gene and protein. ► Low concentrations

  1. The Importance of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 4 (GRK4 in Pathogenesis of Salt Sensitivity, Salt Sensitive Hypertension and Response to Antihypertensive Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Rayner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Salt sensitivity is probably caused by either a hereditary or acquired defect of salt excretion by the kidney, and it is reasonable to consider that this is the basis for differences in hypertension between black and white people. Dopamine acts in an autocrine/paracrine fashion to promote natriuresis in the proximal tubule and thick ascending loop of Henle. G-protein receptor kinases (or GRKs are serine and threonine kinases that phosphorylate G protein-coupled receptors in response to agonist stimulation and uncouple the dopamine receptor from its G protein. This results in a desensitisation process that protects the cell from repeated agonist exposure. GRK4 activity is increased in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and infusion of GRK4 antisense oligonucleotides attenuates the increase in blood pressure (BP. This functional defect is replicated in the proximal tubule by expression of GRK4 variants namely p.Arg65Leu, p.Ala142Val and p.Val486Ala, in cell lines, with the p.Ala142Val showing the most activity. In humans, GRK4 polymorphisms were shown to be associated with essential hypertension in Australia, BP regulation in young adults, low renin hypertension in Japan and impaired stress-induced Na excretion in normotensive black men. In South Africa, GRK4 polymorphisms are more common in people of African descent, associated with impaired Na excretion in normotensive African people, and predict blood pressure response to Na restriction in African patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension. The therapeutic importance of the GRK4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was emphasised in the African American Study of Kidney Disease (AASK where African-Americans with hypertensive nephrosclerosis were randomised to receive amlodipine, ramipril or metoprolol. Men with the p.Ala142Val genotype were less likely to respond to metoprolol, especially if they also had the p.Arg65Leu variant. Furthermore, in the analysis of response to treatment in

  2. Bisphenol A at a low concentration boosts mouse spermatogonial cell proliferation by inducing the G protein-coupled receptor 30 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Huang, Wei [Department of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100091 (China); Liu, Yu-Xiang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu, Ben-Zhan, E-mail: bzhu@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most prevalent chemicals in daily-use materials, therefore, human exposure to BPA is ubiquitous. We found that low concentrations of BPA stimulate the spermatogonial GC-1 cells proliferation by G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30)-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-c-Fos pathway. However, through the same pathway GPR30 expression has been shown to be induced by EGF, an EGFR ligand. Thus, we want to know if low concentrations of BPA are able to induce the GPR30 expression and the possible mechanism(s) in GC-1 cells. By transient transfection with expression plasmids, 10{sup −9} M BPA significantly transactivates the Gpr30-5′-flanking region through activating the GPR30, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), estrogen receptor-α (ER-α), and EFGR-ERK pathways. Furthermore, an activator protein-1 (AP-1) site located within this region is found to be responsible for the transactivation of BPA. Expectedly, through the same pathways, BPA significantly induces the gene and protein expression of GPR30. c-Fos is further observed to be strongly recruited to the AP-1 site in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and its dysfunction on the AP-1 site markedly suppresses the expression of GPR30, p-ERK1/2, p-Ser118-ER-α and cell proliferation by BPA. Our results demonstrate that a low-concentration BPA induces GPR30 expression through the GPR30-EFGR-ERK-c-Fos, ER-α, and PKG pathways, presumably boosting the cells proliferation via a regulatory loop. The present study provides a novel insight into the potential role of GPR30 in the initiation and progression of male germ cell cancer induced by environmentally relevant BPA. - Highlights: ► Low concentrations of BPA activate the PKG and GPR30-EFGR-ERK-ER-α pathways. ► Low concentrations of BPA activate the AP-1 site of Gpr30-5′-flanking region. ► Low concentrations of BPA induce the expression of GPR30 gene and protein. ► Low

  3. Developmental expression of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 and three GnRH mRNAs in the teleost fish cobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, J Shaik; Benninghoff, Abby D; Holt, G Joan; Khan, Izhar A

    2007-02-01

    The cDNAs of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) and three prepro-gonadotropin-releasing hormones, GnRH-I (seabream GnRH), GnRH-II (chicken GnRH-II), and GnRH-III (salmon GnRH) were isolated and cloned from the brain of the teleost fish cobia, Rachycentron canadum. The cobia GPR54 cDNA was 95 and 51-56% identical to those of tilapia and mammalian models respectively. The GnRH cDNA sequences of cobia showed strong identities to those of tilapia, Atlantic croaker, red drum, and the seabass and seabream species. The real-time quantitative RT-PCR methods allowed detection of all three GnRH mRNAs on the first day after hatching (DAH). The GnRH-I mRNA levels, which were the lowest among the three GnRHs, increased gradually with two distinct peaks in larvae at 3 and 4 DAH. On the other hand, GnRH-II and GnRH-III mRNAs were significantly higher in larvae at 2 and 6 DAH compared with those on the preceding days. In addition, significant peaks of all the three GnRH mRNAs were observed in the brains of 26-day-old fish. The finding of higher GnRH-I and GnRH-II mRNAs in males than females at 153 DAH may be related to early puberty observed during the first year in laboratory-reared male cobia. Moreover, this study demonstrates for the first time the expression of GPR54 mRNA during larval development in a vertebrate species. The concomitant expression patterns of GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs during different stages of larval and juvenile developments, and during early puberty in male cobia suggest a potential relationship between GPR54 and multiple GnRHs during these stages of development consistent with the role of GPR54 in controlling GnRH release in mammals. The increase in GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs observed during early puberty in cobia is consistent with a similar change reported in pubertal rats. This finding together with the localization of GPR54 mRNAs on GnRH neurons in fish and mammals suggests that the GPR54-GnRH interactions may be conserved in different vertebrate groups

  4. Specific interaction of Gαi3 with the Oa1 G-protein coupled receptor controls the size and density of melanosomes in retinal pigment epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Young

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ocular albinism type 1, an X-linked disease characterized by the presence of enlarged melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and abnormal crossing of axons at the optic chiasm, is caused by mutations in the OA1 gene. The protein product of this gene is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR localized in RPE melanosomes. The Oa1-/- mouse model of ocular albinism reproduces the human disease. Oa1 has been shown to immunoprecipitate with the Gαi subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins from human skin melanocytes. However, the Gαi subfamily has three highly homologous members, Gαi1, Gαi2 and Gαi3 and it is possible that one or more of them partners with Oa1. We had previously shown by in-vivo studies that Gαi3-/- and Oa1-/- mice have similar RPE phenotype and decussation patterns. In this paper we analyze the specificity of the Oa1-Gαi interaction. METHODOLOGY: By using the genetic mouse models Gαi1-/-, Gαi2-/-, Gαi3-/- and the double knockout Gαi1-/-, Gαi3-/- that lack functional Gαi1, Gαi2, Gαi3, or both Gαi1 and Gαi3 proteins, respectively, we show that Gαi3 is critical for the maintenance of a normal melanosomal phenotype and that its absence is associated with changes in melanosomal size and density. GST-pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays conclusively demonstrate that Gαi3 is the only Gαi that binds to Oa1. Western blots show that Gαi3 expression is barely detectable in the Oa1-/- RPE, strongly supporting a previously unsuspected role for Gαi3 in melanosomal biogenesis. CONCLUSION: Our results identify the Oa1 transducer Gαi3 as the first downstream component in the Oa1 signaling pathway.

  5. Myocardial Ablation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 (GRK2 Decreases Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through an Anti-Intrinsic Apoptotic Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Fan

    Full Text Available Studies from our lab have shown that decreasing myocardial G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2 activity and expression can prevent heart failure progression after myocardial infarction. Since GRK2 appears to also act as a pro-death kinase in myocytes, we investigated the effect of cardiomyocyte-specific GRK2 ablation on the acute response to cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. To do this we utilized two independent lines of GRK2 knockout (KO mice where the GRK2 gene was deleted in only cardiomyocytes either constitutively at birth or in an inducible manner that occurred in adult mice prior to I/R. These GRK2 KO mice and appropriate control mice were subjected to a sham procedure or 30 min of myocardial ischemia via coronary artery ligation followed by 24 hrs reperfusion. Echocardiography and hemodynamic measurements showed significantly improved post-I/R cardiac function in both GRK2 KO lines, which correlated with smaller infarct sizes in GRK2 KO mice compared to controls. Moreover, there was significantly less TUNEL positive myocytes, less caspase-3, and -9 but not caspase-8 activities in GRK2 KO mice compared to control mice after I/R injury. Of note, we found that lowering cardiac GRK2 expression was associated with significantly lower cytosolic cytochrome C levels in both lines of GRK2 KO mice after I/R compared to corresponding control animals. Mechanistically, the anti-apoptotic effects of lowering GRK2 expression were accompanied by increased levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, and increased activation of Akt after I/R injury. These findings were reproduced in vitro in cultured cardiomyocytes and GRK2 mRNA silencing. Therefore, lowering GRK2 expression in cardiomyocytes limits I/R-induced injury and improves post-ischemia recovery by decreasing myocyte apoptosis at least partially via Akt/Bcl-2 mediated mitochondrial protection and implicates mitochondrial-dependent actions, solidifying GRK2 as a pro-death kinase in the heart.

  6. On the G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromers and Their Allosteric Receptor-Receptor Interactions in the Central Nervous System: Focus on Their Role in Pain Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kjell Fuxe; Tarakanov, Alexander O.; Luigi F. Agnati; Alicia Rivera; Kathleen Van Craenenbroeck; Wilber Romero-Fernandez; Dasiel O. Borroto-Escuela

    2013-01-01

    The modulatory role of allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in the pain pathways of the Central Nervous System and the peripheral nociceptors has become of increasing interest. As integrators of nociceptive and antinociceptive wiring and volume transmission signals, with a major role for the opioid receptor heteromers, they likely have an important role in the pain circuits and may be involved in acupuncture. The delta opioid receptor (DOR) exerts an antagonistic allosteric influence on ...

  7. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, developmental regulation, and a knock-out mutant of a novel leu-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor (DLGR-2) from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kathrine Krageskov; Hauser, Frank; Schiøtt, Morten; Pedersen, Karen-Marie; Søndergaard, Leif; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis

    2000-01-01

    After screening the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project database with sequences from a recently characterized Leu-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor (LGR) fromDrosophila (DLGR-1), we identified a second gene for a different LGR (DLGR-2) and cloned its cDNA. DLGR-2 is 1360 amino acid...... LGRs (LGR-4 and LGR-5). This homology includes the seven transmembrane region (e.g., 49% amino acid identity with the human TSH receptor) and the very large extracellular amino terminus. This amino terminus contains 18 Leu-rich repeats-in contrast with the 3 mammalian glycoprotein hormone receptors and...

  8. Estrogen stimulated migration and invasion of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells involves an ezrin-dependent crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptor 30 and estrogen receptor beta signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kewen; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Yaxing; You, Xinchao; Li, Ping; Wang, Tinghuai

    2016-07-01

    Estrogen mediates important cellular activities in estrogen receptor negative (ER-) breast cancer cells via membrane associated G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30). However, the biological role and mechanism of estrogen action on cell motility and invasion in this aggressive kind of tumors remains poorly understood. We showed here that treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2) in ER-negative cancer cells resulted in ezrin-dependent cytoskeleton rearrangement and elicited a stimulatory effect on cell migration and invasion. Mechanistically, E2 induced ezrin activation was mediated by distinct mechanisms in different cell contexts. In SK-BR-3 cells with a high GPR30/ERβ ratio, silencing of GPR30 was able to abolish E2 induced ERK1/2, AKT phosphorylation and ezrin activation, whereas in MDA-MB-231 cells with low GPR30/ERβ ratio, E2 stimulated ezrin activation was mediated by the ERβ/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Importantly, we showed that activation of GPR30 signaling significantly prevents ERβ activation induced ezrin phosphorylation, cell migration and invasion, indicating an antagonist effect between GPR30 and ERβ signaling in MDA-MB-231 cells. These findings highlight the important interplay between different estrogen receptors in estrogen induced cell motility and invasiveness in ER-negative breast cancer cells. PMID:26850467

  9. Progress in the associated G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) of aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) pathogenesis%醛固酮瘤(APA)发病相关的G蛋白耦联受体(GPCRs)研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐曦

    2014-01-01

    醛固酮瘤(aldosterone-producing adenoma,APA)是原发性醛固酮增多症的一个重要亚型,约占30%~60%,是引起继发性高血压的重要病因.有关APA的发病机制,可见不同水平与角度的研究,但是对于APA的具体发病机制仍不清楚.本文就已知的与发病相关的G蛋白耦联受体(G-protein-coupled receptors,GPCRs)进行论述.

  10. H2O2-Activated Mitochondrial Phospholipase iPLA2 gamma Prevents Lipotoxic Oxidative Stress in Synergy with UCP2, Amplifies Signaling via G-Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR40, and Regulates Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic beta-Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 12 (2015), s. 958-972. ISSN 1523-0864 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP303/11/P320; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-02033S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-06666S; GA ČR GA15-02051S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial phospholipase iPLA2 gamma * uncoupling protein UCP2 * G-protein coupled receptor - 40 * glucose -stimulated insulin secretion * pancreatic beta cells Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 7.407, year: 2014

  11. Sequence and expression pattern of a novel human orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, GPRC5B, a family C receptor with a short amino-terminal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    2000-01-01

    Query of GenBank with the amino acid sequence of human metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2 (mGluR2) identified a predicted gene product of unknown function on BAC clone CIT987SK-A-69G12 (located on chromosome band 16p12) as a homologous protein. The transcript, entitled GPRC5B, was cloned f...

  12. Aromatic interactions impact ligand binding and function at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics results validated by experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania; Villa, Nancy; Fang, Lijuan; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-02-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT2 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family consists of types 2A, 2B, and 2C that share ∼75% transmembrane (TM) sequence identity. Agonists for 5-HT2C receptors are under development for psychoses; whereas, at 5-HT2A receptors, antipsychotic effects are associated with antagonists - in fact, 5-HT2A agonists can cause hallucinations and 5-HT2B agonists cause cardiotoxicity. It is known that 5-HT2A TM6 residues W6.48, F6.51, and F6.52 impact ligand binding and function; however, ligand interactions with these residues at the 5-HT2C receptor have not been reported. To predict and validate molecular determinants for 5-HT2C-specific activation, results from receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies were compared with experimental results for ligand binding and function at wild type and W6.48A, F6.51A, and F6.52A point-mutated 5-HT2C receptors.

  13. A highly conserved glycine within linker I and the extreme C terminus of G protein alpha subunits interact cooperatively in switching G protein-coupled receptor-to-effector specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostenis, Evi; Martini, Lene; Ellis, James; Waldhoer, Maria; Heydorn, Arne; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Norregaard, Pia K; Jorgensen, Rasmus; Whistler, Jennifer L; Milligan, Graeme

    2004-01-01

    Numerous studies have attested to the importance of the extreme C terminus of G protein alpha subunits in determining their selectivity of receptor recognition. We have previously reported that a highly conserved glycine residue within linker I is important for constraining the fidelity of receptor...... recognition by Galpha(q) proteins. Herein, we explored whether both modules (linker I and extreme C terminus) interact cooperatively in switching G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-to-effector specificity and created as models mutant Galpha(q) proteins in which glycine was replaced with various amino acids and...... the C-terminal five Galpha(q) residues with the corresponding Galpha(i) or Galpha(s) sequence. Coupling properties of the mutated Galpha(q) proteins were determined after coexpression with a panel of 13 G(i)-and G(s) -selective receptors and compared with those of Galpha proteins modified in only one...

  14. Microgravity and Signaling Molecules in Rat Osteoblasts: Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor, and Small GTP-Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumel, Yasuhiro; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Morita, Sadao; Katano, Hisako; Akiyama, Hideo; Hirano, Masahiko; Ohya, Keiichi; Sams, Clarence F.; Whitson, Peggy A.

    2005-01-01

    Rat osteoblasts were cultured for 4 and 5 days aboard Space Shuttle and solubilized on board. The mRNA levels of the post-receptor signaling molecules were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The G-protein alpha subunit G(alpha)q mRNA levels were elevated 3-fold by microgravity. G(alpha)q stimulates PLC(beta), and then PKC. PKC(delta) and PKC(theta) mRNA levels were increased 2- to 5-fold by microgravity The mRNA levels of SOS and Ras GRF were increased 4 to 5-fold by microgravity, while Ras GAP was not altered. Spaceflight-induced bone loss might be attributed to microgravity modulation of the signaling pathway in osteoblasts.

  15. Are Agonistic Autoantibodies against G-Protein Coupled Receptors Involved in the Development of Long-Term Side Effects of Tumor Chemotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberland, Annekathrin; Santos, Robson A S; Schimke, Ingolf; Wallukat, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathies are long-term consequences of chemo- and radiotherapy and develop long after completing the initial tumor treatment. The slow progression of such late effects might be an indication of the involvement of autoimmune processes in the development of such follow-up consequences. Functionally active autoantibodies, which permanently stimulate relevant cell receptors, might be a crucial component. Here, we report the detection of functionally active agonistic autoantibodies such as the autoantibody against the adrenergic alpha1-receptor, the muscarinic M2-receptor, and the newly discovered autoantibody against the Mas-receptor in the plasma of a cancer survivor following chemotherapy treatment. PMID:23569443

  16. Physical Interaction of Jab1 with Human Serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled Receptor and Their Possible Roles in Cell Survival*

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Baik, Ja-Hyun; Kang, Insug; Jin, Changbae; Rhim, Hyewhon

    2010-01-01

    The 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) is one of the most recently cloned serotonin receptors, and it plays important roles in Alzheimer disease, depression, and learning and memory disorders. However, unlike the other serotonin receptors, the cellular mechanisms of 5-HT6R are poorly elucidated relative to its significance in human brain diseases. Here, using a yeast two-hybrid assay, we found that the human 5-HT6R interacts with Jun activation domain-binding protein-1 (Jab1). We also confirmed a physic...

  17. Inhibition of Subsets of G Protein-coupled Receptors by Empty Mutants of G Protein α Subunits in Go, G11, and G16

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Bo; Gu, Lingjie; Simon, Melvin I.

    2000-01-01

    We previously reported that the xanthine nucleotide binding Goα mutant, GoαX, inhibited the activation of Gi-coupled receptors. We constructed similar mutations in G11α and G16α and characterized their nucleotide binding and receptor interaction. First, we found that G11αX and G16αX expressed in COS-7 cells bound xanthine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) instead of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate). Second, we found that G11αX and G16αX interacted with βγ subunits in the presence of xanthine diphospha...

  18. A generic microfluidic biosensor of G protein-coupled receptor activation - impedance measurements of reversible morphological changes of reverse transfected HEK293 cells on microelectrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srivastava, S.K.; Ramaneti, R.; Roelse, M.; Duy Tong, H.; Vrouwe, E.X.; Brinkman, A.G.M.; Smet, de L.C.P.M.; Rijn, van C.J.M.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy of cell lines on interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) is an established method of monitoring receptor-specific cell shape changes in response to certain analytes. Normally, assays are done in multiwells making it a bulky, static and single use procedure. Here, we present a biosens

  19. Enzymatic recycling of ascorbic acid from dehydroascorbic acid by glutathione-like peptides in the extracellular loops of aminergic G-protein coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Fewins, Jenna; Rhinesmith, Tyler; Koch, Ariana; Dillon, Patrick F

    2016-07-01

    The intracellular recycling of ascorbic acid from dehydroascorbic acid by the glutathione-glutathione reductase system has been well-characterized. We propose that extracellular recycling of ascorbic acid is performed in a similar manner by cysteine-rich, glutathione-like regions of the first and second extracellular loops of some aminergic receptors including adrenergic, histaminergic, and dopaminergic receptors. Previous research in our laboratory demonstrated that ascorbic acid binds to these receptors at a site on their first or second extracellular loops, significantly enhancing ligand activity, and apparently recycling hundreds of times their own concentration of ascorbate in an enzymatic fashion. In this study, we have synthesized 25 peptides from the first and second extracellular loops of aminergic and insulin receptors and compared them directly to glutathione for their ability to prevent the oxidation of ascorbate and to regenerate ascorbate from dehydroascorbic acid. Peptide sequences that mimic glutathione in containing a cysteine and a glutamic acid-like amino acid also mimic glutathione activity in effects and in kinetics. Some (but not all) peptide sequences that contain one or more methionines instead of cysteine can significantly retard the oxidation of ascorbic acid but do not recycle it from dehydroascorbate into ascorbate. Peptides lacking both cysteines and methionines uniformly failed to alter significantly ascorbate or dehydroascorbate oxidation or reduction. We believe that this is the first proof that receptors may carry out both ligand binding and enzymatic activity extracellularly. Our results suggest the existence of a previously unknown extracellular system for recycling ascorbate. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26749062

  20. Regulated expression of pH sensing G protein-coupled receptor-68 identified through chemical biology defines a new drug target for ischemic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Jamie L; Goetsch, Sean C.; Aguilar, Hector R.; Coe, Helen; Luo, Xiang; Liu, Ning; Van Rooij, Eva; Frantz, Doug E.; Schneider, Jay W.

    2012-01-01

    Chemical biology promises discovery of new and unexpected mechanistic pathways, protein functions and disease targets. Here, we probed the mechanism-of-action and protein targets of 3,5-disubstituted isoxazoles (Isx), cardiomyogenic small-molecules that target Notch-activated epicardium-derived cells (NECs) in vivo and promote functional recovery after myocardial infarction (MI). Mechanistic studies in NECs led to an Isx-activated Gq protein-coupled receptor (GqPCR) hypothesis tested in a cel...

  1. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Family C 6A (GPRC6A: Possible molecular target in Bone Receptor acoplado a proteína G familia C6A: Posible blanco molecular en hueso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Luis Negri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available GPRC6A is a recently identified member of family C of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs that is closely related to the calcium-sensing receptor CASR. It has recently been shown that GPRC6A extracellular cations and amino acids and requires both extracellular cations and amino acids for optimal stimulation in vitro. The study of the ligand profile of GPRC6A has shown that l-ornithine is the most potent and efficacious l-amino acid agonist, followed by several other aliphatic, neutral, and basic amino acids. Some studies show cation-dependent activation of GPRC6A, but compared to CASR, much higher extracellular calcium concentrations are needed to activate this receptor. Furthermore, the divalent cation Mg(2+ was found to be a positive modulator of the l-ornithine response. GPRC6A may be a candidate for the elusive extracellular calcium-sensing mechanism known to be present in osteoblasts, which respond to high local Ca²+ concentrations. GPRC6A has also been proposed as a candidate receptor for ostocalcin, regulating energy metabolism and as a molecular target for the action of strontium on bone.El GPRC6A es un miembro recientemente identificado de la familia C de receptores acoplados a proteínas G (GPCRs que está estrechamente emparentado con el receptor sensor de calcio (CASR. Se ha demostrado que este receptor es capaz de sensar cationes extracelulares y aminoácidos y que requiere tanto de los cationes extracelulares y de los aminoácidos para su óptima estimulación in vitro. El estudio del perfil de ligandos ha mostrado que la l-ornithine es el más potente eficaz l-aminoácido agonista seguido de varios otros aminoácidos alifáticos, neutros, y básicos. Algunos estudios han mostrado la activación por cationes del GPRC6A, pero comparado con el CASR, se necesitan concentraciones extracelulares más altas de calcio para activar este receptor. Es más, el Mg(2+ ha mostrado ser un modulador positivo de la respuesta a la l-ornithine. Se

  2. Expression of orphan G-protein coupled receptor GPR174 in CHO cells induced morphological changes and proliferation delay via increasing intracellular cAMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Expression of GPR174 in CHO cells induces morphological changes and proliferation delay. ► These are due to increase in intracellular cAMP concentration. ► Lysophosphatidylserine was identified to stimulate GPR174 leading to activate ACase. ► The potencies of fatty acid moiety on LysoPS were oleoyl ⩾ stearoyl > palmitoyl. ► We propose that GPR174 is a lysophosphatidylserine receptor. -- Abstract: We established cell lines that stably express orphan GPCR GPR174 using CHO cells, and studied physiological and pharmacological features of the receptor. GPR174-expressing cells showed cell–cell adhesion with localization of actin filaments to cell membrane, and revealed significant delay of cell proliferation. Since the morphological changes of GPR174-cells were very similar to mock CHO cells treated with cholera toxin, we measured the concentration of intracellular cAMP. The results showed the concentration was significantly elevated in GPR174-cells. By measuring intracellular cAMP concentration in GPR174-cells, we screened lipids and nucleotides to identify ligands for GPR174. We found that lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) stimulated increase in intracellular cAMP in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, phosphorylation of Erk was elevated by LysoPS in GPR174 cells. These LysoPS responses were inhibited by NF449, an inhibitor of Gαs protein. These results suggested that GPR174 was a putative LysoPS receptor conjugating with Gαs, and its expression induced morphological changes in CHO cells by constitutively activating adenylyl cycles accompanied with cell conjunctions and delay of proliferation.

  3. Acidosis Decreases c-Myc Oncogene Expression in Human Lymphoma Cells: A Role for the Proton-Sensing G Protein-Coupled Receptor TDAG8

    OpenAIRE

    Zhigang Li; Lixue Dong; Eric Dean; Yang, Li V.

    2013-01-01

    Acidosis is a biochemical hallmark of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we report that acute acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in U937 human lymphoma cells. The level of c-Myc transcripts, but not mRNA or protein stability, contributes to c-Myc protein reduction under acidosis. The pH-sensing receptor TDAG8 (GPR65) is involved in acidosis-induced c-Myc downregulation. TDAG8 is expressed in U937 lymphoma cells, and the overexpression or knockdown of TDAG8 further decreases or partia...

  4. Identification of a novel protein-protein interaction motif mediating interaction of GPCR-associated sorting proteins with G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornert, Olivier; Møller, Thor Christian; Boeuf, Julien;

    2013-01-01

    degradation pathway. This protein belongs to the recently identified GPCR-associated sorting proteins (GASPs) family that comprises ten members for which structural and functional details are poorly documented. We present here a detailed structure-function relationship analysis of the molecular interaction...... GPCRs and highlight the presence within GASPs of a novel protein-protein interaction motif that might represent a new target to investigate the involvement of GASPs in the modulation of the activity of GPCRs.......GPCR desensitization and down-regulation are considered key molecular events underlying the development of tolerance in vivo. Among the many regulatory proteins that are involved in these complex processes, GASP-1 have been shown to participate to the sorting of several receptors toward the...

  5. Towards a thermodynamic definition of efficacy in partial agonism: The thermodynamics of efficacy and ligand proton transfer in a G protein-coupled receptor of the rhodopsin class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadley, Kenneth J; Sykes, Shane C; Davies, Robin H

    2010-11-15

    The thermodynamic binding profiles of agonist and antagonist complexes of the 4-hydroxypropanolamine partial agonist, prenalterol, on the chronotropic adrenergic response in guinea-pig right atria were determined over a 15 °C temperature range. The tissue response was compared with data on the ethanolamine agonist, isoprenaline, given by binding studies in a number of rat tissues. Utilising the residue conservatism surrounding the known active conformers bound to either of two aspartate residues (α-helices II, III) in both receptors (β(1), β(2)) and species (guinea-pig, rat and human), no significant deformation in the extended side chain could be found in prenalterol's agonist binding compared to isoprenaline. Antagonist binding gave a highly favourable entropy contribution at 30.0 °C of -4.7±1.2 kcal/mol. The enthalpy change between bound agonist and antagonist complexes, a function of the efficacy alone, was -6.4±1.1 kcal/mol, coincident with the calculated intrinsic preference of a primary/secondary amine-aspartate interaction for a neutral hydrogen-bonded form over its ion pair state, giving values of 6.3-6.6 kcal/mol with calculations of good quality, a figure expected to be close to that shown within a hydrophobic environment. Delivery of a proton to a conserved aspartate anion (α-helix II) becomes the critical determinant for agonist action with resultant proton transfer stabilisation dominating the enthalpy change. A proposed monocation-driven ligand proton pumping mechanism within the ternary complex is consistent with the data, delivery between two acid groups being created by the movement of the cation and the counter-movement of the ligand protonated amine moving from Asp 138 (α-helix III) to Asp 104 (α-helix II). PMID:20727346

  6. Modification on ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) scaffold. discovery of bile acid derivatives as selective agonists of cell-surface G-protein coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GP-BAR1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepe, Valentina; Renga, Barbara; Festa, Carmen; D'Amore, Claudio; Masullo, Dario; Cipriani, Sabrina; Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Monti, Maria Chiara; Novellino, Ettore; Limongelli, Vittorio; Zampella, Angela; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2014-09-25

    Bile acids are signaling molecules interacting with the nuclear receptor FXR and the G-protein coupled receptor 1 (GP-BAR1/TGR5). GP-BAR1 is a promising pharmacological target for the treatment of steatohepatitis, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. Endogenous bile acids and currently available semisynthetic bile acids are poorly selective toward GP-BAR1 and FXR. Thus, in the present study we have investigated around the structure of UDCA, a clinically used bile acid devoid of FXR agonist activity, to develop a large family of side chain modified 3α,7β-dihydroxyl cholanoids that selectively activate GP-BAR1. In vivo and in vitro pharmacological evaluation demonstrated that administration of compound 16 selectively increases the expression of pro-glucagon 1, a GP-BAR1 target, in the small intestine, while it had no effect on FXR target genes in the liver. Further, compound 16 results in a significant reshaping of bile acid pool in a rodent model of cholestasis. These data demonstrate that UDCA is a useful scaffold to generate novel and selective steroidal ligands for GP-BAR1. PMID:25162837

  7. Aptamer BC007 for neutralization of pathogenic autoantibodies directed against G-protein coupled receptors: A vision of future treatment of patients with cardiomyopathies and positivity for those autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallukat, Gerd; Müller, Johannes; Haberland, Annekathrin; Berg, Sabine; Schulz, Angela; Freyse, Ernst-Joachim; Vetter, Roland; Salzsieder, Eckhard; Kreutz, Reinhold; Schimke, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies such as idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), Chagas' cardiomyopathy and Peripartum cardiomyopathy present with autoantibodies against G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR-AABs) that agonistically activate their receptors. For the treatment of "agonistic autoantibody diseases" and in particular DCM, the removal of the GPCR-AABs by immunoadsorption (IA) has been studied with convincing patient benefit. To overcome cost and logistics problems of IA, the application of the aptamer BC007 for in vivo neutralization of GPCR-AABs could help. We demonstrate here, that the aptamer neutralized, in vitro, the presently known cardiovascular-pathogenic GPCR-AABs. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, the aptamer demonstrated its GPCR-AAB neutralizing potency in vivo. In the serum of DCM patients, the same GPCR-AAB reduction was achieved when patients were either immunoadsorbed or patient's serum was ex vivo treated with the aptamer. In our view, aptamer BC007 treatment in GPCR-AAB-positive patients would have a comparable benefit as that seen after IA. Not knowing all that interfering with our idea of aptamer-dependent neutralization of GPCR-AABs, the first preliminary steps have been taken for bringing the idea closer to patients. PMID:26584137

  8. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) Regulates α-Smooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA) Production through the Succinate Dehydrogenase-G Protein-coupled Receptor 91 (GPR91) Pathway in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying Hui; Choi, Dae Hee; Lee, Eun Hye; Seo, Su Ryeon; Lee, Seungkoo; Cho, Eun-Hee

    2016-05-01

    Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is an NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. Recent studies have shown that SIRT3 expression is decreased in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Moreover, SIRT3 is a key regulator of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which catalyzes the oxidation of succinate to fumarate. Increased succinate concentrations and the specific G protein-coupled receptor 91 (GPR91) are involved in the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). In this study, we aimed to establish whether SIRT3 regulated the SDH activity, succinate, and GPR91 expression in HSCs and an animal model of NAFLD. Our goal was also to determine whether succinate released from hepatocytes regulated HSC activation. Inhibiting SIRT3 using SIRT3 siRNA exacerbated HSC activation via the SDH-succinate-GPR91 pathway, and SIRT3 overexpression or honokiol treatment attenuated HSC activation in vitro In isolated liver and HSCs from methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet-induced NAFLD, the expression of SIRT3 and SDH activity was decreased, and the succinate concentrations and GPR91 expression were increased. Moreover, we found that GPR91 knockdown or resveratrol treatment improved the steatosis in MCD diet-fed mice. This investigation revealed a novel mechanism of the SIRT3-SDH-GPR91 cascade in MCD diet-induced HSC activation in NAFLD. These findings highlight the biological significance of novel strategies aimed at targeting SIRT3 and GPR91 in HSCs with the goal of improving NAFLD treatment. PMID:26912655

  9. Berberine attenuates high glucose-induced fibrosis by activating the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 and repressing the S1P2/MAPK signaling pathway in glomerular mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiying; Li, Jie; Xiong, Fengxiao; Huang, Junying; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Peiqing; Huang, Heqing

    2016-08-15

    Berberine (BBR) exerts powerful renoprotective effects on diabetic nephropathy (DN), but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 ameliorates diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting the activation of the sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2) signaling pathway. In this study, we explored the role of TGR5 in the BBR-induced downregulation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated fibrosis in glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Results showed that, BBR suppressed the expression of FN, ICAM-1, and TGF-β1 in high-glucose cultures of GMCs, and the phosphorylation level of c-Jun/c-Fos was downregulated. The high glucose lowered TGR5 expression in a time-dependent manner; this effect was reversed by BBR in a dose-dependent manner. The TGR5 agonist INT-777 decreased the high glucose-induced FN, ICAM-1, and TGF-β1 protein contents. In addition, TGR5 siRNA blocked S1P2 degradation by BBR. And MAPK signaling, which plays important regulatory roles in the pathological progression of DN, was activated by TGR5 siRNA. Apart from this, MAPK signaling as well as FN, ICAM-1, and TGF-β1 suppressed by BBR under high glucose conditions were limited by TGR5 depletion. Thus, BBR decreases FN, ICAM-1, and TGF-β1 levels under high glucose conditions in GMCs possibly by activating TGR5 and inhibiting S1P2/MAPK signaling. PMID:27292312

  10. Estrogen and pure antiestrogen fulvestrant (ICI 182 780) augment cell–matrigel adhesion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through a novel G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30)-to-calpain signaling axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulvestrant (ICI 182 780, ICI) has been used in treating patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer, yet initial or acquired resistance to endocrine therapies frequently arises and, in particular, cancer recurs as metastasis. We demonstrate here that both 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and ICI enhance cell adhesion to matrigel in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, with increased autolysis of calpain 1 (large subunit) and proteolysis of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), indicating calpain activation. Additionally, either E2 or ICI induced down-regulation of estrogen receptor α without affecting G protein coupled estrogen receptor 30 (GPR30) expression. Interestingly, GPR30 agonist G1 triggered calpain 1 autolysis but not calpain 2, whereas ER agonist diethylstilbestrol caused no apparent calpain autolysis. Furthermore, the actions of E2 and ICI on calpain and cell adhesion were tremendously suppressed by G15, or knockdown of GPR30. E2 and ICI also induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by U0126 profoundly impeded calpain activation triggered by estrogenic and antiestrogenic stimulations indicating implication of ERK1/2 in the GPR30-mediated action. Lastly, the E2- or ICI-induced cell adhesion was dramatically impaired by calpain-specific inhibitors, ALLN or calpeptin, suggesting requirement of calpain in the GPR30-associated action. These data show that enhanced cell adhesion by E2 and ICI occurs via a novel GPR30-ERK1/2-calpain pathway. Our results indicate that targeting the GPR30 signaling may be a potential strategy to reduce metastasis and improve the efficacy of antiestrogens in treatment of advanced breast cancer. - Highlights: • Estrogen and ICI augment adhesion to matrigel with calpain activation in MCF-7 cells. • GPR30 mediates cell–matrigel adhesion and calpain activation via ERK1/2. • Calpain is required in the cell–matrigel adhesion induced by E2 and ICI

  11. Estrogen and pure antiestrogen fulvestrant (ICI 182 780) augment cell–matrigel adhesion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through a novel G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30)-to-calpain signaling axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yan; Li, Zheng; He, Yan; Shang, Dandan; Pan, Jigang; Wang, Hongmei; Chen, Huamei; Zhu, Zhuxia [Department of Physiology/Cancer Research Group, Guiyang Medical University School of Basic Medicine, 9 Beijing Road, Guiyang 550004, Guizhou (China); Wan, Lei [Department of Pharmacology, Guiyang Medical University School of Basic Medicine, 9 Beijing Road, Guiyang 550004, Guizhou (China); Wang, Xudong, E-mail: xdwang@gmc.edu.cn [Department of Physiology/Cancer Research Group, Guiyang Medical University School of Basic Medicine, 9 Beijing Road, Guiyang 550004, Guizhou (China)

    2014-03-01

    Fulvestrant (ICI 182 780, ICI) has been used in treating patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer, yet initial or acquired resistance to endocrine therapies frequently arises and, in particular, cancer recurs as metastasis. We demonstrate here that both 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and ICI enhance cell adhesion to matrigel in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, with increased autolysis of calpain 1 (large subunit) and proteolysis of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), indicating calpain activation. Additionally, either E2 or ICI induced down-regulation of estrogen receptor α without affecting G protein coupled estrogen receptor 30 (GPR30) expression. Interestingly, GPR30 agonist G1 triggered calpain 1 autolysis but not calpain 2, whereas ER agonist diethylstilbestrol caused no apparent calpain autolysis. Furthermore, the actions of E2 and ICI on calpain and cell adhesion were tremendously suppressed by G15, or knockdown of GPR30. E2 and ICI also induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by U0126 profoundly impeded calpain activation triggered by estrogenic and antiestrogenic stimulations indicating implication of ERK1/2 in the GPR30-mediated action. Lastly, the E2- or ICI-induced cell adhesion was dramatically impaired by calpain-specific inhibitors, ALLN or calpeptin, suggesting requirement of calpain in the GPR30-associated action. These data show that enhanced cell adhesion by E2 and ICI occurs via a novel GPR30-ERK1/2-calpain pathway. Our results indicate that targeting the GPR30 signaling may be a potential strategy to reduce metastasis and improve the efficacy of antiestrogens in treatment of advanced breast cancer. - Highlights: • Estrogen and ICI augment adhesion to matrigel with calpain activation in MCF-7 cells. • GPR30 mediates cell–matrigel adhesion and calpain activation via ERK1/2. • Calpain is required in the cell–matrigel adhesion induced by E2 and ICI.

  12. Prunetin signals via G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30(GPER1): Stimulation of adenylyl cyclase and cAMP-mediated activation of MAPK signaling induces Runx2 expression in osteoblasts to promote bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kainat; Pal, Subhashis; Yadav, Manisha; Maurya, Rakesh; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2015-12-01

    Prunetin is found in red clover and fruit of Prunus avium (red cherry). The effect of prunetin on osteoblast function, its mode of action and bone regeneration in vivo were investigated. Cultures of primary osteoblasts, osteoblastic cell line and HEK293T cells were used for various in vitro studies. Adult female rats received drill-hole injury at the femur diaphysis to assess the bone regenerative effect of prunetin. Prunetin at 10nM significantly (a) increased proliferation and differentiation of primary cultures of osteoblasts harvested from rats and (b) promoted formation of mineralized nodules by bone marrow stromal/osteoprogenitor cells. At this concentration, prunetin did not activate any of the two nuclear estrogen receptors (α and β). However, prunetin triggered signaling via a G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30/GPER1, and enhanced cAMP levels in osteoblasts. G15, a selective GPR30 antagonist, abolished prunetin-induced increases in osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and intracellular cAMP. In osteoblasts, prunetin up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) protein through cAMP-dependent Erk/MAP kinase activation that ultimately resulted in the up-regulation of GPR30. Administration of prunetin at 0.25mg/kg given to rats stimulated bone regeneration at the site of drill hole and up-regulated Runx2 expression in the fractured callus and the effect was comparable to human parathyroid hormone, the only clinically used osteogenic therapy. We conclude that prunetin promotes osteoinduction in vivo and the mechanism is defined by signaling through GPR30 resulting in the up-regulation of the key osteogenic gene Runx2 that in turn up-regulates GPR30. PMID:26345541

  13. Inhibitory effects of omega-3 fatty acids on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats: Possible involvement of G protein-coupled receptor 120/β-arrestin2/TGF-β activated kinase-1 binding protein-1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jia; Li, Haiying; Meng, Chengjie; Chen, Dongdong; Chen, Zhouqing; Wang, Yibin; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids have been reported to improve neuron functions during aging and in patients affected by mild cognitive impairment, and mediate potent anti-inflammatory via G protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) signal pathway. Neuron dysfunction and inflammatory response also contributed to the progression of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI). This study was to examine the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on SAH-induced EBI. Two weeks before SAH, 30% Omega-3 fatty acids was administered by oral gavage at 1g/kg body weight once every 24h. Specific siRNA for GPR120 was exploited. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, fluoro-Jade B staining, and neurobehavioral scores and brain water content test showed that omega-3 fatty acids effectively suppressed SAH-induced brain cell apoptosis and neuronal degradation, behavioral impairment, and brain edema. Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays results showed that omega-3 fatty acids effectively suppressed SAH-induced elevation of inflammatory factors, including cyclooxygenase-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, omega-3 fatty acids could inhibit phosphorylation of transforming growth factor β activated kinase-1 (TAK1), MEK4, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and IkappaB kinase as well as activation of nuclear factor kappa B through regulating GPR120/β-arrestin2/TAK1 binding protein-1 pathway. Furthermore, siRNA-induced GPR120 silencing blocked the protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids. Here, we show that stimulation of GPR120 with omega-3 fatty acids pretreatment causes anti-apoptosis and anti-inflammatory effects via β-arrestin2/TAK1 binding protein-1/TAK1 pathway in the brains of SAH rats. Fish omega-3 fatty acids as part of a daily diet may reduce EBI in an experimental rat model of SAH. PMID:27000704

  14. Biphasic Regulation of Yes-associated Protein (YAP) Cellular Localization, Phosphorylation, and Activity by G Protein-coupled Receptor Agonists in Intestinal Epithelial Cells: A NOVEL ROLE FOR PROTEIN KINASE D (PKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Sinnett-Smith, James; Stevens, Jan V; Young, Steven H; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2016-08-19

    We examined the regulation of Yes-associated protein (YAP) localization, phosphorylation, and transcriptional activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Our results show that stimulation of intestinal epithelial IEC-18 cells with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonist angiotensin II, a potent mitogen for these cells, induced rapid translocation of YAP from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (within 15 min) and a concomitant increase in YAP phosphorylation at Ser(127) and Ser(397) Angiotensin II elicited YAP phosphorylation and cytoplasmic accumulation in a dose-dependent manner (ED50 = 0.3 nm). Similar YAP responses were provoked by stimulation with vasopressin or serum. Treatment of the cells with the protein kinase D (PKD) family inhibitors CRT0066101 and kb NB 142-70 prevented the increase in YAP phosphorylation on Ser(127) and Ser(397) via Lats2, YAP cytoplasmic accumulation, and increase in the mRNA levels of YAP/TEAD-regulated genes (Ctgf and Areg). Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3 markedly attenuated YAP nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, phosphorylation at Ser(127), and induction of Ctgf and Areg expression in response to GPCR activation. These results identify a novel role for the PKD family in the control of biphasic localization, phosphorylation, and transcriptional activity of YAP in intestinal epithelial cells. In turn, YAP and TAZ are necessary for the stimulation of the proliferative response of intestinal epithelial cells to GPCR agonists that act via PKD. The discovery of interaction between YAP and PKD pathways identifies a novel cross-talk in signal transduction and demonstrates, for the first time, that the PKDs feed into the YAP pathway. PMID:27369082

  15. A library of 7TM receptor C-terminal tails. Interactions with the proposed post-endocytic sorting proteins ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Arne; Søndergaard, Birgitte P; Ersbøll, Bjarne;

    2004-01-01

    Adaptor and scaffolding proteins determine the cellular targeting, the spatial, and thereby the functional association of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors with co-receptors, transducers, and downstream effectors and the adaptors determine post-signaling events such as receptor sequ...... that the tail library provides useful information on the general importance of certain adaptor proteins, for example, in this case, ruling out EBP50 as being a broad spectrum-recycling adaptor....... proteins previously proposed to be involved in post-endocytotic sorting of receptors. Of the two proteins suggested to target receptors for recycling to the cell membrane, which is the route believed to be taken by a majority of receptors, ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin)-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50) bound...

  16. A library of 7TM receptor C-terminal tails - Interactions with the proposed post-endocytic sorting proteins ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, A.; Sondergaard, B.P.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær;

    2004-01-01

    Adaptor and scaffolding proteins determine the cellular targeting, the spatial, and thereby the functional association of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors with co-receptors, transducers, and downstream effectors and the adaptors determine post-signaling events such as receptor sequ...... that the tail library provides useful information on the general importance of certain adaptor proteins, for example, in this case, ruling out EBP50 as being a broad spectrum-recycling adaptor....... proteins previously proposed to be involved in post-endocytotic sorting of receptors. Of the two proteins suggested to target receptors for recycling to the cell membrane, which is the route believed to be taken by a majority of receptors, ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin)binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50) bound...

  17. Prediction of GPCR-G Protein Coupling Specificity Using Features of Sequences and Biological Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshihide Ono; Haretsugu Hishigaki

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the coupling specificity between G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and specific classes of G proteins is important for further elucidation of receptor functions within a cell. Increasing information on GPCR sequences and the G protein family would facilitate prediction of the coupling properties of GPCRs. In this study, we describe a novel approach for predicting the coupling specificity between GPCRs and G proteins. This method uses not only GPCR sequences but also the functional knowledge generated by natural language processing, and can achieve 92.2% prediction accuracy by using the C4.5 algorithm.Furthermore, rules related to GPCR-G protein coupling are generated. The combination of sequence analysis and text mining improves the prediction accuracy for GPCR-G protein coupling specificity, and also provides clues for understanding GPCR signaling.

  18. Molecular cloning of a novel, putative G protein-coupled receptor from sea anemones structurally related to members of the FSH, TSH, LH/CG receptor family from mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nothacker, H P; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1993-01-01

    hormone (FSH, TSH, LH/CG) receptor family from mammals, including a very large, extracellular N terminus (18-25% sequence identity) and a 7 transmembrane region (44-48% sequence identity). As with the mammalian glycoprotein hormone receptor genes, the sea anemone receptor gene yields transcripts which can...

  19. Functional importance of the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region in the calcium-sensing receptor. Constitutive activity and inverse agonism in a family C G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, T A; Burstein, E S;

    2000-01-01

    the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region of CaR, indicating that this part of the receptor is particularly sensitive to mutation-induced activation. This region was subjected to random saturation mutagenesis, and 219 mutant receptor clones were isolated and screened pharmacologically in a high throughput...... screening assay. Selected mutants were characterized further in an inositol phosphate assay. The vast majority of the mutants tested displayed an increased affinity for Ca(2+). Furthermore, 21 of the mutants showed increased basal activity in the absence of agonist. This constitutive activity was not......, suppressed the elevated basal response of the constitutively activated Ca/1a mutants demonstrating inverse agonist activity of CPCCOEt. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region is of key importance for the maintenance of the inactive conformation of CaR....

  20. 17β-estradiol rapidly facilitates lordosis through G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) via deactivation of medial preoptic nucleus μ-opioid receptors in estradiol primed female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Nathan; Serey, Chhorvann; Sinchak, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In female rats sexual receptivity (lordosis) can be induced with either a single large dose of estradiol benzoate (EB), or a priming dose of EB that does not induce sexual receptivity followed by 17β-estradiol (E2). Estradiol priming initially inhibits lordosis through a multi-synaptic circuit originating in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH) that activates and internalizes μ-opioid receptors (MOR) in medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) neurons. Lordosis is facilitated when MPN MOR are d...

  1. G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-fei GAO; Hai-lin ZHANG; Zhen-dong YOU; Chang-lin LU; Cheng HE

    2007-01-01

    Aim: G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRK) are important for neuronal signaling and membrane excitability. In the present study, we intend to find whether GIRK channels express functionally in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Methods: We used RT-PCR to detect mRNA for4 subunits of GIRK in the adult DRG. The whole-cell patch clamp recording was used to confirm GIRK channels functionally expressed. Results: The mRNA for the 4 subunits of GIRK were detected in the adult DRG. GTPγS enhanced inwardly rectifying potassium (K+) currents of the DRG neurons, while Ba2+inhibited such currents. Furthermore, the GIRK channels were shown to be coupled to the GABAB receptor, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family, as baclofen increased the inwardly rectifying K+ currents. Conclusion: GIRK channels are expressed and functionally coupled with GABAB receptors in adult rat DRG neurons.

  2. Diverse activation pathways in class A GPCRs converge near the G-protein-coupling region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, A J; Deupi, Xavier; Lebon, Guillaume; Heydenreich, Franziska M; Flock, Tilman; Miljus, Tamara; Balaji, Santhanam; Bouvier, Michel; Veprintsev, Dmitry B; Tate, Christopher G; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Babu, M Madan

    2016-08-25

    Class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large family of membrane proteins that mediate a wide variety of physiological functions, including vision, neurotransmission and immune responses. They are the targets of nearly one-third of all prescribed medicinal drugs such as beta blockers and antipsychotics. GPCR activation is facilitated by extracellular ligands and leads to the recruitment of intracellular G proteins. Structural rearrangements of residue contacts in the transmembrane domain serve as 'activation pathways' that connect the ligand-binding pocket to the G-protein-coupling region within the receptor. In order to investigate the similarities in activation pathways across class A GPCRs, we analysed 27 GPCRs from diverse subgroups for which structures of active, inactive or both states were available. Here we show that, despite the diversity in activation pathways between receptors, the pathways converge near the G-protein-coupling region. This convergence is mediated by a highly conserved structural rearrangement of residue contacts between transmembrane helices 3, 6 and 7 that releases G-protein-contacting residues. The convergence of activation pathways may explain how the activation steps initiated by diverse ligands enable GPCRs to bind a common repertoire of G proteins. PMID:27525504

  3. Research progress of G protein-coupled receptor kinases in pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease%G蛋白耦连受体激酶在帕金森病发病机制中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴娜; 刘振国

    2011-01-01

    C protein-coupled receptor kinases ( GRKs) are a class of important soluble proteins that mediate receptor desensitization. They are the essential elements in negative feedback mechanism of C protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling pathway. Increased neurohormonal levels in nervous system diseases and adverse consequences in nervous system diseases induced by sustained neurohormonal stimulation indicate that the desensitization of neural receptors is a very important protection mechanism. Recent researches have revealed that GRKs play an important role in the development of Parkinson's disease and its motor complications. GRK6, which is localized in medium-sized spinous neurons, is the most critical GRKs in striatum. GRK6 knockout is related to the hypersensitivity of dopamine receptor. The research progress of GRKs in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease is reviewed in this paper.%G蛋白耦连受体激酶(GRKs)是一类介导受体脱敏的重要可溶性蛋白质,是G蛋白耦连受体(GPCRs)信号转导通路负反馈机制中必不可少的因素.神经系统疾病中神经激素水平的升高,以及神经激素持续刺激引起的不利后果,表明了神经激素受体反应性脱敏是一种非常重要的保护机制.近年来研究显示,GRKs在帕金森病及其运动并发症的发展过程中起着重要作用,其中GRK6主要定位于中型棘状神经元上,GRK6敲除与多巴胺受体的超敏有关,是纹状体最关键的GRKs.文章就近年来GRKs在帕金森病发病机制中的研究进展进行综述.

  4. Trans-Cinnamic Acid Increases Adiponectin and the Phosphorylation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase through G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Kopp

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Adiponectin and intracellular 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK are important modulators of glucose and fat metabolism. Cinnamon exerts beneficial effects by improving insulin sensitivity and blood lipids, e.g., through increasing adiponectin concentrations and AMPK activation. The underlying mechanism is unknown. The Gi/Go-protein-coupled receptor (GPR 109A stimulates adiponectin secretion after binding its ligand niacin. Trans-cinnamic acid (tCA, a compound of cinnamon is another ligand. We hypothesize whether AMPK activation and adiponectin secretion by tCA is transmitted by GPR signaling. Differentiated 3T3-L1 cells were incubated with pertussis toxin (PTX, an inhibitor of Gi/Go-protein-coupling, and treated with different tCA concentrations. Treatment with tCA increased adiponectin and the pAMPK/AMPK ratio (p ≤ 0.001. PTX incubation abolished the increased pAMPK/AMPK ratio and adiponectin secretion. The latter remained increased compared to controls (p ≤ 0.002. tCA treatment stimulated adiponectin secretion and AMPK activation; the inhibitory effect of PTX suggests GPR is involved in tCA stimulated signaling.

  5. Bioorthogonal fluorescent labeling of functional G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, He; Naganathan, Saranga; Kazmi, Manija A;

    2014-01-01

    contrast, the strain-promoted [3+2] azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SpAAC) with dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO) reagents yielded stoichiometric conjugates with azF-rhodopsin while undergoing negligible background reactions. As one application of this technique, we used Alexa488-rhodopsin to measure the kinetics of...

  6. IMAGING ASSESSMENT OF G-PROTEIN-COUPLED ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ACTIVATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    We expect to provide a targeted imaging assay that links chemical mechanism of toxicity to target organ effects and heart physiology within individual 96-hpf zebrafish. Importantly, with the utilization of selective, non-toxic agonists or antagonists for additional xenobiot...

  7. G protein coupled receptor, the vault of drug discovery——introduction of Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2012%G蛋白偶联受体:药物发现的摇篮——2012年诺贝尔化学奖简介

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晨光; 丁卫

    2012-01-01

    Two American scientists Robert Lefkowitz and Brian Kobilka have honored the 2012 Nobel Price in Chemistry for their achievements in the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) studies. In this article, we introduced their research in the related fields and summarized their major academic contributions that recognized among scientific researchers. Furthermore, we expanded the discussion regarding the significance and the potential applications of their work for morden medication and drug development.%2012年度的诺贝尔化学奖授予了在G蛋白偶联受体研究中作出突出成就的美国科学家罗伯特·莱夫科维茨(Robert J.Lefkowitz)教授和布莱恩·克比尔卡(Brian K.Kobilka)教授.本文将对两位获奖者的研究工作与主要学术贡献给予较为系统的归纳和总结,并对其获奖工作的科学意义及在相关药物研发重点的应用和价值进行展望和分析.

  8. 在基因化学的规模上识别G蛋白偶合受体(GPCR)与其配体的相互作用%Identification of G-protein coupled receptors and ligands interactions on a chemo-genomic scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亭; 段勇

    2009-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) represent a class of important therapeutic targets. Seeking novel ligands as potential drugs targeting GPCRs and identifying natural ligands for orphan GPCRs have been long-standing efforts of academic and pharmaceutical industrial research. To accelerate this effort, there is a critical need for methods capable of predicting GPCR-ligand interactions on a large scale. Such methods also may help to reveal cross-pharmacology of different GPCRs in order to alleviate side effects and toxicity of potential drugs. Here we report a support vector machine (SVM)-based method for predicting GPCR-ligand interactions on a chemo-genomic scale. In this method, GPCRs were characterized by the sequence information of the transmembrane segments and ligands were represented by their chemical structural information. The application of the method to a set of known GPCR-ligand interacting pairs that included GPCRs from 28 subfamilies of the A family led to a model of GPCR-ligand interaction network. The model was able to distinguish interacting pairs from non-interacting pairs with an average 86.9% true-positive rate and 99.97% true-negative rate. Moreover, the model correctly predicted the interactions of a number of new ligands and orphan GPCRs that were chemically and phylogenetically novel to the training data set. This method is expected to be applicable to in silico high-throughput GPCR-targeting drug discovery and ligand identification at the GPCRs with unknown functions.%G蛋白偶合受体(GPCR)不仅是一类重要的生物膜蛋白,而且代表着一类重要的治疗疾病的生物把标.长期以来,学术研究界和制药工业界都在努力寻找能与这些蛋白发生相互作用的配体分子以期成为潜在药物,其中包括对那些生物功能还未知的GPCR的配体的寻找.一个能对GPcR以及可能配体的相互作用关系作出准确预报和筛选的方法显然可以加速这一过程.尤其是这个方

  9. Biological roles and therapeutic potential of hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashan eAhmed

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the recent past, deorphanization studies have described intermediates of energy metabolism to activate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and to thereby regulate metabolic functions. GPR81, GPR109A and GPR109B, formerly known as the nicotinic acid receptor family, are encoded by clustered genes and share a high degree of sequence homology. Recently, hydroxy-carboxylic acids were identified as endogenous ligands of GPR81, GPR109A and GPR109B, and therefore these receptors have been placed into a novel receptor family of hydroxy-carboxylic acid (HCA receptors. The HCA1 receptor (GPR81 is activated by the glycolytic metabolite 2-hydroxy-propionic acid (lactate, the HCA2 receptor is activated by the ketone body 3-hydroxy-butyric acid and the HCA3 receptor (GPR109B is a receptor for the β-oxidation intermediate 3-hydroxy-octanoic acid. While HCA1 and HCA2 receptors are present in most mammalian species, the HCA3 receptor is exclusively found in humans and higher primates. HCA receptors are expressed in adipose tissue and mediate anti-lipolytic effects in adipocytes through Gi-type G-protein-dependent inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. HCA2 and HCA3 inhibit lipolysis during conditions of increased β-oxidation such as prolonged fasting, whereas HCA1 mediates the anti-lipolytic effects of insulin in the fed state. As HCA2 is a receptor for the established anti-dyslipidemic drug nicotinic acid, HCA1 and HCA3 also represent promising drug targets and several synthetic ligands for HCA receptors have been developed. In this article, we will summarize the deorphanization and pharmacological characterization of HCA receptors. Moreover, we will discuss recent progress in elucidating the physiological and pathophysiological role to further evaluate the therapeutic potential of the HCA receptor family for the treatment of metabolic disease.

  10. Crystal structure of the human beta2 adrenergic G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Choi, Hee-Jung; Rosenbaum, Daniel M;

    2007-01-01

    transmembrane segments and the connecting loops are well resolved, whereas the extracellular regions of the beta2AR are not seen. The beta2AR structure differs from rhodopsin in having weaker interactions between the cytoplasmic ends of transmembrane (TM)3 and TM6, involving the conserved E/DRY sequences. These...... differences may be responsible for the relatively high basal activity and structural instability of the beta2AR, and contribute to the challenges in obtaining diffraction-quality crystals of non-rhodopsin GPCRs....

  11. Acidic Tumor Microenvironment and pH-Sensing G protein-Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Justus, Calvin R.; Lixue eDong; Yang, Li V.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechani...

  12. Acidic tumor microenvironment and pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Justus, Calvin R.; Dong, Lixue; Yang, Li V.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechan...

  13. An Adaptive Strategy for the Classification of G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamed, S; Marwala, T

    2007-01-01

    One of the major problems in computational biology is the inability of existing classification models to incorporate expanding and new domain knowledge. This problem of static classification models is addressed in this paper by the introduction of incremental learning for problems in bioinformatics. Many machine learning tools have been applied to this problem using static machine learning structures such as neural networks or support vector machines that are unable to accommodate new information into their existing models. We utilize the fuzzy ARTMAP as an alternate machine learning system that has the ability of incrementally learning new data as it becomes available. The fuzzy ARTMAP is found to be comparable to many of the widespread machine learning systems. The use of an evolutionary strategy in the selection and combination of individual classifiers into an ensemble system, coupled with the incremental learning ability of the fuzzy ARTMAP is proven to be suitable as a pattern classifier. The algorithm ...

  14. Molecular evolution of a chordate specific family of G protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Leese Florian; Hatt Hanns; Pelz Thomas; Mayer Christoph; Kurtenbach Stefan; Neuhaus Eva M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Chordate evolution is a history of innovations that is marked by physical and behavioral specializations, which led to the development of a variety of forms from a single ancestral group. Among other important characteristics, vertebrates obtained a well developed brain, anterior sensory structures, a closed circulatory system and gills or lungs as blood oxygenation systems. The duplication of pre-existing genes had profound evolutionary implications for the developmental ...

  15. Identification of G protein-coupled receptors in Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni by comparative genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Tulio D L; Young, Neil D.; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Hall, Ross S.; Mangiola, Stefano; Lonie, Andrew; Gasser, Robin B

    2014-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease affecting ~200 million people worldwide. Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni are two relatively closely related schistosomes (blood flukes), and the causative agents of urogenital and hepatointestinal schistosomiasis, respectively. The availability of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data sets for these two schistosomes now provides unprecedented opportunities to explore their biology, host interactions and schistosomiasis at the molec...

  16. A chemical screen identifies class A G-protein coupled receptors as regulators of cilia

    OpenAIRE

    Avasthi, Prachee; Marley, Aaron; Lin, Henry; Gregori-Puigjane, Elisabet; Shoichet, Brian K.; von Zastrow, Mark; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2012-01-01

    Normal cilia length and motility are critical for proper cellular function. Prior studies of the regulation of ciliary structure and length have primarily focused on the intraflagellar transport machinery and motor proteins required for ciliary assembly and disassembly. However, several mutants with abnormal length flagella highlight the importance of signaling proteins as well. In this study, an unbiased chemical screen was performed to uncover signaling pathways that are critical for ciliog...

  17. An Adaptive Strategy for the Classification of G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, S.; Rubin, D.; Marwala, T.

    2007-01-01

    One of the major problems in computational biology is the inability of existing classification models to incorporate expanding and new domain knowledge. This problem of static classification models is addressed in this paper by the introduction of incremental learning for problems in bioinformatics. Many machine learning tools have been applied to this problem using static machine learning structures such as neural networks or support vector machines that are unable to accommodate new informa...

  18. Identification of four evolutionarily related G protein-coupled receptors from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmont, Martin; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael;

    2006-01-01

    The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is an important vector for malaria, which is one of the most serious human parasitic diseases in the world, causing up to 2.7 million deaths yearly. To contribute to our understanding of A. gambiae and to the transmission of malaria, we have now cloned four...

  19. Isothermal Chemical Denaturation to Determine Binding Affinity of Small Molecules to G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Patrick; Weihofen, Wilhelm; Siu, Fai; Xie, Amy; Katakia, Hetal; Wright, S. Kirk; Hunt, Ian; Brown, Richard K; Freire, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The determination of accurate binding affinities is critical in drug discovery and development. Several techniques are available for characterizing the binding of small molecules to soluble proteins. The situation is different for integral membrane proteins. Isothermal chemical denaturation (ICD) has been shown to be a valuable biophysical method to determine in a direct and label-free fashion the binding of ligands to soluble proteins. In this communication, the application of isothermal che...

  20. G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling Architecture of Mammalian Immune Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Polouliakh; Richard Nock; Frank Nielsen; Hiroaki Kitano

    2009-01-01

    A series of recent studies on large-scale networks of signaling and metabolic systems revealed that a certain network structure often called "bow-tie network" are observed. In signaling systems, bow-tie network takes a form with diverse and redundant inputs and outputs connected via a small numbers of core molecules. While arguments have been made that such network architecture enhances robustness and evolvability of biological systems, its functional role at a cellular level remains obscure....

  1. G protein-coupled receptors oligomerization in the basal ganglia and its implications in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Albergaria, Catarina Soares de

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT| Parkinson’s disease is a chronic and progressive condition of the central nervous system (CNS) that affects around 1% of the world population – it is the second most common neurodegenerative disease among elderly people, being only superseded by Alzheimer’s disease. The symptoms of the disease are originated by a selective death of dopaminergic neurons from a particular region of basal ganglia, but the etiology of this event remains unknown. In the last few years, neu...

  2. Expression and function of G-protein-coupled receptorsin the male reproductive tract

    OpenAIRE

    Avellar, Maria Christina W; Maria Fatima M. Lázari; Porto, Catarina S.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the expression and function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), α1-adrenoceptors and relaxin receptors in the male reproductive tract. The localization and differential expression of mAChR and α1-adrenoceptor subtypes in specific compartments of the efferent ductules, epididymis, vas deferens, seminal vesicle and prostate of various species indicate a role for these receptors in the modulation of luminal fluid composition and smooth muscle contract...

  3. Expression and function of G-protein-coupled receptorsin the male reproductive tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina W. Avellar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the expression and function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs, α1-adrenoceptors and relaxin receptors in the male reproductive tract. The localization and differential expression of mAChR and α1-adrenoceptor subtypes in specific compartments of the efferent ductules, epididymis, vas deferens, seminal vesicle and prostate of various species indicate a role for these receptors in the modulation of luminal fluid composition and smooth muscle contraction, including effects on male fertility. Furthermore, the activation of mAChRs induces transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and the Sertoli cell proliferation. The relaxin receptors are present in the testis, RXFP1 in elongated spermatids and Sertoli cells from rat, and RXFP2 in Leydig and germ cells from rat and human, suggesting a role for these receptors in the spermatogenic process. The localization of both receptors in the apical portion of epithelial cells and smooth muscle layers of the vas deferens suggests an involvement of these receptors in the contraction and regulation of secretion.Esta revisão enfatiza a expressão e a função dos receptores muscarínicos, adrenoceptores α1 e receptores para relaxina no sistema reprodutor masculino. A expressão dos receptores muscarínicos e adrenoceptores α1 em compartimentos específicos de dúctulos eferentes, epidídimo, ductos deferentes, vesícula seminal e próstata de várias espécies indica o envolvimento destes receptores na modulação da composição do fluido luminal e na contração do músculo liso, incluindo efeitos na fertilidade masculina. Além disso, a ativação dos receptores muscarínicos leva à transativação do receptor para o fator crescimento epidermal e proliferação das células de Sertoli. Os receptores para relaxina estão presentes no testículo, RXFP1 nas espermátides alongadas e células de Sertoli de rato e RXFP2 nas células de Leydig e germinativas

  4. Characterization of heteromultimeric G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels of the tunicate tadpole with a unique pore property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Y; Okado, H; Kubo, Y

    2001-05-25

    Two cDNAs that encode the G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (GIRK, Kir3) of tunicate tadpoles (tunicate G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channel-A and -B; TuGIRK-A and -B) have been isolated. The deduced amino acid sequences showed approximately 60% identity with the mammalian Kir3 family. Detected by whole mount in situ hybridization, both TuGIRK-A and -B were expressed similarly in the neural cells of the head and neck region from the tail bud stage to the young tadpole stage. By co-injecting cRNAs of TuGIRK-A and G protein beta(1)/gamma(2) subunits (Gbetagamma) in Xenopus oocytes, an inwardly rectifying K(+) current was expressed. In contrast, coinjection of TuGIRK-B with Gbetagamma did not express any current. When both TuGIRK-A and -B were coexpressed together with Gbetagamma, an inwardly rectifying K(+) current was also detected. The properties of this current clearly differed from those of TuGIRK-A current, since it displayed a characteristic decline of the macroscopic conductance at strongly hyperpolarized potentials. TuGIRK-A/B current also differed from TuGIRK-A current in terms of the lower sensitivity to the Ba(2+) block, the higher sensitivity to the Cs(+) block, and the smaller single channel conductance. Taken together, we concluded that TuGIRK-A and -B form functional heteromultimeric G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channels in the neural cells of the tunicate tadpole. By introducing a mutation of Lys(161) to Thr in TuGIRK-B, TuGIRK-A/B channels acquired a higher sensitivity to the Ba(2+) block and a slightly lower sensitivity to the Cs(+) block, and the decrease in the macroscopic conductance at hyperpolarized potentials was no longer observed. Thus, the differences in the electrophysiological properties between TuGIRK-A and TuGIRK-A/B channels were shown to be, at least partly, due to the presence of Lys(161) at the external mouth of the pore of the TuGIRK-B subunit. PMID:11278535

  5. Biochemical analysis of a rhodopsin photoactivatable GFP fusion as a model of G-protein coupled receptor transport

    OpenAIRE

    Sammons, Joshua D.; Gross, Alecia K.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin is trafficked to the rod outer segment of vertebrate rod cells with high fidelity. When rhodopsin transport is disrupted retinal photoreceptors apoptose, resulting in the blinding disease autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Herein, we introduce rhodopsin-photoactivatable GFP-1D4 (rhodopsin-paGFP-1D4) for the purposes of monitoring rhodopsin transport in living cells. Rhodopsin-paGFP-1D4 contains photoactivatable GFP (paGFP) fused to rhodopsin’s C-terminus and the last eight ami...

  6. Alteration in contractile G-protein coupled receptor expression by moist snuff and nicotine in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, Hardip; Xu, Cang-Bao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The cardiovascular risk for users of use of Swedish snus/American snuff (moist tobacco) has been debated for a long time. The present study was designed to examine the effects of water- or lipid-soluble (DMSO-soluble) snus and nicotine, the most important substance in tobacco, on the expression of...... kinases (MAPK). However, the effects of moist tobacco on the expression of GPCR are less studied. Rat middle cerebral arteries were isolated and organ cultured in serum-free medium for 24h in the presence of water-soluble snus (WSS), DMSO-soluble snus (DSS), or nicotine. The dose of snus and nicotine was...

  7. Inflammatory Mediators Alter the Astrocyte Transcriptome and Calcium Signaling Elicited by Multiple G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Hamby, Mary E.; Coppola, Giovanni; Ao, Yan; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Khakh, Baljit S.; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation features in CNS disorders such as stroke, trauma, neurodegeneration, infection, and autoimmunity in which astrocytes play critical roles. To elucidate how inflammatory mediators alter astrocyte functions, we examined effects of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and interferon-gamma (IFNγ), alone and in combination, on purified, mouse primary cortical astrocyte cultures. We used microarrays to conduct whole-genome expression profiling, and measured ...

  8. Depletion of calcium stores contributes to progesterone-induced attenuation of calcium signaling of G protein-coupled receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gehrig-Burger, K.; Slaninová, Jiřina; Gimpl, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 16 (2010), s. 2815-2824. ISSN 1420-682X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non-genomic effect * oxytocin * bradykinin * progesterone Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 7.047, year: 2010

  9. Present perspectives on the automated classification of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the protein sequence level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Matthew N; Gloriam, David E; Secker, Andrew;

    2011-01-01

    economically important groups of proteins known. The GPCRs undertake numerous vital metabolic functions and interact with a hugely diverse range of small and large ligands. Many different methodologies have been developed to efficiently and accurately classify the GPCRs. These range from motif-based techniques...... sequence relations, implicit within the family, into an adaptive approach to classification. Importantly, we also allude to some of the key innate problems in developing an effective approach to classifying the GPCRs: the lack of sequence similarity between the six classes that comprise the GPCR family and...

  10. Emerging roles for the pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors in response to acidotic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Edward J Sanderlin,1 Calvin R Justus,1 Elizabeth A Krewson,2 Li V Yang1,21Department of Internal Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA; 2Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA Abstract: Protons (hydrogen ions) are the simplest form of ions universally produced by cellular metabolism including aerobic respiration and glycolysis. Export of protons out of cells by a number of aci...

  11. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-3-deficient mice exhibit WHIM syndrome features and attenuated inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Tarrant, Teresa K.; Billard, Matthew J.; Timoshchenko, Roman G; McGinnis, Marcus W.; Serafin, D. Stephen; Foreman, Oded; Esserman, Denise A.; Chao, Nelson J.; Lento, William E.; Lee, David M.; Patel, Dhavalkumar; Siderovski, David P.

    2013-01-01

    GRK3−/− mice exhibit impaired CXCL12/CXCR4 responses, myelokathexis and hypogammaglobulinemia, as in WHIM syndrome, and are protected in inflammatory arthritis models by altered granulocyte trafficking.

  12. Recombinant Murine Gamma Herpesvirus 68 Carrying KSHV G Protein-Coupled Receptor Induces Angiogenic Lesions in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Junjie Zhang; Lining Zhu; Xiaolu Lu; Feldman, Emily R.; Keyes, Lisa R.; Yi Wang; Hui Fan; Hao Feng; Zanxian Xia; Jiya Sun; Taijiao Jiang; Shou-Jiang Gao; Tibbetts, Scott A; Pinghui Feng

    2015-01-01

    Human gamma herpesviruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are capable of inducing tumors, particularly in in immune-compromised individuals. Due to the stringent host tropism, rodents are resistant to infection by human gamma herpesviruses, creating a significant barrier for the in vivo study of viral genes that contribute to tumorigenesis. The closely-related murine gamma herpesvirus 68 (γHV68) efficiently infects laboratory mouse strai...

  13. Cross-talk between MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling and G protein-couple signaling in synoviocytes of collagen-induced arthritis rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ling-ling; WEI Wei; WANG Qing-tong; CHEN Jing-yu; CHEN Yin

    2008-01-01

    Background Signaling pathways that regulate the production of cytokines and destructive enzymes have been implicated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis.There are co-relations between signaling pathways.The aim of this study was to investigate interactions and cross-talks between MEK1/2-extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2)signaling and G protein-couple signaling in synoviocytes of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats by the stimulation of interleukin-1 (IL-1),U0126,isoprenaline hydrochloride and aminophyline respectively.Methods Twenty Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were induced by chicken type Ⅱ collagen.Synoviocytes of CIA rats were isolated and cultured.The expressions of Gi,phosphorylated MEK1/2 (p-MEK1/2) and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) were detected by Western blotting.cAMP level and protein kinase A (PKA) activity were measured by radioimmunoassay and kinase-glo(R) luminescent kinase assay respectively.Results There was remarkable inflammation in CIA rats accompanied by swelling paws,hyperplastic synovium,pannus and cartilage erosion,cAMP level and PKA activity of synoviocytes decreased.Gi,p-ERK1/2 and p-MEK1/2 increased,rIL-1α improved the expression of Gi,p-ERK1/2 and p-MEK1/2,cAMP and PKA increased with stimulation of rIL-1α.U0126 inhibited Gi,cAMP and PKA of synoviocytes stimulated by rIL-1α.Isoprenaline hydrochloride enhanced Gi,cAMP and PKA,but had no effects on p-MEK1/2 and p-ERK1/2.Aminophyline increased cAMP and PKA,but inhibited p-MEK1/2 and p-ERK1/2.Conclusions Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and G protein-couple signaling are associated with synovitis.There are cross talks between MAPKs and G protein-couple signaling.The two signaling pathways represent potential therapeutic targets for RA.

  14. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: A moving story of receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Thue W; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2008-01-01

    Animals sense light and chemical signals through proteins called G-protein-coupled receptors. The crystal structure of one such receptor in complex with a G-protein fragment shows how these receptors are activated.

  15. Protein-Protein Interactions at the Adrenergic Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Cotecchia, Susanna; Stanasila, Laura; Diviani, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The adrenergic receptors are among the best characterized G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and knowledge on this receptor family has provided several important paradigms about GPCR function and regulation. One of the most recent paradigms initially supported by studies on adrenergic receptors is that both βarrestins and G protein-coupled receptors themselves can act as scaffolds binding a variety of proteins and this can result in growing complexity of the receptor-mediated cellular effect...

  16. Tsh receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Frauman, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The TSH receptor is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor(GPCR)family. It is one of the glycoprotein hormone receptors, which also includes the FSH and LH/CG receptors. The TSH receptor mediates the action of the pituitary-derived glycoprotein, TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone, thyrotropin or thyrotrophin). TSH binds to the TSH receptor which is located on thyroid follicular cells (but is also expressed in extrathyroidal sites). Glycosylation of the TSH receptor occurs, as does cleavage ...

  17. Targeting of the retroviral envelope protein SL3-2 towards the human G-Protein coupled receptor hAPJ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Kristina

    overflade protein af SL3-2 har indsat en naturlig ligand for et humant protein. Det er apelin receptoren, APJ, som findes på overfladen af forskellige humane celletyper. Gennem de beskrevne forsøg er det lykkedes os at få SL3-2 til at inficere celler via APJ. Det har vist sig, at SL3-2 er en fremragende...... aktiviteten af de to proteiner. Fremtidige studier vil vise, om det er muligt at inducere membran fusion gennem disse biotinylerede proteiner....

  18. Simple Genetic Selection Protocol for Isolation of Overexpressed Genes That Enhance Accumulation of Membrane-Integrated Human G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Escherichia coli ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Skretas, Georgios; Georgiou, George

    2010-01-01

    The efficient production of membrane proteins in bacteria remains a major challenge. In this work, we sought to identify overexpressed genes that enhance the yields of recombinant membrane proteins in Escherichia coli. We developed a genetic selection system for bacterial membrane protein production, consisting of membrane protein fusions with the enzyme β-lactamase and facile selection of high-production strains on ampicillin-containing media. This system was used to screen the ASKA library,...

  19. KSHV G protein-coupled receptor inhibits lytic gene transcription in primary-effusion lymphoma cells via p21-mediated inhibition of Cdk2

    OpenAIRE

    Cannon, M; Cesarman, E; Boshoff, C

    2006-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) remains the most common AIDS-associated malignancy worldwide. In sub-Saharan Africa especially, this aggressive endothelial-cell tumor is a cause of widespread morbidity and mortality. Infection with Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is now known to be an etiologic force behind KS and primary-effusion lymphoma (PEL). Over time, KSHV has pirated many human genes whose products regulate angiogenesis, inflammation, and the cell cycle. One of these, the KSHV vGPCR, ...

  20. Characterization of mRNA expression for the endothelial differentiation G-protein-coupled (EDG) receptors in porcine endometrial tissue during the pre-implantation period of pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Establishment of pregnancy in the pig requires proper preparation of the uterine environment. Although the mechanisms by which the endometrium undergoes preparation for embryo implantation are not clear, recent evidence has suggested that lysophospholipids, such as sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and ...

  1. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Stimulate Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion via the G-Protein-Coupled Receptor FFAR2

    OpenAIRE

    Tolhurst, Gwen; Heffron, Helen; Lam, Yu Shan; Parker, Helen E; Habib, Abdella M; Diakogiannaki, Eleftheria; Cameron, Jennifer; Grosse, Johannes; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.

    2012-01-01

    Interest in how the gut microbiome can influence the metabolic state of the host has recently heightened. One postulated link is bacterial fermentation of “indigestible” prebiotics to short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which in turn modulate the release of gut hormones controlling insulin release and appetite. We show here that SCFAs trigger secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 from mixed colonic cultures in vitro. Quantitative PCR revealed enriched expression of the ...

  2. The Role of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Proteolysis Site Cleavage of Polycystin-1 in Renal Physiology and Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Trudel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystin-1 (PC1 plays an essential role in renal tubular morphogenesis, and PC1 dysfunction causes human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. A fundamental characteristic of PC1 is post-translational modification via cleavage at the juxtamembrane GPCR proteolysis site (GPS motif that is part of the larger GAIN domain. Given the considerable biochemical complexity of PC1 molecules generated in vivo by this process, GPS cleavage has several profound implications on the intracellular trafficking and localization in association with their particular function. The critical nature of GPS cleavage is further emphasized by the increasing numbers of PKD1 mutations that significantly affect this cleavage process. The GAIN domain with the GPS motif therefore represents the key structural element with fundamental importance for PC1 and might be polycystic kidney disease’s (PKD Achilles’ heel in a large spectrum of PKD1 missense mutations. We highlight the central roles of PC1 cleavage for the regulation of its biogenesis, intracellular trafficking and function, as well as its significance in polycystic kidney disease.

  3. The Drosophila genes CG14593 and CG30106 code for G-protein-coupled receptors specifically activated by the neuropeptides CCHamide-1 and CCHamide-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karina K; Hauser, Frank; Williamson, Michael; Weber, Stine B; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a novel neuropeptide, CCHamide, was discovered in the silkworm Bombyx mori (L. Roller et al., Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 38 (2008) 1147-1157). We have now found that all insects with a sequenced genome have two genes, each coding for a different CCHamide, CCHamide-1 and -2. We have also...

  4. GK4, a G-protein-coupled receptor with a phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase domain in Phytophthora infestans, is involved in sporangia development and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Chenlei; Meijer, Harold J G; de Keijzer, Jeroen; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Yuanchao; Govers, Francine

    2013-04-01

    For dispersal and host infection plant pathogens largely depend on asexual spores. Pathogenesis and sporulation are complex processes that are governed by cellular signalling networks including G-protein and phospholipid signalling. Oomycetes possess a family of novel proteins called GPCR-PIPKs (GKs) that are composed of a seven-transmembrane spanning (7-TM) domain fused to a phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) domain. Based on this domain structure GKs are anticipated to link G-protein and phospholipid signal pathways; however, their functions are currently unknown. Expression analyses of the 12 GK genes in Phytophthora infestans and their orthologues in Phytophthora sojae, revealed differential expression during asexual development. PiGK1 and PiGK4 were fused to monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) and ectopically expressed in P. infestans. In growing hyphae different subcellular distribution patterns were observed indicating that these two GKs act independently during development. We focused on the functional analyses of PiGK4. Its localization suggested involvement in cell differentiation and elongation and its 7-TM domain showed a canonical GPCR membrane topology. Silencing of GK4 and overexpression of full-length and truncated constructs in P. infestans revealed that PiGK4 is not only involved in spore germination and hyphal elongation but also in sporangia cleavage and infection. PMID:23448716

  5. G protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) transcription in intestinal epithelial cells is significantly affected by bacteria belonging to the Bacteroides, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes phyla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, Marlene; Theil, Peter Kappel; Jensen, Bent Borg;

    2012-01-01

    ≤ 0.05) compared with cells without bacteria added. The alteration in cellular GPR120 mRNA was observed with bacteria categorized as either probiotics or bacteria capable of inducing an anti-inflammatory effect. The beneficial effect of these bacteria may very well be mediated by regulation of GPR120...

  6. The Caenorhabditis elegans D2-like dopamine receptor DOP-2 physically interacts with GPA-14, a Gαi subunit

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Pratima; Harbinder, Singh

    2012-01-01

    Dopaminergic inputs are sensed on the cell surface by the seven-transmembrane dopamine receptors that belong to a superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Dopamine receptors are classified as D1-like or D2-like receptors based on their homology and pharmacological profiles. In addition to well established G-protein coupled mechanism of dopamine receptors in mammalian system they can also interact with other signaling pathways. In C. elegans four dopamine receptors (dop-1, dop-2, do...

  7. A Dynamic View of Molecular Switch Behavior at Serotonin Receptors: Implications for Functional Selectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Mart?? Solano, Maria; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor Maeso, Manuel; Selent, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Functional selectivity is a property of G protein-coupled receptors that allows them to preferentially couple to particular signaling partners upon binding of biased agonists. Publication of the X-ray crystal structure of serotonergic 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors in complex with ergotamine, a drug capable of activating G protein coupling and ??-arrestin signaling at the 5-HT1B receptor but clearly favoring ??-arrestin over G protein coupling at the 5-HT2B subtype, has recently provided structu...

  8. Different behaviour of GPCRs when exposed to non-ionic detergents. GPCR/G protein coupling in detergent-resistant membrane domains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudajev, Vladimír; Stöhr, Jiří; Bouřová, Lenka; Novotný, Jiří; Svoboda, Petr

    2006. s. 70-70. [Keystone symposia on lipid rafts and cell function. 23.03.2006-28.03.2006, Steamboat Springs] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : GPCR * G protein * detergent-resistent membrane domains * GABAB * delta-opioid receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  9. GABA(B) receptor phosphorylation regulates KCTD12-induced K+ current desensitization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adelfinger, L.; Tureček, Rostislav; Ivankova, K.; Jensen, A. A.; Moss, S. J.; Gassmann, M.; Bettler, B.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 3 (2014), s. 369-379. ISSN 0006-2952 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : GABA -B * G-protein coupled receptor * GPCR Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.009, year: 2014

  10. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaasse, E.C.; IJzerman, A.P.; Grip, W.J. de; Beukers, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein clas

  11. Agonism and antagonism at the insulin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Louise; Hansen, Bo Falck; Jensen, Pia; Pedersen, Thomas Åskov; Vestergaard, Kirsten; Schäffer, Lauge; Blagoev, Blagoy; Oleksiewicz, Martin B; Kiselyov, Vladislav V; De Meyts, Pierre Marcel Joseph

    2012-01-01

    insulin analogues. The occurrence of ligand agonism and antagonism is well described for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other receptors but in general, with the exception of antibodies, not for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In the case of the IR, no natural ligand or insulin analogue has been...

  12. Adenosine and its receptors as therapeutic targets: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Sachdeva, Sakshi; Gupta, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of the authors is to present an overview of adenosine and its receptors, which are G-protein coupled receptors. The four known adenosine receptor subtypes are discussed along with the therapeutic potential indicating that these receptors can serve as targets for various dreadful diseases.

  13. Novel cannabinoid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, A J

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoids have numerous physiological effects. In the years since the molecular identification of the G protein-coupled receptors CB1 and CB2, the ion channel TRPV1, and their corresponding endogenous ligand systems, many cannabinoid-evoked actions have been shown conclusively to be mediated by one of these specific receptor targets. However, there remain several examples where these classical cannabinoid receptors do not explain observed pharmacology. Studies using mice genetically delete...

  14. Bombesin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity: review and current status

    OpenAIRE

    Sancho, Veronica; Di Florio, Alessia; Moody, Terry W.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    The three mammalian bombesin (Bn) receptors (gastrin-releasing peptide [GRP] receptor, neuromedin B [NMB] receptor, BRS-3) are one of the classes of G protein-coupled receptors that are most frequently over-express/ectopically expressed by common, important malignancies. Because of the clinical success of somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity with neuroendocrine...

  15. AT1 receptors as mechanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael; Storch, Ursula; Gudermann, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are appreciated as central components of neurohormonal signaling. Recently, it turned out that they may also play a role in mechanotransduction. The angiotensin II AT(1) receptor was the first G-protein-coupled receptor claimed to be a mechanosensor. In the meantime, several other G(q/11)-coupled receptors were found to be sensitive to mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, there is first evidence to support the concept that G(i/o)-coupled receptors are susceptible to mechanical stimulation as well. Mechanical receptor activation appears to be agonist-independent and is initiated by a conformational change of the receptor protein discernible from agonist-bound conformations. Mechanically induced receptor activation plays a physiological role for myogenic vasoconstriction and is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:21147033

  16. Regulation of gonadotropin receptor gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); R. Kraaij (Robert); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe receptors for the gonadotropins differ from the other G protein-coupled receptors by having a large extracellular hormone-binding domain, encoded by nine or ten exons. Alternative splicing of the large pre-mRNA of approximately 100 kb can result in mRNA species that encode truncated

  17. Activity of L-alpha-amino acids at the promiscuous goldfish odorant receptor 5.24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bolette; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    The goldfish odorant receptor 5.24 is a member of family C of G protein-coupled receptors and is closely related to the human receptor GPRC6A. Receptor 5.24 has previously been shown to have binding affinity for L-alpha-amino acids, especially the basic amino acids arginine and lysine. Here we re...

  18. Yeast Ste2 receptors as tools for study of mammalian protein kinases and adaptors involved in receptor trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Background Mammalian receptors that couple to effectors via heterotrimeric G proteins (e.g., beta 2-adrenergic receptors) and receptors with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity (e.g., insulin and IGF-I receptors) constitute the proximal points of two dominant cell signaling pathways. Receptors coupled to G proteins can be substrates for tyrosine kinases, integrating signals from both pathways. Yeast cells, in contrast, display G protein-coupled receptors (e.g., alpha-factor pheromone receptor ...

  19. Teaching old receptors new tricks: biasing seven-transmembrane receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Rajagopal, Keshava; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs; also known as G protein-coupled receptors) are the largest class of receptors in the human genome and are common targets for therapeutics. Originally identified as mediators of 7TMR desensitization, β-arrestins (arrestin 2 and arrestin 3) are now recognized as true adaptor proteins that transduce signals to multiple effector pathways. Signalling that is mediated by β-arrestins has distinct biochemical and functional consequences from those mediated by G p...

  20. Receptors of mammalian trace amines

    OpenAIRE

    Lewin, Anita H.

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of a family of G-protein coupled receptors, some of which bind and are activated by biogenic trace amines, has prompted speculation as to the physiological role of these receptors. Observations associated with the distribution of these trace amine associated receptors (TAARs) suggest that they may be involved in depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, eating disorders, migraine headaches, and Parkinson's disease. Preliminary in vitro data, obtained using cloned rec...