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Sample records for anti-inflammatory soluble cd163

  1. Soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger J

    2012-01-01

    of sCD163 is unknown, but during inflammation and macrophage activation, sCD163 levels increase acutely due to metalloproteinase-mediated cleavage near the cell membrane. It is now evident that sCD163 is very useful as a biomarker of macrophage activation in various inflammatory diseases...

  2. Soluble macrophage-derived CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The soluble form of the haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb) scavenger receptor (sCD163) is a specific plasma/serum marker for macrophage activity. Here, we have characterized molecular forms in serum and investigated a role of sCD163 as a binder of Hp-Hb complexes. METHODS: The sCD163...

  3. Monocyte/macrophage-derived soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten N; Abildgaard, Niels; Maniecki, Maciej B

    2014-01-01

    in bone marrow samples than in the matched blood samples, which indicate a localized production of sCD163 within the bone marrow microenvironment. CONCLUSIONS: Soluble CD163 was found to be a prognostic marker in patients with multiple myeloma. This may indicate that macrophages and/or monocytes have......OBJECTIVES: Macrophages play an important role in cancer by suppression of adaptive immunity and promotion of angiogenesis and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages strongly express the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163, which can also be found as a soluble protein in serum and other body...

  4. CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Søren K; Møller, Holger J

    2004-01-01

    CD163 is a hemoglobin scavenger receptor exclusively expressed in the monocyte-macrophage system. A particularly high expression is seen in macrophages of the 'alternative activation' phenotype playing a major role in dampening the inflammatory response and in scavenging components of damaged cells...... of hemoglobin to the macrophage may fuel an anti-inflammatory response because heme metabolites have potent anti-inflammatory effects. In addition to being present on the macrophage surface, continuous shedding of the extracellular domain of CD163 leads to substantial amounts of soluble receptor in plasma....... An increased shedding is due to inflammatory stimuli, and a role for soluble CD163 in immune suppression has been proposed. Furthermore, recent data indicate that soluble CD163 may be a valuable diagnostic parameter for monitoring macrophage activation in inflammatory conditions....

  5. Soluble ectodomain CD163 and extracellular vesicle-associated CD163 are two differently regulated forms of â €soluble CD163' in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etzerodt, Anders; Berg, Ronan M.G.; Plovsing, Ronni R.

    2017-01-01

    for macrophage activity and inflammation. The present study disclosed that 10% of sCD163 in healthy persons is actually extracellular vesicle (EV)-associated CD163 not being cleaved and shed. Endotoxin injection of human volunteers caused a selective increase in the ectodomain CD163, while septic patients...... exhibited high levels of both soluble ectodomain CD163 and extracellular vesicle (EV) CD163, the latter representing up 60% of total plasma CD163. A poor prognosis of septic patients measured as the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score correlated with the increase in membrane-associated CD163...

  6. Soluble CD163 levels in children with sickle cell disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Holger Jon; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Bartram, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by vasculopathy, which has been causally linked to intravascular haemolysis and high levels of free plasma haemoglobin. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is implicated in the clearance of free plasma haemoglobin and high plasma concentrations have been linked...... to arterial disease. We therefore investigated the value of sCD163 as a biomarker in children with SCD, and also measured haptoglobin levels in this population. We measured sCD163 in 25 control children with no haemoglobinopathy, 41 with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS) in the steady state, 27 with HbSS taking...

  7. Urinary Soluble CD163 in Active Renal Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Vincent P; Wong, Limy; Kennedy, Claire; Elliot, Louise A; O'Meachair, Shane; Coughlan, Alice Marie; O'Brien, Eoin C; Ryan, Michelle M; Sandoval, Diego; Connolly, Emma; Dekkema, Gerjan J; Lau, Jiaying; Abdulahad, Wayel H; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F; Heeringa, Peter; Buckley, Colm; O'Brien, Cathal; Finn, Stephen; Cohen, Clemens D; Lindemeyer, Maja T; Hickey, Fionnuala B; O'Hara, Paul V; Feighery, Conleth; Moran, Sarah M; Mellotte, George; Clarkson, Michael R; Dorman, Anthony J; Murray, Patrick T; Little, Mark A

    2016-09-01

    A specific biomarker that can separate active renal vasculitis from other causes of renal dysfunction is lacking, with a kidney biopsy often being required. Soluble CD163 (sCD163), shed by monocytes and macrophages, has been reported as a potential biomarker in diseases associated with excessive macrophage activation. Thus, we hypothesized that urinary sCD163 shed by crescent macrophages correlates with active glomerular inflammation. We detected sCD163 in rat urine early in the disease course of experimental vasculitis. Moreover, microdissected glomeruli from patients with small vessel vasculitis (SVV) had markedly higher levels of CD163 mRNA than did those from patients with lupus nephritis, diabetic nephropathy, or nephrotic syndrome. Both glomeruli and interstitium of patients with SVV strongly expressed CD163 protein. In 479 individuals, including patients with SVV, disease controls, and healthy controls, serum levels of sCD163 did not differ between the groups. However, in an inception cohort, including 177 patients with SVV, patients with active renal vasculitis had markedly higher urinary sCD163 levels than did patients in remission, disease controls, or healthy controls. Analyses in both internal and external validation cohorts confirmed these results. Setting a derived optimum cutoff for urinary sCD163 of 0.3 ng/mmol creatinine for detection of active renal vasculitis resulted in a sensitivity of 83%, specificity of 96%, and a positive likelihood ratio of 20.8. These data indicate that urinary sCD163 level associates very tightly with active renal vasculitis, and assessing this level may be a noninvasive method for diagnosing renal flare in the setting of a known diagnosis of SVV. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  8. Identification of the hemoglobin scavenger receptor/CD163 as a natural soluble protein in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Peterslund, Niels Anker; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov

    2002-01-01

    The hemoglobin scavenger receptor (HbSR/CD163) is an interleukin-6- and glucocorticoid-regulated macrophage/monocyte receptor for uptake of haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes. Moreover, there are strong indications that HbSR serves an anti-inflammatory function. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting...... enabled identification of a soluble plasma form of HbSR (sHbSR) having an electrophoretic mobility equal to that of recombinant HbSR consisting of the extracellular domain (scavenger receptor cysteine-rich 1-9). A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was established and used to measure the s...

  9. Clinical significance of soluble hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 (sCD163 in sepsis, a prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Feng

    Full Text Available We investigated serum soluble CD163 (sCD163 levels for use in the diagnosis, severity assessment, and prognosis of sepsis in the critical ill patients and compared sCD163 with other infection-related variables.During july 2010 and April 2011, serum was obtained from 102 sepsis patients (days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 after admission to an ICU and 30 systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS patients with no sepsis diagnosed. Serum levels of sCD163, procalcitonon (PCT, and C reactive protein (CRP were determined respectively. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA scores for sepsis patients were also recorded. Then evaluated their roles in sepsis.The sCD163 levels were 0.88(0.78-1.00 ug/mL for SIRS patients, 1.50(0.92-2.00 ug/mL for moderate sepsis patients, and 2.95(2.18-5.57 ug/mL for severe sepsis patients on day 1. The areas under the ROC curves for sCD163, CRP, and PCT for the diagnosis of sepsis were, respectively, 0.856(95%CI: 0.791-0.921, 0.696(95%CI: 0.595-0.797, and 0.629(95%CI: 0.495-0.763, At the recommended cut-off 1.49 ug/mL for sCD163, the sensitivity is 74.0% with 93.3% specificity. Based on 28-day survivals, sCD163 levels in the surviving group stay constant, while they tended to gradually increase in the non-surviving group.The area under the ROC curve for sCD163 for sepsis prognosis was 0.706(95%CI 0.558-0.804. Levels of sCD163 with cut-off point >2.84 ug/mL have sensitivity of 55.8.0%, specificity 80.4%. Common risk factors for death and sCD163 were included in multivariate logistic regression analysis; the odds ratios (OR for sCD163 and SOFA scores for sepsis prognosis were 1.173 and 1.396, respectively (P<0.05. Spearman rank correlation analysis showed that sCD163 was weakly, but positively correlated with CRP, PCT, and SOFA scores (0.2< r <0.4, P<0.0001, but not with leukocyte counts (r <0.2, P = 0.450.Serum sCD163 is superior to PCT and CRP for the diagnosis of sepsis and differentiate the severity of sepsis. sCD163

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Modulation of Microglia via CD163-Targeted Glucocorticoids Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in the 6-OHDA Parkinson's Disease Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tentillier, Noemie; Etzerodt, Anders; Olesen, Mads N

    2016-01-01

    intravenous CD163-targeted liposomes with Dexa for 3 weeks exhibited better motor performance than the control groups and had minimal glucocorticoid-driven side effects. Furthermore, these animals showed better survival of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra and an increased number of microglia...... that CD163+ macrophages can be a target to modulate brain immune response to achieve neuroprotection in the 6-hydroxydopamine model. To do so, we targeted the CD163+ population, which to a low but significant extent infiltrated in the neurodegenerating area of the brain. Specially designed liposomes...... targeted for the CD163 receptor were loaded with glucocorticoids and injected peripherally to modify the infiltrated CD163 cells toward an anti-inflammatory profile. This modification of the CD163 population resulted in a distinctive microglial response that correlated with decreased dopaminergic cell...

  11. Plasma Soluble CD163 Level Independently Predicts All-Cause Mortality in HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Ertner, Gideon; Petersen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CD163, a monocyte- and macrophage-specific scavenger receptor, is shed as soluble CD163 (sCD163) during the proinflammatory response. Here, we assessed the association between plasma sCD163 levels and progression to AIDS and all-cause mortality among individuals infected with human.......35 [95% CI, 1.13-1.63], respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Plasma sCD163 was an independent marker of all-cause mortality in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals, suggesting that monocyte/macrophage activation may play a role in HIV pathogenesis and be a target of intervention....

  12. CD163 and its role in inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Chyczewski

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Mononuclear phagocytes represent a heterogeneous population of cells with individual subpopulations exerting different pro- or anti-inflammatory functions. CD163 is a monocyte/macrophage specific marker expressed predominantly on cells which possess strong anti-inflammatory potential. The expression of CD163 is strongly induced by anti-inflammatory mediators such as glucocorticoids and interleukin-10, while being inhibited by pro-inflammatory mediators such as interferon-gamma. CD163-expressing mononuclear phagocytes, as well as soluble CD163, may both take part in downregulating an inflammatory response. It seems, therefore, that CD163 may be an interesting target for therapeutic modulation of the inflammatory response. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 3, 365–374

  13. Macrophage activity assessed by soluble CD163 in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Møller, Holger Jon; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease where TNF-α is a central mediator of inflammation, and is cleaved from the cell surface by TACE/ADAM17. This metalloproteinase is also responsible for the release of soluble (s) CD163. Soluble CD163 reflects macrophage activati...

  14. Serum soluble CD163 predicts risk of type 2 diabetes in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Moestrup, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Activation of adipose tissue macrophages with concomitant low-grade inflammation is believed to play a central role in the development of type 2 diabetes. We tested whether a new macrophage-derived biomarker, soluble CD163 (sCD163), identifies at-risk individuals before overt disease has developed....

  15. Soluble CD163 from activated macrophages predicts mortality in acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Grønbaek, Henning; Schiødt, Frank V

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a scavenger receptor shed in serum during inflammatory activation of macrophages. We investigated if sCD163 was increased and predicted outcome in acute liver failure (ALF). METHODS: Samples from 100 consecutive patients enrolled in the U.S. ALF Study.......65-5.6), pliver cirrhosis (9.8mg/l (3.6-16.9), p=0.0002). sCD163 on day 1 correlated significantly with ALT, AST, bilirubin, and creatinine. sCD163 concentrations on day 3 were elevated in patients with fatal outcome of disease compared to spontaneous survivors, 29.0mg/l (7...

  16. Macrophage activity assessed by soluble CD163 in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Møller, Holger Jon; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease where TNF-α is a central mediator of inflammation, and is cleaved from the cell surface by TACE/ADAM17. This metalloproteinase is also responsible for the release of soluble (s) CD163. Soluble CD163 reflects macrophage activation...... in macrophage activity as evidenced by increasing levels following anti-TNF withdrawal, despite maintenance of a stable clinical condition achieved by conventional remedies. It remains to be determined whether sCD163 is an early predictor of disease flare....

  17. Macrophage activity assessed by soluble CD163 in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Møller, Holger Jon; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease where TNF-α is a central mediator of inflammation, and is cleaved from the cell surface by TACE/ADAM17. This metalloproteinase is also responsible for the release of soluble (s) CD163. Soluble CD163 reflects macrophage activati...... in macrophage activity as evidenced by increasing levels following anti-TNF withdrawal, despite maintenance of a stable clinical condition achieved by conventional remedies. It remains to be determined whether sCD163 is an early predictor of disease flare....

  18. Soluble CD163 is increased in patients with acute pancreatitis independent of disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrasch, Thomas; Brünnler, Tanja; Hamer, Okka W; Schmid, Karin; Voelk, Markus; Herfarth, Hans; Buechler, Christa

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucially involved in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is specifically released from macrophages and systemic levels are increased in inflammatory diseases. Here, sCD163 was measured in serum of 50 patients with acute pancreatitis to find out possible associations with disease activity. Admission levels of systemic sCD163 were nearly three-fold higher in patients with acute pancreatitis compared to controls. In patients sCD163 did not correlate with C-reactive protein and leukocyte count as established markers of inflammation. Levels were not associated with disease severity assessed by the Schroeder score, Balthazar score, Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation (Apache) II score and peripancreatic necrosis score. Soluble CD163 was not related to complications of acute pancreatitis. These data show that serum sCD163 is increased in acute pancreatitis indicating activation of macrophages but is not associated with disease severity and outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Soluble CD163 does not predict first-time myocardial infarction in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Møller, Holger Jon; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2013-01-01

    Soluble CD163 (sCD163) has been associated with arterial inflammation and non-calcified plaques in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals and has therefore been suggested as a predictive biomarker of myocardial infarction (MI).......Soluble CD163 (sCD163) has been associated with arterial inflammation and non-calcified plaques in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals and has therefore been suggested as a predictive biomarker of myocardial infarction (MI)....

  20. Soluble macrophage-derived CD163 is a marker of disease activity and progression in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Moller, H J; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the expression of the soluble form of the resident macrophage marker CD163 (sCD163) and its association with core parameters for disease activity, including radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the expression of the soluble form of the resident macrophage marker CD163 (sCD163) and its association with core parameters for disease activity, including radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  1. Association of CD163+ macrophages and local production of soluble CD163 with decreased lymphocyte activation in spondylarthropathy synovitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baeten, Dominique; Møller, Holger Jon; Delanghe, Joris

    2004-01-01

    treated with infliximab. Polymorphism of haptoglobin (Hp), the CD163 ligand, was determined in 130 SpA and 23 RA patients. RESULTS: CD163+ macrophages, but not CD68+ macrophages, were significantly increased in SpA versus RA synovium and in HLA-B27+ versus HLA-B27- SpA. Despite similar lymphocyte numbers...... by infliximab therapy. The distribution of Hp polymorphism was not altered in SpA and was not related to CD163 expression. CONCLUSION: Increased numbers of CD163+ macrophages in SpA synovium and local production of sCD163 are associated with global inflammation as well as impairment of T cell activation...

  2. Elevated soluble CD163 in gestational diabetes mellitus: secretion from human placenta and adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Furqan Bari

    Full Text Available Recently soluble CD163 (sCD163, a cleaved form of the macrophage receptor CD163, was identified as a macrophage-specific risk-predictor for developing Type 2 Diabetes. Here, we investigate circulating levels of sCD163 in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Furthermore, given the role of the placenta in the pathogenesis of GDM, we assessed placental contribution to sCD163 secretion. Paired maternal (venous and umbilical vein blood samples from GDM (n = 18 and Body Mass Index (BMI matched control women (n = 20 delivered by caesarean section at 39-40 week gestation were assessed for circulating levels of sCD163, Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and Interleukin 6 (IL-6. Media from explant culture of maternal subcutaneous fat and corresponding placental tissues were assayed for these same molecules. CD163 positive cell numbers were determined in placental and adipose tissues of GDM and control women. We found significantly elevated circulating sCD163 levels in GDM mothers (688.4±46.9 ng/ml vs. 505.6±38.6 ng/ml and their offspring (418.2±26.6 ng/ml vs. 336.3±24.4 ng/ml [p<0.05 for both] as compared to controls, together with elevated circulating TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Moreover, both GDM placentae (268.1±10.8 ng/ml/mg vs. 187.6±20.6 ng/ml/mg and adipose explants (41.1±2.7 ng/ml/mg vs. 26.6±2.4 ng/ml/mg released significantly more sCD163 than controls. Lastly, significantly more CD163 positive cells were observed in GDM placentae (25.7±1.1 vs. 22.1±1.2 and adipose tissue (19.1±1.1 vs 12.7±0.9 compared to controls. We describe elevated sCD163 levels in GDM and identify human placenta as a novel source of sCD163 suggesting that placental tissues might contribute to the increased levels of circulating sCD163 in GDM pregnancies.

  3. Macrophage-related serum biomarkers soluble CD163 (sCD163) and soluble mannose receptor (sMR) to differentiate mild liver fibrosis from cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, E S; Rødgaard-Hansen, S; Moessner, B

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages regulate the fibrotic process in chronic liver disease. The aim of the present pilot study was to evaluate two new macrophage-specific serum biomarkers [soluble CD163 (sCD163) and soluble mannose receptor (sMR, sCD206)] as potential fibrosis markers in patients chronically infected...... is shed to serum by the same mechanism as sCD163 (r = 0.40, p macrophage-related markers sCD163 and sMR are significantly higher in patients chronically infected with HCV and with cirrhosis than in those with no/mild fibrosis. sCD163 is a promising new fibrosis marker...

  4. Soluble CD163 and interleukin-6 are increased in aqueous humour from patients with endothelial rejection of corneal grafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funding, Mikkel; Vorum, Henrik; Nexø, Ebba

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate soluble CD163 (sCD163) as a new marker of macrophage activity in aqueous humour from patients with corneal rejection and to investigate correlations between sCD163, the CD163 inducing interleukin-6 (IL-6), and albumin; to investigate whether increases in sCD163 and IL-6 levels...... with uncomplicated corneal grafts. The presence of sCD163 was investigated by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. The concentrations of sCD163, IL-6 and albumin were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: Soluble CD163 was detected in aqueous humour from patients with corneal rejection. Soluble CD163, IL-6 and albumin were......CD163 were related to the outcome of the corneal rejection. CONCLUSIONS: Both sCD163 and IL-6 are present in high levels in aqueous humour from patients with rejection of corneal grafts. Our data suggest that IL-6 is produced locally, whereas sCD163 is at least partly derived from influx from plasma....

  5. Macrophage serum markers in pneumococcal bacteremia: Prediction of survival by soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; K. Moestrup, Søren; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a new macrophage-specific serum marker. This study investigated sCD163 and other markers of macrophage activation (neopterin, ferritin, transcobalamin, and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor [suPAR]) as prognostic factors in patients...... analyses at the time of first positive blood culture. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: sCD163 was highly correlated with other macrophage markers and was significantly elevated (median [25-75 percentiles], 4.6 mg/L [2.8-8.9]) compared with healthy controls (2.7 mg/L [2.1-3.3], p ..., all macrophage markers were increased in patients who died from their infection compared with survivors, whereas no change was observed in any of the markers in the very old age. At cutoff levels of 9.5 mg/L (sCD163) and 1650 nmol/L (C-reactive protein), the relative risk for fatal outcome in patients...

  6. Macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazankov, Konstantin; Tordjman, Joan; Møller, Holger Jon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Macrophages play an important role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a specific marker of macrophage activation. We aimed to measure sCD163 in morbidly obese patients with varying degrees of NAFLD before and after bariatric surgery (BS...... (NAS), Kleiner fibrosis score, and the fatty liver inhibition of progression (FLIP) algorithm. In a subset, CD163 immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for CD163 mRNA were performed. RESULTS: sCD163 was higher in patients with NAS ≥ 5 compared with those with NAS ...). METHODS: Demographic, clinical, and biochemical data, and plasma sCD163 measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, of 196 patients were collected preoperatively and 3, 6, and 12 months after BS leading to significant weight loss. Peroperative liver biopsies were assessed for the NAFLD Activity Score...

  7. Serum soluble CD163 predicts risk of type 2 diabetes in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger J; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Moestrup, Søren K

    2011-01-01

    has developed. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of 8849 study participants from the general population, the Copenhagen City Heart Study, was followed for 18 years for incidence of type 2 diabetes. Risk of disease was calculated according to age- and sex-adjusted percentile categories of serum s......%-33% category. In overweight men 50-70 and >70 years of age, serum sCD163 concentrations in the top 5% group predicted an absolute 10-year risk of type 2 diabetes of 29% and 36% vs 7% and 8% in the lowest percentile group. Equivalent values in women were 19% and 24% vs 4% and 5%. CONCLUSIONS: Increased......BACKGROUND: Activation of adipose tissue macrophages with concomitant low-grade inflammation is believed to play a central role in the development of type 2 diabetes. We tested whether a new macrophage-derived biomarker, soluble CD163 (sCD163), identifies at-risk individuals before overt disease...

  8. Macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 may predict disease progression in hepatocellular carcinoma

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    Kazankov, Konstantin; Rode, Anthony; Simonsen, Kira Schreiner

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor associated macrophages are present in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and associated with a poor prognosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the levels and dynamics of soluble (s)CD163, a specific macrophage activation marker, in patients with HCC. METHODS...

  9. Fasting serum soluble CD 163 predicts risk of type 2 diabetes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    grade inflammation is believed to play a central role in the evolution of type 2 diabetes. Aim: To assess whether a new macrophage-derived biomarker, soluble CD163, identifies at-risk individuals with metabolic syndrome before overt disease ...

  10. Elevated soluble CD163 plasma levels are associated with disease severity in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junning Wang

    Full Text Available Hantaan virus is a major zoonotic pathogen that causesing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS. Although HFRS pathogenesis has not been entirely elucidated, the importance of host-related immune responses in HFRS pathogenesis has been widely recognized. CD163, a monocyte and macrophage-specific scavenger receptor that plays a vital function in the hosts can reduce inflammation, is shed during activation as soluble CD163 (sCD163. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathological significance of sCD163 in patients with HFRS.Blood samples were collected from 81 hospitalized patients in Tangdu Hospital from October 2011 to January 2014 and from 15 healthy controls. The sCD163 plasma levels were measured using a sandwich ELISA, and the relationship between sCD163 and disease severity was analyzed. Furthermore, CD163 expression in 3 monocytes subset was analyzed by flow cytometry.The results demonstrated that sCD163 plasma levels during the HFRS acute phase were significantly higher in patients than during the convalescent stage and the levels in the healthy controls (P<0.0001. The sCD163 plasma levels in the severe/critical group were higher than those in the mild/moderate group during the acute (P<0.0001. A Spearman correlation analysis indicated that the sCD163 levels were positively correlated with white blood cell, serum creatine, blood urea nitrogen levels, while they were negatively correlated with blood platelet levels in the HFRS patients. The monocyte subsets were significantly altered during the acute stage. Though the CD163 expression levels within the monocyte subsets were increased during the acute stage, the highest CD163 expression level was observed in the CD14++CD16+ monocytes when compared with the other monocyte subsets.sCD163 may be correlated with disease severity and the disease progression in HFRS patients; however, the underlying mechanisms should be explored further.

  11. Soluble CD163 levels are elevated in cerebrospinal fluid and serum in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and are associated with impaired peripheral nerve function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup, M; Møller, Holger Jon; Tankisi, H

    2015-01-01

    nerve function. Higher levels of soluble CD163 in people with diabetic polyneuropathy suggest that inflammation plays a role in the development of neural impairment. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid soluble CD163 level and peripheral nerve conduction indicates that soluble CD163 may...

  12. Plasma level of the macrophage-derived soluble CD163 is increased and positively correlates with severity in Gaucher's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; de Fost, Maaike; Aerts, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Recently, soluble CD163 (sCD163) has been identified as a macrophage/monocyte-specific plasma protein and increased concentrations have been measured in patients with infection and myeloid leukaemia. In the present study we investigated the levels of sCD163 in patients with Gaucher's disease......, an inherited lysosomal storage disorder characterised by hepato- and splenomegaly due to excessive accumulation of macrophages. The sCD163 plasma levels, median (25-75 percentiles), were far above the levels in normal subjects [7.1 mg/L (4.8-10.3) vs. 1.9 mg/L (1.5-2.4), P ... in monitoring disease with increased macrophage activity....

  13. The monocytic lineage specific soluble CD163 is a plasma marker of coronary atherosclerosis

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    Aristoteli, Lina Panayiota; Møller, Holger Jon; Bailey, Brian

    2006-01-01

    significant (>50% luminal diameter) coronary stenoses in one or more major coronary arteries (1, 2 or 3 vessel disease), and sCD163 concentration was measured by ELISA. Plasma sCD163 was non-parametrically distributed, being significantly higher in CAD+ patients (median 2.47 mg/L, 25th-75th percentile, 1...

  14. Soluble CD163, A Product of Monocyte/Macrophage Activation Is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nonetheless, investigations addressing sCD163 in cases preeclamptic women are needed. Objectives: To investigate maternal and umbilical cord levels of sCD163 in women with preeclampsia. Materials and Methods: A case – control study was conducted at the labour ward of Qassim Maternity Hospital, Kingdom of Saudi ...

  15. Soluble CD163 predicts incident chronic lung, kidney and liver disease in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard-Klitbo, Ditte M; Mejer, Niels; Knudsen, Troels B

    2017-01-01

    .46] and incident chronic kidney disease (aHR, 10.94; 95% CI: 2.32; 51.35), when compared with lowest quartiles. Further, (every 1 mg) increase in plasma sCD163 was positively correlated with incident liver disease (aHR, 1.12; 95% CI: 1.05; 1.19). The sCD163 level was not associated with incident cancer......, cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus. CONCLUSION: sCD163 was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease, chronic lung disease and liver disease in treated HIV-1-infected individuals, suggesting that monocyte/macrophage activation may be involved in the pathogenesis of non...

  16. Soluble CD163, a marker of Kupffer cell activation, is related to portal hypertension in patients with liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbaek, H; Sandahl, T D; Mortensen, C

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activation of Kupffer cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of portal hypertension by release of vasoconstrictive substances and fibrosis due to co-activation of hepatic stellate cells. AIM: To study soluble plasma (s) CD163, a specific marker of activated macrophages...... for HVPG. These findings support a primary role of macrophage activation in portal hypertension, and may indicate a target for biological intervention....

  17. Preterm delivery predicted by soluble CD163 and CRP in women with symptoms of preterm delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ida; Grove, Jakob; Thorsen, Poul

    2005-01-01

    : High levels of sCD163 or CRP are associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery in women with symptoms of delivery. Good prediction of preterm delivery before 34 weeks of gestation was obtained by a combination of preterm prelabour rupture of membranes (PPROM), overweight, relaxin, CRP and s...

  18. Urinary and serum soluble CD25 complements urinary soluble CD163 to detect active renal anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkema, Gerjan J; Abdulahad, Wayel H; Bijma, Theo; Moran, Sarah M; Ryan, Louise; Little, Mark A; Stegeman, Coen A; Heeringa, Peter; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F

    2018-03-01

    Early detection of renal involvement in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is of major clinical importance to allow prompt initiation of treatment and limit renal damage. Urinary soluble cluster of differentiation 163 (usCD163) has recently been identified as a potential biomarker for active renal vasculitis. However, a significant number of patients with active renal vasculitis test negative using usCD163. We therefore studied whether soluble CD25 (sCD25), a T cell activation marker, could improve the detection of renal flares in AAV. sCD25 and sCD163 levels in serum and urine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 72 patients with active renal AAV, 20 with active extrarenal disease, 62 patients in remission and 18 healthy controls. Urinary and blood CD4+ T and CD4+ T effector memory (TEM) cell counts were measured in 22 patients with active renal vasculitis. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were generated and recursive partitioning was used to calculate whether usCD25 and serum soluble CD25 (ssCD25) add utility to usCD163. usCD25, ssCD25 and usCD163 levels were significantly higher during active renal disease and significantly decreased after induction of remission. A combination of usCD25, usCD163 and ssCD25 outperformed all individual markers (sensitivity 84.7%, specificity 95.1%). Patients positive for sCD25 but negative for usCD163 (n = 10) had significantly higher C-reactive protein levels and significantly lower serum creatinine and proteinuria levels compared with the usCD163-positive patients. usCD25 correlated positively with urinary CD4+ T and CD4+ TEM cell numbers, whereas ssCD25 correlated negatively with circulating CD4+ T and CD4+ TEM cells. Measurement of usCD25 and ssCD25 complements usCD163 in the detection of active renal vasculitis.

  19. Amniotic fluid concentrations of soluble scavenger receptor for hemoglobin (sCD163) in pregnancy complicated by preterm premature rupture of the membranes and histologic chorioamnionitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacerovsky, Marian; Drahosova, Marcela; Andrys, Ctirad; Hornychova, Helena; Tambor, Vojtech; Lenco, Juraj; Tosner, Jindrich; Krejsek, Jan

    2011-08-01

    To determine changes in the amniotic fluid, soluble form of scavenger receptor for hemoglobin (sCD163) concentrations during advancing gestation, and in patients with preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) complicated by histological chorioamnionitis were studied. One hundred and fifty-two women with singleton pregnancies were enrolled. The concentration of sCD163 in amniotic fluid was determined using sandwich enzyme immunoassay technique. Women in the midtrimester had a significantly higher median amniotic fluid sCD163 concentration than those at term not in labor (308 ng/ml vs. 217 ng/ml; p = 0.04). Patients with PPROM and histological chorioamnionitis had a higher median amniotic fluid sCD163 level than those with PPROM without histological chorioamnionitis (885 ng/ml vs. 288 ng/ml; p < 0.0001). Amniotic fluid sCD163 concentrations decrease with advancing gestation. Amniotic fluid sCD163 concentrations are significantly higher in women with PPROM between 24 and 36 gestational weeks with histological chorioamnionitis than those without histological signs of inflammation.

  20. Differential expression of CD163 on monocyte subsets in healthy and HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Tippett

    163-expressing anti-inflammatory macrophages given appropriate stimuli. Levels of CD163 expression on monocytes may be a potential biomarker reflecting efforts by the immune system to resolve immune activation and inflammation in HIV-infected individuals.

  1. Additive inhibition of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection with the soluble sialoadhesin and CD163 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Guo, Rui; He, Shan; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Sun, Huaichang

    2014-01-22

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an economically important swine disease to the swine industry worldwide. Current PRRS vaccines are only partially effective and new vaccine development faces great challenges. Sialoadhesin (Sn) and CD163 are the two essential receptors for PRRSV infection of porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM). To investigate the feasibility of the soluble viral receptors for PRRS control, in the present study we generated recombinant adenovirus (rAd) expressing the four N-terminal Ig-like domains of porcine Sn (Sn4D), the fifth SRCR domain (SRCR5) or domains 5-9 (SRCR59) of porcine CD163 as porcine Fc (pFc) fusion proteins. Efficient expression of the soluble viral receptors in the rAd-transduced cells was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. To detect their antiviral activities, the soluble viral receptors were purified from the media of rAd-transduced cells and identified by Western blotting. The viral binding assay showed that the soluble receptors Sn4D-Fc and SRCR59-Fc, but not SRCR5-Fc and the control pFc, were able to bind to PRRSV particles. The viral infection blocking assays showed that co-treatment of PRRSV with different concentrations of Sn4D-Fc and SRCR59-Fc proteins resulted in a much higher (72.1%-77.6%) reduction in PRRSV-positive cell number than the single protein treatment (45.1%-60.0% or 44.0%-56.2%). To investigate the feasibility of delivering the soluble viral receptors to PAM, two pig cell lines were transduced with rAd-Sn4D-Fc and/or rAd-SRCR59-Fc using a transwell culture system. PAM cells were infected with PRRSV and then co-cultured with the rAd-transduced cells. Viral titration assay showed that co-cultivation of the infected PAM with rAd-Sn4D-Fc- and rAd-SRCR59-Fc-transduced cells resulted in much higher (by ∼3.5 log) reduction in the viral titers (TCID50) than that of co-cultivation with the single vector-transduced cells (by ∼1.0 log). Further studies showed that the rAd co

  2. Monocyte expression and soluble levels of the haemoglobin receptor (CD163/sCD163 and the mannose receptor (MR/sMR in septic and critically ill non-septic ICU patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders G Kjærgaard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of sepsis is challenging and there is an unmet need for sensitive and specific diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. Following activation of macrophages and monocytes, the haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor (CD163 and the mannose receptor (MR are shed into the circulation (sCD163 and sMR. OBJECTIVE: We investigated monocyte expression of CD163 and MR, and levels of sCD163 and sMR in septic and non-septic patients, and in healthy controls. We hypothesised that these receptors are elevated during sepsis and can be used diagnostic and prognostic. METHODS: Twenty-one patients with severe sepsis or septic shock and 15 critically ill non-septic patients were included in this prospective observational study at three ICUs at Aarhus University Hospital and Randers Regional Hospital, Denmark. Fifteen age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers served as controls. Levels of sCD163 and sMR were measured using a sandwich ELISA and monocyte expression of CD163 and MR was evaluated by flow cytometry during the first four days of ICU stay. The diagnostic and prognostic values of the receptors were assessed using AUROC curves. RESULTS: At ICU admission and during the observation period, monocyte expression of CD163 and levels of sCD163 and sMR were significantly higher in septic patients compared with non-septic patients and healthy controls (p<0.01 for all comparisons. Monocytes did not express MR. The diagnostic values estimated by AUROC were 1.00 for sMR, 0.95 for sCD163, 0.87 for CRP, and 0.75 for monocyte-bound CD163. Among the septic patients, monocyte expression of CD163 was higher in non-survivors compared with survivors at ICU admission (p = 0.02 and during the observation period (p = 0.006. The prognostic value of monocyte-bound CD163 estimated by AUROC at ICU admission was 0.82. CONCLUSION: The macrophage-specific markers CD163, sCD163, and sMR are increased in septic patients. Particularly sMR is a promising new

  3. Diagnostic value of soluble CD163 serum levels in patients suspected of meningitis: comparison with CRP and procalcitonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Larsen, Klaus; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic value of sCD163 serum levels with CRP and PCT in meningitis and bacterial infection. An observational cohort study was conducted between February 2001 and February 2005. The study population comprised 55 patients suspected......-operating characteristic AUCs (areas under curves). Patients were classified by 2 sets of diagnostic criteria into: A) purulent meningitis, serous meningitis or non-meningitis, and B) systemic bacterial infection, local bacterial infection or non-bacterial disease. An elevated serum level of sCD163 was the most specific...... infection, the AUC of sCD163 (0.83) did not differ significantly from those of CRP or PCT. All markers had AUCs meningitis and other conditions. In conclusion, CRP and PCT had high diagnostic value and were superior as markers of bacterial infection compared to s...

  4. Serum markers of macrophage activation in pre-eclampsia: no predictive value of soluble CD163 and neopterin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Camilla S; Knudsen, Ulla Breth; Moestrup, Søren K

    2007-01-01

    -eclampsia group (r=0.32, p=0.011). C-reactive protein was higher in pre-eclampsia than in healthy pregnancies by week 38 (159 versus 91 nmol/l, p=0.0189). CONCLUSIONS: The macrophage serum-markers sCD163 and neopterin are not pre-symptomatic nor prognostic markers for pre-eclampsia......BACKGROUND: Alternatively activated macrophages expressing the CD163 and CD206 surface receptors are the dominant immune-cell type found in the placenta. The placental number and distribution of macrophages is altered in pre-eclampsia, and the generalised inflammatory reaction associated with pre...

  5. Soluble CD163 and soluble mannose receptor predict survival and decompensation in patients with liver cirrhosis, and correlate with gut permeability and bacterial translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainer, F; Horvath, A; Sandahl, T D

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activated hepatic macrophages play a key role in inflammation and fibrosis progression in chronic liver disease. AIM: To assess the prognostic value of soluble (s)CD163 and mannose receptor (sMR) in cirrhotic patients and explore associations with markers of intestinal permeability...... (lactulose-mannitol ratio, diamine oxidase), bacterial translocation (endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein) and markers of systemic immune activation (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, sCD14). METHODS: We prospectively investigated 101 cirrhotic patients (Child-Pugh class A: n = 72, Child-Pugh classes B.......3, Child-Pugh class A = 4.2, Child-Pugh classes B and C = 8.4 mg/L; sMR in healthy controls = 15.8, Child-Pugh class A = 36.5, Child-Pugh classes B and C = 66.3 μg/dL). A total of 21 patients died during the observation period. Patients with sCD163 levels above 5.9 mg/L showed significantly reduced...

  6. Soluble hemoglobin-haptoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 as a lineage-specific marker in the reactive hemophagocytic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaer, Dominik J; Schleiffenbaum, Boris; Kurrer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    and thus specificity. Serum levels of the macrophage specific scavenger receptor CD163 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and were found to be highly increased in patients with RHS (median 39.0 mg/L). Significantly lower levels were determined in patients with sepsis (median 9...

  7. Visceral obesity is associated with increased soluble CD163 concentration in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Peter; Parkner, Tina; Søndergaard, Esben

    2015-01-01

    individuals. The objective was to examine the effect of male overweight/obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on associations between adiposity parameters and sCD163. A total of 23 overweight/obese non-diabetic men, 16 overweight/obese men with T2DM, and a control group of 20 normal-weight healthy men......-body fat, adjusted for BMI and age, VAT remained a significant predictor of sCD163 in the overweight/obese T2DM men, but not in the overweight/obese non-diabetic men. Our results indicate that VAT inflammation is exaggerated in men with T2DM, and that propensity to store excess body fat viscerally...... multiple linear regression analysis. In the normal-weight healthy men, there was no significant association between adiposity parameters and sCD163, whereas in the overweight/obese non-diabetic men, measures of general and regional adiposity were positively associated with sCD163. In the overweight...

  8. Predictive value of soluble haemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 serum levels for survival in verified tuberculosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, T B; Gustafson, P; Kronborg, G

    2005-01-01

    Pre-treatment serum levels of sCD163 were measured in a cohort of 236 suspected tuberculosis (TB) cases from Guinea-Bissau, with a median follow-up period of 3.3 years (range 0-6.4 years). In 113 cases, the diagnosis of TB was verified by positive sputum microscopy and/or culture. Among the verif...

  9. Soluble CD163, adiponectin, C-reactive protein and progression of dysglycaemia in individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deichgræber, Pia; Witte, Daniel R; Møller, Holger J

    2016-01-01

    : This prospective study included 1014 individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus participating in the Danish arm of the Anglo-Danish-Dutch study of Intensive Treatment In PeOple with ScreeN-detected Diabetes in Primary Care (ADDITION-Europe trial) baseline examination in 2001–2006 and follow......Aim/hypothesis: Our aim was to investigate the association between the macrophage-activation marker soluble CD163 (sCD163), adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP) and changes in glycaemia, insulin resistance and insulin secretion in individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods...... homeostasis in individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg....

  10. Diagnostic value of soluble CD163 serum levels in patients suspected of meningitis: comparison with CRP and procalcitonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Larsen, Klaus; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic value of sCD163 serum levels with CRP and PCT in meningitis and bacterial infection. An observational cohort study was conducted between February 2001 and February 2005. The study population comprised 55 patients suspected of meningi......The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic value of sCD163 serum levels with CRP and PCT in meningitis and bacterial infection. An observational cohort study was conducted between February 2001 and February 2005. The study population comprised 55 patients suspected...... of meningitis on admission to a 27-bed infectious disease department at a Danish university hospital. Biomarker serum levels on admission were measured. Sensitivity and specificity were evaluated at pre-specified cut-off values and overall diagnostic accuracies were compared using receiver......-operating characteristic AUCs (areas under curves). Patients were classified by 2 sets of diagnostic criteria into: A) purulent meningitis, serous meningitis or non-meningitis, and B) systemic bacterial infection, local bacterial infection or non-bacterial disease. An elevated serum level of sCD163 was the most specific...

  11. Haptoglobin and CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, S K

    2001-01-01

    of the complex by HbSR/CD163 and endocytosis in macrophages. The haptoglobin-dependent HbSR/CD163 scavenging system for hemoglobin clearance prevents toxic effects of hemoglobin in plasma and kidney and explains the decrease in the haptoglobin plasma concentration in patients with accelerated hemolysis. The Hb......The plasma protein haptoglobin and the endocytic hemoglobin receptor HbSR/CD163 are key molecules in the process of removing hemoglobin released from ruptured erythrocytes. Hemoglobin in plasma is instantly bound with high affinity to haptoglobin--an interaction leading to the recognition......SR/CD163 activity may be of quantitative importance for iron uptake in macrophages in general and for some iron-associated pathological processes, e.g. the atherogenesis-promoting oxidation of LDL leading to foam cell formation and apoptosis in the vessel wall....

  12. Haptoglobin and CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, S K

    2001-01-01

    The plasma protein haptoglobin and the endocytic hemoglobin receptor HbSR/CD163 are key molecules in the process of removing hemoglobin released from ruptured erythrocytes. Hemoglobin in plasma is instantly bound with high affinity to haptoglobin--an interaction leading to the recognition of the ......SR/CD163 activity may be of quantitative importance for iron uptake in macrophages in general and for some iron-associated pathological processes, e.g. the atherogenesis-promoting oxidation of LDL leading to foam cell formation and apoptosis in the vessel wall....... of the complex by HbSR/CD163 and endocytosis in macrophages. The haptoglobin-dependent HbSR/CD163 scavenging system for hemoglobin clearance prevents toxic effects of hemoglobin in plasma and kidney and explains the decrease in the haptoglobin plasma concentration in patients with accelerated hemolysis. The Hb...

  13. The absence of the CD163 receptor has distinct temporal influences on intracerebral hemorrhage outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leclerc, Jenna L; Lampert, Andrew S; Loyola Amador, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) toxicity precipitates secondary brain damage following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). CD163 is an anti-inflammatory Hb scavenger receptor and CD163-positive macrophages/microglia locally accumulate post-bleed, yet no studies have investigated the role of CD163 after ICH. ICH...

  14. The macrophage low-grade inflammation marker sCD163 is modulated by exogenous sex steroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik; Møller, Holger Jon; Trolle, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a novel marker linked to states of low-grade inflammation such as diabetes, obesity, liver disease, and atherosclerosis, all prevalent in subjects with Turner syndrome (TS) and Klinefelter syndrome (KS). We aimed to assess the levels of sCD163 and the regulation of sCD163...

  15. New nanomicelle curcumin formulation for ocular delivery: improved stability, solubility, and ocular anti-inflammatory treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengshuang; Xin, Meng; Guo, Chuanlong; Lin, Guiming; Wu, Xianggen

    2017-11-01

    A stable topical ophthalmic curcumin formulation with high solubility, stability, and efficacy is needed for pharmaceutical use in clinics. The objective of this article was to describe a novel curcumin containing a nanomicelle formulation using a polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol (PVCL-PVA-PEG) graft copolymer. Nanomicelle curcumin was formulated and optimized and then further evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity/in vivo ocular irritation, in vitro cellular uptake/in vivo corneal permeation, and in vitro antioxidant activity/in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy. The solubility, chemical stability, and antioxidant activity were greatly improved after the encapsulation of the PVCL-PVA-PEG nanomicelles. The nanomicelle curcumin ophthalmic solution was simple to prepare and the nanomicelles are stable to the storage conditions, and it had good cellular tolerance. Nanomicelle curcumin also had excellent ocular tolerance in rabbits. The use of nanomicelles significantly improved in vitro cellular uptake and in vivo corneal permeation as well as improved anti-inflammatory efficacy when compared with a free curcumin solution. These findings indicate that nanomicelles could be promising topical delivery systems for the ocular administration of curcumin.

  16. The absence of the CD163 receptor has distinct temporal influences on intracerebral hemorrhage outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Jenna L; Lampert, Andrew S; Loyola Amador, Claudia; Schlakman, Brandon; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Svendsen, Pia; Moestrup, Søren K; Doré, Sylvain

    2018-02-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) toxicity precipitates secondary brain damage following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). CD163 is an anti-inflammatory Hb scavenger receptor and CD163-positive macrophages/microglia locally accumulate post-bleed, yet no studies have investigated the role of CD163 after ICH. ICH was induced in wildtype and CD163 -/- mice and various anatomical and functional outcomes were assessed. At 3 d, CD163 -/- mice have 43.4 ± 5.0% (p = 0.0002) and 34.8 ± 3.4% (p = 0.0003) less hematoma volume and tissue injury, respectively. Whereas, at 10 d, CD163 -/- mice have 49.2 ± 15.0% larger lesions (p = 0.0385). An inflection point was identified, where CD163 -/- mice perform better on neurobehavioral testing and have less mortality before 4 d, but increased mortality and worse function after 4 d (p = 0.0389). At 3 d, CD163 -/- mice have less Hb, iron, and blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased astrogliosis and neovascularization, and no change in heme oxygenase 1 (HO1) expression. At 10 d, CD163 -/- mice have increased iron and VEGF immunoreactivity, but no significant change in HO1 or astrogliosis. These novel findings reveal that CD163 deficiency has distinct temporal influences following ICH, with early beneficial properties but delayed injurious effects. While it is unclear why CD163 deficiency is initially beneficial, the late injurious effects are consistent with the key anti-inflammatory role of CD163 in the recovery phase of tissue damage.

  17. The Association between Monocyte Surface CD163 and Insulin Resistance in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reina Kawarabayashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the association between monocyte CD163 and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. One hundred sixty-six patients with type 2 diabetes without inflammatory or chronic kidney disease were recruited. The monocyte CD163 levels were measured by flow cytometry and soluble CD163 (sCD163 by ELISA. Insulin resistance was evaluated by the index of the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-R. Results. The median sCD163 and monocyte CD163 expression levels were 582.9 (472.4–720.0 ng/ml and 6061 (4486–7876 mean fluorescent intensity (MFI, respectively. In a simple regression analysis, monocyte CD163 was inversely correlated with log [HOMA-R] (r=–0.257, p=0.010, and sCD163 was positively correlated with log [HOMA-R] (r=0.198, p=0.042. In multiple regression analyses, monocyte CD163 was an independent contributor to log [HOMA-R] (β=–0.220, p=0.020 even after adjustment of various clinical factors for HOMA-R (R2=0.281, p=0.001, whereas sCD163 was not. Conclusions. Monocyte surface CD163 expression levels were more significantly associated with insulin resistance than sCD163 in patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting a novel pathophysiological role of CD163.

  18. Reduced production of anti-inflammatory soluble HLA-G molecules in styrene exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Quintavalle, Sonia; Stignani, Marina; Franzè, Fabrizio; Melchiorri, Loredana; De Rosa, Edoardo; Baricordi, Olavio R

    2009-03-01

    HLA-G antigens are non-classical HLA-class I anti-inflammatory molecules. Since styrene exposure has been suggested to induce immune alteration, we analyzed plasma levels and "in vitro" peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) production of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) molecules after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, in styrene exposed workers and healthy subjects. Exposed workers showed reduced plasma levels of sHLA-G and IL-10 in comparison to healthy controls. Similarly, lower levels of sHLA-G and IL-10 molecules were observed in PBMC culture supernatants after LPS activation. These data propose styrene exposure as a mediator of impaired sHLA-G production. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Soluble Dietary Fiber Can Protect the Gastrointestinal Mucosa Against Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Urushidani, Tetsuro

    2016-07-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal damage is a serious problem in patients, but effective therapy is not available at present. The effects of feeding conditions and dietary fiber (DF) on NSAID-induced gastrointestinal lesions were examined in mice. NSAIDs (indomethacin, diclofenac, loxoprofen, aspirin) were administered to male mice in various feeding conditions. Gastrointestinal lesions were examined 24 h after NSAID dosing. Regular diets, dietary-fiber-free diet (FFD), and diets supplemented with various types of DF were given to mice. NSAIDs produced marked ulcers and perforations selectively in the gastric antrum when they were administered after feeding of regular diet for 2 h after a 22-h fast. When NSAIDs, except for aspirin, were administered in unfasted conditions, they caused marked lesions in the small intestine. When mice were given FFD, antral ulcers and intestinal lesions induced by indomethacin (30 mg/kg, s.c.) markedly decreased, but when cellulose, an insoluble DF, was added to FFD, the lesions appeared again. The addition of pectin, a soluble DF, to regular diet containing 4.1 % crude fiber significantly inhibited the formation of antral ulcers as well as intestinal lesions caused by indomethacin or diclofenac (100 mg/kg, s.c.). The results indicated that NSAIDs given after feeding of diet produced ulcers selectively in the gastric antrum. The severity of the gastrointestinal lesions depended on the concentration of soluble or insoluble DF in food. Our results suggest that soluble DF such as pectin may be a safe means for protecting the gastrointestinal mucosa against NSAIDs.

  20. Scavenger Receptor CD163 and Its Biological Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Onofre

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available CD163 is a member of scavenger receptor super family class B of the first subgroup. It is mapped to the region p13 on chromosome 12. Five different isoforms of CD163 have been described, which differ in the structure of their cytoplasmic domains and putative phosporylation sites. This scavenger receptor is selectively expressed on cells of monocytes and macrophages lineage exclusively. CD163 immunological function is essentially homeostatic. It also has other functions because participates in adhesion to endothelial cells, in tolerance induction and tissues regeneration. Other very important function of CD163 is the clearance of hemoglobin in its cell-free form and participation in anti-inflammation in its soluble form, exhibiting cytokine-like functions. We review the biological functions of CD163 which have been discovered until now. It seems apparent from this review that CD163 scavenger receptor can be used as biomarker in different diseases and as a valuable diagnostic parameter for prognosis of many diseases especially inflammatory disorders and sepsis.

  1. Lesional accumulation of CD163-expressing cells in the gut of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Franzè

    Full Text Available Monocytes/macrophages displaying different markers of activation/differentiation infiltrate the inflamed gut of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, but the role that each monocyte/macrophage subpopulation plays in the pathogenesis of IBD is not fully understood. The hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163, a specific marker of monocytes/macrophages, has been associated with either anti-inflammatory or inflammatory functions of macrophages in several pathologies. In this study we examined the tissue distribution and function of CD163-expressing monocytes/macrophages in IBD. CD163 RNA and protein expression was more pronounced in IBD in comparison to normal controls, with no significant difference between Crohn's disease and Ulcerative colitis. In IBD, over-expression of CD163 was restricted to areas with active inflammation and not influenced by current therapy. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the accumulation of CD163-expressing cells in IBD, mostly around and inside blood vessels, thus suggesting that these cells are partly recruited from the systemic circulation. Indeed, FACS analysis of circulating mononuclear cells showed that the fractions of CD163-positive monocytes were increased in IBD patients as compared to controls. Functionally, interleukin-6 up-regulated CD163 expression in lamina propria mononuclear cells and mucosal explants of normal subjects. In IBD blood and mucosal cell cultures, cross-linking of CD163 with a specific monoclonal anti-CD163 antibody enhanced tumor necrosis factor-α synthesis. These findings indicate that IBD mucosa is abundantly infiltrated with CD163-positive cells, which could contribute to amplify the inflammatory cytokine response.

  2. Differential expression of monocyte CD163 in single- and dual-asthmatic responders during allergen-induced bronchoconstriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, K; Møller, H J; Dubuske, L M

    2006-01-01

    a chemiluminescence analyser. In 21 DR, nine SR and 13 NR-soluble CD163 in plasma was measured by ELISA before, 1, 8 and 24 h after the challenge. RESULTS: In DR, the baseline expression of monocyte CD163 and eNO were significantly greater than in SR and NR. A pattern of (1) decreased monocyte CD163 expression, (2......) unchanged sCD163 and (3) increased eNO in DR was contrasted by a pattern of (1) increased CD163 expression, (2) increased sCD163 and (3) unchanged eNO in SR. During allergen challenge, the changes in monocyte CD163 expression and sCD163 inversely correlated with the changes in eNO. CONCLUSION: Both pro...

  3. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J

    2006-01-01

    CD163 is the monocyte/macrophage-specific receptor for haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb) complexes. The cytoplasmic tail of human CD163 exists as a short tail variant and two long tail variants. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that all three CD163 variants...... are substantially expressed in blood, liver, and spleen, and the short tail variant is the predominant mRNA species. Using cell transfectants in which cDNA encoding the CD163 variants was inserted at the same site in the genome, we evaluated the expression and endocytic properties of the tail variants. Ligand...... uptake analysis showed that cells expressing the CD163 short tail variant exhibited a higher capacity for ligand endocytosis than cells expressing the CD163 long tail variants. The difference in endocytic activity was explained by confocal microscopic analysis, showing marked deviations in subcellular...

  4. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase contributes to the anti-inflammatory effect of antimicrobial triclocarban in a murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Yan; Qiu, Hong; Morisseau, Christophe; Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Ulu, Arzu; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2011-01-01

    The increasing use of the anti-microbial triclocarban (TCC) in personal care products (PCPs) has resulted in concern regarding environmental pollution. TCC is a potent inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Inhibitors of sEH (sEHIs) are anti-inflammatory, anti-hypertensive and cardio-protective in multiple animal models. However, the in vivo effects anticipated from a sEHI have not been reported for TCC. Here we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects in vivo of TCC in a murine model. TCC was employed in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine model. Systolic blood pressure, plasma levels of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokine, and metabolomic profile of plasma oxylipins were determined. TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. TCC significantly repressed the increased release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine caused by LPS. Furthermore, TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo in a time-dependent manner towards resolution of inflammation as expected from a sEHI. These results demonstrated that at the doses used TCC is anti-inflammatory in the murine model. This study suggests that TCC may provide some benefits in humans in addition to its antimicrobial activities due to its potent inhibition of sEH. It may be a promising starting point for developing new low volume high value applications of TCC. However these biological effects also caution against the general over use of TCC in PCPs. PMID:21741984

  5. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase contributes to the anti-inflammatory effect of antimicrobial triclocarban in a murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junyan; Qiu Hong; Morisseau, Christophe; Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Ulu, Arzu; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing use of the antimicrobial triclocarban (TCC) in personal care products (PCPs) has resulted in concern regarding environmental pollution. TCC is a potent inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Inhibitors of sEH (sEHIs) are anti-inflammatory, anti-hypertensive and cardio-protective in multiple animal models. However, the in vivo effects anticipated from a sEHI have not been reported for TCC. Here we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects in vivo of TCC in a murine model. TCC was employed in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine model. Systolic blood pressure, plasma levels of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokine, and metabolomic profile of plasma oxylipins were determined. TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. TCC significantly repressed the increased release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine caused by LPS. Furthermore, TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo in a time-dependent manner towards resolution of inflammation as expected from a sEHI. These results demonstrated that at the doses used TCC is anti-inflammatory in the murine model. This study suggests that TCC may provide some benefits in humans in addition to its antimicrobial activities due to its potent inhibition of sEH. It may be a promising starting point for developing new low volume high value applications of TCC. However these biological effects also caution against the general over use of TCC in PCPs. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: → Anti-microbial triclocarban (TCC) is anti-inflammatory in a murine model. → TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo as expected from a sEHI. → TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. → TCC significantly repressed LPS-induced increased release of inflammatory cytokines.

  6. CD163-L1 Is an Endocytic Macrophage Protein Strongly Regulated by Mediators in the Inflammatory Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Jesper B; Nielsen, Marianne J; Reichhardt, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    exhibits similarity to CD163 in terms of structure and regulated expression in cultured monocytes but shows clear differences compared with the known CD163 ligand preferences and expression pattern in the pool of tissue macrophages. We postulate that CD163-L1 functions as a scavenger receptor for one......CD163-L1 belongs to the group B scavenger receptor cysteine-rich family of proteins, where the CD163-L1 gene arose by duplication of the gene encoding the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 in late evolution. The current data demonstrate that CD163-L1 is highly expressed and colocalizes with CD163......-phase mediator IL-6 and the anti-inflammatory mediator IL-10 but is suppressed by the proinflammatory mediators IL-4, IL-13, TNF-α, and LPS/IFN-γ. Furthermore, we show that CD163-L1 is an endocytic receptor, which internalizes independently of cross-linking through a clathrin-mediated pathway. Two cytoplasmic...

  7. The antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of water-soluble fraction of bee venom on rheumatoid arthritis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Hern Lee

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated that bee venom (BV injection into acupoint (i.e. Zusanli produced more potent anti-inflammatory and antinociciptive effect in Freunds adjuvant induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA model as compared with that of non-acupoint injection(i.e back. However, the precise components underlying BV-induced antinociceptive and/or anti-inflammatory effects have not been fully understood. Therefore, we further investigated the anti-arthritic effect of BV after extracting the whole BV according to solubility (water soluble: BVA, ethylacetate soluble: BVE. Subcutaneous BVA treatment (0.9 mg/kg/day into Zusanli acupoint was found to dramatically inhibit paw edema and radiological change (i.e. new bone proliferation and soft tissue swelling caused by Freunds adjuvant injection. In addition, the increase of serum interleukin-6 by RA induction was normalized by the BVA treatment as similar with that of non-arthritic animals. On the other hand, BVA therapy significantly reduced arthritis induced nociceptive behaviors (i.e., nociceptive score for mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hyperalgesia. Furthermore, BVA treatment significantly suppressed adjuvant induced Fos expression in the lumbar spinal cord at 3 weeks post-adjuvant injection. However, BVE treatment (0.05 mg/kg/day has not any anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effect on RA. Based on the present results, we demonstrated that BVA might be a effective fraction in whole BV for long-term treatment of RA-induced pain and inflammation. However, it is clear necessary that further fraction study about BVA was required for elucidating an effective component of BVA.

  8. Changes in fat mass correlate with changes in soluble sCD163, a marker of mature macrophages, in patients with CKD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Jonas; Møller, Holger Jon; Witasp, Anna

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, adipose tissue was shown to contain macrophages capable of contributing to systemic inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Here, we investigate this putative relationship in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) by using the novel macrophage marker soluble (s...

  9. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-jing Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL. Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

  10. The clinical significance of the CD163+ and CD68+ macrophages in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Qun Kong

    Full Text Available Our previous study has found that the abundance of peritumoral CD68(+ macrophages was associated with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC after resection. However, CD68 staining could not discriminate the protumoral or tumoricidal subpopulations from pan-macrophages. CD163 is a marker of alternatively activated macrophages. In this study, the clinical significance of CD163(+ cells in tumors and peritumoral liver tissues was evaluated in a cohort of 295 patients with HCC after curative resection. We found that the density of CD163(+ cells was well correlated with that of CD68(+ cells in both tumors and peritumoral liver tissues but was much more. Immunostaining on consecutive sections and flow cytometry assay on surgical resected specimens further supported the findings that the CD163(+ cells was more abundant than CD68(+ cells. The density of peritumoral CD68(+ cells was associated with poor recurrence-free survival (RFS and poor overall survival (OS (P = 0.004 and P = 0.001, respectively, whereas the CD163(+ cells have no prognostic values either in tumors or in peritumoral liver tissues. In another cohort of 107 HCC patients, preoperative plasma concentration of soluble form of CD163 (sCD163 was associated with active hepatitis-related factors but not associated with the markers of tumor invasion. In conclusion, both the CD163(+ cells local infiltration and plasma sCD163 were of limited significance in HCC, and they were more likely markers related to active hepatitis rather than tumor progression.

  11. Soluble dietary fiber protects against nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced damage to the small intestine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Hara, Toshiko; Murakawa, Daisuke; Matsuura, Masashi; Takata, Kenji

    2010-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often cause ulcers in the small intestine in humans, but there are few effective agents for treatment of small intestinal ulcers. We found that soluble dietary fibers (SDFs), such as pectin, could prevent the formation of small intestinal lesions induced by indomethacin (IND) in cats. To elucidate the mechanism of protection by SDFs, we examined the viscosities of SDFs and the effects of pectin on gastrointestinal absorption of IND and intestinal hypermotility induced by IND. Cats were given regular dry food (RFD-Dry) or RFD-Dry supplemented with pectin, guar gum, polydextrose, or mucin twice daily. IND was administered orally once daily for 3 days. Mucosal lesions in the small intestine were examined 24 h after the final dosing of IND. Plasma concentrations of IND were measured by HPLC. GI motilities were measured using a telemetry system in conscious cats implanted with force transducers. Viscosities of the SDFs were measured using a viscosimeter. In cats given RFD-Dry, IND (3 mg/kg) increased motility and produced many lesions in the lower half of the small intestine; the total lesion area (TLA) was 7.5 +/- 2.6 cm(2) (n = 4). Lesions induced by IND were markedly decreased in cats given RFD-Dry supplemented with 3% pectin, guar gum, polydextrose or mucin; TLAs were 0.6 +/- 0.3, 0.0 +/- 0.0, 1.3 +/- 0.8 and 1.6 +/- 0.5 cm(2) (n = 4) (P 1,200, 1 and 4, respectively. Pectin did not affect the absorption of IND nor did it inhibit IND-induced intestinal hypermotility. SDFs protect the small intestine against NSAID-induced damage, probably by compensating a barrier function of the mucin decreased by IND. Viscosities of the SDFs play a role, at least in part, in the protective effects of the SDFs on the small intestine.

  12. CD163-Macrophages Are Involved in Rhabdomyolysis-Induced Kidney Injury and May Be Detected by MRI with Targeted Gold-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Carril, Mónica; Padro, Daniel; Guerrero-Hue, Melanie; Tarín, Carlos; Samaniego, Rafael; Cannata, Pablo; Cano, Ainhoa; Villalobos, Juan Manuel Amaro; Sevillano, Ángel Manuel; Yuste, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Praga, Manuel; Egido, Jesús; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in rhabdomyolysis-acute kidney injury (AKI), although the molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage differentiation are poorly understood. We analyzed the expression and regulation of CD163, a membrane receptor mainly expressed by anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, in rhabdomyolysis-AKI and developed targeted probes for its specific detection in vivo by MRI. Intramuscular injection of glycerol in mice promoted an early inflammatory response, with elevated proportion of M1 macrophages, and partial differentiation towards a M2 phenotype in later stages, where increased CD163 expression was observed. Immunohistological studies confirmed the presence of CD163-macrophages in human rhabdomyolysis-AKI. In cultured macrophages, myoglobin upregulated CD163 expression via HO-1/IL-10 axis. Moreover, we developed gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles vectorized with an anti-CD163 antibody that specifically targeted CD163 in kidneys from glycerol-injected mice, as determined by MRI studies, and confirmed by electron microscopy and immunological analysis. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that CD163 is present in both human and experimental rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI, suggesting an important role of this molecule in this pathological condition. Therefore, the use of probes targeting CD163-macrophages by MRI may provide important information about the cellular composition of renal lesion in rhabdomyolysis.

  13. CD163 positive subsets of blood dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2006-01-01

    expression in dendritic cells (DCs) was investigated using multicolor flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 31 healthy donors and 15 HIV-1 patients in addition to umbilical cord blood from 5 newborn infants. Total RNA was isolated from MACS purified DCs and CD163 mRNA was determined with real-time reverse...... transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The effect of glucocorticoid and phorbol ester stimulation on monocyte and dendritic cell CD163 and CD91 expression was investigated in cell culture of mononuclear cells using multicolor flow cytometry. We identified two CD163+ subsets in human blood with dendritic cell...... characteristics, CD163lo and CD163hi, together constituting a substantial fraction of DCs. Both subsets were characterized as [lin]- CD4+ ILT3+ HLA-DR+ CD11c+ by flow cytometry, and CD163 mRNA was readily detectable in MACS purified human DCs. CD163 on DCs was upregulated by glucocorticoid, and treatment...

  14. In vitro antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of ethyl acetate soluble proanthocyanidins of the inflorescence of Cocos nucifera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padumadasa, Chayanika; Dharmadana, Durga; Abeysekera, Ajit; Thammitiyagodage, Mayuri

    2016-09-05

    Proanthocyanidins belong to a class of polyphenolic compounds called flavonoids and have been reported to exhibit important biological activities. The immature inflorescence of Cocos nucifera L. is used by Ayurvedic and traditional medical practitioners for the treatment of menorrhagia in Sri Lanka. Our studies have shown that the inflorescence of Cocos nucifera L. predominantly contains proanthocyanidins. To determine the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of ethyl acetate soluble proanthocyanidins (EASPA) of immature inflorescence of Cocos nucifera L. EASPA fraction of an acetone/water (7:3) extract of Cocos nucifera L. inflorescence was purified on Sephadex LH-20 and was used for the study. Antioxidant activity of EASPA was determined using DPPH and SOR scavenging assays. Anti-inflammatory activity of EASPA was determined by oxidative burst assay using chemiluminescence technique. MTT colorimetric assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of EASPA to both PC3 and HeLa cells. EASPA showed radical scavenging activity against both DPPH and superoxide radicals with IC50 values of 11.02 ± 0.60 μg/mL and 26.11 ± 0.72 μg/mL. In both assays, EASPA showed less antioxidant activity than the standards used. It exhibited similar anti-inflammatory activity (IC50 = 10.31 ± 1.11 μg/mL) to ibuprofen (IC50 = 11.20 ± 1.90 μg/mL) (P ≥ 0.05). EASPA also showed stronger cytotoxic activity towards Hela cells (IC50 = 18.78 ± 0.90 μg/mL) than tamoxifen (IC50 = 28.80 ± 1.94 μg/mL) (P ≤ 0.05), while low cytotoxicity was observed against PC3 cells (IC50 = 44.21 ± 0.73 μg/mL) compared to doxorubicin (IC50 = 1.38 ± 0.16 μg/mL). EASPA showed antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities.

  15. Molecular characterization of the haptoglobin.hemoglobin receptor CD163. Ligand binding properties of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby

    2004-01-01

    CD163 is the macrophage receptor for endocytosis of haptoglobin.hemoglobin complexes. The extracellular region consisting of nine scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domains also circulates in plasma as a soluble protein. By ligand binding analysis of a broad spectrum of soluble CD163...... truncation variants, the amino-terminal third of the SRCR region was shown to be crucial for the binding of haptoglobin.hemoglobin complexes. By Western blotting of the CD163 variants, a panel of ten monoclonal antibodies was mapped to SRCR domains 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, and 9, respectively. Only the two antibodies...... to CD163 demonstrated that optimal ligand binding requires physiological plasma calcium concentrations, and an immediate ligand release occurs at the low calcium concentrations measured in acidifying endosomes. In conclusion, SRCR domain 3 of CD163 is an exposed domain and a critical determinant...

  16. Soluble factors from Lactobacillus reuteri CRL1098 have anti-inflammatory effects in acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Griet

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that Lactobacillus reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors were able to reduce TNF-α production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The aims of this study were to determine whether L. reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors were able to modulate in vitro the inflammatory response triggered by LPS in murine macrophages, to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunoregulatory effect, and to evaluate in vivo its capacity to exert anti-inflammatory actions in acute lung injury induced by LPS in mice. In vitro assays demonstrated that L. reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors significantly reduced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators (NO, COX-2, and Hsp70 and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, and IL-6 caused by the stimulation of macrophages with LPS. NF-kB and PI3K inhibition by L. reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors contributed to these inhibitory effects. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway and the diminished expression of CD14 could be involved in the immunoregulatory effect. In addition, our in vivo data proved that the LPS-induced secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory cells recruitment to the airways and inflammatory lung tissue damage were reduced in L. reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors treated mice, providing a new way to reduce excessive pulmonary inflammation.

  17. Solubility enhancement of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) using polypolypropylene oxide core PAMAM dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Fatma Ebru; Senel, Mehmet

    2013-07-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the aqueous solubility enhancement properties of polypropylene oxide cored PAMAM (PPO@PAMAM) dendrimers. The solubility of NSAIDs (Ketoprofen, Ibuprofen and Diflunisal) was investigated in the presence of PPO@PAMAM dendrimers at room temperature in buffer solution. The effects of dendrimer concentration, generation and core size on the solubility of NSAIDs have been investigated. The experimental results showed that the solubility of the NSAIDs was approximately proportional to dendrimer concentration and generation. In addition, the effect of core size on the solubility of NSAIDs in constant generation and concentration of PPO@PAMAM dendrimer was Ketoprofen>Diflunisal>Ibuprofen. Under optimized conditions, PPO@PAMAM dendrimers are highly effective solubility enhancer for NSAIDs due to its new polypropylene oxide core. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Higher CD163 levels are associated with insulin resistance in HCV and HIV-infected adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Michael; Ma, Yifei; Scherzer, Rebecca; Price, Jennifer C.; French, Audrey L.; Plankey, Michael W.; Grunfeld, Carl; Tien, Phyllis C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives HIV/HCV coinfection is associated with insulin resistance, but the mechanism is unclear. We hypothesized that intestinal epithelial damage and the consequent monocyte/macrophage activation, and inflammation explain this perturbation. Design Cross-sectional study of 519 adults (220 HIV+/HCV−;64 HIV−/HCV+;89 HIV+/HCV+;146 HIV−/HCV−). Methods We used multivariable linear regression to evaluate associations of HIV and HCV with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and if intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP, a marker of gut epithelial integrity), soluble(s)CD14 and sCD163 (markers of monocyte/macrophage activation) and interleukin-6(IL-6, an inflammatory cytokine) mediated this association. Results HIV+/HCV+ and HIV−/HCV+ had greater demographic-adjusted HOMA-IR (mean[95%CI]:1.96[1.51,2.54] and 1.65[1.22,2.24]) than HIV+/HCV− and HIV−/HCV−(1.41[1.18,1.67] and 1.44[1.17,1.75], respectively). After additional adjustment for lifestyle and metabolic factors, HIV+/HCV+ remained associated with 36%(95%CI:4%,80%) greater HOMA-IR relative to HIV−/HCV−, while HIV−/HCV+ and HIV+/HCV− had smaller differences. Adjustment for sCD163 substantially attenuated the difference between HIV+/HCV+ and HIV−/HCV−; adjustment for I-FABP, sCD14, and IL-6 had little effect. Higher sCD163 was independently associated with 19%[95%CI:7%,33%], 26%[95%CI:15%,39%],25%[95%CI:14%,37%], and 23%[95%CI:11%,36%] greater HOMA-IR in HIV+/HCV+, HIV−/HCV+,HIV+/HCV−, and HIV−/HCV−(all estimates per doubling of sCD163). I-FABP, sCD14, and IL-6 were not associated with HOMA-IR. Conclusion HIV/HCV coinfection is associated with greater HOMA-IR, even after controlling for demographic, lifestyle, and metabolic factors. sCD163, which appears independent of intestinal epithelial damage and inflammation, partly explains this association. Our findings that the association of sCD163 with HOMAIR occurred even in the absence of HIV and HCV

  19. Macrophage activation marker sCD163 correlates with accelerated lipolysis following LPS exposure: a human-randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittig, Nikolaj; Svart, Mads; Jessen, Niels

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophage activation determined by levels of soluble sCD163 is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This suggests that macrophage activation is involved in the pathogenesis of conditions is characte......BACKGROUND: Macrophage activation determined by levels of soluble sCD163 is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This suggests that macrophage activation is involved in the pathogenesis of conditions...... in lipid metabolic adaptions under conditions such as obesity, DM2 and NAFLD....

  20. Macrophage activation marker sCD163 correlates with accelerated lipolysis following LPS exposure: a human-randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaj Rittig

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Macrophage activation determined by levels of soluble sCD163 is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. This suggests that macrophage activation is involved in the pathogenesis of conditions is characterised by adaptions in the lipid metabolism. Since sCD163 is shed to serum by inflammatory signals including lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxin, we investigated sCD163 and correlations with lipid metabolism following LPS exposure. Methods: Eight healthy male subjects were investigated on two separate occasions: (i following an LPS exposure and (ii following saline exposure. Each study day consisted of a four-hour non-insulin-stimulated period followed by a two-hour hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp period. A 3H-palmitate tracer was used to calculate the rate of appearance (Rapalmitate. Blood samples were consecutively obtained throughout each study day. Abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained for western blotting. Results: We observed a significant two-fold increase in plasma sCD163 levels following LPS exposure (P < 0.001, and sCD163 concentrations correlated positively with the plasma concentration of free fatty acids, Rapalmitate, lipid oxidation rates and phosphorylation of the hormone-sensitive lipase at serine 660 in adipose tissue (P < 0.05, all. Furthermore, sCD163 concentrations correlated positively with plasma concentrations of cortisol, glucagon, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6 and IL-10 (P < 0.05, all. Conclusion: We observed a strong correlation between sCD163 and stimulation of lipolysis and fat oxidation following LPS exposure. These findings support preexisting theory that inflammation and macrophage activation play a significant role in lipid metabolic adaptions under conditions such as obesity, DM2 and NAFLD.

  1. Proteolytic shedding of the macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabriek, B.O.; Møller, H.J.; Vloet, R.P.M.; Winsen, L.M. van; Hanemaaijer, R.; Teunissen, C.E.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Berg, T.K. van den; Dijkstra, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    The scavenger receptor CD163 is selectively expressed on tissue macrophages and human monocytes. CD163 has been implicated to play a role in the clearance of hemoglobin and in the regulation of cytokine production by macrophages. Membrane CD163 can be cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)

  2. Diagnostic value of urine sCD163 levels for sepsis and relevant acute kidney injury: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Longxiang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis is a common syndrome in critically ill patients and easily leads to the occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI, with high mortality rates. This study aimed to investigate the diagnostic value of urine soluble CD163 (sCD163 for identification of sepsis, severity of sepsis, and for secondary AKI, and to assess the patients’ prognosis. Methods We enrolled 20 cases with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, 40 cases with sepsis (further divided into 17 sepsis cases and 23 severe sepsis cases admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU, and 20 control cases. Results for urine sCD163 were recorded on the day of admission to the ICU, and AKI occurrence was noted. Results On the day of ICU admission, the sepsis group exhibited higher levels of urine sCD163 (74.8 ng/ml; range: 47.9-148.3 ng/ml compared with those in the SIRS group (31.9 ng/ml; 16.8-48.0, P . The area under the curve (AUC was 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72-0.94, P  the sensitivity was 0.83, and the specificity was 0.75 (based on a cut-off point of 43.0 ng/ml. Moreover, the severe sepsis group appeared to have a higher level of sCD163 compared with that in the sepsis group (76.2; 47.2-167.5 ng/ml vs. 74.2; 46.2-131.6 ng/ml, but this was not significant. For 15 patients with AKI, urine sCD163 levels at AKI diagnosis were significantly higher than those of the remaining 35 sepsis patients upon ICU admission (121.0; 74.6-299.1 ng/ml vs. 61.8; 42.8-128.3 ng/ml, P = 0.049. The AUC for urine sCD163 was 0.688 (95% CI: 0.51-0.87, P = 0.049. Sepsis patients with a poor prognosis showed a higher urine sCD163 level at ICU admission (98.6; 50.3-275.6 ng/ml vs. 68.0; 44.8-114.5 ng/ml, but this was not significant. Patients with AKI with a poor prognosis had higher sCD163 levels than those in patients with a better prognosis (205.9; 38.6-766.0 ng/ml vs. 80.9; 74.9-141.0 ng/ml, but this was not significant. Conclusions This study shows, for the

  3. Systemic levels of the anti-inflammatory decoy receptor soluble RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end products) are decreased in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Romy M; Otoni, Cristiane C; Jergens, Albert E; Grützner, Niels; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2014-10-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common condition in dogs, and a dysregulated innate immunity is believed to play a major role in its pathogenesis. S100A12 is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, which is involved in phagocyte activation and is increased in serum/fecal samples from dogs with IBD. S100A12 binds to the receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a pattern-recognition receptor, and results of studies in human patients with IBD and other conditions suggest a role of RAGE in chronic inflammation. Soluble RAGE (sRAGE), a decoy receptor for inflammatory proteins (e.g., S100A12) that appears to function as an anti-inflammatory molecule, was shown to be decreased in human IBD patients. This study aimed to evaluate serum sRAGE and serum/fecal S100A12 concentrations in dogs with IBD. Serum and fecal samples were collected from 20 dogs with IBD before and after initiation of medical treatment and from 15 healthy control dogs. Serum sRAGE and serum and fecal S100A12 concentrations were measured by ELISA, and were compared between dogs with IBD and healthy controls, and between dogs with a positive outcome (i.e., clinical remission, n=13) and those that were euthanized (n=6). The relationship of serum sRAGE concentrations with clinical disease activity (using the CIBDAI scoring system), serum and fecal S100A12 concentrations, and histologic disease severity (using a 4-point semi-quantitative grading system) was tested. Serum sRAGE concentrations were significantly lower in dogs with IBD than in healthy controls (p=0.0003), but were not correlated with the severity of histologic lesions (p=0.4241), the CIBDAI score before (p=0.0967) or after treatment (p=0.1067), the serum S100A12 concentration before (p=0.9214) and after treatment (p=0.4411), or with the individual outcome (p=0.4066). Clinical remission and the change in serum sRAGE concentration after treatment were not significantly associated (p=0.5727); however, serum s

  4. Comparative assessment of the recognition of domain-specific CD163 monoclonal antibodies in human monocytes explains wide discrepancy in reported levels of cellular surface CD163 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Etzerodt, Anders; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2011-01-01

    . Materials and Methods The cellular distribution of CD163 on human peripheral blood monocytes in freshly drawn blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from buffy-coats was investigated by flow cytometry using CD163 monoclonal antibodies recognizing scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain......Background CD163 is expressed exclusively on cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage and is widely used as a marker of human macrophages. Further, it has been suggested as a diagnostic marker of monocyte/macrophage activity in inflammatory conditions and as a therapeutic target. However, studies...... 1 (MAC2-158), domain 4 (R-20), domain 7 (GHI/61), and domain 9 (RM3/1). The CD163 monoclonal antibodies were characterized in binding and endocytosis experiments in human macrophages and CD163-transfected Flp-In CHO cells. Calcium-dependent ligand binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance...

  5. Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2015-06-23

    In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs in the treatment of inflammatory and cancerous diseases. Such targeting of macrophages has been tried using the natural propensity of macrophages to non-specifically phagocytose circulating foreign particulate material. In addition, the specific targeting of macrophage-expressed receptors has been used in order to obtain a selective uptake in macrophages and reduce adverse effects of off-target delivery of drugs. CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage-specific endocytic receptor that has been studied for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs to macrophages using targeted liposomes or antibody drug conjugates. This review will focus on the biology of CD163 and its potential role as a target for selective macrophage targeting compared with other macrophage targeting approaches.

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity in selected Antarctic benthic organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Moles, Juan; Torrent, Anna; Alcaraz, M. José; Ruhí, Ramon; Avila, Conxita

    2014-01-01

    Antarctic benthos was prospected in search for anti-inflammatory activity in polar benthic invertebrates, in two different geographical areas: deep-bottoms of the Eastern Weddell Sea and shallow-waters of the South Shetland Islands. A total of 36 benthic algae and invertebrate species were selected to perform solubility tests in order to obtain extracts that were soluble at an innocuous ethanol concentration (0.2%) for cell culture, and further test them for anti-inflammatory activity. From t...

  7. The macrophage CD163 surface glycoprotein is an erythroblast adhesion receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabriek, Babs O; Polfliet, Machteld M J; Vloet, Rianka P M

    2007-01-01

    on the surface of macrophages in erythroblastic islands, in erythroblast binding. In particular, the monoclonal antibody ED2 was found to inhibit erythroblast binding to bone marrow macrophages. Here, we identify the ED2 antigen as the rat CD163 surface glycoprotein, a member of the group B scavenger receptor...... cysteine-rich (SRCR) family that has previously been shown to function as a receptor for hemoglobin-haptoglobin (Hb-Hp) complexes and is believed to contribute to the clearance of free hemoglobin. CD163 transfectants and recombinant protein containing the extracellular domain of CD163 supported...... the adhesion of erythroblastic cells. Furthermore, we identified a 13-amino acid motif (CD163p2) corresponding to a putative interaction site within the second scavenger receptor domain of CD163 that could mediate erythroblast binding. Finally, CD163p2 promoted erythroid expansion in vitro, suggesting...

  8. Proteolytic shedding of the macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabriek, Babs O; Møller, Holger J; Vloet, Rianka P M

    2007-01-01

    MMP-9 levels in controls, but not in MS patients. Moreover, evidence was obtained for CD163-cleaving MMP activity in plasma of MS patients. Finally, the increased proteolytic shedding of CD163 correlated to reduced plasma levels of circulating inflammatory cytokines. Collectively, our results provide...... evidence for proteolytic shedding of CD163 in MS and suggest a possible link to cytokine production. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jul...

  9. The macrophage scavenger receptor (CD163): a double-edged sword in treatment of malignant disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan

    2009-01-01

    was investigated in biopsies from bladder cancer patients. We demonstrated that CD163 mRNA expression was significantly elevated in muscle invasive tumors (T2-T4) compared with superficial tumors (Ta), and that a high level of CD163 mRNA expression in tumor biopsies was significantly associated with poor 13-year...... in inflammatory conditions and as a potential candidate for targeted drug delivery. The present PhD demonstrates that more than 80% of circulatory monocytes express the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163. Assessment of different CD163 mAbs under general test conditions allowed us to explain the discrepancy...

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of chloroform soluble fraction from Perilla frutescens britton leaves produced by radiation breeding in RAW264.7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Yun Ho; So, Yang Kang; Kim, Jin Baek; Jin, Chang Hyun [Advance Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Soo [Dept. Food Science and Technology Graduate School, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Young [Freshwater Bioresources Utilization Division, Nakdonggang National Institute of Biological Resources, Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The present study aimed to determine the anti-inflammatory effects of each solvent fraction of a mutant Perilla frutescens produced by radiation breeding. Following extraction with 80% methanol, P. frutescens was fractionated in the order of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and butanol; the chloroform fraction exhibited less cytotoxicity, the greatest inhibitory effect on the production of nitric oxide (NO), and the highest rate of inhibition on the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and interferon-β (IFN-β). The chloroform fraction also suppressed the mRNA and protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and reduced the activation of nuclear factor-{sub κ}B (NF-{sub κ}B) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, the presence of corosolic acid in the chloroform fraction was identifed. Taken together, the present fndings indicate that the chloroform fraction obtained from mutant P. frutescens inhibited NO production in LPSstimulated RAW264.7 cells via the suppression of iNOS expression and the inactivation of NF-{sub κ}B.

  11. Hemoglobin induces monocyte recruitment and CD163-macrophage polarization in abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Amaro Villalobos, Juan Manuel; Lindholt, Jes S

    2015-01-01

    163 expressing macrophages ex vivo, in vitro and in human AAA. METHODS AND RESULTS: CD163 mRNA and protein expression was significantly higher in human AAA (n=7) vs. healthy wall (n=6). CD163 was predominantly found in adventitia of AAA, coinciding with areas rich in hemosiderin and adjacent...

  12. The haptoglobin-CD163-heme oxygenase-1 pathway for hemoglobin scavenging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jens Haugbølle; Etzerodt, Anders; Svendsen, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The haptoglobin- (Hp-) CD163-heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway is an efficient captor-receptor-enzyme system to circumvent the hemoglobin (Hb)/heme-induced toxicity during physiological and pathological hemolyses. In this pathway, Hb tightly binds to Hp leading to CD163-mediated uptake of the complex...

  13. CD163: a signal receptor scavenging haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes from plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Madsen, Mette; Moestrup, Søren K

    2002-01-01

    CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage membrane protein belonging to the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domain family. The CD163 expression is induced by interleukin-6, interleukin-10 and glucocorticoids. Its function has remained unknown until recently when CD163 was identified...... as the endocytic receptor binding hemoglobin (Hb) in complex with the plasma protein haptoglobin (Hp). This specific receptor-ligand interaction leading to removal from plasma of the Hp-Hb complex-but not free Hp or Hb-now explains the depletion of circulating Hp in individuals with increased intravascular...... hemolysis. Besides having a detoxificating effect by removing Hb from plasma, the CD163-mediated endocytosis of the Hp-Hb complex may represent a major pathway for uptake of iron in the tissue macrophages. The novel functional linkage of CD163 and Hp, which both are induced during inflammation, also reveal...

  14. CD163-positive cancer cells are potentially associated with high malignant potential in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chaoya; Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Nakagawa, Takenobu; Yamada, Sohsuke; Kitada, Shohei; Motoshima, Takanobu; Kamba, Tomomi; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2018-03-01

    CD163 is preferentially expressed by monocyte/macrophages; however, recent studies using immunohistochemistry (IHC) have reported that some cancer cells also express CD163. In the present IHC study, we investigated CD163 staining of cancer cells and macrophages in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tissues and determined the relationship between cancer cell CD163 expression and clinical prognosis in patients with ccRCC. IHC for CD163 was performed in ccRCC tissues from 103 patients. CD163-positive cancer cells were detected in 35% of the patients (36/103); however, the positive signals on cancer cells were significantly lower than those on macrophages. CD163-positive cancer cells were preferentially detected in patients with high T classification, and females, and were significantly associated with shortened progression-free survival and a lower overall survival ratio. Notably, a high intensity of CD163-positive macrophage infiltration was detected in the CD163-positive cancer cell-high tumor areas. Although CD163 mRNA was detected in cultured macrophages, no CD163 mRNA was detected in two cultured RCC cell lines. The detailed mechanism by which a positive signal is detected on cancer cells has not been clarified. Detection of the CD163 antigen on cancer cells might be a useful marker for evaluating the clinical course of patients with ccRCC.

  15. The class I scavenger receptor CD163 promotes internalization of ADAMTS13 by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbij, Fabian C; Sorvillo, Nicoletta; Kaijen, Paul H P; Hrdinova, Johana; Peyron, Ivan; Fijnheer, Rob; Ten Brinke, Anja; Meijer, Alexander B; van Alphen, Floris P J; van den Berg, Timo K; Graversen, Jonas J H; Moestrup, Soren K; Voorberg, Jan

    2017-01-24

    Internalization of ADAMTS13 by macrophages may contribute to its clearance from the circulation. Here we investigated endocytic mechanisms that contribute to the uptake of ADAMTS13 by macrophages. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were used to monitor the uptake of fluorescently labeled recombinant ADAMTS13 by flow cytometry. Internalization of ADAMTS13 was blocked upon addition of the cell-permeable dynamin inhibitor dynasore. Partial blocking of ADAMTS13 uptake was observed by using mannan; however, uptake was not affected by an antibody that blocked binding to the macrophage mannose receptor CD206, which suggests that other endocytic receptors contribute to the internalization of ADAMTS13 by macrophages. A pull-down with ADAMTS13 and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis identified the class I scavenger receptor CD163 as a candidate receptor for ADAMTS13. Blocking experiments with monoclonal anti-CD163 antibody EDHu-1 resulted in decreased ADAMTS13 internalization by macrophages. Pronounced inhibition of ADAMTS13 uptake by EDHu-1 was observed in CD163 high-expressing macrophages. In agreement with these findings, CD163-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells were capable of rapidly internalizing ADAMTS13. Surface plasmon resonance revealed binding of ADAMTS13 to scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains 1-9 and 1-5 of CD163. Taken together, our data identify CD163 as a major endocytic receptor for ADAMTS13 on macrophages.

  16. TOPICAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF COSTUS AFER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bioactivity-monitored extraction and chromatographic fractionation of different morphological parts of Costus afer using the croton aldehyde-induced mouse ear oedema model resulted in the location of significant anti-inflammatory activity in the chloroform-soluble fraction (CSE, 64% oedema inhibition 50 mg/200μl, ...

  17. Evaluation of acute toxicity and anti-inflammatory effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was further fractionated in sequence to n-hexane (BSH), chloroform (BSC) and methanol (BSM) soluble fractions. Acute toxicity was evaluated by oral administration of plant and hind paw induced-edema method in rats was used for the anti-inflammatory evaluation. Results: The BSE was found safe up to the dose level of ...

  18. Anti-inflammatory Flavonoids Isolated from Passiflora foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Yen; To, Dao Cuong; Tran, Manh Hung; Lee, Joo Sang; Lee, Jeong Hyung; Kim, Jeong Ah; Woo, Mi Hee; Min, Byung Sun

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of the soluble ethyl acetate fraction and chemical components of the stem bark of Passiflora foetida (Passifloraceae). Ten flavonoids (1-10) were isolated by various chromatographic techniques, and their structures were determined based on spectroscopic analyses by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Luteolin (2) and chrysoeriol (3) showed the most potent inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophage cell line, RAW264.7, with half maximal inhibitor concentration (IC50) values of 1.2 and 3.1 μM, respectively. These compounds suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression at the transcription level. Our research indicates that the stem bark of P. foetida has significant anti-inflammatory properties, suggesting that its flavonoids may have anti-inflammatory benefits.

  19. Oral Paracoccidioidomycosis Granulomas are Predominantly Populated by CD163+ Multinucleated Giant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Prado Gomes Pedreira, Renato; de Carli, Marina Lara; Beijo, Luiz Alberto; Nonogaki, Suely; Pereira, Alessandro Antônio Costa; Junior, Noé Vital Ribeiro; Sperandio, Felipe Fornias; Hanemann, João Adolfo Costa

    2016-10-01

    Multinucleated giant cells (MGC) are considered to be a hallmark of granulomatous inflammation; thus, they may play an essential role in the host response against pathogens, particularly Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. This study characterizes the MGC found in oral paracoccidioidomycosis and assesses the correlation of MGC with the amount of fungi within oral tissues. Twenty-six cases were included. They were classified as loose or dense granulomas, and the total MGC, including foreign-body and Langhans giant cells, besides the total and intracellular fungi, were taken into consideration. CD163 immunoexpression was performed, and CD163+ multinucleated giant cells were also quantified. Dense granulomas revealed more foreign-body type and total giant cells than loose granulomas (P paracoccidioidomycosis lesions contain MGC that mainly belong to a CD163+ phenotype, also showing both Langhans and foreign-body arrangements. Additionally, the higher the presence of MGC, the higher the amount of phagocytized fungi.

  20. Replacement of Porcine CD163 Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Domain 5 with a CD163-Like Homolog Confers Resistance of Pigs to Genotype 1 but Not Genotype 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kevin D; Bardot, Rachel; Whitworth, Kristin M; Trible, Benjamin R; Fang, Ying; Mileham, Alan; Kerrigan, Maureen A; Samuel, Melissa S; Prather, Randall S; Rowland, Raymond R R

    2017-01-15

    CD163 knockout (KO) pigs are resistant to infection with genotype 2 (type 2) porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Furthermore, the substitution of CD163 scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain 5 with a homolog of human CD163-like (hCD163L1) SRCR 8 domain confers resistance of transfected HEK cells to type 1 PRRSV. As a means to understand the role of domain 5 in PRRSV infection with both type 1 and type 2 viruses, pigs were genetically modified (GM) to possess one of the following genotypes: complete knockout (KO) of CD163, deletions within SRCR domain 5, or replacement (domain swap) of SRCR domain 5 with a synthesized exon encoding a homolog of hCD163L1 SRCR domain 8. Immunophenotyping of porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) showed that pigs with the KO or SRCR domain 5 deletion did not express CD163. When placed in culture, PAMs from pigs with the CD163 KO phenotype were completely resistant to a panel consisting of six type 1 and nine type 2 isolates. PAMs from pigs that possessed the hCD163L1 domain 8 homolog expressed CD163 and supported the replication of all type 2 isolates, but no type 1 viruses. Infection of CD163-modified pigs with representative type 1 and type 2 viruses confirmed the in vitro results. The results confirm that CD163 is the likely receptor for all PRRS viruses. Even though type 1 and type 2 viruses are considered phenotypically similar at several levels, there is a distinct difference between the viral genotypes in the recognition of CD163. Genetic modification of the CD163 gene creates the opportunity to develop production animals that are resistant to PRRS, the costliest viral disease to ever face the swine industry. The results create further opportunities to develop refinements in the modification of CD163 with the goal of making pigs refractory to infection while retaining important CD163 functions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 functions as an innate immune sensor for bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabriek, Babs O.; van Bruggen, Robin; Deng, Dong Mei; Ligtenberg, Antoon J. M.; Nazmi, Kamran; Schornagel, Karin; Vloet, Rianka P. M.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; van den Berg, Timo K.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane glycoprotein receptor CD163 is a member of the scavenger receptor cystein-rich (SRCR) superfamily class B that is highly expressed on resident tissue macrophages in vivo. Previously, the molecule has been shown to act as a receptor for hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes and to

  2. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 functions as an innate immune sensor for bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabriek, B.O.; van Bruggen, R.; Deng, D.M.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Nazmi, K.; Schornagel, K.; Vloet, R.P.M.; Dijkstra, C.D.; van den Berg, T.K.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane glycoprotein re- ceptor CD163 is a member of the scaven- ger receptor cystein-rich (SRCR) super- family class B that is highly expressed on resident tissue macrophages in vivo. Pre- viously, the molecule has been shown to act as a receptor for hemoglobin- haptoglobin complexes

  3. Evolution of the CD163 family and its relationship to the bovine gamma delta T cell co-receptor WC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin Cynthia L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR domain is an ancient and conserved protein domain. CD163 and WC1 molecules are classed together as group B SRCR superfamily members, along with Spα, CD5 and CD6, all of which are expressed by immune system cells. There are three known types of CD163 molecules in mammals, CD163A (M130, coded for by CD163, CD163b (M160, coded for by CD163L1 and CD163c-α (CD163L1 or SCART, while their nearest relative, WC1, is encoded by a multigene family so far identified in the artiodactyl species of cattle, sheep, and pigs. Results We annotated the bovine genome and identified genes coding for bovine CD163A and CD163c-α but found no evidence for CD163b. Bovine CD163A is widely expressed in immune cells, whereas CD163c-α transcripts are enriched in the WC1+ γδ T cell population. Phylogenetic analyses of the CD163 family genes and WC1 showed that CD163c-α is most closely related to WC1 and that chicken and platypus have WC1 orthologous genes, previously classified as among their CD163 genes. Conclusion Since it has been shown that WC1 plays an important role in the regulation of γδ T cell responses in cattle, which, like chickens, have a high percentage of γδ T cells in their peripheral blood, CD163c-α may play a similar role, especially in species lacking WC1 genes. Our results suggest that gene duplications resulted in the expansion of CD163c-α-like and WC1-like molecules. This expanded repertoire was retained by species known as "γδ T cell high", but homologous SRCR molecules were maintained by all mammals.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor α-converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17) mediates ectodomain shedding of the scavenger receptor CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etzerodt, Anders; Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    CD163 is expressed specifically in the monocyte/macrophage lineage, where it mediates uptake of haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes, leading to metabolism of the oxidative heme molecule. Shedding of the CD163 ectodomain from the cell surface produces a sCD163 plasma protein, and a positive correlation...... to identify TACE/ADAM17 as an enzyme responsible for PMA-induced cleavage of the membrane-proximal region of CD163. As TACE/ADAM17-mediated shedding of TNF-α is up-regulated in macrophages subjected to inflammatory stimuli, the present results now provide a likely explanation for the strong empirical...... relationship between the sCD163 plasma level and infectious/inflammatory diseases relating to macrophage activity....

  5. Tumor necrosis factor α-converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17) mediates ectodomain shedding of the scavenger receptor CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etzerodt, Anders; Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    CD163 is expressed specifically in the monocyte/macrophage lineage, where it mediates uptake of haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes, leading to metabolism of the oxidative heme molecule. Shedding of the CD163 ectodomain from the cell surface produces a sCD163 plasma protein, and a positive correlation...... to identify TACE/ADAM17 as an enzyme responsible for PMA-induced cleavage of the membrane-proximal region of CD163. As TACE/ADAM17-mediated shedding of TNF-alpha is up-regulated in macrophages subjected to inflammatory stimuli, the present results now provide a likely explanation for the strong empirical...... relationship between the sCD163 plasma level and infectious/inflammatory diseases relating to macrophage activity...

  6. Serum levels of TWEAK and scavenger receptor CD163 in type 1 diabetes mellitus: relationship with cardiovascular risk factors. a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Llauradó

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test the usefulness of serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (sTWEAK and soluble scavenger receptor CD163 (sCD163 as markers of subtle inflammation in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM without clinical cardiovascular (CV disease and to evaluate their relationship with arterial stiffness (AS. METHODS: Sixty-eight patients with T1DM and 68 age and sex-matched, healthy subjects were evaluated. Anthropometrical variables and CV risk factors were recorded. Serum concentrations of sTWEAK and sCD163 were measured. AS was assessed by aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV. All statistical analyses were stratified by gender. RESULTS: T1DM patients showed lower serum concentrations of sTWEAK (Men: 1636.5 (1146.3-3754.8 pg/mL vs. 765.9 (650.4-1097.1 pg/mL; p<0.001. Women: 1401.0 (788.0-2422.2 pg/mL vs. 830.1 (562.6-1175.9 pg/mL; p = 0.011 compared with their respective controls. Additionally, T1DM men had higher serum concentrations of sCD163 (285.0 (247.7-357.1 ng/mL vs. 224.8 (193.3-296.5 ng/mL; p = 0.012 compared with their respective controls. sTWEAK correlated negatively with aPWV in men (r = -0.443; p<0.001. However, this association disappeared after adjusting for potential confounders. In men, the best multiple linear regression model showed that the independent predictors of sTWEAK were T1DM and WHR (R(2 = 0.640; p<0.001. In women, T1DM and SBP were the independent predictors for sTWEAK (R(2 = 0.231; p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: sTWEAK is decreased in T1DM patients compared with age and sex-matched healthy subjects after adjusting for classic CV risk factors, although sTWEAK levels may be partially influenced by some of them. Additionally, T1DM men have higher serum concentrations of sCD163. These results point out an association between the inflammatory system and CV risk in T1DM.

  7. Anti-inflammatory and neuropharmacological activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-inflammatory and neuropharmacological activities of Caesalpinia pulcherrima leaves. U Bose, V Bala, AK Shill, AA Rahman. Abstract. The crude methanolic extracts of leaves of Caesalpinia pulcherrima were evaluated for its anti-inflammatory and neuropharmacological activities. When given orally to rats at dose of ...

  8. Anti-inflammatory effects of Zea mays L. husk extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Kyung-Baeg; Kim, Hyoyoung; Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Jung-A; Kim, Mi Ok; Jung, Eunsun; Lee, Jongsung; Park, Deokhoon

    2016-08-19

    Zea mays L. (Z. mays) has been used for human consumption in the various forms of meal, cooking oil, thickener in sauces and puddings, sweetener in processed food and beverage products, bio-disel. However, especially, in case of husk extract of Z. mays, little is known about its anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, in this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of Z. mays husk extract (ZMHE) and its mechanisms of action were investigated. The husks of Z. Mays were harvested in kangwondo, Korea. To assess the anti-inflammatory activities of ZMHE, we examined effects of ZMHE on nitric oxide (NO) production, and release of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and eotaxin-1. The expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene was also determined by Western blot and luciferase reporter assays. To determine its mechanisms of action, a luciferase reporter assay for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) was introduced. ZMHE inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of NO in RAW264.7 cells. In addition, expression of iNOS gene was reduced, as confirmed by Western blot and luciferase reporter assays. Effects of ZMHE on the AP-1 and NF-kB promoters were examined to elucidate the mechanism of its anti-inflammatory activity. Activation of AP-1 and NF-kB promoters induced by LPS was significantly reduced by ZMHE treatment. In addition, LPS-induced production of sICAM-1 and IL-4-induced production of eotaxin-1 were all reduced by ZMHE. Our results indicate that ZMHE has anti-inflammatory effects by downregulating the expression of iNOS gene and its downregulation is mediated by inhibiting NF-kB and AP-1 signaling.

  9. Anti-inflammatory liposomes have no impact on liver regeneration in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman Jepsen, Betina; Jarlhelt Andersen, Kasper; Riegels Knudsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical resection is the gold standard in treatment of hepatic malignancies, giving the patient the best chance to be cured. The liver has a unique capacity to regenerate. However, an inflammatory response occurs during resection, in part mediated by Kupffer cells, that influences...... the speed of regeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a Kupffer cell targeted anti-inflammatory treatment on liver regeneration in rats. Methods: Two sets of animals, each including four groups of eight rats, were included. Paired groups from each set received treatment......; liver tissue was sampled for analysis of regeneration rate and proliferation index. Results: The high dose dexamethasone group had significantly lower body and liver weight than the placebo and anti-CD163-dex groups. There were no differences in liver regeneration rates between groups. Hepatocyte...

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2017-01-01

    . In addition, indirect anti-inflammatory effects of long-term exercise are mediated via improvements in body composition. CONCLUSION: Physical activity represents a natural, strong anti-inflammatory strategy with minor side effects and should be integrated in the management of patients with cardiometabolic......BACKGROUND: Persistent inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). AIMS: The aim of this review was to provide the reader with an update of the mechanisms whereby exercise-induced cytokines may impact...... and IL-10 is provoked by exercise and exerts direct anti-inflammatory effects by an inhibition of TNF-α and by stimulating IL-1ra, thereby limiting IL-1β signalling. Moreover, muscle-derived IL-6 appears to have direct anti-inflammatory effects and serves as a mechanism to improve glucose tolerance...

  11. Prescription Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inflammatory Medicines Share Print Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are medicines you can take for pain relief. ... well. Path to improved health How do prescription NSAIDs work? NSAIDs stop a certain kind of enzyme ...

  12. Anti-inflammatory activity in selected Antarctic benthic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eMoles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic benthos was prospected in search for anti-inflammatory activity in polar benthic invertebrates, in two different geographical areas: deep-bottoms of the Eastern Weddell Sea and shallow-waters of the South Shetland Islands. A total of 36 benthic algae and invertebrate species were selected to perform solubility tests in order to test them for anti-inflammatory activity. From these, ethanol extracts of ten species from five different phyla resulted suitable to be studied in cell macrophage cultures (RAW 264.7. Cytotoxicity (MTT method and production of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, interleukin-1 were determined at three extract concentrations (50, 125, 250 g/mL. Bioassays resulted in four different species showing anti-inflammatory activity corresponding to three sponges: Mycale (Oxymycale acerata, Isodictya erinacea, and I. toxophila; and one hemichordate: Cephalodiscus sp. These results show that Antarctic sessile invertebrates may have great value as a source of lead compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications.

  13. Repeated Excessive Exercise Attenuates the Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Exercise in Older Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronni E. Sahl

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Purpose: A number of studies have investigated the effect of training with a moderate exercise dose (3–6 h/weekly on the inflammatory profile in blood, and the data are inconsistent. Cross-sectional studies indicate a positive effect of physical activity level on inflammation levels and risk of metabolic disease. However, it is not clear whether this may be dose dependent and if very prolonged repeated exercise therefore may be beneficial for low-grade inflammation. Based on this we studied how excessive repeated prolonged exercise influenced low-grade inflammation and adipose tissue anti-inflammatory macrophage content in six older male recreationally trained cyclists. Low-grade inflammation and adipose tissue macrophage content were investigated in six older trained men (age: 61 ± 4 years; VO2peak: 48 ± 2 mL kg−1 min−1 following repeated prolonged exercise.Methods: Cycling was performed daily for 14 days covering in total 2,706 km (1,681 miles. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2peak was measured before and after the cycling. Duration and intensity of the exercise were determined from heart rates sampled during cycling. An adipose tissue biopsy from subcutaneous abdominal fat and a blood sample were obtained at rest in the overnight fasted state before and after the cycling. Anti-inflammatory adipose tissue macrophages (ATM were immunohistochemically stained in cross sectional sections using a CD163 binding antibody. The ATM and adipocyte sizes were analyzed blindly.Results: The cyclists exercised daily for 10 h and 31 ± 37 min and average intensity was 53 ± 1% of VO2peak. Body weight remained unchanged and VO2peak decreased by 6 ± 2% (P = 0.04. Plasma inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-18 remained unchanged, as did hsCRP, but plasma IL-6 increased significantly. CD163 macrophage content remained unchanged, as did adipocyte cell size. The HbA1c was not significantly decreased, but there was a trend (P < 0.07 toward an

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Iridoids of Botanical Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective anti-inflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo. PMID:22414102

  15. CD163 and CD206 expression does not correlate with tolerance and cytokine production in LPS-tolerant human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Januzzi, Amanda Barba; Brunialti, Milena Karina Colo; Salomao, Reinaldo

    2017-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-tolerant monocytes produce small amounts of inflammatory cytokines, which is one of the characteristics of the alternative activated macrophages (AAM). These cells exhibited an increased expression of CD206 and CD163. Given the functional similarities of AAMs with the modulation of monocytes' functions observed during sepsis and LPS-tolerance, we evaluated whether the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production by LPS-tolerant monocytes is associated with the phenotype of cells expressing CD206 and CD163. We investigated whether tolerant human monocytes would modulate their expression of CD206 and CD163, markers of alternative activation, and whether the level of their expression would be related to cytokines detection. Tolerance to LPS was induced in peripheral blood mononuclear cell by pre-incubating the cells with increasing concentrations of LPS. The expression of CD206 and CD163 and intracellular TNF-α and IL-6 was determined 24 h after LPS challenge by flow cytometry. No differences in CD163 expression were observed between tolerant and non-tolerant cells, while the expression of CD206, which was decreased following LPS stimulation in non-tolerized cells, was further reduced in tolerant cells. Decreased production of inflammatory cytokines was observed in the tolerized cells, regardless of the expression of CD163 and CD206, with the exception of IL-6 in CD206+ monocytes, which was similarly expressed in both tolerized and non-tolerized cells. The effect of LPS in the expression of CD163 and CD206 on monocytes is not reverted in LPS tolerant cells, and the inhibition of inflammatory cytokines in tolerant cells is not related with modulation of these receptors. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  16. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubin, Nicholas J; Monaghan, Sean F; Ayala, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, it has become well accepted that sepsis exhibits two, oftentimes concomitant, inflammatory stages; a pro-inflammatory phase, referred to as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and an anti-inflammatory phase, called the compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS). Considering that therapeutic interventions designed to attenuate the pro-inflammatory septic response have generally failed, much recent research has gone into understanding how and why septic patients display immunosuppressive characteristics, what the significance of septic immunosuppression may be and if there exists any therapeutic targets within the CARS. Herein, we describe the potential mechanisms of the immunosuppressive/CARS phase of sepsis by discussing what anti-inflammatory agents, receptors and cell populations are currently believed to contribute to CARS. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The New Role of CD163 in the Differentiation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Vascular Endothelial-Like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs can differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (VECs. It is regarded as an important solution to cure many diseases, such as ischemic diseases and diabetes. However, the mechanisms underlying BMSC differentiation into VECs are not well understood. Recent reports showed that CD163 expression was associated with angiogenesis. In this study, overexpression of CD163 in BMSCs elevated the protein level of the endothelial-associated markers CD31, Flk-1, eNOS, and VE-cadherin, significantly increased the proportion of Alexa Fluor 488-acetylated-LDL-positive VECs, and promoted angiogenesis on Matrigel. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CD163 acted downstream homeobox containing 1 (Hmbox1 and upstream fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2. These data suggested that CD163 was involved in Hmbox1/CD163/FGF-2 signal pathway in BMSC differentiation into vascular endothelial-like cells. We found a new signal pathway and a novel target for further investigating the gene control of BMSC differentiation into a VEC lineage.

  18. Tomato leaves methanol extract possesses anti- inflammatory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2011-12-16

    Dec 16, 2011 ... demonstrated, the anti-inflammatory effect of tomato leaves and its associated molecular mechanisms have not yet been fully investigated. ... This mechanism is an immunological response following bacterial infection and is ... inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that are mainly used in the treatment of pain and ...

  19. Chemical Characterization, Anti inflammatory and Analgesic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical Characterization, Anti inflammatory and Analgesic Properties of Jatropha Multifida Root Bark. ... Phytochemical investigations reveal the presence of alkaloids, tannins, glycosides, saponins and flavonoids. The extract at a dose of 400 mg/kg significantly (P < 0.01) reduced paw thickness in rat compared to control.

  20. Anti-inflammatory responses of resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Samarjit; Das, Dipak K

    2007-09-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a natural polyphenolic, non-flavonoid antioxidant, is a phytoalexin found in many plants including grapes, nuts and berries. Recent studies have documented that resveratrol has various health benefits, such as cardiovascular and cancer preventive properties. However, the experimental basis for such health benefit is not fully understood. One of the possible mechanisms for its protective activities is by down regulation of the inflammatory responses. That includes the inhibition of synthesis and release of pro-inflammatory mediators, modifications of eicosanoid synthesis, inhibition of some activated immune cells, or inhibiting the enzymes, such as cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which are responsible for the synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators through the inhibitory effect of resveratrol on transcription factors like nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) or activator protein-1 (AP-1). Being a phenolic compound, resveratrol certainly possesses a low bioavailability and most importantly, a rapid clearance from the plasma. Recent growing interest in varying protective nature of resveratrol may clinically also hold a respectable position as a better alternative for anti-inflammatory drugs. The purpose of this review is to provide evidence that resveratrol exhibits potent anti-inflammatory activity and also to explain the underling mechanism for both resveratrol- induced cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory properties. While it is true that the cardioprotective properties of resveratrol are likely attributable, at least in part, to its anti-inflammatory properties, the mechanisms discussed address foremost mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory activity which, in turn, is responsible for cardioprotection.

  1. Natural products and anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Gaofeng; Wahlqvist, Mark L; He, Guoqing; Yang, Min; Li, Duo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review paper was to summarise some commonly available natural products and their anti-inflammatory activity. We have collected data from MEDLINE, Current Contents and scientific journals, which included 92 publications. There are numerous natural products detailed in this literature; however we have summarized a few of the most commonly available and potent ones. In this paper, the natural products with anti-inflammatory activity including curcumin, parthenolide, cucurbitacins, 1,8-cineole, pseudopterosins, lyprinol, bromelain, flavonoids, saponins, marine sponge natural products and Boswellia serrata gum resin were reviewed. Natural products play a significant role in human health in relation to the prevention and treatment of inflammatory conditions. Further studies are being conducted to investigate the mechanism of action, metabolism, safety and long term side effect of these natural products, as well as interactions between these natural products with food and drug components.

  2. CD163+ Tumor-Associated Macrophages Correlated with Poor Prognosis and Cancer Stem Cells in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Fei He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs play an important role in the progression and prognostication of numerous cancers. However, the role and clinical significance of TAM markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC has not been elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate the correlation between the expression of TAM markers and pathological features in OSCC by tissue microarray. Tissue microarrays containing 16 normal oral mucosa, 6 oral epithelial dysplasia, and 43 OSCC specimens were studied by immunohistochemistry. We observed that the protein expression of the TAM markers CD68 and CD163 as well as the cancer stem cell (CSC markers ALDH1, CD44, and SOX2 increased successively from the normal oral mucosa to OSCC. The expressions of CD68 and CD163 were significantly associated with lymph node status, and SOX2 was significantly correlated with pathological grade and lymph node status, whereas ALDH1 was correlated with tumor stage. Furthermore, CD68 was significantly correlated with CD163, SOX2, and ALDH1 (P<0.05. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that OSCC patients overexpressing CD163 had significantly worse overall survival (P<0.05. TAM markers are associated with cancer stem cell marker and OSCC overall survival, suggesting their potential prognostic value in OSCC.

  3. Distribution of CD163-positive cell and MHC class II-positive cell in the normal equine uveal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Yuto; Matsuda, Kazuya; Okamoto, Minoru; Takehana, Kazushige; Hirayama, Kazuko; Taniyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the uveal tract participate in ocular immunity including immune homeostasis and the pathogenesis of uveitis. In horses, although uveitis is the most common ocular disorder, little is known about ocular immunity, such as the distribution of APCs. In this study, we investigated the distribution of CD163-positive and MHC II-positive cells in the normal equine uveal tract using an immunofluorescence technique. Eleven eyes from 10 Thoroughbred horses aged 1 to 24 years old were used. Indirect immunofluorescence was performed using the primary antibodies CD163, MHC class II (MHC II) and CD20. To demonstrate the site of their greatest distribution, positive cells were manually counted in 3 different parts of the uveal tract (ciliary body, iris and choroid), and their average number was assessed by statistical analysis. The distribution of pleomorphic CD163- and MHC II-expressed cells was detected throughout the equine uveal tract, but no CD20-expressed cells were detected. The statistical analysis demonstrated the distribution of CD163- and MHC II-positive cells focusing on the ciliary body. These results demonstrated that the ciliary body is the largest site of their distribution in the normal equine uveal tract, and the ciliary body is considered to play important roles in uveal and/or ocular immune homeostasis. The data provided in this study will help further understanding of equine ocular immunity in the normal state and might be beneficial for understanding of mechanisms of ocular disorders, such as equine uveitis.

  4. Anti inflammatory effects of statin in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Nasef Abdelsalam Rezk; Ahmad Elewa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Statins are now becoming recognized as powerful antiinflammatory agents that exert beneficial effects beyond low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction [1]. COPD patients receiving statins obtain a benefit from these therapeutic agents. Clearly, the best medical evidence for the association of statins with improved outcomes for COPD patients [2]. We aimed in this study to assess anti inflammatory effects of statin in COPD patients. Patients and methods: We studied 28...

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Allium ursinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Elena PÂRVU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate Allium ursinum leaves and flowers extract anti-inflammatory effect. Plant extract 1:1 (w:v was prepared from A. ursinum leaves by a modified Squibb repercolation method. The in vivo anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated on a rat turpentine oil-induced inflammation (i.m. 6 mL/kg BW. The animals were randomly assigned to nine groups (n=8: negative control, inflammation, A. ursinum flower extract (AUF, A. ursinum leaves extract (AUL, indomethacin (INDO (20 mg/kg BW, aminoguanidine (AG (50 mg/kg b.w./d i.p. as a selective NOS2 inhibitor, NG-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (NAME (5 mg/kg b.w./d i.p. as a nonselective NOS inhibitor, L-arginine (ARG (100 mg/kg b.w./d i.p., NO synthesis substrate, and Trolox (20 mg/kg b.w./d i.p as an antioxidant. At 24h from inflammation induction total oxidative status (TOS, oxidative stress index (OSI, nitric oxide (NOx and in vitro phagocytosis test were reduced and the total antioxidative reactivity (TAR was increased by the testes plant extracts. AUF had a better inhibitory effect than AUL. In conclusion, we provided evidence for the hypothesis that A. ursinum leaves and flowers extract exerts anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the phagocytosis through the reduction of the nitro-oxidative stress.

  6. Tumor-associated macrophages in oral premalignant lesions coexpress CD163 and STAT1 in a Th1-dominated microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kazumasa; Haraguchi, Shigeki; Hiori, Miki; Shimada, Jun; Ohmori, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are implicated in the growth, invasion and metastasis of various solid tumors. However, the phenotype of TAMs in premalignant lesions of solid tumors has not been clarified. In the present study, we identify the phenotype of TAMs in leukoplakia, an oral premalignant lesion, by immunohistochemical analysis and investigate the involvement of infiltrated T cells that participate in the polarization of TAMs. The subjects included 30 patients with oral leukoplakia and 10 individuals with normal mucosa. Hematoxylin and eosin slides were examined for the histological grades, and immunohistochemical analysis was carried out using antibodies against CD68 (pan-MΦ), CD80 (M1 MΦ), CD163 (M2 MΦ), CD4 (helper T cells: Th), CD8 (cytotoxic T cells), CXCR3, CCR5 (Th1), CCR4 (Th2), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1), phosphorylated STAT1 (pSTAT1) and chemokine CXCL9. The differences in the numbers of positively stained cells among the different histological grades were tested for statistical significance using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Correlations between different types of immune cells were determined using Spearman’s rank analysis. An increase in the rate of CD163 + TAM infiltration was observed in mild and moderate epithelial dysplasia, which positively correlated with the rate of intraepithelial CD4 + Th cell infiltration. Although CCR4 + cells rarely infiltrated, CXCR3 + and CCR5 + cells were observed in these lesions. Cells positive for STAT1 and chemokine CXCL9, interferon- (IFN)-induced gene products, and pSTAT1 were also observed in the same lesions. Double immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the cells that were positive for CD163 were also positive for STAT1. CD163 + TAMs in oral premalignant lesions coexpress CD163 and STAT1, suggesting that the TAMs in oral premalignant lesions possess an M1 phenotype in a Th1-dominated micromilieu

  7. Circulating macrophage activation markers, CD163 and CD206, are associated with disease severity and treatment response in patients with autoimmune hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Henning; Kazankov, Konstantin; Jessen, Niels

    Circulating macrophage activation markers, CD163 and CD206, are associated with disease severity and treatment response in patients with autoimmune hepatitis......Circulating macrophage activation markers, CD163 and CD206, are associated with disease severity and treatment response in patients with autoimmune hepatitis...

  8. Genetically edited pigs lacking CD163 show no resistance following infection with the African swine fever virus isolate, Georgia 2007/1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Luca; Gaudreault, Natasha N; Whitworth, Kristen M; Murgia, Maria V; Nietfeld, Jerome C; Mileham, Alan; Samuel, Melissa; Wells, Kevin D; Prather, Randall S; Rowland, Raymond R R

    2017-01-15

    African swine fever is a highly contagious, often fatal disease of swine for which there is no vaccine or other curative treatment. The macrophage marker, CD163, is a putative receptor for African swine fever virus (ASFV). Pigs possessing a complete knockout of CD163 on macrophages were inoculated with Georgia 2007/1, a genotype 2 isolate. Knockout and wild type pen mates became infected and showed no differences in clinical signs, mortality, pathology or viremia. There was also no difference following in vitro infection of macrophages. The results do not rule out the possibility that other ASFV strains utilize CD163, but demonstrate that CD163 is not necessary for infection with the Georgia 2007/1 isolate. This work rules out a significant role for CD163 in ASFV infection and creates opportunities to focus on alternative receptors and entry mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anti-inflammatory Nanomedicine for Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Katsuki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease, in the development of which inflammation mediated by innate immune cells plays a critical role, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins are a widely used lipid-lowering drug that has lipid-independent vasculoprotective effects, such as improvement of endothelial dysfunction, antioxidant properties, and inhibitory effects on inflammation. Despite recent advances in lipid-lowering therapy, clinical trials of statins suggest that anti-inflammatory therapy beyond lipid-lowering therapy is indispensible to further reduce cardiovascular events. One possible therapeutic option to the residual risk is to directly intervene in the inflammatory process by utilizing a nanotechnology-based drug delivery system (nano-DDS. Various nano-sized materials are currently developed as DDS, including micelles, liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, and metallic nanoparticles. The application of nano-DDS to coronary artery disease is a feasible strategy since the inflammatory milieu enhances incorporation of nano-sized materials into mononuclear phagocytic system and permeability of target lesions, which confers nano-DDS on “passive-targeting” property. Recently, we have developed a polymeric nanoparticle-incorporating statin to maximize its anti-inflammatory property. This statin nanoparticle has been tested in various disease models, including plaque destabilization and rupture, myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, and ventricular remodeling after acute myocardial infarction, and its clinical application is in progress. In this review, we present current development of DDS and future perspective on the application of anti-inflammatory nanomedicine to treat life-threatening cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of Lippia dulcis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, S; Meckes, M; Pérez, C; Susunaga, A; Zavala, M A

    2005-10-31

    Lippia dulcis hexane and ethanol extracts were tested for its anti-inflammatory activity in several animal models. Hexane extract showed to be inactive, but the ethanol extract at doses of 400 mg/kg produced significant inhibition of carrageenan-induced paw oedema and reduced the weight of cotton pellet-induced granuloma, moreover, the topical application of 0.5 mg/ear of this extract inhibited the edema induced with TPA by 49.13%, an effect which is of less intensity than that produced by indomethacine at the same dose.

  11. Erdosteine: antitussive and anti-inflammatory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Negro, Roberto W

    2008-01-01

    Erdosteine is a multifactorial drug currently used in COPD for its rheologic activity on bronchial secretions and its positive effects on bacterial adhesiveness. Erdosteine produces an active metabolite (Met 1) which was shown to produce antioxidant effects during the respiratory burst of human PMNs, due to the presence of an SH group. The substantial antitussive effects of erdosteine were first documented in clinical trials even though mucolytic agents are regarded as not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Actually, a mucolytic drug could exert antitussive effects if it also affects mucus consistency and enhances ciliary function. In the last decade, data from several studies on animal models pointed to the possible antitussive and anti-inflammatory properties of erdosteine and an indirect anti-inflammatory mechanism of action was suggested. Recently, data from some controlled versus placebo studies documented the antioxidant properties of erdosteine in humans and in current smokers with COPD. The mechanism of action was described as related to erdosteine's ability to inhibit some inflammatory mediators and some pro-inflammatory cytokines that are specifically involved in oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is also presumed to impair beta-adrenoceptor function and contribute to airway obstruction, specific controlled studies recently investigated the effect of antioxidant intervention on short-term airway response to salbutamol in nonreversible COPD, according to a double-blind design versus placebo and NAC. Only erdosteine consistently restored a significant short-term reversibility in COPD subjects, previously unresponsive to beta(2) adrenergics. This peculiar activity of erdosteine (to our knowledge never previously assessed) proved related to the ROS scavenging activity (which actually proved equal to that of N), and its significant inhibiting effect on

  12. Novel anti-inflammatory agents in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loukides, Stelios; Bartziokas, Konstantinos; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays a central role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD related inflammation is less responsive to inhaled steroids compared to asthma. There are three major novel anti-inflammatory approaches to the management of COPD. The first approach is phosphodiesterase...... on these strategies exist at the moment. A third potential approach involves novel agents whose mechanism of action is closely related to COPD mechanisms and pathophysiology. Such novel treatments are of great interest since they may treat both COPD and co-morbidities. Several novel agents are currently under...

  13. Improved dissolution and anti-inflammatory effect of ibuprofen by solid dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liyuan; Dang, Qifeng; Liu, Chengsheng; Chen, Jun; Song, Lei; Chen, Xiguang

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the dissolution rate and anti-inflammatory effect of ibuprofen by a solid dispersion (SD) method. Initial screening was developed based on drug solubility in carriers in the liquid state to select a suitable water-soluble carrier system for the preparation of SDs. The dissolution of ibuprofen in urea was higher than in PEG4000 or mannitol. Thus, urea was selected as the carrier for the preparation of SDs. SDs were characterized in terms of dissolution, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Solid dispersion-based (SDBT) and conventional (CT) tablets were prepared by the wet granulation method. The anti-inflammatory effect of SDBT was evaluated using the mouse ear edema test with xylene. In vitro release results indicated that the ibuprofen dissolution rate was improved by the SD. SD characterization results suggested that ibuprofen partly precipitates in crystalline and amorphous forms after SD preparation and that ibuprofen and urea do not interact. SDBT displayed more significant anti-inflammatory effects than CT. The dissolution rate and anti-inflammatory effect of ibuprofen were significantly enhanced by the ibuprofen-urea SD.

  14. Impaired CD163-mediated hemoglobin-scavenging and severe toxic symptoms in patients treated with gemtuzumab ozogamicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, M.B.; Hasle, H.; Friis-Hansen, L.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a novel syndrome of severe toxic symptoms during intravascular hemolysis due to impaired hemoglobin scavenging in 2 children with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing CD33-directed therapy with the immunotoxin gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO). A simultaneous high plasma hemoglobin, haptoglobin...... and macrophages from liver, spleen, and bone marrow coexpress CD33, thus suggesting that the GO-induced cellular cytotoxicity of CD33 positive cells eradicates a significant part of the CD163 positive monocytes and macrophages. The risk of severe toxic symptoms from plasma hemoglobin should be considered after CD......33-targeted chemotherapy when the disease is complicated by a pathologic intravascular hemolysis. Furthermore, the cases provide further circumstantial evidence of a key role of (CD163-expressing) monocytes/macrophages in plasma hemoglobin clearance in vivo Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/15...

  15. Anti-inflammatory potential of silk sericin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Towiwat, Pasarapa; Srichana, Teerapol

    2013-04-01

    Silk sericin was found to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are related to the inflammatory reaction. The objectives of this study were to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of sericin in vivo using the carrageenan-induced rat edema model and changes in the histology of tissues. The effects of sericin on the expression of COX-2 and iNOS were also evaluated. Sericin solutions at 0.004-0.080 mg/mL were applied topically to the top of the hind paw and carrageenan (1.0 mg) was injected subcutaneously to the plantar surface of the right hind paw. Our results indicated that sericin significantly reduced the inflammation in rats' paw compared with the negative control (water and acetone) and its effect at 0.080 mg/mL was only slightly lower than that of 1.0% w/v indomethacin. Similar numbers of polymorphonuclear and macrophage cells were found in rats' tissue treated with indomethacin and sericin solution, while the numbers were significantly higher in their absence. The gene expression results by RT-PCR showed that the COX-2 and iNOS genes were down-regulated in samples treated with sericin in a dose dependent manner. These data indicated that the anti-inflammatory properties of sericin may be partly attributable to the suppression of the COX-2 enzyme and nitric oxide production.

  16. Tumor-promoting macrophages induce the expression of the macrophage-specific receptor CD163 in malignant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Etzerodt, Anders; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm

    2012-01-01

    .017, and aggressive (grade III/IV) cancers (p = 0.015). The expression strongly correlated with local expression of IL-6 (r = 0.72; p ... by a significant portion of the malignant cells in both tumors and lymph nodes. CD163 expressing tumor cells may constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells with a phenotypic shift associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and increased metastatic activity induced by TAMs....

  17. Medicinal herbs as possible sources of anti-inflammatory products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Corciovă

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants constitute an inexhaustible source of bioactive compounds that can be valuable for research in the chemistry field of anti-inflammatory compounds. This review describes several plants from international and national flora that have been shown to have anti-inflammatory activity in various clinical trials. The paper includes: general aspects regarding the vegetal source, compounds responsible for anti-inflammatory activity, mechanism of action and clinical trials carried out with extracts or products containing standardized extracts.

  18. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities: Chemical constituents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities: Chemical constituents of essential oils of Ocimum gratissimum , Eucalyptus citriodora and Cymbopogon giganteus inhibited lipoxygenase L-1 and cyclooxygenase of PGHS.

  19. Anti-inflammatory and bronchodilatory constituents of leaf extracts of Anacardium occidentale L. in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awakan, Oluwakemi Josephine; Malomo, Sylvia Omonirume; Adejare, Abdullahi Adeyinka; Igunnu, Adedoyin; Atolani, Olubunmi; Adebayo, Abiodun Humphrey; Owoyele, Bamidele Victor

    2018-01-01

    Anacardium occidentale L. leaf is useful in the treatment of inflammation and asthma, but the bioactive constituents responsible for these activities have not been characterized. Therefore, this study was aimed at identifying the bioactive constituent(s) of A. occidentale ethanolic leaf extract (AOEL) and its solvent-soluble portions, and evaluating their effects on histamine-induced paw edema and bronchoconstriction. The bronchodilatory effect was determined by measuring the percentage protection provided by plant extracts in the histamine-induced bronchoconstriction model in guinea pigs. The anti-inflammatory effect of the extracts on histamine-induced paw edema in rats was determined by measuring the increase in paw diameter, after which the percent edema inhibition was calculated. The extracts were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify the bioactive constituents. Column chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used respectively to isolate and characterize the constituents. The bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory activities of the isolated bioactive constituent were evaluated. Histamine induced bronchoconstriction in the guinea pigs and edema in the rat paw. AOEL, hexane-soluble portion of AOEL, ethyl acetate-soluble portion of AOEL, and chloroform-soluble portion of AOEL significantly increased bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory activities (P occidentale leaf, and can therefore be employed in the management of bronchoconstriction and inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Shanghai Changhai Hospital. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Ghasemian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil’s claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle.

  1. Reduced sTWEAK and increased sCD163 levels in HIV-infected patients: modulation by antiretroviral treatment, HIV replication and HCV co-infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M Beltrán

    Full Text Available Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease due to increased inflammation and persistent immune activation. CD163 is a macrophage scavenger receptor that is involved in monocyte-macrophage activation in HIV-infected patients. CD163 interacts with TWEAK, a member of the TNF superfamily. Circulating levels of sTWEAK and sCD163 have been previously associated with cardiovascular disease, but no previous studies have fully analyzed their association with HIV.The aim of this study was to analyze circulating levels of sTWEAK and sCD163 as well as other known markers of inflammation (hsCRP, IL-6 and sTNFRII and endothelial dysfunction (sVCAM-1 and ADMA in 26 patients with HIV before and after 48 weeks of antiretroviral treatment (ART and 23 healthy subjects.Patients with HIV had reduced sTWEAK levels and increased sCD163, sVCAM-1, ADMA, hsCRP, IL-6 and sTNFRII plasma concentrations, as well as increased sCD163/sTWEAK ratio, compared with healthy subjects. Antiretroviral treatment significantly reduced the concentrations of sCD163, sVCAM-1, hsCRP and sTNFRII, although they remained elevated when compared with healthy subjects. Antiretroviral treatment had no effect on the concentrations of ADMA and sTWEAK, biomarkers associated with endothelial function. The use of protease inhibitors as part of antiretroviral therapy and the presence of HCV-HIV co-infection and/or active HIV replication attenuated the ART-mediated decrease in sCD163 plasma concentrations.HIV-infected patients showed a proatherogenic profile characterized by increased inflammatory, immune-activation and endothelial-dysfunction biomarkers that partially improved after ART. HCV-HIV co-infection and/or active HIV replication enhanced immune activation despite ART.

  2. Neutrophil and Monocyte CD64 and CD163 Expression in Critically Ill Neonates and Children with Sepsis: Comparison of Fluorescence Intensities and Calculated Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Groselj-Grenc

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the expression of CD64 and CD163 on neutrophils and monocytes in SIRS with/without sepsis and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of CD64 and CD163 molecules expression determined as (1 mean fluorescence intensities (MFI of CD64 and CD163; and (2 the ratio (index of linearized MFI to the fluorescence signal of standardized beads. Patients and methods. Fifty-six critically ill neonates and children with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS and suspected sepsis, classified into two groups: SIRS with sepsis (n=29 and SIRS without sepsis (n=27. Results. CD64 and CD163 MFI measured on neutrophils and monocytes were elevated in patients with SIRS with sepsis. Diagnostic accuracy of indexes was equal to diagnostic accuracy of MFI for CD64 on neutrophils (0.833 versus 0.854 for day 0 and 0.975 versus 0.983 for day 1 and monocytes (0.811 versus 0.865 for day 0 and 0.825 versus 0.858 for day 1, and CD163 on neutrophils (0.595 versus 0.655 for day 0 and 0.677 versus 0.750 for day 1, but not for CD163 on monocytes. Conclusion. CD64 MFI, CD163 MFI, CD64 indexes for neutrophils and monocytes, and CD163 index for neutrophils can all be used for discrimination of SIRS and sepsis in critically ill neonates and children. CD64 index for neutrophils, however, is superior to all other markers.

  3. Bioassay guided isolation and identification of anti-inflammatory and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study describes the anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity and lipophilic profile with acute toxicological studies of Urtica dioica. Successive extraction of the leaves with organic solvents of increasing polarity and their screening for anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activity was assessed. Hexane extract ...

  4. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of Cyphostemma vogelii (Hook

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rita

    2013-04-24

    Apr 24, 2013 ... Key words: Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, mice, Cyphostemma vogelii, nociception. ... steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are considered the drugs of ..... 44-55. Hughes H, Lang M (1983). Control of pain in dogs and cats In: Kitchell. R, Erickson H (eds.) Animal pain. Baltimore Waverly press. pp. 207-.

  5. Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Activities of Methanol Extracts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Activities of Methanol Extracts and Alkaloid Fractions of four Mexican Medicinal Plants of Solanaceae. ... equivalents/g of extract), the best antioxidant activity (94.80% inhibition of DPPH and 97.57% of ABTS) and the highest anti-inflammatory activity (81.93% inhibition of the inflammation).

  6. Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of Amorphophallus bulbifer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the Amorphophallus Bulbifer in Wistar rats and mice. Methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of the hydroalcohol extract of A. bulbifer whole plant at dose levels of 100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. in rats was determined with a plethysmograph paw volume ...

  7. Evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to investigate the leaf part of the plant for analgesic and anti-inflammatory. The ethanol extract of Ficus iteophylla leaves (100, 200, and 400mgkg-1, i.p) was evaluated for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. The analgesic effect was studied using acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction ...

  8. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity of Liquidambar formosana Hance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of Liquidambar formosana Hance infructescence (Liquidambaris fructus, ELF) in vivo, and clarify its underlying mechanisms. Methods: The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of ELF was examined by xylene-induced ear swelling test in mice as well as carrageenan-induced ...

  9. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of Crinum asiaticum leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of Crinum asiaticum (Amaryllidaceae) leaf ethanolic extract. Analgesic effect was investigated in acetic acid induced writhing model and formalin induced licking model in swiss albino mice. Anti-inflammatory effect was conducted in carrageenan-induced ...

  10. Anti-inflammatory studies of yam (Dioscorea esculenta) extract on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... Anti-inflammatory studies of yam (Dioscorea esculenta) extract on wistar rats. J. O. Olayemi and E. O. Ajaiyeoba*. Department of Pharmacognosy, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. Accepted 4 July, 2007. The defatted methanol extract of Dioscorea esculenta tuber was evaluated for anti-inflammatory.

  11. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the possible anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects of ethanolic extract of Pedalium murex Linn. fruits in selected experimental animal models. Anti-inflammatory activity of Pedalium murex Linn., with doses of 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg, p.o., was evaluated by Lambda-carrageenan ...

  12. Investigation of the anti-inflammatory and anti- nociceptive activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-06-15

    Jun 15, 2009 ... (1998) Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Sambucus ebulus rhizome extract in rats. J. Ethnopharmacol. 61: 229-235. Barros IMC, Lopes LDG, Borges MOR, Borges ACR, Ribeiro MNS,. Freire SMF (2006). Anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of Pluchea quitic (D.C) ethanolic extract.

  13. Synthesis and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Some Novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Some Novel Trisubstituted Thiophene Analogues. ... Ethiopian Pharmaceutical Journal ... analogues (IVa-IVf) were designed, synthesized, characterized and evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenin-induced rat hind paw oedema model at 10 mg/kg dose.

  14. The effects of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a complication of excessive anticoagulation.2. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including aspirin. The NSAIDs produce their effects through a blockade of the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins by COX. Corticosteroids reduce the availability of arachidonic acid, contributing to the anti-inflammatory activity ...

  15. Assessment of anti-inflammatory potential of Sesbania bispinosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim and objectives: Leaf extracts and fractions of S. bispinosa were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity in mice using acute and chronic anti-inflammatory models with aspirin as a reference drug. Materials and methods: Methanol, chloroform and hexane were used to prepare leaf extracts by soxhlet extraction method, ...

  16. Evaluation Of Analgesic And Anti-Inflammatory Activity Of Diospyros ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation Of Analgesic And Anti-Inflammatory Activity Of Diospyros Cordifolia Extract. S Das, PK Haldar, G Pramanik, SP Panda, S Bera. Abstract. In this study we evaluated the analgesic and anti- inflammatory activities of the methanol extract of stem bark of Diospyros cordifolia (MEDC) Roxb. The analgesic effects of the ...

  17. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Saurabh; Cabot, Peter J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2016-07-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked with the generation and progression of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes and atherosclerosis, and anti-inflammatory drugs therefore have the potential to assist in the treatment of these conditions. Carica papaya is a tropical plant that is traditionally used in the treatment of various ailments including inflammatory conditions. A literature search was conducted by using the keywords "papaya", "anti-inflammatory and inflammation" and "immunomodulation and immune" along with cross-referencing. Both in vitro and in vivo investigation studies were included. This is a review of all studies published since 2000 on the anti-inflammatory activity of papaya extracts and their effects on various immune-inflammatory mediators. Studies on the anti-inflammatory activities of recognized phytochemicals present in papaya are also included. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that papaya extracts and papaya-associated phytochemicals possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, clinical studies are lacking.

  18. Anti-inflammatory activity of Taraxacum officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hye-Jin; Kang, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Hyun-Joo; Kang, Young-Sook; Lim, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Myeong; Park, Eun-Hee

    2008-01-04

    Taraxacum officinale has been widely used as a folkloric medicine for the treatment of diverse diseases. The dried plant was extracted with 70% ethanol to generate its ethanol extract (TEE). For some experiments, ethyl acetate (EA), n-butanol (BuOH) and aqueous (Aq) fractions were prepared in succession from TEE. TEE showed a scavenging activity in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, a diminishing effect on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, and an anti-angiogenic activity in the chicken chorioallantoic (CAM) assay. In the carrageenan-induced air pouch model, TEE inhibited production of exudate, and significantly diminished nitric oxide (NO) and leukocyte levels in the exudate. It also possessed an inhibitory effect on acetic acid-induced vascular permeability and caused a dose-dependent inhibition on acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing in mice. Suppressive effects of TEE on the production of NO and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages were also assessed. Among the fractions, the n-butanol fraction (BuOH) was identified to be most effective in the CAM assay. Collectively, Taraxacum officinale contains anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities through its inhibition of NO production and COX-2 expression and/or its antioxidative activity.

  19. Compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Conquy, Minou; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    The concept of 'Compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome' (CARS) was proposed in 1997 by Roger Bone (1941-1997) to qualify the consequences of the counter-regulatory mechanisms initiated to limit the overzealous inflammatory process in patients with infectious (sepsis) or non-infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). One major consequence of CARS is the modification of the immune status that could favour the enhanced susceptibility of intensive care patients to nosocomial infections. Indeed, most animal 'two-hit' models illustrate an enhanced sensitivity to infection after a first insult. However, this observation is highly dependent on the experimental procedure. Numerous functions of circulating leukocytes are altered in sepsis and SIRS patients, as well as in animal models of sepsis or SIRS. However, this is rather a reprogramming of circulating leukocytes, since there is not a global defect of the immune cells functions. Furthermore, within tissues, leukocytes are rather primed or activated than immunosuppressed. Thus, CARS may be considered as an adapted compartmentalized response with the aim to silence some acute proinflammatory genes, and to maintain the possible expression of certain genes involved in the anti-infectious process.

  20. Anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids: changing concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Robert

    2014-02-05

    Despite being the most effective anti-inflammatory treatment for chronic inflammatory diseases, the mechanisms by which glucocorticoids (corticosteroids) effect repression of inflammatory gene expression remain incompletely understood. Direct interaction of the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) with inflammatory transcription factors to repress transcriptional activity, i.e. transrepression, represents one mechanism of action. However, transcriptional activation, or transactivation, by NR3C1 also represents an important mechanism of glucocorticoid action. Glucocorticoids rapidly and profoundly increase expression of multiple genes, many with properties consistent with the repression of inflammatory gene expression. For example: the dual specificity phosphatase, DUSP1, reduces activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases; glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (TSC22D3) represses nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcriptional responses; inhibitor of κBα (NFKBIA) inhibits NF-κB; tristraprolin (ZFP36) destabilises and translationally represses inflammatory mRNAs; CDKN1C, a cell cycle regulator, may attenuate JUN N-terminal kinase signalling; and regulator of G-protein signalling 2 (RGS2), by reducing signalling from Gαq-linked G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), is bronchoprotective. While glucocorticoid-dependent transrepression can co-exist with transactivation, transactivation may account for the greatest level and most potent repression of inflammatory genes. Equally, NR3C1 transactivation is enhanced by β2-adrenoceptor agonists and may explain the enhanced clinical efficacy of β2-adrenoceptor/glucocorticoid combination therapies in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Finally, NR3C1 transactivation is reduced by inflammatory stimuli, including respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinovirus. This provides an explanation for glucocorticoid resistance. Continuing efforts to understand roles for glucocorticoid

  1. Anti-inflammatory Action of Green Tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Tomokazu; Goto, Shingo; Monira, Pervin; Isemura, Mamoru; Nakamura, Yoriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Green tea has been shown to have beneficial effects against a variety of diseases such as cancer, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative diseases. Through cellular, animal, and human experiments, green tea and its major component, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) have been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects. Our previous findings have indicated that green tea and EGCG suppress the gene and/or protein expression of inflammatory cytokines and inflammation-related enzymes. Using bibliographic databases, particularly PubMed (provided by the http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, United States), we examined the potential usefulness of green tea/EGCG for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases in human clinical and epidemiological studies. We also reviewed results from cellular and animal experiments and proposed action mechanisms. Most of the results from the human studies indicated the beneficial effects of green tea and tea catechins against inflammatory diseases. The cellular and animal studies also provided evidence for the favorable effects of green tea/EGCG. These results are compatible with our previous findings and can be largely explained by a mechanism wherein green tea/EGCG acts as an antioxidant to scavenge reactive oxygen species, leading to attenuation of nuclear factor-κB activity. Since green tea and EGCG have multiple targets and act in a pleiotropic manner, we may consider their usage to improve the quality of life in patients with inflammatory disease. Green tea and EGCG have beneficial health effects and no severe adverse effects; however, care should be taken to avoid overdosage, which may induce deleterious effects including hepatic injury. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Anti-inflammatory properties of bioactive titanium metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bangcheng; Gan, Lu; Qu, Yang; Yue, Chongxia

    2010-09-01

    Anti-inflammatory properties of bioactive titanium metals prepared by anodic oxidation (AO-Ti) and alkali-heat (AH-Ti) treatments were studied by bacterial adhesion test and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity assay methods. The bioactivities of the metals were also evaluated by apatite formation ability and osteoblasts culture experiments. Both metals could induce apatite formation and support osteoblasts proliferation. At the condition with normal incandescent light shine, both bioactive titanium metals had antibacterial adhesion properties compared with the titanium metal without treatment. The MPO activity assay proved that they both showed anti-inflammatory properties in vivo. The bioactive AO-Ti had better anti-inflammatory properties than the AH-Ti. It indicated that it is possible to optimize the anti-inflammatory properties of the bioactive titanium metals by different preparation methods. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Anti-inflammatory activities of enzymatic (alcalase) hydrolysate of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-inflammatory activities of enzymatic (alcalase) hydrolysate of a whey protein concentrate. LB de Carvalho-Silva, MTB Pacheco, R Bertoldo, C de Carvalho Veloso, LC Teodoro, A Giusti-Paiva, PCB Lollo, R Soncini ...

  4. Anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of bipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenblat, Joshua D; Kakar, Ron; Berk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    the overall antidepressant effect of adjunctive anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of bipolar depression. METHODS: Completed and ongoing clinical trials of anti-inflammatory agents for BD published prior to 15 May 15 2015 were identified through searching the PubMed, Embase, Psych......INFO, and Clinicaltrials.gov databases. Data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the antidepressant effect of adjunctive mechanistically diverse anti-inflammatory agents were pooled to determine standard mean differences (SMDs) compared with standard therapy alone. RESULTS: Ten RCTs were identified...... for qualitative review. Eight RCTs (n = 312) assessing adjunctive nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (n = 53), omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n = 140), N-acetylcysteine (n = 76), and pioglitazone (n = 44) in the treatment of BD met the inclusion criteria for quantitative analysis. The overall effect size...

  5. Antinociceptive and anti-Inflammatory effects of the standardized oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antinociceptive and anti-Inflammatory effects of the standardized oil of Indian Callistemon lanceolatus leaves in experimental animals. M Sudhakar, CV Rao, AL Rao, A Ramesh, N Srinivas, DB Raju, B Krishna Murthy ...

  6. anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities: chemical constituents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    *Corresponding author. E-mail: bedisag@yahoo.fr. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITIES: CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS OF ESSENTIAL OILS OF OCIMUM GRATISSIMUM,. EUCALYPTUS CITRIODORA AND CYMBOPOGON GIGANTEUS INHIBITED. LIPOXYGENASE L-1 AND CYCLOOXYGENASE OF ...

  7. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: adverse effects and their prevention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), their history, development, mode of action, toxicities, strategies for the prevention of toxicity, and future developments. - Methods: Medline search for articles published up to 2007, using the keywords acetylsalicylic acid,

  8. [Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossermelli, W; Pastor, E H

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) comprise an important class of medicaments that reduced the symptoms of inflamation in rheumatic disease. This article emphasizes similarities and class characteristics of the NSAID, mechanisms of action, and drug-interactions.

  9. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Melanthera scandens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okokon, Jude E; Udoh, Anwanga E; Frank, Samuel G; Amazu, Louis U

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of leaf extract of Melanthera scandens (M. scandens). Methods The crude leaf extract (39–111 mg/kg) of M. scandens was investigated for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities using various experimental models. The anti-inflammatory activity was investigated using carragenin, egg-albumin induced oedema models, while acetic acid, formalin-induced paw licking and thermal-induced pain models were used to evaluate the antinociceptive property. Results The extract caused a significant (P<0.05 – 0.001) dose-dependent reduction of inflammation and pains induced by different agents used. Conclusions The leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects which may be mediated through the phytochemical constituents of the plant. PMID:23569885

  10. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity of Liquidambar formosana Hance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    serum decreased and the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 increased (p < 0.01). In addition,. ELF treatment resulted in decrease of COX-2 (p < 0.01), iNOS (p < 0.01) and NF-κB p65 (p < 0.01) expressions in Wistar rats. Conclusion: The results reveal that ELF possesses significant anti-inflammatory effect in vivo.

  11. Radiation as anti-inflammatory agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaraju, S.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation is used for many disease treatments, recently works are being conducted on benefits of radiation for treating inflammatory diseases but clinical practices are limited. There are always risks involved with radiation. Risks could include, but are not limited to, potential late effects, even the induction of tumor formation as well as changes in normal tissues. Recently it has been reported in three randomized double blind studies using radiation for patients with painful degenerative joint diseases. All the three studies showed improvement in symptoms within months, suggesting the some with acute disease improve spontaneously. The treatment actually did not improve the architecture of the joint, yet it decreased painful symptoms. Pathologic evaluation weeks later showed disappearance of edema in the joint space with diminished inflammation and joint swelling. Thus it is postulated some therapeutic effects of radiotherapy for inflammatory diseases are due to the ability of radiation to inhibit cell proliferation. Sometimes inflammatory cells which affect the inflammatory joint space. This may have long-term consequences if it exists during critical periods. This may explain the effectiveness of radiotherapy in prevention of inflammatory disease. It is also noted that the effects of very low radiation doses of less than 500 rads on acute inflammation formations are most spectacular. Mitigation of pain, edema and erythema occurs so fast and after such low doses that it is inconceivable that cell death or inhibition of proliferation could play any role in this process. The optimal therapeutic effects of low dose irradiation occur in the very early stages of inflammation when vascular dilatation, edema formation and leukocyte invasion are beginning. There certainly can be adverse effects from radiation, yet it has to be noted that more than 1,60,000 people die annually of adverse effects of simple non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pills that are available in the

  12. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory-Organometallic Anticancer Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Păunescu, Emilia; McArthur, Sarah; Soudani, Mylène; Scopelliti, Rosario; Dyson, Paul J

    2016-02-15

    Compounds that combine metal-based drugs with covalently linked targeted organic agents have been shown, in some instances, to exhibit superior anticancer properties compared to the individual counterparts. Within this framework, we prepared a series of organometallic ruthenium(II)- and osmium(II)-p-cymene complexes modified with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) indomethacin and diclofenac. The NSAIDs are attached to the organometallic moieties via monodentate (pyridine/phosphine) or bidentate (bipyridine) ligands, affording piano-stool Ru(II) and Os(II) arene complexes of general formula [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(N)], where N is a pyridine-based ligand, {2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate} or {2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate}, [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(P)], where P is a phosphine ligand, {2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl-4-(diphenylphosphanyl)benzoate} or {2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl-4-(diphenylphosphanyl)benzoate, and [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl(N,N')][Cl], where N,N' is a bipyridine-based ligand, (4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl-2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetate), (4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl-2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetate), (bis(2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl)[2,2'-bipyridine]-5,5'-dicarboxylate), or (bis(2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl)[2,2'-bipyridine]-5,5'-dicarboxylate). The antiproliferative properties of the complexes were assessed in human ovarian cancer cells (A2780 and A2780cisR, the latter being resistant to cisplatin) and nontumorigenic human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells. Some of the complexes are considerably more cytotoxic than the original drugs and also display significant cancer cell selectivity.

  13. Dendrimer encapsulation enhances anti-inflammatory efficacy of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuelai; Hao, Wei; Lok, Chun-Nam; Wang, Yue Chun; Zhang, RuiZhong; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2014-12-01

    Our previous studies revealed that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) promoted wound healing in part through their anti-inflammatory actions. As recent reports also suggested anti-inflammatory effects of dendrimers, we therefore undertook this study using dendrimer as the delivery system for AgNP to explore any potential synergistic anti-inflammatory efficacy. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was added to cultured RAW264.7 and J774.1 cells to mimic in vitro inflammation condition, followed by the addition of either silver dendrimer nanocomposite (Ag-DNC), AgNPs, or dendrimer. The levels of inflammatory markers TNF-alpha and interleukin-6 were assessed using ELISA assay. Furthermore, in vivo effects such of Ag-DNC, AgNPs, or dendrimer were studied in a burn wound model in mice. Our results confirmed that both naked dendrimer and AgNPs had anti-inflammatory properties. In in vitro study, Ag-DNC was shown to have the best anti-inflammatory efficacy than AgNPs or dendrimer alone. In-vivo experiments also indicated that animals in the Ag-DNC group had the fastest healing time with the least inflammation. Our study would suggest that dendrimer could provide additional anti-inflammatory benefits and might be an excellent delivery system for silver nanoparticles for future clinical application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impaired CD163 Mediated Hemoglobin-Scavenging and Hemolytic Crisis in Patients Treated with CD33 Targeted Chemotherapy (Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin, MylotargTM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Hasle, Henrik; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2007-01-01

    Hemoglobin liberated to plasma during intravascular hemolyses is rapidly bound to haptoglobin. The hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes undergo endocytosis through the monocyte/macrophage specific scavenger receptor for hemoglobin (CD163). This mechanism protects against oxidative and NO-scavenging...... adverse effects of free hemoglobin. In this study, we describe a novel syndrome of severe intravascular hemolysis and serious hemolytic crisis due to impaired hemoglobin scavenging in three acute myeloid leukemia patients following CD33-directed therapy with the immunotoxin gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO......-expressing monocytes. We show that CD163 positive monocytes and bone marrow macrophages coexpress CD33 thus suggesting that the GO-induced cellular cytotoxicity of CD33 positive cells eradicates a significant part of the CD163 positive monocytes and macrophages. The patients had severe inflammation...

  15. Prodrugs of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), More Than Meets the Eye: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qandil, Amjad M.

    2012-01-01

    The design and the synthesis of prodrugs for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been given much attention by medicinal chemists, especially in the last decade. As a therapeutic group, NSAIDs are among the most widely used prescribed and over the counter (OTC) medications. The rich literature about potential NSAID prodrugs clearly shows a shift from alkyl, aryalkyl or aryl esters with the sole role of masking the carboxylic acid group, to more elaborate conjugates that contain carefully chosen groups to serve specific purposes, such as enhancement of water solubility and dissolution, nitric oxide release, hydrogen sulfide release, antioxidant activity, anticholinergic and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory (AChEI) activity and site-specific targeting and delivery. This review will focus on NSAID prodrugs that have been designed or were, later, found to possess intrinsic pharmacological activity as an intact chemical entity. Such intrinsic activity might augment the anti-inflammatory activity of the NSAID, reduce its side effects or transform the potential therapeutic use from classical anti-inflammatory action to something else. Reports discussed in this review will be those of NO-NSAIDs, anticholinergic and AChEI-NSAIDs, Phospho-NSAIDs and some miscellaneous agents. In most cases, this review will cover literature dealing with these NSAID prodrugs from the year 2006 and later. Older literature will be used when necessary, e.g., to explain the chemical and biological mechanisms of action. PMID:23247285

  16. Curcumin: An Anti-Inflammatory Molecule from a Curry Spice on the Path to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purusotam Basnet

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage and inflammation have been pointed out in preclinical studies as the root cause of cancer and other chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer’s disease, etc. Epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested that cancer could be prevented or significantly reduced by treatment with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs, therefore, curcumin, a principal component of turmeric (a curry spice showing strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might be a potential candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. However, curcumin, a highly pleiotropic molecule with an excellent safety profile targeting multiple diseases with strong evidence on the molecular level, could not achieve its optimum therapeutic outcome in past clinical trials, largely due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Curcumin can be developed as a therapeutic drug through improvement in formulation properties or delivery systems, enabling its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. This review mainly focuses on the anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin and recent developments in dosage form and nanoparticulate delivery systems with the possibilities of therapeutic application of curcumin for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer.

  17. Curcumin: an anti-inflammatory molecule from a curry spice on the path to cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Purusotam; Skalko-Basnet, Natasa

    2011-06-03

    Oxidative damage and inflammation have been pointed out in preclinical studies as the root cause of cancer and other chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer's disease, etc. Epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested that cancer could be prevented or significantly reduced by treatment with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs, therefore, curcumin, a principal component of turmeric (a curry spice) showing strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might be a potential candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. However, curcumin, a highly pleiotropic molecule with an excellent safety profile targeting multiple diseases with strong evidence on the molecular level, could not achieve its optimum therapeutic outcome in past clinical trials, largely due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Curcumin can be developed as a therapeutic drug through improvement in formulation properties or delivery systems, enabling its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. This review mainly focuses on the anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin and recent developments in dosage form and nanoparticulate delivery systems with the possibilities of therapeutic application of curcumin for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer.

  18. Prognostic significance of interleukin-8 and CD163-positive cell-infiltration in tumor tissues in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Fujita

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We investigated whether serum interleukin (IL-8 reflects the tumor microenvironment and has prognostic value in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Fifty OSCC patients who received radical resection of their tumor(s were enrolled. Preoperative sera were measured for IL-8 by ELISA. Expression of IL-8 and the infiltration of immune cells in tumor tissues were analyzed by an immunohistochemical staining of surgical specimens. RESULTS: We found that disease-free survival (DFS was significantly longer in the Stage I/II OSCC patients with low serum IL-8 levels compared to those with high levels (p = 0.001. The tumor expression of IL-8, i.e., IL-8(T and the density of CD163-positive cells in the tumor invasive front, i.e., CD163(IF were correlated with the serum IL-8 level (p = 0.033 and p = 0.038, respectively, and they were associated with poor clinical outcome (p = 0.007 and p = 0.002, respectively, in DFS in all patients. A multivariate analysis revealed that N status, IL-8(T and CD163(IF significantly affected the DFS of the patients. Further analysis suggested that combination of N status with serum IL-8, IL-8(T or CD163(IF may be a new criterion for discriminating between OSCC patients at high and low risk for tumor relapse. Interestingly, the in vitro experiments demonstrated that IL-8 enhanced generation of CD163-positive M2 macrophages from peripheral blood monocytes, and that the cells produced IL-10. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that IL-8 may be involved in poor clinical outcomes via generation of CD163-positive M2 macrophages, and that these factors in addition to N status may have prognostic value in patients with resectable OSCSS.

  19. Anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of leaf extracts and fractions of Mangifera indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, C G; Deepak, M; Viswanatha, G L; Savinay, G; Hanumantharaju, V; Rajendra, C E; Halemani, Praveen D

    2013-04-13

    To evaluate the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of leaf extracts and fractions of Mangifera indica in in vitro conditions. In vitro DPPH radical scavenging activity and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibition assays were used to evaluate the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities respectively. Methanolic extract (MEMI), successive water extract (SWMI) and ethyl acetate fraction (EMEMI), n-butanol fraction (BMEMI) and water soluble fraction (WMEMI) of methanolic extract were evaluated along with respective reference standards. In in vitro DPPH radical scavenging activity, the MEMI, EMEMI and BMEMI have offered significant antioxidant activity with IC(50) values of 13.37, 3.55 and 14.19 μg/mL respectively. Gallic acid, a reference standard showed significant antioxidant activity with IC(50) value of 1.88 and found to be more potent compared to all the extracts and fractions. In in vitro LOX inhibition assay, the MEMI, EMEMI and BMEMI have showed significant inhibition of LOX enzyme activity with IC(50) values of 96.71, 63.21 and 107.44 μg/mL respectively. While, reference drug Indomethacin also offered significant inhibition against LOX enzyme activity with IC(50) of 57.75. Furthermore, MEMI was found to more potent than SWMI and among the fractions EMEMI was found to possess more potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. These findings suggest that the MEMI and EMEMI possess potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in in vitro conditions. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The macrophage activation marker sCD163 combined with markers of the Enhanced Liver Fibrosis (ELF) score predicts clinically significant portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl, T D; McGrail, R; Møller, H J

    2016-01-01

    analyses improved the AUROC to 0.91 in the estimation cohort and 0.90 in the validation cohort. Furthermore, a high value of the combined score was associated with a high short-term mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of the macrophage activation marker sCD163 and the fibrosis markers predicted......BACKGROUND: Noninvasive identification of significant portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis is needed in hepatology practice. AIM: To investigate whether the combination of sCD163 as a hepatic inflammation marker and the fibrosis markers of the Enhanced Liver Fibrosis score (ELF) can...

  1. Lyprinol—Is It a Useful Anti-Inflammatory Agent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila A. Doggrell

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The New Zealand green lipped mussel preparation Lyprinol is available without a prescription from a supermarket, pharmacy or Web. The Food and Drug Administration have recently warned Lyprinol USA about their extravagant anti-inflammatory claims for Lyprinol appearing on the web. These claims are put to thorough review. Lyprinol does have anti-inflammatory mechanisms, and has anti-inflammatory effects in some animal models of inflammation. Lyprinol may have benefits in dogs with arthritis. There are design problems with the clinical trials of Lyprinol in humans as an anti-inflammatory agent in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, making it difficult to give a definite answer to how effective Lyprinol is in these conditions, but any benefit is small. Lyprinol also has a small benefit in atopic allergy. As anti-inflammatory agents, there is little to choose between Lyprinol and fish oil. No adverse effects have been reported with Lyprinol. Thus, although it is difficult to conclude whether Lyprinol does much good, it can be concluded that Lyprinol probably does no major harm.

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of root of Alpinia galanga willd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Kumar Ghosh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the study is to evaluate the acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activities of root extract of Alpinia galanga in rodents. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out using albino rats of either sex (150-200 g. An extract of the root of A. galanga was prepared using absolute alcohol and distillation in a Soxhlet apparatus. The acute anti-inflammatory effects of this extract were evaluated using carrageenan-, bradykinin-, and 5-HT-induced rat paw edema. The chronic anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated using formaldehyde-induced rat paw edema. Results and Analysis: Inhibition of inflammation was seen to be 32.22% in carrageenan-induced, 37.70% in 5-HT-induced, and 35.21% in bradykinin-induced anti-inflammatory models. In chronic inflammatory model, a progressive inhibition of 34.73% (3 rd day, 37.50% (5 th day, 38.83% (7 th day, 44.66% (9 th day, 49.59% (11 th day, and 55.75% (13 th day was observed with study compound. The efficacy was comparable with the standard drugs. Conclusion: It can be thus concluded that A. galanga has anti-inflammatory properties and probably acts by blocking histaminic and serotonin pathways. It may be an effective alternative to NASAIDs and corticosteroid in inflammatory disorders.

  3. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pinus roxburghii Sarg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhirender Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chir Pine, Pinus roxburghii, named after William Roxburgh, is a pine native to the Himalaya. Pinus roxburghii Sarg. (Pinaceae is traditionally used for several medicinal purposes in India. As the oil of the plant is extensively used in number of herbal preparation for curing inflammatory disorders, the present study was undertaken to assess analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of its bark extract. Dried and crushed leaves of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. were defatted with petroleum ether and then extracted with alcohol. The alcoholic extract at the doses of 100 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg body weight was subjected to evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental animal models. Analgesic activity was evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests in Swiss albino mice; acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma in Wistar albino rats. Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin were employed as reference drugs for analgesic and anti-inflammatory studies, respectively. In the present study, the alcoholic bark extract of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. demonstrated significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in the tested models.

  4. Anti-inflammatory management for tendon injuries - friends or foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Kai-Ming

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute and chronic tendon injuries are very common among athletes and in sedentary population. Most physicians prescribe anti-inflammatory managements to relieve the worst symptoms of swelling and pain, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids and physical therapies. However, experimental research shows that pro-inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandins may play important regulatory roles in tendon healing. Noticeably nearly all cases of chronic tendon injuries we treat as specialists have received non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs by their physician, suggesting that there might be a potential interaction in some of these cases turning a mild inflammatory tendon injury into chronic tendinopathy in predisposed individuals. We are aware of the fact that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids may well have a positive effect on the pain control in the clinical situation whilst negatively affect the structural healing. It follows that a comprehensive evaluation of anti-inflammatory management for tendon injuries is needed and any such data would have profound clinical and health economic importance.

  5. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Are Caspase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christina E; Soti, Subada; Jones, Torey A; Nakagawa, Akihisa; Xue, Ding; Yin, Hang

    2017-03-16

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most commonly used drugs in the world. While the role of NSAIDs as cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors is well established, other targets may contribute to anti-inflammation. Here we report caspases as a new pharmacological target for NSAID family drugs such as ibuprofen, naproxen, and ketorolac at physiologic concentrations both in vitro and in vivo. We characterize caspase activity in both in vitro and in cell culture, and combine computational modeling and biophysical analysis to determine the mechanism of action. We observe that inhibition of caspase catalysis reduces cell death and the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Further, NSAID inhibition of caspases is COX independent, representing a new anti-inflammatory mechanism. This finding expands upon existing NSAID anti-inflammatory behaviors, with implications for patient safety and next-generation drug design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Piper nigrum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasleem, Farhana; Azhar, Iqbal; Ali, Syed Nawazish; Perveen, Shaista; Mahmood, Zafar Alam

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate and compare the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of pure compound, piperine along with hexane and ethanol extracts of Piper nigrum L. fruit in mice and rats. The analgesic activity was determined by tail immersion method, analgesy-meter, hot plate and acetic acid induced writhing test. While the anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan-induced paw inflammation in rats. Piperine at a dose of 5 mg/kg and ethanol extract at a dose of 15 mg/kg after 120 min and hexane extract at a dose of 10 mg/kg after 60 min exhibited significant (PPiper nigrum L possesses potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular characterization of the haptoglobin.hemoglobin receptor CD163. Ligand binding properties of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby

    2004-01-01

    binding to SRCR domain 3 exhibited effective inhibition of ligand binding. Furthermore, analysis of purified native CD163 revealed that proteolytic cleavage in SRCR domain 3 inactivates ligand binding. Calcium protects against cleavage in this domain. Analysis of the calcium sensitivity of ligand binding...

  8. Clinical Significance of CD163+ and CD68+ Tumor-associated Macrophages in High-risk HPV-related Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Jing; Han, Ling-Fei; Wu, Xiang-Guang; Wei, Wen-Fei; Wu, Lan-Fang; Yi, Hong-Yan; Yan, Rui-Ming; Bai, Xiang-Yang; Zhong, Mei; Yu, Yan-Hong; Liang, Li; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Objective . To explore the influence of M2-polarized tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) on high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV)-related cervical carcinogenesis and metastasis. Methods . CD68+ and CD163+ macrophages were examined immunohistochemically in a series of 130 samples, including 26 cases of normal cervical tissues, 59 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and 45 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and the results were statistically analyzed. The macrophage count was corrected for the epithelial and stromal compartments respectively. Clinical data were also obtained. Results. High counts of CD68+ and CD163+ macrophages were associated with hr-HPV infection (both p cancer. Notably, a high index of CD163+ macrophages was significantly associated with higher FIGO stages ( p = 0.009) and lymph node metastasis ( p = 0.012), but a similar finding was not found for CD68+ macrophages ( p = 0.067, p = 0.079, respectively). Conclusions. Our study supported a critical role of TAMs as a prospective predictor for hr-HPV-related cervical carcinogenesis. CD163, as a promising TAMs marker, is superior to CD68 for predicting the malignant transformation and metastatic potential of cervical cancer.

  9. The Prognostic Impact of CD163-Positive Macrophages in Follicular Lymphoma: A Study from the BC Cancer Agency and the Lymphoma Study Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kridel, Robert; Xerri, Luc; Gelas-Dore, Bénédicte; Tan, King; Feugier, Pierre; Vawda, Ayesha; Canioni, Danielle; Farinha, Pedro; Boussetta, Sami; Moccia, Alden A; Brice, Pauline; Chavez, Elizabeth A; Kyle, Alastair H; Scott, David W; Sanders, Ashley D; Fabiani, Bettina; Slack, Graham W; Minchinton, Andrew I; Haioun, Corinne; Connors, Joseph M; Sehn, Laurie H; Steidl, Christian; Gascoyne, Randy D; Salles, Gilles

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to assess the prognostic significance of follicular lymphoma-associated macrophages in the era of rituximab treatment and maintenance. We applied immunohistochemistry for CD68 and CD163 to two large tissue microarrays (TMA). The first TMA included samples from 186 patients from the BC Cancer Agency (BCCA) who had been treated with first-line systemic treatment including rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone. The second contained 395 samples from PRIMA trial patients treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, and randomized to rituximab maintenance or observation. Macrophage infiltration was assessed using Aperio image analysis. Each of the two cohorts was randomly split into training/validation sets. An increased CD163-positive pixel count was predictive of adverse outcome in the BCCA dataset [5-year progression-free survival (PFS) 38% vs. 72%, respectively, P = 0.004 in the training cohort and 5-year PFS 29% vs. 61%, respectively, P = 0.004 in the validation cohort]. In the PRIMA trial, an increased CD163 pixel count was associated with favorable outcome (5-year PFS 60% vs. 44%, respectively, P = 0.011 in the training cohort and 5-year PFS 55% vs. 37%, respectively, P = 0.030 in the validation cohort). CD163-positive macrophages predict outcome in follicular lymphoma, but their prognostic impact is highly dependent on treatment received. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Kalanchosine dimalate, an anti-inflammatory salt from Kalanchoe brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sônia Soares; de Souza, Maria de Lourdes Mendes; Ibrahim, Tereza; de Melo, Giany Oliveira; de Almeida, Ana Paula; Guette, Catherine; Férézou, Jean-Pierre; Koatz, Vera Lucia G

    2006-05-01

    This report describes the isolation and characterization of kalanchosine dimalate (KMC), an anti-inflammatory salt from the fresh juice of the aerial parts of Kalanchoe brasiliensis. KMC comprises the new metabolite kalanchosine (1) and malic acid (2) in a 1:2 stoichiometric ratio. Kalanchosine (1), 3,6-diamino-4,5-dihydroxyoctanedioic acid, is the first naturally occurring dimeric bis(gamma-hydroxy-beta-amino acid) and is at least partially responsible for the anti-inflammatory properties of K. brasiliensis.

  11. Inclusion Complexes of Copaiba (Copaifera multijuga Hayne Oleoresin and Cyclodextrins: Physicochemical Characterization and Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Gabriel de Oliveira Pinheiro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Complexation with cyclodextrins (CDs is a technique that has been extensively used to increase the aqueous solubility of oils and improve their stability. In addition, this technique has been used to convert oils into solid materials. This work aims to develop inclusion complexes of Copaifera multijuga oleoresin (CMO, which presents anti-inflammatory activity, with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD by kneading (KND and slurry (SL methods. Physicochemical characterization was performed to verify the occurrence of interactions between CMO and the cyclodextrins. Carrageenan-induced hind paw edema in mice was carried out to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of CMO alone as well as complexed with CDs. Physicochemical characterization confirmed the formation of inclusion complex of CMO with both β-CD and HP-β-CD by KND and SL methods. Carrageenan-induced paw edema test showed that the anti-inflammatory activity of CMO was maintained after complexation with β-CD and HP-β-CD, where they were able to decrease the levels of nitrite and myeloperoxidase. In conclusion, this study showed that it is possible to produce inclusion complexes of CMO with CDs by KND and SL methods without any change in CMO’s anti-inflammatory activity.

  12. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects of the ethanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The leaves of Acalypha wilkesiana are commonly used for the treatment of pain, fever and ulcer by traditional medical practitioners without any scientific data to evaluate ... Different sets of rats were used for the anti-ulcer, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic studies although animal grouping for extract administration were as in ...

  13. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of Allium Ascalonicum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The methanol and aqueous extract of Allium ascalonicom were investigated for analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. Thermal and chemical models of pain assessment were used while albumin was used to induce inflammation. The extracts were administered at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg. The methanol extract ...

  14. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-inflammatory potential was investigated in egg-albumin and carrageenan induced paw edema models while the antinociceptive activity was determined using acetic acid induced writhing reflex and tail immersion tests at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg. The negative control group (group A) received distilled ...

  15. Hemostatic, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To study the hemostatic, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects of Sanqixiantao dressing. Methods: Sanqixiantao dressing was prepared by mixting with sanqixiiantao extract (8 %) with membrane-forming matrix (5:4:9:2 volume ratio of polyvinyl alcohol: Na CMC: gelatin: glycerol). Rats with local surface ...

  16. Antipyretic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and 2-acetamido-5-sulfonamidobenzoic acid (AMSABA, 4) were synthesized and evaluated for their analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities. HASBA, AASBA and AMASBA showed higher analgesic activity than aspirin (ASA) at 100 mg/kg dose, while AMSABA showed the least analgesic property.

  17. Non-Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs Usage In Orthopaedics And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs NSAIDs) are a group of heterogeneous compounds with nti inflammatory, analgesic and often times anti pyretic roperties. They are weak organic acids and are the most commonly used drugs in Orthopaedic/Trauma practice. hey provide mild to moderate pain relief.

  18. Investigations into the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to investigate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials of the ethanolic extract and fractions of Citrus sinensis stem-bark, investigate and to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of the most active fraction (EAF) of the ethanolic extract against acetaminophen-induced acute hepatic injury.

  19. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Methanoilc and Ethanolic Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: Aqueous ethanoic and methanolic extracts of Citrus Sinensis Peel were investigated for anti- inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced paw oedema in wistar rats, and compared to a positive control drug,. Indomethacin. These extracts were given(IP) in a concentration of 20, and 70mg/kg with extract with a ...

  20. Investigation of the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of the root extract of Elephantorrhiza elephantina (Burch.) Skeels (Fabaceae) were investigated using wistar rats. The extract was administered intraperitoneally (i.p) to rats at graded doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg BWt. Carrageenan and. Histamine were injected into rat ...

  1. Acute toxicity studies, anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanolic extracts of the stem bark of Enantia chlorantha and Nauclea latifolia were investigated in rats and mice for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. The activities of the extracts were tested on egg white-induced oedema, acetic acid-induced writhing and hot plate models. Methanolic extract of Nauclea latifolia ...

  2. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECT OF Myrtus nivellei Batt & Trab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-15

    Jan 15, 2015 ... reduce significantly the paw edema with a comparable effect to that observed with Diclofenac. (positive control). This is the first report to demonstrate a significant anti-inflammatory activity of the methanolic extract prepared from Myrtus nivellei. Keywords: Anti-inflammatoy activity; Myrtus nivellei Batt & Trab; ...

  3. Possible mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity and safety profile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Animals were grouped and treated with diclofenac, chlorpheniramine, and granisetron (reference anti-inflammatory agents), or aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Pistia stratiotes at doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg orally. Control groups received distilled water. Paw thicknesses was measured at 30 or 60 min intervals for 2.5 ...

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of Syzygium cumini seed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... The Syzygium cumini (Myrtaceae) is a popular traditional medicinal plant in India. This study was intended to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of S. cumini seed in carrageenan induced paw oedema in wistar rats at the dose level of 200 and 400 mg/kg.

  5. In vitro anti-inflammatory and phytochemical properties of crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baliospermum montanum (Muell – Arg) which belong to Euphorbiaceae family is a well known perennial herb in Indian medicine used to treat various disorders like asthma, bronchitis, purgative, anthelmintic, diuretic, diaphoretic, rubefacient and tonic. The anti-inflammatory activity of four different solvent extracts of B.

  6. Comparative anti-inflammatory properties of Capsaicin and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The analgesic effect of capsaicin (the active ingredient in Capsicum frutescens Linn. [Solanaceae]) had been reported in several studies. Current research is being directed at producing analgesics, anti-inflammatory agents with better side effect profile. Objectives: To investigate if either the ethyl acetate extract ...

  7. Anti-inflammatory Activities of Extracts of Some Traditionally Used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydroalcoholic extracts of some traditional medicinal plants used in Ethiopia for the treatment of skin diseases, were investigated for their anti-inflammatory activities in carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema at doses of 300 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg body weight. The extracts were obtained from the leaves of Bidens pilosa ...

  8. Experimental evaluation of anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clove oil of Eugenia caryophyllata (Myrtaceae) is a light yellowish fluid obtained from dried flower buds. Clove oil is used traditionally to relieve toothache. Aim: The aim of the present work was to study the anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive and antipyretic potential of clove oil in mice. Methods: Analgesic activity ...

  9. Anti-inflammatory effect of Myrtus nivellei Batt & Trab (myrtaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work aims at evaluating the anti-inflammatory activity of an endemic species of the central sahara: Myrtus nivellei Batt & Trab. The methanolic extract of this plant was extracted by Soxhlet apparatus and concentrated under reduced pressure using a rotary evaporator. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema test, five ...

  10. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of Triphala recipe were studied in animal models. Triphala recipe (4 mg/ear) significantly exhibited an inhibitory effect on the ear edema formation induced by ethyl phenylpropiolateinduced, but not on the arachidonic acid -induced ear edema in rats. Furthermore, Triphala ...

  11. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Magnolia sieboldii Extract in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of Magnolia sieboldii extract (MSE) on the production of pro- inflammatory cytokines by macrophage. Methods: The whole plant of M. sieboldii was extracted with methanol at room temperature. The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of MSE was investigated on lipopolysaccharide ...

  12. anti-inflammatory activity of selected nigerian medicinal plants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracts of nineteen plant species from an inventory of Nigerian medicinal plants were screened for activity in two in vitro anti-inflammatory model test systems, inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis and PAF-induced elastase release from neutrophilis. Anacardium occidentale and Acalipha hispida were active in both test ...

  13. Hemostatic, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Purpose: To study the hemostatic, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects of Sanqixiantao dressing. Methods: ... Sanqixiantao extract significantly shortened blood clotting time in vitro (p < 0.01), and showed antibacterial activities against ..... application effect of different silver dressings in treatment of patients ...

  14. Phytochemical, Analgesic And Anti-Inflammatory Effects Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical screening was carried out on the ethylacetate portion of the ethanolic extract of the leaves of Pseudocedrella kotschyii and then evaluated for its analgesic (acetic acid-induced writhing) and anti-inflammatory (raw egg albumin-induced oedema) activities in mice and rats respectively. Phytochemical screening ...

  15. analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanolic extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-30

    Apr 30, 2015 ... The analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the ethanolic extract of Rheumatic Tea Formula ... Salix alba were studied in mice and rats using acetic acid induced writhing, hot plate method, ... albino mice, while the phytochemical screening showed the presence of alkaloids, tannins and glycosides.

  16. Phytochemical screening, safety evaluation, anti-inflammatory and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thereafter anti-inflammatory and analgesic studies were conducted using standard tests such as carrageenan, histamine-induced-oedema, tail flick test and acetic acid writhing test. Phytochemical screening of the powdered material showed that tannin, flavonoid and reducing sugar were present while alkaloids, cardiac ...

  17. The Phytochemical Constituents, Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the methanolic extract of the leaves of Jatropha curcas were investigated in mice and rats respectively. The phytochemical screening of the extract was also carried out. The analgesic effect was determined by acetic acid – induced writhing test in mice. While the anti- ...

  18. Flavonoids, anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxicity of Macfadyena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kaempferol, 7-O, 8-C diglucoside and vicenin II were isolated, while 6, methoxy, acacetin 7-O glucoside; and quercitrin were isolated from ethanol extract. These compounds were characterized and identified by their physicochemical and spectral data. The crude ethanol extract exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity ...

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of kaempferol, myricetin, fisetin and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of kaempferol, myricetin, fisetin and ibuprofen in rat pups. Methods: The expression levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined by western blotting; the inhibition of these proteins by plant compounds was evaluated.

  20. Growth inhibitory, apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mice. Collectively, these results suggest that CEMB is a very potent anti-tumour compound. [Ravanan P, Singh SK, Subba Rao GSR and Kondaiah P 2011 Growth inhibitory, apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities displayed by a novel modified triterpenoid, cyano enone of methyl boswellates. J. Biosci. 36 297–307] DOI ...

  1. Phytochemical Analysis and Anti-Inflammatory activity of Methanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study investigated the phytochemistry and anti-inflammatory activity of methanolic root extract of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta against paw edema induced by egg albumin and carrageenan in rats. Phytochemical analysis and acute toxicity test (LD50) of the methanol extract was also carried out. Results show that ...

  2. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Magnolia sieboldii Extract in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of Magnolia sieboldii extract (MSE) on the production of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophage. Methods: The whole plant of M. sieboldii was extracted with methanol at room temperature. The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of MSE was investigated on lipopolysaccharide ...

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of ginsenosides from Panax ginseng and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ginsenosides (G) are biologically active saponin compounds found inPanax ginseng. Although these compounds are reported to possess numerous biological activities, recent issues have arisen regarding their immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory roles in inflammatory cells. This is because 1) inflammation, ...

  4. Anti-inflammatory of both Eucalyptus spp. and Pistascia lentiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Eucalyptus spp. and Pistascia lentiscus are among the Palestinian trees that are traditionally used in folkloric medicine in treating many diseases; leaves of which are thought to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and antioxidant effects. The goal of this study is to evaluate the in vitro inhibitory effect of ...

  5. Anti-inflammatory potential of native Australian herbs polyphenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Guo

    2014-01-01

    Anise myrtle, lemon myrtle and bay leaf selectively inhibited COX-2 and iNOS enzymes, while Tasmannia pepper leaf extract exhibited a pronounced inhibitory activity toward COX-1 and was the least effective inhibitor of iNOS. Anise myrtle and lemon myrtle are potentially more efficient anti-inflammatory agents than Tasmannia pepper leaf.

  6. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory Evaluation of the Anti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-inflammatory activity of the aqueous leaf extract of Pterocarpus santalinoides was evaluated using the carrageenan-induced paw oedema and leucocyte migration in rats, and croton oil-induced ear oedema in mice. The extract (50-100mg/kg) and indomethacin (10mg/kg) produced significant (p<0.05) inhibitions of ...

  7. Anti-inflammatory activity of some copper chelates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorenson, J.R.J.

    1974-01-01

    With the observation that cupric acetate had anti-inflammatory activity in the foot edema model of inflammation, it was felt that copper may play a role as a component of the active metabolite of anti-inflammatory agents used clinically. To test this hypothesis, various Cu chelates were made and tested in the foot edema, cotton-wad granuloma and polyarthritis models of inflammation. A marked increase in anti-inflammatory activity has been observed for the Cu chelates of chelating agents that had no anti-inflammatory activity as well as those that have been used clinically. Since ulcers may be viewed as inflammatory processes and often associated with the arthritic disease syndrome, the Cu chelates were evaluated as anti-ulcer agents. These compounds were demonstrated to have anti-ulcer activity in the Shay as well as the corticoid and stress induced rat ulcer models. Mechanistic considerations relevant to lysosomal and digestive proteolytic enzyme inhibition, anti-cholinergic activity, prostaglandin synthesis and wound healing are discussed. 9 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Anti-inflammatory activity of bark of Xeromphis spinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswa Nath Das

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The bark of Xeromphis spinosa extracted by a mixture of equal proportions of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol at an oral dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity when compared with control.

  9. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of a polyherbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, WAP (400 mg/kg) nether affected locomotory activity nor induced gastric lesion in mice. The results of this study revealed that extract of a polyherbal mixture containing the leaves and roots of Plumbago zeylinica and fruits of Capsicum frutescens possesses anti-noiceptive and anti-inflammatory activity.

  10. Cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of four different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of four different solvent extracts obtained from the aerial parts of Galega officinalis L. Methods: The hexane, DCM, methanol and water extracts of G. officinalis were successively obtained by soxhlet extraction method. The cytotoxic activity of the ...

  11. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Solvent Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Solvent Extracts of Tagetes erectus Linn (Asteraceae). NV Shinde*, KG Kanase, ... Soxhlet extractor and refluxed continuously for 6 h. The solvent ... of the plant extract. Most of the so-called peripheral analgesics possess anti-inflammatory properties and, in some cases, also antipyretic activity besides analgesia. For many ...

  12. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanolic extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the ethanolic extract of Rheumatic Tea Formula (RTF) a polyherbal tea consisting the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus, Albizia chevalieri and bark of Salix alba were studied in mice and rats using acetic acid induced writhing, hot plate method, formalin induced pain and ...

  13. Anti-inflammatory and Antinociceptive Effects of the Alcoholic Extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The alcoholic extract of Polygala arvensis (family Polygalaceae) was screened for antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental animals. The extract was administered for three consecutive days. Following an oral dose of 25 - 100 mg/kg, the extract exhibited graded dose response equivalent to 16.24% ...

  14. [Helicobacter pylori, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and gastroduodenal changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, A V

    1995-09-01

    The author discusses the possible interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and Helicobacter pylori (Hp) which may play an important role in the unleashing of gastroduodenal lesions. To our knowledge, AINEs have no influence on the prevalence of infection by Hp and the latter does not seem to influence the development and intensity of the lesions caused by NSAIDs.

  15. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of water extract from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was done to evaluate the antiinflammatory and analgesic activities of the water extract of the plant in experimental animal models (anti-inflammatory action by carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, the analgesic activity by acetic acid-induced writhing response method. The water extract of I. asarifolia in doses of ...

  16. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities of the aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aqueous extract of Hippobromus pauciflorus (L.f) Radlk leaves at 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight were evaluated for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities in male rats. Antiinflammatory activity was studied by using carrageenan and histamine induced oedema right hind paw volume while the ...

  17. Evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bovine mastitis is one of the most relevant and problematic diseases to treat and control in practice. Puxing Yinyang San (PYS) is a compound of herbs to treat bovine mastitis in China. This study was performed to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of PYS in mice and rats. Materials and ...

  18. Synthesis, Analgesic, Anti-inflammatory and Antimicrobial Activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Microbial infections often produce pain and inflammation. Chemotherapeutic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs are prescribed simultaneously in normal practice. The compound possessing all three activities is not common.The purpose of the present study was to examine whether molecular modification ...

  19. Glycosaminoglycan analogs as a novel anti-inflammatory strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, India C.; Soares, Adriano; Hantson, Jennifer; Teixeira, Mauro; Sachs, Daniela; Valognes, Delphine; Scheer, Alexander; Schwarz, Matthias K.; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Shaw, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Heparin, a glycosaminoglycan (GAG), has both anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant properties. The clinical use of heparin against inflammation, however, has been limited by concerns about increased bleeding. While the anti-coagulant activity of heparin is well understood, its anti-inflammatory properties are less so. Heparin is known to bind to certain cytokines, including chemokines, small proteins which mediate inflammation through their control of leukocyte migration and activation. Molecules which can interrupt the chemokine-GAG interaction without inhibiting coagulation could therefore, represent a new class of anti-inflammatory agents. In the present study, two approaches were undertaken, both focusing on the heparin-chemokine relationship. In the first, a structure based strategy was used: after an initial screening of potential small molecule binders using protein NMR on a target chemokine, binding molecules were optimized through structure-based design. In the second approach, commercially available short oligosaccharides were polysulfated. In vitro, these molecules prevented chemokine-GAG binding and chemokine receptor activation without disrupting coagulation. However, in vivo, these compounds caused variable results in a murine peritoneal recruitment assay, with a general increase of cell recruitment. In more disease specific models, such as antigen-induced arthritis and delayed-type hypersensitivity, an overall decrease in inflammation was noted, suggesting that the primary anti-inflammatory effect may also involve factors beyond the chemokine system. PMID:23087686

  20. Anti-inflammatory medicinal plants and the molecular mechanisms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Medicinal plant and plant products have shown tremendous potentials and are used beneficially in the treatment of inflammation and in the management of diseases with significant inflammatory components. Many medicinal plants employed as anti-inflammatory and antiphlogistic remedies lack the ...

  1. Synthesis, Anti-inflammatory and Anti-nociceptive Evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The final products were purified on column chromatography, eluting with ... the reference drug. Results: The compounds were obtained in high yield (70 – 90 %) and purity. The anti-inflammatory results showed a poor activity for the compounds except o-palmitoylamino ..... causes an increase in the peritoneal fluid level of.

  2. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Compounds Isolated from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Perez G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This review shows over 300 compounds isolated and identified from plants that previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity. They have been classified in appropriate chemical groups and data are reported on their pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, and other properties.

  3. Anti-inflammatory effect of Zanthoxylum bungeanum -cake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ), a kind of traditional therapy of moxibustion, has been used in China since 340 B.C. However, its mechanism remains unclear. So, this study was attempted to reveal the anti-inflammatory effect of ZBCS-moxi on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) rats.

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of Eucalyptus spp. and Pistascia lentiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenolic Acids of the Two Major Blueberry Species in the US Market and Their. Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Activities. Plant Food Hum Nutr. 70(1): 56-62. 11. Landau, S.; Muklada, H.; Markovics, A.; Azaizeh, H. (2014). Traditional Uses of Pistacia lentiscus in Veterinary and Human Medicine. In: Yaniv, Z.; Dudai, ...

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity of mycelial extracts from medicinal mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yan; Zhu, Shuiling; Lu, Zhenming; Xu, Hongyu; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms have been essential components of traditional Chinese herbal medicines for thousands of years, and they protect against diverse health-related conditions. The components responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity have yet to be fully studied. This study investigates the anti-inflammatory activity of n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of mycelia in submerged culture from 5 commercially available medicinal mushrooms, namely Cephalosporium sinensis, Cordyceps mortierella, Hericium erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, and Armillaria mellea. MTT colorimetric assay was applied to measure the cytotoxic effects of different extracts. Their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated via inhibition against production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) in murine macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Of the 20 extracts, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts from C. sinensis, C. mortierella, and G. lucidum; chloroform extracts from H. erinaceus and A. mellea; and ethyl acetate extracts from A. mellea at nontoxic concentrations (effective inhibitor, with the lowest half maximal inhibitory concentration (64.09 ± 6.29 μg/mL) of the LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate that extracts from medicinal mushrooms exhibited anti-inflammatory activity that might be attributable to the inhibition of NO generation and can therefore be considered a useful therapeutic and preventive approach to various inflammation-related diseases.

  6. Essential Oil Composition and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Salvia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Sage, Salvia officinalis L (Lamiaceae), is widely cultivated medicinal plant for its economic importance and large content of bioactive components; therefore, in the present study, the active components (volatile compounds) and the anti-inflammatory effect of S. officinalis have been investigated. Methods: Salvia ...

  7. Anti-inflammatory activity of Ruta graveolens Linn on carrageenan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aqueous, ethanolic and methanolic extracts of Ruta graveolens were investigated for anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced paw edema in wistar male rats, and compared to a positive control drug, Voveran. These extracts were given (ip) in a concentration of 20 and 50 mg/kg b.w. before carrageenan injection.

  8. Anti-inflammatory and acute toxicity evaluation of aqueous infusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Marrubium deserti de Noé, which is locally known as “Merriouet saharaui”, is widely used in Algeria as a traditional treatment of many ailments. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and acute toxicity of the aqueous infusion extract from aerial parts of Marrubium deserti were investigated. Meanwhile, acute oral ...

  9. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of methanol fruit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties of crude methanol fruit extract of Quercus incana (QI), as well as its acute toxicity and phytochemical profile. Methods: Two animal models were used: Wistar rats for carrageenan-induced paw inflammation and Swiss albino mice for acetic ...

  10. Marine Diterpenoids as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Yisett; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Jones, Gillian E.; Fernandez, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a highly regulated process, and its dysregulation can lead to the establishment of chronic inflammation and, in some cases, to death. Inflammation is the cause of several diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis, and asthma. The search for agents inhibiting inflammation is a great challenge as the inflammatory response plays an important role in the defense of the host to infections. Marine invertebrates are exceptional sources of new natural products, and among those diterpenoids secondary metabolites exhibit notable anti-inflammatory properties. Novel anti-inflammatory diterpenoids, exclusively produced by marine organisms, have been identified and synthetic molecules based on those structures have been obtained. The anti-inflammatory activity of marine diterpenoids has been attributed to the inhibition of Nuclear Factor-κB activation and to the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. However, more research is necessary to describe the mechanisms of action of these secondary metabolites. This review is a compilation of marine diterpenoids, mainly isolated from corals, which have been described as potential anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:26538822

  11. Antibacterial and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Anacardium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    displaying a significantly (P<0.05) higher activity compared to the leaves extract. The results of this study therefore justify the use of this plant in the treatment of inflammation and bacterial infections. Key words: Antibacterial, Anti inflammatory, Anacardium occidentale. INTRODUCTION. Medicinal plants represent a rich ...

  12. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background of study: Plants used for traditional medicine contain a wide range of substances which can be used to treat various infectious diseases. Aim: The study evaluated the in vitro antioxidant, antinociceptive, and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Justicia secunda Vahl leaf. Methods: The acute ...

  13. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Solvent Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Traditionally, the leaves of Tagetes erectus L. are used in India for the alleviation of pain and inflammation. The objective of this study was to investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of this plant material in an animal model. Methods: The chloroform, methanol and ether extracts of the leaves of ...

  14. Anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive and antipyretic potential of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: Extracts of Terminalia citrina fruits were evaluated at doses of 200mg/kg, 400mg/kg and 600mg/kg in albino mice for preventive effect in inflammatory edema, peripheral pain sensation and pyrexia. Carrageenan induced paw edema method was utilized to evaluate anti-inflammatory activity.

  15. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities of the aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... The results suggest a potential benefit of H. pauciflorus leaves in treating conditions associated with inflammation, pain and fever. These properties might be adduced to the presence of the phytoconstituents. Key words: Hippobromus pauciflorus, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, brewer's yeast, ...

  16. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of the volatile oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the qualitative methods used for the control of the antimicrobial activity, the method of diffusion on filter paper discs proved to be the most efficient, the results correlating well with the MIC. Our studies have demonstrated the efficiency of the natural compounds' of T. majus L. in anti-inflammatory treatments in animals.

  17. Studies on the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of methanolic extracts of the brown seaweed Sargassum swartzii (Turner) C. Agardh (Phaeophyta) and green seaweed Ulva reticulata Forsskal (Chlorophyta) were examined. S. swartzii and U. reticulata extracts at the dose of 500 mg/kg body weight showed analgesic effects in ...

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Effect Of Some Common Nigerian Vegetables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanol extracts of four common Nigerian vegetables; A.graveoleus, C.argentia, T. triangulare and T.occidentalis were investigated for anti-inflammatory activity in rats using carrageenan. Carrageenan-induced oedema in the sub-plantar hind paw of vegetable extracts treated rats was significantly inhibited. This finding ...

  19. Anti-inflammatory activity of Wigandia urens and Acalypha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... Alexandre-Moreira MS, Piuvezam MR, Araujo CC, Thomas G (1999). Studies on the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of Curatella americana L. J. Ethnopharmacol. 67: 171-177. Argueta VA (1994). Atlas de las Plantas de la Medicina Tradicional. Mexicana II. Instituto Nacional Indigenista, México City ...

  20. Anti inflammatory and antipyretic activities of the methanol leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acacia ataxacantha (Leguminosae) has been reported to be used in traditional medicine for management of pain and inflammation. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti inflammatory and antipyretic activities of methanol leaf extract of Acacia ataxacantha in rats. The acute toxicity study was carried out using ...

  1. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of Nothospondias staudtii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aqueous (AENS), methanolic (MENS) and chloroform (CENS) extracts of the leaves of Nothospondias staudtii Engl (Anacardianceae) were screened for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in mice and rats. Pain responses were studied in mice using the tail immersion and acetic acid induced writing while ...

  2. Topical anti-inflammatory activity of yacon leaf extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane B. Oliveira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. H. Rob. , Asteraceae, known as yacon, is an herb that is traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in folk medicine. However, recent studies have demonstrated that this plant has other interesting properties such as anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory actions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the topical anti-inflammatory property of different extracts prepared from yacon leaves and analyze the role of different chemical classes in this activity. Three yacon leaf extracts were obtained: aqueous extract, where chlorogenic acid derivatives and sesquiterpene lactones were detected; leaf rinse extract, rich in sesquiterpene lactones; and polar extract, rich in chlorogenic acid derivatives. All the extracts exhibited anti-edematogenic activity in vivo (aqueous extract: 25.9% edema inhibition at 0.50 mg/ear; polar extract: 42.7% inhibition at 0.25 mg/ear; and leaf rinse extract: 44.1% inhibition at 0.25 mg/ear. The leaf rinse extract furnished the best results regarding neutrophil migration inhibition, and NO, TNF-α and PGE2 inhibition. These data indicate that both sesquiterpene lactones and chlorogenic acid derivatives contribute to the anti-inflammatory action, although sesquiterpene lactones seem to have more pronounced effects. In conclusion, yacon leaf extracts, particularly the sesquiterpene lactone-rich extract, has potential use as topical anti-inflammatory agent.

  3. Topical anti-inflammatory activity of yacon leaf extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane B. Oliveira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. H. Rob. , Asteraceae, known as yacon, is an herb that is traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in folk medicine. However, recent studies have demonstrated that this plant has other interesting properties such as anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory actions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the topical anti-inflammatory property of different extracts prepared from yacon leaves and analyze the role of different chemical classes in this activity. Three yacon leaf extracts were obtained: aqueous extract, where chlorogenic acid derivatives and sesquiterpene lactones were detected; leaf rinse extract, rich in sesquiterpene lactones; and polar extract, rich in chlorogenic acid derivatives. All the extracts exhibited anti-edematogenic activity in vivo (aqueous extract: 25.9% edema inhibition at 0.50 mg/ear; polar extract: 42.7% inhibition at 0.25 mg/ear; and leaf rinse extract: 44.1% inhibition at 0.25 mg/ear. The leaf rinse extract furnished the best results regarding neutrophil migration inhibition, and NO, TNF-α and PGE2 inhibition. These data indicate that both sesquiterpene lactones and chlorogenic acid derivatives contribute to the anti-inflammatory action, although sesquiterpene lactones seem to have more pronounced effects. In conclusion, yacon leaf extracts, particularly the sesquiterpene lactone-rich extract, has potential use as topical anti-inflammatory agent.

  4. Obtaining from grape pomace an enzymatic extract with anti-inflammatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morgado, B; Candiracci, M; Santa-María, C; Revilla, E; Gordillo, B; Parrado, J; Castaño, A

    2015-03-01

    Grape pomace, a winemaking industry by-product, is a rich source of bioactive dietary compounds. Using proteases we have developed an enzymatic process for obtaining a water-soluble extract (GP-EE) that contains biomolecules such as peptides, carbohydrates, lipids and polyphenols in soluble form. Of especial interest is its high polyphenol content (12%), of which 77% are flavonoids and 33% are phenolic acids. The present study evaluates in vitro the potential anti-inflammatory effect of GP-EE by monitoring the expression of inflammatory molecules on N13 microglia cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). GP-EE decreases the mRNA levels of the inflammatory molecules studied. The molecules under study were as follows: inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), the ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1(Iba-1) and the Toll like receptor-4 (TLR-4), as well as the iNOS protein level in LPS-stimulated microglia. Our findings suggest that, as a result of its ability to regulate excessive microglial activation, GP-EE possesses anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, acting as a chemopreventive agent, it may be of therapeutic interest in neurodegenerative diseases involving neuroinflammation. We can, therefore, propose GP-EE as a useful natural extract and one that would be beneficial to apply in the field of functional foods.

  5. The Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Aspidosperma tomentosum (Apocynaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anansa Bezerra de Aquino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the crude ethanolic extract (CEE, its fractions, and the flavonoid isorhamnetin from Aspidosperma tomentosum using models of nociception and inflammation in mice. In the writhing test, the CEE and its fractions (except for soluble phase, CHCl3 100% and EtAcO 100% at 100 mg/kg p.o. induced antinociceptive activity. Isorhamnetin (100 μmol/kg, p.o. was also active. In the hot plate test, only the treatment with the fractions Hex : CHCl3 50%, CHCl3 100%, and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% (100 mg/kg, p.o. increased the latency time, reversed by the opioid antagonist naloxone. Fractions that were active in the hot plate test did not show catalepsy condition. It was observed that CEE, all fractions, and isorhamnetin reduced the formalin effects in the neurogenic phase. In the inflammatory phase, only CEE, isorhamnetin, and CHCl3 100% and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% fractions were active. CEE and all fractions, except for CHCl3 : MeOH 10% fraction, isorhamnetin, and soluble fraction were able to produce an antioedematogenic activity in the ear capsaicin-induced edema test. In the thioglycolate-induced peritonitis, only EtAcO 100% fraction was not active. The results demonstrate that A. tomentosum has antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models.

  6. The antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Aspidosperma tomentosum (Apocynaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Anansa Bezerra de; Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz Henrique Agra; Matta, Carolina Barbosa Brito da; Epifânio, Willians Antônio do Nascimento; Aquino, Pedro Gregório Vieira; Santana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana; de Araújo-Júnior, João Xavier

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the crude ethanolic extract (CEE), its fractions, and the flavonoid isorhamnetin from Aspidosperma tomentosum using models of nociception and inflammation in mice. In the writhing test, the CEE and its fractions (except for soluble phase, CHCl3 100% and EtAcO 100%) at 100 mg/kg p.o. induced antinociceptive activity. Isorhamnetin (100  μ mol/kg, p.o.) was also active. In the hot plate test, only the treatment with the fractions Hex : CHCl3 50%, CHCl3 100%, and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% (100 mg/kg, p.o.) increased the latency time, reversed by the opioid antagonist naloxone. Fractions that were active in the hot plate test did not show catalepsy condition. It was observed that CEE, all fractions, and isorhamnetin reduced the formalin effects in the neurogenic phase. In the inflammatory phase, only CEE, isorhamnetin, and CHCl3 100% and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% fractions were active. CEE and all fractions, except for CHCl3 : MeOH 10% fraction, isorhamnetin, and soluble fraction were able to produce an antioedematogenic activity in the ear capsaicin-induced edema test. In the thioglycolate-induced peritonitis, only EtAcO 100% fraction was not active. The results demonstrate that A. tomentosum has antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of electronic signal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Robert H; Sorgnard, Richard E

    2008-01-01

    Inflammation often plays a key role in the perpetuation of pain. Chronic inflammatory conditions (e.g. osteoarthritis, immune system dysfunction, micro-circulatory disease, painful neuritis, and even heart disease) have increased as baby boomers age. Medicine's current anti-inflammatory choices are NSAIDs and steroids; the value in promoting cure and side effect risks of these medications are unclear and controversial, especially considering individual patient variations. Electricity has continuously been a powerful tool in medicine for thousands of years. All medical professionals are, to some degree, aware of electrotherapy; those who directly use electricity for treatment know of its anti-inflammatory effects. Electronic signal treatment (EST), as an extension of presently available technology, may reasonably have even more anti-inflammatory effects. EST is a digitally produced alternating current sinusoidal electronic signal with associated harmonics to produce theoretically reasonable and/or scientifically documented physiological effects when applied to the human body. These signals are produced by advanced electronics not possible even 10 to 15 years ago. The potential long-lasting anti-inflammatory effects of some electrical currents are based on basic physical and biochemical facts listed in the text below, namely that of stimulating and signaling effective and long-lasting anti-inflammatory effects in nerve and muscle cells. The safety of electrotherapeutic treatments in general and EST in particular has been established through extensive clinical use. The principles of physics have been largely de-emphasized in modern medicine in favor of chemistry. These electrical treatments, a familiar application of physics, thus represent powerful and appropriate elements of physicians' pain care armamentaria in the clinic and possibly for prescription for use at home to improve overall patient care and maintenance of quality of life via low-risk and potentially

  8. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory potential therapy for opportunistic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Areej M; Amro, Bassam I; Mashallah, Sundus; Haddadin, Randa N

    2016-05-31

    Methanolic extracts of six plants (Arbutus andrachne, Chrysanthemum coronarium, Inula viscosa, Origanum syriacum, Punica granatum, and Rosmarinus officinalis) used in traditional medicine for the treatment of bacterial and fungal infections were evaluated. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity of some medicinal plants in lowering the risk of opportunistic infections of the oral cavity caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. Extracts were evaluated separately and in a mixture. The methanolic plant extracts were tested against three opportunistic microorganisms by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). They were also evaluated for their ability to suppress the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 while not suppressing the release of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using ELISA. All extracts showed both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities. However, O. syriacum exhibited the highest antimicrobial activity for the three microorganisms among all of the tested extracts (MIC S. aureus: 1 mg/mL; P. aeruginosa: 2 mg/mL; and C. albicans: 1 mg/mL). The extracts inhibited the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 with apparent dose-dependent responses while they attenuated the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The mixture of O. syriacum and R. officinalis showed an anti-inflammatory effect, with a synergistic antimicrobial effect. These findings support the idea that a diet rich in plants and herbs may contribute to the reduction of inflammation and microbial growth and may also be preventive against various infections, including those related to the oral cavity.

  9. Role of effective composition on antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, sedative-hypnotic capacities of 6 common edible Lilium varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Huang, Hanhan; Zhang, Yao; Li, Xia; Li, Hongfa; Jiang, Qianqian; Gao, Wenyuan

    2015-04-01

    Nine Lilium samples (belong to 6 different cultivars with different maturity stage) were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed of total phenolics (TP), total flavonoids (TF), total saponins (TS), total carbohydrates (TC, polysaccharides), and soluble proteins contents (SP), and the monomeric components were quantified utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector (HPLC-PAD) associated with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Antioxidant activity (reducing power and DPPH radical scavenging activity), anti-inflammatory (xylene-induced mouse ear edema detumescent assay and carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema detumescent assay), and sedative-hypnotic capacities (sodium pentobarbital-induced sleep assay) were comparatively evaluated in mouse model. Additionally, correlation analysis and principal component analysis were carried out to detect clustering and elucidate relationships between components' concentrations and bioactivities to clarify the role of effective composition. Lilium bulbs in later maturity stage preliminary evidenced higher saponins content, and lower phenolic acids and flavonoids content. The result demonstrated that Lilium bulbs generally had distinct antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and sedative-hypnotic capacities. Varieties statistically differed (P Lilium varieties of Dongbei and Lanzhou presented potent sedative-hypnotic effect and anti-inflammatory activity. The antioxidant capacity was related to the phenolic acids and flavonoids contents, the anti-inflammatory and sedative-hypnotic capacities were related to the saponins content. This is first study presenting comprehensive description of common edible Lilium bulbs' chemical compositions, sedative-hypnotic, and anti-inflammatory capacities grown in China. It would informatively benefit the genetic selection and cultivated optimization of Lilium varieties to improve nutritional quality, and promote Lilium bulbs as a therapeutic functional

  10. Anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of Bursera copallifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columba-Palomares, M F María C; Villareal, Dra María L; Acevedo Quiroz, M C Macdiel E; Marquina Bahena, M C Silvia; Álvarez Berber, Dra Laura P; Rodríguez-López, Dra Verónica

    2015-10-01

    The plant species Bursera copallifera (DC) bullock is used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation. The leaves of this plant can be prepared as an infusion to treat migraines, bronchitis, and dental pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of organic extracts from the stems, stem bark, and leaves of B. copallifera, which was selected based on the knowledge of its traditional use. We evaluated the ability of extracts to inhibit mouse ear inflammation in response to topical application of 12-O tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. The extracts with anti-inflammatory activity were evaluated for their inhibition of pro-inflammatory enzymes. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxic activities of the organic extracts were evaluated using the sulforhodamine B assay. The hydroalcoholic extract of the stems (HAS) exhibited an anti-inflammatory activity of 54.3% (0.5 mg/ear), whereas the anti-inflammatory activity of the dichloromethane-methanol extract from the leaves (DMeL) was 55.4% at a dose of 0.1 mg/ear. Methanol extract from the leaves (MeL) showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity (IC50 = 4.4 μg/mL), hydroalcoholic extract of leaves, and DMeL also reduce the enzyme activity, (IC50 = 6.5 μg/mL, IC50 = 5.7 μg/mL), respectively, from stems HAS exhibit activity at the evaluated concentrations (IC50 =6.4 μg/mL). The hydroalcoholic extract of the stems exhibited the highest cytotoxic activity against a breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF7, IC50 = 0.90 μg/mL), whereas DMeL exhibited an IC50 value of 19.9 μg/mL. In conclusion, extracts from leaves and stems inhibited cyclooxygenase-1, which is the target enzyme for nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs, and some of these extracts demonstrated substantial antiproliferative effects against the MCF7 cell line. These results validate the traditional use of B. copallifera.

  11. Evolution of the Macrophage CD163 Phenotype and Cytokine Profiles in a Human Model of Resolving Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy J. Evans

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cantharidin skin blisters were examined over two days to model the acute and resolving phases of inflammation in human skin. Four blisters were created by topical administration of cantharidin (0.1% v/v to the forearm of healthy volunteers, with IRB approval. Duplicate skin blisters were aspirated at 16 and 40 hours to model the proinflammatory and resolving phases, respectively. There was a significant increase in leukocyte infiltrate at 40 h with appearance of a “resolving macrophage” phenotype CD14+CD163+ by flow cytometry. Neutrophils acquired apoptotic markers at 40 h and were observed to be phagocytosed by macrophagic “Reiter’s” cells. Multiplex cytokine analysis demonstrated that monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1/CCL2, interleukin- (IL- 6, IL-8/CXCL8, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α, and eotaxin (CCL11 were all significantly upregulated at 16 h compared with 40 h. In contrast, immunoregulatory transforming growth factor- (TGF- β, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22, and interferon-inducible protein (IP-10/CXCL10 were significantly elevated at 40 h. Our results demonstrate that the phases of inflammation and resolution can be discriminated in a two-day model of dermal wound healing. This confirms and extends our understanding of wound repair in humans and provides a powerful research tool for use in clinical settings and to track the molecular benefits of therapeutic intervention.

  12. Synthesis, Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activities of 3- Ethyl-2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    inflammatory activities. Results: ... series, and compared well with the reference standard, diclofenac sodium, which exbited analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of 62.04 ... and anti-inflammatory properties. The present work is an extension of ...

  13. In vivo Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Zapoteca portoricensis (Jacq) HM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Zapoteca portoricensis possesses significant anti-inflammatory activity in acute inflammation in rats. The terpenoids and steroids present in the column fractions may be responsible for the activity. Keywords: Zapoteca portoricensis; Anti-inflammatory, Egg albumeninduced edema, Terpenoids; Steroids.

  14. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and the risk of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manthripragada, Angelika D; Schernhammer, Eva S; Qiu, Jiaheng

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD).......Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD)....

  15. Biodistribution and PET Imaging of a Novel [(68)Ga]-Anti-CD163-Antibody Conjugate in Rats with Collagen-Induced Arthritis and in Controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichendorff, Sascha; Svendsen, Pia; Bender, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    -68 and evaluated stability and binding specificity of the conjugate ([(68)Ga]ED2) in vitro. Furthermore, tracer biodistribution was assessed in vivo in healthy rats and rats with acute collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) by MicroPET and tissue analysis. RESULTS: Radiosynthesis of [(68)Ga]ED2 antibody...... was also changed in the sense that a significantly higher liver uptake and lower spleen uptake of [(68)Ga]ED2 was measured in CIA rats that accordingly showed a corresponding change in level of CD163 expression. CONCLUSIONS: [(68)Ga]ED2 specifically binds CD163 in vitro and in vivo. Biodistribution studies...... in CIA rats suggest that this novel tool may have applications in studies of inflammatory diseases....

  16. Anti-inflammatory properties of edible mushrooms: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszyńska, Bożena; Grzywacz-Kisielewska, Agata; Kała, Katarzyna; Gdula-Argasińska, Joanna

    2018-03-15

    Mushrooms have been used extensively, owing to their nutritional and medicinal value, for thousands of years. Modern research confirms the therapeutic effect of traditionally used species. Inflammation is a natural response of the immune system to damaging factors, e.g. physical, chemical and pathogenic. Deficiencies of antioxidants, vitamins, and microelements, as well as physiological processes, such as aging, can affect the body's ability to resolve inflammation. Mushrooms are rich in anti-inflammatory components, such as polysaccharides, phenolic and indolic compounds, mycosteroids, fatty acids, carotenoids, vitamins, and biometals. Metabolites from mushrooms of the Basidiomycota taxon possess antioxidant, anticancer, and most significantly, anti-inflammatory properties. Recent reports indicate that edible mushroom extracts exhibit favourable therapeutic and health-promoting benefits, particularly in relation to diseases associated with inflammation. In all certainty, edible mushrooms can be referred to as a "superfood" and are recommended as a valuable constituent of the daily diet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Isoflavones: Anti-Inflammatory Benefit and Possible Caveats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, a biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, is also known to be involved in a host of diseases, such as obesity, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and even cancer. Isoflavones are a class of flavonoids that exhibit antioxidant, anticancer, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Increasing evidence has highlighted the potential for isoflavones to prevent the chronic diseases in which inflammation plays a key role, though the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, some studies have raised concerns about isoflavones induced negative effects like carcinogenesis, thymic involution, and immunosuppression. Therefore, this review aims to summarize the anti-inflammatory effects of isoflavones, unravel the underlying mechanisms, and present the potential health risks.

  18. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Prostatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Ishiguro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic diseases are characterized by increased activity of cytokines, growth factors, and cyclooxygenases- (COX- 1 and 2. Activation of COX-1 and COX-2 results in increased levels of prostaglandins and the induction of angiogenic, antiapoptotic and inflammatory processes. Inhibition of COX enzymes by members of the widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID class of drugs decreases prostaglandin production, and exerts a variety of anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, and antinociceptive effects. While numerous in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies have shown that NSAIDs inhibit the risk and progression of prostatic diseases, the relationship between NSAIDs and such diseases remains controversial. Here we review the literature in this area, critically analyzing the benefits and caveats associated with the use of NSAIDs in the treatment of prostatic diseases.

  19. Anti-inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activity of Ouabain in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Ingrid Bezerra de Vasconcelos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na+/K+-ATPase pump, was identified as an endogenous substance of human plasma. Ouabain has been studied for its ability to interfere with various regulatory mechanisms. Despite the studies portraying the ability of ouabain to modulate the immune response, little is known about the effect of this substance on the inflammatory process. The aim of this work was to study the effects triggered by ouabain on inflammation and nociceptive models. Ouabain produced a reduction in the mouse paw edema induced by carrageenan, compound 48/80 and zymosan. This anti-inflammatory potential might be related to the inhibition of prostaglandin E2, bradykinin, and mast-cell degranulation but not to histamine. Ouabain also modulated the inflammation induced by concanavalin A by inhibiting cell migration. Besides that, ouabain presented antinociceptive activity. Taken these data together, this work demonstrated, for the first time, that ouabain presented in vivo analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects.

  20. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of r.a.p . ( Radix Angelicae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper was to study the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Radix Angelicae Pubescentis (R.A.P) ethanol extracts. Three classic anti-inflammatory models and two analgesic models were used in this research. In anti-inflammatory tests, all the extracts have a certain inhibition on the acute ...

  1. Anti-inflammatory and Antinociceptive Effects of the Alcoholic Extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-inflammatory and Antinociceptive Effects of the Alcoholic Extract of Indian Polygala arvensis in Experimental Animals. ... time in the hot plate method by 69.55% (p < 0.01) and 107.13% (p < 0.001) respectively as well as in analgesymeter-induced mechanical pain by 28.84% (p < 0.5) and 55.71% (p < 0.05) respectively.

  2. Original Research Article In vivo Anti-Inflammatory Effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Acetylsalicylic acid. 100. 0.88 ± 0.09 (19.3) 0.35 ± 0.12 (64.7)*. 0.31 ± 0.08 (45.6) *. *P<0.05, **P<0.01, (n=5): significant compared to the vehicle treated group. Values in parenthesis represent percent inhibition of edema. respectively. The anti-inflammatory effect of the crude methanol extract, chloroform fractions and.

  3. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of methanol extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    studied using albumen-induced paw oedema and formalin-induced paw lick in rats as the anti-inflammatory test models; acetic acid-induced ..... meperidine, and brain stem stimulation in rats and cats. Pain. 4: 161-174. Fields H.L. (1987). Analgesic Drugs. In: Day W, ed. Pain. MacGraw- Hill, USA. p. 272. García M.D. ...

  4. Mechanisms of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Asad; Steele, Vernon E; Menter, David G; Hawk, Ernest T

    2016-02-01

    Various clinical and epidemiologic studies show that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin and cyclooxygenase inhibitors (COXIBs) help prevent cancer. Since eicosanoid metabolism is the main inhibitory targets of these drugs the resulting molecular and biological impact is generally accepted. As our knowledge base and technology progress we are learning that additional targets may be involved. This review attempts to summarize these new developments in the field. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECTS OF CHAMOMILE ESSENTIAL OIL IN MICE

    OpenAIRE

    Fabian, D.; Juhás, Š. (Štefan); Bukovska, A.; Bujňáková, D.; Grešáková, L.; Koppel, J.

    2011-01-01

    Essential oils are plant secondary metabolites with positive pharmacological properties, e.g. anti-oxidative, antimicrobial or immunomodulative, but they can have toxic and allergic effects as well. The aim of this study was to analyze anti-inflammatory effects of chamomile essential oil dietary administration in carrageenan paw oedema and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis. Mice received chamomile essential oil in three concentrations (5000, 2500 and 1250 ppm) in the standard roden...

  6. Hepatoprotective and anti-inflammatory activities of Plantago major L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türel, Idris; Ozbek, Hanefi; Erten, Remzi; Oner, Ahmet Cihat; Cengiz, Nureddin; Yilmaz, Orhan

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities of Plantago major L. (PM). Anti-inflammatory activity: Control and reference groups were administered isotonic saline solution (ISS) and indomethacin, respectively. Plantago major groups were injected PM in doses of 5 mg/kg (PM-I), 10 mg/kg (PM-II), 20 mg/kg (PM-III) and 25 mg/kg (PM-IV). Before and three hours after the injections, the volume of right hind-paw of rats was measured using a plethysmometer. HEPATOPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY: The hepatotoxicity was induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) administration. Control, CCl4 and reference groups received isotonic saline solution, CCl4 and silibinin, respectively. Plantago major groups received CCl4 (0.8 ml/kg) and PM in doses of 10, 20 and 25 mg/kg, respectively for seven days. Blood samples and liver were collected on the 8th day after the animals were killed. Plantago major had an anti-inflammatory effect matching to that of control group at doses of 20 and 25 mg/kg. It was found that reduction in the inflammation was 90.01% with indomethacin, 3.10% with PM-I, 41.56% with PM-II, 45.87% with PM-III and 49.76% with PM-IV. Median effective dose (ED50) value of PM was found to be 7.507 mg/kg. Plantago major (25 mg/kg) significantly reduced the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels when compared to the CCl4 group. The histopathological findings showed a significant difference between the PM (25 mg/kg) and CCl4 groups. The results showed that PM had a considerable anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities.

  7. Synthesis, in vitro anti-inflammatory activity and molecular docking ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a mechanism of action for aspirin-like drugs Nature 231. 232. 2. Reitz D B and Isakson P C 1995 Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors Curr. Pharm. Design 1 211. 3. Gans K R, Galbraith W, Roman R J, Haber S B, Kerr J S,. Schmidt W K, Smith C, Hewes W E and Ackerman N R. 1990 Anti-inflammatory and safety profile of DuP 697,.

  8. Anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapy with ketoprofen ameliorates experimental lymphatic vascular insufficiency in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Nakamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disruption of the lymphatic vasculature causes edema, inflammation, and end-tissue destruction. To assess the therapeutic efficacy of systemic anti-inflammatory therapy in this disease, we examined the impact of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, ketoprofen, and of a soluble TNF-alpha receptor (sTNF-R1 upon tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha activity in a mouse model of acquired lymphedema. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Lymphedema was induced by microsurgical ablation of major lymphatic conduits in the murine tail. Untreated control mice with lymphedema developed significant edema and extensive histopathological inflammation compared to sham surgical controls. Short-term ketoprofen treatment reduced tail edema and normalized the histopathology while paradoxically increasing TNF-alpha gene expression and cytokine levels. Conversely, sTNF-R1 treatment increased tail volume, exacerbated the histopathology, and decreased TNF-alpha gene expression. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C, which stimulates lymphangiogenesis, closely correlated with TNF-alpha expression. CONCLUSIONS: Ketoprofen therapy reduces experimental post-surgical lymphedema, yet direct TNF-alpha inhibition does not. Reducing inflammation while preserving TNF-alpha activity appears to optimize the repair response. It is possible that the observed favorable responses, at least in part, are mediated through enhanced VEGF-C signaling.

  9. Anti-inflammatory activity of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hsiung Pan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating epidemiological and clinical evidence shows that inflammation is an important risk factor for various human diseases. Thus, suppressing chronic inflammation has the potential to delay, prevent, and control various chronic diseases, including cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, joint, skin, pulmonary, blood, lymph, liver, pancreatic, and intestinal diseases. Various natural products from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM have been shown to safely suppress proinflammatory pathways and control inflammation-associated disease. In vivo and/or in vitro studies have demonstrated that anti-inflammatory effects of TCM occur by inhibition of the expression of master transcription factors (for example, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, pro-inflammatory cytokines (for example, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, chemokines (for example, chemokine (C-C motif ligand (CCL-24, intercellular adhesion molecule expression and pro-inflammatory mediators (for example, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2. However, a handful of review articles have focused on the anti-inflammatory activities of TCM and explore their possible mechanisms of action. In this review, we summarize recent research attempting to identify the anti-inflammatory constituents of TCM and their molecular targets that may create new opportunities for innovation in modern pharmacology.

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Cembranoids from the Soft Coral Lobophytum crassum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Hung Lai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Cembrane-type diterpenoids are among the most frequently encountered natural products from the soft corals of the genus Lobophytum. In the course of our investigation to identify anti-inflammatory constituents from a wild-type soft coral Lobophytum crassum, two new cembranoids, lobophyolide A (1 and B (2, along with five known compounds (3–7, were isolated. The structures of these natural products were identified using NMR and MS spectroscopic analyses. Compound 1 was found to possess the first identified α-epoxylactone group among all cembrane-type diterpenoids. The in vitro anti-inflammatory effect of compounds 1–5 was evaluated. The results showed that compounds 1–5 not only reduced IL-12 release, but also attenuated NO production in LPS-activated dendritic cells. Our data indicated that the isolated series of cembrane-type diterpenoids demonstrated interesting structural features and anti-inflammatory activity which could be further developed into therapeutic entities.

  11. Anti-inflammatory activity of polysaccharide from Pholiota nameko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiping; Lu, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Shuhai; Lu, Meijun; Liu, Hongmei

    2008-06-01

    Pholiota nameko polysaccharide (PNPS-1) has been isolated and purified by enzymatic hydrolysis, hot water extraction, ethanol precipitation, and ion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. The anti-inflammatory activity of PNPS-1 was evaluated in rodents using xylene-induced ear edema, egg albumin-, carrageenin-, and formaldehyde-induced paw edema, cotton pellet granuloma test, adhesion of peritoneal leukocytes in vitro, and ulcerogenic activity. The results showed that PNPS-1 (5 mg/ear) inhibited topical edema in the mouse ear and at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg (intraperitoneally) it significantly suppressed the development of egg albumin-, carrageenin-, and formaldehyde-induced paw edema in the animals. PNPS-1 (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, per oral) significantly inhibited the growth of granuloma tissues induced by subcutaneously implanted cotton pellets in rats by 10.96, 18.07, and 43.75%, respectively. PNPS-1 also inhibited spontaneous and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-activated adhesion of peritoneal leukocytes in vitro. Further, both acute as well as chronic administration of PNPS-1 (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, per oral) did not produce any gastric lesion in rats. In conclusion, these data indicated that PNPS-1 possesses significant anti-inflammatory activity suggesting its potential as an anti-inflammatory agent for use in the treatment of various inflammatory-related diseases.

  12. Structural characterization of anti-inflammatory Immunoglobulin G Fc proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Alysia A.; Giddens, John; Pincetic, Andrew; Lomino, Joseph V.; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a central mediator of host defense due to its ability to recognize and eliminate pathogens. The recognition and effector responses are encoded on distinct regions of IgGs. The diversity of the antigen recognition Fab domains accounts for IgG's ability to bind with high specificity to essentially any antigen. Recent studies have indicated that the Fc effector domain also displays considerable heterogeneity, accounting for its complex effector functions of inflammation, modulation and immune suppression. Therapeutic anti-tumor antibodies, for example, require the pro-inflammatory properties of the IgG Fc to eliminate tumor cells, while the anti-inflammatory activity of Intravenous Immunoglobulin G (IVIG) requires specific Fc glycans for activity. In particular, the anti-inflammatory activity of IVIG is ascribed to a small population of IgGs in which the Asn297-linked complex N-glycans attached to each Fc CH2 domain include terminal α2,6-linked sialic acids. We used chemoenzymatic glycoengineering to prepare fully di-sialylated IgG Fc and solved its crystal structure. Comparison of the structures of asialylated Fc, sialylated Fc, and F241A Fc, a mutant that displays increased glycan sialylation, suggests that increased conformational flexibility of the CH2 domain is associated with the switch from pro- to anti-inflammatory activity of the Fc. PMID:25036289

  13. UV filters, ingredients with a recognized anti-inflammatory effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Couteau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explain observed differences during SPF determination using either an in vivo or in vitro method, we hypothesized on the presence of ingredients having anti-inflammatory properties. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To research our hypothesis, we studied the 21 UV filters both available on the market and authorized by European regulations and subjected these filters to the phorbol-myristate-acetate test using mice. We then catalogued the 13 filters demonstrating a significant anti-inflammatory effect with edema inhibition percentages of more than 70%. The filters are: diethylhexyl butamido triazone (92%, benzophenone-5 and titanium dioxide (90%, benzophenone-3 (83%, octocrylène and isoamyl p-methoxycinnamate (82%, PEG-25 PABA and homosalate (80%, octyl triazone and phenylbenzimidazole sulfonic acid (78%, octyl dimethyl PABA (75%, bis-ethylhexyloxyphenol methoxyphenyl triazine and diethylamino hydroxybenzoyl hexylbenzoate (70%. These filters were tested at various concentrations, including their maximum authorized dose. We detected a dose-response relationship. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The anti-inflammatory effect of a sunscreen ingredient may affect the in vivo SPF value.

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Activity and Composition of Senecio salignus Kunth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuauhtemoc Pérez González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Senecio salignus. This medicinal plant is often used in Mexico for the treatment of fever and rheumatism. Chloroform and methanol extracts of the plant were tested on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA- induced edema in mice ears. The methanol extract of the plant inhibited edema by 36±4.4% compared with the control, while the chloroform extract exhibited an even greater level of inhibition (64.1%. The chloroform extract was then fractionated, and the composition of the active fraction was determined by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory activity of this fraction was then tested on TPA-induced ear edema in mice, and we found that the active fraction could inhibit edema by 46.9%. The anti-inflammatory effect of the fraction was also tested on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats at doses of 100 mg/kg; a 58.9±2.8% reduction of the edema was observed 4 h after administration of carrageenan, and the effect was maintained for 5 h.

  15. Anti-inflammatory activity of electron-deficient organometallics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingwen; Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; Shang, Lijun; Barry, Nicolas P E

    2017-11-01

    We report an evaluation of the cytotoxicity of a series of electron-deficient (16-electron) half-sandwich precious metal complexes of ruthenium, osmium and iridium ([Os/Ru( η 6 - p -cymene)(1,2-dicarba- closo -dodecarborane-1,2-dithiolato)] ( 1/2 ), [Ir( η 5 -pentamethylcyclopentadiene)(1,2-dicarba- closo -dodecarborane-1,2-dithiolato)] ( 3 ), [Os/Ru( η 6 - p -cymene)(benzene-1,2-dithiolato)] ( 4/5 ) and [Ir( η 5 -pentamethylcyclopentadiene)(benzene-1,2-dithiolato)] ( 6 )) towards RAW 264.7 murine macrophages and MRC-5 fibroblast cells. Complexes 3 and 6 were found to be non-cytotoxic. The anti-inflammatory activity of 1-6 was evaluated in both cell lines after nitric oxide (NO) production and inflammation response induced by bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as the stimulus. All metal complexes were shown to exhibit dose-dependent inhibitory effects on LPS-induced NO production on both cell lines. Remarkably, the two iridium complexes 3 and 6 trigger a full anti-inflammatory response against LPS-induced NO production, which opens up new avenues for the development of non-cytotoxic anti-inflammatory drug candidates with distinct structures and solution chemistry from that of organic drugs, and as such with potential novel mechanisms of action.

  16. Influence of Boiling Duration of GCSB-5 on Index Compound Content and Antioxidative and Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Hee; Chung, Hwa-Jin; Shin, Joon-Shik; Ha, In-Hyuk; Kim, Me-Riong; Koh, Wonil; Lee, Jinho

    2017-01-01

    GCSB-5, an herbal drug composition with an anti-inflammatory effect, is prepared by boiling, which is the most common herbal extraction method in traditional Korean medicine. Several parameters are involved in the process, i.e., extractant type, herb-to-extractant ratio, extraction temperature and pressure, and total boiling time. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of boiling time on index compound amount and the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities of GCSB-5. Different samples of GCSB-5 were obtained by decocting for 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 240 min. Each sample was tested for hydrogen ion concentration (pH), total soluble solid content (TSSC), marker compound profiles, and antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity. pH was found to decrease while TSSC increased with extended decoction. Marker compound contents for GCSB-5 (acanthoside D for Acanthopanax sessiliflorus Seem, 20-hydroxyecdysone for Achyranthes japonica Nakai, and pinoresinol diglucoside for Eucommia ulmoides Oliver) remained relatively constant regardless of the length of boiling. Total D-glucose amount increased with longer boiling. The antioxidative and anti-inflammatory potentials of GCSB-5 were not substantially affected by decoction duration. Biological characteristics and marker compound content of GCSB-5 were not altered significantly in prolonged boiling. Longer boiling duration of GCSB-5 did not increase yield in a time-dependent manner, but yields of 210 and 240 min samples were significantly higherHydrogen ion concentration of GCSB-5 samples decreased while total soluble solid content and D-glucose concentration levels increased with boiling durationAlthough concentrations of some index compounds increased with extended boiling duration of GCSB-5, increase was small and not in a direct proportional relationshipAntioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of GCSB-5 were not substantially affected by decoction duration. Abbreviations used: CAM: Complementary

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils from Mangifera indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R M; Dutra, T S; Simionatto, E; Ré, N; Kassuya, C A L; Cardoso, C A L

    2017-03-16

    Mangifera indica is widely found in Brazil, and its leaves are used as an anti-inflammatory agent in folk medicine. The aim of this study is to perform composition analysis of essential oils from the M. indica varieties, espada (EOMIL1) and coração de boi (EOMIL2), and confirm their anti-inflammatory properties. Twenty-three volatile compounds were identified via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in two essential oils from the leaves. Paw edema and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were evaluated using the carrageenan-induced paw model, while leukocyte migration was analyzed using the pleurisy model. At oral doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg, the essential oils significantly reduced edema formation and the increase in MPO activity induced by carrageenan in rat paws. For a dose of 300 mg/kg EOMIL1, 62 ± 8% inhibition of edema was observed, while EOMIL2 led to 51 ± 7% inhibition of edema. At a dose of 100 mg/kg, the inhibition was 54 ± 9% for EOMIL1 and 37 ± 7% for EOMIL2. EOMIL1 and EOMIL2 significantly reduced MPO activity at doses of 100 mg/kg (47 ± 5 and 23 ± 8%, respectively) and 300 mg/kg (50 ± 9 and 31 ± 7%, respectively). In the pleurisy model, inhibitions were also observed for EOMIL1 and EOMIL2 in the leukocyte migration test. The results of the present study show that essential oils from M. indica differ in chemical composition and anti-inflammatory activity in rats.

  18. Fluridone as a new anti-inflammatory drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Mirko; Scarfì, Sonia; Sturla, Laura; Guida, Lucrezia; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Di Paola, Rosanna; Bruzzone, Santina; Salis, Annalisa; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2013-11-15

    Fluridone is a herbicide extensively utilized in agriculture for its documented safety in animals. Fluridone contains a 4(1H)-pyridone and a trifluoromethyl-benzene moiety, which are also present in molecules with analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. The established absence of adverse effects of Fluridone on animals prompted us to investigate whether it could represent a new anti-inflammatory compound targeting human cells. In stimulated human monocytes, micromolar Fluridone inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 expression and the release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and prostaglandin-E2, to a similar extent as Acetylsalicylic acid. Fluridone also inhibited the proliferation of aortic smooth muscle cells and reduced proliferation and cytokine release by human activated lymphocytes. The mechanism of Fluridone seems to rely on the dose-dependent inhibition of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB, a transcription factor playing a pivotal role in inflammation. Fluridone also inhibited the release from stimulated human monocytes of abscisic acid, a plant stress hormone recently discovered also in mammalian cells, where it stimulates pro-inflammatory responses. Interestingly, the mechanism of Fluridone's toxicity in plants relies on the inhibition of the enzyme phytoene desaturase, involved in the biosynthetic pathway of ß-carotene, the precursor of absciscic acid in plants. Finally, administration of Fluridone reduced peritoneal inflammation in Zymosan-treated mice. These results suggest that Fluridone could represent a new prototype of anti-inflammatory drug, also active on abscisic acid pro-inflammatory pathway. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-inflammatory profile of paricalcitol in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donate-Correa, Javier; Henríquez-Palop, Fernando; Martín-Núñez, Ernesto; Hernández-Carballo, Carolina; Ferri, Carla; Pérez-Delgado, Nayra; Muros-de-Fuentes, Mercedes; Mora-Fernández, Carmen; Navarro-González, Juan F

    Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, is used to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism in kidney transplant patients. Experimental and clinical studies in non-transplant kidney disease patients have found this molecule to have anti-inflammatory properties. In this exploratory study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory profile of paricalcitol in kidney-transplant recipients. Thirty one kidney transplant recipients with secondary hyperparathyroidism completed 3 months of treatment with oral paricalcitol (1μg/day). Serum concentrations and gene expression levels of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analysed at the beginning and end of the study. Paricalcitol significantly decreased parathyroid hormone levels with no changes in calcium and phosphorous. It also reduced serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) by 29% (P<0.05) and 9.5% (P<0.05) compared to baseline, respectively. Furthermore, gene expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in peripheral blood mononuclear cells decreased by 14.1% (P<0.001) and 34.1% (P<0.001), respectively. The ratios between pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10), both regarding serum concentrations and gene expression, also experienced a significant reduction. Paricalcitol administration to kidney transplant recipients has been found to have beneficial effects on inflammation, which may be associated with potential clinical benefits. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypersensitivity to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Christoffer V; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Mørtz, Charlotte G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are reported to be the second most common cause of drug hypersensitivity. In 2011, experts from the EAACI/ENDA group and GA(2)LEN proposed a new classification system for NSAID hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to classify...... responders reacted to non-pyrazolone drugs. Only one patient could not be classified according to the EAACI/ENDA system. An overlap between respiratory and cutaneous symptoms was found in 15/39 (38%) of patients. CONCLUSIONS: All but one of our patients could be classified according to the EAACI...

  1. Isolation, Characterization and Anti-Inflammatory Property of Thevetia Peruviana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thilagavathi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thevetia peruviana seeds contain glucosides of neriifolin, acetylneriifolin and thevetin. Seed oil distillates of Thevetia peruviana have been found to contain anti-bacterial activity. In the persent work, the fresh flowers of Thevetia peruviana was subjected to phytochemical studies. The results of the study showed that the flowers contain quercetin, kaempferol and quercetin-7-o-galactoside. The structure of the isolated compound was characterized by UV, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. The anti-inflammatory character of the isolated compound was tested by in vitro method and the results of the study revealed that the isolated compound showed a biphasic property.

  2. Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Macular Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Russo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are nowadays widely used in ophthalmology to reduce eye inflammation, pain, and cystoid macular edema associated with cataract surgery. Recently, new topical NSAIDs have been approved for topical ophthalmic use, allowing for greater drug penetration into the vitreous. Hence, new therapeutic effects can be achieved, such as reduction of exudation secondary to age-related macular degeneration or diabetic maculopathy. We provide an updated review on the clinical use of NSAIDs for retinal diseases, with a focus on the potential future applications.

  3. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Andrea; Costagliola, Ciro; Delcassi, Luisa; Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Semeraro, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are nowadays widely used in ophthalmology to reduce eye inflammation, pain, and cystoid macular edema associated with cataract surgery. Recently, new topical NSAIDs have been approved for topical ophthalmic use, allowing for greater drug penetration into the vitreous. Hence, new therapeutic effects can be achieved, such as reduction of exudation secondary to age-related macular degeneration or diabetic maculopathy. We provide an updated review on the clinical use of NSAIDs for retinal diseases, with a focus on the potential future applications.

  4. sTREM-1, sIL-2Rα, and IL-6, but not sCD163, might predict sepsis in polytrauma patients: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trancă, S; Oever, J T; Ciuce, C; Netea, M; Slavcovici, A; Petrișor, C; Hagău, N

    2017-06-01

    To investigate whether sTREM-1, sIL-2Rα, sCD163, and IL-6 predict septic complications following polytrauma. Prospective observational study in a university hospital intensive care unit. Blood samples were drawn on admission, 24 and 48 h after the injury from 64 adult polytrauma patients. The occurence of infectious complications was investigated. The sepsis-free rates for the multiple trauma patients were considered as end points in the Kaplan-Meier plot analysis. Upon admission, sIL-2Rα mean values were higher in the T group compared to the T&S patients (1789 ± 1027 pg/mL versus 1280 ± 605 pg/mL, p = 0.02). The initial mean values of sTREM-1, IL-6, and sCD163 did not discriminate between the T and T&S groups patients (p > 0.05). sTREM-1 cutoff was 62 pg/mL: the sepsis-free rates differed significantly between the patients with sTREM-1 concentrations lower and higher than the cutoff (80 versus 48 %, p sepsis; for sIL-2Rα values in the range 946-1593 pg/mL, the sepsis-free rate was 68 %, while from the patients with sIL-2Rα sepsis-free (p = 0.05). sCD163 cutoff of 1000 ng/mL did not discriminate between the patients (76 versus 64 %, p = 0.28). For IL-6, the sepsis-free rates differed significantly between the patients with concentrations lower and higher than 400 pg/mL (78 versus 38 %, p sepsis in multiple trauma patients. Level II-Diagnostic tests and criteria.

  5. Novel anti-inflammatory therapies for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Razi; Spagnoli, Vincent; Tardif, Jean-Claude; L'Allier, Philippe L

    2015-06-01

    The underlying role of inflammation in atherosclerosis has been characterized. However, current treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) predominantly consists of targeted reductions in serum lipoprotein levels rather than combating the deleterious effects of acute and chronic inflammation. Vascular inflammation acts by a number of different molecular and cellular pathways to contribute to atherogenesis. Over the last decades, both basic studies and clinical trials have provided evidence for the potential benefits of treatment of inflammation in CAD. During this period, development of pharmacotherapies directed towards inflammation in atherosclerosis has accelerated quickly. This review will highlight specific therapies targeting interleukin-1β (IL-1β), P-selectin and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). It will also aim to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of serpin administration, colchicine and intravenous HDL-directed treatment of CAD. We summarize the mechanistic rationale and evidence for these novel anti-inflammatory treatments at both the experimental and clinical levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic potential of Caesalpinia ferrea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Maria A. Lima

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Caesalpinia ferrea Mart. belongs to the family Fabaceae. Known as pau-ferro and jucá, it is used in folk medicine to treat diabetes, as antipyretic and antirheumatic. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of the ethanol extract of the fruits of C. ferrea (EECf. In the evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity, EECf (50 mg/kg produced significantly inhibition of ear edema by 66.6% compared to control. Indomethacin (10 mg/kg showed inhibition of 83.9% compared to control. EECf (50 mg/kg inhibited of vascular permeability induced by acetic acid and was also able to reduce of cell migration to the peritoneal cavity induced by thioglycolate. In the writhing test induced by acid acetic, EECf (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg significantly reduced the number of contortions by 24.9, 46.9 and 74.2%, respectively. In the formalin test, EECf presented effects only in the second phase. The results provided experimental evidence for the effectiveness of the traditional use of C. ferrea in treating various diseases associated with inflammation and pain.

  7. Melatonin as an Anti-Inflammatory Agent Modulating Inflammasome Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Favero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation may be defined as the innate response to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, injury, and metabolic stress; its ultimate function is to restore the physiological homeostatic state. The exact aetiology leading to the development of inflammation is not known, but a combination of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of many inflammation-related clinical conditions. Recent studies suggest that the pathogenesis of different inflammatory diseases also involves the inflammasomes, intracellular multiprotein complexes that mediate activation of inflammatory caspases thereby inducing the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Melatonin, an endogenous indoleamine, is considered an important multitasking molecule with fundamental clinical applications. It is involved in mood modulation, sexual behavior, vasomotor control, and immunomodulation and influences energy metabolism; moreover, it acts as an oncostatic and antiaging molecule. Melatonin is an important antioxidant and also a widespread anti-inflammatory molecule, modulating both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in different pathophysiological conditions. This review, first, gives an overview concerning the growing importance of melatonin in the inflammatory-mediated pathological conditions and, then, focuses on its roles and its protective effects against the activation of the inflammasomes and, in particular, of the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  8. Anti-inflammatory Elafin in human fetal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalberg, Cecilia; Noda, Nathalia; Polettini, Jossimara; Jacobsson, Bo; Menon, Ramkumar

    2017-02-01

    Elafin is a low molecular weight protein with antileukoproteinase, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and immunomodulating properties. The profile of Elafin in fetal membranes is not well characterized. This study determined the changes in Elafin expression and concentration in human fetal membrane from patients with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM) and in vitro in response to intra-amniotic polymicrobial pathogens. Elafin messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions were studied in fetal membranes from PPROM, normal term as well as in normal term not in labor membranes in an organ explant system treated (24 h) with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measured Elafin concentrations in culture supernatants from tissues treated with LPS and polybacterial combinations of heat-inactivated Mycoplasma hominis (MH), Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) and Gardnerella vaginalis (GV). Elafin mRNA expression in fetal membranes from women with PPROM was significantly higher compared to women who delivered at term after normal pregnancy (5.09±3.50 vs. 11.71±2.21; Pmembranes showed a significantly increased Elafin m-RNA expression (Pmembranes also showed no changes in Elafin protein concentrations compared to untreated controls. Higher Elafin expression in PPROM fetal membranes suggests a host response to an inflammatory pathology. However, lack of Elafin response to LPS and polymicrobial treatment is indicative of the minimal anti-inflammatory impact of this molecule in fetal membranes.

  9. Chalcone Derivatives: Anti-inflammatory Potential and Molecular Targets Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Debarshi Kar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Asati, Vivek

    2017-11-20

    Chalcone or (E)-1,3-diphenyl-2-propene-1-one scaffold has gained considerable scientific interest in medicinal chemistry owing to its simple chemistry, ease in synthesizing a variety of derivatives and exhibiting a broad range of promising pharmacological activities by modulating several molecular targets. A number of natural and (semi-) synthetic chalcone derivatives have demonstrated admirable anti-inflammatory activity due to their inhibitory potential against various therapeutic targets like Cyclooxygenase (COX), Lipooxygenase (LOX), Interleukins (IL), Prostaglandins (PGs), Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), Leukotriene D4 (LTD4), Nuclear Factor-κB (NF- κB), Intracellular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1), Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1) and TLR4/MD-2, etc. The chalcone scaffold with hydroxyl, methoxyl, carboxyl, prenyl group and/or heterocyclic ring substitution like thiophene/furan/indole showed promising anti-inflammatory activity. In this review, a comprehensive study (from the year 1991 to 2016) on multi-targets of inflammatory interest, related inflammation reactions and their treatment by chalcone-based inhibitors acting on various molecular targets entailed in inflammation, Structure-Activity Relationships (SARs), Mechanism of Actions (MOAs), and patents are highlighted. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory properties of Euphorbia hirta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanhers, M C; Fleurentin, J; Dorfman, P; Mortier, F; Pelt, J M

    1991-06-01

    Lyophilised aqueous extract of Euphorbia hirta L. (Euphorbiaceae) has been evaluated for analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory properties in mice and rats, in order to complete its activity profile, after the confirmation of the existence of a central depressant activity particularly expressed by a strong sedative effect, associated with anxiolytic effects. This study leads us to the conclusion that this plant extract exerts central analgesic properties. Such a dose-dependent action was obtained against chemical (writhing test) and thermic (hot plate test) stimuli, respectively, from the doses of 20 and 25 mg/kg and it was inhibited by a naloxone pretreatment, a specific morphinic antagonist compound. An antipyretic activity was obtained at the sedative doses of 100 and 400 mg/kg, on the yeast-induced hyperthermia. Finally, significant and dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects were observed on an acute inflammatory process (carrageenan-induced edema test in rats) from the dose of 100 mg/kg. On the other hand, plant extract remained inactive on chronic processes such as Freund's adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis, after a chronic treatment during fourteen days at the daily dose of 200 or 400 mg/kg; however, if inefficacy was observed on rat backpaws edema and on loss of weight, the aqueous extract reduced the inflammatory hyperalgia.

  11. Anti-inflammatory Cerebrosides from Cultivated Cordyceps militaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ching-Peng; Liu, Shan-Chi; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Chan, You; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Lee, Chia-Lin; Du, Ying-Chi; Wu, Tung-Ying; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2016-02-24

    Cordyceps militaris (bei-chong-chaw, northern worm grass) is a precious and edible entomopathogenic fungus, which is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as a general booster for the nervous system, metabolism, and immunity. Saccharides, nucleosides, mannitol, and sterols were isolated from this fungus. The biological activity of C. militaris was attributed to the saccharide and nucleoside contents. In this study, the aqueous methanolic fraction of C. militaris fruiting bodies exhibited a significant anti-inflammatory activity. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the active fraction led to the isolation of eight compounds, including one new and two known cerebrosides (ceramide derivatives), two nucleosides, and three sterols. Cordycerebroside A (1), the new cerebroside, along with soyacerebroside I (2) and glucocerebroside (3) inhibited the accumulation of pro-inflammatory iNOS protein and reduced the expression of COX-2 protein in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. This is the first study on the isolation of cerebrosides with anti-inflammatory activity from this TCM.

  12. Lactarius rufus (1→3),(1→6)-β-D-glucans: structure, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthes, Andrea Caroline; Carbonero, Elaine R; Córdova, Marina Machado; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Gorin, Philip Albert James; Iacomini, Marcello

    2013-04-15

    Medicinal health benefits uses of edible as well as non-edible mushrooms have been long recognized. The pharmacological potential of mushrooms, especially antitumor, immunostimulatory and anti-inflammatory activities has been documented. Wild ectomycorrhizal mushroom, Lactarius rufus had the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive potential of their polysaccharides evaluated using the formalin model. Two structurally different (1→3),(1→6)-linked β-D-glucans were isolated from fruiting bodies. Soluble (FSHW) β-D-glucan 1-30 mg kg(-1) produced potent inhibition of inflammatory pain caused by formalin when compared with the insoluble one (IHW), suggesting that solubility and/or branching degree could alter the activity of β-glucans. Their structures were determined using mono- and bi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, methylation analysis, and controlled Smith degradation. They were β-D-glucans, with a main chain of (1→3)-linked Glcp residues, substituted at O-6 by single-unit Glcp side chains (IHW), on average to every fourth residue of the backbone, or by mono- and few oligosaccharide side chains for soluble β-glucan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-inflammatory drugs and uterine cervical cancer cells: Antineoplastic effect of meclofenamic acid

    OpenAIRE

    SORIANO-HERNANDEZ, ALEJANDRO D.; MADRIGAL-PÉREZ, DANIELA; GALVAN-SALAZAR, HECTOR R.; MARTINEZ-FIERRO, MARGARITA L.; VALDEZ-VELAZQUEZ, LAURA L.; ESPINOZA-GÓMEZ, FRANCISCO; VAZQUEZ-VUELVAS, OSCAR F.; OLMEDO-BUENROSTRO, BERTHA A.; GUZMAN-ESQUIVEL, JOSE; RODRIGUEZ-SANCHEZ, IRAM P.; LARA-ESQUEDA, AGUSTIN; MONTES-GALINDO, DANIEL A.; DELGADO-ENCISO, IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Uterine cervical cancer (UCC) is one of the main causes of cancer-associated mortality in women. Inflammation has been identified as an important component of this neoplasia; in this context, anti-inflammatory drugs represent possible prophylactic and/or therapeutic alternatives that require further investigation. Anti-inflammatory drugs are common and each one may exhibit a different antineoplastic effect. As a result, the present study investigated different anti-inflammatory models of UCC ...

  14. A possible mechanism in the recruitment of eosinophils and Th2 cells through CD163(+) M2 macrophages in the lesional skin of eosinophilic cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Taku; Kambayashi, Yumi; Furudate, Sadanori; Kakizaki, Aya; Aiba, Setsuya

    2014-01-01

    M2 macrophages play a critical role in the recruitment of T helper 2 (Th2) regulatory T cells (Treg). To study the role of M2 macrophages and Treg cells in eosinophilic celulitis. We employed immunohistochemical staining for CD163( )and CD206 (macrophages) as well as FoxP3 (Treg), in lesional skin of four cases of eosinophilic cellulitis. CD163(+) CD206(+) M2 macrophages, which were previously reported to produce CCL17 to induce Th2 cells and Treg cells, were predominantly infiltrating the subcutaneous tissues and interstitial area of the dermis. M2 macrophages derived from PBMC showed significantly increased expression of CCL11, CCL17, CCL24 and CCL26 mRNA and production of CCL17 and CCL24, when stimulated by IL-4 or IL- 13. In addition, CCL17-producing cells and CCL24-producing cells were prominent in the lesional skin of EC. Our study sheds light on one of the possible immunological mechanisms of eosinophilic cellulitis.

  15. Anti-inflammatory Actions of Adjunctive Tetracyclines and Other Agents in Periodontitis and Associated Comorbidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilakaratne, Aruni; Soory, Mena

    2014-01-01

    The non-antimicrobial properties of tetracyclines such as anti-inflammatory, proanabolic and anti-catabolic actions make them effective pharmaceuticals for the adjunctive management of chronic inflammatory diseases. An over-exuberant inflammatory response to an antigenic trigger in periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory diseases could contribute to an autoimmune element in disease progression. Their adjunctive use in managing periodontitis could have beneficial effects in curbing excessive inflammatory loading from commonly associated comorbidities such as CHD, DM and arthritis. Actions of tetracyclines and their derivatives include interactions with MMPs, tissue inhibitors of MMPs, growth factors and cytokines. They affect the sequence of inflammation with implications on immunomodulation, cell proliferation and angiogenesis; these actions enhance their scope, in treating a range of disease entities. Non-antimicrobial chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) sustain their diverse actions in organ systems which include anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-proteolytic actions, inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. A spectrum of biological actions in dermatitis, periodontitis, atherosclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, malignancy and prevention of bone resorption is particularly relevant to minocycline. Experimental models of ischemia indicate their specific beneficial effects. Parallel molecules with similar functions, improved Zn binding and solubility have been developed for reducing excessive MMP activity. Curbing excessive MMP activity is particularly relevant to periodontitis, and comorbidities addressed here, where specificity is paramount. Unique actions of tetracyclines in a milieu of excessive inflammatory stimuli make them effective therapeutic adjuncts in the management of chronic inflammatory disorders. These beneficial actions of tetracyclines are relevant to the adjunctive management of periodontitis subjects

  16. Novel enzyme formulations for improved pharmacokinetic properties and anti-inflammatory efficacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lan; Yan, Shenglei; Zhang, Yonghong; Hu, Xueyuan; Guo, Qi; Yuan, Yuming; Zhang, Jingqing

    2018-02-15

    Anti-inflammatory enzymes promote the dissolution and excretion of sticky phlegm, clean the wound surface and accelerate drug diffusion to the lesion. They play important roles in treating different types of inflammation and pain. Currently, various formulations of anti-inflammatory enzymes are successfully prepared to improve the enzymatic characteristics, pharmacokinetic properties and anti-inflammatory efficacies. The work was performed by systematically searching all available literature. An overall summary of current research about various anti-inflammatory enzymes and their novel formulations is presented. The original and improved enzymatic characteristics, pharmacokinetic properties, action mechanisms, clinical information, storage and shelf life, treatment efficacies of anti-inflammatory enzymes and their different formulations are summarized. The influencing factors such as enzyme type, source, excipient, pharmaceutical technique, administration route and dosage are analyzed. The combined application of enzymes and other drugs are included in this paper. Anti-inflammatory enzymes were widely applied in treating different types of inflammation and diseases with accompanying edema. Their novel formulations increased enzymatic stabilities, improved pharmacokinetic properties, provided different administration routes, and enhanced anti-inflammatory efficacies of anti-inflammatory enzymes but decreased side effects and toxicity. Novel enzyme formulations improve and expand the usage of anti-inflammatory enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Barettin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trond Ø. Jørgensen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present novel bioactivity for barettin isolated from the marine sponge Geodia barretti. We found that barettin showed strong antioxidant activity in biochemical assays as well as in a lipid peroxidation cell assay. A de-brominated synthetic analogue of barettin did not show the same activity in the antioxidant cell assay, indicating that bromine is important for cellular activity. Barettin was also able to inhibit the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNFα from LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. This combination of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities could indicate that barettin has an atheroprotective effect and may therefore be an interesting product to prevent development of atherosclerosis.

  18. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of barettin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Karianne F; Hansen, Espen; Østerud, Bjarne; Eilertsen, Karl-Erik; Bayer, Annette; Engqvist, Magnus; Leszczak, Kinga; Jørgensen, Trond Ø; Andersen, Jeanette H

    2013-07-22

    In this paper, we present novel bioactivity for barettin isolated from the marine sponge Geodia barretti. We found that barettin showed strong antioxidant activity in biochemical assays as well as in a lipid peroxidation cell assay. A de-brominated synthetic analogue of barettin did not show the same activity in the antioxidant cell assay, indicating that bromine is important for cellular activity. Barettin was also able to inhibit the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNFα from LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. This combination of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities could indicate that barettin has an atheroprotective effect and may therefore be an interesting product to prevent development of atherosclerosis.

  19. [Antidiarrheal and anti-inflammatory effects of berberine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M F; Shen, Y Q

    1989-03-01

    Berberine sulfate (Ber) 40 and 80 mg/kg ig reduced the purging effects of castor oil or Cassia angustifolia leaf in mice, but did not affect the gastrointestinal transport function of Chinese ink in normal mice. Ber 60 mg/kg ig significantly inhibited the increased vascular permeability induced by ip 0.7% acetic acid in mice. Ber 20 and 50 mg/kg sc markedly inhibited the increased vascular permeability induced by histamine 100 micrograms/0.1 ml ic in rats. Ber 4 and 8 mg/kg sc produced obvious inhibition in the xylene-induced swelling of mouse ear. The anti-inflammatory effects were enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. It is suggested that the antidiarrheal effect of Ber is relative to its restriction against exudative inflammation to a certain extent.

  20. Pharmacological interactions of anti-inflammatory-analgesics in odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Guardia, Javier; Cutando, Antonio; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis

    2009-02-01

    In this second article we describe the more interesting pharmacological interactions in dental practice based on the prescription of analgesic narcotics, paracetamol and non-selective non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAI) (which inhibit cyclooxigenase 1 -COX 1- and cyclooxigenase 2 -COX 2-) and selective NSAIs (COX 2 inhibitors). The importance of preventing the appearance of these pharmacological interactions is because these are medicaments prescribed daily in odontology for moderate pain treatment and inflammation in the oral cavity. Paracetamol can interact with warfarin and therefore care should be taken with chronic alcoholic patients. All NSAIs reduce renal blood flow and consequently are capable of reducing the efficacy of medicaments used for treating arterial hypertension, which act via a renal mechanism. Especial attention should be taken considering the risk of interaction between the antagonists of AT1 receptors of angiostensin II (ARAII) and the NSAIs.

  1. Anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of five Veronica species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harput, U Sebnem; Saracoglu, Iclal; Inoue, Makoto; Ogihara, Yukio

    2002-04-01

    Biological activities of five Veronica species (Scrophulariaceae), V. cymbalaria, V. hederifolia, V. pectinata var. glandulosa, V. persica and V. polita were studied for their anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities. Their methanol extracts showed both the inhibitory activity of nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and cytotoxic activity against KB epidermoid carcinoma and B16 melanoma. When the methanol extracts were fractionated between water and chloroform, water fractions significantly inhibited NO production without any cytotoxicity, while chloroform fractions showed cytotoxicity dose-dependently. When the radical scavenging activity was determined using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), water fractions of the five Veronica species scavenged free radicals effectively, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of this species on NO production was due to their radical scavenging activity. On the other hand, chloroform fractions of Veronica species except for V. cymbalaria showed similar cytotoxic activity against KB and B16 melanoma cells.

  2. Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic and Antiulcer properties of Porphyra vietnamensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Bhatia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Aim of the present work was to investigate the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antiulcer effects of red seaweed Porphyra vietnamensis (P. vietnamenis. Materials and Methods: Aqueous (POR and alcoholic (PE fractions were successfully isolated from P. vietnamenis. Further biological investigations were performed using a classic test of paw edema induced by carrageenan, writhing induced by acetic acid, hot plate method and naproxen induced gastro-duodenal ulcer. Results: Among the fractions POR showed better activity.  POR and PE significantly (p < 0.05 reduced carrageenan induced paw edema in a dose dependent manner. In the writhing test POR significantly (p < 0.05 reduced abdominal writhes than PE.  In hot plate method POR showed better analgesic activity than PE. POR showed comparable ulcers reducing potential (p

  3. Anti-inflammatory treatment for carditis in acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, Antoinette; Adler, Alma J; Saloojee, Haroon

    2015-05-28

    Rheumatic heart disease remains an important cause of acquired heart disease in developing countries. Although prevention of rheumatic fever and management of recurrences have been well established, optimal management of active rheumatic carditis remains unclear. This is an update of a review published in 2003, and previously updated in 2009 and 2012. To assess the effects, both harmful and beneficial, of anti-inflammatory agents such as aspirin, corticosteroids and other drugs in preventing or reducing further valvular damage in patients with acute rheumatic fever. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2013, Issue 9 of 12), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1948 to 2013 October Week 1), EMBASE (Ovid, 1980 to 2013 Week 41) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1982 to 17 October 2013). We last searched Index Medicus (1950 to April 2001) in 2001. We checked reference lists of identified studies and applied no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials comparing anti-inflammatory agents (e.g. aspirin, steroids, immunoglobulins, pentoxifylline) versus placebo or controls, or comparing any of the anti-inflammatory agents versus one another, in adults and children with acute rheumatic fever diagnosed according to Jones, or modified Jones, criteria. The presence of cardiac disease one year after treatment was the major outcome criterion selected. Two review authors extracted data and assessed risk of bias using the methodology outlined in the Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration were used. No new studies were included in this update. Eight randomised controlled trials involving 996 people were selected for inclusion in the review. Researchers compared several steroidal agents such as corticotrophin, cortisone, hydrocortisone, dexamethasone, prednisone and intravenous immunoglobulin versus aspirin, placebo or no treatment. Six

  4. Antinoceptive and Anti-inflammatory Activities of the Ethanolic Extract, Fractions and Flavones Isolated from Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd. Poir (Leguminosae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariluze P Cruz

    Full Text Available The bark of Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd. Poiret (Leguminosae family, popularly known as "jurema preta" in Brazil, is used by the population of Contendas of Sincorá (Bahia State, Brazil for the treatment of coughs and wound healing. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the bark ethanol extract (EEMT and solvent soluble fractions (hexane-H, DCM-D, EtOAc-E and BuOH-B of the extract in vivo. Additionally, we synthesized 5,7-dihidroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone (isosakuranetin and isolated the compound sakuranetin, and both compounds were also tested. The anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive assays performed were: writhing test; nociception induced by intraplantar formalin injection; leukocyte recruitment to the peritoneal cavity; evaluation of vascular permeability (Evans blue test; and evaluation of mechanical hypernociception (von Frey test. Production of TNF-α, IL-10, myeloperoxidase and the expression of ICAM-1 were also evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way ANOVA followed by the Bonferroni post-test (n = 8, with P < 0.05. The EEMT showed antinociceptive activities in writhing test (100-200 mg/kg, in the second phase of the formalin test (50-200 mg/kg, and in mechanical hypernociception (100 mg/kg. EEMT showed an anti-inflammatory effect by reducing neutrophil migration to the peritoneal cavity and in the plantar tissue detected by the reduction of myeloperoxidase activity (100 mg/kg, reduction of IL-10 levels and expression of ICAM-1 in the peritoneal exudate and the mesentery (100 mg/kg, respectively. The four soluble EEMT fractions showed good results in tests for antinociceptive (H, D, E, B and anti-inflammation (H, D, E. Only sakuranetin showed reduction of the writhing and neutrophil migration (200 mg/kg. Thus, the EEMT and soluble fractions of M. tenuiflora bark demonstrated great antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities, as also sakuranetin. More studies

  5. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory kaempferol glycosides from Sedum dendroideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Melo, Giany O; Malvar, David do C; Vanderlinde, Frederico A; Rocha, Fabio F; Pires, Priscila Andrade; Costa, Elson A; de Matos, Lécia G; Kaiser, Carlos R; Costa, Sônia S

    2009-07-15

    To identify the compounds responsible for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects previously described for Sedum dendroideum, through bioassay-guided fractionation procedures. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated through mouse acetic acid-induced writhing model. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed through croton oil-induced mouse ear oedema and carrageenan-induced peritonitis. The Sedum dendroideum juice afforded seven known flavonoids identified with basis on NMR data. The oral administration of the major kaempferol glycosides kaempferitrin [1] (17.29 micromol/kg), kaempferol 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside [2] (16.82 micromol/kg), kaempferol 3-O-neohesperidoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside [3] (13.50 micromol/kg) or alpha-rhamnoisorobin [5] (23.13 micromol/kg) inhibited by 47.3%, 25.7%, 60.2% and 58.0%, respectively, the acetic acid-induced nociception (indomethacin: 27.95 micromol/kg, p.o.; 68.9%). Flavonoids 1, 2, 3 or 5, at the same doses, reduced by 39.5%, 46.5%, 35.6% and 33.3%, respectively, the croton oil-induced oedema (dexamethasone: 5.09 micromol/kg, s.c.; 83.7%) and impaired leukocyte migration by 42.9%, 46.3%, 50.4% and 49.6%, respectively (dexamethasone: 5.09 micromol/kg, s.c.; 66.1%). Our findings show that the major kaempferol glycosides may account for the renowned medicinal use of Sedum dendroideum against pain and inflammatory troubles.

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Sanghuangporus sanghuang Mycelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Ching Lin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is characterized by inflammation of the lung tissue and oxidative injury caused by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Studies have suggested that anti-inflammatory or antioxidant agents could be used for the treatment of ALI with a good outcome. Therefore, our study aimed to test whether the mycelium extract of Sanghuangporus sanghuang (SS-1, believed to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, could be used against the excessive inflammatory response associated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS-induced ALI in mice and to investigate its possible mechanism of action. The experimental results showed that the administration of SS-1 could inhibit LPS-induced inflammation. SS-1 could reduce the number of inflammatory cells, inhibit myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, regulate the TLR4/PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and the signal transduction of NF-κB and MAPK pathways in the lung tissue, and inhibit high mobility group box-1 protein 1 (HNGB1 activity in BALF. In addition, SS-1 could affect the synthesis of antioxidant enzymes Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 and Thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1 in the lung tissue and regulate signal transduction in the KRAB-associated protein-1 (KAP1/nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor Nrf2/Kelch Like ECH associated Protein 1 (Keap1 pathway. Histological results showed that administration of SS-1 prior to induction could inhibit the large-scale LPS-induced neutrophil infiltration of the lung tissue. Therefore, based on all experimental results, we propose that SS-1 exhibits a protective effect against LPS-induced ALI in mice. The mycelium of S. sanghuang can potentially be used for the treatment or prevention of inflammation-related diseases.

  7. ANTIOXIDANT, ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF GEORGIAN LEGUMINOUS CROPS CULTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhikvishvili, I; Mamniashvili, T; Gogia, N; Enukidze, M; Machavariani, M; Sanikidze, T

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the common in Georgia leguminous crops culture with pronounced antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activity. The primary evaluation of the antiinflammatory effects of beans was performed on the experimental models of MDCK and Jurkat cells model systems. Extracts of various varieties of legumes (Beans "Kidney", Meadow beans, Beans Shulavera, Batumian beans, Beans "Udelebi", green peas, peas Shulavera, lentils Lens Culinaris, Soy) were added to the intact or incubated under oxidative stress conditions Jurkat and MDCK cells. Cells' vitality was determined by MTT test. On the basis of analysis of the obtained results, we concluded that: - Meadow beans extract (low doses) revealed cytoprotective effect on the intact and incubated under oxidative stress conditions immune (Jurkat) and epithelial (MDCK) cells. High antioxidant, cytoprotective activity of this extract correlates with high polyphenols content in it. - The extract of Shulavera beans did affect the intact Jurkat and MDCK cells, but showed pronounced cytoprotective activity on these cells incubated under the oxidative stress conditions. High antioxidant, cytoprotective activity of this extract correlates with high content of polyphenols in it. - Low dose of lentils Lens Culinaris extracts revealed cytoprotective activity on the incubated under oxidative stress conditions MDCK cells, but was inactive in case of intact MDCK and incubated in different conditions immune Jurkat cells. The selective antioxidant activity of this extract is related with its other constituent components, but not polyphenols. - Despite high polyphenols content and high antioxidant activity in vivo, Batumian beans revealed moderate cytoprotective activity on intact and incubated under oxidative stress conditions Jurkat cells, suppressive activity on the intact MDCK cells and was inactive in relation to the incubated under oxidative stress conditions MDCK cells. Based on these findings, we can identify

  8. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of Croton celtidifolius bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, G M; Felippi, R; DalBó, S; Siqueira-Junior, J M; Arruda, D C; Delle Monache, F; Timbola, A K; Pizzolatti, M G; Ckless, K; Ribeiro-do-valle, R M

    2003-03-01

    Croton celtidifolius Baill commonly known as "sangue-de-adave" is a tree found in the Atlantic Forest of south of Brazil, mainly in Santa Catarina. The bark and leaf infusions of this medicinal plant have been popularly used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. In this study we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of crude extract (CE), aqueous fraction (AqF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF), butanolic fraction (BuF) and catechin, gallocatechin and sub-fractions, 19SF, 35SF and 63SF that contained a mixture of proanthocyanidins and were derived from the EAF fraction. The CE, AqF, EAF, BuF, catechin and sub-fractions 35SF and 63SF reduced paw edema induced by carrageenan. The CE, fractions, sub-fractions and isolated compounds showed antioxidant properties in vitro, all were able to scavenge superoxide anions at a concentration of 100 microg ml(-1). The EAF, catechin and gallocatechin were most effective in the deoxyribose assay, IC50 0.69 (0.44-1.06), 0.20 (0.11-0.39), 0.55 (0.28-1.08) microg x ml(-1) respectively. The CE and other fractions and sub-fractions inhibited deoxyribose degradation up to 1 microg x ml(-1). In the hydrophobic system only AqF did not show lipid peroxidation inhibition. The CE, other fractions, sub-fractions and isolated compounds inhibited lipidid peroxidation only at a concentration of 100 microg x ml(-1). In summary, this study demonstrates that Croton celtidifolius bark has significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity.

  9. The Crystal Structure of the Fifth Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Domain of Porcine CD163 Reveals an Important Residue Involved in Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongfang; Jiang, Longguang; Qiao, Songlin; Zhi, Yubao; Chen, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yanyan; Huang, Xiaojing; Huang, Mingdong; Li, Rui; Zhang, Gai-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has become an economically critical factor in swine industry since its worldwide spread in the 1990s. Infection by its causative agent, PRRS virus (PRRSV), was proven to be mediated by an indispensable receptor, porcine CD163 (pCD163), and the fifth scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain (SRCR5) is essential for virus infection. However, the structural details and specific residues of pCD163 SRCR5 involved in infection have not been defined yet. In this study, we prepared recombinant pCD163 SRCR5 in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells and determined its crystal structure at a high resolution of 2.0 Å. This structure includes a markedly long loop region and shows a special electrostatic potential, and these are significantly different from those of other members of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily (SRCR-SF). Subsequently, we carried out structure-based mutational studies to identify that the arginine residue at position 561 (Arg561) in the long loop region is important for PRRSV infection. Further, we showed Arg561 probably takes effect on the binding of pCD163 to PRRSV during virus invasion. Altogether the current work provides the first view of the CD163 SRCR domain, expands our knowledge of the invasion mechanism of PRRSV, and supports a molecular basis for prevention and control of the virus. PRRS has caused huge economic losses to pig farming. The syndrome is caused by PRRSV, and PRRSV infection has been shown to be mediated by host cell surface receptors. One of them, pCD163, is especially indispensable, and its SRCR5 domain has been further demonstrated to play a significant role in virus infection. However, its structural details and the residues involved in infection are unknown. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of pCD163 SRCR5 and then carried out site-directed mutational studies based on the crystal structure to elucidate which residue is important. Our

  10. NSAIDs do not require the presence of a carboxylic acid to exert their anti-inflammatory effect - why do we keep using it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Nasir; Huang, Zhangjian; Sanaee, Forough; Rodriguez-Dimitrescu, Alexandra; Aldawsari, Fahad; Jamali, Fakhreddin; Bhardwaj, Atul; Islam, Nazar Ul; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A

    2016-12-01

    The carboxylic acid group (-COOH) present in classical NSAIDs is partly responsible for the gastric toxicity associated with the administration of these drugs. This concept has been extensively proven using NSAID prodrugs. However, the screening of NSAIDs with no carboxylic acid at all has been neglected. The goal of this work was to determine if new NSAID derivatives devoid of acidic moieties would retain the anti-inflammatory activity of the parent compound, without causing gastric toxicity. To test this concept, we replaced the carboxylic acid group in ibuprofen, flurbiprofen, and naproxen with three ammonium moieties. We tested the resulting water-soluble NSAID derivatives for anti-inflammatory and ulcerogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. In this regard, we observed that all non-acidic NSAIDs exerted a potent anti-inflammatory activity, suggesting that the acid group in commercial 2-phenylpropionic acid NSAIDs not be an essential requirement for anti-inflammatory activity. These data provide complementary evidence supporting the discontinuation of ulcerogenic acidic NSAIDs.

  11. Evaluation of the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of fixed dose combination: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Lahoti

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Combining paracetamol with ibuprofen enhances analgesic/anti-inflammatory activity over their individual component but potentiation of analgesic activity of diclofenac was not seen when paracetamol was added to it.

  12. The tissue microlocalisation and cellular expression of CD163, VEGF, HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14 is correlated to clinical outcome in NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra M Ohri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously investigated the microlocalisation of M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. This study investigated the non-macrophage (NM expression of proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. METHODS: Using immunohistochemistry, CD68(+ macrophages and proteins associated with either a cytotoxic M1 phenotype (HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14, or a non-cytotoxic M2 phenotype (CD163 and VEGF were identified. NM expression of the markers was analysed in the islets and stroma of surgically resected tumours from 20 patients with extended survival (ES (median 92.7 months and 20 patients with poor survival (PS (median 7.7 months. RESULTS: The NM expression of NM-HLA-DR (p<0.001, NM-iNOS (p = 0.02 and NM-MRP 8/14 (p = 0.02 was increased in ES compared to PS patients in the tumour islets. The tumour islet expression of NM-VEGF, was decreased in ES compared to PS patients (p<0.001. There was more NM-CD163 expression (p = 0.04 but less NM-iNOS (p = 0.002 and MRP 8/14 (p = 0.01 expression in the stroma of ES patients compared with PS patients. The 5-year survival for patients with above and below median NM expression of the markers in the islets was 74.9% versus 4.7% (NM-HLA-DR p<0.001, 65.0% versus 14.6% (NM-iNOS p = 0.003, and 54.3% versus 22.2% (NM-MRP 8/14 p = 0.04, as opposed to 34.1% versus 44.4% (NM-CD163 p = 0.41 and 19.4% versus 59.0% (NM-VEGF p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Cell proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages are also expressed by other cell types in the tumour islets and stroma of patients with NSCLC. Their tissue and cellular microlocalisation is associated with important differences in clinical outcome.

  13. In-vitro anti- inflammatory activity of aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, V R; Dhanamani, M; Sudhamani, T

    2009-04-01

    Aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (lour.) Spreng, which is traditionally used in the treatment of cough and cold was screened for its anti- inflammatory activity by HRBC membrane stabilisation model. Aqueous extract (500 mcg/ml) showed significant anti-inflammatory activity as compared to that of hydrocortisone sodium.

  14. Anti-inflammatory properties of a novel peptide interleukin 1 receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klementiev, Boris; Li, Shizhong; Korshunova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is implicated in neuroinflammation, an essential component of neurodegeneration. We evaluated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of a novel peptide antagonist of IL-1 signaling, Ilantide.......Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is implicated in neuroinflammation, an essential component of neurodegeneration. We evaluated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of a novel peptide antagonist of IL-1 signaling, Ilantide....

  15. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcer activities of Sida acuta in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcer properties was also studied in mice and rats using the tail immersion, mouse ear oedema and acetylsalicylic acid induced ulceration models. The crude extracts exhibited significant (p< 0.001) analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in mice as well as a marked protection ...

  16. Anti-inflammatory effect of interleukin-10 in rabbit immune complex-induced colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grool, TA; Van Dullemen, H; Meenan, J; Koster, F; ten Kate, F. J. W.; Lebeaut, A; Tytgat, GNJ; Van Deventer, SJH

    Background: Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that downregulates the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and additionally induces the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines, thus possibly leading to reduction of chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. In this

  17. Evaluation of Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activities of the Root ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activities of the Root Extracts of Indigofera spicata F. in Mice. ... The results clearly demonstrate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the aqueous and 80% methanolic root extracts of the plant, providing evidence in part for the folkloric use of the plant. Keywords: ...

  18. Utilization of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are widely prescribed worldwide. In Nigeria there is unrestricted access to these useful, yet potentially harmful drugs. We set out to assess the utilization of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in outpatients attending clinics in a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. Consecutive patients were ...

  19. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18086388 Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. Ko...varik P, Sauer I, Schaljo B. Immunobiology. 2007;212(9-10):895-901. Epub 2007 Nov 8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Molecular... mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. PubmedID 18086388 Title Molecular

  20. In silico and in vivo anti-inflammatory studies of curcuminoids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the anti-inflammatory activity of curcuminoids in comparison with that of eugenol in silico, and to determine the anti-inflammatory activity of wound dressings made from zinc oxide powder and liquid turmeric extract with a high curcuminoid content. Methods: In silico studies were conducted, using ...

  1. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the saponins extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The saponins extract of Carissa edulis Vahl family Apocynaceae was investigated for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. The analgesic activity was studied using hot-plate and acetic acid-induced writhing tests in mice while the anti-inflammatory activity was studied using carrageenan-induced paw oedema test in ...

  2. Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Aqueous Extract of Aloe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 57.59% and 68.06% inhibition respectively. The present study showed that the aqueous extract of Aloe barbadensis has anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities that could be mediated via modulators of pain and inflammation or through central activity. Keywords: Aloe barbadensis; anti-inflammatory; analgesic activity ...

  3. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities of Secamone afzelii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . This study re-ports the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of S. afzelii. The anti-inflammatory activity was determined by the carrageenan-induced paw oedema method in 7 day old chicks and antioxi-dant property by the 2 ...

  4. Chemical composition and anti-inflammatory activity of the leaves of Byrsonima verbascifolia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saldanha, Aline Aparecida; Carmo, Do Lucas Fernandes; Nascimento, Do Sara Batista; Matos, de Natália Alves; Carvalho Veloso, de Clarice; Castro, Ana Hortência Fonsêca; Vos, de Ric C.H.; Klein, André; Siqueira, de João Máximo; Carollo, Carlos Alexandre; Nascimento, Do Thalita Vieira; Toffoli-Kadri, Mônica Cristina; Soares, Adriana Cristina

    2016-01-01

    An ethnopharmacological survey indicates that the genus Byrsonima has some medicinal species that are commonly found in the Brazilian Cerrado and has been used as an anti-inflammatory and for gastroduodenal disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant

  5. Aspirin and its related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspirin and its related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid has been utilised by physicians for hundreds of years as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic (1). Derived from plant sources, such as the willow tree, it has the ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells and stimulate.

  6. Anti-inflammatory drugs in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsford, K D

    2007-01-01

    Historically, anti-inflammatory drugs had their origins in the serendipitous discovery of certain plants and their extracts being applied for the relief of pain, fever and inflammation. When salicylates were discovered in the mid-19th century to be the active components of Willow Spp., this enabled these compounds to be synthesized and from this, acetyl-salicylic acid or Aspirin was developed. Likewise, the chemical advances of the 19th-20th centuries lead to development of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), most of which were initially organic acids, but later non-acidic compounds were discovered. There were two periods of NSAID drug discovery post-World War 2, the period up to the 1970's which was the pre-prostaglandin period and thereafter up to the latter part of the last century in which their effects on prostaglandin production formed part of the screening in the drug-discovery process. Those drugs developed up to the 1980-late 90's were largely discovered empirically following screening for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities in laboratory animal models. Some were successfully developed that showed low incidence of gastro-intestinal (GI) side effects (the principal adverse reaction seen with NSAIDs) than seen with their predecessors (e.g. aspirin, indomethacin, phenylbutazone); the GI reactions being detected and screened out in animal assays. In the 1990's an important discovery was made from elegant molecular and cellular biological studies that there are two cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzyme systems controlling the production of prostanoids [prostaglandins (PGs) and thromboxane (TxA2)]; COX-1 that produces PGs and TxA2 that regulate gastrointestinal, renal, vascular and other physiological functions, and COX-2 that regulates production of PGs involved in inflammation, pain and fever. The stage was set in the 1990's for the discovery and development of drugs to selectively control COX-2 and spare the COX-1 that is central to

  7. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of Ficus carica Linn. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, B; Mujeeb, M; Aeri, V; Mir, S R; Faiyazuddin, M; Shakeel, F

    2012-01-01

    Ficus carica Linn. (Moraceae) is commonly known as edible fig. The leaves, roots, fruits and latex of the plant are medicinally used in different diseases. The leaves are claimed to be effective in various inflammatory conditions like painful or swollen piles, insect sting and bites. However, there has been no report on anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of F. carica leaves. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of F. carica leaves. Our study validated the traditional claim with pharmacological data. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of the drug could be due to the presence of steroids and flavanoids, respectively, which are reported to be present in the drug. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory activity of the drug could be due to its free radical scavenging activity. Further work is also required to isolate and characterise the active constituents responsible for the anti-inflammatory activities.

  8. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activities of Quillaja saponaria Mol. saponin extract in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhel, Sumana

    2016-01-01

    Quillaja saponaria bark contains a high percentage of triterpene saponins and has been used for centuries as antiinflammatory and analgesic agent in Chilean folk medicine. In the Present study the anti-inflammatory activities of the aqueous extract of commercially partially purified saponin from Quillaja saponari a Mol. in in vivo animal models. Aqueous extract of the plant material was prepared by cold maceration. The anti-inflammatory activity of a commercial Quillaja saponaria Mol. (QS) saponin extract was investigated by carragenan induced mice paw edema model for acute inflammation (Winter, 1962) [16]. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carragenan in paw edema model in swiss albino mice (18-20 g). The anti-inflammatory activity was found to be dose dependent in carragenan induced paw edema. QS was found to significantly ( p  Quillaja saponaria saponins (QS) possess significant anti-inflammatory activity.

  9. Nanoemulsion as a strategy for improving the oral bioavailability and anti-inflammatory activity of andrographolide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen CC

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ching-Chi Yen,1 Yi-Chen Chen,1 Ming-Tsang Wu,2 Chia-Chi Wang,1,3 Yu-Tse Wu1,4 1School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 2Chinese Medicine Department, Ditmanson Medical Foundation, Chiayi Christian Hospital, Chiayi City, Taiwan; 3PhD Program in Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 4Department of Medical Research, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Background: Andrographolide (AG, a compound with low water solubility, possesses various pharmacological activities, particularly anti-inflammatory activity. However, its low oral bioavailability is a major obstacle to its potential use. This study developed and optimized an AG-loaded nanoemulsion (AG-NE formulation to improve AG oral bioavailability and its protective effects against inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: A high-pressure homogenization technique was used to prepare the AG-NE and solubility, viscosity, and droplet size tests were conducted to develop the optimized AG-NE composed of α-tocopherol, ethanol, Cremophor EL, and water. The permeability was assessed using everted rat gut sac method and in vivo absorption and anti-inflammatory effect in rats was also evaluated. The plasma concentration of AG was determined using our validated high performance liquid chromatography method, which was used to generate a linear calibration curve over the concentration range of 0.1–25 µg/mL in rat plasma (R2>0.999.Results: The optimized AG-NE had a droplet size of 122±11 nm confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and a viscosity of 28 centipoise (cps. It was stable at 4 and 25°C for 90 days. An ex vitro intestinal permeability study indicated that the jejunum was the optimal site for AG absorption from the optimized AG-NE, which was 8.21 and 1.40 times higher than that from an AG suspension and AG ethanol solution, respectively. The pharmacokinetic results indicate that

  10. Brazilian medicinal plants with corroborated anti-inflammatory activities: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Victor Pena; Arruda, Caroline; Abd El-Salam, Mohamed; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp

    2018-12-01

    Inflammatory disorders are common in modern life, and medicinal plants provide an interesting source for new compounds bearing anti-inflammatory properties. In this regard, Brazilian medicinal plants are considered to be a promising supply of such compounds due to their great biodiversity. To undertake a review on Brazilian medicinal plants with corroborated anti-inflammatory activities by selecting data from the literature reporting the efficacy of plants used in folk medicine as anti-inflammatory, including the mechanisms of action of their extracts and isolated compounds. A search in the literature was undertaken by using the following Web tools: Web of Science, SciFinder, Pub-Med and Science Direct. The terms 'anti-inflammatory' and 'Brazilian medicinal plants' were used as keywords in search engine. Tropicos and Reflora websites were used to verify the origin of the plants, and only the native plants of Brazil were included in this review. The publications reporting the use of well-accepted scientific protocols to corroborate the anti-inflammatory activities of Brazilian medicinal plants with anti-inflammatory potential were considered. We selected 70 Brazilian medicinal plants with anti-inflammatory activity. The plants were grouped according to their anti-inflammatory mechanisms of action. The main mechanisms involved inflammatory mediators, such as interleukins (ILs), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), cyclooxygenase (COX) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The collected data on Brazilian medicinal plants, in the form of crude extract and/or isolated compounds, showed significant anti-inflammatory activities involving different mechanisms of action, indicating Brazilian plants as an important source of anti-inflammatory compounds.

  11. Anti-inflammatory properties of desipramine and fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portet Karine

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antidepressants are heavily prescribed drugs and have been shown to affect inflammatory signals. We examined whether these have anti-inflammatory properties in animal models of septic shock and allergic asthma. We also analysed whether antidepressants act directly on peripheral cell types that participate in the inflammatory response in these diseases. Methods The antidepressants desipramine and fluoxetine were compared in vivo to the glucocorticoid prednisolone, an anti-inflammatory drug of reference. In a murine model of lipopolysaccharides (LPS-induced septic shock, animals received the drugs either before or after injection of LPS. Circulating levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α and mortality rate were measured. In ovalbumin-sensitized rats, the effect of drug treatment on lung inflammation was assessed by counting leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavages. Bronchial hyperreactivity was measured using barometric plethysmography. In vitro production of TNF-α and Regulated upon Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and presumably Secreted (RANTES from activated monocytes and lung epithelial cells, respectively, was analysed by immunoassays. Reporter gene assays were used to measure the effect of antidepressants on the activity of nuclear factor-κB and activator protein-1 which are involved in the control of TNF-α and RANTES expression. Results In the septic shock model, all three drugs given preventively markedly decreased circulating levels of TNF-α and mortality (50% mortality in fluoxetine treated group, 30% in desipramine and prednisolone treated groups versus 90% in controls. In the curative trial, antidepressants had no statistically significant effect, while prednisolone still decreased mortality (60% mortality versus 95% in controls. In ovalbumin-sensitized rats, the three drugs decreased lung inflammation, albeit to different degrees. Prednisolone and fluoxetine reduced the number of macrophages, lymphocytes

  12. The tissue microlocalisation and cellular expression of CD163, VEGF, HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14 is correlated to clinical outcome in NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri, Chandra M; Shikotra, Aarti; Green, Ruth H; Waller, David A; Bradding, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We have previously investigated the microlocalisation of M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. This study investigated the non-macrophage (NM) expression of proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. Using immunohistochemistry, CD68(+) macrophages and proteins associated with either a cytotoxic M1 phenotype (HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14), or a non-cytotoxic M2 phenotype (CD163 and VEGF) were identified. NM expression of the markers was analysed in the islets and stroma of surgically resected tumours from 20 patients with extended survival (ES) (median 92.7 months) and 20 patients with poor survival (PS) (median 7.7 months). The NM expression of NM-HLA-DR (pMRP 8/14 (p = 0.02) was increased in ES compared to PS patients in the tumour islets. The tumour islet expression of NM-VEGF, was decreased in ES compared to PS patients (pMRP 8/14 (p = 0.01) expression in the stroma of ES patients compared with PS patients. The 5-year survival for patients with above and below median NM expression of the markers in the islets was 74.9% versus 4.7% (NM-HLA-DR pMRP 8/14 p = 0.04), as opposed to 34.1% versus 44.4% (NM-CD163 p = 0.41) and 19.4% versus 59.0% (NM-VEGF p = 0.001). Cell proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages are also expressed by other cell types in the tumour islets and stroma of patients with NSCLC. Their tissue and cellular microlocalisation is associated with important differences in clinical outcome.

  13. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Raptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Meteyer, Carol U.; Miller, R. Eric; Fowler, Murray E.

    2012-01-01

    The use of analgesia has become standard, and appropriate, practice in avian medicine. As in mammals, pain control in avian patients is usually accomplished with opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used singly or in combination for a multimodal approach. Despite their usefulness, widespread use, and relative safety in clinical use, few controlled studies in birds have been conducted on efficacy, safety, and dosing. The guidelines for the use of NSAIDs in raptors and other birds have mainly been empirical. More recently, NSAIDs in free-living raptors have emerged as a major conservation issue with the discovery that diclofenac sodium was responsible for the population crash of three species of Gyps vultures in southern Asia. In this context, residues of veterinary NSAIDs in domestic animals are now considered environmental contaminants that can be significantly toxic to vultures and possibly other avian scavengers. Ironically, the disaster with Asian vultures has led to a considerable body of research on NSAIDs in raptors to the benefit of clinicians who now have scientific information available to help assess dosing, safety, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics of NSAIDs in their raptor patients.

  14. Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic and Antiulcer properties of Porphyra vietnamensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Saurabh; Sharma, Kiran; Sharma, Ajay; Nagpal, Kalpana; Bera, Tanmoy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Aim of the present work was to investigate the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antiulcer effects of red seaweed Porphyra vietnamensis (P. vietnamenis). Materials and Methods: Aqueous (POR) and alcoholic (PE) fractions were successfully isolated from P. vietnamenis. Further biological investigations were performed using a classic test of paw edema induced by carrageenan, writhing induced by acetic acid, hot plate method and naproxen induced gastro-duodenal ulcer. Results: Among the fractions POR showed better activity. POR and PE significantly (p < 0.05) reduced carrageenan induced paw edema in a dose dependent manner. In the writhing test POR significantly (p < 0.05) reduced abdominal writhes than PE. In hot plate method POR showed better analgesic activity than PE. POR showed comparable ulcers reducing potential (p<0.01) to that of omeprazole, and has more ulcer reducing potential then PE. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrated that P. vietnamenis aqueous fraction possesses biological activity that is close to the standards taken for the treatment of peripheral painful or/and inflammatory and ulcer conditions. PMID:25767759

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Dimethylfumarate: A Potential New Therapy for Asthma?

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    Petra Seidel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, which results from the deregulated interaction of inflammatory cells and tissue forming cells. Beside the derangement of the epithelial cell layer, the most prominent tissue pathology of the asthmatic lung is the hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC bundles, which actively contributes to airway inflammation and remodeling. ASMCs of asthma patients secrete proinflammatory chemokines CXCL10, CCL11, and RANTES which attract immune cells into the airways and may thereby initiate inflammation. None of the available asthma drugs cures the disease—only symptoms are controlled. Dimethylfumarate (DMF is used as an anti-inflammatory drug in psoriasis and showed promising results in phase III clinical studies in multiple sclerosis patients. In regard to asthma therapy, DMF has been anecdotally reported to reduce asthma symptoms in patients with psoriasis and asthma. Here we discuss the potential use of DMF as a novel therapy in asthma on the basis of in vitro studies of its inhibitory effect on ASMC proliferation and cytokine secretion in ASMCs.

  16. Nucleic acid-binding polymers as anti-inflammatory agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewoo; Sohn, Jang Wook; Zhang, Ying; Leong, Kam W.; Pisetsky, David; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Dead and dying cells release nucleic acids. These extracellular RNAs and DNAs can be taken up by inflammatory cells and activate multiple nucleic acid-sensing toll-like receptors (TLR3, 7, 8, and 9). The inappropriate activation of these TLRs can engender a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The redundancy of the TLR family encouraged us to seek materials that can neutralize the proinflammatory effects of any nucleic acid regardless of its sequence, structure or chemistry. Herein we demonstrate that certain nucleic acid-binding polymers can inhibit activation of all nucleic acid-sensing TLRs irrespective of whether they recognize ssRNA, dsRNA or hypomethylated DNA. Furthermore, systemic administration of such polymers can prevent fatal liver injury engendered by proinflammatory nucleic acids in an acute toxic shock model in mice. Therefore these polymers represent a novel class of anti-inflammatory agent that can act as molecular scavengers to neutralize the proinflammatory effects of various nucleic acids. PMID:21844380

  17. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Risk of Melanoma

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    Joanne M. Jeter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs inhibit tumor growth in vitro, we investigated the association between NSAIDs and melanoma to determine if there was epidemiologic evidence of a chemopreventive effect from these medications. Three hundred twenty-seven subjects with incident melanoma and 119 melanoma-free controls completed a structured interview assessing melanoma risk factors. The unadjusted odds ratio (OR for use of nonaspirin NSAIDs was 0.58 (95% CI 0.31–1.11, in a comparison of subjects with melanoma to controls. After adjustment for melanoma risk factors, the OR was 0.71 (95% CI 0.23–2.02. Aspirin users had an unadjusted OR of 0.85 (95% CI 0.45–1.69 and an adjusted OR of 1.45 (95% CI 0.44–4.74. In this pilot study, we found no evidence of a significant association between analgesic use and melanoma risk when potential confounders are assessed. Based on conflicting reports in the literature, meta-analysis may be appropriate.

  18. The neuroimmune basis of anti-inflammatory acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavoussi, Ben; Ross, B Evan

    2007-09-01

    This review article presents the evidence that the antiinflammatory actions of acupuncture are mediated via the reflexive central inhibition of the innate immune system. Both laboratory and clinical evidence have recently shown the existence of a negative feedback loop between the autonomic nervous system and the innate immunity. There is also experimental evidence that the electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve inhibits macrophage activation and the production of TNF, IL-1beta , IL-6, IL-18, and other proinflammatory cytokines. It is therefore conceivable that along with hypnosis, meditation, prayer, guided imagery, biofeedback, and the placebo effect, the systemic anti-inflammatory actions of traditional and electro-acupuncture are directly or indirectly mediated by the efferent vagus nerve activation and inflammatory macrophage deactivation. In view of this common physiological mediation, assessing the clinical efficacy of a specific acupuncture regimen using conventional double-blind placebo-controlled trials inherently lacks objectivity due to (1) the uncertainty of ancient rules for needle placement, (2) the diffuse noxious inhibitory control triggered by control-needling at irrelevant points, (3) the possibility of a dose-response relationship between stimulation and effects, and (4) the possibility of inadequate blinding using an inert sham procedure. A more objective assessment of its efficacy could perhaps consist of measuring its effects on the surrogate markers of autonomic tone and inflammation. The use of acupuncture as an adjunct therapy to conventional medical treatment for a number of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases seems plausible and should be validated by confirming its cholinergicity.

  19. Anti-inflammatory polysaccharides of Azadirachta indica seed tegument

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    Lívia de Paulo Pereira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Azadirachta indica A. Juss., Meliaceae, or Indian neem is a plant used to treat inûammatory disorders. Total polysaccharide (TPL and FI (fractioned by ion exchange chromatography from the seed tegument of A. indica were evaluated in models of acute inflammation (paw edema/peritonitis using Wistar rats. Paw edema (measured by hydroplethysmometry was induced s.c. by Λ-carrageenan (300 µg, histamine (100 µg, serotonin (20 µg, compound 48/80 (10 µg, prostaglandin (PGE2 30 µg or L-arginine (15 µg. Peritonitis (analyzed for leukocyte counts/protein dosage was induced i.p. by carrageenan (500 mg or N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP 50 ng. Animals were treated i.v. with TPL (1 mg/kg or FI (0.01, 0.1, 1 mg/kg 30 min before stimuli. FI toxicity (at 0.1 mg/kg, i.v. for seven days was analyzed by the variation of body/organ mass and hematological/biochemical parameters. TPL extraction yielded 1.3%; FI, presenting high carbohydrate and low protein content, at 0.1 mg/kg inhibited paw edema induced by carrageenan (77%, serotonin (54%, PGE2 (69% and nitric oxide (73%, and the peritonitis elicited by carrageenan (48% or fMLP (67%, being well tolerated by animals. FI exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activity, revealing to be important active component in traditionally prepared remedies to treat inflammatory states.

  20. Design and development of Unani anti-inflammatory cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Sana; Zaman, Roohi; Haider, Nafis; Shamsi, Shariq; Alam, Anzar

    Inflammation is the symptom of many diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Many side effects are associated with the Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) used as conventional treatment for these conditions. In Unani, there are large number of single and compound drugs for inflammatory conditions. One dosage form of Unani system of medicine is named as Zimad in which paste is formed by mixing powder in oil, water, herbal extract. Zimadat is prepared just before application and used in many disease conditions as resolving, styptic, astringent, and antiseptic. As the pre-application procedure is difficult and also complicated for patients, hence, the present study attempted to modify the form of Zimad into cream. Various batches of cream of Zimad Mohallil were prepared by using extracts of the formulation and by adding additives. Various physicochemical parameters of prepared cream were carried and compared with market cream. The optimized cream of Zimad Mohallil (F 4 ) was selected after preliminary tests and evaluated further. The optimized cream showed good results in physicochemical parameters equivalent to market sample. Zimad Mohallil was converted into convenient cream form by adding minimum additives and benefits could be achieved without any hassle and cumbersome work, which is encountered in crude or paste form. The optimized cream was equivalent to standard market cream. Copyright © 2017 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inflammation, cytokines and anti-inflammatory therapies in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabet, J Y; Lopes, M E; Champagne, S; Su, J B; Merlet, P; Hittinger, L

    2002-03-01

    Both experimental and clinical studies have shown a role for inflammation in the pathogenesis of heart failure. This seems related to an imbalance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Certain categories in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy have shown the presence of humoral and cellular immunity activation suggesting a possible relation between myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. Recent studies suggest a link between the circulating levels of cytokines (TNF alpha IL-1 et IL-6), the clinical status and prognostic. However, the mechanisms connecting heart failure and cytokine activation are unclear and the sites of cytokines production remain controversial. In the clinical setting, specific measurements of cytokines are not available. As tests of inflammation, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein concentration appear to have interesting pronostic values. Current conventional therapy i.e. ACE inhibitors, type I angiotensin II antagonist and beta-blockers have shown some anti-cytokine properties. Recently, immunosuppressive therapies have shown their ability to improve symptoms and LV ejection in selected patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and clear sign of myocardium inflammation. Specific anti-cytokine therapy have been developed and showed interesting results in preliminary clinical studies. However large clinical trials testing this new therapy have been stoppel prematurely because of deterious effects.

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of glaucocalyxin B in microglia cells

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    Ping Gan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Over-activated microglia is involved in various kinds of neurodegenerative process including Parkinson, Alzheimer and HIV dementia. Suppression of microglial over activation has emerged as a novel strategy for treatment of neuroinflammation-based neurodegeneration. In the current study, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of the ent-kauranoid diterpenoids, which were isolated from the aerial parts of Rabdosia japonica (Burm. f. var. glaucocalyx (Maxim. Hara, were investigated in cultured microglia cells. Glaucocalyxin B (GLB, one of five ent-kauranoid diterpenoids, significantly decreased the generation of nitric oxide (NO, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated microglia cells. In addition, GLB inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in LPS-activated microglia cells. Furthermore, GLB strongly induced the expression of heme oxygenase (HO-1 in BV-2 microglia cells. Finally, GLB exhibited neuroprotective effect by preventing over-activated microglia induced neurotoxicity in a microglia/neuron co-culture model. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that the GLB possesses anti-nueroinflammatory activity, and might serve as a potential therapeutic agent for treating neuroinflammatory diseases.

  3. Anti-inflammatory polymer electrodes for glial scar treatment

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    Maria eAsplund

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymer films offer a convenient route for the functionalization of implantable microelectrodes without compromising their performance as excellent recording units. A micron thick coating, deposited on the surface of a regular metallic electrode, can elute anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of glial scarring as well as growth factors for the support of surrounding neurons. Electroactivation of the polymer drives the release of the substance and should ideally provide a reliable method for controlling quantity and timing of release. Driving signals in the form of a constant potential, a slow redox sweep or a fast pulse are all represented in literature. Few studies present such release in vivo from actual recording and stimulating microelectronic devices. It is essential to bridge the gap between studies based on release in vitro, and the intended application, which would mean release into living and highly delicate tissue. In the biological setting, signals are limited both by available electronics and by the biological safety. Driving signals must not be harmful to tissue and also not activate the tissue in an uncontrolled manner. This review aims at shedding more light on how to select appropriate driving parameters for the polymer electrodes for the in vivo setting. It brings together information regarding activation thresholds for neurons, as well as injury thresholds, and puts this into context with what is known about efficient driving of release from conducting polymer films.

  4. Anti-inflammatory properties of drugs from saffron crocus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Anna; Fontecchio, Gabriella; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Chichiriccò, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The medicinal uses of saffron (Crocus sativus Linnaeus) have a long history beginning in Asian countries since the Late Bronze Age. Recent studies have validated its potential to lower the risk of several diseases. Some metabolites derived from saffron stigmas exert numerous therapeutic effects due to hypolipidemic, antitussive, antioxidant, antidiabetic activities and many others. Water and ethanol extracts of Crocus sativus L. are cardioprotective and counteract neurodegenerative disorders. Many of these medicinal properties of saffron can be attributed to a number of its compounds such as crocetin, crocins and other substances having strong antioxidant and radical scavenger properties against a variety of radical oxygen species and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Botany, worldwide spreading of cultivars, biochemical pathways, active constituents and chemical detection methods are reviewed. Therapeutic uses of saffron principles with particular regard to those exhibiting antioxidant and thus anti-inflammatory features are discussed. To date, very few adverse health effects of saffron have been demonstrated. At high doses (more than 5 g/die day), it should be avoided in pregnancy owing to its uterine stimulation activity.

  5. Endoscopical appearances of nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drug (NSAID- enteropathy

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    Marcellus Simadibrata

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAID have been associated with a sudden and sustained rise in the incidence of gastrointestinal ulcer complications. The aim of the study was to reveal the endoscopical abnormalities found in the duodenum & proximal jejunum due to NSAID. Thirty eight patients taking NSAID for their arthritis or rheumatism were included in this study. Gastro-duodeno-jejunoscopy was done with Olympus PCF-10. The endoscopical appearances of NSAID entero gastropathy were evaluated with a scoring system. The NSAID-entero-gastropathy appearances were endoscopically seen as hyperemia, erosion and ulcer. From all patient recruited, 7.9% complaint of diarrhea and 71.1% complaint of dyspepsia. Endoscopically, in the duodenal bulb we found 79% cases of hyperemia, 39.5% cases of erosion and 7.9% cases of ulcer. In the second part (descending part of the duodenum we found 28.9% cases of hyperemia, 15.8% cases of erosion and 2.6% case of ulcer. In the jejunum, we found 7.9% cases of hyperemia, 2.6% case of erosion and no ulcer. It is concluded that the most frequent abnormal endoscopical appearances in NSAID- enteropathy was hyperemia. The most frequent site of NSAID-enteropathy abnormal findings was in the duodenal bulb. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 225-9Keywords: NSAID-enteropathy, endoscopical appearances.

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of polyphenols in arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Zamudio-Cuevas, Yessica; Punzi, Leonardo; Spinella, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    Polyphenols have been extensively investigated with regard to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulant properties in many inflammatory chronic conditions. The aim of this review is to summarise how these compounds can modulate the inflammatory pathways which characterise the most prevalent arthropathies including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and crystal-induced arthritis. Among polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate, carnosol, hydroxytyrosol, curcumin, resveratrol, kaempferol and genistein have been the most widely investigated in arthritis. The most important results of the studies outlined in this article show how polyphenolic compounds are able to inhibit the expression and the release of a number of pro-inflammatory mediators and proteolytic enzymes, the activity of different transcriptional factors and the production of reactive oxygen species in vitro. Studies on animal models of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and gout show interesting results in terms of reduced tissue damage, restored cartilage homeostasis, and decreased levels of uric acid, respectively. Despite the multiple protective effects of polyphenols, there are no dietary recommendations for patients affected by rheumatic diseases. Future studies, including intervention trials, should be conducted to determine the relevance of polyphenols consumption or supplementation in arthritis. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Basal and inducible anti-inflammatory epoxygenase activity in endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askari, Ara A. [Barts and the London, Queen Mary University, London (United Kingdom); Thomson, Scott [Comparative Biomedical Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, London (United Kingdom); Edin, Matthew L.; Lih, Fred B.; Zeldin, Darryl C. [Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Bishop-Bailey, David, E-mail: dbishopbailey@rvc.ac.uk [Comparative Biomedical Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • We examined epoxygenase product formation and regulation in endothelial cells. • The epoxygenase CYP2J2 is an LPS (TLR-4) inducible enzyme in endothelial cells. • The endothelial cell line EA.Hy926 synthesises epoxygenase products. • Inhibition of endothelial epoxygenases increases TNFα secretion. • Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors reduce inflammation-induced TNFα and NFκB. - Abstract: The roles of CYP lipid-metabolizing pathways in endothelial cells are poorly understood. Human endothelial cells expressed CYP2J2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) mRNA and protein. The TLR-4 agonist LPS (1 μg/ml; 24 h) induced CYP2J2 but not sEH mRNA and protein. LC–MS/MS analysis of the stable commonly used human endothelial cell line EA.Hy926 showed active epoxygenase and epoxide hydrolase activity: with arachidonic acid (stable epoxide products 5,6-DHET, and 14,15-DHET), linoleic acid (9,10-EPOME and 12,13-EPOME and their stable epoxide hydrolase products 9,10-DHOME and 12,13-DHOME), docosahexaenoic acid (stable epoxide hydrolase product 19,20-DiHDPA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (stable epoxide hydrolase product 17,18-DHET) being formed. Inhibition of epoxygenases using either SKF525A or MS-PPOH induced TNFα release, but did not affect LPS, IL-1β, or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced TNFα release. In contrast, inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase by AUDA or TPPU inhibited basal, LPS, IL-1β and PMA induced TNFα release, and LPS-induced NFκB p65 nuclear translocation. In conclusion, human endothelial cells contain a TLR-4 regulated epoxygenase CYP2J2 and metabolize linoleic acid > eicosapentaenoic acid > arachidonic acid > docosahexaenoic acid to products with anti-inflammatory activity.

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Novel Standardized Solid Lipid Curcumin Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Pragati P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Inflammation and the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines are associated with numerous chronic diseases such as type-2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. An overwhelming amount of data indicates that curcumin, a polyphenol obtained from the Indian spice turmeric, Curcuma longa, is a potential chemopreventive agent for treating certain cancers and other chronic inflammatory diseases. However, the low bioavailability of curcumin, partly due to its low solubility and stability in the digestive tract, limits its therapeutic applications. Recent studies have demonstrated increased bioavailability and health-promoting effects of a novel solid lipid particle formulation of curcumin (Curcumin SLCP, Longvida®). The goal of this study was to evaluate the aqueous solubility and in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of solid lipid curcumin particle (SLCP) formulations using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cultured murine macrophages. SLCPs treatment significantly decreased nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) levels at concentrations ranging from 10 to 50 μg/mL, and reduced interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Transient transfection experiments using a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) reporter construct indicate that SLCPs significantly inhibit the transcriptional activity of NF-κB in macrophages. Taken together, these results show that in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages, SLCPs have improved solubility over unformulated curcumin, and significantly decrease the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mediators NO, PGE2, and IL-6 by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB. PMID:25490740

  9. DMPD: Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18336664 Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macrophages...(.html) (.csml) Show Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macrophages. PubmedID 18336664 Title Mechanism

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of the topical preparation of Valeriana wallichii and Achyranthes aspera leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuda, Fazli; Iqbal, Zafar; Khan, Ayub; Zakiullah; Nasir, Fazli; Shah, Yasar

    2013-05-01

    In vivo and in vitro screening of anti inflammatory activity of Valeriana wallichii and Achyranthes aspera leaves crude extract was performed, using standardized procedures. Methanolic crude extract topical formulation (cream) of Valeriana wallichii and Achyranthes aspera leaves (Family Valerianaceae and Amaranthaceae respectively), were screened for their anti-inflammatory activity, through "Carrageenan induced hind paw edema" test, for their effect on the acute and chronic phase inflammation models in male Wistar rats. Methanolic extract and its fractions were also evaluated for their in vitro anti-inflammatory activity using lipoxygenase inhibition assay. Leaves of Valeriana wallichii showed significant (PValeriana wallichii also showed considerable (IC 50=73 ± 0.36) in vitro anti-inflammatory activity as compared to standard (6.11 ± 0.02). Similarly Achyranthes aspera leaves showed relatively weak (p>0.05) in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. However, its activity was comparable with that of standard at 10% concentration after 5 hrs of carrageenan injection. This activity was present in ethyl acetate fraction during in vitro screening (IC 50=76 ± 0.14) as compared to that of standard (IC 50=6.11 ± 0.02). The combined in vitro and in vivo Anti-inflammatory screening shows that the ethyl acetate fraction of the crude extract of Valeriana wallichii and Achyranthes aspera can be used for the isolation of new Anti-inflammatory lead compounds.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of phytochemicals from fruits, vegetables, and food legumes: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fengmei; Du, Bin; Xu, Baojun

    2017-06-12

    Inflammation is the first biological response of the immune system to infection, injury or irritation. Evidence suggests that the anti-inflammatory effect is mediated through the regulation of various inflammatory cytokines, such as nitric oxide, interleukins, tumor necrosis factor alpha-α, interferon gamma-γ as well as noncytokine mediator, prostaglandin E 2 . Fruits, vegetables, and food legumes contain high levels of phytochemicals that show anti-inflammatory effect, but their mechanisms of actions have not been completely identified. The aim of this paper was to summarize the recent investigations and findings regarding in vitro and animal model studies on the anti-inflammatory effects of fruits, vegetables, and food legumes. Specific cytokines released for specific type of physiological event might shed some light on the specific use of each source of phytochemicals that can benefit to counter the inflammatory response. As natural modulators of proinflammatory gene expressions, phytochemical from fruits, vegetables, and food legumes could be incorporated into novel bioactive anti-inflammatory formulations of various nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Finally, these phytochemicals are discussed as the natural promotion strategy for the improvement of human health status. The phenolics and triterpenoids in fruits and vegetables showed higher anti-inflammatory activity than other compounds. In food legumes, lectins and peptides had anti-inflammatory activity in most cases. However, there are lack of human study data on the anti-inflammatory activity of phytochemicals from fruits, vegetables, and food legumes.

  12. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activities of Quillaja saponaria Mol. saponin extract in mice

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    Sumana Sarkhel

    Full Text Available Objective: Quillaja saponaria bark contains a high percentage of triterpene saponins and has been used for centuries as antiinflammatory and analgesic agent in Chilean folk medicine.In the Present study the anti-inflammatory activities of the aqueous extract of commercially partially purified saponin from Quillaja saponaria Mol. in in vivo animal models. Methods & materials:: Aqueous extract of the plant material was prepared by cold maceration. The anti-inflammatory activity of a commercial Quillaja saponaria Mol. (QS saponin extract was investigated by carragenan induced mice paw edema model for acute inflammation (Winter, 1962 [16]. Results: The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carragenan in paw edema model in swiss albino mice (18–20 g. The anti-inflammatory activity was found to be dose dependent in carragenan induced paw edema. QS was found to significantly (p < 0.05 reduce the carragenan induced mice paw edema (38.59%; 20 mg/kg bw as compared to carragenan control. The percentage inhibition of standard anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin was (55%; 10 mg/kg, bw. Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrate that the aqueous extract of Quillaja saponaria saponins (QS possess significant anti-inflammatory activity. Keywords: Anti-inflammatory activity, Aqueous extract, Paw edema

  13. Antioxidant, Anti-Glycation and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Phenolic Constituents from Cordia sinensis

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    Muhammad Nasir

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nine compounds have been isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of C. sinensis, namely protocatechuic acid (1, trans-caffeic acid (2, methyl rosmarinate (3, rosmarinic acid (4, kaempferide-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6, quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7, kaempferide-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1→6-β-D-glucopyranoside (8 and kaempferol-3-O-α-L-rhamno-pyranosyl (1→6-β-D-glucopyranoside (9, all reported for the first time from this species. The structures of these compounds were deduced on the basis of spectroscopic studies, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 1–9 were investigated for biological activity and showed significant anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageen induced rat paw edema test. The antioxidant activities of isolated compounds 1–9 were evaluated by the DPPH radical scavenging test, and compounds 1, 2, 4 and 7–9 exhibited marked scavenging activity compared to the standard BHA. These compounds were further studied for their anti-glycation properties and some compounds showed significant anti-glycation inhibitory activity. The purity of compounds 2–5, 8 and 9 was confirmed by HPLC. The implications of these results for the chemotaxonomic studies of the genus Cordia have also been discussed.

  14. Assessment of anti-inflammatory potential of Sesbania bispinosa Linn. leaf extracts and fractions by acute and

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    Ganesh D. Boddawar

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that leaves of S. bispinosa possess significant level of anti-inflammatory activity and ethyl acetate fraction may be further explored as an anti-inflammatory remedy as it was found to possess higher anti-inflammatory activity among all extracts and fractions as demonstrated in both acute and chronic models.

  15. DMPD: Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecular mechanisms. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17981503 Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecula...) (.html) (.csml) Show Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecular mech...ecular mechanisms. Authors Straus DS, Glass CK. Publication Trends Immunol. 2007 De...anisms. PubmedID 17981503 Title Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmol

  16. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities of Thymus serphyllum Linn. in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamger; Mazhar, Uzma; Mushtaq, Muhammad Naveed; Khan, Hafeez Ullah; Maheen, Safirah; Malik, Muhammad Nasir Hayat; Ahmad, Taseer; Latif, Fouzia; Tabassum, Nazia; Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Ahsan, Haseeb; Khan, Wasim; Javed, Ibrahim; Ali, Haider

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities of Thymus serphyllum Linn. in mice. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan and egg albumin induced paw edema in mice, while analgesic activity was assessed using formalin induced paw licking and acetic acid induced abdominal writhing in mice. For determination of antipyretic activity, pyrexia was induced by subcutaneous injection of 20% yeast. All the extracts produced significant anti-inflammatory effect however, ether extract produced maximum effect 34% inhibition (p Thymus serphyllum in traditional medicine for inflammation accompanied by pain and fever.

  17. Design, synthesis, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of novel piroxicam analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, Amanda Silva; Bispo Júnior, Walfrido; da Silva, Yolanda Karla Cupertino; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana; Castro, Rosane de Paula; Sabino, José Ricardo; Lião, Luciano Morais; Lima, Lídia Moreira; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2012-11-28

    In this paper we report the design, synthesis, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a series of benzothiazine N-acylhydrazones 14a–h, planned by structural modification of piroxicam (1), a non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Among the synthesized analogues, compounds 14f (LASSBio-1637) and 14g (LASSBio-1639) were identified as novel antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory prototypes, active by oral administration, acting by a mechanism of action that seems to be different from that of piroxicam, since they were inactive as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) at concentrations of 10 mM.

  18. Design, Synthesis, Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Novel Piroxicam Analogues

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    Eliezer J. Barreiro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the design, synthesis, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a series of benzothiazine N-acylhydrazones 14a–h, planned by structural modification of piroxicam (1, a non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Among the synthesized analogues, compounds 14f (LASSBio-1637 and 14g (LASSBio-1639 were identified as novel antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory prototypes, active by oral administration, acting by a mechanism of action that seems to be different from that of piroxicam, since they were inactive as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2 at concentrations of 10 mM.

  19. Polysaccharide Constituents of Three Types of Sea Urchin Shells and Their Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Heng; Shang, Xiaohui; Dong, Qi; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Heng; Lu, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    As a source of potent anti-inflammatory traditional medicines, the quantitative chromatographic fingerprints of sea urchin shell polysaccharides were well established via pre-column derivatization high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Based on the quantitative results, the content of fucose and glucose could be used as preliminary distinguishing indicators among three sea urchin shell species. Besides, the anti-inflammatory activities of the polysaccharides from sea urchin shells and their gonads were also determined. The gonad polysaccharide of Anthocidaris crassispina showed the most potent anti-inflammatory activity among all samples tested. PMID:26389925

  20. TO STUDY OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECT OF CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS IN RAT PAW EDEMA MODEL

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    Anil Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION The process of inflammation is one of the most fundamental responses of the vascularised living tissue to local injury.1 Inflammation is a universal host defense process involving a complex network of cell-cell, cell-mediator & tissue interactions.2 AIM AND OBJECTIVES To study of anti-inflammatory effect of calcium channel blockers in rat paw edema model. MATERIALS AND METHODS To evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect with different doses of calcium channel blockers nifedipine, verapamil and standard drug ibuprofen in experimentally induced acute model of inflammation in male Wister rat. Inter drug comparison of anti-inflammatory efficacy of nifedipine, verapamil with standard drug ibuprofen in rats. Divide the animals into 3 groups each comprising at least six rats. Control group inject saline, standard group inject ibuprofen 20 mg/kg. test group inject (nifedipine & verapamil subcutaneously. After 30 min inject 0.1ml 1% (w/v Carrageenin in the plantar region of the left paw of all rats. The left hind paw was measured plethysmograph, immediately (zero hour and 4 hours after the sub plantar injection of Carrageenin. The difference between zero hour volume and the paw volume recorded at the end of 4 hrs. Indicated the actual volume. RESULT The statistical test ANOVA is applied to inter drug comparison. It is found that drug. Nifedipine 1mg/kg (86% has more efficacy significantly as compared to standard drug Ibuprofen 20mg/kg (55%, and drug Verapamil 1mg/kg (71% for its anti-inflammatory action. (F value is 94.27 >tab F 5.82 so this method is statistically highly significant. CONCLUSION Thus it was found that nifedipine has better anti-inflammatory efficacy as compared to ibuprofen, verapamil in various experimental anti-inflammatory models. The various experimental anti-inflammatory models were rat paw edema method. The calcium channel blockers included were nifedipine, verapamil and standard drug ibuprofen. Nifedipine has anti-inflammatory

  1. Polysaccharide Constituents of Three Types of Sea Urchin Shells and Their Anti-Inflammatory Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Heng; Shang, Xiaohui; Dong, Qi; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Heng; Lu, Xiaoling

    2015-09-16

    As a source of potent anti-inflammatory traditional medicines, the quantitative chromatographic fingerprints of sea urchin shell polysaccharides were well established via pre-column derivatization high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Based on the quantitative results, the content of fucose and glucose could be used as preliminary distinguishing indicators among three sea urchin shell species. Besides, the anti-inflammatory activities of the polysaccharides from sea urchin shells and their gonads were also determined. The gonad polysaccharide of Anthocidaris crassispina showed the most potent anti-inflammatory activity among all samples tested.

  2. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory properties and anti-inflammatory activity of 2-amino-5-alkylidene-thiazol-4-ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelcerovic, Zaklina; Veljkovic, Andrej; Kocic, Gordana; Yancheva, Denitsa; Petronijevic, Zivomir; Anderluh, Marko; Smelcerovic, Andrija

    2015-03-05

    Thirty 2-amino-5-alkylidene-thiazol-4-ones were assayed for inhibitory activity against commercial enzyme xanthine oxidase (XO) in vitro and XO in rat liver homogenate as well as for anti-inflammatory response on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). 4-((2-Benzylamino-4-oxothiazol-5(4H)-ylidene)-methyl)benzonitrile showed the most potent inhibitory effect against commercial XO (IC50 = 17.16 μg/mL) as well as against rat liver XO (IC50 = 24.50 μg/mL). All compounds containing the 4-cyanobenzylidene group or (indol-3-yl)methylene group at the position 5 of thiazol-4-one moiety were moderately potent inhibitors of commercial XO. The assayed compounds were docked into the crystal structures of XO enzyme complexes with three diverse inhibitors (PDB codes: 1FIQ, 1VDV, and 1V97) using OEDocking software. Our results strongly point to a correlation between the data on inhibitory activity against commercial XO and data on antioxidant activity of studied compounds, screened using a lipid peroxidation (LP) method. 2-(Benzylamino)-5-((thiophen-2-yl)methylene)thiazol-4(5H)-one showed the highest anti-inflammatory response on PBMCs, exerted most probably through the NF-κB inhibition. Studied 2-amino-5-alkylidene-thiazol-4-ones obey the "Rule of five" and meet all criteria for good solubility and permeability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for fibromyalgia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Häuser, Winfried; Mücke, Martin; Tölle, Thomas Rudolf; Bell, Rae F; Moore, R Andrew

    2017-03-27

    Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used in the treatment of pain in fibromyalgia, despite being considered not to be effective. To assess the analgesic efficacy, tolerability (drop-out due to adverse events), and safety (serious adverse events) of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for fibromyalgia in adults. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Embase for randomised controlled trials from inception to January 2017. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved studies and reviews, and online clinical trial registries. We included randomised, double-blind trials of two weeks' duration or longer, comparing any oral NSAID with placebo or another active treatment for relief of pain in fibromyalgia, with subjective pain assessment by the participant. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality and potential bias. Primary outcomes were participants with substantial pain relief (at least 50% pain relief over baseline or very much improved on Patient Global Impression of Change scale (PGIC)) or moderate pain relief (at least 30% pain relief over baseline or much or very much improved on PGIC), serious adverse events, and withdrawals due to adverse events; secondary outcomes were adverse events, withdrawals due to lack of efficacy, and outcomes relating to sleep, fatigue, and quality of life. Where pooled analysis was possible, we used dichotomous data to calculate risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT), using standard methods. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE and created a 'Summary of findings' table. Our searches identified six randomised, double-blind studies involving 292 participants in suitably characterised fibromyalgia. The mean age of participants was between 39 and 50 years, and 89% to 100% were women. The initial pain intensity was around 7/10 on a 0 to 10 pain scale, indicating severe pain. NSAIDs tested were etoricoxib 90 mg

  4. Variation of Anti-inflammatory Cytokines in Relationship with Menopause

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    Dan MIHU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to assess serum levels of the key anti-inflammatory cytokines in women of reproductive age and in pre and postmenopausal women. Material and Method. 175 women were enrolled and were divided into 5 groups (1 – Fertile women; 2 – Pre- and perimenopausal women; 3 – Postmenopausal women; 4 – Surgically-induced menopause; 5 – Chronic inflammation. Multiplex cytokine kits were used to evaluate serum levels of interleukin-4, -10 and -13. We determined the serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone, of luteinizing hormone, 17β-estradiol, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate using sandwich ELISA. Results. IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17 present a statistically significant decrease (p=0.00, p=0.00, respectively p=0.0053 in women with natural or surgically induced menopause (groups 3 and 4, compared with fertile women and premenopausal women (Groups 1, 2 and 5. Serum levels of IL-4 and IL-10 are significantly higher in fertile patients with associated chronic inflammatory diseases (133.5±1.314 pg/ml, respectively 6.406±13.47 pg/ml than in fertile patients without chronic inflammatory diseases or premenopausal women (84.67±1.22 pg/ml, respectively 0.627±0.714. Conclusions. IL-4 and IL-10, together with IL-17, show significantly lower serum values in patients with natural or surgically induced menopause compared with patients of childbearing age or in premenopause. IL-4 and IL-10 show significantly higher serum values for patients of childbearing age presenting chronic inflammatory pathology compared with patients of childbearing age without chronic inflammatory pathology or premenopausal patients.

  5. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) Induced Dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Paul Ray-Yee; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most prescribed group of drugs in the world. They are used primarily for pain relief in chronic inflammatory joint disease and act by inhibiting enzymes COX1 and COX2 and ultimately preventing the production of active prostanoids which are required for the innate inflammatory pathway. The use of NSAIDs have been associated with the development of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms ranging from simple dyspepsia to life threatening GI bleeds and perforations. The definition of dyspepsia has evolved over the years and this has hampered accurate studies on the prevalence of dyspepsia as different studies used varying criteria to define dyspepsia. It is now known that NSAIDs significantly increase the risk of dyspepsia.The risk of developing peptic ulcer disease vary with specific NSAIDs and dosages but there is no correlation between the symptoms of dyspepsia and underlying peptic ulcers. The pathogenesis of dyspepsia with NSAIDs is not completely understood. Peptic ulceration alone is not able to account for the majority of dyspepsia symptoms encountered by NSAIDs users. Erosive oesophagitis secondary to NSAIDs may be contributing factor to the prevalence of dyspepsia in NSAIDs users. Altered gut permeability and changes in gastric mechanosensory function due to NSAIDs may also be a contributory factor. Management of NSAID induced dyspepsia is involves a multipronged approach. Drug avoidance if possible would be ideal. Other options include using the lowest effective dose, changing to an NSAIDs with a safer GI risk profile, avoiding concurrent use with other NSAIDs or if the patient has a previous history of peptic ulcer disease, and co-prescribing with anti-secretory medications such as proton pump inhibitors. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori has a protective role against developing peptic ulcers and may also improve symptoms of NSAIDs induced dyspepsia.

  6. Inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects of soybean agglutinin

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    Benjamin C.F.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean agglutinin (SBA lectin, a protein present in raw soybean meals, can bind to and be extensively endocytosed by intestinal epithelial cells, being nutritionally toxic for most animals. In the present study we show that SBA (5-200 µg/cavity injected into different cavities of rats induced a typical inflammatory response characterized by dose-dependent exudation and neutrophil migration 4 h after injection. This effect was blocked by pretreatment with glucocorticoid (0.5 mg/kg or by co-injection of N-acetyl-galactosamine (100 x [M] lectin, but not of other sugars (100 x [M] lectin, suggesting an inflammatory response related to the lectin activity. Neutrophil accumulation was not dependent on a direct effect of SBA on the macrophage population since the effect was not altered when the number of peritoneal cells was increased or decreased in vivo. On the other hand, SBA showed chemotactic activity for human neutrophils in vitro. A slight increase in mononuclear cells was observed 48 h after ip injection of SBA. Phenotypic analysis of these cells showed an increase in the CD4+/CD8- lymphocyte population that returned to control levels after 15 days, suggesting the development of an immune response. SBA-stimulated macrophages presented an increase in the expression of CD11/CD18 surface molecules and showed some characteristics of activated cells. After intravenous administration, SBA increased the number of circulating neutrophils and inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the neutrophil migration induced by ip injection of carrageenan into peritoneal cavities. The co-injection of N-acetyl-galactosamine or mannose, but not glucose or fucose, inhibited these effects. The data indicate that soybean lectin is able to induce a local inflammatory reaction but has an anti-inflammatory effect when present in circulating blood

  7. The Epidemiology of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

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    Jerry Tenenbaum

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use has increased dramatically in the past two decades. A large proportion of the elderly population (more than 65 years of age holds a current or recent NSAID prescription, accounting for approximately 90% of all NSAID prescriptions. Despite studies that advise finding alternatives for NSAIDs for the management of osteoarthritis, physicians often prescribe NSAIDs first for such common musculoskeletal conditions. Despite being identified as risk factors for gastrointestinal complications, the simultaneous use of two NSAIDs and the coadministration of NSAIDs with corticosteroids and with coumadin continue to occur. The point prevalence of NSAID-induced ulcers is 10% to 30%, and 15% to 35% of all peptic ulcer complications are caused by NSAIDs. The increased risk of gastrointestinal complications when NSAIDs are used is 3% to 5%. This risk increases with other identified risk factors (eg, older age, previous gastrointestinal history, comorbid diseases and poor health. Gastrointestinal causes of hospitalization (eg, gastrointestinal hemorrhage and perforation and death have increased in parallel to increased NSAID use. ‘Antiulcer’ agents are prescribed twice as often in NSAID users, and the economic impact (eg, diagnostic tests and hospitalization is that about one-third of the arthritis budget has been dedicated to deal with gastrointestinal side effects of NSAIDs. Misoprostol and omeprazole have been shown to be cytoprotective for the gastroduodenal mucosa when NSAIDs are used, and misoprostol has been shown to reduce the risk of gastroduodenal ulcer complications. Economic evaluations have suggested that these agents are a cost effective means of dealing with such NSAID-associated problems. Although no NSAID is totally safe, a number of studies have demonstrated that NSAIDs may be ranked according to relative gastrointestinal toxicity. The role of Helicobacter pylori in NSAID-associated problems

  8. Aptamers Against Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshtam, Maryam; Asgary, Seddigheh; Kouhpayeh, Shirin; Shariati, Laleh; Khanahmad, Hossein

    2017-02-01

    Inflammatory disorders result from continuous inflammation in injured sites. Many molecules are involved in this process; the inhibition of which could prevent the inflammation. Chemokines are a group of these biological mediators which are categorized into pro-, anti-, and pro-/anti-inflammatory. Thus, targeting these essential molecules can be an effective way for prevention and control of inflammatory diseases. Various therapeutic agents have been developed for primary and secondary prevention of these disorders, but each of them has its own limitations. Aptamers, as novel therapeutic agents, are a new generation of drugs which could replace other medications even antibodies. Aptamer can bind to its target molecule to trap it and prohibit its function. Among large group of inflammatory cytokines, only 11 aptamers have been selected either against cytokines or their related receptors. These cytokines include interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-10, IL-11, IL-17, IL-32, TGF-β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, CCL2, and IP-10. Most of the isolated aptamers are against pro-inflammatory or dual function cytokines, and it seems that they could be used for diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of the related inflammatory diseases. Most of the aptamers have been tested in vitro, but so far, none of them has been approved for in vivo use. Given a vast number of inflammatory cytokines, more aptamers against this group of biological molecules will be selected in the near future. The available aptamers will also be tested in clinical trials. Therefore, a significant improvement is expected for the prevention and control of inflammatory disorders.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Thyme Essential Oil in Mice

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    Š. Juhas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant essential oils are plant secondary metabolites possessing various pharmacological properties, primarily anti-oxidative, antimicrobial or immunomodulatory ones. The aim of this work was to study the effects of thyme essential oil dietary administration in murine DTH/ CHS reaction, carrageenan paw oedema and TNBS colitis. Thyme essential oil was added to the murine diet at three concentrations (5000, 2500 and 1250 ppm and fed to Balb/c mice. The extent of ear swelling in DTH/CHS reaction and paw oedema induced by carrageenan application was measured using the Mitutoyo thickness gauge. In the model of TNBS colitis we evaluated the changes in body weight, the colon weight : body weight ratio, bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes, and macroscopical and histological scores. IL-1β and IL-6 messenger RNA expression in colonic samples of one experimental group were assessed using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. Dietary supplementation with 5000 ppm of thyme essential oil significantly decreased paw oedema and ear swelling. This thyme essential oil concentration caused a significant inhibition of total mRNA IL-1β expression in the mouse colon, and markedly decreased the macroscopic and microscopic scores of colitis. On the other hand, the 1250 ppm of thyme essential oil in diet increased ear oedema induced by oxazolone application in mice. Our study indicates that thyme essential oil is able to affect murine experimental inflammatory models depending on the concentration used. It is concluded that the anti-inflammatory effects of thyme essential oil should be interpreted with a caution due to its contradictory, dose-related effects.

  10. Anti-inflammatory profile of paricalcitol in kidney transplant recipients

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    Javier Donate-Correa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, is used to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism in kidney transplant patients. Experimental and clinical studies in non-transplant kidney disease patients have found this molecule to have anti-inflammatory properties. In this exploratory study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory profile of paricalcitol in kidney-transplant recipients. Methods: Thirty one kidney transplant recipients with secondary hyperparathyroidism completed 3 months of treatment with oral paricalcitol (1 μg/day. Serum concentrations and gene expression levels of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analysed at the beginning and end of the study. Results: Paricalcitol significantly decreased parathyroid hormone levels with no changes in calcium and phosphorous. It also reduced serum concentrations of interleukin (IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α by 29% (p < 0.05 and 9.5% (p < 0.05 compared to baseline, respectively. Furthermore, gene expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in peripheral blood mononuclear cells decreased by 14.1% (p < 0.001 and 34.1% (p < 0.001, respectively. The ratios between pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6 and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, both regarding serum concentrations and gene expression, also experienced a significant reduction. Conclusions: Paricalcitol administration to kidney transplant recipients has been found to have beneficial effects on inflammation, which may be associated with potential clinical benefits. Resumen: Antecedentes y objetivos: El paricalcitol, un activador selectivo del receptor de la vitamina D, se utiliza en el tratamiento del hiperparatiroidismo secundario en el receptor de trasplante renal. Estudios tanto clínicos como experimentales realizados en pacientes renales no trasplantados muestran propiedades antiinflamatorias para esta molécula. En

  11. Umbilical cord blood concentration of soluble scavenger receptor for hemoglobin, but not pentraxin 3, is of value for the early postpartum identification of the presence of histological chorioamnionitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacerovsky, Marian; Drahosova, Marcela; Hornychova, Helena; Tambor, Vojtech; Flidrova, Eva; Musilova, Ivana; Tosner, Jindrich; Andrys, Ctirad

    2011-10-01

    To determine whether umbilical cord blood concentrations of soluble scavenger receptor for hemoglobin (sCD163) and pentraxin 3 (PTX3) are of value in the early postpartum diagnosis of histological chorioamnionitis in preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM). Eighty-three women with pregnancies complicated by PPROM between 24 and 36 weeks of gestation with (n = 38) and without (n = 45) the presence of histological chorioamnionitis were included in the study. We compared umbilical cord blood sCD163 and PTX3 levels in preterm neonates from PPROM pregnancies with versus without the presence of histological chorioamnionitis using nonparametric test (Mann-Whitney U test). The presence of histological chorioamnionitis was associated with a higher median umbilical cord blood sCD163, but not PTX3 concentration, to compare with the absence of histological chorioamnionitis [sCD163: median 1466 ng/mL, interquartile range (IQR) 1187-1828 vs. 1168 ng/mL, IQR 887-1595; p = 0.01; PTX3: median 3.96 ng/mL, IQR 2.24-6.77 vs. 2.95 ng/mL, IQR 1.74-6.93; p = 0.49]. HCA is associated with an increase of umbilical cord blood sCD163, but not PTX3 concentration. Umbilical cord blood sCD163 seems to be a postpartum marker of the presence of histological chorioamnionitis.

  12. Precision engineering for PRRSV resistance in pigs: Macrophages from genome edited pigs lacking CD163 SRCR5 domain are fully resistant to both PRRSV genotypes while maintaining biological function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Burkard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS is a panzootic infectious disease of pigs, causing major economic losses to the world-wide pig industry. PRRS manifests differently in pigs of all ages but primarily causes late-term abortions and stillbirths in sows and respiratory disease in piglets. The causative agent of the disease is the positive-strand RNA PRRS virus (PRRSV. PRRSV has a narrow host cell tropism, limited to cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. CD163 has been described as a fusion receptor for PRRSV, whereby the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain 5 (SRCR5 region was shown to be an interaction site for the virus in vitro. CD163 is expressed at high levels on the surface of macrophages, particularly in the respiratory system. Here we describe the application of CRISPR/Cas9 to pig zygotes, resulting in the generation of pigs with a deletion of Exon 7 of the CD163 gene, encoding SRCR5. Deletion of SRCR5 showed no adverse effects in pigs maintained under standard husbandry conditions with normal growth rates and complete blood counts observed. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs and peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs were isolated from the animals and assessed in vitro. Both PAMs and macrophages obtained from PBMCs by CSF1 stimulation (PMMs show the characteristic differentiation and cell surface marker expression of macrophages of the respective origin. Expression and correct folding of the SRCR5 deletion CD163 on the surface of macrophages and biological activity of the protein as hemoglobin-haptoglobin scavenger was confirmed. Challenge of both PAMs and PMMs with PRRSV genotype 1, subtypes 1, 2, and 3 and PMMs with PRRSV genotype 2 showed complete resistance to viral infections assessed by replication. Confocal microscopy revealed the absence of replication structures in the SRCR5 CD163 deletion macrophages, indicating an inhibition of infection prior to gene expression, i.e. at entry/fusion or unpacking stages.

  13. Phenolic composition, anitproliferative and anti-inflammatory properties of conventional and organic cinnamon and peppermint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conventional and organic cinnamon and peppermint were investigated for their phenolic profile, antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with 75% acetone was a better method than Soxhlet and overnight extraction for phenolic content and a...

  14. [Screening of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities in marines macroalgae from Mediterranean Sea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatter Riahi, R; Tarhouni, S; Kharrat, R

    2011-01-01

    Methanolic extracts of 13 seaweeds collected from the Mediterranean sea (Tunisian, Moroccan and Greek coasts) from different classes (Chlorophycae, Pheopbycae and Rhodophycae) are testedfor their analgesic and antiinflammatory effects. These activities were estimated in vivo, respectively by writhing test and carrageenan test. Nine species among 13 tested seaweeds showed an important analgesic activity. On the other hand only 5 seaweeds showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity (Cystoseira barbata and Sargassum vulgare) had endowed with the double analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity. The red algae Geliduim sesquipedale have only anti-inflammatory activity and the other one endowed only with an analgesic activity (Enteromorpha compressa, Chaetomorpha linum, Cystoseira ericoidies, Sacchoriza bulbosa et Corralina officinalis). The simultaneous or individual presence of the analgesic and\\or anti-inflammatory activities of the various extracts can find its application in the therapeutic domain.

  15. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of Grewia asiatica Linn. in rodents

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    Udaybhan Singh Paviaya

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study indicates that root bark of G. asiatica exhibits peripheral and central analgesic effect and anti-inflammatory activity, which may be attributed to the various phytochemicals present in root bark of G. asiatica.

  16. Cell-based screening assay for anti-inflammatory activity of bioactive compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Kees; Vonk, Roel J.; Priebe, Marion G.; Roelofsen, Han

    2015-01-01

    Excess dietary intake may induce metabolic inflammation which is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Recent evidence indicates that dietary bioactive compounds may diminish metabolic inflammation. To identify anti-inflammatory bioactives, we developed a screening assay

  17. Antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory activity of Carrageenan from Hypnea musciformis Wulfen

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Solimabi; Das, B.

    Pharmacological studies on K-carrageenan extracted from Hypnea musciformis have shown that it antagonizes histamine-induced spasm in guineapig ielum and possesses anti-inflammatory activity against rat hind paw oedema induced by commercial...

  18. Guava pomace: a new source of anti-inflammatory and analgesic bioactives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Guava pomace is an example of the processing waste generated after the manufacturing process from the juice industry that could be a source of bioactives. Thus, the present investigation was carried out in order to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive potential and determinate the main phenolic compounds of a guava pomace extract (GPE). Methods The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, histamine-induced paw edema and neutrophils migration in the peritoneal cavity models. Acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and formalin test were performed to investigate the antinociceptive effects. In addition, the content of total phenolic and of individual phenolic compounds was determined by GC/MS. Results GPE showed anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, histamine-induced paw edema and neutrophils migration in the peritoneal cavity models (p guava pomace could be an interesting source of anti-inflammatory and analgesic substances. PMID:24063346

  19. Treating Gulf War Illness with Novel Anti-Inflammatories: A Screening of Botantical Microglia Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    SUBJECT TERMS Gulf War Illness, botanical, anti-inflammatory, biomarker, microglia, improvement, treatment 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...Younger, J.W. (2016, October) Diagnostic overlap of Gulf War Illness, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/ Chronic Fatigue syndrome, and Fibromyalgia in

  20. Brine Shrimp Cytotoxicity, Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Properties of Woodfordia fruticosa Kurz Flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baravalia, Yogesh; Vaghasiya, Yogeshkumar; Chanda, Sumitra

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the cytotoxicity, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of methanol extract of Woodfordia fruticosa flowers. Cytotoxic activity of methanol extract of Woodfordia fruticosa flowers was tested using Artemia salina (Brine shrimp) bioassay. Two doses (400 and 600 mg/Kg) were evaluated for the anti-inflammatory activity against the carrageenan, histamine, dextran, serotonin and formaldehyde-induced rat paw edema, cotton pellet-induced granuloma and formaldehyde-induced analgesia in rats. In cytotoxicity study, extract caused 73% mortality of Brine shrimp larvae after 24 h at a concentration of 1000 μg/mL. The results of the anti-inflammatory study showed that the extract produced significant (p Woodfordia fruticosa flowers have weak cytotoxic and potent anti-inflammatory compounds and justifies the traditional uses for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.

  1. Effects of phytochemicals on in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Kyuichi; Kato, Yuri; Sakano, Taiken; Baba, Nobuyuki; Hagiwara, Kota; Tamura, Akira; Baba, Seigo; Natsume, Midori; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics have been shown to improve the condition of not only the human gastrointestinal tract but also the entire body. We found that quercetin enhances the anti-inflammatory activity of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, which is abundant in human intestines. Here, we assessed whether certain phytochemicals could enhance the anti-inflammatory activity of B. adolescentis. Bifidobacteria were anaerobically cultured with phytochemicals for 3 h, and the anti-inflammatory activity of the supernatants was estimated by testing their ability to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264 macrophages. Of the 55 phytochemicals tested, phloretin, (+)-taxifolin, and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate as well as quercetin-3-O-glucoside and quercetin-4'-O-glucoside were similar to quercetin in promoting NO suppression by B. adolescentis. In addition, the phytochemicals excluding quercetin increased the concentrations of lactic and acetic acids in the co-culture supernatants. These results suggest that some phytochemicals may activate the anti-inflammatory function of B. adolescentis.

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of the hexane extract of Byrsonima crassifolia seeds in experimental animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz Ramirez, Alethia; Flores Cotera, Luis B; Perez Gutierrez, Rosa Martha

    2013-01-01

    Byrsonima crassifolia is a tropical tree, commonly known as nance and distributed widely in Mexico and Central and South America. Since pre- Hispanic times, the seeds of the fruits have been used in folklore medicine as an anti-inflammatory; however, currently no researchers have examined its potential pharmacological properties in scientific studies. This study investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of extracts obtained with the solvents n-hexane, chloroform, and methanol from seeds of B crassifolia. The research team induced edemas in Wistar rats with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol (TPA), formaldehyde, carrageenan, and histamine to study the anti-inflammatory activity of the three organic extracts of seeds from B crassifolia. The team also used the cotton-pellet granuloma method to induce edemas in Wistar rats and study the inhibitory effect of the three extracts from B crassifolia. Finally, the team examined the participation of the nitric oxide (NO) system in the anti-inflammatory activity of the hexane extract of nance seeds (NS), diclorofenac, and L-NAME as well as the effects of L-arginine and D-arginine on the antiinflammatory actions of the compounds. This research was conducted in the Laboratory of Research of Natural Products, School of Chemical Engineering, National Polytechnic Institute (IPNESIQIE) and Department of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Cinvestav-IPN, Av. IPN 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Mexico D.F., CP 07360, Mexico. The research team measured the edema that the solvents caused, either in the ears of rats for tetradecanoylphorbol or in the paws for formaldehyde, carrageenan, and histamine. To study the antiproliferative effects of the extracts after implantation of the cotton-pellet granuloma, the team determined the wet and dry weights of the pellets, after drying at 70°C for 1 hour in the second case. To study the participation of the NO system in the anti-inflammatory activity of the hexane extract of NS, diclofenac, and L

  3. Screening of Ficus religiosa leaves fractions for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities

    OpenAIRE

    Gulecha, Vishal; Sivakumar, T; Upaganlawar, Aman; Mahajan, Manoj; Upasani, Chandrashekhar

    2011-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate the different fractions of dried leaves of Ficus religiosa Linn for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity using different models of pain and inflammation Materials and Methods : The analgesic activity of F. religiosa carried out using acetic acid-induced writhing in mice and tail flick test in rats. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet-granuloma formation in rats. Five different fractions (FRI, FR...

  4. A Novel Pleiotropic Anti-Inflammatory Drug to Reduce ARDS Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Page 1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0288 TITLE: A Novel Pleiotropic Anti-Inflammatory Drug to Reduce ARDS Incidence PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gary...Pleiotropic Anti-Inflammatory Drug to Reduce ARDS Incidence 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Gary...N0224 is effective for trauma and/or sepsis. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Hemorrhagic shock, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), TRB-N0224 to prevent ARDS

  5. Brine Shrimp Cytotoxicity, Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Properties of Woodfordia fruticosa Kurz Flowers

    OpenAIRE

    Baravalia, Yogesh; Vaghasiya, Yogeshkumar; Chanda, Sumitra

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the cytotoxicity, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of methanol extract of Woodfordia fruticosa flowers. Cytotoxic activity of methanol extract of Woodfordia fruticosa flowers was tested using Artemia salina (Brine shrimp) bioassay. Two doses (400 and 600 mg/Kg) were evaluated for the anti-inflammatory activity against the carrageenan, histamine, dextran, serotonin and formaldehyde-induced rat paw edema, cotton pellet-induced granuloma and for...

  6. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the methanolic extract of Opuntia humifusa stem

    OpenAIRE

    Bhesh Raj Sharma; Chul Min Park; Jong Choi; Dong Young Rhyu

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Opuntia humifusa (O. humifusa) Raf. has been used for the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, inflammation, and cancer. Our study was designed to unveil the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the methanolic extract of O. humifusa Raf stem (OHS). Materials and Methods: The anti-nociceptive effect was measured by hot plate, acetic acid-induced writhing, and tail flick assays in mice and rats. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effect was measured by vascular...

  7. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in clinical and experimental epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Beatrice Mihaela; Epureanu, Florin Bogdan; Radu, Mihai; Fabene, Paolo Francesco; Bertini, Giuseppe

    2017-03-01

    Current antiepileptic drugs have limited efficacy and provide little or no benefits in 30% of the patients. Given that a role for brain inflammation in epilepsy has been repeatedly reported in recent years, the potential of anti-inflammatory drugs should be explored in depth, as they may provide new therapeutical approaches in preventing or reducing epileptogenesis. Here, we review preclinical (both in vivo and in vitro) and clinical epilepsy studies in which nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), i.e. cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective inhibitors (COXIBs) and nonselective NSAIDs, were used for seizure control. The effects of NSAIDs are reviewed in animal models of both chemical (pilocarpine, kainic acid, pentylenetetrazol, or carbachol administration) and electrical (tetanic hippocampal stimulation, electroshock) seizure induction. In the pilocarpine model, NSAIDs are neuroprotective, reduce mossy fiber sprouting or diminish P-glycoprotein upregulation, but only rarely protect against seizures. While neuroprotective effects have also been observed in the kainic acid model, NSAIDs tend in general to worsen seizure activity. Effects of COXIB administration in the pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures model are variable, alternating from protection against seizures to null effects or even increased incidence of convulsions. Moreover, NSAIDs tested in the tetanic hippocampal stimulation model diminished the seizure-associated P-glycoprotein upregulation, but were not very effective in seizure control. NSAIDs efficacy in experimental in vivo epilepsy studies may be influenced by multiple factors, including the timing of administration (before or after status epilepticus induction), the animal model of epilepsy or some of the signaling pathways involved in cyclooxygenase induction (e.g. prostaglandins and their receptors). On the other hand, the few clinical studies on the use of NSAIDs in neurological pathologies accompanied/characterized by seizures indicate that

  8. Pharmacoeconomics of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, H A; Campbell, M

    1993-02-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for the relief of the symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), sprains and strains, sports injuries and menstrual disorders, and have a small role in the management of patent ductus arteriosus in the neonate. In patients with RA, symptom relief through use of NSAIDs is firmly established, although it remains unclear whether they influence the course and outcome of the disease. For the average patient with RA taking NSAIDs, the attributable risk of hospitalisation with gastrointestinal problems related to NSAIDs is 1.3 to 1.6% annually and risk of death is 0.15%. Associations of therapy with risk are greatest with age, corticosteroid use and previous NSAID-related gastrointestinal adverse effects, and less marked with disability and high NSAID dose. These are important data in attempting to balance risk of therapy with clinical efficacy in an individual patient, and assessing the cost-effectiveness of prophylaxis. Although half of all NSAID consumption is for control of pain associated with degenerative conditions, their superiority over simple analgesics in osteoarthritis is poorly documented. This finding supports the use of the simple analgesic paracetamol (acetaminophen) as the preferred therapy of osteoarthritis, especially when its lower cost and low incidence of adverse effects are taken into consideration. Consistent differences in clinical effectiveness of individual NSAIDs have not been demonstrated, although unpredictable interpatient variation in response to individual agents is of considerable clinical importance, and a more expensive NSAID may prove cost effective for some patients. Cost effectiveness can be improved by a self-adjusted dosage regime which also leads to lower overall drug consumption. The adverse gastrointestinal effects of these drugs account for about 30% of the overall cost of arthritis treatment, and although studies to date have been too limited to

  9. Antimicrobial, Antiparasitic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Cytotoxic Activities of Lopezia racemosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cruz Paredes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the potential benefits of the Mexican medicinal plant Lopezia racemosa (Onagraceae. Extracts and fractions from aerial parts of this plant were assessed to determine their antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities in vitro. Aerial parts of the plant were extracted with various solvents and fractionated accordingly. Extracts and fractions were tested against a panel of nine bacterial and four fungal species. The antiparasitic activity was tested against Leishmania donovani, whereas the anti-inflammatory activity of the compounds was determined by measuring the secretion of interleukin-6 from human-derived macrophages. The same macrophage cell line was used to investigate the cytotoxicity of the compounds. Various extracts and fractions showed antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, and anti-inflammatory activities. The hexanic fraction HF 11-14b was the most interesting fraction with antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activities. The benefit of L. racemosa as a traditional medicinal plant was confirmed as shown by its antibacterial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the biological activities of L. racemosa, including antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory activities.

  10. Antimicrobial, Antiparasitic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Cytotoxic Activities of Lopezia racemosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Paredes, Carla; Bolívar Balbás, Paulina; Juárez, Zaida Nelly; Sánchez Arreola, Eugenio; Hernández, Luis Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the potential benefits of the Mexican medicinal plant Lopezia racemosa (Onagraceae). Extracts and fractions from aerial parts of this plant were assessed to determine their antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities in vitro. Aerial parts of the plant were extracted with various solvents and fractionated accordingly. Extracts and fractions were tested against a panel of nine bacterial and four fungal species. The antiparasitic activity was tested against Leishmania donovani, whereas the anti-inflammatory activity of the compounds was determined by measuring the secretion of interleukin-6 from human-derived macrophages. The same macrophage cell line was used to investigate the cytotoxicity of the compounds. Various extracts and fractions showed antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, and anti-inflammatory activities. The hexanic fraction HF 11-14b was the most interesting fraction with antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activities. The benefit of L. racemosa as a traditional medicinal plant was confirmed as shown by its antibacterial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the biological activities of L. racemosa, including antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:23843731

  11. Mechanisms of action underlying the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of propolis: a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio A. R. Araujo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Many biological properties have been attributed to various types of propolis, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antitumor, wound healing, and immunomodulatory activities. This article reviewed studies published that investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of propolis of different origins and/or its isolated components, focusing on the mechanisms of action underlying this activity and also addressing some aspects of immunomodulatory effects. The search was performed of the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, HighWire Press, Scielo, Google Academics, Research Gate and ISI Web of Knowledgement. The anti-inflammatory activity was associated with propolis or compounds such as polyphenols (flavonoids, phenolic acids and their esters, terpenoids, steroids and amino acids. CAPE is the most studied compounds. The main mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activity of propolis included the inhibition of cyclooxygenase and consequent inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis, free radical scavenging, inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis, reduction in the concentration of inflammatory cytokines and immunosuppressive activity. Propolis was found to exert an anti-inflammatory activity in vivo and in vitro models of acute and chronic inflammation and others studies, indicating its promising potential as anti-inflammatory agent of natural origin and as a source of chemical compounds for the development of new drugs.

  12. Mechanisms of action underlying the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of propolis: a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio A. R. Araujo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Many biological properties have been attributed to various types of propolis, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antitumor, wound healing, and immunomodulatory activities. This article reviewed studies published that investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of propolis of different origins and/or its isolated components, focusing on the mechanisms of action underlying this activity and also addressing some aspects of immunomodulatory effects. The search was performed of the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, HighWire Press, Scielo, Google Academics, Research Gate and ISI Web of Knowledgement. The anti-inflammatory activity was associated with propolis or compounds such as polyphenols (flavonoids, phenolic acids and their esters, terpenoids, steroids and amino acids. CAPE is the most studied compounds. The main mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activity of propolis included the inhibition of cyclooxygenase and consequent inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis, free radical scavenging, inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis, reduction in the concentration of inflammatory cytokines and immunosuppressive activity. Propolis was found to exert an anti-inflammatory activity in vivo and in vitro models of acute and chronic inflammation and others studies, indicating its promising potential as anti-inflammatory agent of natural origin and as a source of chemical compounds for the development of new drugs.

  13. The novel biomarker of alternative macrophage activation, soluble mannose receptor (sMR/sCD206)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten N; Andersen, Niels F; Rødgaard-Hansen, Sidsel

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in the pathophysiology of human malignancies. They support growth of cancer cells by promoting angiogenesis, and by inhibiting tumour cell apoptosis and anti-tumor immune reactions. Several membrane proteins are well-described markers...... of human TAMs, including the haemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 and the macrophage mannose receptor (MR/CD206). Interestingly, both CD163 and MR exist as soluble serum proteins (sCD163 and sMR) that may reflect the activation state of tissue macrophages, including TAMs. Here, we report the first data......, sMR levels were elevated in 27% of patients, and decreased after treatment. Further, sMR levels were associated with prognostic markers in MM, and elevated sMR (>0.43mg/L) was an independent marker of overall survival in a multivariate analysis (HR=2.20, P=0.006). Levels of sMR in blood samples...

  14. Anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effect of Ulmus davidiana var. japonica Nakai extract on a macrophage cell line and immune cells in the mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hui; Park, Cheol-Won; Jung, Yun-Jae

    2013-03-27

    Traditional Oriental medicine has utilized the barks of the stem and root of Ulmus davidiana var. japonica Nakai (UD) to treat inflammatory disorders. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate UD's anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects on a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophage cell line and small-intestinal lamina propria (LP) cells, respectively. RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with LPS in the presence of various concentrations of a UD water-soluble extract. Cell viability, nitric oxide (NO) production, and the level of inflammatory cytokines synthesis were measured. Among the mice receiving the UD water-soluble extract, changes in the LP cell populations and immunoglobulin (Ig)A production were evaluated. The UD water-soluble extract inhibited LPS-induced NO synthesis and inflammatory cytokine production in a RAW264.7 macrophage-like cell line. Small-intestinal LP cells isolated from mice that received the UD extract displayed a decrease in the side scatter of medium-to-high cells. Those LP cells isolated from the UD-treated mice also showed a marked decrease of intracellular IgA. However, UD administration had no apparent effect on the synthesis of systemic inflammatory cytokines. These results suggest that UD water-soluble extracts have anti-inflammatory properties and, as such, can be used to promote intestinal immune-homeostatic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. PRODRUGS OF NON- STEROID ANTI - INFLAMMATORY AGENTS (NSAIDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to novel depot formulations (prodrugs) comprising an immobility promoting unit linked via an ester to an active pharmaceutical ingredient, i.a. common NSAIDs. The novel depot formulations are suitable for intra-articular injections and are soluble at slightly acidic p...

  16. Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of Amorphophallus bulbifer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Small pieces of fresh petiole and bulbils of this plant are cooked as vegetable with dry fish and taken with rice once a day for 10 - 12 days for rheumatic muscular and joint pain while crushed tubers are used as antidote to poisoning from animal bites [3,4]. Water soluble amino acids [5], alkaloids from the dried entire plant [6] ...

  17. Novel antioxidant and anti-inflammatory peptides from the Siamese crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) hemoglobin hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueangsakulthai, Jiraporn; Phosri, Santi; Theansungnoen, Tinnakorn; Jangpromma, Nisachon; Temsiripong, Theeranan; Mckendrick, John E; Khunkitti, Watcharee; Klaynongsruang, Sompong

    2017-11-22

    Novel antioxidant and anti-inflammatory peptides were isolated from hydrolysates of Siamese crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) hemoglobin. C. siamensis hemoglobin hydrolysates (CHHs) were obtained by pepsin digestion at different incubation times (2, 4, 6, and 8 H) at 37 °C and subjected to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity assessment. CHH obtained by 2-H hydrolysis (2H-CHH) showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity with respect to decreasing nitric oxide (NO) production, whereas the strongest antioxidant activity was found for 6-H hydrolysis (6H-CHH) against nitric oxide radicals. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of individual peptide components, 2H-CHH and 6H-CHH were purified by semipreparative HPLC. Peptide fraction P57 isolated from 6H-CHH was found to exhibit the highest nitric oxide radical inhibition activity (32.0%). Moreover, purification of 2H-CHH yielded peptide fraction P16, which displayed a high efficacy in decreasing NO production of macrophage RAW 264.7 cells (83.2%) and significantly reduced proinflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE 2 ) production to about 2.0, 0.3, and 1.9 ng/mL, respectively. Using LTQ orbitrap XL mass spectrometry, active peptide sequences were identified as antioxidant KIYFPHF (KF7), anti-inflammatory SAFNPHEKQ (SQ9), and IIHNEKVQAHGKKVL (IL15). Additionally, CHHs simulated gastric and intestinal in vitro digestion positively contributed to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Taken collectively, the results of this work demonstrate that CHHs contain several peptides with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, which may prove valuable as treatment or supplement against diseases associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Review of anti-inflammatory, immune-modulatory and wound healing properties of molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tarek B; Liu, Lei; Kotiw, Michael; Benkendorff, Kirsten

    2018-01-10

    This review focuses on traditional and contemporary anti-inflammatory uses of mollusc-derived products summarising all the in vitro, in vivo and human clinical trials that have tested the anti-inflammatory activity of molluscan natural products. Inflammatory conditions, burns and wounds have been an ongoing concern for human health since the early era of civilisation. Many texts from ancient medicine have recorded the symptoms, signs and treatments for these conditions. Natural treatments are well-documented in traditional European medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Siddha and ancient Mediterranean and African traditional medicine and include a surprisingly large number of molluscan species. An extensive review of the Materia Medica and scientific literature was undertaken using key word searches for "mollusc" and "anti-inflammatory" or "immunomodulatory" or "wound healing". Molluscs have been used in ethnomedicine by many traditional cultures to treat different aspects of inflammatory conditions. We found 104 different anti-inflammatory preparations from a variety of molluscan species, of which 70 were from the well-documented Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). This traditional use of molluscs has driven the testing for inflammatory activity in extracts from some species in the phylum Mollusca, with 20 in vitro studies, 40 in vivo animal studies and 14 human clinical trials performed to substantiate the anti-inflammatory and wound healing activity of molluscs. Some of these studies have led to the approval of mollusc-derived products to be used as over-the-counter (OTC) nutraceuticals, like Lyprinol® and Biolane™ from the New Zealand green lipped mussel Perna canaliculus. Natural products provide important leads for the development of pharmaceuticals, including anti-inflammatory agents. Only a small proportion of the molluscan traditional medicines have been tested to confirm their anti-inflammatory activity and most screening studies have tested

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Properties and Chemical Characterization of the Essential Oils of Four Citrus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Jorge Luis; Simas, Daniel Luiz Reis; Pinheiro, Mariana Martins Gomes; Moreno, Daniela Sales Alviano; Alviano, Celuta Sales; da Silva, Antonio Jorge Ribeiro; Fernandes, Patricia Dias

    2016-01-01

    Citrus fruits have potential health-promoting properties and their essential oils have long been used in several applications. Due to biological effects described to some citrus species in this study our objectives were to analyze and compare the phytochemical composition and evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of essential oils (EO) obtained from four different Citrus species. Mice were treated with EO obtained from C. limon, C. latifolia, C. aurantifolia or C. limonia (10 to 100 mg/kg, p.o.) and their anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated in chemical induced inflammation (formalin-induced licking response) and carrageenan-induced inflammation in the subcutaneous air pouch model. A possible antinociceptive effect was evaluated in the hot plate model. Phytochemical analyses indicated the presence of geranial, limonene, γ-terpinene and others. EOs from C. limon, C. aurantifolia and C. limonia exhibited anti-inflammatory effects by reducing cell migration, cytokine production and protein extravasation induced by carrageenan. These effects were also obtained with similar amounts of pure limonene. It was also observed that C. aurantifolia induced myelotoxicity in mice. Anti-inflammatory effect of C. limon and C. limonia is probably due to their large quantities of limonene, while the myelotoxicity observed with C. aurantifolia is most likely due to the high concentration of citral. Our results indicate that these EOs from C. limon, C. aurantifolia and C. limonia have a significant anti-inflammatory effect; however, care should be taken with C. aurantifolia.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Properties and Chemical Characterization of the Essential Oils of Four Citrus Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Amorim

    Full Text Available Citrus fruits have potential health-promoting properties and their essential oils have long been used in several applications. Due to biological effects described to some citrus species in this study our objectives were to analyze and compare the phytochemical composition and evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of essential oils (EO obtained from four different Citrus species. Mice were treated with EO obtained from C. limon, C. latifolia, C. aurantifolia or C. limonia (10 to 100 mg/kg, p.o. and their anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated in chemical induced inflammation (formalin-induced licking response and carrageenan-induced inflammation in the subcutaneous air pouch model. A possible antinociceptive effect was evaluated in the hot plate model. Phytochemical analyses indicated the presence of geranial, limonene, γ-terpinene and others. EOs from C. limon, C. aurantifolia and C. limonia exhibited anti-inflammatory effects by reducing cell migration, cytokine production and protein extravasation induced by carrageenan. These effects were also obtained with similar amounts of pure limonene. It was also observed that C. aurantifolia induced myelotoxicity in mice. Anti-inflammatory effect of C. limon and C. limonia is probably due to their large quantities of limonene, while the myelotoxicity observed with C. aurantifolia is most likely due to the high concentration of citral. Our results indicate that these EOs from C. limon, C. aurantifolia and C. limonia have a significant anti-inflammatory effect; however, care should be taken with C. aurantifolia.

  1. Anti-inflammatory activity of leaf extract and fractions of Bursera simaruba (L.) Sarg (Burseraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, B; Díaz, E; García, M V; Feliciano, A San; López-Perez, J L; Israel, A

    2004-05-01

    Seeking for new medicinal compounds in plants used in traditional medicine, which grow in Venezuela, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of the leaf hexane extract (HE) and several fractions obtained from sp. Bursera simaruba (L.) Sarg. (Indio desnudo) using carrageenan-induced paw edema inflammation. Oral administration of leaf HE as well I (91-100) fraction, and compounds VIII 25-26 and VIII 29, inhibited the carrageenan-induced paw edema with different capacity and time course, over a period of 7h. The anti-inflammatory effect was comparable to that of the reference drug phenylbutazone (80 mg/kg, p.o.). Included in fraction I (91-100), Vitamin E was identified as one of its components and compound VIII 29 was identified as a methyl-beta-peltatin A. The comparison of the anti-inflammatory activity of VIII 29 fraction with the corresponding standard of methyl-beta-peltatin A, suggest that this compound could be one of the active principles involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of Bursera simaruba (L.) Sarg. leave. Our results contribute to the pharmacological support of the use of Bursera simaruba (L.) Sarg. as anti-inflammatory in the ethnomedicinal practice. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Analgesic Activities of Agrimonia eupatoria L. Infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo N. Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Agrimony (Agrimonia eupatoria L. (Ae is used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory and oxidative related diseases. Therefore, this study focuses on the anti-inflammatory and analgesic potential of Ae infusion (AeI. Phenolic compounds characterization was achieved by HPLC-PDA-ESI/MSn. To evaluate antioxidant potential, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, and SNAP assays were used. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity of AeI was investigated in LPS-stimulated macrophages by measuring the NO production. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity was validated using the mouse carrageenan-induced paw edema model. Peripheral and central analgesic potential was evaluated using the acetic acid-induced writhing and hot-plate tests, respectively, as well as the formalin assay to assess both activities. The safety profile was disclosed in vitro and in vivo, using MTT and hematoxylin assays, respectively. Vitexin, quercetin O-galloyl-hexoside, and kaempferol O-acetyl-hexosyl-rhamnoside were referred to in this species for the first time. AeI and mainly AePF (Ae polyphenolic fraction showed a significant antiradical activity against all tested radicals. Both AeI and AePF decreased NO levels in vitro, AePF being more active than AeI. In vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities were verified for both samples at concentrations devoid of toxicity. Agrimony infusion and, mainly, AePF are potential sources of antiradical and anti-inflammatory polyphenols.

  3. Anti-inflammatory and Antihistaminic Study of a Unani Eye Drop Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Abdul

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Unani eye drop is an ophthalmic formulation prepared for its beneficial effects in the inflammatory and allergic conditions of the eyes. In the present study, the Unani eye drop formulation was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity, using in vivo and in vitro experimental models respectively. The Unani eye drop formulation exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in turpentine liniment-induced ocular inflammation in rabbits. The preparation also showed antihistaminic activity in isolated guinea-pig ileum. The anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity of eye drop may be due to presence of active ingredients in the formulation. Although there are many drugs in Unani repository which are mentioned in classical books or used in Unani clinical practice effectively in treatment of eye diseases by various Unani physicians. Inspite of the availability of vast literature, there is a dearth of commercial Unani ocular preparations. So, keeping this in mind, the eye drop formulation was prepared and its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity was carried out in animal models. Thus, in view of the importance of alternative anti-inflammatory and anti- allergic drugs, it becomes imperative to bring these indigenous drugs to the front foot and evaluate their activities.

  4. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of Pseudananas macrodontes (Morr.) Harms (Bromeliaceae) fruit extract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errasti, María E; Caffini, Néstor O; Pelzer, Lilian E; Rotelli, Alejandra E

    2013-01-01

    Several species of the family Bromeliaceae are characterized by the production of proteases in unusual amounts, especially in fruits. Bromelain, an extract rich in cysteine endopeptidases obtained from Ananas comosus L., and a few other proteases have been used as anti-inflammatory agents for some years, but bromelain is still mainly being used as alternative and/or complementary therapy to the treatment with glucocorticoids, nonsteroidal antirheumatics, and immunomodulators. In this study, the anti-inflammatory action of a partially purified extract from Pseudananas macrodontes (Morr.) Harms fruits (PPE(Pm)) is presented, whose main components are cysteine endopeptidases. The effect of PPE(Pm) was assessed in carrageenan-induced and serotonin-induced rat paw edema, as well as in the cotton pellet granuloma model. Doses with equal proteolytic activity of PPE(Pm) and bromelain produced significantly similar anti-inflammatory responses in the acute inflammatory models assayed, supporting the hypothesis that proteolytic activity could be responsible for the anti-inflammatory action. On the contrary, comparable anti-inflammatory effects of PPE(Pm) and bromelain in the chronic inflammatory assay required a much lower proteolytic activity content of PPE(Pm), which could be due to a differential affinity for the protein target involved in this process.

  5. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of the fruits of Vernonia anthelmintica (L Willd.

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    Alok Pandey

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of the fruits of Vernonia anthelmintica (L Willd. (V. anthelmintica. Method: Hot plate method in mice, acetic acid induced writhing response in mice, tail immersion test and carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and cotton pellet induced granuloma in rats method were used for screening analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of the fruit of V. anthelmintica (family: Asteraceae. Results: The result of the study showed that the ethanolic extract of V. anthelmintica (100 and 200 mg/kg body weight, p.o. fruits possed peripheral and central analgesic activity in animal model. The V. anthelmintica fruits extract showed in vivo anti-inflammatory activity on acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity models in rats. Conclusions: On the basis of result it can be concluded that saponins, steroids, tannins and flavonoids are the major constituents that are present in the fruits of V. anthelmintica which may be responsible for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity.

  6. Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines Release in Mice Injected with Crotalus durissus terrificus Venom

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    A. Hernández Cruz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Crotalus durissus terrificus venom (Cdt were analyzed with respect to the susceptibility and the inflammatory mediators in an experimental model of severe envenomation. BALB/c female mice injected intraperitoneally presented sensibility to Cdt, with changes in specific signs, blood biochemical and inflammatory mediators. The venom induced reduction of glucose and urea levels and an increment of creatinine levels in serum from mice. Significant differences were observed in the time-course of mediator levels in sera from mice injected with Cdt. The maximum levels of IL-6, NO, IL-5, TNF, IL-4 and IL-10 were observed 15 min, 30 min, 1, 2 and 4 hours post-injection, respectively. No difference was observed for levels of IFN-γ. Taken together, these data indicate that the envenomation by Cdt is regulated both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses at time-dependent manner. In serum from mice injected with Cdt at the two first hours revealed of pro-inflammatory dominance. However, with an increment of time an increase of anti-inflammatory cytokines was observed and the balance toward to anti-inflammatory dominance. In conclusion, the observation that Cdt affects the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines provides further evidence for the role played by Cdt in modulating pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance.

  7. LED enhances anti-inflammatory effect ofluteolin (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shengnuo; Habib, Ahsan; Liu, Jun; Tan, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a complex pathological process usually results from abnormal microglial activation, thus, intervention in a microglial stimulation pathway could be a promising approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Luteolin is an important bioflavonoid possesses anti-inflammatory properties, which is widely studied over these years. Light emitting diode (LED) therapy is reported to be a potential therapeutic strategy for many diseases including neurodegenerative diseases. However, little is known about the anti-inflammatory effect of LED therapy on activated microglial cells, even less is known whether there is a synergistic anti-inflammatory effect exist in LED and luteolin therapy. In this study, we aimed to confirm the anti-inflammatory effect of luteolin and LED combination therapy in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. We showed that luteolin inhibited LPS-induced cytotoxicity, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production through modulation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in BV2 cells. In addition, LED therapy enhanced the anti-inflammatory effect of luteolin. These results suggest that a synergistic effect between luteolin and LED could be a new effective therapy in relieving neuroinflammation.

  8. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities in Extracts from Minke Whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) Blubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walquist, Mari Johannessen; Stormo, Svein Kristian; Jensen, Ida-Johanne; Østerud, Bjarne; Eilertsen, Karl-Erik

    2017-01-01

    Intake of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-n3-PUFA) is commonly recognized to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD). In previous studies, cold-pressed whale oil (CWO) and cod liver oil (CLO) were given as a dietary supplement to healthy volunteers. Even though CWO contains less than half the amount of LC-n3-PUFA of CLO, CWO supplement resulted in beneficial effects on anti-inflammatory and CVD risk markers compared to CLO. In the present study, we prepared virtually lipid-free extracts from CWO and CLO and evaluated the antioxidative capacity (AOC) and anti-inflammatory effects. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays were used to test the AOC, and the results indicated high levels of antioxidants present in all extracts. The anti-inflammatory effects of the extracts were tested with lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) treated THP-1 cells, measuring its ability to reduce cytokine and chemokine secretion. Several CWO extracts displayed anti-inflammatory activity, and a butyl alcohol extract of CWO most effectively reduced TNF- α (50%, p < 0.05) and MCP-1 (85%, p < 0.001) secretion. This extract maintained a stable effect of reducing MCP-1 secretion (60%, p < 0.05) even after long-term storage. In conclusion, CWO has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that may act in addition to its well-known LC-n3-PUFA effects.

  9. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities in Extracts from Minke Whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata Blubber

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    Mari Johannessen Walquist

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intake of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-n3-PUFA is commonly recognized to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD. In previous studies, cold-pressed whale oil (CWO and cod liver oil (CLO were given as a dietary supplement to healthy volunteers. Even though CWO contains less than half the amount of LC-n3-PUFA of CLO, CWO supplement resulted in beneficial effects on anti-inflammatory and CVD risk markers compared to CLO. In the present study, we prepared virtually lipid-free extracts from CWO and CLO and evaluated the antioxidative capacity (AOC and anti-inflammatory effects. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays were used to test the AOC, and the results indicated high levels of antioxidants present in all extracts. The anti-inflammatory effects of the extracts were tested with lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- treated THP-1 cells, measuring its ability to reduce cytokine and chemokine secretion. Several CWO extracts displayed anti-inflammatory activity, and a butyl alcohol extract of CWO most effectively reduced TNF-α (50%, p<0.05 and MCP-1 (85%, p<0.001 secretion. This extract maintained a stable effect of reducing MCP-1 secretion (60%, p<0.05 even after long-term storage. In conclusion, CWO has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that may act in addition to its well-known LC-n3-PUFA effects.

  10. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of some Libyan medicinal plants in experimental animals

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    Nahar Lutfun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ballota pseudodictamnus (L. Benth. (Lamiaceae, Salvia fruticosa Mill. (Lamiaceae and Thapsia garganica L. (Apiaceae are three well-known medicinal plants from the Libyan flora, which have long been used for the treatment of inflammations. The aim of the present study was to investigate, for the first time, the anti-inflammatory property of the methanol (MeOH extracts of the aerial parts of these plants. Shade-dried and ground aerial parts of B. pseudodictamnus, S. fruticosa and T. garganica were Soxhlet-extracted with MeOH. The extracts were concentrated by evaporation under reduced pressure at 40°C. The anti-inflammatory activity of the extracts was evaluated using the carrageenan-induced mice paw edema model. The administration of the extracts at a dose of 500 mg/kg body weight produced statistically significant inhibition (p < 0.05 of edema within 3 h of carrageenan administration. The results demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory properties of the test extracts. Among the extracts, the S. fruticosa extract exhibited the most significant inhibition of inflammation after 3 h (62.1%. Thus, S. fruticosa could be a potential source for the discovery and development of newer anti-inflammatory ‘leads’ for drug development. The anti-inflammatory activity of B. pseudodictamnus and S. fruticosa could be assumed to be related to high levels of phenolic compounds, e.g., flavonoids, present in these plants.

  11. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of olive oil (Olea europeae L.) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidi, Akram; Moghadam-kia, Sara; Moghadam, Jalal Zarringhalam; Eidi, Maryam; Rezazadeh, Shamsali

    2012-03-01

    Olive [Olea europaea L. (Oleaceae)] is a long-lived evergreen tree that is widespread in different parts of the world. Olive oil has been reported to relieve pain; however, there is still insufficient data in the literature on the subject. Thus, it is considered worthwhile investigating the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of olive oil in adult male Balb/C mice. The antinociceptive effects were studied using formalin, hot plate and writhing tests. The acute anti-inflammatory effects of olive oil in mice were studied using xylene ear edema test. Olive oil (1, 5 and 10 ml/kg body wt.) was injected intraperitoneally. Intact animals served as controls. Our results showed that the olive oil only decreased the second phase of formalin-induced pain. In the hot plate test, olive oil did not raise the pain threshold over the 60 min duration of the test. Olive oil exhibited antinociceptive activity against writhing-induced pain by acetic acid. In the xylene ear edema test, olive oil showed significant anti-inflammatory activity in the mice. The present data indicated that olive oil has antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in mice but further investigation of these effects is required to elucidate the mechanism(s) involved in analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of Olea europaea oil.

  12. Chemical composition and anti-inflammatory activity of the leaves of Byrsonima verbascifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Aline Aparecida; do Carmo, Lucas Fernandes; do Nascimento, Sara Batista; de Matos, Natália Alves; de Carvalho Veloso, Clarice; Castro, Ana Hortência Fonsêca; De Vos, Ric C H; Klein, André; de Siqueira, João Máximo; Carollo, Carlos Alexandre; do Nascimento, Thalita Vieira; Toffoli-Kadri, Mônica Cristina; Soares, Adriana Cristina

    2016-10-01

    An ethnopharmacological survey indicates that the genus Byrsonima has some medicinal species that are commonly found in the Brazilian Cerrado and has been used as an anti-inflammatory and for gastroduodenal disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity along with qualitative chemical characterization of the methanolic extract of the leaves of Byrsonima verbascifolia (BvME) obtained by exhaustive percolation. The data from the chemical analyses by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry led to tentative identification of 42 compounds belonging to proanthocyanidins, galloyl quinic acid derivatives, flavonoids, and triterpene glycoside derivatives. BvME contain flavonoids and show an antioxidative activity. The methanolic extract administered intraperitoneally at doses of 50, 100, or 300 mg/kg showed a significant reduction in paw edema and modulated the neutrophil influx in a mouse model. Furthermore, the anti-edematogenic activity of the extract provided in smaller doses (12.5 and 25 mg/kg) was also demonstrated in a mouse paw edema model. The extract inhibited NO production by macrophages induced by lipopolysaccharide. We presume that the anti-inflammatory effects of BvME are due to a combination of compounds present in B. verbascifolia, including catechins (procyanidins), flavonoids, and triterpene glycosides and that these anti-inflammatory actions should be mediated, at least partly, through the inhibition of NO production. This study supports and validates the ethnopharmacological uses of B. verbascifolia as an anti-inflammatory.

  13. Participation of Tumor-Associated Myeloid Cells in Progression of Amelanotic Melanoma (RMM Tumor Line) in F344 Rats, with Particular Reference to MHC Class II- and CD163-Expressing Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondoc, A; Golbar, H M; Pervin, M; Katou-Ichikawa, C; Tanaka, M; Izawa, T; Kuwamura, M; Yamate, J

    2017-12-01

    Tumor progression is often influenced by infiltration of myeloid cells; depending on the M1- or M2-like activation status, these cells may have either inhibitory or promoting effects on tumor growth. We investigated the properties of tumor-associated myeloid cells in a previously established homotransplantable amelanotic melanoma (RMM tumor line) in F344 rats. RMM tumor nodules were allowed to reach the sizes of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 cm, respectively. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry was performed for macrophage markers CD68 and CD163, and for the antigen-presenting cell marker, MHC class II. Although no significant change was observed in the number of CD68 + and CD163 + macrophages during RMM progression, the number of MHC class II + antigen-presenting cells was reduced in 3 cm nodules. Real-time RT-PCR of laser microdissection samples obtained from RMM regions rich in MHC class II + cells demonstrated high expressions of M1-like factors: IFN-γ, GM-CSF and IL-12a. Furthermore, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, followed by real-time RT-PCR for CD11b + MHC class II + (myeloid antigen-presenting cells), CD11b + CD163 + (M2 type myeloid cells), CD11b + CD80 + (M1 type myeloid cells) and CD11b + CD11c + (dendritic cells) cells was performed. Based on the levels of inflammation- and tumor progression-related factors, MHC class II + antigen-presenting cells showed polarization towards M1, while CD163 + macrophages, towards M2. CD80 + and CD11c + myeloid cells did not show clear functional polarization. Our results provide novel information on tumor-associated myeloid cells in amelanotic melanoma, and may become useful in further research on melanoma immunity.

  14. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen-Barr, Eva; Held, Ulrike; Grooten, Wilhelmus Ja; Roelofs, Pepijn Ddm; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Wertli, Maria M

    2016-10-15

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most frequently prescribed drugs for the treatment of sciatica. A previous Cochrane review on the efficacy of NSAIDs summarised findings for acute and chronic low back pain (LBP) and sciatica. This is an update of the original review (2008) focusing on people suffering from sciatica. To determine the efficacy of NSAIDs in pain reduction, overall improvement, and reported side effects in people with sciatica. We performed electronic searches up to 24 June 2015 in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and two trials registers. We searched reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews on the topics for additional trials. We included randomised controlled trials (double-blind, single-blind, and open-label) that assessed the efficacy of NSAIDs in sciatica. We included all trials that compared NSAIDs to placebo, to other NSAIDs, or to other medication. Additional interventions were allowed if there was a clear contrast for the treatment with NSAIDs in the trial. Three review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted the data. Where feasible we calculated pooled results using Review Manager 5.3. We reported pain relief outcomes using mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We used risk ratios (RR) with 95% CI to report global improvement of treatment, adverse effects, and additional medication. We performed a meta-analysis if possible. We assessed level of evidence using the GRADE approach. We used standard methodological procedures recommended by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 10 trials reported in 9 publications (N = 1651). Only one trial out of 10 was assessed at low risk of bias. Five trials used the currently recommended daily dose for the drug, and two trials used lower daily doses available over the counter. Three trials investigated NSAIDs no longer approved for human use. The follow-up duration

  15. Simple Synthesis of Modafinil Derivatives and Their Anti-inflammatory Activity

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    Mankil Jung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Simple synthesis of modafinil derivatives and their biological activity are described. The key synthetic strategies involve substitution and coupling reactions. We determined the anti-inflammatory effects of modafinil derivatives in cultured BV2 cells by measuring the inhibition of nitrite production and expression of iNOS and COX-2 after LPS stimulation. It was found that for sulfide analogues introduction of aliphatic groups on the amide part (compounds 11ad resulted in lower anti-inflammatory activity compared with cyclic or aromatic moieties (compounds 11ek. However, for the sulfoxide analogues, introduction of aliphatic moieties (compounds 12ad showed higher anti-inflammatory activity than cyclic or aromatic fragments (compounds 12ek in BV-2 microglia cells.

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity of the apolar extract from the seaweed Galaxaura marginata (Rhodophyta, Nemaliales

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    E. Rozas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The red seaweed Galaxaura marginata (Ellis & Solander Lamouroux, well known by the antibacterial activity of its polar extract and the cytotoxic activity of its oxygenated desmosterol, showed anti-inflammatory action in its apolar fraction. Topical anti-inflammatory activity was observed in samples collected at São Sebastião channel, northern littoral of São Paulo State, Brazil. The apolar extract and its fractions obtained through Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC reduced the topical inflammation produced by croton oil in mouse ear. Such data indicated that the apolar extract from the marine red alga G. marginata displayed anti-inflammatory activity (since 1mg/ear extract reduced 95±0.5% inflammation, which could be the result of the synergic activity of the four fractions present in the apolar extract.

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of the leaf extacts of Gendarussa vulgaris Nees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, T K Mohamed; Azeem, A K; Dilip, C; Sankar, C; Prasanth, N V; Duraisami, R

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the anti-inflammatory property of the leaf exacts of Gendarussa vulgaris (G. vulgaris) Nees. G. vulgaris Nees of the family Apocynaceae is a medium sized tree grown in semishade or no shade and is common in the Ernad and Nilambur taluks of Kerala.Various parts of this plant have been used in the treatment of ulcers, sores, inflammation, dyspepsia, healing of wounds, etc. The present study aimed at the evaluation of anti-inflammatory property of the aqueous and alcoholic extracts of the leaves by both in vitro and in vivo methods. In vitro method was estimated by human red blood cell membrane stabilisation (HRBC) method and in vivo method was estimated on the carrageenan induced paw oedima. Both the methods showed significant anti-inflammatory property of the different extracts tested. The alcoholic extract at a concentration of 300 mg/mL showed potent activity on comparing with the standard drug diclofenac sodium.

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of curcumin derivatives containing NSAIDs for their anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenfeng; Li, Yonlian; Yue, Yuan; Zhang, Kun; Chen, Qian; Wang, Huaqian; Lu, Yujing; Huang, Mou-Tuan; Zheng, Xi; Du, Zhiyun

    2015-08-01

    Oral administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was frequently associated with serious adverse effects. Inspired by curcumin-a naturally traditional Chinese medicine, a series of curcumin derivatives containing NSAIDs, used for transdermal application, were synthesized and screened for their anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo. Compared with curcumin and parent NSAID (salicylic acid and salsalate), topical application of A11 and B13 onto mouse ear edema, prior to TPA treatment markedly suppressed the expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, respectively. Mechanistically, A11 and B13 blocked the phosphorylation of IκBα and suppressed the activation of p65 and IκBα. It was found that A11 and B13 may be potent anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of marine brown algae Sargassum ilicifolium extract for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpi, Chandraraj C.; Nagathan, Channabasappa V.; Karajgi, Santosh R.; Kalyane, Navanath V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The methanolic extract of Sargassum ilicifolium (Pheophyceae) was used to evaluate its analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity in the present study. Materials and Methods: Analgesic activity was tested using Acetic acid writhing method and Eddy hot plate method in Male albino mice and Wister rats respectively at a dose level of 1, 10, 50, 100mg/kg p.o. At the same dose, its anti-inflammatory activity was also tested using Carrageenan induced rat paw edema method Result Acetic acid writhing test and Eddy's hot plate episodes were significantly and dose dependently reduced. Carrageenan (a standard inflammatory agent) induced paw edema in rats was significantly reduced after intraperitonal administration of methanolic extract. Results: showed dose dependant significant activity in comparison with standard and control. Conclusion: Methanolic extracts of the brown seaweeds Sargassum ilicifolium have potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity at moderate doses. PMID:23900805

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of GLP-1-Based Therapies beyond Glucose Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sun; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone mainly secreted from intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. GLP-1 has beneficial effects for glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells, delaying gastric emptying, decreasing plasma glucagon, reducing food intake, and stimulating glucose disposal. Therefore, GLP-1-based therapies such as GLP-1 receptor agonists and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4, which is a GLP-1 inactivating enzyme, have been developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. In addition to glucose-lowering effects, emerging data suggests that GLP-1-based therapies also show anti-inflammatory effects in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 1 and 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, diabetic nephropathy, asthma, and psoriasis. This review outlines the anti-inflammatory actions of GLP-1-based therapies on diseases associated with chronic inflammation in vivo and in vitro, and their molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27110066

  1. Evaluation of antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity of hydromethanol extract of Cocos nucifera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Sagar; Mazumder, U K; Pramanik, G; Saha, P; Haldar, P K; Gupta, M

    2013-02-01

    Cocos nucifera L. (family: arecaceae) is generally straight unbranched plant, traditionally cultivated for its fruit (coconut) in home gardens. In the present study, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive (analgesic) activity of hydromethanol extract of Cocos nucifera L. (HECN) was evaluated in animal models. HECN showed significant (p < 0.05) and dosedependent anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced paw oedema models of inflammation and the result was comparable with the standard drug diclofenac. In addition, the extract also showed highly significant (p < 0.01) antinociceptive activity. HECN treated group showed increase in the reaction time in hot plate method and decrease the writhing induced by acetic acid in mice when compared with control group animal. The anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity observed in the present study could be attributed largely to the presence of its antioxidant phytoconstituents such as flavonoid, saponin and polyphenols.

  2. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) extract rich in ellagitannins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Trujano, María Eva; Pellicer, Francisco; Mena, Pedro; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has been used for centuries for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, there is a lack of comprehensive information focused on the properties of a certain pomegranate (poly)phenolic profile to cure pain and gastric injury induced by anti-inflammatory drugs. This study investigated the systemic effects of different doses of a HPLC-characterized pomegranate extract on the formalin-induced nociceptive behavior in mice. The effect of the extract against gastric injury caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and ethanol was also assessed. Pomegranate reduced nociception in both phases of the formalin test, suggesting central and peripheral activities to inhibit nociception. Indomethacin-induced gastric injury was not produced in the presence of pomegranate, which also protected against ethanol-induced gastric lesions. The present results reinforce the benefits of pomegranate (poly)phenolics in the treatment of pain as well as their anti-inflammatory properties.

  3. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities of virgin coconut oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intahphuak, S; Khonsung, P; Panthong, A

    2010-02-01

    This study investigated some pharmacological properties of virgin coconut oil (VCO), the natural pure oil from coconut [Cocos nucifera Linn (Palmae)] milk, which was prepared without using chemical or high-heat treatment. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects of VCO were assessed. In acute inflammatory models, VCO showed moderate anti-inflammatory effects on ethyl phenylpropiolate-induced ear edema in rats, and carrageenin- and arachidonic acid-induced paw edema. VCO exhibited an inhibitory effect on chronic inflammation by reducing the transudative weight, granuloma formation, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity. VCO also showed a moderate analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response as well as an antipyretic effect in yeast-induced hyperthermia. The results obtained suggest anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic properties of VCO.

  4. Neuro-immune interactions via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallowitsch-Puerta, Margot; Pavlov, Valentin A.

    2010-01-01

    The overproduction of TNF and other cytokines can cause the pathophysiology of numerous diseases. Controlling cytokine synthesis and release is critical for preventing unrestrained inflammation and maintaining health. Recent studies identified an efferent vagus nerve-based mechanism termed “the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” that controls cytokine production and inflammation. Here we review current advances related to the role of this pathway in neuro-immune interactions that prevent excessive inflammation. Experimental evidence indicates that vagus nerve cholinergic anti-inflammatory signaling requires alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on non-neuronal cytokine producing cells. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists inhibit cytokine release and protect animals in a variety of experimental lethal inflammatory models. Knowledge related to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can be exploited in therapeutic approaches directed towards counteracting abnormal chronic and hyper-activated inflammatory responses. PMID:17289087

  5. The anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of glucocorticoids, recent developments and mechanistic insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Agnes E.; Chapman, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of glucocorticoids in the 1940s and the recognition of their anti-inflammatory effects, they have been amongst the most widely used and effective treatments to control inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, their clinical efficacy is compromised by the metabolic effects of long-term treatment, which include osteoporosis, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes mellitus. In recent years, a great deal of effort has been invested in identifying compounds that separate the beneficial anti-inflammatory effects from the adverse metabolic effects of glucocorticoids, with limited effect. It is clear that for these efforts to be effective, a greater understanding is required of the mechanisms by which glucocorticoids exert their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive actions. Recent research is shedding new light on some of these mechanisms and has produced some surprising new findings. Some of these recent developments are reviewed here. PMID:20398732

  6. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of some Jordanian medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, A H; Alkofahi, A

    1998-03-01

    The anti-nociceptive effect of ethanolic extract of 11 traditionally used Jordanian plants was studied by using the acetic acid-induced writhing and hot-plate test in mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of these plants was determined by xylene-induced ear oedema in mice and cotton pellet granuloma test in rats. Mentha piperita, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Apium graveolens, Eucalyptus camaldulentis, and Ruta graveolens possess an anti-nociceptive effect against both acetic acid-induced writhing and hot plate-induced thermal stimulation. M. piperita, Jasminum officinale, Commiphora molmol, and Beta vulgaris possess an anti-inflammatory effect against acute (xylene-induced ear oedema) and chronic (cotton-pellet granuloma) inflammation. The anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects were dose dependent. These data affirm the traditional use of some of these plants for painful and inflammatory conditions.

  7. The patterns of toxicity and management of acute nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Laura J Hunter, David M Wood, Paul I DarganClinical Toxicology, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UKAbstract: The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are widely used for their analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic actions. They are commonly taken in overdose in many areas of the world. The majority of patients with acute NSAID overdose will remain asymptomatic or develop minor self-limiting gastrointestinal symptoms. However, serious clinical sequelae have been reported in patients with acute NSAID overdose and these include convulsions, metabolic acidosis, coma and acute renal failure. There appear to be some differences between the NSAIDs in terms of the relative risk of these complications; in particular mefenamic acid is most commonly associated with convulsions. The management of these serious clinical features is largely supportive and there are no specific antidotes for acute NSAID toxicity.Keywords: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID, ibuprofen, toxicity, poisoning, overdose, management

  8. Inflammation in Depression and the Potential for Anti-Inflammatory Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohler, Ole; Krogh, Jesper; Mors, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports an association between depression and inflammatory processes, a connection that seems to be bidirectional. Clinical trials have indicated antidepressant treatment effects for anti-inflammatory agents, both as add-on treatment and as monotherapy. In particular......, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cytokine-inhibitors have shown antidepressant treatment effects compared to placebo, but also statins, poly-unsaturated fatty acids, pioglitazone, minocycline, modafinil, and corticosteroids may yield antidepressant treatment effects. However, the complexity...... of the inflammatory cascade, limited clinical evidence, and the risk for side effects stress cautiousness before clinical application. Thus, despite proof-of-concept studies of anti-inflammatory treatment effects in depression, important challenges remain to be investigated. Within this paper, we review...

  9. Optimization on Extraction Engineering of the Anti - inflammatory Bioactive Materials from Ainsliaea Fragrans Champ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ainsliaea fragrans Champ.(A.fragrans is a traditional Chinese herbal, phenolic compounds was the major anti - inflammatory bioactive constituents. To improve the bioavailability and enhanced the curative effect of A.fragrans, the anti - inflammatory effect of phenolic acids and the “non-active” group of control vectors constitute a new biomedical material, which is of great significance to the treatment of diseases inflammation. Hence, in this thesis, regarding the total phenolic acid transfer rate as the indicator, L9(34 orthogonal design was used to optimize the extraction process of total Phenolic acid from A.fragrans by reflux extraction method on solvent dosage, extraction times and extraction time.The optimal extraction technology was as follows: 15 times of water volume, reflux extraction 3 times, extraction time 60 min. The result of pharmacological activity indicated anti-inflammatory effect: 95% ethanol extraction > water extraction > 30% ethanol extraction > 60% ethanol extraction.

  10. Nutraceutical potential of Byrsonima cydoniifolia fruits based on chemical composition, anti-inflammatory, and antihyperalgesic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Vanessa Samúdio Dos; Nascimento, Thalita Vieira; Felipe, Josyelen Lousada; Boaretto, Amanda Galdi; Damasceno-Junior, Geraldo Alves; Silva, Denise Brentan; Toffoli-Kadri, Mônica Cristina; Carollo, Carlos Alexandre

    2017-12-15

    In recent years, the fruits of native Brazilian plant species with anti-inflammatory property have gained prominence due to their properties comparable to traditional medicines. This study aimed to chemically characterize and evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antihyperalgesic activity of Byrsonima cydoniifolia fruit, which is widely used to manufacture ice cream and jellies. Our results revealed that the fruit exhibits flavonoid derivatives and stilbenes, as trans-piceatannol and resveratrol, as main secondary metabolites. In mice, the hydroethanolic extract of fruit reduced the edema, migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into the peritoneal cavity, as well as abdominal writhings. The results demonstrated, for the first time, the presence of stilbenoids in the Byrsonima genus and the anti-inflammatory and antihyperalgesic effect of Byrsonima cydoniifolia fruits, supporting its potential as a nutraceutical food. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the methanolic extract of Opuntia humifusa stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhesh Raj; Park, Chul Min; Choi, Jong Won; Rhyu, Dong Young

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Opuntia humifusa (O. humifusa) Raf. has been used for the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, inflammation, and cancer. Our study was designed to unveil the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the methanolic extract of O. humifusa Raf stem (OHS). Materials and Methods: The anti-nociceptive effect was measured by hot plate, acetic acid-induced writhing, and tail flick assays in mice and rats. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effect was measured by vascular permeability and carrageenan and serotonin-induced paw edema tests in rats. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory effect was also measured using macrophage-like LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells. Results: OHS extract inhibited acetic acid-induced writhing (pdiseases. PMID:28884086

  12. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the methanolic extract ofOpuntia humifusastem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhesh Raj; Park, Chul Min; Choi, Jong Won; Rhyu, Dong Young

    2017-01-01

    Opuntia humifusa ( O. humifusa ) Raf. has been used for the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, inflammation, and cancer. Our study was designed to unveil the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the methanolic extract of O. humifusa Raf stem (OHS). The anti-nociceptive effect was measured by hot plate, acetic acid-induced writhing, and tail flick assays in mice and rats. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effect was measured by vascular permeability and carrageenan and serotonin-induced paw edema tests in rats. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory effect was also measured using macrophage-like LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells. OHS extract inhibited acetic acid-induced writhing (pdiseases.

  13. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITIES OF AVOCADO SEED (Persea americana Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caecilia Desi Kristanti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of infusion and methanolic extract from avocado seeds. The anti-inflammatory activity was determined using carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. The analgesic activity was assessed using acetic acid stimuli to induce peripheral pain in mice. Results of this research showed that both all level doses of infusion and methanolic extract of avocado seeds have a significant reduction on the mice paw edema. All level doses of methanolic extract of avocado seeds have a significant reduction on the number of abdominal writhes induced by acetic acid, but only the lowest dose of infusion showed a significant reduction. Our findings suggest that avocado seeds contains potential anti-inflammatory and analgesic compounds which support its traditional use. Further phytochemical studies are required to determine the active compounds are actually responsible for such properties.

  14. In vivo anti-inflammatory effect of Rosa canina L. extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzio, Francesca; Greco, Emanuela; Carretta, Donatella; Cervellati, Rinaldo; Govoni, Paolo; Speroni, Ester

    2011-09-01

    Rosa canina L. is a medicinal plant largely used in traditional folk medicine. Several compounds from rose hip extracts were reported to display in vitro anti-inflammatory activities. The in vivo effects of Rosa canina extracts are still poorly investigated. In the present study the anti-inflammatory and the gastroprotective effects of a hydroalcoholic crude extract of Rosa canina fruits were tested in rat. The anti-inflammatory activity of the extract was tested on the carrageenin-induced rat paw edema assay. The gastroprotective effect was investigated on the ethanol-induced gastric damage model. The in vitro antioxidant activity of this extract was also quantified using the Briggs-Rauscher oscillating reaction, the Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity method, and the Total Phenolic Content. Data show that the Rosa canina extract inhibits the development of carrageenin-induced edema; the anti-inflammatory power is similar to that of indomethacin. The antiedema effect was more significant using a higher dose of the extract. The total score expressing gastric damage was lower in Rosa canina pre-treated stomachs with respect to unpre-treated ones, although the antiulcerogenic effectiveness was not statistically significant. The antiulcerogenic effectiveness was not statistically detectable, even if the total score expressing gastric damage was lower in Rosa canina stomachs from pre-treated rats with respect to unpre-treated ones. Chemical analysis revealed that the extract owns a good antioxidant activity that may also contribute to the anti-inflammatory effects observed in vivo. Altogether, the present data demonstrate the anti-inflammatory property of Rosa canina suggesting its potential role as adjuvant therapeutic tool for the management of inflammatory-related diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Intra-Articular Hyaluronic Acid: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Roy; Bedi, Asheesh; Manjoo, Ajay; Niazi, Faizan; Shaw, Peter; Mease, Philip

    2018-02-01

    Objective Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the leading causes of disability in the adult population. Common nonoperative treatment options include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), intra-articular corticosteroids, and intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid (HA). HA is found intrinsically within the knee joint providing viscoelastic properties to the synovial fluid. HA therapy provides anti-inflammatory relief through a number of different pathways, including the suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Methods We conducted a systematic review to summarize the published literature on the anti-inflammatory properties of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis. Included articles were categorized based on the primary anti-inflammatory responses described within them, by the immediate cell surface receptor protein assessed within the article, or based on the primary theme of the article. Key findings aimed to describe the macromolecules and inflammatory-mediated responses associated with the cell transmembrane receptors. Results Forty-eight articles were included in this systematic review that focused on the general anti-inflammatory effects of HA in knee OA, mediated through receptor-binding relationships with cluster determinant 44 (CD44), toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) and 4 (TLR-4), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and layilin (LAYN) cell surface receptors. Higher molecular weight HA (HMWHA) promotes anti-inflammatory responses, whereas short HA oligosaccharides produce inflammatory reactions. Conclusions Intra-articular HA is a viable therapeutic option in treating knee OA and suppressing inflammatory responses. HMWHA is effective in suppressing the key macromolecules that elicit the inflammatory response by short HA oligosaccharides.

  16. Differential ability of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory macrophages to perform macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redka, Dar'ya S; Gütschow, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio; Canton, Johnathan

    2018-01-01

    Macropinocytosis mediates the uptake of antigens and of nutrients that dictate the regulation of cell growth by mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Because these functions differ in proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory macrophages, we compared the macropinocytic ability of two extreme polarization states. We found that anti-inflammatory macrophages perform vigorous macropinocytosis constitutively, while proinflammatory cells are virtually inactive. The total cellular content of Rho-family GTPases was higher in anti-inflammatory cells, but this disparity failed to account for the differential macropinocytic activity. Instead, reduced activity of Rac/RhoG was responsible for the deficient macropinocytosis of proinflammatory macrophages, as suggested by the stimulatory effects of heterologously expressed guanine nucleotide-exchange factors or of constitutively active (but not wild-type) forms of these GTPases. Similarly, differences in the activation state of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) correlated with the macropinocytic activity of pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages. Differences in PtdIns3K and Rho-GTPase activity were attributable to the activity of calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs), which appear to be functional only in anti-inflammatory cells. However, agonists of PtdIns3K, including cytokines, chemokines, and LPS, induced macropinocytosis in proinflammatory cells. Our findings revealed a striking difference in the macropinocytic ability of pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages that correlates with their antigen-presenting and metabolic activity. © 2018 Redka et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of a water extract of Trachelospermum jasminoides (Apocynaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Ming-Jyh; Chou, Pei-Yu; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Huang, Guan-Jhong; Wang, Bor-Sen; Chen, Jwo-Sheng; Chien, Yi-Chung; Huang, Ming-Hsing

    2009-11-12

    This study investigated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of a water extract of Trachelospermum jasminoides (WET) in ICR mice. In HPLC analysis, the fingerprint chromatogram of WET was established. Acetic acid-induced writhing response and formalin-induced pain were examined the analgesics effects of WET. WET on lambda-Carrageenan(carr)-induced paw edema was performed. We investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of WET via studies of the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRx) in the liver and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrite oxide (NO) in the edema paw. Serum NO and TNF-alpha were also measured. The fingerprint chromatogram of WET was established through HPLC analysis, and implies that WET contains the active ingredient gallic acid, chlorgenic acid, caffeic acid, taxifolin, isoquercitrin and quercetin. WET significantly inhibited the numbers of acetic acid-induced writhing responses and the formalin-induced pain in the late phase. In the anti-inflammatory test, WET inhibited the development of paw edema induced by carr. WET decreased the paw edema at the third, fourth and fifth hour after carr administration, and increased the activities of SOD, GPx and GRx in the liver tissue and decreased the MDA level in the edema paw at the third hour after carr injection. WET decreased the level of NO in edematous paw tissue and in serum level, and diminished the level of serum TNF-alpha at the fifth hour after carr injection. These results demonstrated that WET is an effective anti-inflammatory agent in carr-induced inflammation. WET probably exerts anti-inflammatory effects by suppressing TNF-alpha and NO. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of WET might be related to the decrease in the level of MDA in the edema paw via increasing the activities of SOD, GPx and GRx in the liver.

  18. Anti-allergic, anti-pruritic, and anti-inflammatory activities of Centella asiatica extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mathew; Joseph, Lincy; Ramaswamy

    2009-07-03

    This study investigated antipruritic and anti-inflammatory effect of Centella asiatica extract in rats and anti-allergic in vitro using sheep (Capra hircus) serum method and compound 48/80 induced mast cell degranulation method, compared with standard drug ketotifen fumarate. In rats, extract of Centella asiatica administered orally was examined for anti-pruritic study and chlorpheniramine maleate was used as standard drug while carageenan paw induced inflammatory method was used for the antiinfammatory study. The results show that the extracts of Centella asiatica exhibited antiallergic, anti-pruritic and anti-inflammatory activities.

  19. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF ROSUVASTATIN WITH THAT OF ASPIRIN IN ALBINO RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdul Majeed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Statins are HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors well known for their hypolipidemic action. More recently, there has been an increased interest in pleiotropic effects of statins like anti-inflammatory action that occurs independent of their lipid lowering effect. Statins exert anti-inflammatory action by preventing the isoprenylation of Rho proteins, a family of small G proteins and subsequent disruption of their functions. Hence, the present study was planned to compare the anti-inflammatory effect of rosuvastatin with that of aspirin on acute inflammation, so that it could be utilised in acute inflammatory conditions as an adjuvant or as a monotherapy avoiding adverse effects of commonly used antiinflammatory agents like NSAIDS (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The aim of the study is to compare anti-inflammatory effect of rosuvastatin with that of aspirin on carrageenan-induced inflammation in albino rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS 18 adult albino rats weighing between 100-150 g of either sex were divided into 3 groups. Control, Standard and test receiving oral normal saline (2 mL/kg, aspirin (100 mg/kg and rosuvastatin (5 mg/kg drug solutions, respectively. Acute inflammation model of carrageenan-induced paw oedema was used as tool. An hour after the administration of the drugs to each group, paw oedema was induced with intradermal injection of 0.1 mL of carrageenan (1% into the plantar surface of the right hind paw of each rat. Volume of inflamed paw was determined using a plethysmometer immediately and also at 30, 60, 120 and 180 minutes after injection. Finally, mean paw volumes at different time intervals were calculated and percentage inhibition of paw oedema with standard and test drugs were determined. RESULTS Data was analysed using by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Results showed that rosuvastatin has statistically significant (P<0.05 anti-inflammatory action reflected by percentage

  20. Exploration of the Anti-Inflammatory Drug Space Through Network Pharmacology: Applications for Drug Repurposing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Anda-Jáuregui, Guillermo; Guo, Kai; McGregor, Brett A; Hur, Junguk

    2018-01-01

    The quintessential biological response to disease is inflammation. It is a driver and an important element in a wide range of pathological states. Pharmacological management of inflammation is therefore central in the clinical setting. Anti-inflammatory drugs modulate specific molecules involved in the inflammatory response; these drugs are traditionally classified as steroidal and non-steroidal drugs. However, the effects of these drugs are rarely limited to their canonical targets, affecting other molecules and altering biological functions with system-wide effects that can lead to the emergence of secondary therapeutic applications or adverse drug reactions (ADRs). In this study, relationships among anti-inflammatory drugs, functional pathways, and ADRs were explored through network models. We integrated structural drug information, experimental anti-inflammatory drug perturbation gene expression profiles obtained from the Connectivity Map and Library of Integrated Network-Based Cellular Signatures, functional pathways in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Reactome databases, as well as adverse reaction information from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). The network models comprise nodes representing anti-inflammatory drugs, functional pathways, and adverse effects. We identified structural and gene perturbation similarities linking anti-inflammatory drugs. Functional pathways were connected to drugs by implementing Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). Drugs and adverse effects were connected based on the proportional reporting ratio (PRR) of an adverse effect in response to a given drug. Through these network models, relationships among anti-inflammatory drugs, their functional effects at the pathway level, and their adverse effects were explored. These networks comprise 70 different anti-inflammatory drugs, 462 functional pathways, and 1,175 ADRs. Network-based properties, such as degree

  1. Development of anti-inflammatory drugs - the research and development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Richard Graham

    2014-01-01

    The research and development process for novel drugs to treat inflammatory diseases is described, and several current issues and debates relevant to this are raised: the decline in productivity, attrition, challenges and trends in developing anti-inflammatory drugs, the poor clinical predictivity of experimental models of inflammatory diseases, heterogeneity within inflammatory diseases, 'improving on the Beatles' in treating inflammation, and the relationships between big pharma and biotechs. The pharmaceutical research and development community is responding to these challenges in multiple ways which it is hoped will lead to the discovery and development of a new generation of anti-inflammatory medicines. © 2013 Nordic Pharmacological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Evaluation of In Vitro Anti-inflammatory Activity of Azomethines of Aryl Oxazoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Niraimathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ability to inhibit erythrocyte hemolysis is often used as a characteristic of the membrane stabilising action of chemical compounds. Azomethines of aryl oxazoles were evaluated for anti-inflammatory by in vitro hemolytic membrane stabilising study. The effect of inflammation condition was studied on erythrocyte exposed to hypotonic solution. In this in vitro method the membrane stabilising action leads to anti-inflammatory activity and was compared with that produced by diclofenac sodium as the reference standard. Results of the evaluation indicate that the synthesised compounds found to exhibit membrane stabilising activity.

  3. Lichens as a source of chemical compounds with anti-inflammatory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studzińska-Sroka Elżbieta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms of inflammation accompany a number of diseases. In order to mitigate them, folk medicine has used a variety of medicinal substances, including herbs and mushrooms. Lichens are less known organisms, containing specific secondary metabolites with interesting biological properties. One of their biological actions is the anti-inflammatory activity that has been confirmed by in vitro and animal studies. It has been proven that compounds and extracts from lichens inhibit the enzymes involved in the inflammatory process. The following paper is a review of research on the little-known anti-inflammatory properties of lichens.

  4. Synthesis, Characterization & Screening for Anti-Inflammatory & Analgesic Activity of Quinoline Derivatives Bearing Azetidinones Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sujeet Kumar; Mishra, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are clinically used as anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic agents but they have the drawbacks such as gastric irritation and gastric ulceration. Recently, quinoline derivatives have shown significant anti-inflammatory and less ulcerogenic activity. The present study deals with the synthesis and pharmacological assessment of a series of novel quinoline derivatives bearing azetidinones scaffolds as anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents. A series of newer 3-chloro-1-(substituted)-4-(tetrazolo [1,5-a]quinolin-4- yl)azetidin-2-one derivatives (6a-l) was synthesized starting with acetanilide (1). Initially, acetanilide (1) was allowed to react with Vilsmeier-Haack reagent (DMF + POCl3) to form 2- chloro-3-formyl quinoline (2). The 2-chloro-3-formyl quinoline (2) was further treated with p-toluenesulphonic acid and sodium azide which yielded Tetrazolo [1,5-1] quinoline-4- carbaldehyde (3). The reaction of formyl group with various substituted amines (4a-l) formed corresponding Schiff base intermediates (5a-l), which were further allowed to react with chloroacetyl chloride to produce 3-chloro-1-(substituted)-4-(tetrazolo [1,5-a]quinolin-4-yl) azetidin-2-one derivatives (6a-l). The structure of the final analogues (6a-l) has been confirmed on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectra. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities by using carrageenan induced rat paw model and Eddy's hot plate method respectively. All the values of elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectra were found to be prominent. The anti-inflammatory activity test revealed that 3-chloro-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)- 4-(tetrazolo[1,5-a] quinolin-4-yl)azetidin-2-one (6b), 3-chloro-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)- 4-(tetrazolo[1,5-a]quinolin-4-yl)azetidin-2-one (6a) exhibited significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity as compared to control group. The results of the

  5. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Teucrium chamaedrys Leaves Aqueous Extract in Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Pourmotabbed; Amir Farshchi; Golbarg Ghiasi; Peyman Malek Khatabi

    2010-01-01

    Objective(s)Current study was undertaken to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the aqueous extract of Teucrium chamaedrys in mice and rats. Materials and MethodsFor evaluating of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity, we used the carrageenan- and dextran-induced paw oedema, acetic acid-induced writhing, tail flick and formalin pain tests.ResultsThe extract of T. chamaedrys (50–200 mg/kg) and acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/kg) produced a significant (P< 0.01) inhibitio...

  6. Exploration of the Anti-Inflammatory Drug Space Through Network Pharmacology: Applications for Drug Repurposing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo de Anda-Jáuregui

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The quintessential biological response to disease is inflammation. It is a driver and an important element in a wide range of pathological states. Pharmacological management of inflammation is therefore central in the clinical setting. Anti-inflammatory drugs modulate specific molecules involved in the inflammatory response; these drugs are traditionally classified as steroidal and non-steroidal drugs. However, the effects of these drugs are rarely limited to their canonical targets, affecting other molecules and altering biological functions with system-wide effects that can lead to the emergence of secondary therapeutic applications or adverse drug reactions (ADRs. In this study, relationships among anti-inflammatory drugs, functional pathways, and ADRs were explored through network models. We integrated structural drug information, experimental anti-inflammatory drug perturbation gene expression profiles obtained from the Connectivity Map and Library of Integrated Network-Based Cellular Signatures, functional pathways in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG and Reactome databases, as well as adverse reaction information from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS. The network models comprise nodes representing anti-inflammatory drugs, functional pathways, and adverse effects. We identified structural and gene perturbation similarities linking anti-inflammatory drugs. Functional pathways were connected to drugs by implementing Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA. Drugs and adverse effects were connected based on the proportional reporting ratio (PRR of an adverse effect in response to a given drug. Through these network models, relationships among anti-inflammatory drugs, their functional effects at the pathway level, and their adverse effects were explored. These networks comprise 70 different anti-inflammatory drugs, 462 functional pathways, and 1,175 ADRs. Network-based properties, such

  7. Gastrointestinal Complications Depending on the Selectivity of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Dzyak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of gastrointestinal complications during administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, commonly used to treat a range of conditions, particularly rheumatic diseases. The results of own researches, which served to define the characteristics of changes in the state of gastric secretory function in patients receiving non-selective and selective anti-inflammatory agent and their comparative analysis, are provided. The data obtained demonstrated a certain contribution to the understanding of the mechanism of development of complications from the gastrointestinal tract when taken drugs of above group.

  8. Self nanoemulsifying granules (SNEGs) of meloxicam: preparation, characterization, molecular modeling and evaluation of in vivo anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Vidhi J; Desai, Namita D; Shaikh, Mushtaque S; Shinde, Ujwala A

    2017-04-01

    Meloxicam, a BCS class II drug belonging to the class of NSAIDs is indicated in conditions of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and osteoarthritis in which rapid onset of drug action is desired to reduce inflammation and pain. The objective of the study was to thus develop Self Nanoemulsifying Granules (SNEGs) of Meloxicam (MLX) for enhancement of solubility; and subsequently dissolution rate, thus aiming for a faster onset of action. Preliminary studies along with molecular modeling studies were carried out for selection of appropriate lipids, surfactants and cosurfactants for the development of MLX-loaded Self Nanoemulsifying preconcentrate (SNEP). A charge inducer was incorporated into the formulation so as to increase the solubility of MLX in lipids and hence, drug loading. A three-factor D-optimal mixture design was used for optimization of MLX loaded SNEP. The role of charge inducer in increasing the drug loading of MLX in SNEDDS was studied by molecular dynamics simulation using Desmond. Optimized SNEP was adsorbed onto solid carriers to form SNEGs for improved stability and enhanced flow properties. Physical characterization studies of SNEGs, in vitro release studies, and in vivo evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of the optimized formulation were performed. All the results indicated that MLX SNEGs can be a promising alternative to conventional oral NSAIDs therapy because of enhanced dissolution characteristics and subsequent rapid onset of action.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory molecular mechanisms of Bo-Ye-Niu- Pi-Xiao ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... and iNOS by amentoflavone and quercetin in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. PLEFA, 66: 485-492. Chan MM, Hunag HI, Fenton MR, Fong D (1998). In vivo inhibition of nitric oxide synthase gene expression by curcumin, a cancer preventive natural product with anti-inflammatory properties.

  10. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the water extract from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In ayurvedic and Thai traditional medicine, the fruit of T. chebula is useful in arthritic disorders, inflammation, tumor, pains, chronic and recurrent fever. The study investigated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models. Materials and methods: The water extract of T. chebula fruit was ...

  11. Drug Targets for Cardiovascular-Safe Anti-Inflammatory: In Silico Rational Drug Studies.

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    Sajad Shahbazi

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 plays an important role in memory consolidation and synaptic activity, the most fundamental functions of the brain. It converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin endoperoxide H2. In contrast, if over-expressed, it causes inflammation in response to cytokine, pro-inflammatory molecule, and growth factor. Anti-inflammatory agents, by allosteric or competitive inhibition of COX-2, alleviate the symptoms of inflammation. Coxib family drugs, particularly celecoxib, are the most famous anti-inflammatory agents available in the market showing significant inhibitory effect on COX-2 activity. Due to high cardiovascular risk of this drug group, recent researches are focused on the investigation of new safer drugs for anti-inflammatory diseases. Natural compounds, particularly, phytochemicals are found to be good candidates for drug designing and discovery. In the present study, we performed in silico studies to quantitatively scrutinize the molecular interaction of curcumin and its structural analogs with COX-2, COX-1, FXa and integrin αIIbβIII to investigate their therapeutic potential as a cardiovascular-safe anti-inflammatory medicine (CVSAIM. The results of both ADMET and docking study indicated that out of all the 39 compounds studied, caffeic acid had remarkable interaction with proteins involved in inflammatory response. It was also found to inhibit the proteins that are involved in thrombosis, thereby, having the potential to be developed as therapeutic agent.

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Babassu Oil and Development of a Microemulsion System for Topical Delivery

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    Mysrayn Y. F. A. Reis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Babassu oil extraction is the main income source in nut breakers communities in northeast of Brazil. Among these communities, babassu oil is used for cooking but also medically to treat skin wounds and inflammation, and vulvovaginitis. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of babassu oil and develop a microemulsion system with babassu oil for topical delivery. Topical anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in mice ear edema using PMA, arachidonic acid, ethyl phenylpropiolate, phenol, and capsaicin as phlogistic agents. A microemulsion system was successfully developed using a Span® 80/Kolliphor® EL ratio of 6 : 4 as the surfactant system (S, propylene glycol and water (3 : 1 as the aqueous phase (A, and babassu oil as the oil phase (O, and analyzed through conductivity, SAXS, DSC, TEM, and rheological assays. Babassu oil and lauric acid showed anti-inflammatory activity in mice ear edema, through inhibition of eicosanoid pathway and bioactive amines. The developed formulation (39% A, 12.2% O, and 48.8% S was classified as a bicontinuous to o/w transition microemulsion that showed a Newtonian profile. The topical anti-inflammatory activity of microemulsified babassu oil was markedly increased. A new delivery system of babassu microemulsion droplet clusters was designed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of vegetable oil.

  13. A study of the anti-inflammatory effects of the ethyl acetate fraction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of the ethyl acetate fraction of the methanol extract of FF (FFE) were assessed by measuring NO and PGE2 production by and intracellular ROS and protein levels of iNOS and COX-2 in RAW 264.7 cells. Results: FFE inhibited COX-2 expression in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells.

  14. Biological activities (anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant) of fractions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bryophytes like other lower plants (non-vascular plants) are not traditionally employed for therapeutic purposes. Hence this study evaluated the in vitro anti-oxidant potentials and anti-inflammatory activities of the fractions and methanolic extract of Moss (Philonotis hastata, Duby) with a view to studying its ...

  15. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of chloroform extract of Bryonia laciniosa in experimental animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Malaya; Mazumdar, Upal Kanti; Sivakumar, Thangavel; Vamsi, Madgulav Laxmi Mohan; Karki, Subhas Somalingappa; Sambathkumar, Ramanathan; Manikandan, Laxmanan

    2003-09-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of the leaves of Bryonia laciniosa was evaluated using carrageenan, dextran, histamine, serotonin induced rat paw oedema and cotton pellet induced granuloma (chronic) models in rats. In mice, carrageenan peritonitis test was performed for the extract by oral administration. The chloroform extract of Bryonia laciniosa (CEBL) exhibited significant anti-inflammatory effect at the dose 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg. Maximum inhibition (52.4%) was noted at the dose of 200 mg/kg after 3 h of drug treatment in carrageenan induced paw oedema, whereas the indomethacin (standard drug) produced 62.1% of inhibition. The extract exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in dextran induced paw oedema in a dose dependent manner. The extract also exhibited significant inhibition on the hind paw oedema in rats caused by histamine and serotonin respectively. In the chronic model (cotton pellet induced granuloma) the CEBL (200 mg/kg) and standard drug showed decreased formation of granuloma tissue by 50.1 and 57.3% (p<0.001) respectively. The extract also inhibited peritoneal leukocyte migration in mice. Thus, the present study revealed that the chloroform extract of Bryonia laciniosa exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in the tested models.

  16. Evaluation of Caesalpinia bonduc seed coat extract for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanand M Kannur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, Caesalpinia bonduc seed coat extract (CBSCE has been evaluated for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity C. bonduc seeds have been attributed with anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties in the folklore medicine. Here in our study, we have tried to carry out the systematic evaluation of the seed coat extract of C. bonduc to substantiate these claims. C. bonduc seed coat was extracted with 95% ethanol and concentrated; further, the extract was screened for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity. The studies were carried using Carrageenan-induced Paw Edema, Egg albumin-induced paw edema, Eddy′s Hot Plate Test, Tail Immersion Method so as to prove acclaimed properties. The data was analyzed statistically by Students′ ′t′ test. The results indicate that seed coat extract has the ability to decrease the induced inflammation at varied doses in Carrageenan model as well as in the Egg albumin model in rats. The antinociceptive results indicate that the extract has the ability to increase the pain threshold of the animals and reduce the pain factor, thereby inducing analgesia. Thus, it can be concluded that CBSCE posses analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity.

  17. The pro-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory foam cell macrophage paradox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, Anita C.; Eijgelaar, Wouter J.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Newby, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of foamy macrophages by sequestering extracellular modified lipids is a key event in atherosclerosis. However, there is controversy about the effects of lipid loading on macrophage phenotype, with in vitro evidence suggesting either pro-or anti-inflammatory consequences. To investigate

  18. Assessment of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Y; Akita, S; Salamin, P A; Maier, R

    1990-10-01

    Four commercial gel preparations of topical anti-inflammatory agents have been assessed in six animal models commonly used to determine the biological activity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents for systemic administration. Only UV-induced erythema of the skin, adjuvant induced arthritis and the measurement of vascular permeability proved suitable for differentiation of the potency of the four topical agents. Carrageenin-induced paw oedema, the cotton pellet test and the assessment of the pain threshold according to Randall and Selitto were of little value. The effects of the gel preparation of diclofenac (CAS 15307-86-5) diethylammonium (Voltaren Emulgel) were comparable to two preparations containing 1% and 5% active ingredient, respectively. Gel 4 showed low overall activity. The experiments demonstrated that some of the models used for the assessment of anti-inflammatory agent for systemic administration proved suitable for the testing of topical preparations and that percutaneous absorption was insufficient to elicit anti-inflammatory effect in the animals at sites remote from the site of application.

  19. Phytochemical Analysis by HPLC–HRESI-MS and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Tabernaemontana catharinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ivan Marques

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tabernaemontana catharinensis (Apocynaceae has been popularly used by folk medicine because of its anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antiophidic properties. This study aims to analyze the flavonoids composition of the hydroethanolic extract and of the ethyl acetate (EtOAc and butanol (BuOH fractions of T. catharinensis leaves, as well as to evaluate their anti-inflammatory activity using in vivo models. The phytochemical profile, determined by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography–High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC–HRESI-MS, showed the presence of flavonoids mainly having an isorhamnetin nucleus. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in carrageenan-induced paw edema (pre- and post-treatment with oral administration of a T. catharinensis hydroethanolic extract (50, 100, and 150 mg/kg and of organic fractions (50 mg/kg. The extract and fractions showed antiedematogenic activity by decreasing myeloperoxidase (MPO production. In the zymosan-air-pouch model, the extract and fractions inhibited leukocyte migration and significantly decreased the levels of various proteins, such as MPO, interleukin (IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay, which revealed no cytotoxicity of the extract and the fractions. These results suggest that the hydroethanolic extract and organic fractions of T. catharinensis leaves have sufficient anti-inflammatory activity to support the popular use of this plant in the treatment of inflammatory disorders.

  20. Assessment Of Pattern Of Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used in the treatment of pains. Self-medication is a common practice all over the world. Unwanted effects from use of this class of medication could pose health challenges. This study evaluated the prevalence and pattern of inappropriate use of NSAIDs among ...

  1. Negative effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ciprofloxacin, a second generation fluoroquinolone is often co-administered with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in life threatening situations in which Staphylococcus aureus infections are accompanied with pain and inflammation. This study was carried out to investigate possible in vitro interactions in co ...

  2. Effectiveness of various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To study the effectiveness of various nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with vertebral fractures. Methods: A total of 78 patients (17 males and 61 females) with a mean age of 69.5 years were included. The major inclusion criterion was an osteoporotic vertebral fracture between T7 and L3.

  3. In vivo anti-inflammatory effects of taraxasterol against animal models

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traditional Chinese medicine Taraxacum officinale has been widely used to treat various inflammatory diseases. Taraxasterol is one of the main active components isolated from Taraxacum officinale. Recently, we have demonstrated that taraxasterol has the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects. This study aims to ...

  4. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory properties of the hexane extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maj Obaseki

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... the extract were further assessed by employing the formaldehyde induced arthritis animal model assay. The extract was ... Key words: Hydrocotyle bonariensis, anti-inflammatory, phytochemicals, protein denaturation, membrane stabilization .... Drugs (NSAIDs) for two weeks prior to the experiment and.

  5. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of an Ethanol Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samuel Olaleye

    veterinary medicine. It is also used in the treatment of joint and stomach pains. It equally reliefs insect stings. (Okokon, 2005 personal communication). Nwafor et al., (2006), investigated the acute toxicity potential of the leaf extract in rats, however, no anti-inflammatory or analgesic effect of the leaf has been reported earlier.

  6. p38 Mapk signal pathway involved in anti-inflammatory effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In conclusion, CSS and SLBZS might work as a significant anti-inflammatory effect on hepatocyte of NASH by inhibiting the activation of TLR4, p-p38 MAPK and p38 MAPK involved in p38 MAPK signal pathway. Conclusion: To some extent, CSS and SLBZS may be a potential alternative and complementary medicine to ...

  7. Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Nociceptive Effects of Ethanolic Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ethanolic stembark extract of M .africana (30-90 mg/kg) was investigated for pharmacological properties against egg white albumin - induced inflammation, Chemical as well as thermal- induced pain as well as yeast induced pyresis in rats. The extract demonstrated a dose – dependent anti- inflammatory ...

  8. Anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of ethanolic extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ethanolic leaf extract of Setaria megaphylla (100-300 mg/kg) was investigated for pharmacological properties against egg white albumin - induced inflammation, Chemical as well as thermal- induced pain. The extract demonstrated a dose – dependent anti- inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. These activities ...

  9. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of the ethanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of the ethanolic extract of Lagenaria breviflora whole fruit in rat and mice. ... Its effect was comparable especially at 200mg/kg body weight to those of diclofenac, indomethacin and ibuprofen. It could be suggested from the findings of this experiment that the extract may be ...

  10. COMPARISON OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF NIGELLA SATIVA AND DICLOFENAC SODIUM IN ALBINO RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Muhammad Usman; Qureshi, Hamid Javaid; Saleem, Tahira

    2015-01-01

    Nigella sativa or "Kalonji" is a naturally occurring plant in Pakistan and other countries which possesses a wide range of medicinal properties, the anti-inflammatory property being one of these. Diclofenac sodium is a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug. The purpose of this study was to compare the anti-inflammatory effect of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds with that of diclofenac sodium in albino rats. This laboratory randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted in the Physiology Department, Services Institute of Medical Sciences (SIMS), Lahore. The study was carried out on 90 male albino rats. Five percent formalin in a dose of 50 µl was injected into sub-plantar surface of right hind paw of each rat to produce inflammation. The rats were randomly divided into three groups of thirty each. Group A was given normal saline (control); group B was given Nigella sativa seed extract; and group C received diclofenac sodium, as a reference drug. Increase in paw diameter, and total and differential leukocyte counts were measured as markers of inflammation. Nigella sativa seeds extract caused significant (pdiclofenac sodium; however, the extract was comparatively less potent than diclofenac sodium. The extract had no significant effect (p>0.05) on the total or differential leukocyte counts. Our results suggest that ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds possesses potent anti-inflammatory effect, in albino rats however, this effect is comparatively less but prolonged than that produced by diclofenac sodium.

  11. Anti-Inflammatory and Antiarthritic Activity of Anthraquinone Derivatives in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay D. Kshirsagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aloe emodin is isolated compound of aloe vera which is used traditionally as an anti-inflammatory agent. In vitro pharmacokinetic data suggest that glucuronosyl or sulfated forms of aloe emodin may provide some limitations in its absorption capacity. Aloe emodin was reported to have in vitro anti-inflammatory activity due to inhibition of inducible nitric oxide (iNO and prostaglandin E2, via its action on murine macrophages. However, present work evidenced that molecular docking of aloe emodin modulates the anti-inflammatory activity, as well as expression of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2 in rodent. The AEC (4,5-dihydroxy-9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracene-2 carboxylic acid was synthesized using aloe emodin as starting material. The study was planned for evaluation of possible anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity in carrageenan rat induced paw oedema and complete Freund’s adjuvant induced arthritis in rats. The AE (aloe emodin and AEC significantly P<0.001 reduced carrageenan induced paw edema at 50 and 75 mg/kg. Complete Freund’s adjuvant induced arthritis model showed significant P<0.001 decrease in injected and noninjected paw volume, arthritic score. AE and AEC showed significant effect on various biochemical, antioxidant, and hematological parameters. Diclofenac sodium 10 mg/kg showed significant P<0.001 inhibition in inflammation and arthritis.

  12. Phytol: A chlorophyll component with anti-inflammatory and metabolic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Peter; Hultqvist, Malin; Hellgren, Lars I.

    2014-01-01

    The naturally occurring dipterpene molecule Phytol is an alcohol that can be extracted from the chlorophyll of green plants. Phytol has been studied for decades and has been suggested to have both metabolic properties as well as potent anti-inflammatory effects. Phytol represents a molecule deriv...

  13. In Vivo Anti-inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was observed that the 80% methanol extracts of both plants could significantly lower carrageenan-induced paw oedema at doses of 200 mg/kg, p.o. Among the solvent fractions, the acetone, chloroform and methanol fractions of S. nilotica exhibited anti-inflammatory activity, the strongest being that of the acetone fraction.

  14. Ankle sprain: the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, Peter A. A.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one in 10,000 people per day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic overview, aiming to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

  15. Antimicrobial activity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as the name implies are compounds of nonsteroidal origin, with the capability of inhibiting/reducing inflammatory response associated with tissue injury which could be as a result of physical trauma, noxious chemicals or microorganisms. There is however reason to ...

  16. Review of the safety of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most common classes of medication used worldwide, and as the ageing population increases, the prevalence of painful arthritic conditions parallels this, resulting in the increased use of NSAIDs. Selective and nonselective cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors should be ...

  17. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of prosopis chilenses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abodola, M A; Lutfi, M F; Bakhiet, A O; Mohamed, A H

    2015-07-01

    Prosopis chilensis is used locally in Sudan for inflammatory conditions of joints; however, literature lacks scientific evidence for anti-inflammatory effect of this plant. To evaluate anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of prosopis chilenses. Edema inhibition percent (EI %) and hot plate method were used to evaluate anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Prosopis chilenses in Wistar albino rats. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Prosopis chilenses were compared to indomethacin and acetylsalicylic acid respectively. Ethanolic extract of prosopis chilensis at a dose of 200 and 100mg/kg body weight achieved peak EI% (EI% = 96.1%) and (EI% = 94.4%) three and four hours after oral dosing respectively. The maximum EI% for indomethacin was 97.0% and was recorded after 4 hours following oral administration of the drug at a dose of 5 mg/kg body weight. Prosopis chilensis extracts at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight significantly increased the rats' response time to hot plate compared to acetylsalicylic acid at a dose rate of 100mg/kg body weight (Pprosopis chilenses. Relevance of these effects to prosopis chilenses phy-to-constituents was discussed.

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Babassu Oil and Development of a Microemulsion System for Topical Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Mysrayn Y. F. A.; dos Santos, Simone M.; Silva, Danielle R.; Navarro, Daniela M. A. Ferraz; Santos, Geanne K. N.; Hallwass, Fernando; Bianchi, Otávio; Silva, Alexandre G.; Melo, Janaína V.; Machado, Giovanna; Saraiva, Karina L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Babassu oil extraction is the main income source in nut breakers communities in northeast of Brazil. Among these communities, babassu oil is used for cooking but also medically to treat skin wounds and inflammation, and vulvovaginitis. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of babassu oil and develop a microemulsion system with babassu oil for topical delivery. Topical anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in mice ear edema using PMA, arachidonic acid, ethyl phenylpropiolate, phenol, and capsaicin as phlogistic agents. A microemulsion system was successfully developed using a Span® 80/Kolliphor® EL ratio of 6 : 4 as the surfactant system (S), propylene glycol and water (3 : 1) as the aqueous phase (A), and babassu oil as the oil phase (O), and analyzed through conductivity, SAXS, DSC, TEM, and rheological assays. Babassu oil and lauric acid showed anti-inflammatory activity in mice ear edema, through inhibition of eicosanoid pathway and bioactive amines. The developed formulation (39% A, 12.2% O, and 48.8% S) was classified as a bicontinuous to o/w transition microemulsion that showed a Newtonian profile. The topical anti-inflammatory activity of microemulsified babassu oil was markedly increased. A new delivery system of babassu microemulsion droplet clusters was designed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of vegetable oil. PMID:29430254

  19. Chemical constituents and anti-inflammatory activities of Maqian (Zanthoxylum myriacanthum var. pubescens) bark extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan-li; Gan, Xiao-qing; Fan, Qing-fei; Yang, Jing-jing; Zhang, Ping; Hu, Hua-bin; Song, Qi-shi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, 44 compounds in the petroleum ether extract of Maqian (Zanthoxylum myriacanthum var. pubescens) bark, a traditional Dai herbal medicine, were identified by GC-MS. Major components included 3(2H)-benzofuranone, asarinin and (dimethoxymethyl)-3-methoxy-benzene. A total of 18 compounds were isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of Maqian bark by column chromatography and identified by chemical and spectral analyses. Rhoifoline B, zanthoxyline dimethoxy derivative, N-nortidine, nitidine, decarine are the major alkaloids. Both the petroleum ether and ethyl acetate extracts showed significant inhibition on NO production, which imply anti-inflammatory activity, in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 cells without cell toxicity. Decarine is the major anti-inflammatory constituent with NO IC50 values of 48.43 μM on RAW264.7 cells. The petroleum ether extract, the ethyl acetate extract and decarine showed anti-inflammatory activities through inhibiting TNF-α and IL-1β production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated THP-1 cells without cell toxicity too. Decarine showed anti-inflammatory activity on human colon cells by reducing IL-6 and IL-8 production in TNF-α+IL-1β-induced Caco-2 cells. These results support the use of Maqian bark as a remedy for enteritis and colitis recorded by Dai medicine in China, and elucidate the major pharmacological compounds in Maqian bark. PMID:28383530

  20. AP-1/IRF-3 Targeted Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Andrographolide Isolated from Andrographis paniculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (AG is an abundant component of plants of the genus Andrographis and has a number of beneficial properties including neuroprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic effects. Despite numerous pharmacological studies, the precise mechanism of AG is still ambiguous. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of AG and its target proteins as they pertain to anti-inflammatory responses. AG suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, as well as the mRNA abundance of inducible NO synthase (iNOS, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, cyclooxygenase (COX-2, and interferon-beta (IFN-β in a dose-dependent manner in both lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- activated RAW264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages. AG also substantially ameliorated the symptoms of LPS-induced hepatitis and EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis in mice. Based on the results of luciferase reporter gene assays, kinase assays, and measurement of nuclear levels of transcription factors, the anti-inflammatory effects of AG were found to be clearly mediated by inhibition of both (1 extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK/activator protein (AP-1 and (2 IκB kinase ε (IKKε/interferon regulatory factor (IRF-3 pathways. In conclusion, we detected a novel molecular signaling pathway by which AG can suppress inflammatory responses. Thus, AG is a promising anti-inflammatory drug with two pharmacological targets.