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Sample records for anti-hiv-1 antibodies disrupt

  1. An improved microtiter assay for evaluating anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies from sera or plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yunyun

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibody assay is widely used in AIDS vaccine research and other experimental and clinical studies. The vital dye staining method applied in the detection of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibody has been used in many laboratories. However, the unknown factor(s in sera or plasma affected cell growth and caused protection when the tested sera or plasma was continuously maintained in cell culture. In addition, the poor solubility of neutral red in medium (such as RPMI-1640 also limited the use of this assay. Methods In this study, human T cell line C8166 was used as host cells, and 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT instead of neutral red was used as vital dye. In order to avoid the effect of the unknown factor(s, the tested sera or plasma was removed by a washout procedure after initial 3–6 h culture in the assay. Result This new assay eliminated the effect of the tested sera or plasma on cell growth, improved the reliability of detection of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibody, and showed excellent agreement with the p24 antigen method. Conclusion The results suggest that the improved assay is relatively simple, highly duplicable, cost-effective, and well reliable for evaluating anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies from sera or plasma.

  2. CXCR4-derived synthetic peptides inducing anti-HIV-1 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Chie; Nomura, Wataru; Narumi, Tetsuo; Fujino, Masayuki; Nakahara, Toru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Murakami, Tsutomu; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2013-11-15

    Despite almost 30 years since the identification of the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1), development of effective AIDS vaccines has been hindered by the high mutability of HIV-1. The HIV-1 co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are genetically stable, but viral proteins may mutate rapidly during the course of infection. CXCR4 is a seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor, possessing an N-terminal region (NT) and three extracellular loops (ECL1-3). Previous studies have shown that the CXCR4-ED-derived peptides inhibit the entry of HIV-1 by interacting with gp120, an HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. In the present study, antigenicity of CXCR4-derived peptides has been investigated and the anti-HIV-1 effects of induced antisera have been assessed. It was found that CXCR4-ED-derived antigen molecules immunize mice, showing that the linear peptides have higher antigenicity than the cyclic peptides. The L1- and L2-induced antisera inhibited the HIV-1 entry significantly, while anti-N1 antibodies have no inhibitory activity. This study produced promising examples for the design of AIDS vaccines which target the human protein and can overcome mutability of HIV-1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Contribution of NK cell education to both direct and anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Anne B; Kent, Stephen J; Parsons, Matthew S

    2018-03-07

    Antibody Fc-dependent functions are linked to prevention and control of HIV-1 infection. Basic NK cell biology is likely key to understanding the contributions anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell activation and cytolysis make to HIV-1 susceptibility and disease progression. The importance of NK cell education through inhibitory receptors specific for self-HLA-I in determining the potency of anti-HIV-1 antibody mediated NK cell activation and cytolysis is controversial. To address this issue more definitively we utilized HLA-I genotyping, flow cytometry staining panels and cytolysis assays to assess the functionality of educated and non-educated peripheral blood NK cells. We now demonstrate that educated NK cells are superior in terms of their capacity to become activated and/or mediate cytolysis following anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent stimulation. The profiles of activation observed were similar to those observed upon direct stimulation of NK cells with HLA-I devoid target cells. Non-educated NK cells make significantly lower contributions to total NK cell activation than would be expected from their frequency within the total NK cell population (i.e., are hypofunctional) and educated NK cells make similar or higher contributions as their frequency in the total NK cell population. Finally, NK cells educated through at least one killer immunoglobulin-like receptor and NKG2A exhibited the most significant difference between actual and expected contribution to the total NK cell response, based on their frequency within the total NK cell population, suggesting summation of NK cell education through inhibitory receptors determines overall NK cell functionality. These observations have potential implications for understanding HIV-1 vaccine efficacy and disease progression. IMPORTANCE NK cells are major mediators of anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent functions, including cytokine production and cytolysis. The mechanisms controlling the capacity of individual NK cells to

  4. Computational analysis of anti-HIV-1 antibody neutralization panel data to identify potential functional epitope residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Anthony P; Scharf, Louise; Horwitz, Joshua; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2013-06-25

    Advances in single-cell antibody cloning methods have led to the identification of a variety of broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies. We developed a computational tool (Antibody Database) to help identify critical residues on the HIV-1 envelope protein whose natural variation affects antibody activity. Our simplifying assumption was that, for a given antibody, a significant portion of the dispersion of neutralization activity across a panel of HIV-1 strains is due to the amino acid identity or glycosylation state at a small number of specific sites, each acting independently. A model of an antibody's neutralization IC50 was developed in which each site contributes a term to the logarithm of the modeled IC50. The analysis program attempts to determine the set of rules that minimizes the sum of the residuals between observed and modeled IC50 values. The predictive quality of the identified rules may be assessed in part by whether there is support for rules within individual viral clades. As a test case, we analyzed antibody 8ANC195, an anti-glycoprotein gp120 antibody of unknown specificity. The model for this antibody indicated that several glycosylation sites were critical for neutralization. We evaluated this prediction by measuring neutralization potencies of 8ANC195 against HIV-1 in vitro and in an antibody therapy experiment in humanized mice. These experiments confirmed that 8ANC195 represents a distinct class of glycan-dependent anti-HIV-1 antibody and validated the utility of computational analysis of neutralization panel data.

  5. An anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibody expressed as an endocytotic transmembrane protein mediates internalization of HIV-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Yee-Joo; Lim, S.-P.; Ting, Anthony E.; Goh, Phuay-Yee; Tan, Y.H.; Lim, Seng Gee; Hong Wanjin

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we used HIV-1 as a model to demonstrate a novel approach for receptor-independent cell entry of virus. The heavy chain of an anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibody was engineered with endocytotic and transmembrane motifs from either the cation-independent mannose 6-phospate receptor or the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence studies showed that the chimeric antibodies were expressed on the cell surface and can undergo rapid internalization. Furthermore, one of the chimeric antibodies was able to bind and internalize HIV-1. Using a luciferase reporter HIV-1, we further showed that internalized viruses could undergo replication. Therefore, we have demonstrated a proof-of-principle of a novel method that can be used to internalize virus into cells, without prior knowledge of the cellular receptor for the virus. We propose that this approach would be particularly useful for studying viruses whose cellular receptor(s) is not known

  6. Sequential Immunization Elicits Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies in Ig Knockin Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolano, Amelia; Steichen, Jon M; Dosenovic, Pia; Kulp, Daniel W; Golijanin, Jovana; Sok, Devin; Freund, Natalia T; Gitlin, Alexander D; Oliveira, Thiago; Araki, Tatsuya; Lowe, Sarina; Chen, Spencer T; Heinemann, Jennifer; Yao, Kai-Hui; Georgeson, Erik; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Gazumyan, Anna; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; Burton, Dennis R; Schief, William R; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-09-08

    A vaccine that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1 is likely to be protective, but this has not been achieved. To explore immunization regimens that might elicit bNAbs, we produced and immunized mice expressing the predicted germline PGT121, a bNAb specific for the V3-loop and surrounding glycans on the HIV-1 spike. Priming with an epitope-modified immunogen designed to activate germline antibody-expressing B cells, followed by ELISA-guided boosting with a sequence of directional immunogens, native-like trimers with decreasing epitope modification, elicited heterologous tier-2-neutralizing responses. In contrast, repeated immunization with the priming immunogen did not. Antibody cloning confirmed elicitation of high levels of somatic mutation and tier-2-neutralizing antibodies resembling the authentic human bNAb. Our data establish that sequential immunization with specifically designed immunogens can induce high levels of somatic mutation and shepherd antibody maturation to produce bNAbs from their inferred germline precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera on this in......To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera...... on this infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...... to CD4 and that post binding events may be common to the infection of lymphocytes. Anti HIV-1 sera showed neutralizing activity against heterologous and even autologous escape virus. This finding, together with the observation that monocytes and M phi s are infected in vivo, suggests that protection...

  8. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera...... on this infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...

  9. Slaying the Trojan horse: natural killer cells exhibit robust anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent activation and cytolysis against allogeneic T cells.

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    Gooneratne, Shayarana L; Richard, Jonathan; Lee, Wen Shi; Finzi, Andrés; Kent, Stephen J; Parsons, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    Many attempts to design prophylactic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines have focused on the induction of neutralizing antibodies (Abs) that block infection by free virions. Despite the focus on viral particles, virus-infected cells, which can be found within mucosal secretions, are more infectious than free virus both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, assessment of human transmission couples suggests infected seminal lymphocytes might be responsible for a proportion of HIV-1 transmissions. Although vaccines that induce neutralizing Abs are sought, only some broadly neutralizing Abs efficiently block cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1. As HIV-1 vaccines need to elicit immune responses capable of controlling both free and cell-associated virus, we evaluated the potential of natural killer (NK) cells to respond in an Ab-dependent manner to allogeneic T cells bearing HIV-1 antigens. This study presents data measuring Ab-dependent anti-HIV-1 NK cell responses to primary and transformed allogeneic T-cell targets. We found that NK cells are robustly activated in an anti-HIV-1 Ab-dependent manner against allogeneic targets and that tested target cells are subject to Ab-dependent cytolysis. Furthermore, the educated KIR3DL1(+) NK cell subset from HLA-Bw4(+) individuals exhibits an activation advantage over the KIR3DL1(-) subset that contains both NK cells educated through other receptor/ligand combinations and uneducated NK cells. These results are intriguing and important for understanding the regulation of Ab-dependent NK cell responses and are potentially valuable for designing Ab-dependent therapies and/or vaccines. NK cell-mediated anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent functions have been associated with protection from infection and disease progression; however, their role in protecting from infection with allogeneic cells infected with HIV-1 is unknown. We found that HIV-1-specific ADCC antibodies bound to allogeneic cells infected with HIV-1 or coated

  10. Detection of anti-HIV-1 IgG antibodies in whole saliva by GACELISA and Western blot assays.

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    Matee, M I; Lyamuya, E F; Simon, E; Mbena, E C; Kagoma, C; Samaranayake, L P; Scheutz, F

    1996-05-01

    The present study, based on 158 HIV seropositives and 167 HIV seronegatives, demonstrates that saliva collected with the Omni-SAL device and tested with GACELISA (an IgG antibody capture ELISA) is an effective non-invasive alternative to serum for anti-HIV IgG antibody screening. The study also shows that a conventional serum Western blot kit can be used, with slight modifications, for confirmatory testing of saliva specimens. Collecting saliva with the Omni-SAL device had a very good acceptance rate among Tanzanian subjects, and although this diagnostic method is not yet known by the general public, 65% of the study participants preferred to give saliva instead of blood for HIV testing.

  11. Neutralizing Activity of Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies against Clade B Clinical Isolates Produced in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Yehuda Z; Lorenzi, Julio C C; Seaman, Michael S; Nogueira, Lilian; Schoofs, Till; Krassnig, Lisa; Butler, Allison; Millard, Katrina; Fitzsimons, Tomas; Daniell, Xiaoju; Dizon, Juan P; Shimeliovich, Irina; Montefiori, David C; Caskey, Marina; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2018-03-01

    HIV-1 epidemic. Antibodies with exceptional neutralizing activity against HIV-1 may provide several advantages to traditional HIV drugs, including an improved side-effect profile, a reduced dosing frequency, and immune enhancement. The activity of these antibodies has been established in vitro by utilizing HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped viruses derived from circulating viruses but produced in 293T cells by pairing Env proteins with a backbone vector. We tested PBMC-produced circulating viruses against five anti-HIV-1 antibodies currently in clinical development. We found that the activity of these antibodies against PBMC isolates is significantly less than that against 293T Env-pseudotyped viruses. This decline varied among the antibodies tested, with some demonstrating moderate reductions in activity and others showing an almost 100-fold reduction. As the development of these antibodies progresses, it will be critical to determine how the results of different in vitro tests correspond to performance in the clinic. Copyright © 2018 Cohen et al.

  12. Anti-V3/Glycan and Anti-MPER Neutralizing Antibodies, but Not Anti-V2/Glycan Site Antibodies, Are Strongly Associated with Greater Anti-HIV-1 Neutralization Breadth and Potency.

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    Jacob, Rajesh Abraham; Moyo, Thandeka; Schomaker, Michael; Abrahams, Fatima; Grau Pujol, Berta; Dorfman, Jeffrey R

    2015-05-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER), the V2/glycan site (initially defined by PG9 and PG16 antibodies), and the V3/glycans (initially defined by PGT121-128 antibodies) are targets of broadly neutralizing antibodies and potential targets for anti-HIV-1 antibody-based vaccines. Recent evidence shows that antibodies with moderate neutralization breadth are frequently attainable, with 50% of sera from chronically infected individuals neutralizing ≥ 50% of a large, diverse set of viruses. Nonetheless, there is little systematic information addressing which specificities are preferentially targeted among such commonly found, moderately broadly neutralizing sera. We explored associations between neutralization breadth and potency and the presence of neutralizing antibodies targeting the MPER, V2/glycan site, and V3/glycans in sera from 177 antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected (>1 year) individuals. Recognition of both MPER and V3/glycans was associated with increased breadth and potency. MPER-recognizing sera neutralized 4.62 more panel viruses than MPER-negative sera (95% prediction interval [95% PI], 4.41 to 5.20), and V3/glycan-recognizing sera neutralized 3.24 more panel viruses than V3/glycan-negative sera (95% PI, 3.15 to 3.52). In contrast, V2/glycan site-recognizing sera neutralized only 0.38 more panel viruses (95% PI, 0.20 to 0.45) than V2/glycan site-negative sera and no association between V2/glycan site recognition and breadth or potency was observed. Despite autoreactivity of many neutralizing antibodies recognizing MPER and V3/glycans, antibodies to these sites are major contributors to neutralization breadth and potency in this cohort. It may therefore be appropriate to focus on developing immunogens based upon the MPER and V3/glycans. Previous candidate HIV vaccines have failed either to induce wide-coverage neutralizing antibodies or to substantially protect vaccinees. Therefore, current efforts focus on novel approaches never before

  13. An anti-HIV-1 V3 loop antibody fully protects cross-clade and elicits T-cell immunity in macaques mucosally challenged with an R5 clade C SHIV.

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    Jennifer D Watkins

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutralizing antibodies have been shown to protect macaques against SHIV challenge. However, genetically diverse HIV-1 clades have evolved, and a key question left unanswered is whether neutralizing antibodies can confer cross-clade protection in vivo. The novel human monoclonal antibody HGN194 was isolated from an individual infected with an HIV-1 clade AG recombinant circulating recombinant form (CRF. HGN194 targets an epitope in the third hypervariable loop (V3 of HIV-1 gp120 and neutralizes a range of relatively neutralization-sensitive and resistant viruses. We evaluated the potential of HGN194 to protect infant rhesus monkeys against a SHIV encoding a primary CCR5-tropic HIV-1 clade C envelope. After high-dose mucosal challenge, all untreated controls became highly viremic while all HGN194-treated animals (50 mg/kg were completely protected. When HGN194 was given at 1 mg/kg, one out of two monkeys remained aviremic, whereas the other had delayed, lower peak viremia. Interestingly, all protected monkeys given high-dose HGN194 developed Gag-specific proliferative responses of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. To test whether generation of the latter involved cryptic infection, we ablated CD8+ cells after HGN194 clearance. No viremia was detected in any protected monkeys, thus ruling out virus reservoirs. Thus, induction of CD8 T-cell immunity may have resulted from transient "Hit and Run" infection or cross priming via Ag-Ab-mediated cross-presentation. Together, our data identified the HGN194 epitope as protective and provide proof-of-concept that this anti-V3 loop mAb can prevent infection with sterilizing immunity after challenge with virus of a different clade, implying that V3 is a potential vaccine target.

  14. Anti-HIV-1 activity of eight monofloral Iranian honey types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z. multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P. sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies.

  15. Anti-HIV-1 activity of eight monofloral Iranian honey types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Behbahani

    Full Text Available Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50 values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z. multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P. sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and anti-HIV-1 efficacy of negatively charged human serum albumins in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, M E; Swart, P J; Schutten, Martin; Smit, C; Proost, J H; Osterhaus, A D; Meijer, D K

    Negatively charged albumins (NCAs, with the prototypes succinylated human serum albumin (Suc-HSA) and aconitylated human serum albumin (Aco-HSA)), modified proteins with a potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (anti-HIV-1) activity in vitro, were studied for their pharmacokinetic behaviour

  17. Photo-translocation of anti-HIV-1 drugs into TZM-bl cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khanyile, T

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Targeted drug delivery into HIV-1 infected cells offers a reduction in toxicity and side effect. Using a femtosecond (fs) laser of different beam shapes anti-HIV-1 drugs are efficiently delivered into TZM-bl cells....

  18. New anti-HIV-1, antimalarial, and antifungal compounds from Terminalia bellerica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsaraj, R.; Pushpangadan, P.; Wagner Smitt, U.

    1997-01-01

    A bioactivity-guided fractionation of an extract of Terminalia bellerica fruit rind led to the isolation of two new lignans named termilignan (1) and thannilignan (2), together with 7-hydroxy-3',4'-(methylenedioxy)flavan (3) and anolignan B (4). All four compounds possessed demonstrable anti-HIV-1...

  19. Cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 caged xanthones from the resin and fruits of Garcinia hanburyi.

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    Reutrakul, Vichai; Anantachoke, Natthinee; Pohmakotr, Manat; Jaipetch, Thaworn; Sophasan, Samaisukh; Yoosook, Chalobon; Kasisit, Jittra; Napaswat, Chanita; Santisuk, Thawatchai; Tuchinda, Patoomratana

    2007-01-01

    Three new caged xanthones, 7-methoxydesoxymorellin (1), 2-isoprenylforbesione (2) and 8,8a-epoxymorellic acid (3), together with nine known caged xanthones were isolated from the EtOAc extracts of resin and fruits of Garcinia hanburyi. The structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. Most of the isolated compounds showed significant cytotoxicities against a panel of mammalian cancer cell lines. Compound 3, together with the known compounds desoxymorellin, morellic acid, gambogic acid, hanburin, forbesione and dihydroisomorellin, exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity in the reverse transcriptase (RT) assay while the known compounds desoxygambogenin and dihydroisomorellin were found moderately active in the syncytium assay. This work represents the first report on the anti-HIV-1 activities of caged xanthones.

  20. 7,8-secolignans from Schisandra neglecta and their anti-HIV-1 activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xuemei; Mu, Huaixue; Hu, Qiufen, E-mail: huqiufena@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Chemistry in Ethnic Medicinal Resources, State Ethnic Affairs Commission and Ministry of Education, Yunnan University of Nationalities (China); Wang, Ruirui; Yang, Liumeng; Zheng, Yongtang [Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Sun, Handong; Xiao, Weilie, E-mail: xwl@mail.kib.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China)

    2012-10-15

    Four new 7,8-secolignans (neglectahenols A-D), together with two known 7,8-secolignans, were isolated from leaves and stems of Schisandra neglecta. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including extensive one and two dimension NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) techniques. 7,8-Secolignans and neglectahenols A-D were also tested for their anti-HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) activities, and all of them showed modest activities. (author)

  1. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of the aqueous extract of Asterina pectinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadeniz, Fatih; Karagozlu, Mustafa Zafer; Kong, Chang-Suk; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2011-03-01

    An aqueous extract of starfish, Asterina pectinifera, was investigated for its anti-HIV-1 efficiency in vitro on human T-cell lines. A. pectinifera significantly maintained the viability of HIV-infected cells as much as 86% of the untreated infected control cells at the non-toxic concentrations (0.05~4 mg/mL) in CEM-SS cells. Anti-HIV-1 activity of A. pectinifera extract was further supported by quantification of syncytia formation, reverse transcriptase activity and Western blot analysis in C8166, CEM-SS and H9 cells, respectively. Current results demonstrated a notable inhibition of HIV-1 induced syncytia formation and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity assay with EC50 of 0.71 mg/mL and 0.65 mg/mL, respectively. Moreover, A. pectinifera extract treatment decreased the production of p24 protein and gene expression of HIV-1 viral infection factor in a dose-dependent manner according to immunoblot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. In the light of current study, it can be concluded that A. pectinifera contains highly potential anti-HIV-1 components and a further investigation for active compound isolation is urged.

  2. A duodenally absorbable CXC chemokine receptor 4 antagonist, KRH-1636, exhibits a potent and selective anti-HIV-1 activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyama, Kozi; Yokoyama-Kumakura, Sei; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Tanaka, Reiko; Hirose, Kunitaka; Bannai, Kenji; Edamatsu, Takeo; Yanaka, Mikiro; Niitani, Yoshiaki; Miyano-Kurosaki, Naoko; Takaku, Hiroshi; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2003-01-01

    A low molecular weight nonpeptide compound, KRH-1636, efficiently blocked replication of various T cell line-tropic (X4) HIV type 1 (HIV-1) in MT-4 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells through the inhibition of viral entry and membrane fusion via the CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)4 coreceptor but not via CC chemokine receptor 5. It also inhibited binding of the CXC chemokine, stromal cell-derived factor 1α, to CXCR4 specifically and subsequent signal transduction. KRH-1636 prevented monoclonal antibodies from binding to CXCR4 without down-modulation of the coreceptor. The inhibitory effect against X4 viral replication by KRH-1636 was clearly reproduced in the human peripheral blood lymphocyte/severe combined immunodeficiency mouse system. Furthermore, this compound was absorbed into the blood after intraduodenal administration as judged by anti-HIV-1 activity and liquid chromatography MS in the plasma. Thus, KRH-1636 seems to be a promising agent for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:12642669

  3. Anti-HIV-1 B cell responses are dependent on B cell precursor frequency and antigen-binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosenovic, Pia; Kara, Ervin E; Pettersson, Anna-Klara; McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew; Hartweger, Harald; Thientosapol, Eddy S; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2018-04-16

    The discovery that humans can produce potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to several different epitopes on the HIV-1 spike has reinvigorated efforts to develop an antibody-based HIV-1 vaccine. Antibody cloning from single cells revealed that nearly all bNAbs show unusual features that could help explain why it has not been possible to elicit them by traditional vaccination and instead would require a sequence of different immunogens. This idea is supported by experiments with genetically modified immunoglobulin (Ig) knock-in mice. Sequential immunization with a series of specifically designed immunogens was required to shepherd the development of bNAbs. However, knock-in mice contain superphysiologic numbers of bNAb precursor-expressing B cells, and therefore how these results can be translated to a more physiologic setting remains to be determined. Here we make use of adoptive transfer experiments using knock-in B cells that carry a synthetic intermediate in the pathway to anti-HIV-1 bNAb development to examine how the relationship between B cell receptor affinity and precursor frequency affects germinal center (GC) B cell recruitment and clonal expansion. Immunization with soluble HIV-1 antigens can recruit bNAb precursor B cells to the GC when there are as few as 10 such cells per mouse. However, at low precursor frequencies, the extent of clonal expansion is directly proportional to the affinity of the antigen for the B cell receptor, and recruitment to GCs is variable and dependent on recirculation.

  4. Anti-HIV-1 activity of a new scorpion venom peptide derivative Kn2-7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoqing Chen

    Full Text Available For over 30 years, HIV/AIDS has wreaked havoc in the world. In the absence of an effective vaccine for HIV, development of new anti-HIV agents is urgently needed. We previously identified the antiviral activities of the scorpion-venom-peptide-derived mucroporin-M1 for three RNA viruses (measles viruses, SARS-CoV, and H5N1. In this investigation, a panel of scorpion venom peptides and their derivatives were designed and chosen for assessment of their anti-HIV activities. A new scorpion venom peptide derivative Kn2-7 was identified as the most potent anti-HIV-1 peptide by screening assays with an EC(50 value of 2.76 µg/ml (1.65 µM and showed low cytotoxicity to host cells with a selective index (SI of 13.93. Kn2-7 could inhibit all members of a standard reference panel of HIV-1 subtype B pseudotyped virus (PV with CCR5-tropic and CXCR4-tropic NL4-3 PV strain. Furthermore, it also inhibited a CXCR4-tropic replication-competent strain of HIV-1 subtype B virus. Binding assay of Kn2-7 to HIV-1 PV by Octet Red system suggested the anti-HIV-1 activity was correlated with a direct interaction between Kn2-7 and HIV-1 envelope. These results demonstrated that peptide Kn2-7 could inhibit HIV-1 by direct interaction with viral particle and may become a promising candidate compound for further development of microbicide against HIV-1.

  5. Role of seminal plasma in the anti-HIV-1 activity of candidate microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of microbicides for prevention of HIV-1 infection in macaque models for vaginal infection has indicated that the concentrations of active compounds needed for protection by far exceed levels sufficient for complete inhibition of infection in vitro. These experiments were done in the absence of seminal plasma (SP, a vehicle for sexual transmission of the virus. To gain insight into the possible effect of SP on the performance of selected microbicides, their anti-HIV-1 activity in the presence, and absence of SP, was determined. Methods The inhibitory activity of compounds against the X4 virus, HIV-1 IIIB, and the R5 virus, HIV-1 BaL was determined using TZM-bl indicator cells and quantitated by measuring β-galactosidase induced by infection. The virucidal properties of cellulose acetate 1,2-benzene-dicarboxylate (CAP, the only microbicide provided in water insoluble, micronized form, in the presence of SP was measured. Results The HIV-1 inhibitory activity of the polymeric microbicides, poly(naphthalene sulfonate, cellulose sulfate, carrageenan, CAP (in soluble form and polystyrene sulfonate, respectively, was considerably (range ≈ 4 to ≈ 73-fold diminished in the presence of SP (33.3%. Formulations of micronized CAP, providing an acidic buffering system even in the presence of an SP volume excess, effectively inactivated HIV-1 infectivity. Conclusion The data presented here suggest that the in vivo efficacy of polymeric microbicides, acting as HIV-1 entry inhibitors, might become at least partly compromised by the inevitable presence of SP. These possible disadvantages could be overcome by combining the respective polymers with acidic pH buffering systems (built-in for formulations of micronized CAP or with other anti-HIV-1 compounds, the activity of which is not affected by SP, e.g. reverse transcriptase and zinc finger inhibitors.

  6. Anti-HIV-1 activity of combinations and covalent conjugates of negatively charged human serum albumins (NCAs) and AZT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, M.E; Swart, P.J; Witvrouw, M; Esté, J.A; Reymen, D; De Clercq, E; Meijer, D.K F

    1999-01-01

    Negatively charged albumins (NCAs, with the prototypes Suc-HSA and Aco-HSA), modified proteins with a potent anti-HIV-1 activity in the nanomolar concentration range, were studied for several aspects of their antiviral mechanism. In addition we investigated the antiviral activity of combinations and

  7. Comparative pharmacokinetic, immunologic and hematologic studies on the anti-HIV-1/2 compounds aconitylated and succinylated HSA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, P. J.; Beljaars, E.; Smit, C.; Pasma, A.; Schuitemaker, H.; Meijer, D. K.

    1996-01-01

    Charge modification by succinylation or cis-aconitylation of the terminal epsilon NH2 functions of the amino acid lysine in human serum albumin, resulted in polyanionic compounds with an anti-HIV-1 activity in the low nanomolar concentration range. After iv injections in rats of the negatively

  8. Anti-HIV-1 integrase compounds from Dioscorea bulbifera and molecular docking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaniad, Prapaporn; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Pianwanit, Somsak; Tewtrakul, Supinya

    2016-01-01

    Dioscorea bulbifera L. (Dioscoreaceae) has been used in a traditional Thai longevity medicine preparation. Isolation of inhibitors from natural products is a potential source for continuous development of new HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors. The objective of this study is to isolate the compounds and evaluate their anti-HIV-1 IN activity, as well as to predict the potential interactions of the compounds with an IN. The ethyl acetate and water fractions (1-100 μg/mL) of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils were isolated and tested for their anti-HIV-1 IN activity using the multiplate integration assay (MIA). The interactions of the active compounds with IN were investigated using a molecular docking method. The ethyl acetate and water fractions of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils afforded seven compounds. Among these, allantoin (1), 2,4,3',5'-tetrahydroxybibenzyl (2), and 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-2-styrylchromone (5) were isolated for the first time from this plant. Myricetin (4) exhibited the most potent activity with an IC50 value of 3.15 μM, followed by 2,4,6,7-tetrahydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (3, IC50 value= 14.20 μM), quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6, IC50 value = 19.39 μM) and quercetin-3-O-β-D-galactopyranoside (7, IC50 value = 21.80 μM). Potential interactions of the active compounds (3, 4, 6, and 7) with the IN active site were additionally investigated. Compound 4 showed the best binding affinity to IN and formed strong interactions with various amino acid residues. These compounds interacted with Asp64, Thr66, His67, Glu92, Asp116, Gln148, Glu152, Asn155, and Lys159, which are involved in both the 3'-processing and strand transfer reactions of IN. In particular, galloyl, catechol, and sugar moieties were successful inhibitors for HIV-1 IN.

  9. Anti-HIV-1 cycloartanes from leaves and twigs of Gardenia thailandica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Saiai, Aroonchai; Pohmakotr, Manat; Yoosook, Chalobon; Kasisit, Jittra; Napaswat, Chanita; Santisuk, Thawatchai; Reutrakul, Vichai

    2004-04-01

    Thailandiol ( 1), gardenolic acid A ( 2), quadrangularic acid E ( 3) and 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha-cycloart-24(31)-en-28-oic acid ( 4) have been isolated from the leaves and twigs of Gardenia thailandica Tirveng (order: Rubiales; family: Rubiaceae). In addition, 5-hydroxy-7,2',3',4',5',6'-hexamethoxyflavone ( 5), 5,7-dihydroxy-2',3', 4',5',6'-pentamethoxyflavone ( 6), 5-hydroxy-7,2',3',4',5'-pentamethoxyflavone ( 7) and 5,7-dihydroxy-2',3',4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone ( 8) were also isolated from the same source. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Crude extracts and compounds 1 - 4 displayed anti-HIV-1 activities as determined by using the (Delta)(Tat/Rev)MC99 virus and 1A2 cell line system. The EC (50) values determined by the syncytium assay ranged from < 7.8 to 110 microg/mL. They also exhibited moderate to high activities in reverse transcriptase (RT) assay; the IC (50) values of compounds 1 - 4, ranged from < 22.5 to 156.8 microg/mL.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies AC-43 and AC-29 disrupt Plasmodium vivax ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Therefore, these glycoproteins appear to be potential candidates for a vector- directed transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV). [Chugh M, Gulati B R and Gakhar S K 2010 Monoclonal antibodies AC-43 and AC-29 disrupt Plasmodium vivax development in the Indian malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies (Diptera: culicidae); J.

  11. Aaptamine Derivatives with Antifungal and Anti-HIV-1 Activities from the South China Sea Sponge Aaptos aaptos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Bing Yu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Five new alkaloids of aaptamine family, compounds (1–5 and three known derivatives (6–8, have been isolated from the South China Sea sponge Aaptos aaptos. The structures of all compounds were unambiguously elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, as well as by comparison with the literature data. Compounds 1–2 are characterized with triazapyrene lactam skeleton, whereas compounds 4–5 share an imidazole-fused aaptamine moiety. These compounds were evaluated in antifungal and anti-HIV-1 assays. Compounds 3, 7, and 8 showed antifungal activity against six fungi, with MIC values in the range of 4 to 64 μg/mL. Compounds 7–8 exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity, with inhibitory rates of 88.0% and 72.3%, respectively, at a concentration of 10 μM.

  12. Human antibodies and fusion proteins as HIV-1 therapeutic | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Available for licensing from the NCI are novel human anti-HIV-1 domain antibodies and their fusion proteins for anti-HIV-1 antibodies and anti-retroviral as therapeutics and/or preventatives for infection by different HIV-1 strains.

  13. Qualitative and quantitative intravaginal targeting: Key to anti-HIV-1 microbicide delivery from test tube to in vivo success

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pillay, V

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available MASHINGAIDZE,1 YAHYA E. CHOONARA,1 LISA C. DU TOIT,1 ECKHART BUCHMANN,2 VINESH MAHARAJ,3 VALENCE M. K. NDESENDO,4 PRADEEP KUMAR1 1Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Parktown, 2193..., Pretoria, South Africa 4School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, St. John?s University of Tanzania, Dodoma, Tanzania ABSTRACT: The past decade has seen several effective anti-HIV-1 agent discoveries, yet microbicides continue to disappoint...

  14. Enhanced anti-HIV-1 activity of G-quadruplexes comprising locked nucleic acids and intercalating nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Nielsen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Two G-quadruplex forming sequences, 50-TGGGAG and the 17-mer sequence T30177, which exhibit anti-HIV-1 activity on cell lines, were modified using either locked nucleic acids (LNA) or via insertions of (R)-1-O-(pyren-1-ylmethyl)glycerol (intercalating nucleic acid, INA) or (R)-1-O-[4-(1-pyrenylet......Two G-quadruplex forming sequences, 50-TGGGAG and the 17-mer sequence T30177, which exhibit anti-HIV-1 activity on cell lines, were modified using either locked nucleic acids (LNA) or via insertions of (R)-1-O-(pyren-1-ylmethyl)glycerol (intercalating nucleic acid, INA) or (R)-1-O-[4......-(1-pyrenylethynyl)phenylmethyl]glycerol (twisted intercalating nucleic acid, TINA). Incorporation of LNA or INA/TINA monomers provide as much as 8-fold improvement of anti-HIV-1 activity. We demonstrate for the first time a detailed analysis of the effect the incorporation of INA/TINA monomers in quadruplex forming...... of the antiviral QFOs in the present study formed more thermally stable G-quadruplexes and also high-order G-quadruplex structures which might be responsible for the increased antiviral activity observed....

  15. Diarylpyrimidine-dihydrobenzyloxopyrimidine hybrids: new, wide-spectrum anti-HIV-1 agents active at (sub)-nanomolar level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotili, Dante; Tarantino, Domenico; Artico, Marino; Nawrozkij, Maxim B; Gonzalez-Ortega, Emmanuel; Clotet, Bonaventura; Samuele, Alberta; Esté, José A; Maga, Giovanni; Mai, Antonello

    2011-04-28

    Here, we describe a novel small series of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) that combine peculiar structural features of diarylpyrimidines (DAPYs) and dihydro-alkoxy-benzyl-oxopyrimidines (DABOs). These DAPY-DABO hybrids (1-4) showed a characteristic SAR profile and a nanomolar anti-HIV-1 activity at both enzymatic and cellular level. In particular, the two compounds 4d and 2d, with a (sub)nanomolar activity against wild-type and clinically relevant HIV-1 mutant strains, were selected as lead compounds for next optimization studies.

  16. Molecular cloning and anti-HIV-1 activities of APOBEC3s from northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Song, Jia-Hao; Pang, Wei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-07-18

    Northern pig-tailed macaques (NPMs, Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection largely due to the loss of HIV-1-restricting factor TRIM5α. However, great impediments still exist in the persistent replication of HIV-1 in vivo, suggesting some viral restriction factors are reserved in this host. The APOBEC3 proteins have demonstrated a capacity to restrict HIV-1 replication, but their inhibitory effects in NPMs remain elusive. In this study, we cloned the NPM A3A-A3H genes, and determined by BLAST searching that their coding sequences (CDSs) showed 99% identity to the corresponding counterparts from rhesus and southern pig-tailed macaques. We further analyzed the anti-HIV-1 activities of the A3A-A3H genes, and found that A3G and A3F had the greatest anti-HIV-1 activity compared with that of other members. The results of this study indicate that A3G and A3F might play critical roles in limiting HIV-1 replication in NPMs in vivo. Furthermore, this research provides valuable information for the optimization of monkey models of HIV-1 infection.

  17. Anti-HIV-1 activity of flavonoid myricetin on HIV-1 infection in a dual-chamber in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Pasetto

    Full Text Available HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01-100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic, H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic, and the dual tropic (X4R5 HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research.

  18. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  19. Fluorine Substituted 1,2,4-Triazinones as Potential Anti-HIV-1 and CDK2 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S. I. Makki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine substituted 1,2,4-triazinones have been synthesized via alkylation, amination, and/or oxidation of 6-(2-amino-5-fluorophenyl-3-thioxo-3,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-5(2H-one 1 and 4-fluoro-N-(4-fluoro-2-(5-oxo-3-thioxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1,2,4-triazin-6-ylphenylbenzamide 5 as possible anti-HIV-1 and CDK2 inhibitors. Alkylation on positions 2 and 4 in 1,2,4-triazinone gave compounds 6–8. Further modification was performed by selective alkylation and amination on position 3 to form compounds 9–15. However oxidation of 5 yielded compounds 16–18. Structures of the target compounds have been established by spectral analysis data. Five compounds (5, 11, 14, 16, and 17 have shown very good anti-HIV activity in MT-4 cells. Similarly, five compounds (1, 3, and 14–16 have exhibited very significant CDK2 inhibition activity. Compounds 14 and 16 were found to have dual anti-HIV and anticancer activities.

  20. DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitory and anti-HIV-1 flavones from leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkum, Naowarat; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Pohmakotr, Manat; Reutrakul, Vichai; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Yoosook, Chalobon; Kasisit, Jitra; Napaswad, Chanita

    2012-03-01

    Four new flavones, 5,2'-dihydroxy-7,3',4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (1), 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-7,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (2), 5,7,2',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (3) and 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (4), along with the known 5,3'-dihydroxy-6,7,4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (5), 5,7,3',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,4'-dimethoxyflavone (6), syringaldehyde, vanillic acid and scopoletin were isolated from the leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata (Rubiaceae). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. Flavone 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity against P-388 and MCF-7 cell lines, while 3, 5 and 6 were active only in P-388 cell line. All active compounds were found to inhibit DNA topoisomerase IIα activity, which may be responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. Flavones 1-3, 5 and 6 also exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity in the anti-syncytium assay using (∆Tat/rev)MC99 virus and 1A2 cell line system; 2 was most potent. Only flavones 1 and 6 showed considerably activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Qualitative and quantitative intravaginal targeting: key to anti-HIV-1 microbicide delivery from test tube to in vivo success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Viness; Mashingaidze, Felix; Choonara, Yahya E; Du Toit, Lisa C; Buchmann, Eckhart; Maharaj, Vinesh; Ndesendo, Valence M K; Kumar, Pradeep

    2012-06-01

    The past decade has seen several effective anti-HIV-1 agent discoveries, yet microbicides continue to disappoint clinically. Our review expounds the view that unsatisfactory microbicide failures may be a result of inefficient delivery systems employed. We hereby propose a thorough scientific qualitative and quantitative investigation of important aspects involved in HIV-1 transmission as a prerequisite for microbicide delivery. Intravaginal targeting of HIV-1 increases the chances of microbicide success, wherein vaginal microenvironmental factors including pH should be maintained at HIV-1 prohibitive acidic levels simultaneously to ward off other sexually transmitted diseases, which compromise vaginal epithelial barrier properties. Furthermore, choice of receptors to target both on HIV-1 and on target cells is vital in deterring transmission. Appropriate modeling of virus-target cell interactions as well as targeting early stages of the HIV-1 infection accompanied by computation and delivery of appropriate microbicide quantities could revolutionize microbicide research, ultimately delivering a female-controlled HIV-1 prevention modality appropriately. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Anti-HIV-1 activity and structure-activity-relationship study of a fucosylated glycosaminoglycan from an echinoderm by targeting the conserved CD4 induced epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Wu; Wu, Mingyi; Huang, Ning; Gao, Na; Xiao, Chuang; Li, Zi; Zhang, Zhigang; Zheng, Yongtang; Peng, Wenlie; Zhao, Jinhua

    2013-10-01

    Fucosylated glycosaminoglycan (FG) is a novel glycosaminoglycan with a chondroitin sulfate-like backbone and fucose sulfate branches. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of FG for combating HIV-1 infection. Anti-HIV activities of FGs were assessed by a cytopathic effect assay and an HIV-1 p24 detection assay. The biomolecule interactions were explored via biolayer interferometry technology. The SAR was established by comparing its anti-HIV-1 activities, conserved CD4 induced (CD4i) epitope-dependent interactions and anticoagulant activities. FG efficiently and selectively inhibited the X4- and R5X4-tropic HIV-1 infections in C8166 cells with little cytotoxicity against C8166 cells and PBMCs. Our data indicated that FG bound to gp120 with nanomolar affinity and may interact with CD4i of gp120. Additionally, the CD4i binding affinity of FG was higher than that of dextran sulfate. SAR studies suggested that the unique sulfated fucose branches account for the anti-HIV-1 activity. The molecular size and present carboxyl groups of FG may also play important roles in various activities. Notably, several FG derivatives showed higher anti-HIV-1 activities and much lower anticoagulant activities than those of heparin. FG exhibits strong activity against X4- and R5X4-tropic HIV-1 infections. The mechanism may be related to targeting CD4i of gp120, which results in inhibition of HIV-1 entry. The carboxyl group substituted derivatives of FG (8.5-12.8kDa), might display high anti-HIV-1 activity and low anticoagulant activity. Our data supports further the investigation of FG derivatives as novel HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting CD4i. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine enhances anti-HIV-1 immune responses in patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Frank Y; Tung, Jack K; Pallikkuth, Suresh; Pahwa, Savita; Fischl, Margaret A

    2016-04-27

    HIV-1 specific cellular immunity plays an important role in controlling viral replication. In this first-in-human therapeutic vaccination study, a replication-defective HIV-1 vaccine (HIVAX) was tested in HIV-1 infected participants undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to enhance anti-HIV immunity (Clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT01428596). A010 was a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the safety and the immunogenicity of a replication defective HIV-1 vaccine (HIVAX) given as a subcutaneous injection to HIV-1 infected participants who were receiving HAART with HIV-1 viral load 500 cells/mm(3). HIV-1 specific immune responses were monitored by INF-γ enzyme linked immunospot (Elispot) and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assay after vaccination. Following the randomized placebo-controlled vaccination phase, subjects who received HIVAX vaccine and who met eligibility underwent a 12-week analytical antiretroviral treatment interruption (ATI). Viral load was monitored throughout the study. HIVAX was well tolerated in trial participants. Transient grade 1 to 2 (mild to moderate) injection site reactions occurred in 8 of 10 vaccinated participants. HIVAX was immunogenic in all vaccinated participants. The functionality of T cells was significantly enhanced after vaccination. Median viral load (3.45 log10 copies/ml, range of 96-12,830 copies/ml) at the end of the 12-week treatment interruption in HIVAX vaccinated group was significantly lower than the pre-treatment levels. Three vaccinated participants extended ATI for up to 2 years with stable CD4 cells and low viral loads. HIVAX vaccine is generally safe, elicits strong anti-HIV-1 immune responses, and may play an important role in controlling viral load during treatment interruption in HIV-1 infected participants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of anti-HIV-1 activity of a new iridoid glycoside isolated from Avicenna marina, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-11-01

    This study was carried out to check the efficacy of methanol seed extract of Avicenna marina and its column chromatographic fractions on Peripheral Blood Mono nuclear Cells (PBMCs) toxicity and HIV-1 replication. The anti-HIV-1 activities of crude methanol extract and its fractions were performed by use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and HIV-1 p24 antigen kit. A time of drug addiction approach was also done to identify target of anti-HIV compound. The activity of the extracts on CD4, CD3, CD19 and CD45 expression in lymphocytes population was performed by use of flow cytometry. The most active anti-HIV agent was detected by spectroscopic analysis as 2'-O-(4-methoxycinnamoyl) mussaenosidic acid. The apparent effective concentrations for 50% virus replication (EC50) of methanol extract and iridoid glycoside were 45 and 0.1 μg/ml respectively. The iridoid glycoside also did not have any observable effect on the proportion of CD4, CD3, CD19 and CD45 cells or on the intensity of their expressions on PBMCs. In addition, the expression level of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) and chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) on CD4(+) T cells were decreased in cells treated with this iridoid glycoside. The reduction of these two HIV coreceptors and the result of time of addition study demonstrated that this iridoid glycoside restricts HIV-1 replication on the early stage of HIV infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Cinnamon-Derived Procyanidin Compound Displays Anti-HIV-1 Activity by Blocking Heparan Sulfate- and Co-Receptor- Binding Sites on gp120 and Reverses T Cell Exhaustion via Impeding Tim-3 and PD-1 Upregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridgette Janine Connell

    Full Text Available Amongst the many strategies aiming at inhibiting HIV-1 infection, blocking viral entry has been recently recognized as a very promising approach. Using diverse in vitro models and a broad range of HIV-1 primary patient isolates, we report here that IND02, a type A procyanidin polyphenol extracted from cinnamon, that features trimeric and pentameric forms displays an anti-HIV-1 activity against CXCR4 and CCR5 viruses with 1-7 μM ED50 for the trimer. Competition experiments, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding assay, revealed that IND02 inhibited envelope binding to CD4 and heparan sulphate (HS as well as to an antibody (mAb 17b directed against the gp120 co-receptor binding site with an IC50 in the low μM range. IND02 has thus the remarkable property of simultaneously blocking gp120 binding to its major host cell surface counterparts. Additionally, the IND02-trimer impeded up-regulation of the inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 on CD4+ and CD8+ cells, thereby demonstrating its beneficial effect by limiting T cell exhaustion. Among naturally derived products significantly inhibiting HIV-1, the IND02-trimer is the first component demonstrating an entry inhibition property through binding to the viral envelope glycoprotein. These data suggest that cinnamon, a widely consumed spice, could represent a novel and promising candidate for a cost-effective, natural entry inhibitor for HIV-1 which can also down-modulate T cell exhaustion markers Tim-3 and PD-1.

  6. Association of serum levels of anti-myeloperoxidase antibody with retinal photoreceptor ellipsoid zone disruption in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shivani; Saxena, Sandeep; Prasad, Senthamizh; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Bhasker, Shashi Kumar; Das, Siddharth; Krasnik, Vladimir; Caprnda, Martin; Opatrilova, Radka; Kruzliak, Peter

    2017-05-01

    To study the association of serum levels of anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) antibody with retinal photoreceptor ellipsoid zone (EZ) disruption in diabetic retinopathy. Consecutive patients with type 2 DM [diabetes mellitus with no retinopathy (NODR; n=20); non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR; n=18); proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR; n=16)] and healthy controls (n=20) between the ages of 40 and 65years were included. Disruption of EZ was graded by spectral domain optical coherence tomography as no disruption of EZ and disrupted EZ. The serum levels of anti-MPO antibody was analyzed using standard protocol. Association between the variables was evaluated using multiple regression analysis. A significant difference was found between the serum levels of anti-MPO antibody in various study groups (pdisruption and levels of anti-MPO antibody [adjusted odd's ratio (AOR)=1.079, CI 1.010-1.124, p=0.04]. A significant positive correlation was found between logMAR visual acuity and grade of disruption (AOR=1.008, CI 1.006-5.688, p=0.04). An increased serum anti-MPO antibody levels is associated with retinal photoreceptor EZ disruption and decreased visual acuity in diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Presence and Anti-HIV-1 Function of Tenascin C in Breast Milk and Genital Fluids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin G Mansour

    Full Text Available Tenascin-C (TNC is a newly identified innate HIV-1-neutralizing protein present in breast milk, yet its presence and potential HIV-inhibitory function in other mucosal fluids is unknown. In this study, we identified TNC as a component of semen and cervical fluid of HIV-1-infected and uninfected individuals, although it is present at a significantly lower concentration and frequency compared to that of colostrum and mature breast milk, potentially due to genital fluid protease degradation. However, TNC was able to neutralize HIV-1 after exposure to low pH, suggesting that TNC could be active at low pH in the vaginal compartment. As mucosal fluids are complex and contain a number of proteins known to interact with the HIV-1 envelope, we further studied the relationship between the concentration of TNC and neutralizing activity in breast milk. The amount of TNC correlated only weakly with the overall innate HIV-1-neutralizing activity of breast milk of uninfected women and negatively correlated with neutralizing activity in milk of HIV-1 infected women, indicating that the amount of TNC in mucosal fluids is not adequate to impede HIV-1 transmission. Moreover, the presence of polyclonal IgG from milk of HIV-1 infected women, but not other HIV-1 envelope-binding milk proteins or monoclonal antibodies, blocked the neutralizing activity of TNC. Finally, as exogenous administration of TNC would be necessary for it to mediate measurable HIV-1 neutralizing activity in mucosal compartments, we established that recombinantly produced TNC has neutralizing activity against transmitted/founder HIV-1 strains that mimic that of purified TNC. Thus, we conclude that endogenous TNC concentration in mucosal fluids is likely inadequate to block HIV-1 transmission to uninfected individuals.

  8. Disruption?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray......This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray...

  9. Crystal structure of a cross-reaction complex between an anti-HIV-1 protease antibody and an HIV-2 protease peptide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří; Lescar, J.; Fábry, Milan; Hořejší, Magdalena; Sieglová, Irena; Sedláček, Juraj; Bentley, G. A.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 3 (2005), s. 332-337 ISSN 1047-8477 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GV203/98/K023; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK5011112 Grant - others:EK(XE) QLRT-2001-02360 Keywords : single-chain Fv fragment * peptide complex * HIV protease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.490, year: 2005

  10. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamata, Masakazu, E-mail: masa3k@ucla.edu [Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kim, Patrick Y. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ng, Hwee L. [Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ringpis, Gene-Errol E.; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O' Connor, Sean [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yang, Otto O. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chen, Irvin S.Y. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8{sup +} T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8{sup +} T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24{sup Gag} in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect.

  11. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8+ T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Masakazu; Kim, Patrick Y.; Ng, Hwee L.; Ringpis, Gene-Errol E.; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O'Connor, Sean; Yang, Otto O.; Chen, Irvin S.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8 + T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8 + T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8 + T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24 Gag in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8 + T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8 + T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8 + T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8 + T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8 + T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8 + T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect

  12. Elicitation of Both Anti HIV-1 Env Humoral and Cellular Immunities by Replicating Vaccinia Prime Sendai Virus Boost Regimen and Boosting by CD40Lm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianfeng; Sobue, Tomoyoshi; Isshiki, Mao; Makino, Shun-ichi; Inoue, Makoto; Kato, Kazunori; Shioda, Tatsuo; Ohashi, Takashi; Sato, Hirotaka; Komano, Jun; Hanabusa, Hideji; Shida, Hisatoshi

    2012-01-01

    For protection from HIV-1 infection, a vaccine should elicit both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. A novel vaccine regimen and adjuvant that induce high levels of HIV-1 Env-specific T cell and antibody (Ab) responses was developed in this study. The prime-boost regimen that used combinations of replication-competent vaccinia LC16m8Δ (m8Δ) and Sendai virus (SeV) vectors expressing HIV-1 Env efficiently produced both Env-specific CD8+ T cells and anti-Env antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies (nAbs). These results sharply contrast with vaccine regimens that prime with an Env expressing plasmid and boost with the m8Δ or SeV vector that mainly elicited cellular immunities. Moreover, co-priming with combinations of m8Δs expressing Env or a membrane-bound human CD40 ligand mutant (CD40Lm) enhanced Env-specific CD8+ T cell production, but not anti-Env antibody production. In contrast, priming with an m8Δ that coexpresses CD40Lm and Env elicited more anti-Env Abs with higher avidity, but did not promote T cell responses. These results suggest that the m8Δ prime/SeV boost regimen in conjunction with CD40Lm expression could be used as an immunization platform for driving both potent cellular and humoral immunities against pathogens such as HIV-1. PMID:23236521

  13. Lignosulfonic acid exhibits broadly anti-HIV-1 activity--potential as a microbicide candidate for the prevention of HIV-1 sexual transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Qiu

    Full Text Available Some secondary metabolites from plants show to have potent inhibitory activities against microbial pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, herpes simplex virus (HSV, Treponema pallidum, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, etc. Here we report that lignosulfonic acid (LSA, a polymeric lignin derivative, exhibits potent and broad activity against HIV-1 isolates of diverse subtypes including two North America strains and a number of Chinese clinical isolates values ranging from 21.4 to 633 nM. Distinct from other polyanions, LSA functions as an entry inhibitor with multiple targets on viral gp120 as well as on host receptor CD4 and co-receptors CCR5/CXCR4. LSA blocks viral entry as determined by time-of-drug addiction and cell-cell fusion assays. Moreover, LSA inhibits CD4-gp120 interaction by blocking the binding of antibodies specific for CD4-binding sites (CD4bs and for the V3 loop of gp120. Similarly, LSA interacts with CCR5 and CXCR4 via its inhibition of specific anti-CCR5 and anti-CXCR4 antibodies, respectively. Interestingly, the combination of LSA with AZT and Nevirapine exhibits synergism in viral inhibition. For the purpose of microbicide development, LSA displays low in vitro cytotoxicity to human genital tract epithelial cells, does not stimulate NF-κB activation and has no significant up-regulation of IL-1α/β and IL-8 as compared with N-9. Lastly, LSA shows no adverse effect on the epithelial integrity and the junctional protein expression. Taken together, our findings suggest that LSA can be a potential candidate for tropical microbicide.

  14. D77, one benzoic acid derivative, functions as a novel anti-HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the interaction between integrase and cellular LEDGF/p75

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Li; Zhao Yaxue; Chen, Jing; Yang Liumeng; Zheng Yongtang; Tang Yun; Shen Xu; Jiang Hualiang

    2008-01-01

    Integration of viral-DNA into host chromosome mediated by the viral protein HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential step in the HIV-1 life cycle. In this process, Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is discovered to function as a cellular co-factor for integration. Since LEDGF/p75 plays an important role in HIV integration, disruption of the LEDGF/p75 interaction with IN has provided a special interest for anti-HIV agent discovery. In this work, we reported that a benzoic acid derivative, 4-[(5-bromo-4-{[2,4-dioxo-3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethyl) -1,3-thiazolidin-5-ylidene]methyl}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)methyl]benzoic acid (D77) could potently inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction and affect the HIV-1 IN nuclear distribution thus exhibiting antiretroviral activity. Molecular docking with site-directed mutagenesis analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding assays has clarified possible binding mode of D77 against HIV-1 integrase. As the firstly discovered small molecular compound targeting HIV-1 integrase interaction with LEDGF/p75, D77 might supply useful structural information for further anti-HIV agent discovery

  15. Anti-HIV-1 activity of cellulose acetate phthalate: synergy with soluble CD4 and induction of "dead-end" gp41 six-helix bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurath, A Robert; Strick, Nathan; Jiang, Shibo; Li, Yun-Yao; Debnath, Asim K

    2002-04-30

    Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP), a promising candidate microbicide for prevention of sexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other sexually transmitted disease (STD) pathogens, was shown to inactivate HIV-1 and to block the coreceptor binding site on the virus envelope glycoprotein gp120. It did not interfere with virus binding to CD4. Since CD4 is the primary cellular receptor for HIV-1, it was of interest to study CAP binding to HIV-1 complexes with soluble CD4 (sCD4) and its consequences, including changes in the conformation of the envelope glycoprotein gp41 within virus particles. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to study CAP binding to HIV-1-sCD4 complexes and to detect gp41 six-helix bundles accessible on virus particles using antibodies specific for the alpha-helical core domain of gp41. 1) Pretreatment of HIV-1 with sCD4 augments subsequent binding of CAP; 2) there is synergism between CAP and sCD4 for inhibition of HIV-1 infection; 3) treatment of HIV-1 with CAP induced the formation of gp41 six-helix bundles. CAP and sCD4 bind to distinct sites on HIV-1 IIIB and BaL virions and their simultaneous binding has profound effects on virus structure and infectivity. The formation of gp41 six-helical bundles, induced by CAP, is known to render the virus incompetent for fusion with target cells thus preventing infection.

  16. Anti-HIV-1 activity of cellulose acetate phthalate: Synergy with soluble CD4 and induction of "dead-end" gp41 six-helix bundles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP, a promising candidate microbicide for prevention of sexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and other sexually transmitted disease (STD pathogens, was shown to inactivate HIV-1 and to block the coreceptor binding site on the virus envelope glycoprotein gp120. It did not interfere with virus binding to CD4. Since CD4 is the primary cellular receptor for HIV-1, it was of interest to study CAP binding to HIV-1 complexes with soluble CD4 (sCD4 and its consequences, including changes in the conformation of the envelope glycoprotein gp41 within virus particles. Methods Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA were used to study CAP binding to HIV-1-sCD4 complexes and to detect gp41 six-helix bundles accessible on virus particles using antibodies specific for the α-helical core domain of gp41. Results 1 Pretreatment of HIV-1 with sCD4 augments subsequent binding of CAP; 2 there is synergism between CAP and sCD4 for inhibition of HIV-1 infection; 3 treatment of HIV-1 with CAP induced the formation of gp41 six-helix bundles. Conclusions CAP and sCD4 bind to distinct sites on HIV-1 IIIB and BaL virions and their simultaneous binding has profound effects on virus structure and infectivity. The formation of gp41 six-helical bundles, induced by CAP, is known to render the virus incompetent for fusion with target cells thus preventing infection.

  17. Structure of an anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozyme complex with a 17-mer DNA substrate analog of HIV-1 gag RNA and a mechanism for the cleavage reaction: 750 MHz NMR and computer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, R. P.; Dhingra, M. M.; Sarma, M. H.; Myer, Y. P.; Setlik, R. F.; Shibata, M.; Kazim, A. L.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.; Turner, C. J.; hide

    1997-01-01

    The structure of an anti-HIV-1 ribozyme-DNA abortive substrate complex was investigated by 750 MHz NMR and computer modeling experiments. The ribozyme was a chimeric molecule with 30 residues-18 DNA nucleotides, and 12 RNA residues in the conserved core. The DNA substrate analog had 17 residues. The chimeric ribozyme and the DNA substrate formed a shortened ribozyme-abortive substrate complex of 47 nucleotides with two DNA stems (stems I and III) and a loop consisting of the conserved core residues. Circular dichroism spectra showed that the DNA stems assume A-family conformation at the NMR concentration and a temperature of 15 degrees C, contrary to the conventional wisdom that DNA duplexes in aqueous solution populate entirely in the B-form. It is proposed that the A-family RNA residues at the core expand the A-family initiated at the core into the DNA stems because of the large free energy requirement for the formation of A/B junctions. Assignments of the base H8/H6 protons and H1' of the 47 residues were made by a NOESY walk. In addition to the methyl groups of all T's, the imino resonances of stems I and III and AH2's were assigned from appropriate NOESY walks. The extracted NMR data along with available crystallographic data, were used to derive a structural model of the complex. Stems I and III of the final model displayed a remarkable similarity to the A form of DNA; in stem III, a GC base pair was found to be moving into the floor of the minor groove defined by flanking AT pairs; data suggest the formation of a buckled rhombic structure with the adjacent pair; in addition, the base pair at the interface of stem III and the loop region displayed deformed geometry. The loop with the catalytic core, and the immediate region of the stems displayed conformational multiplicity within the NMR time scale. A catalytic mechanism for ribozyme action based on the derived structure, and consistent with biochemical data in the literature, is proposed. The complex

  18. Regulative specification of ectoderm in skeleton disrupted sea urchin embryos treated with monoclonal antibody to Pl-nectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, F; Nakano, E; Sciarrino, S; Matranga, V

    2000-10-01

    Pl-nectin is a glycoprotein first discovered in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin embryo, apically located on ectoderm and endoderm cells. The molecule has been described as functioning as an adhesive substrate for embryonic cells and its contact to ectoderm cells is essential for correct skeletogenesis. The present study was undertaken to elucidate the biochemical characteristics of Pl-nectin and to extend knowledge on its in vivo biological function. Here it is shown that the binding of mesenchyme blastula cells to Pl-nectin-coated substrates was calcium dependent, and reached its optimum at 10 mM Ca2+. Perturbation studies using monoclonal antibody (McAb) to Pl-nectin, which prevent ectoderm cell-Pl-nectin contact, show that dorsoventral axis formation and ectoderm differentiation were retarded. At later stages, embryos recovered and, even if growth and patterning of the skeleton was greatly affected, the establishment of dorsoventral asymmetry was reached. Similarly, the expression of specific ectoderm and endoderm territorial markers was achieved, although occurring with some delay. Endoderm differentiation and patterning was not obviously affected. These results suggest that both endoderm and ectoderm cells have regulative capacities and differentiation of territories is restored after a lag period. On the contrary, failure of inductive differentiation of the skeleton cannot be rescued, even though the ectoderm has recovered.

  19. A High-Affinity Native Human Antibody Disrupts Biofilm from Staphylococcus aureus Bacteria and Potentiates Antibiotic Efficacy in a Mouse Implant Infection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estellés, Angeles; Woischnig, Anne-Kathrin; Liu, Keyi; Stephenson, Robert; Lomongsod, Evelene; Nguyen, Da; Zhang, Jianzhong; Heidecker, Manfred; Yang, Yifan; Simon, Reyna J; Tenorio, Edgar; Ellsworth, Stote; Leighton, Anton; Ryser, Stefan; Gremmelmaier, Nina Khanna; Kauvar, Lawrence M

    2016-04-01

    Many serious bacterial infections are difficult to treat due to biofilm formation, which provides physical protection and induces a sessile phenotype refractory to antibiotic treatment compared to the planktonic state. A key structural component of biofilm is extracellular DNA, which is held in place by secreted bacterial proteins from the DNABII family: integration host factor (IHF) and histone-like (HU) proteins. A native human monoclonal antibody, TRL1068, has been discovered using single B-lymphocyte screening technology. It has low-picomolar affinity against DNABII homologs from important Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. The disruption of established biofilm was observedin vitroat an antibody concentration of 1.2 μg/ml over 12 h. The effect of TRL1068in vivowas evaluated in a murine tissue cage infection model in which a biofilm is formed by infection with methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus(MRSA; ATCC 43300). Treatment of the established biofilm by combination therapy of TRL1068 (15 mg/kg of body weight, intraperitoneal [i.p.] administration) with daptomycin (50 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced adherent bacterial count compared to that after daptomycin treatment alone, accompanied by significant reduction in planktonic bacterial numbers. The quantification of TRL1068 in sample matrices showed substantial penetration of TRL1068 from serum into the cage interior. TRL1068 is a clinical candidate for combination treatment with standard-of-care antibiotics to overcome the drug-refractory state associated with biofilm formation, with potential utility for a broad spectrum of difficult-to-treat bacterial infections. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Different pattern of immunoglobulin gene usage by HIV-1 compared to non-HIV-1 antibodies derived from the same infected subject.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuzhe Li

    Full Text Available A biased usage of immunoglobulin (Ig genes is observed in human anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs resulting probably from compensation to reduced usage of the VH3 family genes, while the other alternative suggests that this bias usage is due to antigen requirements. If the antigen structure is responsible for the preferential usage of particular Ig genes, it may have certain implications for HIV vaccine development by the targeting of particular Ig gene-encoded B cell receptors to induce neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies. To address this issue, we have produced HIV-1 specific and non-HIV-1 mAbs from an infected individual and analyzed the Ig gene usage. Green-fluorescence labeled virus-like particles (VLP expressing HIV-1 envelope (Env proteins of JRFL and BaL and control VLPs (without Env were used to select single B cells for the production of 68 recombinant mAbs. Ten of these mAbs were HIV-1 Env specific with neutralizing activity against V3 and the CD4 binding site, as well as non-neutralizing mAbs to gp41. The remaining 58 mAbs were non-HIV-1 Env mAbs with undefined specificities. Analysis revealed that biased usage of Ig genes was restricted only to anti-HIV-1 but not to non-HIV-1 mAbs. The VH1 family genes were dominantly used, followed by VH3, VH4, and VH5 among anti-HIV-1 mAbs, while non-HIV-1 specific mAbs preferentially used VH3 family genes, followed by VH4, VH1 and VH5 families in a pattern identical to Abs derived from healthy individuals. This observation suggests that the biased usage of Ig genes by anti-HIV-1 mAbs is driven by structural requirements of the virus antigens rather than by compensation to any depletion of VH3 B cells due to autoreactive mechanisms, according to the gp120 superantigen hypothesis.

  1. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingai, Masashi; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald; Buckler-White, Alicia; Seaman, Michael; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4+ T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected

  2. The anti-HIV-1 effect of scutellarin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Gaohong; Wang Qian; Chen Jijun; Zhang Xuemei; Tam, S.-C.; Zheng Yongtang

    2005-01-01

    Scutellarin was purified from the plant Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand.-Mazz. The activity against 3 strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was determined in vitro in this study. These were laboratory-derived virus (HIV-1 IIIB ), drug-resistant virus (HIV-1 74V ), and low-passage clinical isolated virus (HIV-1 KM018 ). From syncytia inhibition study, the EC 50 of scutellarin against HIV-1 IIIB direct infection in C8166 cells was 26 μM with a therapeutic index of 36. When the mode of infection changed from acute infection to cell-to-cell infection, this compound became even more potent and the EC 50 reduced to 15 μM. This suggested that cell fusion might be affected by this compound. By comparing the inhibitory effects on p24 antigen, scutellarin was also found to be active against HIV-1 74V (EC 50 253 μM) and HIV-1 KM018 (EC 50 136 μM) infection with significant difference in potency. The mechanism of its action was also explored in this study. At a concentration of 433 μM, scutellarin inhibited 48% of the cell free recombinant HIV-1 RT activity. It also caused 82% inhibition of HIV-1 particle attachment and 45% inhibition of fusion at the concentrations of 54 μM. In summary, scutellarin was found to inhibit several strains of HIV-1 replication with different potencies. It appeared to inhibit HIV-1 RT activity, HIV-1 particle attachment and cell fusion. These are essential activities for viral transmission and replication

  3. Evaluation of Anti-HIV-1 Mutagenic Nucleoside Analogues*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Isel, Catherine; El Safadi, Yazan; Smyth, Redmond P.; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Because of their high mutation rates, RNA viruses and retroviruses replicate close to the threshold of viability. Their existence as quasi-species has pioneered the concept of “lethal mutagenesis” that prompted us to synthesize pyrimidine nucleoside analogues with antiviral activity in cell culture consistent with an accumulation of deleterious mutations in the HIV-1 genome. However, testing all potentially mutagenic compounds in cell-based assays is tedious and costly. Here, we describe two simple in vitro biophysical/biochemical assays that allow prediction of the mutagenic potential of deoxyribonucleoside analogues. The first assay compares the thermal stabilities of matched and mismatched base pairs in DNA duplexes containing or not the nucleoside analogues as follows. A promising candidate should display a small destabilization of the matched base pair compared with the natural nucleoside and the smallest gap possible between the stabilities of the matched and mismatched base pairs. From this assay, we predicted that two of our compounds, 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine, should be mutagenic. The second in vitro reverse transcription assay assesses DNA synthesis opposite nucleoside analogues inserted into a template strand and subsequent extension of the newly synthesized base pairs. Once again, only 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine are predicted to be efficient mutagens. The predictive potential of our fast and easy first line screens was confirmed by detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by the compounds in cell culture because only compounds 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine were found to increase the mutation frequency by 3.1- and 3.4-fold, respectively. PMID:25398876

  4. Evaluation of anti-HIV-1 mutagenic nucleoside analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Isel, Catherine; El Safadi, Yazan; Smyth, Redmond P; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2015-01-02

    Because of their high mutation rates, RNA viruses and retroviruses replicate close to the threshold of viability. Their existence as quasi-species has pioneered the concept of "lethal mutagenesis" that prompted us to synthesize pyrimidine nucleoside analogues with antiviral activity in cell culture consistent with an accumulation of deleterious mutations in the HIV-1 genome. However, testing all potentially mutagenic compounds in cell-based assays is tedious and costly. Here, we describe two simple in vitro biophysical/biochemical assays that allow prediction of the mutagenic potential of deoxyribonucleoside analogues. The first assay compares the thermal stabilities of matched and mismatched base pairs in DNA duplexes containing or not the nucleoside analogues as follows. A promising candidate should display a small destabilization of the matched base pair compared with the natural nucleoside and the smallest gap possible between the stabilities of the matched and mismatched base pairs. From this assay, we predicted that two of our compounds, 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine, should be mutagenic. The second in vitro reverse transcription assay assesses DNA synthesis opposite nucleoside analogues inserted into a template strand and subsequent extension of the newly synthesized base pairs. Once again, only 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine are predicted to be efficient mutagens. The predictive potential of our fast and easy first line screens was confirmed by detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by the compounds in cell culture because only compounds 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine were found to increase the mutation frequency by 3.1- and 3.4-fold, respectively. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Cloning of Single-Chain Antibody Variants by Overlap-Extension PCR for Evaluation of Antibody Expression in Transient Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer, Patrick; Kunert, Renate

    2017-01-01

    Single-chain fragment variable-fragment crystallizable antibody constructs (scFv-Fc) are homodimeric proteins representing valuable alternatives to heterotetrameric full-length IgG molecules to study protein properties and product-dependent cellular behavior. In contrast to naturally occurring antibodies, these artificial molecules are assembled from functional antibody domains to reduce molecule complexity and enhance antibody expression levels. The scFv-Fc format retains critical antibody functions such as antigen binding affinity and antibody effector functions. Here, we present a protocol to convert the full-length anti-HIV-1 IgG1 antibody 2F5 into a scFv-Fc construct. Variable and constant regions are amplified by conventional PCR reactions and assembled by a single overlap-extension PCR reaction. The amplified product is then cloned into a mammalian expression vector suitable for high-titer transient gene expression. This workflow can be applied to any antibody sequence by adapting the specific primer sequences to the antibody of choice.

  6. Engineering and functional evaluation of a single-chain antibody against HIV-1 external glycoprotein gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H W; Cole, D; Jiang, W Z; Jin, H T; Fu, N; Chen, Z L; Jin, N Y

    2005-07-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein surface subunit gp120 is an attractive target for molecular intervention. This is because anti-HIV-1 gp120 neutralizing antibodies display the potential ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection. The present investigation describes the construction of a genetically engineered single chain antibody (scFv102) against HIV-1 gp120, its expression and functional evaluation. The parental hybridoma cell line (102) produces an immunoglobulin directed against the conserved CD4-binding region of gp120. cDNAs encoding the variable regions of the heavy (V(H)) and light (V(L)) chains were prepared by reverse transcription PCR and linked together with an oligonucleotide encoding a linker peptide (Gly(4)Ser)(3) to produce a single chain antibody gene. The resulting DNA construct was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector (pET28) and recombinant scFv102 was expressed in Eserichia coli as an insoluble protein. The denatured scFv102 was refolded and purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Purified scFv102 had the same specificity as the intact IgG in immuno-blotting assays and immuno-fluorescence (IF) detection, but ELISA analyses demonstrated the affinity of scFv102 to be 5-fold lower than that of the parental monoclonal antibody. In neutralization assays, scFv102 at concentrations lower than 40 microg/ml exhibited efficient interference with viral replication and inhibition of viral infection (90%) across a range of primary isolates of subtype B HIV-1. These results suggest that the constructed anti-HIV-1 gp120 scFv102 has good biological activity and can potentially be used for in vitro diagnostic and in vivo therapeutic applications.

  7. Investigating Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard, Stine Schmieg; Rosenstand, Claus Andreas Foss

    This book shares knowledge collected from 2015 and onward within the Consortium for Digital Disruption anchored at Aalborg University (www.dd.aau.dk). Evidenced by this publication, the field of disruptive innovation research has gone through several stages of operationalizing the theory. In recent...... years, researchers are increasingly looking back towards the origins of the theory in attempts to cure it from its most obvious flaws. This is especially true for the use of the theory in making predictions about future disruptions. In order to continue to develop a valuable theory of disruption, we...... find it useful to first review what the theory of disruptive innovation initially was, how it has developed, and where we are now. A cross section of disruptive innovation literature has been reviewed in order to form a general foundation from which we might better understand the changing world...

  8. Disruption model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Bronner, G.

    1982-07-01

    Calculations of disruption time and energy dissipation have been obtained by simulating the plasma as an electrical conducting loop that varies in resistivity, current density, major radius. The calculations provide results which are in good agreement with experimental observations. It is believed that this approach allows engineering designs for disruptions to be completed in large tokamaks such as INTOR or FED

  9. Digital Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstand, Claus Andreas Foss

    Disruption var frem til slutningen af 2016 i Danmark et ord, som kun få kendte og endnu færre havde en holdning til. Nu er der imidlertid sat fokus på begrebet fra allerhøjeste nationale sted, idet regeringen har taget initiativ til nedsættelse af det, Statsminister Lars Løkke Rasmussen indtil...... videre kalder et ”disruption-råd”. Faktisk er rådet skrevet ind i 2016 regeringsgrundlaget for VLK-regeringen. Disruption af organisationer er ikke et nyt fænomen; men hastigheden, hvormed det sker, er stadig accelererende. Årsagen er den globale mega-trend: Digitalisering. Og derfor er specielt digital...... disruption en sag for os alle. Derfor er det også for vigtigt et emne til, at det udelukkende behandles i elitære videnskabelige, industrielle og politiske kredse. Der er behov for en bredere samfundsdebat; og bogen er et forskningsbaseret bidrag ind i denne debat. For a kvalificere debatten om disruption i...

  10. Politisk disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Dette blogindlæg giver en kort analyse af hvordan de sociale medier ved at give en ny tid har åbnet for den disruption af de politiske processer som især Trump stå som et eksempel på.......Dette blogindlæg giver en kort analyse af hvordan de sociale medier ved at give en ny tid har åbnet for den disruption af de politiske processer som især Trump stå som et eksempel på....

  11. Disrupting Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff; Bazzichelli, Tatiana

    Disruptive Business explores some of the interconnections between art, activism and the business concept of disruptive innovation. With a backdrop of the crisis of financial capitalism, austerity cuts in the cultural sphere, the idea is to focus on potential art strategies in relation to a broken...... economy. In a perverse way, we ask whether this presents new opportunities for cultural producers to achieve more autonomy over their production process. If it is indeed possible, or desirable, what alternative business models emerge? The book is concerned broadly with business as material for reinvention...

  12. Sustainable Disruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Kjær, Lykke Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 the Sustainable Disruptions (SD) project at the Laboratory for Sustainability at Design School Kolding (DK) has developed and tested a set of design thinking tools, specifically targeting the barriers to economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable business development...... invested in the issue of sustainable business development, in particular the leaders and employees of SMEs, but also to design education seeking new ways to consciously handle and teach the complexity inherent in sustainable transformation. Findings indicate that the SD design thinking approach contributes....... The tools have been applied in practice in collaboration with 11 small and medium sized companies (SMEs). The study investigates these approaches to further understand how design thinking can contribute to sustainable transition in a business context. The study and the findings are relevant to organizations...

  13. Disrupted Disclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause Hansen, Hans; Uldam, Julie

    , and onongoing research in the extractive industries and social movements, this work-in-progress sets outto examine (a) why and how transparency has been constructed and mobilized in recentinternational attempts to regulate the extractive industries, specifically oil and gas companies; (b)how companies’ normal...... appearances become challenged through disruptive disclosures in mediaenvironments characterized by multiple levels of visibility, with companies both observing andbeing observed by civil society groups that criticize them; (c) why and how the mobilization aroundtransparency and ensuing practices......While projects of governance by transparency have become widespread over the past decades, theyare usually investigated and theorized in isolation from the wider field of visibility and surveillancein which they are embedded. Building on theories of governance, visibility and surveillance...

  14. Gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies are frequently elicited in ART-naïve chronically HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Carrillo

    Full Text Available Antibodies with the ability to block the interaction of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env gp120 with CD4, including those overlapping the CD4 binding site (CD4bs antibodies, can protect from infection by HIV-1, and their elicitation may be an interesting goal for any vaccination strategy. To identify gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies in plasma samples from HIV-1 infected individuals we have developed a competitive flow cytometry-based functional assay. In a cohort of treatment-naïve chronically infected patients, we showed that gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies were frequently elicited (detected in 97% plasma samples and correlated with binding to trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. However, no correlation was observed between functional CD4 binding blockade data and titer of CD4bs antibodies determined by ELISA using resurfaced gp120 proteins. Consistently, plasma samples lacking CD4bs antibodies were able to block the interaction between gp120 and its receptor, indicating that antibodies recognizing other epitopes, such as PGT126 and PG16, can also play the same role. Antibodies blocking CD4 binding increased over time and correlated positively with the capacity of plasma samples to neutralize the laboratory-adapted NL4.3 and BaL virus isolates, suggesting their potential contribution to the neutralizing workforce of plasma in vivo. Determining whether this response can be boosted to achieve broadly neutralizing antibodies may provide valuable information for the design of new strategies aimed to improve the anti-HIV-1 humoral response and to develop a successful HIV-1 vaccine.

  15. Broadly neutralizing antibodies for treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Yehuda Z; Caskey, Marina

    2018-04-24

    Several anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) with exceptional breadth and potency that target different HIV-1 envelope epitopes have been identified. bNAbs are an attractive new strategy for HIV-1 prevention and therapy, and potentially, for long-term remission or cure. Here, we discuss findings from early clinical studies that have evaluated these novel bNAbs. Phase 1 studies of bNAbs targeting two distinct HIV-1 envelope epitopes have demonstrated their favorable safety and pharmacokinetic profile. Single bNAb infusions led to significant, but transient, decline in viremia with selection of escape variants. A single bNAb also delayed viral rebound in ART-treated participants who discontinued ART. Importantly, in-vivo efficacy was related to antibody potency and to the level of preexisting resistance. Studies in animal models showed that bNAbs can clear HIV-infected cells and modulate host immune responses. These findings suggest that bNAbs may target the latent HIV reservoir in humans and could contribute to long-term remission of HIV-1 infection. bNAbs may offer advantages over traditional ART for both the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. In addition, bNAbs may target the latent viral reservoir. bNAb combinations and bNAbs engineered for prolonged half-life and increased potency are currently undergoing clinical evaluation.

  16. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... Hormones and Health › Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) EDCs Myth vs. ...

  17. Anti-HIV-1 protease activities of crude extracts of some Garcinia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-22

    Mar 22, 2010 ... indicated significant HIV-1 protease inhibition (Chen et al., 1996). Garcinia livingstoneii has been reported to produce gutifferone A, being an anti-HIV ..... Abe F, Estrada MJ, Soler C, Chilpa RR. (2004). HIV-1 inhibitory compounds from Calophyllum brasiliense leaves. Biol. Pharm. Bull. 27: 1471-1475.

  18. Anti-HIV-1 activities of the extracts from the medicinal plant Linum grandiflorum Desf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammed, Magdy M. D.; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Ibrahim, Nabaweya A.

    2009-01-01

    As part of our screening of anti-AIDS agents from natural sources e.g. Ixora undulata, Paulownia tomentosa, Fortunella margarita, Aegle marmelos and Erythrina abyssinica, the different organic and aqueous extracts of Linum grandiflorum leaves and seeds were evaluated in vitro by the microculture ...

  19. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Evaluation of New Sonogashira-Modified Emivirine (MKC-442) Analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danel, Krzystof; Jørgensen, Per Trolle; La Colla, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The MKC-442 analogue 6-(3,5-dimethylbenzyl)-5-ethyluracil substituted with a (propargyloxo)methyl group at N(1) has previously been found highly active against HIV-1. The C C bond in the substituent at N(1) is here utilized in a series of chemical reactions in order to develop new agents...... with higher activity against HIV-1-resistant mutants. The syntheses involved Pd-catalyzed C,C-coupling reactions, addition of disulfides, and click chemistry on the terminal C C bond as well as addition of bromine to the so formed internal C C bonds. Sonogashira coupling were performed with silyl...

  20. New findings on the d(TGGGAG) sequence: Surprising anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanucci, Valeria; Zarrelli, Armando; Liekens, Sandra; Noppen, Sam; Pannecouque, Christophe; Di Fabio, Giovanni

    2018-02-10

    The biological relevance of tetramolecular G-quadruplexes especially as anti-HIV agents has been extensively reported in the literature over the last years. In the light of our recent results regarding the slow G-quadruplex folding kinetics of ODNs based on d(TGGGAG) sequence, here we report a systematic anti-HIV screening to investigate the impact of the G-quadruplex folding on their anti-HIV activity. In particular, varying the single stranded concentrations of ODNs, it has been tested a pool of ODN sample solutions with different G-quadruplex concentrations. The anti-HIV assays have been designed favouring the limited kinetics involved in the tetramolecular G4-association based on the d(TGGGAG) sequence. Aiming to determine the stoichiometry of G-quadruplex structures in the same experimental conditions of the anti-HIV assays, a native gel electrophoresis was performed. The gel confirmed the G-quadruplex formation for almost all sample solutions while showing the formation of high order G4 structures for the more concentrated ODNs solutions. The most significant result is the discovery of a potent anti-HIV activity of the G-quadruplex formed by the natural d(TGGGAG) sequence (IC 50  = 14 nM) that, until now, has been reported to be completely inactive against HIV infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Anti-HIV-1 activity of anionic polymers: a comparative study of candidate microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP in soluble form blocks coreceptor binding sites on the virus envelope glycoprotein gp120 and elicits gp41 six-helix bundle formation, processes involved in virus inactivation. CAP is not soluble at pH Methods Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA were used to (1 study HIV-1 IIIB and BaL binding to micronized CAP; (2 detect virus disintegration; and (3 measure gp41 six-helix bundle formation. Cells containing integrated HIV-1 LTR linked to the β-gal gene and expressing CD4 and coreceptors CXCR4 or CCR5 were used to measure virus infectivity. Results 1 HIV-1 IIIB and BaL, respectively, effectively bound to micronized CAP. 2 The interaction between HIV-1 and micronized CAP led to: (a gp41 six-helix bundle formation; (b virus disintegration and shedding of envelope glycoproteins; and (c rapid loss of infectivity. Polymers other than CAP, except Carbomer 974P, elicited gp41 six-helix bundle formation in HIV-1 IIIB but only poly(napthalene sulfonate, in addition to CAP, had this effect on HIV-1 BaL. These polymers differed with respect to their virucidal activities, the differences being more pronounced for HIV-1 BaL. Conclusions Micronized CAP is the only candidate topical microbicide with the capacity to remove rapidly by adsorption from physiological fluids HIV-1 of both the X4 and R5 biotypes and is likely to prevent virus contact with target cells. The interaction between micronized CAP and HIV-1 leads to rapid virus inactivation. Among other anionic polymers, cellulose sulfate, BufferGel and aryl sulfonates appear most effective in this respect.

  2. Anti-HIV-1 protease activities of crude extracts of some Garcinia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-22

    Mar 22, 2010 ... the life cycle of the virus is the HIV-1 protease (PR) which process viral proteins into functional enzymes and structural proteins. HIV-1 PR plays a key role in the maturity and infectivity of the virus hence it has become an important target in HIV drug development (Kohl et al., 1988). HIV-1. PR function as a ...

  3. Isolation of anti-HIV-1 lignans from Larrea tridentata by counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnabre, J N; Ito, Y; Ma, Y; Huang, R C

    1996-01-08

    Several lignans, mostly new, were isolated from Larrea tridentata by assay-guided counter-current chromatography (CCC). Using the secreted alkaline phosphatase bioassay of HIV Tat transactivation and the two-phase hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water solvent system, two major components (Gr and Lo) were identified as anti-HIV active principles. The chemical structures of the constituents of Gr (G1-G4) and Lo (L1-L4) were determined by GC-MS and NMR. After optimization of isolation conditions, a large-scale isolation with the chloroform-methanol-water system yielded five constituents (FB1-FB5). The most predominant anti-HIV compound FB2 (denoted Malachi 4:5-6 or mal.4), which occurs in 0.23% yield, was separated from its FB1 isomer (0.13% yield). Compound FB4 and two tricyclic lignans (FB3 and FB5) were also isolated in a substantial amount for further testing of their anti-HIV activities. These compounds may represent a new class of anti-HIV agents with important clinical relevance.

  4. Mechanism of action and resistant profile of anti-HIV-1 coumarin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Yuan, Xiong; Yu, Donglei; Lee, K H; Chen, Chin Ho

    2005-02-20

    Dicamphanoyl khellactone (DCK) is a coumarin derivative that can potently inhibit HIV-1 replication. DCK does not inhibit RNA-dependent DNA synthesis. However, an HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor-resistant strain, HIV-1/RTMDR1, is resistant to DCK. Thus, it is possible that HIV-1 RT is the target of DCK. To test this possibility, DCK-resistant viruses were selected in the presence of DCK. Our results indicate that a single amino acid mutation, E138K in HIV-1 RT, is sufficient to confer DCK resistance. Interestingly, a DCK derivative, 3'R,4'R-Di-O-(-)-camphanoyl-2-ethyl-2',2'-dimethyldihydropyrano[2,3-f]chromone (DCP8), is effective against HIV-1/RTMDR1. However, the DCK-escape virus carrying the E138K mutation remains resistant to DCP8. Since DCK did not inhibit the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT when using poly-rA or poly-rC as template, we evaluated the effect of DCK on the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT. Our results indicate that DCK can inhibit the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT. In conclusion, DCK is a unique HIV-1 RT inhibitor that inhibits the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity. In contrast, DCK did not significantly affect the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity when poly-rA or poly-rC was used as templates. An E138K mutation in the non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) binding pocket of HIV-1 RT confers resistance to DCK and its chromone derivative, DCP8.

  5. The C-terminal sequence of IFITM1 regulates its anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Jia

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins inhibit a wide range of viruses. We previously reported the inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strain BH10 by human IFITM1, 2 and 3. It is unknown whether other HIV-1 strains are similarly inhibited by IFITMs and whether there exists viral countermeasure to overcome IFITM inhibition. We report here that the HIV-1 NL4-3 strain (HIV-1NL4-3 is not restricted by IFITM1 and its viral envelope glycoprotein is partly responsible for this insensitivity. However, HIV-1NL4-3 is profoundly inhibited by an IFITM1 mutant, known as Δ(117-125, which is deleted of 9 amino acids at the C-terminus. In contrast to the wild type IFITM1, which does not affect HIV-1 entry, the Δ(117-125 mutant diminishes HIV-1NL4-3 entry by 3-fold. This inhibition correlates with the predominant localization of Δ(117-125 to the plasma membrane where HIV-1 entry occurs. In spite of strong conservation of IFITM1 among most species, mouse IFITM1 is 19 amino acids shorter at its C-terminus as compared to human IFITM1 and, like the human IFITM1 mutant Δ(117-125, mouse IFITM1 also inhibits HIV-1 entry. This is the first report illustrating the role of viral envelope protein in overcoming IFITM1 restriction. The results also demonstrate the importance of the C-terminal region of IFITM1 in modulating the antiviral function through controlling protein subcellular localization.

  6. Single dose of glycoengineered anti-CD19 antibody (MEDI551) disrupts experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inhibiting pathogenic adaptive immune responses in the bone marrow and spinal cord while preserving peripheral regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ding; Blazek, Monica; Ireland, Sara; Ortega, Sterling; Kong, Xiangmei; Meeuwissen, Anouk; Stowe, Ann; Carter, Laura; Wang, Yue; Herbst, Ronald; Monson, Nancy L

    2014-11-15

    Plasma cells and the autoreactive Abs they produce are suspected to contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, but recent attempts to target these components of humoral immunity have failed. MEDI551, an anti-CD19 Ab that depletes mature B cells including plasma cells may offer a compelling alternative that reduces pathogenic adaptive immune responses while sparing regulatory mechanisms. Indeed, our data demonstrate that a single dose of MEDI551, given before or during ongoing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, disrupts development of the disease. Leukocyte infiltration into the spinal cord is significantly reduced, as well as short-lived and long-lived autoreactive CD138(+) plasma cells in the spleen and bone marrow, respectively. In addition, potentially protective CD1d(hi)CD5(+) regulatory B cells show resistance to depletion, and myelin-specific Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are expanded. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MEDI551 disrupts experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inhibiting multiple proinflammatory components whereas preserving regulatory populations. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Helicobacter pylori, hepatitis viruses A, C, E antibodies and HBsAg-prevalence and associated risk factors in pediatric communities of karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, S.; Muzzafar, R.; Hafiz, S.; Abbas, Z.; Zafar, M.N.; Naqvi, S.A.A.; Rizvi, S.A.U.H.

    2007-01-01

    To document the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), Hepatitis A virus (HAV), Hepatitis C virus (HCV), Hepatitis E virus (HEV) antibodies and Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg), in the pediatric age group of low socioeconomic urban communities of Karachi and to identify risk factors associated with these infections. Three hundred and eighty children, ages 5 months to 15 years were investigated. Venous blood samples were collected and questionnaire filled on sociodemographic characteristics (family income, number of dependents in the family, area of living, number of people per room per house, and number of children sharing bed with parents and siblings). Gastrointestinal symptoms were recorded. Anti-HAV IgG (Hepatitis A virus IgG antibody), anti-HCV (Hepatitis C virus antibody), anti-HEV (Hepatitis E antibodies) and HBsAg, were analyzed by enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). Samples were also screened for anti-HIV1/2 (human immunodeficiency virus 1 and 2 antibodies by EIA. IgG antibodies against H. pylori were detected by immunochromatography. A correlation between increasing age and seroconversion was seen for hepatotropic viruses. At 14 years and above,100% of the children were found to be positive for anti-HAV, 26% for anti-HEV, and 1.4%, for anti-HCV while HBsAg was positive in 1.9%. H. pylori infection did not show a significant increase with age. Both anti-HAV and anti-H. pylori were present simultaneously in 30% of the population investigated. With age, increasing number of children acquired antibodies against hepatotropic viruses and H. pylori. Occurrence of HBsAg and anti-HEV at a later age suggests horizontal, rather than vertical transmission. (author)

  8. Antiprothrombin Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Žigon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, the presence of a group of pathogenic autoantibodies called antiphospholipid antibodies causes thrombosis and pregnancy complications. The most frequent antigenic target of antiphospholipid antibodies are phospholipid bound β2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GPI and prothrombin. The international classification criteria for APS connect the occurrence of thrombosis and/or obstetric complications together with the persistence of lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL and antibodies against β2GPI (anti-β2GPI into APS. Current trends for the diagnostic evaluation of APS patients propose determination of multiple antiphospholipid antibodies, among them also anti-prothrombin antibodies, to gain a common score which estimates the risk for thrombosis in APS patients. Antiprothrombin antibodies are common in APS patients and are sometimes the only antiphospholipid antibodies being elevated. Methods for their determination differ and have not yet been standardized. Many novel studies confirmed method using phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT ELISA as an antigen on solid phase encompass higher diagnostic accuracy compared to method using prothrombin alone (aPT ELISA. Our research group developed an in-house aPS/PT ELISA with increased analytical sensitivity which enables the determination of all clinically relevant antiprothrombin antibodies. aPS/PT exhibited the highest percentage of lupus anticoagulant activity compared to aCL and anti-β2GPI. aPS/PT antibodies measured with the in-house method associated with venous thrombosis and presented the strongest independent risk factor for the presence of obstetric complications among all tested antiphospholipid antibodies

  9. Broad-spectrum inhibition of HIV-1 by a monoclonal antibody directed against a gp120-induced epitope of CD4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele E Burastero

    Full Text Available To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to contain gp120-CD4 complex-enhanced antibodies and showed broad-spectrum HIV-1-inhibitory activity. A proportion of MAbs derived from these mice preferentially recognized complex-enhanced epitopes. In particular, a CD4-specific MAb designated DB81 (IgG1Κ was found to preferentially bind to a complex-enhanced epitope on the D2 domain of human CD4. MAb DB81 also recognized chimpanzee CD4, but not baboon or macaque CD4, which exhibit sequence divergence in the D2 domain. Functionally, MAb DB81 displayed broad HIV-1-inhibitory activity, but it did not exert suppressive effects on T-cell activation in vitro. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of MAb DB81 were sequenced. Due to its broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity and lack of immunosuppressive effects, a humanized derivative of MAb DB81 could provide a useful complement to current preventive or therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  10. Broader HIV-1 neutralizing antibody responses induced by envelope glycoprotein mutants based on the EIAV attenuated vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lianxing

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to induce a potent and cross-reactive neutralizing antibody (nAb, an effective envelope immunogen is crucial for many viral vaccines, including the vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The Chinese equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV attenuated vaccine has controlled the epidemic of this virus after its vaccination in over 70 million equine animals during the last 3 decades in China. Data from our past studies demonstrate that the Env protein of this vaccine plays a pivotal role in protecting horses from both homologous and heterogeneous EIAV challenges. Therefore, the amino acid sequence information from the Chinese EIAV attenuated vaccine, in comparison with the parental wild-type EIAV strains, was applied to modify the corresponding region of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 CN54. The direction of the mutations was made towards the amino acids conserved in the two EIAV vaccine strains, distinguishing them from the two wild-type strains. The purpose of the modification was to enhance the immunogenicity of the HIV Env. Results The induced nAb by the modified HIV Env neutralized HIV-1 B and B'/C viruses at the highest titer of 1:270. Further studies showed that a single amino acid change in the C1 region accounts for the substantial enhancement in induction of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions This study shows that an HIV envelope modified by the information of another lentivirus vaccine induces effective broadly neutralizing antibodies. A single amino acid mutation was found to increase the immunogenicity of the HIV Env.

  11. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    Extant research on external knowledge search and open innovation assumes that collaborators are aligned in their strategic interests towards solving innovation problems. However, disruptive innovation is known to threaten the competitive advantage of incumbent firms, thereby creating a potential...

  12. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts....... The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improves search in complementary technologies, while demoting it when strategic interests are misaligned in disruptive technologies....... However, incumbent sources engaged in capability reconfiguration to accommodate disruption improve search efforts in disruptive technologies. The paper concludes that the value of external sources is contingent on more than their knowledge. Specifically, interdependence of sources in search gives rise...

  13. Disruption Rose Tinted II

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    'Disruption - Rose Tinted II' continues to engage narratives of historical English china as previously explored in the work 'Rose Tinted'. This work engages the sleepy rural idyll which is overlaid with visual contemporary social commentary.

  14. Antibody biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... and automated, the hybrid cells can be stored for many years in liquid nitrogen and antibodies production is homogeneous. The hybridoma method .... they may be modified to vehicle active molecules such as radio-isotopes, toxins, cytokines, enzyme etc. In these cases, the therapeutic effect is due to ...

  15. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ability of the highly evolved machinery of immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex ... to Pauling, if the structure of the antigen binding site of antibodies were to be produced in a random ..... where the immune system of the body is destructive, as in autoimmune disorders or after organ transplant.

  16. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While chemistry provides the framework for understanding the structure and function of biomolecules, the immune sys- tem provides a highly evolved natural process to generate one class of complex biomolecules – the antibodies. A combination of the two could be exploited to generate new classes of molecules with novel ...

  17. Digital disruption ?syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Clair; Staib, Andrew

    2017-05-18

    The digital transformation of hospitals in Australia is occurring rapidly in order to facilitate innovation and improve efficiency. Rapid transformation can cause temporary disruption of hospital workflows and staff as processes are adapted to the new digital workflows. The aim of this paper is to outline various types of digital disruption and some strategies for effective management. A large tertiary university hospital recently underwent a rapid, successful roll-out of an integrated electronic medical record (EMR). We observed this transformation and propose several digital disruption "syndromes" to assist with understanding and management during digital transformation: digital deceleration, digital transparency, digital hypervigilance, data discordance, digital churn and post-digital 'depression'. These 'syndromes' are defined and discussed in detail. Successful management of this temporary digital disruption is important to ensure a successful transition to a digital platform. What is known about this topic? Digital disruption is defined as the changes facilitated by digital technologies that occur at a pace and magnitude that disrupt established ways of value creation, social interactions, doing business and more generally our thinking. Increasing numbers of Australian hospitals are implementing digital solutions to replace traditional paper-based systems for patient care in order to create opportunities for improved care and efficiencies. Such large scale change has the potential to create transient disruption to workflows and staff. Managing this temporary disruption effectively is an important factor in the successful implementation of an EMR. What does this paper add? A large tertiary university hospital recently underwent a successful rapid roll-out of an integrated electronic medical record (EMR) to become Australia's largest digital hospital over a 3-week period. We observed and assisted with the management of several cultural, behavioural and

  18. Endocrine disrupting compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, I B; Christensen, P; Dantzer, V

    2001-01-01

    processes, and exposure during critical periods of prenatal development might affect reproductive performance over several generations. Alkylphenols and their metabolites are lipophilic substances exerting apparent estrogenic action in in vitro and in vivo testing systems. With the widespread industrial use...... or embryo models for the evaluation of possible consequences of human exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds is discussed. Furthermore, possible consequences of exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds for the embryo transfer industry are addressed....

  19. Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Families Guide Facts for Families - Vietnamese Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) No. 110; Updated May 2013 Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) is a relatively new diagnosis ...

  20. Disruption prediction at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milani, F.

    1998-12-01

    The sudden loss of the plasma magnetic confinement, known as disruption, is one of the major issue in a nuclear fusion machine as JET (Joint European Torus). Disruptions pose very serious problems to the safety of the machine. The energy stored in the plasma is released to the machine structure in few milliseconds resulting in forces that at JET reach several Mega Newtons. The problem is even more severe in the nuclear fusion power station where the forces are in the order of one hundred Mega Newtons. The events that occur during a disruption are still not well understood even if some mechanisms that can lead to a disruption have been identified and can be used to predict them. Unfortunately it is always a combination of these events that generates a disruption and therefore it is not possible to use simple algorithms to predict it. This thesis analyses the possibility of using neural network algorithms to predict plasma disruptions in real time. This involves the determination of plasma parameters every few milliseconds. A plasma boundary reconstruction algorithm, XLOC, has been developed in collaboration with Dr. D. O'Brien and Dr. J. Ellis capable of determining the plasma wall/distance every 2 milliseconds. The XLOC output has been used to develop a multilayer perceptron network to determine plasma parameters as l i and q ψ with which a machine operational space has been experimentally defined. If the limits of this operational space are breached the disruption probability increases considerably. Another approach for prediction disruptions is to use neural network classification methods to define the JET operational space. Two methods have been studied. The first method uses a multilayer perceptron network with softmax activation function for the output layer. This method can be used for classifying the input patterns in various classes. In this case the plasma input patterns have been divided between disrupting and safe patterns, giving the possibility of

  1. Passive immunotherapy in AIDS: a double-blind randomized study based on transfusions of plasma rich in anti-human immunodeficiency virus 1 antibodies vs. transfusions of seronegative plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittecoq, D; Chevret, S; Morand-Joubert, L; Heshmati, F; Audat, F; Bary, M; Dusautoir, T; Bismuth, A; Viard, J P; Barré-Sinoussi, F

    1995-02-14

    A randomized double-blind controlled trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of passive immunotherapy in the treatment of symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This trial included 86 symptomatic patients randomized to receive plasma rich in anti-HIV-1 antibody or standard seronegative plasma. Each patient in both groups received a 300-ml infusion every 14 days over a 1-year period, and every 28 days thereafter, in addition to zidovudine and other conventional prophylactic treatments. Plasma donors were selected among symptomless seropositive individuals with a CD4 lymphocyte count > or = 400 x 10(6) cells per liter, a negative p24 antigen assay, and a high concentration of anti-p24 antibody. The plasmas were heat-inactivated before infusion. During the study period (day 28-day 365) scheduled by the protocol, clinical benefit from passive immunotherapy was observed in delaying the appearance of the first AIDS-defining event (P group compared to the treatment group. Seven deaths occurred in the treatment group vs. 11 in the control group (P = 0.27). A total of 47 patients died or exhibited new AIDS-defining events, 18 in the treatment group and 29 in the control group (P = 0.009). No clinical benefit was observed after the 1-year period with infusions performed every 4 weeks. These results indicate a favorable effect of passive immunotherapy on the evolution of advanced AIDS.

  2. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kricka, Larry J

    2016-08-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages.

  3. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Monoclonal antibodies AC-43 and AC-29 disrupt Plasmodium vivax ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    diseases, none more challenging than malaria, which claims over a million lives annually (Snow et al. 2005). In this era of environmental changes, resurgent diseases, and drug and insecticide resistance, there is an urgent need .... Females were allowed to feed on rabbit blood for ovarian development. On the third day post ...

  5. Monoclonal antibodies AC-43 and AC-29 disrupt Plasmodium vivax ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The number of oocysts that developed was reduced by 78.6% when mosquitoes ingested a combination of these two mAbs along with the blood meal. AC-43 mAb binds to the epitope common in 97, 80 and 43 kDa polypeptides from the midgut protein extract, as indicated by western blot analysis. Similarly, the mAb AC-29 ...

  6. Managing Supply Chain Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-09

    additional resources such as increased levels of inventory to restore operations following a disruption (Stonebraker & Afifi , 2004; Zsidisin et al...Other Disciplines to Logistics. International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, 27(9/10), pp 515. Stonebraker, P. W. & Afifi

  7. Sustainable Disruption Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Bo Valdemar

    when managing recovery from disruptions. The underlying work of this thesis is carried out as an industrial PhD project in co-operation with the company Jeppesen, which have the airline industry as its primary area of business and the maritime industry as its secondary area. For this reason the thesis...

  8. Comprehensive Cross-Clade Characterization of Antibody-Mediated Recognition, Complement-Mediated Lysis, and Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity of HIV-1 Envelope-Specific Antibodies toward Eradication of the HIV-1 Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujib, Shariq; Liu, Jun; Rahman, A K M Nur-Ur; Schwartz, Jordan A; Bonner, Phil; Yue, Feng Yun; Ostrowski, Mario A

    2017-08-15

    Immunotherapy with passive administration of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 envelope-specific antibodies (bnAbs) in the setting of established infection in vivo has yielded mixed results. The contribution of different antibodies toward the direct elimination of infected cells is poorly understood. In this study, we determined the ability of 12 well-characterized anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies to recognize and eliminate primary CD4 T cells infected with HIV-1 belonging to clades A, B, C, and D, via antibody-dependent complement-mediated lysis (ADCML) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), in vitro We further tested unique combinations of these antibodies to determine the optimal antibody cocktails to be tested in future clinical trials. We report that antibody binding to infected CD4 T cells is highly variable and correlates with ADCML and ADCC processes. Particularly, antibodies targeting the envelope glycan shield (2G12) and V1/V2 site (PG9, PG16, and PGT145) are best at recognizing HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells. However, only PG9 and PG16 and their combinations with other bnAbs sufficiently induced the elimination of HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells by ADCML, ADCC, or both. Notably, CD4 binding site antibodies VRC01, 3BNC117, and NIH45-46 G54W did not exhibit recognition of infected cells and were unable to induce their killing. Future trials geared toward the development of a cure for HIV/AIDS should incorporate V1/V2 antibodies for maximal clearance of infected cells. With the use of only primary immune cells, we conducted a comprehensive cross-clade physiological analysis to aid the direction of antibodies as therapeutics toward the development of a cure for HIV/AIDS. IMPORTANCE Several antibodies capable of neutralizing the majority of circulating HIV-1 strains have been identified to date and have been shown to prevent infection in animal models. However, the use of combinations of such broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) for the treatment and

  9. Statistical analysis of JET disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanga, A.; Johnson, M.F.

    1991-07-01

    In the operation of JET and of any tokamak many discharges are terminated by a major disruption. The disruptive termination of a discharge is usually an unwanted event which may cause damage to the structure of the vessel. In a reactor disruptions are potentially a very serious problem, hence the importance of studying them and devising methods to avoid disruptions. Statistical information has been collected about the disruptions which have occurred at JET over a long span of operations. The analysis is focused on the operational aspects of the disruptions rather than on the underlining physics. (Author)

  10. [Xenoestrogens: endocrine disrupting compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Milena; Murias, Marek

    2008-11-01

    In recent years much attention has been paid to the issues of chemicals that disrupt the normal function of endocrine system, namely xenoestrogens. These chemicals can mimic the activity of endogenous estrogens, antagonize their interaction with estrogen receptors or disrupt the synthesis, metabolism and functions of endogenous female hormones. Due to the fact that they act thanks to many different mechanisms, it is very difficult to estimate their estrogenic activity by means of a simple tests. The important issue remains the fact that xenoestrogens may have a positive or negative influence on the function of the endocrine system. It seems to be very important that there are many sources of xenoestrogens, that is not only vegetables and fruit (phytoestrogens), but also metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb), dental appliances (alkilphenols), food containers or blood containers (PVC--polyvinyl chloride, DEHP--di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate), cosmetics (parabens) and pesticides (DDT--dichlor-diphenyl-trichlorethylane, endosulfane).

  11. Disrupted Refugee Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Ditte Krogh

    2017-01-01

    Fleeing civil war involves managing life threatening events and multiple disruptions of everyday life. The theoretical potentials of analysing the recreation of everyday family life among Syrian refugees in Denmark is explored based on conceptualizations that emphasize the collective agency...... war and struggle to recreate an everyday life in exile is to contribute with contextualization and expansion of mainstream understandings of family life, suffering, and resilience in refugee family trajectories in multiple contexts....

  12. Wound Disruption Following Colorectal Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Hanna, Mark H; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Nguyen, Ninh T; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative wound disruption is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We sought to identify the risk factors and outcomes of wound disruption following colorectal resection. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to examine the clinical data of patients who underwent colorectal resection from 2005 to 2013. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors of wound disruption. We sampled a total of 164,297 patients who underwent colorectal resection. Of these, 2073 (1.3 %) had wound disruption. Patients with wound disruption had significantly higher mortality (5.1 vs. 1.9 %, AOR: 1.46, P = 0.01). The highest risk of wound disruption was seen in patients with wound infection (4.8 vs. 0.9 %, AOR: 4.11, P disruption such as chronic steroid use (AOR: 1.71, P disruption compared to open surgery (AOR: 0.61, P disruption occurs in 1.3 % of colorectal resections, and it correlates with mortality of patients. Wound infection is the strongest predictor of wound disruption. Chronic steroid use, obesity, severe COPD, prolonged operation, non-elective admission, and serum albumin level are strongly associated with wound disruption. Utilization of the laparoscopic approach may decrease the risk of wound disruption when possible.

  13. Disruption - Access cards service

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    We would like to inform you that between 10 November and 15 December 2014, the access cards service in Building 55 will be disrupted, as the GS Department has decided to improve the facilities for users of this building. During the work, you will find the registration, biometric registration and dosimeter exchange services on the second floor of Building 55 and the vehicle sticker service on the ground floor along with the access cards service. We thank you for your understanding and apologise for any inconvenience caused.

  14. Relativistic tidal disruption events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levan A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In March 2011 Swift detected an extremely luminous and long-lived outburst from the nucleus of an otherwise quiescent, low luminosity (LMC-like galaxy. Named Swift J1644+57, its combination of high-energy luminosity (1048 ergs s−1 at peak, rapid X-ray variability (factors of >100 on timescales of 100 seconds and luminous, rising radio emission suggested that we were witnessing the birth of a moderately relativistic jet (Γ ∼ 2 − 5, created when a star is tidally disrupted by the supermassive black hole in the centre of the galaxy. A second event, Swift J2058+0516, detected two months later, with broadly similar properties lends further weight to this interpretation. Taken together this suggests that a fraction of tidal disruption events do indeed create relativistic outflows, demonstrates their detectability, and also implies that low mass galaxies can host massive black holes. Here, I briefly outline the observational properties of these relativistic tidal flares observed last year, and their evolution over the first year since their discovery.

  15. A trypsin inhibitor from rambutan seeds with antitumor, anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, and nitric oxide-inducing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-04-01

    Nephelium lappaceum L., commonly known as "rambutan," is a typical tropical tree and is well known for its juicy and sweet fruit which has an exotic flavor. Chemical studies on rambutan have led to the identification of various components such as monoterpene lactones and volatile compounds. Here, a 22.5-kDa trypsin inhibitor (N . lappaceum trypsin inhibitor (NLTI)) was isolated from fresh rambutan seeds using liquid chromatographical techniques. NLTI reduced the proteolytic activities of both trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. Dithiothreitol reduced the trypsin inhibitory activity of NLTI at a concentration of 1 mM, indicating that an intact disulfide bond is essential to the activity. NLTI inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 0.73 μM. In addition, NLTI manifested a time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on growth in many tumor cells. NLTI is one of the few trypsin inhibitors with nitric oxide-inducing activity and may find application in tumor therapy.

  16. Combinations against combinations: associations of anti-HIV 1 reverse transcriptase drugs challenged by constellations of drug resistance mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Giovanni; Spadari, Silvio

    2002-02-01

    The reverse transcriptase inhibitors still represent the majority of the clinically used anti-HIV drugs and constitute the main backbone of currently employed combinatorial regimens. A major obstacle to successfull chemotherapic eradication of HIV is the emergence of viral strains resistant to the drugs in use. Counteracting the emergence of resistance necessitates alternating the panel of agents employed. In order to rationally design alternative drug combinations, physicians not only must know the genotype of the emerging viral strains, but should also be able to correlate it with its resistant phenotype. However, resistant viral strains usually carry multiple mutations, whose reciprocal influences on the overall level of resistance are largely unknown. Moreover, the choice of agents to be combined must take in account drug-drug interactions and adverse metabolic effects. This review will outline the main pharmacological and clinical features of the currently utilised anti-reverse transcriptase drugs, as well as the correspondent resistance profiles selected during therapy. A major focus will be on the reciprocal influence of drug associations on their own metabolism as well as on the interacting effects of the selected combinations of drug resistance mutations.

  17. Anti-HIV-1 and cytotoxicity of a new dimeric thiazepine alkaloid isolated from Ixora undulata Roxb. leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammed, Magdy M.D.; Mohamed, Khaled M.

    2017-01-01

    The crude alkaloidal extract of Ixora undulata Roxb. leaves recorded a cytotoxicity of IC50 = 125 µg/mL against EL4 and revealed a reduction with CC50 = 47 µg/mL in the viability of MT-4 cells, beside a 50% protection with EC50 > 47 µg/mL against HIV-1IIIB. Bioassay guided fractionation of the cr...

  18. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Evaluation of Some Novel MC-1220 Analogs as Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik B; Loddo, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    in methanol, alkylation, reduction, halogenation, and/or acidic hydrolysis. All synthesized compounds were evaluated for their activity against HIV-1. The most active compound in this study was compound 7, which showed activity against HIV-1 comparable to that of MC-1220. The only difference in structure...

  19. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Activity of New MKC-442 Analogues with an Alkynyl-Substituted 6-Benzyl Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aly, Youssef L.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerreg.; La Colla, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis and antiviral activities are reported of a series of 6-(3-alkynyl benzyl)-substituted analogues of MKC-442 (6-benzyl-1-(ethoxymethyl)-5-isopropyluracil), a highly potent agent against HIV. The 3-alkynyl group is assumed to give a better stacking of the substituted benzyl group to reverse...... transcriptase (RT) and this was believed to improve antiviral activity against HIV-1. The bromo derivatives, 5-alkyl-6-(3-bromo-benzyl)-1-ethoxymethyl derivatives 7a, b and 5-alkyl-6-(3-bromobenzyl)-1-allyloxymethyl derivatives 9a, b, showed activity against HIV on the same level as their corresponding...

  20. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Activity of New Fluoro-HEPT Analogues: An Investigation on Fluoro versus Hydroxy Substituents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard; Loddo, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    Coupling of 6-benzyl-5-hydroxymethyluracil (1) with formaldehyde acetals followed by fluorination using (diethylamino)sulfur trifluoride (DAST) afforded 1-alkenyloxymethyl and 1-propargyloxymethyl 5-fluoromethyl-6-benzyluracils 3a-c. 6-(3,5-Dimethylbenzyl)-5-ethyl-1-[(2-fluoroethoxy......)methyl]pyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione (6) was synthesized by fluorination of the corresponding hydroxy derivative 5. Sonogoshira reaction was performed on 6-(3,5-dimethylbenzyl)-5-ethyl-1-(4-iodobenzyl)uracil (7) with propargyl alcohol to afford 8 which was fluorinated to give the fluoro propargyl derivative 9. Compound...

  1. Structure-Based Design of a Small Molecule CD4-Antagonist with Broad Spectrum Anti-HIV-1 Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, Francesca; Kwon, Young Do; Zhang, Hongtao; Scacalossi, Daniel; Belov, Dmitry S; Tikhonov, Artur A; Andreev, Ivan A; Altieri, Andrea; Kurkin, Alexander V; Kwong, Peter D; Debnath, Asim K

    2015-09-10

    Earlier we reported the discovery and design of NBD-556 and their analogs which demonstrated their potential as HIV-1 entry inhibitors. However, progress in developing these inhibitors has been stymied by their CD4-agonist properties, an unfavorable trait for use as drug. Here, we demonstrate the successful conversion of a full CD4-agonist (NBD-556) through a partial CD4-agonist (NBD-09027), to a full CD4-antagonist (NBD-11021) by structure-based modification of the critical oxalamide midregion, previously thought to be intolerant of modification. NBD-11021 showed unprecedented neutralization breath for this class of inhibitors, with pan-neutralization against a panel of 56 Env-pseudotyped HIV-1 representing diverse subtypes of clinical isolates (IC50 as low as 270 nM). The cocrystal structure of NBD-11021 complexed to a monomeric HIV-1 gp120 core revealed its detail binding characteristics. The study is expected to provide a framework for further development of NBD series as HIV-1 entry inhibitors for clinical application against AIDS.

  2. Maternal Brain Reactive Antibodies and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    from mothers of an ASD child lacking brain- reactive antibodies, 12% of plasma from unselected women of child -bearing age , and 7.6% of plasma from...estimated to average 1 hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data...cloned from the memory B cell population of the mother of a child with ASD binds Caspr2. This antibody disrupts fetal brain development and leads to an

  3. Cell disruption for microalgae biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günerken, E; D'Hondt, E; Eppink, M H M; Garcia-Gonzalez, L; Elst, K; Wijffels, R H

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are a potential source for various valuable chemicals for commercial applications ranging from nutraceuticals to fuels. Objective in a biorefinery is to utilize biomass ingredients efficiently similarly to petroleum refineries in which oil is fractionated in fuels and a variety of products with higher value. Downstream processes in microalgae biorefineries consist of different steps whereof cell disruption is the most crucial part. To maintain the functionality of algae biochemicals during cell disruption while obtaining high disruption yields is an important challenge. Despite this need, studies on mild disruption of microalgae cells are limited. This review article focuses on the evaluation of conventional and emerging cell disruption technologies, and a comparison thereof with respect to their potential for the future microalgae biorefineries. The discussed techniques are bead milling, high pressure homogenization, high speed homogenization, ultrasonication, microwave treatment, pulsed electric field treatment, non-mechanical cell disruption and some emerging technologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen

    BACKGROUND: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may contribute to reproductive changes in boys in the Western world, however, less is known about influence of EDCs in women. The incidence of precocious breast development is increasing in USA and Europe and mammary gland development has been...... gland development before puberty in whole mounted mammary glands and in adults in histological sections of the mammary glands. Moreover, female offspring were evaluated for external genital malformations. The EDCs studied for mammary gland effects were the estrogenic compounds ethinyl estradiol...... were sensitive to EDCs. EDCs with estrogenic mode of action appeared to increase mammary outgrowth in prepubertal female rats and a potent model compound, ethinyl estradiol, increased the density in females and males and the number of terminal end buds in male rats. Histological examination showed...

  5. Overview of core disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchaterre, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the analysis of core-disruptive accidents is given. These analyses are for the purpose of understanding and predicting fast reactor behavior in severe low probability accident conditions, to establish the consequences of such conditions and to provide a basis for evaluating consequence limiting design features. The methods are used to analyze core-disruptive accidents from initiating event to complete core disruption, the effects of the accident on reactor structures and the resulting radiological consequences are described

  6. AIDS and economic disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G S

    1996-10-01

    Child and adult mortality increases in Cameroon due to AIDS will cause life expectancy to fall by as many as 8 years, from just over 50 to just over 40 years. The social consequences of AIDS include grieving, stigmatizing, and the large-scale disruption of family and community structures. Widows and widowers due to AIDS mortality are affected differently from each other, with the widows of men who have died from AIDS facing potential sociocultural and economic hardship. The economic consequences of AIDS in Bamenda and elsewhere in Cameroon will occur mainly through the epidemic's impact upon the size and quality of the labor force. By killing a significant number of male and female workers aged 15-60 years, AIDS will reduce the size and growth rate of the labor force. Despite, rapid population growth, labor is a relatively scarce factor of agricultural production in Cameroon. The spread of HIV in rural areas, combined with the intensity and scarcity of agricultural labor, suggests that AIDS will have an impact upon production and per capita incomes, and increase the already high rates of hunger and absolute poverty. In the context of HIV/AIDS, young people must be empowered to make informed decisions about sex. Adolescents are most at risk because they tend to experiment more than married couples and have many sex partners. Sexual activity begins as early as age 8 years and penetrative sex at age 13 or earlier. The author considers the factors which encourage adolescents to engage in sexual activities.

  7. Disrupting Ethnography through Rhizoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Masny

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article interrogates principles of ethnography in education proposed by Mills and Morton: raw tellings, analytic pattern, vignette and empathy. This article adopts a position that is uncomfortable, unconventional and interesting. It involves a deterritorialization/ rupture of ethnography in education in order to reterritorialize a different concept: rhizoanalysis, a way to position theory and data that is multilayered, complex and messy. Rhizoanalysis, the main focus of this article is not a method. It is an approach to research conditioned by a reality in which Deleuze and Guattari disrupt representation, interpretation and subjectivity. In this article, Multiple Literacies Theory, a theoretical and practical framework, becomes a lens to examine a rhizomatic study of a Korean family recently arrived to Australia and attending English as a second language classes. Observations and interviews recorded the daily lives of the family. The vignettes were selected by reading data intensively and immanently through a process of palpation, an innovative approach to educational research. Rhizoanalysis proposes to abandon the given and invent different ways of thinking about and doing research and what might happen when reading data differently, intensively and immanently, through Multiple Literacies Theory. Rhizoanalysis, a game-changer in the way research can be conducted, affords a different lens to tackle issues in education through research.

  8. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  9. Platelet antibodies blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for the V2, V3, CD4-Binding Site, and gp41 of HIV-1 Mediate Phagocytosis in a Dose-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Thomas; Li, Liuzhe; Liu, Lily; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Gorny, Miroslaw K

    2017-04-15

    In light of the weak or absent neutralizing activity mediated by anti-V2 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), we tested whether they can mediate Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), which is an important element of anti-HIV-1 immunity. We tested six anti-V2 MAbs and compared them with 21 MAbs specific for V3, the CD4-binding site (CD4bs), and gp41 derived from chronically HIV-1-infected individuals and produced by hybridoma cells. ADCP activity was measured by flow cytometry using uptake by THP-1 monocytic cells of fluorescent beads coated with gp120, gp41, BG505 SOSIP.664, or BG505 DS-SOSIP.664 complexed with MAbs. The measurement of ADCP activity by the area under the curve showed significantly higher activity of anti-gp41 MAbs than of the members of the three other groups of MAbs tested using beads coated with monomeric gp41 or gp120; anti-V2 MAbs were dominant compared to anti-V3 and anti-CD4bs MAbs against clade C gp120 ZM109 ADCP activity mediated by V2 and V3 MAbs was positive against stabilized DS-SOSIP.664 trimer but negligible against SOSIP.664 targets, suggesting that a closed envelope conformation better exposes the variable loops. Two IgG3 MAbs against the V2 and V3 regions displayed dominant ADCP activity compared to a panel of IgG1 MAbs. This superior ADCP activity was confirmed when two of three recombinant IgG3 anti-V2 MAbs were compared to their IgG1 counterparts. The study demonstrated dominant ADCP activity of anti-gp41 against monomers but not trimers, with some higher activity of anti-V2 MAbs than of anti-V3 and anti-CD4bs MAbs. The ability to mediate ADCP suggests a mechanism by which anti-HIV-1 envelope Abs can contribute to protective efficacy. IMPORTANCE Anti-V2 antibodies (Abs) correlated with reduced risk of HIV-1 infection in recipients of the RV144 vaccine, suggesting that they play a protective role, but a mechanism providing such protection remains to be determined. The rare and weak neutralizing activities of anti-V2 MAbs prompted us

  11. Thigmotaxis Mediates Trail Odour Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Lloyd D; Corn, Joshua E; Sik Roh, Hyun; Jiménez-Pérez, Alfredo; Manning, Lee-Anne M; Harper, Aimee R; Suckling, David M

    2017-05-10

    Disruption of foraging using oversupply of ant trail pheromones is a novel pest management application under investigation. It presents an opportunity to investigate the interaction of sensory modalities by removal of one of the modes. Superficially similar to sex pheromone-based mating disruption in moths, ant trail pheromone disruption lacks an equivalent mechanistic understanding of how the ants respond to an oversupply of their trail pheromone. Since significant compromise of one sensory modality essential for trail following (chemotaxis) has been demonstrated, we hypothesised that other sensory modalities such as thigmotaxis could act to reduce the impact on olfactory disruption of foraging behaviour. To test this, we provided a physical stimulus of thread to aid trailing by Argentine ants otherwise under disruptive pheromone concentrations. Trail following success was higher using a physical cue. While trail integrity reduced under continuous over-supply of trail pheromone delivered directly on the thread, provision of a physical cue in the form of thread slightly improved trail following and mediated trail disruption from high concentrations upwind. Our results indicate that ants are able to use physical structures to reduce but not eliminate the effects of trail pheromone disruption.

  12. Sleep disruption in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Schleimer, Robert P; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common disease of the upper airways and paranasal sinuses with a marked decline in quality of life (QOL). CRS patients suffer from sleep disruption at a significantly higher proportion (60 to 75%) than in the general population (8-18 %). Sleep disruption in CRS causes decreased QOL and is linked to poor functional outcomes such as impaired cognitive function and depression. Areas covered: A systematic PubMed/Medline search was done to assess the results of studies that have investigated sleep and sleep disturbances in CRS. Expert commentary: These studies reported sleep disruption in most CRS patients. The main risk factors for sleep disruption in CRS include allergic rhinitis, smoking, and high SNOT-22 total scores. The literature is inconsistent with regard to the prevalence of sleep-related disordered breathing (e.g. obstructive sleep apnea) in CRS patients. Although nasal obstruction is linked to sleep disruption, the extent of sleep disruption in CRS seems to expand beyond that expected from physical blockage of the upper airways alone. Despite the high prevalence of sleep disruption in CRS, and its detrimental effects on QOL, the literature contains a paucity of studies that have investigated the mechanisms underlying this major problem in CRS.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  14. Radiolabeled antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies, in particular monoclonal antibodies, offer the potential for the specific nuclear imaging of malignant and benign diseases in man. If this imaging potential is realized, they may also have a large role in cancer treatment. This paper reviews: (1) what monoclonal antibodies are and how they differ from polyclonal antibodies, (2) how they are produced and radiolabeled, (3) the results of preclinical and clinical trials in cancer imaging, including the utility of SPECT and antibody fragments, (4) the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of benign diseases, (5) alternate routes of antibody delivery, (6) the role of these agents in therapy, and (7) whether this technology ''revolutionizes'' the practice of nuclear radiology, or has a more limited complementary role in the imaging department

  15. Ultrasonic disruption of algae cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P. M.; Nowotarski, K.; Joyce, E. M.; Mason, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    During last decade there has been increasing interest in the production of sustainable fuels from microalgae (R.H. Wijffels and M.J. Barbosa, 2010; Singh et al 2011; D.H. Lee 2011). The aim of this project was to determine if algal cells can be ultrasonically disrupted to release lipids for biofuel production. Ultrasonic disruption of two unicellular algal species: Dunnaliella salina and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated using a 20 kHz probe. Haemocytometer, optical density, UV-Vis, fluoro-spectrophotometer and confocal microscopy results demonstrated complete cell destruction of Dunaliella salina within 16 minutes of sonication. Results obtained for Nannochloropsis oculata differed in that ultrasound dispersed clumped cells with little or no cell disruption, as observed by haemocytometer and confocal microscopy analysis. However, UV-Visible and fluoro-spectrophotometer analysis indicated chlorophyll release following sonication, suggesting some cell disruption had occurred.

  16. A Network Disruption Modeling Tool

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leinart, James

    1998-01-01

    Given that network disruption has been identified as a military objective and C2-attack has been identified as the mechanism to accomplish this objective, a target set must be acquired and priorities...

  17. Disruptive innovation: the demand side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havighurst, Clark C

    2008-01-01

    The notion of disruptive innovation provides a welcome framework for considering the prospects for low-cost alternatives in American medicine. Such innovations as have been seen, however, are largely the result of demand by patients paying their own bills because they have high-deductible coverage or are uninsured. Many other cost-saving innovations are discouraged by financing systems that are themselves largely immune to competition from disruptive innovators.

  18. Basis and Statistical Design of the Passive HIV-1 Antibody Mediated Prevention (AMP) Test-of-Concept Efficacy Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Peter B; Juraska, Michal; deCamp, Allan C; Karuna, Shelly; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Mgodi, Nyaradzo; Donnell, Deborah J; Bentley, Carter; Sista, Nirupama; Andrew, Philip; Isaacs, Abby; Huang, Yunda; Zhang, Lily; Capparelli, Edmund; Kochar, Nidhi; Wang, Jing; Eshleman, Susan H; Mayer, Kenneth H; Magaret, Craig A; Hural, John; Kublin, James G; Gray, Glenda; Montefiori, David C; Gomez, Margarita M; Burns, David N; McElrath, Julie; Ledgerwood, Julie; Graham, Barney S; Mascola, John R; Cohen, Myron; Corey, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) have been developed as potential agents for prevention of HIV-1 infection. The HIV Vaccine Trials Network and the HIV Prevention Trials Network are conducting the Antibody Mediated Prevention (AMP) trials to assess whether, and how, intravenous infusion of the anti-CD4 binding site bnAb, VRC01, prevents HIV-1 infection. These are the first test-of-concept studies to assess HIV-1 bnAb prevention efficacy in humans. The AMP trials are two parallel phase 2b HIV-1 prevention efficacy trials conducted in two cohorts: 2700 HIV-uninfected men and transgender persons who have sex with men in the United States, Peru, Brazil, and Switzerland; and 1500 HIV-uninfected sexually active women in seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Participants are randomized 1:1:1 to receive an intravenous infusion of 10 mg/kg VRC01, 30 mg/kg VRC01, or a control preparation every 8 weeks for a total of 10 infusions. Each trial is designed (1) to assess overall prevention efficacy (PE) pooled over the two VRC01 dose groups vs. control and (2) to assess VRC01 dose and laboratory markers as correlates of protection (CoPs) against overall and genotype- and phenotype-specific infection. Each AMP trial is designed to have 90% power to detect PE > 0% if PE is ≥ 60%. The AMP trials are also designed to identify VRC01 properties (i.e., concentration and effector functions) that correlate with protection and to provide insight into mechanistic CoPs. CoPs are assessed using data from breakthrough HIV-1 infections, including genetic sequences and sensitivities to VRC01-mediated neutralization and Fc effector functions. The AMP trials test whether VRC01 can prevent HIV-1 infection in two study populations. If affirmative, they will provide information for estimating the optimal dosage of VRC01 (or subsequent derivatives) and identify threshold levels of neutralization and Fc effector functions associated with high-level protection, setting a benchmark

  19. Nef decreases HIV-1 sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies that target the membrane-proximal external region of TMgp41.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel P J Lai

    2011-12-01

    discovered activity for Nef has important implications for anti-HIV-1 immunity and AIDS pathogenesis.

  20. DNA vaccine molecular adjuvants SP-D-BAFF and SP-D-APRIL enhance anti-gp120 immune response and increase HIV-1 neutralizing antibody titers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sachin; Clark, Emily S; Termini, James M; Boucher, Justin; Kanagavelu, Saravana; LeBranche, Celia C; Abraham, Sakhi; Montefiori, David C; Khan, Wasif N; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2015-04-01

    the gp120 trimer, the inaccessibility of the conserved sequences, highly variable protein sequences, and the loss of HIV-1-specific antibody-producing cells during development. We have shown previously that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily ligands, including BAFF and APRIL, can be multitrimerized using the lung protein SP-D (surfactant protein D), enhancing immune responses. Here we show that DNA or DNA-protein vaccines encoding BAFF or APRIL multitrimers, IL-12p70, and membrane-bound HIV-1 Env gp140 induced tier 1 and tier 2 neutralizing antibodies in a mouse model. BAFF and APRIL enhanced the immune reaction, improved antibody binding, and increased the numbers of anti-HIV-1 antibody-secreting cells. Adaptation of this vaccine design may prove useful in designing preventive HIV-1 vaccines for humans. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Disruption studies on ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautasso, G.; Egorov, S.; Finken, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    Disruptions generate large thermal and mechanical stresses on the tokamak components and are occasionally responsible for damages to the machine. For a future reactor disruptions have a significant impact on the design since all loading conditions must be analyzed in accordance with stricter design criteria (due to safety or difficult maintenance). Therefore the uncertainties affecting the predicted stresses must be reduced as much as possible with a more comprehensive set of measurements and analyses in this generation of experimental machines, and avoidance/predictive methods must be developed further. Disruption studies on ASDEX Upgrade are focused on these subjects, namely on: (1) understanding the physical mechanisms leading to this phenomenon in order to learn to avoid it or to predict its occurrence and to mitigate its effects; (2) analyzing the effects of disruptions on the machine to determine the functional dependence of the thermal and mechanical loads upon the discharge parameters. This allows, firstly, to dimension or reinforce the machine components to withstand these loads and, secondly, to extrapolate them to tokamaks still in the design phase; (3) learning to mitigate the consequence of disruptions, i.e. thermal loads, mechanical forces and runaways with injection of impurity pellets or gas. This paper is focused on most recent results concerning points, i.e. on the analysis of the degree of asymmetry of the forces and on the use of impurity puff for mitigation

  2. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    Three basic topics are addressed for the disruptive event analysis: first, the range of disruptive consequences of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity; second, the possible reduction of the risk of disruption by volcanic activity through selective siting of a repository; and third, the quantification of the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity

  3. Online Education Cast as "Disruptive Innovation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Technology-based forces of "disruptive innovation" are gathering around public education and will overhaul the way K-12 students learn--with potentially dramatic consequences for established public schools, according to an upcoming book that draws parallels to disruptions in other industries. In his "Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation…

  4. Professional Disruption in Health Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    How do professions respond to fast-moving technological changes? Disruptive innovations overturn expectations about how markets function and develop, and they often raise moral, legal and scientific concerns among professionals. Sudden technological changes can result in a state of professional...... disruption, in which technological change challenges the institutional arrangements of a profession. This article distinguishes between fast and slow processes of professional change, focusing on the role of technology as one cause of fast changes to a profession. Professionals and non-professionals engage...... in framing contests that draw on cognitive, normative and relational keys to signal their expectations. It is in these framing contests that professionals run the risk of disruption. Drawing on interview data with key policy actors, I investigate electronic cigarettes regulation in the European Union and its...

  5. Major plasma disruptions in TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onega, R.J.; Becraft, W.R.; Bettis, E.S.

    1979-02-01

    Evaluation of the instrumentation and control of a power producing tokamak fusion reactor such as The Next Step (TNS) requires an assessment of the consequences of a major plasma disruption during reactor operation. The most important consequence of a disruption will be damage to the first wall from thermal and magnetic stress. Severe temperature gradients will cause thermal stress, placing a limit on the number of disruptions that can occur before the integrity of the wall is lost, and eddy currents induced in the wall will interact with the magnetic energy of the plasma and the →B/sub T/ field to create mechanical forces. Consequences to the ohmic heating (OH) coils, their power supplies, and other coils must also be taken into account

  6. Disrupting the Industry with Play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2016-01-01

    or two ago. This is significantly disrupting the industry in several market sectors. This paper describes the components of the playware and embodied artificial intelligence research that has led to disruption in the industrial robotics sector, and which points to the next disruption of the health care......Decades of research into intelligent, playful technology and user-friendly man-machine interfaces has provided important insight into the creation of robotic systems and intelligent interactive systems which are much more user-friendly, safer and cheaper than what appeared possible merely a decade...... sector. This includes playful robotics, LEGO robots for kids, minimal robot systems, user-friendly, behavior-based, biomimetic, modular robotics and intelligent systems. The insight into these components and the use in synthesis for designing robots and intelligent systems allows anybody, anywhere...

  7. Disruptive Innovation in Healthcare & Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Disruption is a powerful body of theory that describes how people interact and react, how behavior is shaped, how organizational cultures form and influence decisions. Innovation is the process of translating an idea or invention into a product or service that creates value or for which customers...... will pay. Disruptive Innovation in context of the author’s body of work in healthcare and rehabilitation relates to how development of a cloud-based converged infrastructure resource, similar to that conceived in a national (Danish) study titled Humanics, can act as an accessible data and knowledge...

  8. Antibodies Against Melanin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... Departments of Internal Medicine and Anatomical Pathology, University of Stellenbosch and MRC. Pigment Metabolism Research Unit, ... at the production of antibodies against natural melanoprotein. and a consideration of our negative .... the random polymerization of several monomers, antibody formed ...

  9. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  10. JET and COMPASS asymmetrical disruptions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gerasimov, S.N.; Abreu, P.; Baruzzo, M.; Drozdov, V.; Dvornova, A.; Havlíček, Josef; Hender, T.C.; Hronová-Bilyková, Olena; Kruezi, U.; Li, X.; Markovič, Tomáš; Pánek, Radomír; Rubinacci, G.; Tsalas, M.; Ventre, S.; Villone, F.; Zakharov, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 11 (2015), s. 113006-113006 ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * asymmetrical disruption * JET * COMPASS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2015

  11. Disruption mitigation on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Sourd, F.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Bucalossi, J.; Eriksson, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    During disruptions, the plasma energy is lost on the first wall within 1 ms, forces up to hundred tons are applied to the structures and kA of electrons are accelerated up to 50 MeV (runaway electrons). Already sources of concern in present day tokamaks, extrapolation to ITER shows the necessity of mitigation procedures, to avoid serious damages to in-vessel components. Massive gas injection was proposed, and encouraging tests have been done on Textor and DIII-D. Similar experiments where performed on Tore Supra, with the goal to validate their effect on runaway electrons, observed during the majority of disruptions. 0.1 mole of helium was injected within 5 ms in ohmic plasmas, up to 1.2 MA, either stable, or in a pre-disruptive phase (argon puffing). Beneficial effects where obtained: reduction of the current fall rate and eddy currents, total disappearance of runaway electrons and easy recovery for the next pulse, without noticeable helium pollution of following plasmas. Analysis of the 4 ms period between injection and disruption indicates that to reach these goals, one need to inject enough helium to keep it only partially ionised. It corresponds to 0.1 g for Tore Supra, and extrapolate to hundreds of grams for ITER. (authors)

  12. Jogging Can Modify Disruptive Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jill I.

    1980-01-01

    Jogging was used to modify disruptive behavior as part of the classroom routine for 12 learning disabled elementary-grade boys. The number of incidents of each of five negative behaviors were reduced by half following the 10-minute jogging routine. (SBH)

  13. Will blockchain disrupt your business?

    OpenAIRE

    Schmeiss, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    Blockchain has been praised to be “the technology most likely to change the next decade of business”. The disruptive power of the blockchain technology is yet limited, says HIIG-researcher Jessica Schmeiss. Beyond the hype, there a opportunities for companies to make their current business models more cost-effective and more efficient.

  14. Marital Alternatives and Marital Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udry, J. Richard

    1981-01-01

    Explores the usefulness of "marital alternatives" as a dimension in explaining marital stability, using longitudinal data from a panel of married, White, urban couples from 16 urban areas. Results indicated the dimension of marital alternatives appeared to be a better predictor of marital disruption than marital satisfaction. (Author/RC)

  15. Disruption mitigation on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Sourd, F.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Bucalossi, J.; Eriksson, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    During disruptions, the plasma energy is lost on the first wall within 1 ms, forces up to hundred tons are applied to the structures and kA of electrons are accelerated up to 50 MeV (runaway electrons). Already sources of concern in present day tokamaks, extrapolation to ITER shows the necessity of mitigation procedures, to avoid serious damages to in-vessel components. Massive gas injection was proposed, and encouraging tests have been done on Textor and DIII-D. Similar experiments where performed on Tore Supra, with the goal to validate their effect on runaway electrons, observed during the majority of disruptions. 0.1 mole of helium was injected within 5 ms in ohmic plasmas, up to 1.2 MA, either stable, or in a pre-disruptive phase (argon puffing). Beneficial effects where obtained: reduction of the current fall rate and eddy currents, total disappearance of runaway electrons and easy recovery for the next pulse, without noticeable helium pollution of following plasmas. Analysis of the 4 ms period between injection and disruption indicates that to reach these goals, one need to inject enough helium to keep it only partially ionised. It correspond to 0.1 g for Tore Supra, and extrapolate to hundred's of grams for ITER. (author)

  16. Antibody engineering: methods and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chames, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    "Antibody Engineering: Methods and Protocols, Second Edition was compiled to give complete and easy access to a variety of antibody engineering techniques, starting from the creation of antibody repertoires and efficient...

  17. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  18. Rapid actions of xenoestrogens disrupt normal estrogenic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Cheryl S; Hu, Guangzhen; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A

    2014-03-01

    Some chemicals used in consumer products or manufacturing (e.g. plastics, surfactants, pesticides, resins) have estrogenic activities; these xenoestrogens (XEs) chemically resemble physiological estrogens and are one of the major categories of synthesized compounds that disrupt endocrine actions. Potent rapid actions of XEs via nongenomic mechanisms contribute significantly to their disruptive effects on functional endpoints (e.g. cell proliferation/death, transport, peptide release). Membrane-initiated hormonal signaling in our pituitary cell model is predominantly driven by mERα with mERβ and GPR30 participation. We visualized ERα on plasma membranes using many techniques in the past (impeded ligands, antibodies to ERα) and now add observations of epitope proximity with other membrane signaling proteins. We have demonstrated a range of rapid signals/protein activations by XEs including: calcium channels, cAMP/PKA, MAPKs, G proteins, caspases, and transcription factors. XEs can cause disruptions of the oscillating temporal patterns of nongenomic signaling elicited by endogenous estrogens. Concentration effects of XEs are nonmonotonic (a trait shared with natural hormones), making it difficult to design efficient (single concentration) toxicology tests to monitor their harmful effects. A plastics monomer, bisphenol A, modified by waste treatment (chlorination) and other processes causes dephosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases, in contrast to having no effects as it does in genomic signaling. Mixtures of XEs, commonly found in contaminated environments, disrupt the signaling actions of physiological estrogens even more severely than do single XEs. Understanding the features of XEs that drive these disruptive mechanisms will allow us to redesign useful chemicals that exclude estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Supply disruption cost for power network planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjoelle, G.H.

    1992-09-01

    A description is given of the method of approach to calculate the total annual socio-economic cost of power supply disruption and non-supplied energy, included the utilities' cost for planning. The total socio-economic supply disruption cost is the sum of the customers' disruption cost and the utilities' cost for failure and disruption. The mean weighted disruption cost for Norway for one hour disruption is NOK 19 per kWh. The customers' annual disruption cost is calculated with basis in the specific disruption cost referred to heavy load (January) and dimensioning maximum loads. The loads are reduced by factors taking into account the time variations of the failure frequency, duration, the loads and the disruption cost. 6 refs

  20. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevado Castro, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Immunization. The first step in preparing useful monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is to immunize an animal (Balb/c for example) with an appropriate antigen. Methods (only for soluble antigen): Solubilize selected antigen in Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.2-7.4, ideally at a final concentration per animal between 10 to 50 μg/ml. It is recommended that the antigen under consideration be incorporated into the emulsion adjuvants in 1:1 volumetric relation. We commonly use Frend's adjuvant (FA) to prepared immunized solution. The first immunization should be prepared with complete FA, and the another could be prepared with incomplete FA. It is recommended to inject mice with 0.2 ml intraperitoneal (ip) or subcutaneous (sc). Our experience suggests the sc route is the preferred route. A minimum protocol for immunizing mice to generate cells for preparing hybridomas is s follows: immunize sc on day 0, boost sc on day 21, take a trial bleeding on day 26; if antibody titters are satisfactory, boost ip on day 35 with antigen only, and remove the spleen to obtain cells for fusion on day 38. Fusion protocol. The myeloma cell line we are using is X63 Ag8.653. At the moment of fusion myeloma cells need a good viability (at least a 95%). 1. Remove the spleen cells from immunized mice using sterile conditions. An immune spleen should yield between 7 a 10x10 7 nucleated cells. 2. Place the spleen in 20 ml of serum-free RPMI 1640 in a Petri dish. Using a needle and syringe, inject the spleen with medium to distend and disrupt the spleen stroma and free the nucleated cells. 3. Flush the cell suspension with a Pasteur pipet to disperse clumps of cells. 4. Centrifuge the spleen cell suspension at 250g for 10 min. Resuspend the pellet in serum-free RPMI 1640. Determine cell concentration using Neuhabuer chamber. 5. Mix the myeloma cells and spleen cells in a conical 50-ml tube in serum-free RPMI 1640, 1 x10 7 spleen cells to 1x10 6 myeloma cells (ratio 10:1). Centrifuge

  1. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  2. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    surface expression of various antibody formats in the generated knockout strain. Functional scFv and scFab fragments were efficiently displayed on yeast whereas impaired chain assembly and heavy chain degradation was observed for display of full-length IgG molecules. To identify the optimal polypeptide......-antibody interface and the antibody intraface.the microenvironment and ecology of Acaryochloris and Prochloron, and in this thesis we attempted to further describe the distribution, growth characteristics and adaptive/regulatory mechanisms of these two cyanobacteria, both in their natural habitat and under defined...

  3. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  4. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Kehoe, John [Saint Davids, PA; Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  5. Bifunctional antibodies for radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, J F; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Bardies, M; Peltier, P; Gautherot, E; Barbet, J

    1995-04-01

    In two-step targeting technique using bifunctional antibodies, a nonradiolabeled immunoconjugate with slow uptake kinetics (several days) is initially injected, followed by a small radiolabeled hapten with fast kinetics (several hours) that binds to the bispecific immunoconjugate already taken up by the tumor target. In patients with colorectal or medullary thyroid cancer, clinical studies performed with an anti-CEA/anti-DTPA-indium bifunctional antibody and an indium-111-labeled di-DTPA-TL bivalent hapten showed that tumor uptake was not modified compared to results for F(ab')2 fragments of the same anti-CEA antibody directly labeled with indium-111, whereas the radioactivity of normal tissues was significantly reduced (3- to 6-fold). The fast tumor uptake kinetics (several hours) and high or very high tumor-to-normal tissue ratios obtained with the bifunctional antibody technique are favorable parameters for efficient radioimmunotherapy.

  6. Antibody Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibody Blood Tests Researchers have discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of ... do I do if I have a negative blood test (or panel) but I’m still having symptoms? ...

  7. Bodily illusions disrupt tactile sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Sarah; Pritchett, Lisa M; Harris, Laurence R

    2015-02-01

    To accurately interpret tactile information, the brain needs to have an accurate representation of the body to which to refer the sensations. Despite this, body representation has only recently been incorporated into the study of tactile perception. Here, we investigate whether distortions of body representation affect tactile sensations. We perceptually altered the length of the arm and the width of the waist using a tendon vibration illusion and measured spatial acuity and sensitivity. Surprisingly, we found reduction in both tactile acuity and sensitivity thresholds when the arm or waist was perceptually altered, which indicates a general disruption of low-level tactile processing. We postulate that the disruptive changes correspond to the preliminary stage as the body representation starts to change and may give new insights into sensory processing in people with long-term or sudden abnormal body representation such as are found in eating disorders or following amputation.

  8. Disrupting the habit of interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Honan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to the growing domain of ‘post-qualitative’ research and experiments with a new (representational form to move away from traditional and clichéd descriptions of research methods. In this paper, I want to interrogate the category of interview, and the habit of interviewing, to disrupt the clichés, so as to allow thinking of different ways of writing/speaking/representing the interactions between researcher and researched that will breathe new life into qualitative inquiries. I will attempt to flatten and shred, destabilise and disrupt our common-sense ideas about interview, including those held most sacred to the qualitative community, that of anonymity and confidentiality, as well as the privilege of the ‘transcript’ in re-presenting interview data.

  9. Disruptive technologies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Flavin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the role of “disruptive” innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally adopted and used by students and staff. Instead, other technologies not owned or controlled by HEIs are widely used to support learning and teaching. According to Christensen's theory of Disruptive Innovation, these disruptive technologies are not designed explicitly to support learning and teaching in higher education, but have educational potential. This study uses Activity Theory and Expansive Learning to analyse data regarding the impact of disruptive technologies. The data were obtained through a questionnaire survey about awareness and use of technologies, and through observation and interviews, exploring participants’ actual practice. The survey answers tended to endorse Disruptive Innovation theory, with participants establishing meanings for technologies through their use of them, rather than in keeping with a designer's intentions. Observation revealed that learners use a narrow range of technologies to support learning, but with a tendency to use resources other than those supplied by their HEIs. Interviews showed that participants use simple and convenient technologies to support their learning and teaching. This study identifies a contradiction between learning technologies made available by HEIs, and technologies used in practice. There is no evidence to suggest that a wide range of technologies is being used to support learning and teaching. Instead, a small range of technologies is being used for a wide range of tasks. Students and lecturers are not dependent on their HEIs to support learning and teaching. Instead, they self-select technologies, with use weighted towards established brands. The

  10. Engineering analysis of TFTR disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1984-09-01

    This report covers an engineering approach quantifying the currents, forces, and times, as well as plasma position, for the worst-case disruption based on engineerign circuit assumptions for the plasma. As the plasma moves toward the wall during the current-decay phase of disruption, the wall currents affect the rate of movement and, hence, the decay time. The calculated structure-induced currents differ considerably from those calculated using a presently available criterion, which specifies that the plasma remains stationary in the center of the torus while decaying in 10 ms. This report outlines the method and basis for the engineering calculation used to determine the current and forces as a function of the circuit characteristics. It provides specific calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with variations in parameters such as the thermal decay time, the torus resistance, and plasma temperature during the current decay. The study reviews possible ways to reduce the disruption damage of TFTR by reducing the magnitude of the plasma external field energy that is absorbed by the plasma during the current decay

  11. Engineering analysis of TFTR disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1984-09-01

    This report covers an engineering approach quantifying the currents, forces, and times, as well as plasma position, for the worst-case disruption based on engineerign circuit assumptions for the plasma. As the plasma moves toward the wall during the current-decay phase of disruption, the wall currents affect the rate of movement and, hence, the decay time. The calculated structure-induced currents differ considerably from those calculated using a presently available criterion, which specifies that the plasma remains stationary in the center of the torus while decaying in 10 ms. This report outlines the method and basis for the engineering calculation used to determine the current and forces as a function of the circuit characteristics. It provides specific calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with variations in parameters such as the thermal decay time, the torus resistance, and plasma temperature during the current decay. The study reviews possible ways to reduce the disruption damage of TFTR by reducing the magnitude of the plasma external field energy that is absorbed by the plasma during the current decay.

  12. Disruptive innovation as an entrepreneurial process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandra, Y.; Yang, S.-J.S.; Singh, P.; Prajogo, D.; O'Neill, P.; Rahman, S.

    2008-01-01

    Research on conditions and causal mechanisms that influence disruptive innovation has been relatively unexplored in the extant research in disruptive innovation. By re-conceptualizing disruptive innovation as an entrepreneurial process at product, firm and industry levels, this paper draws on

  13. Revision Hope: Writing Disruption in Composition Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julie

    1997-01-01

    Uses Roland Barthes's metaphor of the "punctum" to explore the transformative potential of disruptions. Argues that writing teachers have been trained to read disruption in texts and classrooms as "evidence of poor taste or failed pedagogy," but that disruptions delay closure and thereby create spaces wherein theories and…

  14. Disruption and Distinctiveness in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    "Disruption"--while an evocative word triggering feelings of anxiety and perhaps even fear--also signals renewal and growth. The Higher Education (HE) sector in England has experienced some profound disruption over the years, and yet has emerged stronger and renewed in many ways. The impact of recent disruptive forces, from fees to the…

  15. Routine Responses to Disruption of Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Mahua

    2015-01-01

    "Organisational routines" is a widely studied research area. However, there is a dearth of research on disruption of routines. The few studies on disruption of routines discussed problem-solving activities that are carried out in response to disruption. In contrast, this study develops a theory of "solution routines" that are a…

  16. Fisheries-induced disruptive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Pietro; Hui, Cang; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2015-01-21

    Commercial harvesting is recognized to induce adaptive responses of life-history traits in fish populations, in particular by shifting the age and size at maturation through directional selection. In addition to such evolution of a target stock, the corresponding fishery itself may adapt, in terms of fishing policy, technological progress, fleet dynamics, and adaptive harvest. The aim of this study is to assess how the interplay between natural and artificial selection, in the simplest setting in which a fishery and a target stock coevolve, can lead to disruptive selection, which in turn may cause trait diversification. To this end, we build an eco-evolutionary model for a size-structured population, in which both the stock׳s maturation schedule and the fishery׳s harvest rate are adaptive, while fishing may be subject to a selective policy based on fish size and/or maturity stage. Using numerical bifurcation analysis, we study how the potential for disruptive selection changes with fishing policy, fishing mortality, harvest specialization, life-history tradeoffs associated with early maturation, and other demographic and environmental parameters. We report the following findings. First, fisheries-induced disruptive selection is readily caused by commonly used fishing policies, and occurs even for policies that are not specific for fish size or maturity, provided that the harvest is sufficiently adaptive and large individuals are targeted intensively. Second, disruptive selection is more likely in stocks in which the selective pressure for early maturation is naturally strong, provided life-history tradeoffs are sufficiently consequential. Third, when a fish stock is overexploited, fisheries targeting only large individuals might slightly increase sustainable yield by causing trait diversification (even though the resultant yield always remains lower than the maximum sustainable yield that could be obtained under low fishing mortality, without causing disruptive

  17. Changing perspectives in medical practice: disruptive innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterick, Zachary R; Pradhan, Sala R; Paterick, Timothy E; Waterhouse, Blake E

    2009-01-01

    Disruptive innovation represents a business model that identifies a market location and increases consumer options. Retail clinics may represent a disruptive healthcare innovation that identifies strategies to reduce the cost of healthcare at the primary care level. The future of healthcare demands disruptive innovation that will allow for the 50 million uninsured members of our society to receive medical care. Disruptive innovative solutions need to ensure access, quality, and reasonable cost. Retail clinics represent the tip of the iceberg in disruptive innovative thinking. The obstacles that retail clinics must solve will be lessons learned for those that identify future innovative techniques.

  18. Natural and Man-made Antibody Repertories for Antibody Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C eAlmagro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of human, mice and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process.

  19. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltz, Jacob I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  20. Incumbent response to disruptive innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaulio, Matti; Thorén, Kent; Rohrbeck, René

    changes, however successful in minor business model adaptions. An implication hereof is that the business model concept as such has low predictive power in explaining success and failure and is in the need of an operationalization. In addition, the article discusses the relationship between technological...... in relation to disruptive change. In relation to technical change the case company has successfully in transferred its technology from one generation to the next during more than 20 years. In relation to business model change the case company has been proactive but not successful in major business model...... innovation and business innovation....

  1. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  2. Disrupted yeast mitochondria can import precursor proteins directly through their inner membrane

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Import of precursor proteins into the yeast mitochondrial matrix can occur directly across the inner membrane. First, disruption of the outer membrane restores protein import to mitochondria whose normal import sites have been blocked by an antibody against the outer membrane or by a chimeric, incompletely translocated precursor protein. Second, a potential- and ATP-dependent import of authentic or artificial precursor proteins is observed with purified inner membrane vesicles virtually free ...

  3. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook

    1979-01-01

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  4. Disruptive innovation for social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Clayton M; Baumann, Heiner; Ruggles, Rudy; Sadtler, Thomas M

    2006-12-01

    Countries, organizations, and individuals around the globe spend aggressively to solve social problems, but these efforts often fail to deliver. Misdirected investment is the primary reason for that failure. Most of the money earmarked for social initiatives goes to organizations that are structured to support specific groups of recipients, often with sophisticated solutions. Such organizations rarely reach the broader populations that could be served by simpler alternatives. There is, however, an effective way to get to those underserved populations. The authors call it "catalytic innovation." Based on Clayton Christensen's disruptive-innovation model, catalytic innovations challenge organizational incumbents by offering simpler, good-enough solutions aimed at underserved groups. Unlike disruptive innovations, though, catalytic innovations are focused on creating social change. Catalytic innovators are defined by five distinct qualities. First, they create social change through scaling and replication. Second, they meet a need that is either overserved (that is, the existing solution is more complex than necessary for many people) or not served at all. Third, the products and services they offer are simpler and cheaper than alternatives, but recipients view them as good enough. Fourth, they bring in resources in ways that initially seem unattractive to incumbents. And fifth, they are often ignored, put down, or even encouraged by existing organizations, which don't see the catalytic innovators' solutions as viable. As the authors show through examples in health care, education, and economic development, both nonprofit and for-profit groups are finding ways to create catalytic innovation that drives social change.

  5. Tokamak disruption heat flux simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langhoff, M.; Hess, G.; Gahl, J.; Ingram, R.

    1990-01-01

    A coaxial plasma gun system, operating in the deflagration mode, has been built and fired at the University of New Mexico. This system, powered by a 100 kJ capacitor bank, was designed to give a variable pulse length of approximately 50-100 us. The gun is intended to deliver to a target an energy deposition density of 1 kJ per cm 2 via impact with a deuterium plasma possessing a highly directed energy. This system should simulate on the target, over an area of approximately 10 cm 2 , the heat flux of a tokamak plasma disruption on plasma facing components. Current diagnostics for the system are rather rudimentary but sufficient for determination of plasma pulse characteristics and energy transfer to target. Electrical measurements include bank voltage measured via resistive voltage dividers, and bank current measured via Rogowski coil. The shape of the plasma, its position relative to the target area, and the final impact area, is determined via open-shutter photography and the use of witness plates. Total energy deposited onto targets will be determined through simple calorimetry and careful target mass measurements. Preliminary results describing the ablation of carbon targets exposed to disruption like heat fluxes will be presented as well as a description of the experimental apparatus

  6. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  7. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that you have a higher chance of developing thyroid disease in the future. Antithyroid microsomal antibodies may be ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 11. Weiss RE, Refetoff S. Thyroid function testing. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and ... Lupus Read more ...

  8. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    determine their targets on the cell. The newly discovered antibodies will then be engineered for utility as new highly specific drugs and diagnostics in...are from the aldo-keto reductase family (AKRs). Remarkably, 3 of the top 10 genes with induction in the mesenchymal TES2b cells Figure 1. Amino

  9. Monoclonal antibodies in haematopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignani, F.; Martelli, M.F.; Mason, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Oncogene (c-myc, c-myb) amplification in acute myelogenous leukaemia; Ultrastructural characterization of leukaemic cells with monoloclonal antibodies; Origin of B-cell malignancies; Immunohistology of gut lymphomas; and Spurious evidence of lineage infidelity in monocytic leukaemia.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  11. Current concepts in neuroendocrine disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Olea, Martha; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Orlando, Edward F; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Rosenfeld, Cheryl; Wolstenholme, Jennifer; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  12. Current Concepts in Neuroendocrine Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  13. Current disruption in toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    Attempts at raising the density or the plasma current in a tokamak above certain critical values generally result in termination of the discharge by a disruption. This sudden end of the plasma current and plasma confinement is accompanied by large induced voltages and currents in the outer structures which, in large tokamaks, can only be handled with considerable effort, and which will probably only be tolerable in reactors as rare accidents. Because of its crucial importance for the construction and operation of tokamaks, this phenomenon and its theoretical interpretation were the subject of a three-day symposium organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik at Garching from February 14 to 16. (orig./HT)

  14. CATASTROPHIC DISRUPTION OF COMET ISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keane, Jacqueline V.; Kleyna, Jan T.; Riesen, Timm-Emmanuel; Meech, Karen J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B. [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA GSFC, MS 690, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Coulson, Iain M. [Joint Astronomy Center, 660 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Sekanina, Zdenek [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kracht, Rainer, E-mail: keane@ifa.hawaii.edu [Ostlandring 53, D-25335 Elmshorn, Schleswig-Holstein (Germany)

    2016-11-10

    We report submillimeter 450 and 850 μ m dust continuum observations for comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained at heliocentric distances 0.31–0.08 au prior to perihelion on 2013 November 28 ( r {sub h} = 0.0125 au). These observations reveal a rapidly varying dust environment in which the dust emission was initially point-like. As ISON approached perihelion, the continuum emission became an elongated dust column spread out over as much as 60″ (>10{sup 5} km) in the anti-solar direction. Deconvolution of the November 28.04 850 μ m image reveals numerous distinct clumps consistent with the catastrophic disruption of comet ISON, producing ∼5.2 × 10{sup 10} kg of submillimeter-sized dust. Orbital computations suggest that the SCUBA-2 emission peak coincides with the comet's residual nucleus.

  15. Catastrophic Disruption of Comet ISON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Jacqueline V.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Coulson, Iain M.; Kleyna, Jan T.; Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer; Riesen, Timm-Emmanuel; Meech, Karen J.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    We report submillimeter 450 and 850 microns dust continuum observations for comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained at heliocentric distances 0.31-0.08 au prior to perihelion on 2013 November 28 (rh?=?0.0125 au). These observations reveal a rapidly varying dust environment in which the dust emission was initially point-like. As ISON approached perihelion, the continuum emission became an elongated dust column spread out over as much as 60? (greater than 10(exp 5) km in the anti-solar direction. Deconvolution of the November 28.04 850 microns image reveals numerous distinct clumps consistent with the catastrophic disruption of comet ISON, producing approximately 5.2?×?10(exp 10) kg of submillimeter-sized dust. Orbital computations suggest that the SCUBA-2 emission peak coincides with the comet's residual nucleus.

  16. Identification, production, and use of polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies for immunoaffinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nancy E; Foley, Katherine M; Stalder, Elizabeth S; Burgess, Richard R

    2009-01-01

    Immunoaffinity chromatography is a powerful tool for purification of proteins and protein complexes. The availability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized the field of immunoaffinity chromatography by providing a continuous supply of highly uniform antibody. Before the availability of mAbs, the recovery of the target protein from immobilized polyclonal antibodies usually required very harsh, often denaturing conditions. Although harsh conditions are often still used to disrupt the antigen-antibody interaction when using a mAb, various methods have been developed to exploit the uniformity of the antigen-antibody reaction in order to identify agents or conditions that gently disrupt this interaction and thus result in higher recovery of active protein from immunoaffinity chromatography. We discuss here the use of a specific type of monoclonal antibody that we have designated "polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies" (PR-mAbs). These are naturally occurring mAbs that have high affinity for the antigen under binding conditions, but have low affinity in the presence of a combination of low molecular weight hydroxylated compounds (polyols) and nonchaotropic salts. Therefore, these PR-mAbs can be used for gentle immunoaffinity chromatography. PR-mAbs can be easily identified and adapted to a powerful protein purification method for a target protein.

  17. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  18. Automatic location of disruption times in JET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, R; Vega, J; Murari, A

    2014-11-01

    The loss of stability and confinement in tokamak plasmas can induce critical events known as disruptions. Disruptions produce strong electromagnetic forces and thermal loads which can damage fundamental components of the devices. Determining the disruption time is extremely important for various disruption studies: theoretical models, physics-driven models, or disruption predictors. In JET, during the experimental campaigns with the JET-C (Carbon Fiber Composite) wall, a common criterion to determine the disruption time consisted of locating the time of the thermal quench. However, with the metallic ITER-like wall (JET-ILW), this criterion is usually not valid. Several thermal quenches may occur previous to the current quench but the temperature recovers. Therefore, a new criterion has to be defined. A possibility is to use the start of the current quench as disruption time. This work describes the implementation of an automatic data processing method to estimate the disruption time according to this new definition. This automatic determination allows both reducing human efforts to locate the disruption times and standardizing the estimates (with the benefit of being less vulnerable to human errors).

  19. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  20. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Zegers (Netty)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps

  1. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the

  2. Magnetic Purification of Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadge, Vijaykumar Laxman

    This work aimed at the development of magnetic nanoparticles for antibody purification and at the evaluation of their performance in Magnetic fishing and in a newly developed hybrid technology Magnetic Aqueous Two Phase Systems. Magnetic materials were produced by coprecipitation and solvothermal approaches. Natural polymers such as dextran, extracellular polysaccharide and gum Arabic were employed for coating of iron oxide magnetic supports. Polymer coated magnetic supports were then modified with synthetic antibody specific ligands,namely boronic acid, a triazine ligand (named 22/8) and an Ugi ligand (named A2C7I1). To optimize the efficacy of magnetic nanoparticles for antibody magnetic fishing, various solutions of pure and crude antibody solutions along with BSA as a non-specific binding protein were tested. The selectivity of magnetic nanoparticle for antibody, IgG, was found effective with boronic acid and ligand 22/8. Magnetic supports were then studied for their performance in high gradient magnetic separator for effective separation capability as well as higher volume handling capability. The magnetic materials were also supplemented to aqueous two phase systems, devising a new purification technology. For this purpose, magnetic particles modified with boronic acid were more effective. This alternative strategy reduced the time of operation,maximized separation capability (yield and purity), while reducing the amount of salt required. Boronic acid coated magnetic particles bound 170 +/- 10 mg hIgG/g MP and eluted 160 +/- 5 mg hIgG/g MP, while binding only 15 +/- 5 mg BSA/g MP. The affinity constant for the interaction between hIgG and APBA_MP was estimated as 4.9 x 105 M-1 (Ka) with a theoretical maximum capacity of 492 mg hIgG adsorbed/g MP (Qmax). APBA_MPs were also tested for antibody purification directly from CHO cell supernatants. The particles were able to bind 98% of IgG loaded and to recover 95% of pure IgG (purity greater than 98%) at extremely

  3. Modulating Antibody Structure and Function through Directed Mutations and Chemical Rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Christine E; Rincon Pabon, Juan Pablo; Khowsathit, Jittasak; Castaldi, M Paola; Kazmirski, Steven L; Weis, David D; Zhang, Andrew X; Karanicolas, John

    2018-04-09

    Monoclonal antibody therapeutics have revolutionized the treatment of diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders, and also serve as research reagents for diverse and unparalleled applications. To extend their utility in both contexts, we have begun development of tunable antibodies, whose activity can be controlled by addition of a small molecule. Conceptually, we envision that incorporating cavity-forming mutations into an antibody can disrupt its structure, thereby reducing its affinity for antigen; addition of a small molecule may then restore the active structure, and thus rescue antigen binding. As a first proof of concept toward implementing this strategy, we have incorporated individual tryptophan to glycine mutations into FITC-E2, an anti-fluorescein single-chain variable fragment (scFv). We find that these can disrupt the protein structure and diminish antigen binding, and further that both structure and function can be rescued by addition of indole to complement the deleted side chain. While the magnitude of the affinity difference triggered by indole is modest in this first model system, it nonetheless provides a framework for future mutation/ligand pairs that may induce more dramatic responses. Disrupting and subsequently rescuing antibody activity, as exemplified by this first example, may represent a new approach to "design in" fine-tuned control of antibody activity for a variety of future applications.

  4. Clinical use of antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Hoer, Gustav; Cox, P.H.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies as tumour specific carrier molecules for therapeutic agents or as in vivo diagnostic reagents when labelled with radionuclides or NMR signal enhancers is attracting more and more attention. The potential is enormous but the technical problems are also considerable requiring the concerted action of many different scientific disciplines. This volume is based upon a symposium organised in Frankfurt in 1990 under the auspices of the European Association of Nuclear Medicines' Specialist Task Groups on Cardiology and the Utility of Labelled Antibodies. It gives a multidisciplinary review of the state of the art and of problems to be solved as well as recording the not inconsiderable successes which have been booked to date. The book will be of value as a reference to both clinicians and research scientists. refs.; figs.; tabs

  5. Studying host cell protein interactions with monoclonal antibodies using high throughput protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodiya, Vikram N; Lequieu, Joshua; Rodriguez, Maricel; McDonald, Paul; Lazzareschi, Kathlyn P

    2012-10-01

    Protein A chromatography is typically used as the initial capture step in the purification of monoclonal antibodies produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Although exploiting an affinity interaction for purification, the level of host cell proteins in the protein A eluent varies significantly with different feedstocks. Using a batch binding chromatography method, we performed a controlled study to assess host cell protein clearance across both MabSelect Sure and Prosep vA resins. We individually spiked 21 purified antibodies into null cell culture fluid generated with a non-producing cell line, creating mock cell culture fluids for each antibody with an identical composition of host cell proteins and antibody concentration. We demonstrated that antibody-host cell protein interactions are primarily responsible for the variable levels of host cell proteins in the protein A eluent for both resins when antibody is present. Using the additives guanidine HCl and sodium chloride, we demonstrated that antibody-host cell protein interactions may be disrupted, reducing the level of host cell proteins present after purification on both resins. The reduction in the level of host cell proteins differed between antibodies suggesting that the interaction likely varies between individual antibodies but encompasses both an electrostatic and hydrophobic component. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Survey of disruption causes at JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, P. C.; Johnson, M. F.; Alper, B.; Buratti, P.; Hender, T. C.; Koslowski, H. R.; Riccardo, V.

    2011-01-01

    A survey has been carried out into the causes of all 2309 disruptions over the last decade of JET operations. The aim of this survey was to obtain a complete picture of all possible disruption causes, in order to devise better strategies to prevent or mitigate their impact. The analysis allows the

  7. Recovery of Disruptions in Rapid Transit Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadarso, L.; Marin, A.; Maroti, G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the disruption management problem of rapid transit rail networks. Besides optimizing the timetable and the rolling stock schedules, we explicitly deal with the effects of the disruption on the passenger demand.We propose a two-step approach that combines an integrated optimization

  8. Disruption Management in Passenger Railway Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Julie Jespersen; Potthoff, Daniel; Clausen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with disruption management in passenger railway transportation. In the disruption management process, many actors belonging to different organizations play a role. In this paper we therefore describe the process itself and the roles of the different actors. Furthermore, we discus...

  9. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G.; Krægpøth, Morten Visby; Skyt Nielsen, Helena

    identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic...... achievement of peers by about 1.5-2 percent of a standard deviation....

  10. Disrupted Sleep: From Molecules to Cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Someren, E.J.; Cirelli, C.; Dijk, D.J.; Van Cauter, E.; Schwartz, S.; Chee, M.W.L.

    2015-01-01

    Although the functions of sleep remain to be fully elucidated, it is clear that there are far-reaching effects of its disruption, whether by curtailment for a single night, by a few hours each night over a long period, or by disruption in sleep continuity. Epidemiological and experimental studies of

  11. Disrupted Sleep : From Molecules to Cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Someren, Eus J W; Cirelli, Chiara; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Van Cauter, Eve; Schwartz, Sophie; Chee, Michael W L

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Although the functions of sleep remain to be fully elucidated, it is clear that there are far-reaching effects of its disruption, whether by curtailment for a single night, by a few hours each night over a long period, or by disruption in sleep continuity. Epidemiological and

  12. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G.; Krægpøth, Morten Visby; Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    2015-01-01

    identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic...

  13. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G.; Krægpøth, Morten Visby; Skyt Nielsen, Helena

    identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic...

  14. Resistance to Disruption in a Classroom Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E.; Neal, Carrie M.; Ahearn, William H.; Wheeler, Emily E.; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B.; Dube, William V.

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple…

  15. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column.

  16. Plasma membrane disruption: repair, prevention, adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Steinhardt, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    Many metazoan cells inhabit mechanically stressful environments and, consequently, their plasma membranes are frequently disrupted. Survival requires that the cell rapidly repair or reseal the disruption. Rapid resealing is an active and complex structural modification that employs endomembrane as its primary building block, and cytoskeletal and membrane fusion proteins as its catalysts. Endomembrane is delivered to the damaged plasma membrane through exocytosis, a ubiquitous Ca2+-triggered response to disruption. Tissue and cell level architecture prevent disruptions from occurring, either by shielding cells from damaging levels of force, or, when this is not possible, by promoting safe force transmission through the plasma membrane via protein-based cables and linkages. Prevention of disruption also can be a dynamic cell or tissue level adaptation triggered when a damaging level of mechanical stress is imposed. Disease results from failure of either the preventive or resealing mechanisms.

  17. Mechanistic evaluation of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla

    BACKGROUND: This PhD project is part of the research area concerning effects of endocrine disrupters at the National Food Institute at DTU in Denmark. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have proved to be important for improper development of the male reproductive organs and subsequent for the ......BACKGROUND: This PhD project is part of the research area concerning effects of endocrine disrupters at the National Food Institute at DTU in Denmark. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have proved to be important for improper development of the male reproductive organs and subsequent...... metabolising system using liver S9 mixtures or hepatic rat microsomes could be a convenient method for the incorporation of metabolic aspects into in vitro testing for endocrine disrupting effects....

  18. Allosteric Inhibition Through Core Disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, James R.; Shoichet, Brian K. (NWU); (UCSF)

    2010-03-05

    Although inhibitors typically bind pre-formed sites on proteins, it is theoretically possible to inhibit by disrupting the folded structure of a protein or, in the limit, to bind preferentially to the unfolded state. Equilibria defining how such molecules act are well understood, but structural models for such binding are unknown. Two novel inhibitors of {beta}-lactamase were found to destabilize the enzyme at high temperatures, but at lower temperatures showed no preference for destabilized mutant enzymes versus stabilized mutants. X-ray crystal structures showed that both inhibitors bound to a cryptic site in {beta}-lactamase, which the inhibitors themselves created by forcing apart helixes 11 and 12. This opened up a portion of the hydrophobic core of the protein, into which these two inhibitors bind. Although this binding site is 16 {angstrom} from the center of the active site, the conformational changes were transmitted through a sequence of linked motions to a key catalytic residue, Arg244, which in the complex adopts conformations very different from those in catalytically competent enzyme conformations. These structures offer a detailed view of what has heretofore been a theoretical construct, and suggest the possibility for further design against this novel site.

  19. [Study of anti-idiotype antibodies to human monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, R; Takahashi, N; Owaki, I; Kannagi, R; Endo, N; Morita, N; Inoue, M

    1992-02-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 (IgM, lambda), was generated, which reacted specifically with a major of glycolipid present in LS174T colon cancer cells. The glycolipid antigen which reacted with the ll-50 antibody was expected to four sugar residues from its TLC mobility, and it was ascertained that the glycolipid antigen which reacted with ll-50 antibody might be Lc4 antigen [Gal beta 1----3 GLcNAc beta 1----3 Gal beta 1----4 Glc beta 1----1 Cer] judging from TLC immunostaining and ELISA when the reactivity of ll-50 antibody was tested using various pure glycolipids in 3-5 sugar residues as an antigen. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated ll-50 antibody. The serum of the Lc4 antigen recognized by ll-50 antibody was significantly higher in patients with malignant disorders than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). Three mouse monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3 and C5 (all IgG1), were generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with ll-50 antibody. These anti-idiotype antibodies specifically bound to to human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 and had a significant inhibitory activity towards the binding of ll-50 antibody to the Lc4 antigen. This indicated that these anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5, were paratope-related anti-idiotype antibodies. G3, B3, and C5 were expected to define the nearest idiotope because they could mutually inhibit ll-50 antibody. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5. As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by C5 (Id-C5+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by B3 (Id-B3+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher

  20. 5-Modified-2'-dU and 2'-dC as mutagenic anti HIV-1 proliferation agents: synthesis and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Safadi, Yazan; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Laumond, Géraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Burger, Alain; Marquet, Roland; Vivet-Boudou, Valérie

    2010-02-25

    With the goal of limiting HIV-1 proliferation by increasing the mutation rate of the viral genome, we synthesized a series of pyrimidine nucleoside analogues modified in position 5 of the aglycone moiety but unmodified on the sugar part. The synthetic strategies allow us to prepare the targeted compounds directly from commercially available nucleosides. All compounds were tested for their ability to reduce HIV-1 proliferation in cell culture. Two of them (5-hydroxymethyl-2'-dU (1c) and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-dC (2c)) displayed a moderate antiviral activity in single passage experiments. The same two compounds plus two additional ones (5-carbamoyl-2'-dU (1a) and 5-carbamoylmethyl-2'-dU (1b)) were potent inhibitors of HIV-1 RT activity in serial passage assays, in which they induced a progressive loss of HIV-1 replication. In addition, viruses collected after seven passages in the presence of 1c and 2c replicated very poorly after withdrawal of these compounds, consistent with the accumulation of deleterious mutations in the HIV-1 genome.

  1. Development of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Agent from within: Effect of Chimeric Vpr-Containing Protease Cleavage Site Residues on Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio, D.; Rizvi, T. A.; Cartas, M.; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Weber, I. T.; Koprowski, H.; Srinivasan, A.

    1997-04-01

    Effective antiviral agents will be of great value in controlling virus replication and delaying the onset of HIV-1-related disease symptoms. Current therapy involves the use of antiviral agents that target the enzymatic functions of the virus, resulting in the emergence of resistant viruses to these agents, thus lowering their effectiveness. To overcome this problem, we have considered the idea of developing novel agents from within HIV-1 as inhibitors of virus replication. The specificity of the Vpr protein for the HIV-1 virus particle makes it an attractive molecule for the development of antiviral agents targeting the events associated with virus maturation. We have generated chimeric Vpr proteins containing HIV-1-specific sequences added to the C terminus of Vpr. These sequences correspond to nine cleavage sites of the Gag and Gag-Pol precursors of HIV-1. The chimeric Vpr constructs were introduced into HIV-1 proviral DNA to assess their effect on virus infectivity using single- and multiple-round replication assays. The virus particles generated exhibited a variable replication pattern depending on the protease cleavage site used as a fusion partner. Interestingly, the chimeric Vpr containing the cleavage sequences from the junction of p24 and p2, 24/2, completely abolished virus infectivity. These results show that chimeric proteins generated from within HIV-1 have the ability to suppress HIV-1 replication and make ideal agents for gene therapy or intracellular immunization to treat HIV-1 infection.

  2. Rapid progressing allele HLA-B35 Px restricted anti-HIV-1 CD8+ T cells recognize vestigial CTL epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian B Willberg

    Full Text Available The HLA-B*35-Px allele has been associated with rapid disease progression in HIV-1 infection, in contrast to the HLA-B*35-Py allele.Immune responses to two HLA-B*35 restricted HIV-1 specific CTL epitopes and their variants were followed longitudinally during early HIV-1 infection in 16 HLA-B*35+ individuals. Subjects expressing HLA-B*35-Px alleles showed no difference in response to the consensus epitopes compared to individuals with HLA-B*35-Py alleles. Surprisingly, all the HLA-B*35-Px+ individuals responded to epitope-variants even in the absence of a consensus response. Sequencing of the viral population revealed no evidence of variant virus in any of the individuals.This demonstrates a novel phenomenon that distinguishes individuals with the HLA-B*35-Px rapid progressing allele and those with the HLA-B*35-Py slower progressing allele.

  3. Secondary structure in solution of two anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozymes as investigated by two-dimensional 1H 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, R. H.; Sarma, M. H.; Rein, R.; Shibata, M.; Setlik, R. S.; Ornstein, R. L.; Kazim, A. L.; Cairo, A.; Tomasi, T. B.

    1995-01-01

    Two hammerhead chimeric RNA/DNA ribozymes (HRz) were synthesized in pure form. Both were 30 nucleotides long, and the sequences were such that they could be targeted to cleave the HIV-1 gag RNA. Named HRz-W and HRz-M, the former had its invariable core region conserved, the latter had a uridine in the invariable region replaced by a guanine. Their secodary structures were determined by 2D NOESY 1H 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy in 90% water and 10% D2(0), following the imino protons. The data show that both HRz-M and HRz-W form identical secondary structures with stem regions consisting of continuous stacks of AT and GT pairs. An energy minimized computer model of this stem region is provided. The results suggest that the loss of catalytic activity that is known to result when an invariant core residue is replaced is not related to the secondary structure of the ribozymes in the absence of substrate.

  4. Elucidating a Key Anti-HIV-1 and Cancer-Associated Axis: The Structure of CCL5 (Rantes) in Complex with CCR5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-06-01

    CCL5 (RANTES) is an inflammatory chemokine which binds to chemokine receptor CCR5 and induces signaling. The CCL5:CCR5 associated chemotactic signaling is of critical biological importance and is a potential HIV-1 therapeutic axis. Several studies provided growing evidence for the expression of CCL5 and CCR5 in non-hematological malignancies. Therefore, the delineation of the CCL5:CCR5 complex structure can pave the way for novel CCR5-targeted drugs. We employed a computational protocol which is primarily based on free energy calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, and report, what is to our knowledge, the first computationally derived CCL5:CCR5 complex structure which is in excellent agreement with experimental findings and clarifies the functional role of CCL5 and CCR5 residues which are associated with binding and signaling. A wealth of polar and non-polar interactions contributes to the tight CCL5:CCR5 binding. The structure of an HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop in complex with CCR5 has recently been derived through a similar computational protocol. A comparison between the CCL5 : CCR5 and the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop : CCR5 complex structures depicts that both the chemokine and the virus primarily interact with the same CCR5 residues. The present work provides insights into the blocking mechanism of HIV-1 by CCL5.

  5. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of 1-(thiophen-2-yl)-9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole Derivatives as Anti-HIV-1 Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Penta; Lu, Cui-Lin; Chander, Subhash; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Murugesan, Sankarnarayanan

    2015-06-01

    A novel series of 1-(thiophen-2-yl)-9H-pyrido [3,4-b]indole derivatives were synthesized using DL-tryptophan as starting material. All the compounds were characterized by spectral analysis such as (1) H NMR, Mass, IR, elemental analysis and evaluated for inhibitory potency against HIV-1 replication. Among the reported analogues, compound 7g exhibited significant anti-HIV activity with EC(50) 0.53 μm and selectivity index 483; compounds 7e, 7i, and 7o displayed moderate activity with EC(50) 3.8, 3.8, and 2.8 μm and selectivity index >105, >105, and 3.85, respectively. Interestingly, compound 7g inhibited p24 antigen expression in acute HIV-1(IIIB) infected cell line C8166 with EC50 1.1 μm. In this study, we also reported the Lipinski rule of 5 parameters, predicted toxicity profile, drug-likeness, and drug score of the synthesized analogues. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity of 1-substiuted 6-(3-cyanobenzoyl) and [(3-cyanophenyl)fluoromethyl]-5-ethyl-uracils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik B; Loddo, Roberta

    2009-01-01

    1-Substiuted 6-(3-cyanobenzoyl) and [(3-cyanophenyl)fluoromethyl]-5-ethyl-uracils were synthesized and evaluated in cell-based assays against HIV-1 wild-type and its clinically relevant non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistant mutants. Some of the synthesized compounds...

  7. The antibody Hijikata Tatsumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éden Peretta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Considered one of the most influential modern dance representatives in Japan, Tatsumi Hijikata’s work was a milestone in the Japanese post-war experimental artistic scene. Heretic son of his time, he staged a fertile mix of artistic and cultural influences, overlapping subversive elements of European arts and philosophy with radical references from pre-modern Japanese culture. In this way he built the foundations of its unstable antibody, its political-artistic project of dissolution of a organism, both physical and social.

  8. Report on Criteria for Endocrine Disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters as a project contracted by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. The Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters is an interdisciplinary scientific network without walls. The main purpose of the Centre is to build and gather....... The overall aim of this project is to provide a science based proposal for criteria for endocrine disrupters. The terms of reference for the project specify elements to be included and/or addressed when developing the criteria (Annex 1). Also, several international reports and papers dealing with assessment...

  9. The Effects of Disruption on Strategic Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, Anders

    2017-01-01

    , Digitalization, Globalization and much more. Furthermore, the effects of disruption are now being felt by organizations and industries all over the world. In this paper, we will try to outline and illustrate some of those effects using the case-study of an international, Danish, SME. The case company has been...... forced to face some challenges caused by disruption and in the process of doing so has changed its strategy process significantly towards a more learning based approach to strategic management. Keywords: disruption; case- study; SME; strategy process....

  10. Periodic disruptions in the MT-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoletnik, S.

    1988-11-01

    Disruptive instabilities are common phenomena in toroidal devices, especially in tokamaks. Three types can be distinguished: internal, minor and major disruptions. Periodic minor disruptions in the MT-1 tokamak were measured systematically with values of the limiter safety factor between 4 and 10. The density limit as a function of plasma current and horizontal displacement was investigated. Precursor oscillations always appear before the instability with increasing amplitude but can be observed at the density limit with quasi-stationary amplitude. Phase correlation between precursor oscillations were measured with Mirnov coils and x-ray detectors, and they show good agreement with a simple magnetic island model. (R.P.) 11 refs.; 6 figs

  11. Visual in-pile fuel disruption experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, G.L.; Ostensen, R.W.; Young, M.F.

    1978-01-01

    In a loss-of-flow (LOF) accident in an LMFBR, the mode of disruption of fuel may determine the probability of a subsequent energetic excursion. To investigate these phenomena, in-pile disruption of fission-heated irradiated fuel pellets was recorded by high speed cinematography. Instead of fuel frothing or dust-cloud breakup (as used in the SAS code) massive and very rapid fuel swelling, not predicted by analytical models, occurred. These tests support massive fuel swelling as the initial mode of fuel disruption in a LOF accident. (author)

  12. Erosion products in disruption simulation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Barsuk, V.; Kurkin, S.; Mironova, E.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Zhitlukhin, A. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research, Troisk, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Arkhipov, I. [Inst. of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation); Werle, H.; Wuerz, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    Erosion of divertor materials under tokamak disruption event presents a serious problem of ITER technology. Erosion restricts the divertor lifetime and leads to production of redeposited layers of the material retaining large amount of tritium, which is a major safety issue for future fusion reactor. Since ITER disruptive heatloads are not achievable in existing tokamaks, material erosion is studied in special simulation experiments. Till now the simulation experiments have focused mainly on investigation of shielding effect and measurement of erosion rate. In the present work the properties of eroded and redeposited graphite are studied under condition typical for hard ITER disruption. (author)

  13. Disruptions and Their Mitigation in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, K.H.; Jaspers, R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Savtchkov, A.; Lehnen, M.; Waidmann, G.

    2005-01-01

    Disruptions remain a major concern for tokamak devices, particularly for large machines. The critical issues are the induced (halo) currents and the resulting forces, the excessive heating of exposed surfaces by the instantaneous power release, and the possible occurrence of highly energetic runaway electrons. The key topics of the investigations on TEXTOR in the recent years concerned (a) the power deposition pattern recorded by a fast infrared scanner, (b) the runaway generation measured by synchrotron radiation in the infrared spectral region, (c) method development for 'healing' discharges that are going to disrupt, and (d) massive gas puffing for mitigating the adverse effects of disruptions

  14. Consequences of repeated blood-brain barrier disruption in football players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Marchi

    Full Text Available The acknowledgement of risks for traumatic brain injury in American football players has prompted studies for sideline concussion diagnosis and testing for neurological deficits. While concussions are recognized etiological factors for a spectrum of neurological sequelae, the consequences of sub-concussive events are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD and the accompanying surge of the astrocytic protein S100B in blood may cause an immune response associated with production of auto-antibodies. We also wished to determine whether these events result in disrupted white matter on diffusion tensor imaging (DT scans. Players from three college football teams were enrolled (total of 67 volunteers. None of the players experienced a concussion. Blood samples were collected before and after games (n = 57; the number of head hits in all players was monitored by movie review and post-game interviews. S100B serum levels and auto-antibodies against S100B were measured and correlated by direct and reverse immunoassays (n = 15 players; 5 games. A subset of players underwent DTI scans pre- and post-season and after a 6-month interval (n = 10. Cognitive and functional assessments were also performed. After a game, transient BBB damage measured by serum S100B was detected only in players experiencing the greatest number of sub-concussive head hits. Elevated levels of auto-antibodies against S100B were elevated only after repeated sub-concussive events characterized by BBBD. Serum levels of S100B auto-antibodies also predicted persistence of MRI-DTI abnormalities which in turn correlated with cognitive changes. Even in the absence of concussion, football players may experience repeated BBBD and serum surges of the potential auto-antigen S100B. The correlation of serum S100B, auto-antibodies and DTI changes support a link between repeated BBBD and future risk for cognitive changes.

  15. Consequences of Repeated Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvenna, Vikram; Janigro, Mattia; Ghosh, Chaitali; Zhong, Jianhui; Zhu, Tong; Blackman, Eric; Stewart, Desiree; Ellis, Jasmina; Butler, Robert; Janigro, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The acknowledgement of risks for traumatic brain injury in American football players has prompted studies for sideline concussion diagnosis and testing for neurological deficits. While concussions are recognized etiological factors for a spectrum of neurological sequelae, the consequences of sub-concussive events are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) and the accompanying surge of the astrocytic protein S100B in blood may cause an immune response associated with production of auto-antibodies. We also wished to determine whether these events result in disrupted white matter on diffusion tensor imaging (DT) scans. Players from three college football teams were enrolled (total of 67 volunteers). None of the players experienced a concussion. Blood samples were collected before and after games (n = 57); the number of head hits in all players was monitored by movie review and post-game interviews. S100B serum levels and auto-antibodies against S100B were measured and correlated by direct and reverse immunoassays (n = 15 players; 5 games). A subset of players underwent DTI scans pre- and post-season and after a 6-month interval (n = 10). Cognitive and functional assessments were also performed. After a game, transient BBB damage measured by serum S100B was detected only in players experiencing the greatest number of sub-concussive head hits. Elevated levels of auto-antibodies against S100B were elevated only after repeated sub-concussive events characterized by BBBD. Serum levels of S100B auto-antibodies also predicted persistence of MRI-DTI abnormalities which in turn correlated with cognitive changes. Even in the absence of concussion, football players may experience repeated BBBD and serum surges of the potential auto-antigen S100B. The correlation of serum S100B, auto-antibodies and DTI changes support a link between repeated BBBD and future risk for cognitive changes. PMID:23483891

  16. The future of monoclonal antibody technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zider, Alexander; Drakeman, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid growth of monoclonal antibody-based products, new technologies have emerged for creating modified forms of antibodies, including fragments, conjugates and multi-specific antibodies. We created a database of 450 therapeutic antibodies in development to determine which technologies and indications will constitute the “next generation” of antibody products. We conclude that the antibodies of the future will closely resemble the antibodies that have already been approved for commer...

  17. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  18. Disruptions, disruptivity and safer operating windows in the high-β spherical torus NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhardt, S.P.; Bell, R.E.; Diallo, A.; Gates, D.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Menard, J.E.; Mueller, D.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Tritz, K.; Yuh, H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses disruption rates, disruption causes and disruptivity statistics in the high-β N National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557). While the overall disruption rate is rather high, configurations with high β N , moderate q * , strong boundary shaping, sufficient rotation and broad pressure and current profiles are found to have the lowest disruptivity; active n = 1 control further reduces the disruptivity. The disruptivity increases rapidly for q * min > 1.25 is generally acceptable for avoiding the onset of core rotating n = 1 kink/tearing modes; when EPM and ELM disturbances are present, the required q min for avoiding those modes is raised to ∼1.5. The current ramp and early flat-top phase of the discharges are prone to n = 1 core rotating modes locking to the wall, leading to a disruption. Small changes to the discharge fuelling during this phase can often mitigate the rotation damping associated with these modes and eliminate the disruption. The largest stored-energy disruptions are those that occur at high current when a plasma current ramp-down is initiated incorrectly. (paper)

  19. In vitro and in vivo studies evaluating antisemen antibodies as a potential spermicidal agent in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, De-Yu; Liu, Li-Min; Xie, Qing-Dong; Xu, Lan; Huang, Tian-Hua

    2009-09-01

    To determine the spermicidal activity of antisemen antibodies in the hamster model. Prospective, controlled study. Advanced preclinical sciences center. Subgroups of 10 and 14 golden hamsters. Ex vitro and in vivo treatment of sperm with antisemen antibodies or normal rabbit serum. The EC(50) value of antisemen antibodies, the time required for 50% motility loss of progressively motile spermatozoa exposed to antisemen antibodies, the average sperm mitochondrion fluorescence intensity, the rate of fertilization, and the scoring of histologic changes in the hamster vaginal tissue. The EC(50) value of antisemen antibodies was found 70 microg/mL, and the time required for 50% motility loss of progressively motile spermatozoa exposed to antisemen antibodies (at 70 microg/mL) was 5 minutes; for the experimental and control groups, the average fluorescence intensities of sperm mitochondria were respectively 180.28 +/- 82.24 and 309.74 +/- 148.37, the fertilization rates in vitro were 0.09% and 45%, the rates of fertilization with intrauterine sperm injection were 0 and 15.0%. There was a significant difference between two groups. None of the four hamsters that received antisemen antibodies in gel-polyoxyl-40-stearate had epithelial disruption characteristic of inflammation. Antisemen antibodies possess appreciable spermicidal potential, which may be explored as an effective constituent of spermicide.

  20. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...... of the humanization experiment protocol....

  1. Towards a Framework of Digital Platform Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazan, Erol; Tan, Chee-Wee; Lim, Eric T. K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital platforms are disruptive information technology (IT) artifacts that erode conventional business logic associated with traditional market structures. This paper presents a framework for examining the disruptive potential of digital platforms whereby we postulate that the strategic interplay...... of governance regimes and platform layers is deterministic of whether disruptive derivatives are permitted to flourish. This framework has been employed in a comparative case study between centralized (i.e., PayPal) and decentralized (i.e., Coinkite) digital payment platforms to illustrate its applicability...... and yield propositions on the nature and impact of digital platform disruptions. Preliminary findings indicate that centralized digital platforms attempt to create unique configurals to obtain monopolistic power by tightly coupling platform layers, which are difficult to replicate. Conversely, decentralized...

  2. The Logic of Digital Platform Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazan, Erol; Tan, Chee-Wee; Lim, Eric T. K.

    Digital platforms are disruptive IT artifacts, because they facilitate the quick release of innovative platform derivatives from third parties (e.g., apps). This study endeavours to unravel the disruptive potential, caused by distinct designs and configurations of digital platforms on market...... environments. We postulate that the disruptive potential of digital platforms is determined by the degree of alignment among the business, technology and platform profiles. Furthermore, we argue that the design and configuration of the aforementioned three elements dictates the extent to which open innovation...... is permitted. To shed light on the disruptive potential of digital platforms, we opted for payment platforms as our unit of analysis. Through interviews with experts and payment providers, we seek to gain an in-depth appreciation of how contemporary digital payment platforms are designed and configured...

  3. Runaway electron generation in tokamak disruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helander, P. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Andersson, F.; Fulop, T.; Smith, T.H.; Anderson, D.; Lisak, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Electromagnetics, Goteborg (Sweden); Eriksson, L.G. [Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2004-07-01

    The time evolution of the plasma current during a tokamak disruption is calculated by solving the equations for runaway electron production simultaneously with the induction equation for the toroidal electric field. The resistive diffusion time in a post-disruption plasma is typically comparable to the runaway avalanche growth time. Accordingly, the toroidal electric field induced after the thermal quench of a disruption diffuses radially through the plasma at the same time as it accelerates runaway electrons, which in turn back-react on the electric field. When these processes are accounted for in a self-consistent way, it is found that (1) the efficiency and time scale of runaway generation agrees with JET experiments; (2) the runaway current profile typically becomes more peaked than the pre-disruption current profile; and (3) can easily become radially in the shape of filaments. It is also shown that higher runaway electron generation is expected if the thermal quench is sufficiently fast. (authors)

  4. Initiating a watch list for Ebola virus antibody escape mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig R. Miller

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV outbreak in West Africa is the largest in recorded history and resulted in over 11,000 deaths. It is essential that strategies for treatment and containment be developed to avoid future epidemics of this magnitude. With the development of vaccines and antibody-based therapies using the envelope glycoprotein (GP of the 1976 Mayinga strain, one important strategy is to anticipate how the evolution of EBOV might compromise these efforts. In this study we have initiated a watch list of potential antibody escape mutations of EBOV by modeling interactions between GP and the antibody KZ52. The watch list was generated using molecular modeling to estimate stability changes due to mutation. Every possible mutation of GP was considered and the list was generated from those that are predicted to disrupt GP-KZ52 binding but not to disrupt the ability of GP to fold and to form trimers. The resulting watch list contains 34 mutations (one of which has already been seen in humans at six sites in the GP2 subunit. Should mutations from the watch list appear and spread during an epidemic, it warrants attention as these mutations may reflect an evolutionary response from the virus that could reduce the effectiveness of interventions such as vaccination. However, this watch list is incomplete and emphasizes the need for more experimental structures of EBOV interacting with antibodies in order to expand the watch list to other epitopes. We hope that this work provokes experimental research on evolutionary escape in both Ebola and other viral pathogens.

  5. Disruption Management in Passenger Railway Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen-Groth, Julie; Potthoff, Daniel; Clausen, Jens

    This paper deals with disruption management in passenger railway transportation. In the disruption management process, many actors belonging to different organizations play a role. In this paper we therefore describe the process itself and the roles of the different actors. Furthermore, we discus...... for related problems in the airline world are discussed as well. Finally, we address the integration of the re-scheduling processes of the timetable, and the resources rolling stock and crew....

  6. Theranostics Using Antibodies and Antibody-Related Therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moek, Kirsten L; Giesen, Danique; Kok, Iris C; de Groot, Derk Jan A; Jalving, Mathilde; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Brouwers, Adrienne H; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    In theranostics, radiolabeled compounds are used to determine a treatment strategy by combining therapeutics and diagnostics in the same agent. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody-related therapeutics represent a rapidly expanding group of cancer medicines. Theranostic approaches using these

  7. BINARY DISRUPTION BY MASSIVE BLACK HOLES: HYPERVELOCITY STARS, S STARS, AND TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromley, Benjamin C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Rm 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kenyon, Scott J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Brown, Warren R., E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-04-20

    We examine whether disrupted binary stars can fuel black hole growth. In this mechanism, tidal disruption produces a single hypervelocity star (HVS) ejected at high velocity and a former companion star bound to the black hole. After a cluster of bound stars forms, orbital diffusion allows the black hole to accrete stars by tidal disruption at a rate comparable to the capture rate. In the Milky Way, HVSs and the S star cluster imply similar rates of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3} yr{sup -1} for binary disruption. These rates are consistent with estimates for the tidal disruption rate in nearby galaxies and imply significant black hole growth from disrupted binaries on 10 Gyr timescales.

  8. An Ecological Perspective on Sleep Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougeron, Kévin; Abram, Paul K

    2017-09-01

    Despite its evolutionary importance and apparent ubiquity among animals, the ecological significance of sleep is largely unresolved. The ecology of sleep has been particularly neglected in invertebrates. In insects, recent neurobehavioral research convincingly demonstrates that resting behavior shares several common characteristics with sleep in vertebrates. Laboratory studies have produced compelling evidence that sleep disruption can cause changes in insect daily activity patterns (via "sleep rebound") and have consequences for behavioral performance during active periods. However, factors that could cause insect sleep disruption in nature have not been considered nor have the ecological consequences. Drawing on evidence from laboratory studies, we argue that sleep disruption may be an overlooked component of insect ecology and could be caused by a variety of anthropogenic and nonanthropogenic factors in nature. We identify several candidate sleep-disrupting factors and provide new insights on the potential consequences of sleep disruption on individual fitness, species interactions, and ecosystem services. We propose an experimental framework to bridge the current gap in knowledge between laboratory and field studies. We conclude that sleep disruption is a potential mechanism underpinning variation in behavioral, population, and community-level processes associated with several aspects of global change.

  9. Airline Disruption Management - Perspectives, Experiences and Outlook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohl, Niklas; Larsen, Allan; Larsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused by for ex......Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused...... by for example severe weather, technical problems and crew sickness. Thus, the field of Airline Disruption Management has emerged within the past few years. The increased focus on cutting cost at the major airlines has intensified the interest in the development of new and cost e cient methods to handle airline...... disruptions. The purpose of this paper is twofold. In the first part it o ers an introduction to airline disruption management, provides the readers with a description of the planning processes and delivers a detailed overview of the numerous aspects of airline disruption management. In the second part we...

  10. Airline Disruption Management - Perspectives, Experiences and Outlook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohl, Niklas; Larsen, Allan; Larsen, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused by for ex......Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused...... by for example severe weather, technical problems and crew sickness. Thus, the field of Airline Disruption Management has emerged within the past few years. The increased focus on cutting cost at the major airlines has intensified the interest in the development of new and cost efficient methods to handle...... airline disruptions. The purpose of this paper is twofold. In the first part it offers an introduction to airline disruption management provides the readers with a description of the planning processes and delivers a detailed overview of the numerous aspects of airline disruption management. In the second...

  11. MHD stability, operational limits and disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The present physics understandings of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of tokamak plasmas, the threshold conditions for onset of MHD instability, and the resulting operational limits on attainable plasma pressure (beta limit) and density (density limit), and the consequences of plasma disruption and disruption related effects are reviewed and assessed in the context of their application to a future DT burning reactor prototype tokamak experiment such as ITER. The principal considerations covered within the MHD stability and beta limit assessments are (i) magnetostatic equilibrium, ideal MHD stability and the resulting ideal MHD beta limit; (ii) sawtooth oscillations and the coupling of sawtooth activity to other types of MHD instability; (iii) neoclassical island resistive tearing modes and the corresponding limits on beta and energy confinement; (iv) wall stabilization of ideal MHD instabilities and resistive wall instabilities; (v) mode locking effects of non-axisymmetric error fields; (vi) edge localized MHD instabilities (ELMs, etc.); and (vii) MHD instabilities and beta/pressure gradient limits in plasmas with actively modified current and magnetic shear profiles. The principal considerations covered within the density limit assessments are (i) empirical density limits; (ii) edge power balance/radiative density limits in ohmic and L-mode plasmas; and (iii) edge parameter related density limits in H-mode plasmas. The principal considerations covered in the disruption assessments are (i) disruption causes, frequency and MHD instability onset; (ii) disruption thermal and current quench characteristics; (iii) vertical instabilities (VDEs), both before and after disruption, and plasma and in-vessel halo currents; (iv) after disruption runaway electron formation, confinement and loss; (v) fast plasma shutdown (rapid externally initiated dissipation of plasma thermal and magnetic energies); (vi) means for disruption avoidance and disruption effect mitigation; and

  12. Antibodies and Plasmodium falciparum merozoites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramasamy, R; Ramasamy, M; Yasawardena, S

    There is considerable interest in using merozoite proteins in a vaccine against falciparum malaria. Observations that antibodies to merozoite surface proteins block invasion are a basis for optimism. This article draws attention to important and varied aspects of how antibodies to Plasmodium

  13. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise. Desirazu N Rao Bharath Wootla. General Article Volume 12 Issue ... Keywords. Catalytic antibodies; abzymes; hybridome technology; Diels– Alder reaction; Michaelis– Menten kinetics; Factor VIII.

  14. Antiphospholipid antibodies: standardization and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, R S; Friedline, J; Rogers, J S

    1997-09-01

    A phenomenon originally scorned as a laboratory nuisance has turned out to be an important cause of thromboembolism, fetal death, and other forms of human disease. Investigations of this inaptly named "lupus anticoagulant" has led to the discovery of at least two distinct types of autoimmune antibodies. In spite of recent discoveries regarding the pathophysiology of these antibodies, their clinical significance is still controversial.

  15. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA

  16. Mechanical algal disruption for efficient biodiesel extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, Joel David

    Biodiesel from algae provides several benefits over current biodiesel feedstocks, but the energy requirements of processing algae into a useable fuel are currently so high as to be prohibitive. One route to improving this is via disruption of the cells prior to lipid extraction, which can significantly increase energy recovery. Unfortunately, several obvious disruption techniques require more energy than can be gained. This dissertation examines the use of microbubbles to improve mechanical disruption of algal cells using experimental, theoretical, and computational methods. New laboratory experiments show that effective ultrasonic disruption of algae is achieved by adding microbubbles to an algal solution. The configuration studied flows the solution through a tube and insonifies a small section with a high-pressure ultrasound wave. Previous biomedical research has shown effective cell membrane damage on animal cells with similar methods, but the present research is the first to extend such study to algal cells. Results indicate that disruption increases with peak negative pressure between 1.90 and 3.07 MPa and with microbubble concentration up to 12.5 x 107 bubbles/ml. Energy estimates of this process suggest that it requires only one-fourth the currently most-efficient laboratory-scale disruption process. Estimates of the radius near each bubble that causes disruption (i.e. the disruption radius) suggest that it increases with peak negative pressure and is near 9--20 microm for all cases tested. It is anticipated that these procedures can be designed for better efficiency and efficacy, which will be facilitated by identifying the root mechanisms of the bubble-induced disruption. We therefore examine whether bubble expansion alone creates sufficient cell deformation for cell rupture. The spherically-symmetric Marmottant model for bubble dynamics allows estimation of the flow regime under experimental conditions. Bubble expansion is modeled as a point source of

  17. [Antibody induction after intrauterine interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, J; Giers, G; Bald, R; Hansmann, M; Hanfland, P

    1993-06-01

    Immunohematologic and clinical data, i.e., antibody profile, location of the placenta, mode of cordocentesis, obtained from 48 pregnant patients with irregular erythrocyte antibodies during the last 2 years have been retrospectively evaluated. All fetuses of the patients received intrauterine transfusions for the treatment of fetal erythroblastosis. In 16 (33%) patients (group I) a secondarily induced antibody was detected after the onset of intrauterine transfusion therapy. 32 (67%) patients (group II) did not further develop new antibody specificities. Group I exhibited a significantly different distribution in the location of the placenta (p pregnant women. In group I a 5-fold higher rate of anterior than posterior placenta location was found. The mode of cordocentesis differed significantly (p antibodies by invasive intrauterine interventions in our patients depended indirectly on the location of the placenta and directly on the mode of the puncture (trans- vs. paraplacental access).

  18. A role for mixed lineage kinases in granule cell apoptosis induced by cytoskeletal disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Geist, Marie Aavang; Veng, Lone Merete

    2006-01-01

    Microtubule disruption by colchicine induces apoptosis in selected neuronal populations. However, little is known about the upstream death signalling events mediating the neurotoxicity. We investigated first whether colchicine-induced granule cell apoptosis activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase...... (JNK) pathway. Cultured murine cerebellar granule cells were exposed to 1 microm colchicine for 24 h. Activation of the JNK pathway was detected by western blotting as well as immunocytochemistry using antibodies against phospho-c-Jun (p-c-Jun). Next, adult male rats were injected...... intracerebroventricularly with colchicine (10 microg), and JNK pathway activation in dentate granule cells (DGCs) was detected by antibodies against p-c-Jun. The second part of the study tested the involvement of mixed lineage kinases (MLK) as upstream activators of the JNK pathway in colchicine toxicity, using CEP-1347...

  19. Effect of music on mealtime disruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jeff; Carson, Derek; Lindsay, Bill

    People with learning disabilities can disrupt mealtimes with non-cooperative, aggressive and self-injurious behaviours that challenge other people to tolerate and manage them. These behaviours appear to arise because the proximity of other people, and the heightened activity and noise of a dining room, causes anxiety and agitation. To examine how delivering calming background music via headphones affected anxiety-driven behaviours that disrupted mealtimes. A sample of 30 adults with mild, moderate or severe learning disabilities were videotaped during mealtimes on two consecutive days. On the first day, half the group ate without any calming music while the other half sat opposite them wearing earphones and listening to calming music. On the second day, the non-music and music groups swapped around. Of the participants who tolerated the earphones, only three showed disruptive behaviour; all three had been sitting at the table waiting for their food. With so few examples, meaningful inferential analysis was not possible. However, there were signs that calming music had a positive effect on disruptive mealtime behaviours. It eliminated physical harm, complaining and verbal repetition in one person, and stopped another from shouting/swearing. It also reduced the incidence of shouting/swearing, restlessness and vocalising. Calming music and reduced waiting at tables for food may reduce disruptive behaviours.

  20. Disruptive Intelligence - How to gather Information to deal with disruptive innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriens, D.J.; Solberg Søilen, K.

    2014-01-01

    Disruptive innovations are innovations that have the capacity to transform a whole business into one with products that are more accessible and affordable (cf. Christensen et al. 2009). As Christensen et al. argue no business is immune to such disruptive innovations. If these authors are right, it

  1. What Do Chaotrope-Based Avidity Assays for Antibodies to HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins Measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Marina R; Ringe, Rajesh; Sanders, Rogier W; Voss, James E; Moore, John P; Klasse, Per Johan

    2015-06-01

    responses associated with protection, an avidity assay based on chemical disruption is often used to measure the strength of antibody binding. We have analyzed this assay mechanistically and found that the epitope specificity of an antibody has a greater influence on the outcome than does its affinity. As a result, the avidity assay is biased toward the detection of some antibody specificities while disfavoring others. We conclude that the assay may yield merely indirect correlations with weak protection, specifically when Env vaccination has failed to induce broad neutralizing responses. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Tidal Disruption Events from Eccentric Nuclear Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernke, Heather N.; Madigan, Ann-Marie

    2018-04-01

    Stars that get too close to a supermassive black hole are in danger of being tidally disrupted. Stellar two-body relaxation is commonly assumed to be the main driver of these events. Recent work has shown, however, that secular gravitational torques from eccentric nuclear disks can push stars to extreme eccentricities at much higher rates than predicted by two-body relaxation. This work did not include the effects of general relativity, however, which could quench secular torques via rapid apsidal precession. Here we show that, for a star in danger of disruption, general relativity acts on a timescale of less than an orbital period. This short timescale means that general relativity does not have enough time to have a major effect on the orbit. When driven by secular torques from eccentric nuclear disks, tidal disruption event rates are not affected by general relativity.

  3. From Digital Disruption to Business Model Scalability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Lund, Morten; Thomsen, Peter Poulsen

    2017-01-01

    as a response to digital disruption. A series of case studies illustrate that besides frequent existing messages in the business literature relating to the importance of creating agile businesses, both in growing and declining economies, as well as hard to copy value propositions or value propositions that take...... a long time to replicate, business model scalability can be cornered into four dimensions. In many corporate restructuring exercises and Mergers and Acquisitions there is a tendency to look for synergies in the form of cost reductions, lean workflows and market segments. However, this state of mind......This article discusses the terms disruption, digital disruption, business models and business model scalability. It illustrates how managers should be using these terms for the benefit of their business by developing business models capable of achieving exponentially increasing returns to scale...

  4. Density turbulence and disruption phenomena in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waidmann, G.; Kuang, G.; Jadoul, M.

    1992-01-01

    Disruptive processes are observed in tokamak plasmas not only at the operating limits (density limit or q-limit) but can be found under a variety of experimental conditions. Large forces are exerted then on vessel components and support structures. The sudden release of stored plasma energy presents a serious erosion problem for the first wall already in the next generation of large tokamak machines. Strong energy losses from the plasma and an influx of impurities are already present in minor plasma disruptions which do not immediately lead to a plasma current termination. The rapid loss of energy confinement was investigated within the framework of a systematic study on plasma disruption phenomena in TEXTOR. (author) 4 refs., 4 figs

  5. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-01-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D y is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10 10 particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 μm horizontally and 0.55 μm vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H D of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit

  6. Mechanisms of Memory Disruption in Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Daniel G; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2018-03-01

    Depressed individuals typically show poor memory for positive events, potentiated memory for negative events, and impaired recollection. These phenomena are clinically important but poorly understood. Compelling links between stress and depression suggest promising candidate mechanisms. Stress can suppress hippocampal neurogenesis, inhibit dopamine neurons, and sensitize the amygdala. We argue that these phenomena may impair pattern separation, disrupt the encoding of positive experiences, and bias retrieval toward negative events, respectively, thus recapitulating core aspects of memory disruption in depression. Encouragingly, optogenetic reactivation of cells engaged during the encoding of positive memories rapidly reduces depressive behavior in preclinical models. Thus, many memory deficits in depression appear to be downstream consequences of chronic stress, and addressing memory disruption can have therapeutic value. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Isolated Sleep Paralysis: Fear, Prevention, and Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian Andrew; Grom, Jessica Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about isolated sleep paralysis (ISP), and no empirically supported treatments are available. This study aims to determine: the clinical impact of ISP, the techniques used to prevent or disrupt ISP, and the effectiveness of these techniques. 156 undergraduates were assessed with lifetime ISP using a clinical interview. 75.64% experienced fear during ISP, and 15.38% experienced clinically significant distress/interference, while 19.23% attempted to prevent ISP, and 79.31% of these believed their methods were successful. Regarding disruption, 69.29% made attempts, but only 54.12% reported them effective. Disruption was more common than prevention, but several techniques were useful. Encouraging individuals to utilize these techniques and better monitor their symptoms may be an effective way to manage problematic ISP.

  8. Analytic modeling of axisymmetric disruption halo currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, D.A.; Kellman, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    Currents which can flow in plasma facing components during disruptions pose a challenge to the design of next generation tokamaks. Induced toroidal eddy currents and both induced and conducted poloidal ''halo'' currents can produce design-limiting electromagnetic loads. While induction of toroidal and poloidal currents in passive structures is a well-understood phenomenon, the driving terms and scalings for poloidal currents flowing on open field lines during disruptions are less well established. A model of halo current evolution is presented in which the current is induced in the halo by decay of the plasma current and change in enclosed toroidal flux while being convected into the halo from the core by plasma motion. Fundamental physical processes and scalings are described in a simplified analytic version of the model. The peak axisymmetric halo current is found to depend on halo and core plasma characteristics during the current quench, including machine and plasma dimensions, resistivities, safety factor, and vertical stability growth rate. Two extreme regimes in poloidal halo current amplitude are identified depending on the minimum halo safety factor reached during the disruption. A 'type I' disruption is characterized by a minimum safety factor that remains relatively high (typically 2 - 3, comparable to the predisruption safety factor), and a relatively low poloidal halo current. A 'type II' disruption is characterized by a minimum safety factor comparable to unity and a relatively high poloidal halo current. Model predictions for these two regimes are found to agree well with halo current measurements from vertical displacement event disruptions in DIII-D [T. S. Taylor, K. H. Burrell, D. R. Baker, G. L. Jackson, R. J. La Haye, M. A. Mahdavi, R. Prater, T. C. Simonen, and A. D. Turnbull, open-quotes Results from the DIII-D Scientific Research Program,close quotes in Proceedings of the 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, Yokohama, 1998, to be published in

  9. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1980-08-01

    An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity

  10. Automated selective disruption of slow wave sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Sharon J; Zempel, John M; Holtzman, David M; Ju, Yo-El S

    2017-04-01

    Slow wave sleep (SWS) plays an important role in neurophysiologic restoration. Experimentally testing the effect of SWS disruption previously required highly time-intensive and subjective methods. Our goal was to develop an automated and objective protocol to reduce SWS without affecting sleep architecture. We developed a custom Matlab™ protocol to calculate electroencephalogram spectral power every 10s live during a polysomnogram, exclude artifact, and, if measurements met criteria for SWS, deliver increasingly louder tones through earphones. Middle-aged healthy volunteers (n=10) each underwent 2 polysomnograms, one with the SWS disruption protocol and one with sham condition. The SWS disruption protocol reduced SWS compared to sham condition, as measured by spectral power in the delta (0.5-4Hz) band, particularly in the 0.5-2Hz range (mean 20% decrease). A compensatory increase in the proportion of total spectral power in the theta (4-8Hz) and alpha (8-12Hz) bands was seen, but otherwise normal sleep features were preserved. N3 sleep decreased from 20±34 to 3±6min, otherwise there were no significant changes in total sleep time, sleep efficiency, or other macrostructural sleep characteristics. This novel SWS disruption protocol produces specific reductions in delta band power similar to existing methods, but has the advantage of being automated, such that SWS disruption can be performed easily in a highly standardized and operator-independent manner. This automated SWS disruption protocol effectively reduces SWS without impacting overall sleep architecture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Disruptive Innovation by Emerging Multinational Latecomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Peter Ping

    on disruptive innovation (DI) and the bottom of the pyramid (BOP) provides a great opportunity to shed light on the key issue. To take advantage of this “missed” opportunity, I integrate the two reframed constructs of DI and BOP and also develop a typology of four ideal-typical innovations toward a theory...... of latecomer innovation as a special DI by EMNE at BOP to provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the trajectories of catching up and leapfrogging. Built upon latecomer innovation, EMNEs at BOP can emerge as the most disruptive challengers to the MNE incumbents at TOP. The implications of reframed...

  12. Engineering aspects of disruption current decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.

    1983-11-01

    Engineering features associated with the configuration of a tokamak can affect the amount of energy that produces melting and damage to the limiters or internal wall surfaces as the result of a major disruption. During the current decay period of a major thermal disruption, the energy that can damage a wall or limiter comes from the external magnetic field. By providing a good conducting torus near the plasma and increasing the plasma circuit resistance, this magnetic energy (transferred by way of the plasma circuit) can be minimized. This report addresses engineering design features to reduce the energy deposited on the inner torus surface that produces melting of the structures

  13. Development of disruption thermal analysis code DREAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Kobayahsi, Takeshi; Seki, Masahiro.

    1989-01-01

    When a plasma disruption takes place in a tokamak type fusion reactor, plasma facing componenets such as first wall and divertor/limiter are subjected to a intensse heat load in a short duration. At the surface of the wall, temperature rapidly rises, and melting and evaporation occurs. It causes reduction of wall thickness and crack initiation/propagation. As lifetime of the components is significantly affected by them, the transient analysis in consideration of phase changes and radiation heat loss in required in the design of these components. This paper describes the computer code DREAM, developed to perform the disruption thermal analysis, taking phase changes and radiation into account. (author)

  14. Energetics of LMFBR core disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchaterre, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    In general, in the design of fast reactor systems, containment design margins are specified by investigating the response of the containment to core disruptive accidents. The results of these analyses are then translated into criteria which the designers must meet. Currently, uniform and agreed upon criteria are lacking, and in this time while they are being developed, the designer should be aware of the considerations which go into the particular criteria he must work with, and participate in their development. This paper gives an overview of the current state of the art in assessing core disruptive accidents and the design implications of this process. (orig.)

  15. Disruptive Technologies and Networking in Telecom Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Strøjer; Hartington, Simon Preuthun

    2015-01-01

    This article discuss’ how economics of scale in supply and demand in the telecommunication industry has developed and how this has had great effect on the widespread usage and popularity of smartphones. By using this as a theoretical ground the paper looks into technical innovation...... in the telecommunication industry and finds significant similarities between the industry development and the literature on disruptive technology, which finds that incumbent companies are not able to react in a successful way when disruptions occur in their industry. By studying how the telecommunication industry...

  16. Disruptive technologies and networking in telecom industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Strøjer; Hartington, Simon

    This article discuss’ how economics of scale in supply and demand in the telecommunication industry has developed and how this has had great effect on the widespread usage and popularity of smart phones. By using this as a theoretical ground the paper looks into technical innovation...... in the telecommunication industry and finds significant similarities between the industry development and the literature on disruptive technology, which finds that incumbent companies are not able to react in a successful way when disruptions occur in their industry. By studying how the telecommunication industry...

  17. Antibodies Damage the Resilience of Fimbriae, Causing Them To Be Stiff and Tangled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Savarino, Stephen J; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    As adhesion fimbriae are a major virulence factor for many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, they are also potential targets for antibodies. Fimbriae are commonly required for initiating the colonization that leads to disease, and their success as adhesion organelles lies in their ability to both initiate and sustain bacterial attachment to epithelial cells. The ability of fimbriae to unwind and rewind their helical filaments presumably reduces their detachment from tissue surfaces with the shear forces that accompany significant fluid flow. Therefore, the disruption of functional fimbriae by inhibiting this resilience should have high potential for use as a vaccine to prevent disease. In this study, we show that two characteristic biomechanical features of fimbrial resilience, namely, the extension force and the extension length, are significantly altered by the binding of antibodies to fimbriae. The fimbriae that were studied are normally expressed on enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, which are a major cause of diarrheal disease. This alteration in biomechanical properties was observed with bivalent polyclonal antifimbrial antibodies that recognize major pilin subunits but not with the Fab fragments of these antibodies. Thus, we propose that the mechanism by which bound antibodies disrupt the uncoiling of natural fimbria under force is by clamping together layers of the helical filament, thereby increasing their stiffness and reducing their resilience during fluid flow. In addition, we propose that antibodies tangle fimbriae via bivalent binding, i.e., by binding to two individual fimbriae and linking them together. Use of antibodies to disrupt physical properties of fimbriae may be generally applicable to the large number of Gram-negative bacteria that rely on these surface-adhesion molecules as an essential virulence factor. Our study shows that the resiliency of colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) and coli surface antigen 2 (CS2) fimbriae, which are current

  18. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  19. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  20. Antisperm antibodies and fertility association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, B; Cardona-Maya, W

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the relation between antisperm antibodies (ASA) and human fertility by reviewing the scientific literature of the last 45 years. We carried out a review of scientific literature about antisperm antibodies and infertility published in spanish or english in databases as Pubmed, Medline, Scielo, some books and another gray literature include information related to this review and that is published in the last 45 years. Infertile couples suffer infertility by immunological mechanisms mainly by the presence of antisperm antibodies ASA in blood, semen or cervicovaginal secretions; the formation of ASA in men and women may be associated with disturbance in immunomodulatory mechanisms that result in functional impairment of sperm and thus its inability to fertilize the oocyte. Immunological infertility caused by ASA is the result of interference of these antibodies in various stages of fertilization process, inhibiting the ability of interaction between sperm and oocyte. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Antibody Drug Conjugates: Preclinical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Gadi G

    2015-05-01

    The development path for antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) is more complex and challenging than for unmodified antibodies. While many of the preclinical considerations for both unmodified and antibody drug conjugates are shared, special considerations must be taken into account when developing an ADC. Unlike unmodified antibodies, an ADC must preferentially bind to tumor cells, internalize, and traffic to the appropriate intracellular compartment to release the payload. Parameters that can impact the pharmacological properties of this class of therapeutics include the selection of the payload, the type of linker, and the methodology for payload drug conjugation. Despite a plethora of in vitro assays and in vivo models to screen and evaluate ADCs, the challenge remains to develop improved preclinical tools that will be more predictive of clinical outcome. This review will focus on preclinical considerations for clinically validated small molecule ADCs. In addition, the lessons learned from Mylotarg®, the first in class FDA-approved ADC, are highlighted.

  2. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  3. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  4. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. Grøne; Krægpøth, Morten; Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving school-cohort. We i...

  6. Naval sonar disrupts foraging in humpback whales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sivle, L.D.; Wensveen, P.J.; Kvadsheim, P.H.; Lam, F.P.A.; Visser, F.; Curé, C.; Harris, C.M.; Tyack, P.L.; Miller, P.J.O.

    2016-01-01

    Modern long-range naval sonars are a potential disturbance for marine mammals and can cause disruption of feeding in cetaceans. We examined the lunge-feeding behaviour of humpback whales Megaptera novaeangliae before, during and after controlled exposure experiments with naval sonar by use of

  7. Disruptive Innovation by Emerging Multinational Latecomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Peter Ping

    on disruptive innovation (DI) and the bottom of the pyramid (BOP) provides a great opportunity to shed light on the key issue. To take advantage of this “missed” opportunity, I integrate the two reframed constructs of DI and BOP and also develop a typology of four ideal-typical innovations toward a theory...

  8. Biosensor discovery of thyroxine transport disrupting chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchesini, G.R.; Meimaridou, A.; Haasnoot, W.; Meulenberg, E.; Albertus, F.; Mizuguchi, M.; Takeuchi, M.; Irth, H.; Murk, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitous chemicals may interfere with the thyroid system that is essential in the development and physiology of vertebrates. We applied a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based screening method for the fast screening of chemicals with thyroxine (T4) transport disrupting activity. Two

  9. Gender, Career Disruption, and Academic Rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElrath, Karen

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 314 male and female faculty in criminology and sociology found that faculty women are more likely than men to leave academic positions, and women who interrupt careers commonly do so for a job-seeking spouse. Women experience significant losses in tenure and earnings as a result of career disruptions. (MSE)

  10. Is Online Learning a Disruptive Innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Katrina A.

    2011-01-01

    In their desire to plan for the future, planners must assess the role of both internal and external influences on the institution. What then should people make of the idea that technology is disruptive? This perception fuels the views of Barone and Hagner (2001), who claimed that technology would "transform" higher education; Duderstadt (2000),…

  11. Management of posterior urethral disruption injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jeremy B; McAninch, Jack W

    2009-03-01

    Posterior urethral disruption is a traumatic injury to the male urethra, which most often results from pelvic fracture. After trauma, the distraction defect between the two ends of the urethra often scars and becomes fibrotic, blocking the urethra and bladder emptying. Increasing evidence suggests that many posterior urethral disruptions occur at the junction between the membranous urethra and the bulbar urethra, which is distal to the rhabdosphincter. In the acute setting, when a posterior urethral disruption is suspected, retrograde urethrography should be performed. Posterior urethral disruptions can be managed acutely by realignment of the urethra over a urethral catheter or by placement of a suprapubic catheter for bladder drainage only. Once fibrosis has stabilized, the patient can undergo posterior urethroplasty. In most cases, this procedure can be performed via a perineal approach in a single-stage surgery. The results of this single-stage perineal urethroplasty are excellent, and a patent urethra can be re-established in the majority of men who undergo surgery.

  12. Histopathological and biochemical disrupting effects of Escravos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2014-02-27

    Feb 27, 2014 ... The aim of this study was to investigate the histological and biochemical disrupting effects of Escravos ... rupturing or leaking of production infrastructures that are described as, “very old and lack regular ... crude oil were measured in weight on an electronic weighing balance and given orally (oral gavage) ...

  13. Disrupted functional connectivity in adolescent obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Moreno-Lopez

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that adolescent obesity is linked to disrupted functional connectivity in brain networks relevant to maintaining balance between reward, emotional memories and cognitive control. Our findings may contribute to reconceptualization of obesity as a multi-layered brain disorder leading to compromised motivation and control, and provide a biological account to target prevention strategies for adolescent obesity.

  14. Disrupting Educational Inequalities through Youth Digital Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stornaiuolo, Amy; Thomas, Ebony Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews scholarship on youth and young adult activism in digital spaces, as young users of participatory media sites are engaging in political, civic, social, or cultural action and advocacy online to create social change. The authors argue that youth's digital activism serves as a central mechanism to disrupt inequality, and that…

  15. Natural and Professional Help during Marital Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Paul A.; Zax, Melvin

    Although few people bring their psychological problems to mental health professionals, research in the area of 'natural' help is rudimentary. To investigate the process and effectiveness of natural professional groups in helping individuals experiencing marital disruption, 42 helpers (14 mental health professionals, 14 divorce lawyers, and 14…

  16. Development of Disruptive Open Access Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Terry; McConkey, Brigette

    2009-01-01

    Open access (OA) publication has emerged, with disruptive effects, as a major outlet for scholarly publication. OA publication is usually associated with on-line distribution and provides access to scholarly publications to anyone, anywhere--regardless of their ability to pay subscription fees or their association with an educational institution.…

  17. Dynamics and radiation from tidal disruption events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnerot, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    When a star gets too close to a supermassive black hole, it is torn apart by strong tidal forces in a tidal disruption event (TDE). The stellar matter then fuels the compact object causing a bright flare that is a unique probe of the majority of galactic nuclei, otherwise quiescent. For

  18. Heavy Metals Acting as Endocrine Disrupters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Georgescu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Last years researches focused on several natural and synthetic compounds that may interfere with the major functionsof the endocrine system and were termed endocrine disrupters. Endocrine disrupters are defined as chemicalsubstances with either agonist or antagonist endocrine effects in human and animals. These effects may be achievedby interferences with the biosynthesis or activity of several endogenous hormones. Recently, it was demonstratedthat heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd, arsen (As, mercury (Hg, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb and zinc (Zn may exhibitendocrine-disrupting activity in animal experiments. Emerging evidence of the intimate mechanisms of action ofthese heavy metals is accumulating. It was revealed, for example, that the Zn atom from the Zn fingers of theestrogen receptor can be replaced by several heavy metal molecules such as copper, cobalt, Ni and Cd. By replacingthe Zn atom with Ni or copper, binding of the estrogen receptor to the DNA hormone responsive elements in the cellnucleus is prevented. In both males and females, low-level exposure to Cd interferes with the biological effects ofsteroid hormones in reproductive organs. Arsen has the property to bind to the glucocorticoid receptor thusdisturbing glucocorticoids biological effects. With regard to Hg, this may induce alterations in male and femalefertility, may affect the function of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis or the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis,and disrupt biosynthesis of steroid hormones.

  19. Preliminary investigation into the possible endocrine disrupting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    Preliminary investigation into the possible endocrine disrupting activity of Bonny light crude oil contaminated - diet on ... rats (twenty male and twenty five females) were expose to Bonny –light crude oil contaminated diet at concentrations of 1%, 5% and 10% .... also being implicated in possessing antiestrogenic activity9.

  20. Time scales in tidal disruption events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krolik J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We explore the temporal structure of tidal disruption events pointing out the corresponding transitions in the lightcurves of the thermal accretion disk and of the jet emerging from such events. The hydrodynamic time scale of the disrupted star is the minimal time scale of building up the accretion disk and the jet and it sets a limit on the rise time. This suggest that Swift J1644+57, that shows several flares with a rise time as short as a few hundred seconds could not have arisen from a tidal disruption of a main sequence star whose hydrodynamic time is a few hours. The disrupted object must have been a white dwarf. A second important time scale is the Eddington time in which the accretion rate changes form super to sub Eddington. It is possible that such a transition was observed in the light curve of Swift J2058+05. If correct this provides interesting constraints on the parameters of the system.

  1. The Relative Ineffectiveness of Criminal Network Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijn, Paul A. C.; Kashirin, Victor; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in secrecy, data-driven knowledge concerning the effectiveness of different criminal network disruption strategies is very limited. By combining computational modeling and social network analysis with unique criminal network intelligence data from the Dutch Police, we discovered, in contrast to common belief, that criminal networks might even become ‘stronger’, after targeted attacks. On the other hand increased efficiency within criminal networks decreases its internal security, thus offering opportunities for law enforcement agencies to target these networks more deliberately. Our results emphasize the importance of criminal network interventions at an early stage, before the network gets a chance to (re-)organize to maximum resilience. In the end disruption strategies force criminal networks to become more exposed, which causes successful network disruption to become a long-term effort. PMID:24577374

  2. Traffic disruption route Einstein near building 170

    CERN Multimedia

    A Lopez - TS/CE

    2005-01-01

    The TS/CE Group informs you that, for the duration of the work at Building 170, there may be some disruption to traffic on route Einstein in the vicinity of Building 170. The work is due to take place from the 14th to 18th February. For more information, please contact 165029. A. Lopez TS/CE

  3. 75 FR 69881 - Responding to Disruptive Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... the health care setting, which opposes the use of punishment in the management of disruptive patients...: November 9, 2010. Robert C. McFetridge, Director of Regulation Policy and Management, Office of the General... definite period or until the conditions for removing conditions specified in the order are satisfied...

  4. Pesticides Provoke Endocrine Disruption A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, M.A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing numbers of environmental chemicals,including pesticides, have the ability to produce endocrine disruption by various mechanisms. such substances may affect hormone secretion from an endocrine gland and may alter the rate of hormone elimination from the body. environmental chemicals may also disrupt regulatory feedback mechanisms that exist between two endocrine organs; or may interact with a hormone receptor either by mimicking or antagonizing the actions of the natural hormone. these chemicals are referred to endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC's). EDC's act to alter the blood hormone levels or the subsequent action of hormones . the use of radioimmunoassay(RIA) constitutes a superior and unrivalled tool for the determination and quantification of hormones.the endocrine system participates in virtually all important functions of an organism, such as sexual differentiation before birth, sexual maturation during puberty, reproduction in adulthood, growth, metabolism, digestion, cardiovascular function and excretion. hormones are also implicated in the etiology of certain cancers of hormone- dependent tissues, such as those of the breast, uterus, and prostate gland. therefore, endocrine disruption can potentially produce widespread effects. scientists should not stick to the past belief which presumes that pesticides have limited effect on some hormones. A paradigm shift in which a wider vision of understanding of the wholesome complex effects of pesticides on the whole body rather than a narrow limited understanding should take place

  5. E.coli and investigation of antibody titer in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    masoud abdollahi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plant ribosome inactivating proteins act as N-glycosidase enzyme and produce by several family of Caryophyllaceae such as Saponaria Officinalis. Different Isoforms of RIPs expressed by Saponaria Officinalis. SO6 isoform depurinate Adenine 4324 in the conserved GAGA loop of 28SrRNA and disrupts protein synthesis. The aim of this study was expression of SO6 isoform in E.coli and investigation of antibody titer in rats. Methods: In this experimental study, SO6 synthetic gene was excised from recombinant pUC57- SO6 plasmid with BamHI and SalI restriction enzymes and subcloned into pET28a (+ expression vector. The expression of recombinant protein was induced by IPTG. Recombinant SO6 was purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Western blotting was performed to confirm the recombinant protein. Rats were immunized intraperitoneal with purified protein and IgG serum titer was assayed by ELISA. Results: PCR reaction and enzyme digestion confirmed subcloning of SO6 gene into pET28a (+ expression vector. A 29.5kDa protein band on SDS-PAGE showed a high level of recombinant protein expression. Polyclonal antibodies recognized SO6. ELISA confirmed significant antibody titer after injection of protein in test group compared with the control group. Conclusion: The recombinant purified SO6 antigen can be used for anti-cancer and vaccine candidate research.

  6. Cytosolic antibody delivery by lipid-sensitive endosomolytic peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishiba, Misao; Takeuchi, Toshihide; Kawaguchi, Yoshimasa; Sakamoto, Kentarou; Yu, Hao-Hsin; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Madani, Fatemeh; Gräslund, Astrid; Futaki, Shiroh

    2017-08-01

    One of the major obstacles in intracellular targeting using antibodies is their limited release from endosomes into the cytosol. Here we report an approach to deliver proteins, which include antibodies, into cells by using endosomolytic peptides derived from the cationic and membrane-lytic spider venom peptide M-lycotoxin. The delivery peptides were developed by introducing one or two glutamic acid residues into the hydrophobic face. One peptide with the substitution of leucine by glutamic acid (L17E) was shown to enable a marked cytosolic liberation of antibodies (immunoglobulins G (IgGs)) from endosomes. The predominant membrane-perturbation mechanism of this peptide is the preferential disruption of negatively charged membranes (endosomal membranes) over neutral membranes (plasma membranes), and the endosomolytic peptide promotes the uptake by inducing macropinocytosis. The fidelity of this approach was confirmed through the intracellular delivery of a ribosome-inactivation protein (saporin), Cre recombinase and IgG delivery, which resulted in a specific labelling of the cytosolic proteins and subsequent suppression of the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription. We also demonstrate the L17E-mediated cytosolic delivery of exosome-encapsulated proteins.

  7. Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Kong, Ying-Yee; Michalewski, Henry J; Starr, Arnold

    2005-06-01

    Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity were systematically studied in 21 subjects who had been clinically diagnosed with auditory neuropathy (AN), a recently defined disorder characterized by normal outer hair cell function but disrupted auditory nerve function. Neurological and electrophysical evidence suggests that disrupted auditory nerve activity is due to desynchronized or reduced neural activity or both. Psychophysical measures showed that the disrupted neural activity has minimal effects on intensity-related perception, such as loudness discrimination, pitch discrimination at high frequencies, and sound localization using interaural level differences. In contrast, the disrupted neural activity significantly impairs timing related perception, such as pitch discrimination at low frequencies, temporal integration, gap detection, temporal modulation detection, backward and forward masking, signal detection in noise, binaural beats, and sound localization using interaural time differences. These perceptual consequences are the opposite of what is typically observed in cochlear-impaired subjects who have impaired intensity perception but relatively normal temporal processing after taking their impaired intensity perception into account. These differences in perceptual consequences between auditory neuropathy and cochlear damage suggest the use of different neural codes in auditory perception: a suboptimal spike count code for intensity processing, a synchronized spike code for temporal processing, and a duplex code for frequency processing. We also proposed two underlying physiological models based on desynchronized and reduced discharge in the auditory nerve to successfully account for the observed neurological and behavioral data. These methods and measures cannot differentiate between these two AN models, but future studies using electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant might. These results not only show the unique

  8. The mass disruption of Jupiter Family comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Michael J. S.

    2015-01-01

    I show that the size-distribution of small scattered-disk trans-neptunian objects when derived from the observed size-distribution of Jupiter Family comets (JFCs) and other observational constraints implies that a large percentage (94-97%) of newly arrived active comets within a range of 0.2-15.4 km effective radius must physically disrupt, i.e., macroscopically disintegrate, within their median dynamical lifetime. Additional observational constraints include the numbers of dormant and active nuclei in the near-Earth object (NEO) population and the slope of their size distributions. I show that the cumulative power-law slope (-2.86 to -3.15) of the scattered-disk TNO hot population between 0.2 and 15.4 km effective radius is only weakly dependent on the size-dependence of the otherwise unknown disruption mechanism. Evidently, as JFC nuclei from the scattered disk evolve into the inner Solar System only a fraction achieve dormancy while the vast majority of small nuclei (e.g., primarily those with effective radius <2 km) break-up. The percentage disruption rate appears to be comparable with that of the dynamically distinct Oort cloud and Halley type comets (Levison, H.F., Morbidelli, A., Dones, L., Jedicke, R., Wiegert, P.A., Bottke Jr., W.F. [2002]. Science 296, 2212-2215) suggesting that all types of comet nuclei may have similar structural characteristics even though they may have different source regions and thermal histories. The typical disruption rate for a 1 km radius active nucleus is ∼5 × 10-5 disruptions/year and the dormancy rate is typically 3 times less. We also estimate that average fragmentation rates range from 0.01 to 0.04 events/year/comet, somewhat above the lower limit of 0.01 events/year/comet observed by Chen and Jewitt (Chen, J., Jewitt, D.C. [1994]. Icarus 108, 265-271).

  9. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Guided by the Single-Chain Fv of a Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Specifically and Effectively Eradicate Virus Reactivated from Latency in CD4+ T Lymphocytes Isolated from HIV-1-Infected Individuals Receiving Suppressive Combined Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingfeng; Zou, Fan; Lu, Lijuan; Chen, Cancan; He, Dalian; Zhang, Xu; Tang, Xiaoping; Liu, Chao; Li, Linghua; Zhang, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Despite the advent of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), the persistence of viral reservoirs remains a major barrier to curing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Recently, the shock and kill strategy, by which such reservoirs are eradicated following reactivation of latent HIV-1 by latency-reversing agents (LRAs), has been extensively practiced. It is important to reestablish virus-specific and reliable immune surveillance to eradicate the reactivated virus-harboring cells. In this report, we attempted to reach this goal by using newly developed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell technology. To generate anti-HIV-1 CAR-T cells, we connected the single-chain variable fragment of the broadly neutralizing HIV-1-specific antibody VRC01 to a third-generation CAR moiety as the extracellular and intracellular domains and subsequently transduced this into primary CD8 + T lymphocytes. We demonstrated that the resulting VC-CAR-T cells induced T cell-mediated cytolysis of cells expressing HIV-1 Env proteins and significantly inhibited HIV-1 rebound after removal of antiviral inhibitors in a viral infectivity model in cell culture that mimics the termination of the cART in the clinic. Importantly, the VC-CAR-T cells also effectively induced the cytolysis of LRA-reactivated HIV-1-infected CD4 + T lymphocytes isolated from infected individuals receiving suppressive cART. Our data demonstrate that the special features of genetically engineered CAR-T cells make them a particularly suitable candidate for therapeutic application in efforts to reach a functional HIV cure. The presence of latently infected cells remains a key obstacle to the development of a functional HIV-1 cure. Reactivation of dormant viruses is possible with latency-reversing agents, but the effectiveness of these compounds and the subsequent immune response require optimization if the eradication of HIV-1-infected cells is to be achieved. Here, we describe the use of a chimeric antigen

  10. Replacing reprogramming factors with antibodies selected from combinatorial antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Joel W; Xie, Jia; El-Mecharrafie, Nadja; Gross, Simon; Lee, Sohyon; Lerner, Richard A; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2017-10-01

    The reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is usually achieved by exogenous induction of transcription by factors acting in the nucleus. In contrast, during development, signaling pathways initiated at the membrane induce differentiation. The central idea of this study is to identify antibodies that can catalyze cellular de-differentiation and nuclear reprogramming by acting at the cell surface. We screen a lentiviral library encoding ∼100 million secreted and membrane-bound single-chain antibodies and identify antibodies that can replace either Sox2 and Myc (c-Myc) or Oct4 during reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts into iPSCs. We show that one Sox2-replacing antibody antagonizes the membrane-associated protein Basp1, thereby de-repressing nuclear factors WT1, Esrrb and Lin28a (Lin28) independent of Sox2. By manipulating this pathway, we identify three methods to generate iPSCs. Our results establish unbiased selection from autocrine combinatorial antibody libraries as a robust method to discover new biologics and uncover membrane-to-nucleus signaling pathways that regulate pluripotency and cell fate.

  11. Radioiodination of antibodies for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    In view of the great potential of radioiodinated antibody for the detection and treatment of cancer, the present article deals with the various techniques of radioiodination of antibody and their uses. Topics include methods of iodination of antibody, advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and effects of radioiodination on the antibody molecules with respect to their physiochemical and immunologic reactivity. In addition, the clinical usefulness of radioiodinated antibodies is discussed. (Auth.)

  12. Antibodies from plants for bionanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgue, Gueven; Twyman, Richard M; Beiss, Veronique; Fischer, Rainer; Sack, Markus

    2017-11-01

    Antibodies are produced as part of the vertebrate adaptive immune response and are not naturally made by plants. However, antibody DNA sequences can be introduced into plants, and together with laboratory technologies that allow the design of antibodies recognizing any conceivable molecular structure, plants can be used as 'green factories' to produce any antibody at all. The advent of plant-based transient expression systems in particular allows the rapid, convenient, and safe production of antibodies, ranging from laboratory-scale expression to industrial-scale manufacturing. The key features of plant-based production include safety, speed, low cost, and convenience, allowing newcomers to rapidly master the technology and use it to its full advantage. Manufacturing in plants has recently achieved significant milestones and offers more than just an alternative to established microbial and mammalian cell platforms. The use of plants for product development in particular offers the power and flexibility to easily coexpress many different genes, allowing the plug-and-play construction of novel bionanomaterials, perfectly complementing existing approaches based on plant virus-like particles. As well as producing single antibodies for applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry, plants can be used to produce antibody-based supramolecular structures and scaffolds as a new generation of green bionanomaterials that promise a bright future based on clean and renewable nanotechnology applications. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1462. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1462 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 The Authors. WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Antibody-Directed Phototherapy (ADP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adil Butt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically-approved but rather under-exploited treatment modality for cancer and pre-cancerous superficial lesions. It utilises a cold laser or LED to activate a photochemical reaction between a light activated drug (photosensitiser-drug and oxygen to generate cytotoxic oxygen species. These free radical species damage cellular components leading to cell death. Despite its benefits, the complexity, limited potency and side effects of PDT have led to poor general usage. However, the research area is very active with an increasing understanding of PDT-related cell biology, photophysics and significant progress in molecular targeting of disease. Monoclonal antibody therapy is maturing and the next wave of antibody therapies includes antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs, which promise to be more potent and curable. These developments could lift antibody-directed phototherapy (ADP to success. ADP promises to increase specificity and potency and improve drug pharmacokinetics, thus delivering better PDT drugs whilst retaining its other benefits. Whole antibody conjugates with first generation ADP-drugs displayed problems with aggregation, poor pharmacokinetics and loss of immuno-reactivity. However, these early ADP-drugs still showed improved selectivity and potency. Improved PS-drug chemistry and a variety of conjugation strategies have led to improved ADP-drugs with retained antibody and PS-drug function. More recently, recombinant antibody fragments have been used to deliver ADP-drugs with superior drug loading, more favourable pharmacokinetics, enhanced potency and target cell selectivity. These improvements offer a promise of better quality PDT drugs.

  14. Antibody Validation by Western Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signore, Michele; Manganelli, Valeria; Hodge, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Validation of antibodies is an integral part of translational research, particularly for biomarker discovery. Assaying the specificity of the reagent (antibody) and confirming the identity of the protein biomarker is of critical importance prior to implementing any biomarker in clinical studies, and the lack of such quality control tests may result in unexpected and/or misleading results.Antibody validation is the procedure in which a single antibody is thoroughly assayed for sensitivity and specificity. Although a plethora of commercial antibodies exist, antibody specificity must be extensively demonstrated using diverse complex biological samples, rather than purified recombinant proteins, prior to use in clinical translational research. In the simplest iteration, antibody specificity is determined by the presence of a single band in a complex biological sample, at the expected molecular weight, on a Western blot.To date, numerous Western blotting procedures are available, based on either manual or automated systems and spanning the spectrum of single blots to multiplex blots. X-ray film is still employed in many research laboratories, but digital imaging has become a gold standard in immunoblotting. The basic principles of Western blotting are (a) separation of protein mixtures by gel electrophoresis, (b) transfer of the proteins to a blot, (c) probing the blot for a protein or proteins of interest, and (d) subsequent detection of the protein by chemiluminescent, fluorescent, or colorimetric methods. This chapter focuses on the chemiluminescent detection of proteins using a manual Western blotting system and a vacuum-enhanced detection system (SNAP i.d.™, Millipore).

  15. Disrupt mig vel: Fire gode råd om disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydén, Pernille; Ringberg, Torsten; Østergaard Jacobsen, Per

    2017-01-01

    Forandring. Ønsket om at være teknologisk foran, kommer ofte til at ske på bekostning af fokus på kundernes oplevelser. Lighedstegnet mellem disruption og ny teknologi er kun den halve sandhed.......Forandring. Ønsket om at være teknologisk foran, kommer ofte til at ske på bekostning af fokus på kundernes oplevelser. Lighedstegnet mellem disruption og ny teknologi er kun den halve sandhed....

  16. Detection of Antibodies in Blood Plasma Using Bioluminescent Sensor Proteins and a Smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Remco; den Hartog, Ilona; Zijlema, Stefan E; Thijssen, Vito; van der Beelen, Stan H E; Merkx, Maarten

    2016-04-19

    Antibody detection is of fundamental importance in many diagnostic and bioanalytical assays, yet current detection techniques tend to be laborious and/or expensive. We present a new sensor platform (LUMABS) based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) that allows detection of antibodies directly in solution using a smartphone as the sole piece of equipment. LUMABS are single-protein sensors that consist of the blue-light emitting luciferase NanoLuc connected via a semiflexible linker to the green fluorescent acceptor protein mNeonGreen, which are kept close together using helper domains. Binding of an antibody to epitope sequences flanking the linker disrupts the interaction between the helper domains, resulting in a large decrease in BRET efficiency. The resulting change in color of the emitted light from green-blue to blue can be detected directly in blood plasma, even at picomolar concentrations of antibody. Moreover, the modular architecture of LUMABS allows changing of target specificity by simple exchange of epitope sequences, as demonstrated here for antibodies against HIV1-p17, hemagglutinin (HA), and dengue virus type I. The combination of sensitive ratiometric bioluminescent detection and the intrinsic modularity of the LUMABS design provides an attractive generic platform for point-of-care antibody detection that avoids the complex liquid handling steps associated with conventional immunoassays.

  17. Longitudinal association between marital disruption and child BMI and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkes, Jeremy

    2012-08-01

    This research examines whether family disruptions (i.e., divorces and separation) contribute to children's weight problems. The sample consists of 7,299 observations for 2,333 children, aged 5-14, over the 1986-2006 period, from a US representative sample from the Child and Young Adult Survey accompanying the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The study uses individual-fixed-effects models in a longitudinal framework to compare children's BMI and weight problems before and after a disruption. Furthermore, besides doing a before-after comparison for children, the study also estimates the effects at various periods relative to the disruption in order to examine whether children are affected before the disruption and whether any effects change as time passes from the disruption, as some effects may be temporary or slow to develop. Despite having a larger sample than the previous studies, the results provide no evidence that, on average, children's BMI and BMI percentile scores (measured with continuous outcomes) are affected before the disruption, after the disruption, and as time passes from the disruption, relative to a baseline period a few years before the disruption. However, children experiencing a family disruption do have an increased risk of obesity (having a BMI percentile score of 95 or higher) in the two years leading up to the disruption as well as after the disruption, and as time passes from the disruption.

  18. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases.

  19. Academic Publishing, Internet Technology, and Disruptive Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haven Allahar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available After 350 years of operation, the academic journal publishing industry is imbalanced and in flux as a result of the impacts of Internet technology, which has led, over the past 20 years, to the rise of open access publishing. The introduction of open access journals, in the opinion of many researchers, is considered to be a case of disruptive innovation that is revolutionizing the industry. This article analyzes the traditional journal publishing system, the recent open access models of journal publishing as an evolving phenomenon, the nature and extent of open access as a disruptive innovation, and the implications for key stakeholders. The major finding is that open access publishing has gained traction because technology has contributed to lower publication costs, easier access to research articles, and speedier publishing processes. However, the threat posed by open access has not significantly impacted traditional publishers because of strategies employed by the major publishers and slow adoption of open access by some researchers.

  20. Thyroid effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Malene; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Main, Katharina M

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many studies of thyroid-disrupting effects of environmental chemicals have been published. Of special concern is the exposure of pregnant women and infants, as thyroid disruption of the developing organism may have deleterious effects on neurological outcome. Chemicals may exert...... thyroid effects through a variety of mechanisms of action, and some animal experiments and in vitro studies have focused on elucidating the mode of action of specific chemical compounds. Long-term human studies on effects of environmental chemicals on thyroid related outcomes such as growth...... and development are still lacking. The human exposure scenario with life long exposure to a vast mixture of chemicals in low doses and the large physiological variation in thyroid hormone levels between individuals render human studies very difficult. However, there is now reasonably firm evidence that PCBs have...

  1. Manufacturing doubt about endocrine disrupter science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Becher, Georg; Blumberg, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    as flawed. We show that Lamb et al. misuse conceptual frameworks for assessing causality, especially the Bradford-Hill criteria, by ignoring the fundamental problems that exist with inferring causality from empirical observations. We conclude that Lamb et al.'s attempt of deconstructing the UNEP/WHO (2013......We present a detailed response to the critique of "State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals 2012" (UNEP/WHO, 2013) by financial stakeholders, authored by Lamb et al. (2014). Lamb et al.'s claim that UNEP/WHO (2013) does not provide a balanced perspective on endocrine disruption...... is based on incomplete and misleading quoting of the report through omission of qualifying statements and inaccurate description of study objectives, results and conclusions. Lamb et al. define extremely narrow standards for synthesizing evidence which are then used to dismiss the UNEP/WHO 2013 report...

  2. Electromagnetic safety analysis during major disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Chunming; Wang Yafei; Chen Zhi; Feng Kaiming

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic safety analysis during major disruption is important for safety analysis of the CH HCSB TBM. In this paper, using finite element method, the electromagnetic safety analysis of the CH HCSB TBM is carried out in consideration of major disruption. First, the finite element models of the CH HCSB TBM and its sub-module are established; second, the distributions of the induced eddy currents and electromagnetic forces on the whole CH HCSB TBM module and its sub-module are calculated; third, the torquemoment on whole CH HCSB TBM module and its sub-module are calculated from the distributions of the electromagnetic forces. Comparing the maximum allowable values of the parameters of the materials with the calculated data, the electromagnetic safety of the CH HCSB TBM is investigated. (authors)

  3. Neural net prediction of tokamak plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J.V.; Lin, Z.; Horton, W.; McCool, S.C.

    1994-10-01

    The computation based on neural net algorithms in predicting minor and major disruptions in TEXT tokamak discharges has been performed. Future values of the fluctuating magnetic signal are predicted based on L past values of the magnetic fluctuation signal, measured by a single Mirnov coil. The time step used (= 0.04ms) corresponds to the experimental data sampling rate. Two kinds of approaches are adopted for the task, the contiguous future prediction and the multi-timescale prediction. Results are shown for comparison. Both networks are trained through the back-propagation algorithm with inertial terms. The degree of this success indicates that the magnetic fluctuations associated with tokamak disruptions may be characterized by a relatively low-dimensional dynamical system

  4. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and skin manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Qiang; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2016-09-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous compounds that have the ability to disrupt the production and actions of hormones through direct or indirect interaction with hormone receptors, thus acting as agonists or antagonists. Human health is affected after either individual occupation or dietary and environmental exposure to EDCs. On the other hand, skin is one of the largest organs of the body and its main function is protection from noxious substances. EDCs perturb the endocrine system, and they are also carcinogenic, immunotoxic, and hepatotoxic to human skin. In addition, their effects on keratinocytes, melanocytes, sebocytes, inflammatory and immunological cells, and skin stem cells produce inflammatory and allergic skin diseases, chloracne, disorders of skin pigmentation, skin cancer, and skin aging. Mechanisms, which EDCs use to induce these skin disorders are complicated, and involve the interference of endogenous hormones and most importantly the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signal pathway. Further studies on EDCs and skin diseases are necessary to elucidate these mechanisms.

  5. CUMULATIVE DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTERS: SYNERGY OR ADDITIVITY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to chemicals with hormonal activity during critical developmental periods can disrupt reproductive function and development. Within the last decade, several classes of pesticides and toxic substances have been shown to disrupt differentiation of the male rat reproductive...

  6. Conversion of homothallic yeast to heterothallism through to gene disruption

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, WH

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple method was developed for the conversion of homothallic Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains to heterothallism through HO gene disruption. An integrative ho=neo disrupted allele was constructed by cloning a dominant selectable marker...

  7. Conversion of homothallic yeast to heterothallism trough HO gene disruption

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, WH

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple method was developed for the conversion of homothallic Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeaststrains to heterothallism through HO gene disruption. An integrative ho:: neo disrupted allele was constructed by cloning a dominant selectable marker...

  8. Capture of Small Bodies After Tidal Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershova, A.; Medvedev, Yu.

    2017-09-01

    The subject of the current work is the phisical and dynamical evolution of the small comets group formed by tidal disruption of the protocomet while passing near the large body (Sun, Jupiter). The equations of motion were integrated numericaly. In case of the Sun the evolution of the sun-grazing orbits were discussed and the typical lifetime of such comets was estimated. Nongravitational acceleration and the size reduction of fragments due to sublimation were taking into account using the Marsden formula.

  9. Five disruptive technology directions for 5G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccardi, Federico; W. Heath Jr., Robert; Lozano, Angel

    2014-01-01

    New research directions will lead to fundamental changes in the design of future fifth generation (5G) cellular networks. This article describes five technologies that could lead to both architectural and component disruptive design changes: device-centric architectures, millimeter wave, massive...... MIMO, smarter devices, and native support for machine-to-machine communications. The key ideas for each technology are described, along with their potential impact on 5G and the research challenges that remain....

  10. National Defense Industrial Association Disruptive Technologies Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-14

    Algorithms, MEMS • Nano ; Meta; & New Materials • Cognitive Computing • Bio-Revolution NDIA Disruptive Technologies 10/16/2009 Page-8 Forces of Change...DISTRIBUTE 2 1 st Cen t u r y St r a t eg ic Tec h n o l o g y Vec t o r s Defense Science Board 2006 Summer Study August 18, 2006 (Final) NDIA

  11. Disruptive Innovation in Chinese and Indian Businesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    With the rapid development of China and India as new economic powers in global competition, an obvious question is whether these emerging economies are great opportunities or threats. Whilst answers are bound to differ depending on one's perspective, it is increasingly clear that more local firms...... sustainable. This unique book will be valuable to both scholars and practitioners interested in disruptive innovation and those working in the fields of Asian studies, international business, economics and globalization...

  12. Anti-RAGE antibody attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengmei; Yi, Duan; Li, Zhengqian; Zhou, Yongde; Cao, Yiyun; Sun, Yan; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2017-03-30

    Several animal studies demonstrated that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane could influence the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, which involved the cognitive impairment. Increasing evidence has also shown that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) played a major role in maintaining the integrity of BBB. The present study aimed to determine whether the RAGE-specific antibody protects against BBB disruption and cognitive impairment induced by isoflurane exposure in aged rats. 108 aged rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) control group (Control); (2) 4h of 2% isoflurane exposure group (ISO); (3) RAGE antibody (20μL, 2.5μg/μL) treated+4h of 2% isoflurane exposure group (anti-RAGE+ISO); (4) RAGE antibody (20μL, 2.5μg/μL) treated group (anti-RAGE). The isoflurane anesthesia resulted in the upregulation of hippocampal RAGE expression, disruption of BBB integrity, neuroinflammation, and beta-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation in aged rats. In addition, significant cognitive deficits in the Morris water maze test was also observed. The antibody pretreatment resulted in significant improvements in BBB integrity. Furthermore, the expression of RAGE and proinflammatory mediators, as well as, Aβ accumulation were attenuated. Moreover, the antibody administration attenuated the isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats. These results demonstrate that RAGE signaling is involved in BBB damage after isoflurane exposure. Thus, the RAGE antibody represents a novel therapeutic intervention to prevent isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  14. Disruptive Innovation Can Prevent the Next Pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Affan T; Ferland, Lisa; Hood-Cree, Robert; Shaffer, Loren; McNabb, Scott J N

    2015-01-01

    Public health surveillance (PHS) is at a tipping point, where the application of novel processes, technologies, and tools promise to vastly improve efficiency and effectiveness. Yet twentieth century, entrenched ideology and lack of training results in slow uptake and resistance to change. The term disruptive innovation - used to describe advances in technology and processes that change existing markets - is useful to describe the transformation of PHS. Past disruptive innovations used in PHS, such as distance learning, the smart phone, and field-based laboratory testing have outpaced older services, practices, and technologies used in the traditional classroom, governmental offices, and personal communication, respectively. Arguably, the greatest of these is the Internet - an infrastructural innovation that continues to enable exponential benefits in seemingly limitless ways. Considering the Global Health Security Agenda and facing emerging and reemerging infectious disease threats, evolving environmental and behavioral risks, and ever changing epidemiologic trends, PHS must transform. Embracing disruptive innovation in the structures and processes of PHS can be unpredictable. However, it is necessary to strengthen and unlock the potential to prevent, detect, and respond.

  15. Spin Dependence in Tidal Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesden, Michael; Stone, Nicholas; van Velzen, Sjoert

    2018-01-01

    A supermassive black hole (SBH) can tidally disrupt stars when its tidal field overwhelms the stars’ self-gravity. The stellar debris produced in such tidal disruption events (TDEs) evolves into tidal streams that can self-intersect. These inelastic stream collisions dissipate orbital energy, both circularizing the tidal stream and contributing to the emission observed during the TDE. Once circularized into a disk, the stellar debris can be viscously accreted by the SBH powering additional luminous emission. We explore how SBH spin can affect the tidal disruption process. Tidal forces are spin dependent, as is the minimum orbital angular momentum below which stars are directly captured by the SBH. This implies that the TDE rate will be spin dependent, particularly for more massive SBHs for which relativistic effects are more significant. SBH spin also affects TDE light curves through the initial debris orbits, the nature of the stream collisions, the viscous evolution of the accretion disk, and the possibility of launching jets. We explore the spin dependence of these phenomena to identify promising signatures for upcoming surveys expected to discover hundreds of TDE candidates in the next decade.

  16. Natural Hazards and Supply Chain Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, M.

    2016-12-01

    Natural hazards distress the global economy through disruptions in supply chain networks. Moreover, despite increasing investment to infrastructure for disaster risk management, economic damages and losses caused by natural hazards are increasing. Manufacturing companies today have reduced inventories and streamlined logistics in order to maximize economic competitiveness. As a result, today's supply chains are profoundly susceptible to systemic risks, which are the risk of collapse of an entire network caused by a few node of the network. For instance, the prolonged floods in Thailand in 2011 caused supply chain disruptions in their primary industries, i.e. electronic and automotive industries, harming not only the Thai economy but also the global economy. Similar problems occurred after the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami in 2011, the Mississippi River floods and droughts during 2011 - 2013, and the Earthquake in Kumamoto Japan in 2016. This study attempts to discover what kind of effective measures are available for private companies to manage supply chain disruptions caused by floods. It also proposes a method to estimate potential risks using a Bayesian network. The study uses a Bayesian network to create synthetic networks that include variables associated with the magnitude and duration of floods, major components of supply chains such as logistics, multiple layers of suppliers, warehouses, and consumer markets. Considering situations across different times, our study shows desirable data requirements for the analysis and effective measures to improve Value at Risk (VaR) for private enterprises and supply chains.

  17. Disruptive Innovation Can Prevent the Next Pandemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affan eShaikh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Public health surveillance (PHS is at a tipping point, where the application of novel processes, technologies, and tools promise to vastly improve efficiency and effectiveness. Yet 20th-century, entrenched ideology and lack of training results in slow uptake and resistance to change. The term disruptive innovation – used to describe advances in technology and processes that change existing markets, is useful to describe the transformation of PHS. Past disruptive innovations used in PHS, such as distance learning, the smart phone, and field-based laboratory testing have outpaced older services, practices, and technologies used in the traditional classroom, governmental offices, and personal communication, respectively. Arguably, the greatest of these is the Internet – an infrastructural innovation that continues to enable exponential benefits in seemingly limitless ways. Considering the Global Health Security Agenda and facing emerging and reemerging infectious disease threats, evolving environmental and behavioral risks, and ever changing epidemiologic trends, PHS must transform. Embracing disruptive innovation in the structures and processes of PHS can be unpredictable. However it is necessary to strengthen and unlock the potential to prevent, detect, and respond.

  18. Risk Evaluation of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gioiosa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We review here our studies on early exposure to low doses of the estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA on behavior and metabolism in CD-1 mice. Mice were exposed in utero from gestation day (GD 11 to delivery (prenatal exposure or via maternal milk from birth to postnatal day 7 (postnatal exposure to 10 µg/kg body weight/d of BPA or no BPA (controls. Bisphenol A exposure resulted in long-term disruption of sexually dimorphic behaviors. Females exposed to BPA pre- and postnatally showed increased anxiety and behavioral profiles similar to control males. We also evaluated metabolic effects in prenatally exposed adult male offspring of dams fed (from GD 9 to 18 with BPA at doses ranging from 5 to 50 000 µg/kg/d. The males showed an age-related significant change in a number of metabolic indexes ranging from food intake to glucose regulation at BPA doses below the no observed adverse effect level (5000 µg/kg/d. Consistent with prior findings, low but not high BPA doses produced significant effects for many outcomes. These findings provide further evidence of the potential risks that developmental exposure to low doses of the endocrine disrupter BPA may pose to human health, with fetuses and infants being highly vulnerable.

  19. Influence of Dynamic Capabilities in Creating Disruptive Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Čiutienė, Rūta; Thattakath, Emil William

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the influence of Dynamic Capabilities in creating Disruptive Innovation. For doing so the concepts of Dynamic Capabilities and Disruptive Innovation are reviewed. The criteria of an innovation named Disruptive Innovation are obtained by comparative study between the various innovation types. To demonstrate the role of Dynamic Capabilities in creating Disruptive Innovation, the Innovation Lifecycle is demonstrated with respect to Dynamic Capabilities. Th...

  20. Antecedents and implications of disruptive innovation: Evidence from China

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Feng; Williamson, Peter; Yin, Eden

    2015-01-01

    A growing recognition of the importance of disruptive innovation has led researchers to examine the question of how disruptive innovation comes about and to what extent it reflects "discovery" versus "creation" of opportunities. Earlier research has focused on the organisational preconditions for disruptive innovation to arise. Much less attention has been paid to the role of innovation processes, including their goals and design, in promoting disruptive innovation. In this paper we aim to be...

  1. Cost Sharing in the Prevention of Supply Chain Disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Wen Wang; Kelei Xue; Xiaochen Sun

    2017-01-01

    We examine the influence of cost-sharing mechanism on the disruption prevention investment in a supply chain with unreliable suppliers. When a supply chain faces considerable loss following a disruption, supply chain members are motivated toward investing in manners that reduce their disruption probability. In improving supply chain reliability, the cost-sharing mechanism must be set appropriately to realize the efficiency of the disruption prevention investment. In a supply chain where the f...

  2. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  3. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vickie S.

    2013-01-01

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  4. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  5. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  6. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2017-03-28

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  7. Disruptive Behaviour of Students in Primary Education and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esturgo-Deu, M. Estrella; Sala-Roca, Josefina

    2010-01-01

    This study analyses the relation between disruptive behaviours and the emotional abilities of children in primary education. To do this, disruptive behaviour and emotional abilities were evaluated in 1422 pupils aged between 6 and 12 years of age at 11 education centres using EQIjv. No relation was found between disruptive behaviours and age, but…

  8. Practice Oriented Algorithmic Disruption Management in Passenger Railways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Wagenaar (Joris)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractHow to deal with a disruption is a question railway companies face on a daily basis. This thesis focusses on the subject how to handle a disruption such that the passenger service is upheld as much as possible. The current mathematical models for disruption management can not yet be

  9. Feature extraction for improved disruption prediction analysis at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratta, G. A.; Vega, J.; Murari, A.; Johnson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Disruptions are major instabilities and remain one of the main problems in tokomaks. Using Joint European Torus database, a disruption predictor is developed by computational methods including supervised learning techniques. The main objectives of the work are to develop accurate automatic classifiers, to test their performances, and to determine how much in advance of the disruption they can operate with acceptable reliability.

  10. Science and policy on endocrine disrupters must not be mixed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Becher, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The "common sense" intervention by toxicology journal editors regarding proposed European Union endocrine disrupter regulations ignores scientific evidence and well-established principles of chemical risk assessment. In this commentary, endocrine disrupter experts express their concerns about...... of views detrimental to reaching a consensus about scientific foundations for endocrine disrupter regulation in the EU....

  11. Hu and Yo antibodies have heterogeneous avidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totland, Cecilie; Aarseth, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2007-04-01

    Onconeural antibodies such as anti-Hu and anti-Yo may be important in the pathogenesis of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. The avidity of these antibodies is not known. In this study, we compared the avidity of Hu and Yo antibodies both at single time points and over a time range of 2 months to 6 years. The avidity of Yo and Hu antibodies differed among the patients, but anti-Yo generally had higher avidity than anti-Hu. Whether Yo antibodies are more pathogenic than Hu antibodies are presently unknown.

  12. Effect of skin barrier disruption on immune responses to topically applied cross-reacting material, CRM(197), of diphtheria toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroy, S; Peyre, M; Garcia, N; Muller, S; Sesardic, D; Partidos, C D

    2005-08-01

    The high accessibility of the skin and the presence of immunocompetent cells in the epidermis makes this surface an attractive route for needle-free administration of vaccines. However, the lining of the skin by the stratum corneum is a major obstacle to vaccine delivery. In this study we examined the effect of skin barrier disruption on the immune responses to the cross-reacting material CRM(197), a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin (DTx) that is considered as a vaccine candidate. Application of CRM(197), together with cholera toxin (CT), onto the tape-stripped skin of mice elicited antibody responses that had anti-DTx neutralizing activity. Vaccine delivery onto mildly ablated skin or intact skin did not elicit any detectable anti-CRM(197) antibodies. Mice immunized with CRM(197) alone onto the tape-stripped skin mounted a vigorous antigen-specific proliferative response. In contrast, the induction of cellular immunity after CRM(197) deposition onto mildly ablated or intact skin was adjuvant dependent. Furthermore, epidermal cells were activated and underwent apoptosis that was more pronounced when the stratum corneum was removed by tape stripping. Overall, these findings highlight the potential for transcutaneous delivery of CRM(197) and establish a correlation between the degree of barrier disruption and levels of antigen-specific immune responses. Moreover, these results provide the first evidence that the development of a transcutaneous immunization strategy for diphtheria, based on simple and practical methods to disrupt the skin barrier, is feasible.

  13. High levels of antibodies to multiple domains and strains of VAR2CSA correlate with the absence of placental malaria in Cameroonian women living in an area of high Plasmodium falciparum transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutterrow, Yeung L; Avril, Marion; Singh, Kavita

    2012-01-01

    erythrocytes and mediates binding to chondroitin sulfate A, initiating inflammation and disrupting homeostasis at the maternal-fetal interface. Although antibodies can prevent sequestration, it is unclear whether parasite clearance is due to antibodies to a single Duffy binding-like (DBL) domain...... in the lower-transmission site had both lower magnitude and lesser breadth than those in the high-transmission site. These data suggest that immunity to placental malaria results from high antibody levels to multiple VAR2CSA domains and allelic variants and that antibody breadth is influenced by malaria...

  14. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD... Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic antigens...

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to Treponema Pallidum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.M. van de Donk; J.D.A. van Embden; M.F. van Olderen; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThree successive fusions of mouse myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes of a mouse immunized with Treponema Pallidum resulted in one hybridoma producing anti T. pallidum antibodies for each fusion. The mice were immunized with live pallidum cells respectively 1, 3 and 5 months before

  16. Antibodies and antimatter: the resurgence of immuno-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Anna M

    2009-01-01

    The completion of the human genome, coupled with parallel major research efforts in proteomics and systems biology, has led to a flood of information on the roles of individual genes and proteins in normal physiologic processes and their disruptions in disease. In practical terms, this information has opened the door to increasingly targeted therapies as specific molecular markers are identified and validated. The ongoing transition from empiric to molecular medicine has engendered a need for corresponding molecular diagnostics, including noninvasive molecular imaging. Convergence of knowledge regarding key biomarkers that define normal biologic processes and disease with protein and imaging technology makes this an opportune time to revisit the combination of antibodies and PET, or immuno-PET.

  17. War and peace between microbes: HIV-1 interactions with coinfecting viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2009-11-19

    HIV-1 disrupts the homeostatic equilibrium between the host and coinfecting microbes, facilitating reactivation of persistent viruses and invasion by new viruses. These viruses usually accelerate HIV disease but occasionally create conditions detrimental for HIV-1. Understanding these phenomena may lead to anti-HIV-1 strategies that specifically target interactions between HIV-1 and coinfecting viruses.

  18. Disruption of Four Kinesin Genes in Dictyostelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soga Ikko

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinesin and dynein are the two families of microtubule-based motors that drive much of the intracellular movements in eukaryotic cells. Using a gene knockout strategy, we address here the individual function(s of four of the 13 kinesin proteins in Dictyostelium. The goal of our ongoing project is to establish a minimal motility proteome for this basal eukaryote, enabling us to contrast motor functions here with the often far more elaborate motor families in the metazoans. Results We performed individual disruptions of the kinesin genes, kif4, kif8, kif10, and kif11. None of the motors encoded by these genes are essential for development or viability of Dictyostelium. Removal of Kif4 (kinesin-7; CENP-E family significantly impairs the rate of cell growth and, when combined with a previously characterized dynein inhibition, results in dramatic defects in mitotic spindle assembly. Kif8 (kinesin-4; chromokinesin family and Kif10 (kinesin-8; Kip3 family appear to cooperate with dynein to organize the interphase radial microtubule array. Conclusion The results reported here extend the number of kinesin gene disruptions in Dictyostelium, to now total 10, among the 13 isoforms. None of these motors, individually, are required for short-term viability. In contrast, homologs of at least six of the 10 kinesins are considered essential in humans. Our work underscores the functional redundancy of motor isoforms in basal organisms while highlighting motor specificity in more complex metazoans. Since motor disruption in Dictyostelium can readily be combined with other motility insults and stresses, this organism offers an excellent system to investigate functional interactions among the kinesin motor family.

  19. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Manning, L.M.; Stringer, L.D.; Cappadonna, J.; El-Sayed, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m2) to 1- and 4-m2 plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  20. Laser Microbial Killing and Biofilm Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krespi, Yosef P.; Kizhner, Victor

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: To analyze the ability of NIR lasers to reduce bacterial load and demonstrate the capability of fiber-based Q-switched Nd:YAG laser disrupting biofilm. Study Design: NIR diode laser was tested in vitro and in vivo using pathogenic microorganisms (S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa). In addition biofilms were grown from clinical Pseudomonas isolates and placed in culture plates, screws, tympanostomy tubes and PET sutures. Methods: In the animal experiments acute rhinosinusitis model was created by packing the rabbit nose with bacteria soaked solution. The nasal pack was removed in two days and nose was exposed to laser irradiation. A 940 nm diode laser with fiber diffuser was used. Nasal cultures were obtained before and after the laser treatments. Animals were sacrificed fifteen days following laser treatment and bacteriologic/histologic results analyzed. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser generated shockwave pulses were delivered on biofilm using special probes over culture plates, screws, tubes, and PET sutures for the biofilm experiments. Results: Average of two log bacteria reduction was achieved with NIR laser compared to controls. Histologic studies demonstrated preservation of tissue integrity without significant damage to mucosa. Biofilms were imaged before, during and after treatment using a confocal microscope. During laser-generated shockwave application, biofilm was initially seen to oscillate and eventually break off. Large and small pieces of biofilm were totally and instantly removed from the surface to which they were attached in seconds. Conclusions: Significant bacterial reduction was achieved with NIR laser therapy in this experimental in vitro and animal study. In addition we disrupted Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and special probes generating plasma and shockwave. This new and innovative method of bacteria killing and biofilm disruption without injuring host tissue may have clinical application in the

  1. Radioimmunological determination of growth hormone antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kracmar, P.; Hnikova, O.

    1979-01-01

    The method is based on the assumption of the presence of antibodies in the serum of the patient and the formation of the complex antibody-tracer ( 125 I-STH). For separation the principle is used of two antibodies and subsequent ultrafiltration with membrane ultrafilters. Clinical experience, reproducibility and the procedure recommended for simple monitoring and the determination of the amount of antibodies in the serum of patients are presented. (author)

  2. Antibody therapeutics - the evolving patent landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petering, Jenny; McManamny, Patrick; Honeyman, Jane

    2011-09-01

    The antibody patent landscape has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years, particularly in areas of technology relating to antibody modification to reduce immunogenicity in humans or improve antibody function. In some cases antibody techniques that were developed in the 1980s are still the subject of patent protection in the United States or Canada. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody resp...... against the infection. On the other hand, immune complexes between the beta-lactamase and corresponding antibodies could play a role in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary injury in CF by mediating hyperimmune reactions....

  4. Physics and observations of tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalam, Arun; Mageshwaran, Tamilan

    2018-04-01

    We describe a model of tidal disruption events (TDEs) with input physical parameters that include the black hole (BH) mass M•, the specific orbital energy E, the angular momentum J, the star mass M⊙ and radius R⊙. We calculate the rise time of the TDEs, the peak bolometric luminosity in terms of these physical parameters and a typical light curve of TDEs for various All Sky Survey (ASS) and Deep Sky Survey (DSS) missions. We then derive the expected detection rates and discuss the follow up of TDEs through observations in various spectral bands from X-rays to radio wavelengths.

  5. Electrical disruption in toroidal plasma of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberto, M.; Silva, C.A.B.; Goes, L.C.S.; Sudano, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The initial phase of ionization of a toroidal plasma produced in hydrogen was investigated using zero-dimensional model. The model describes the temporal evolution of plasma by spatial medium of particle density and temperature, on whole plasma volume. The energy and particle (electrons and ions) balance equations are considered. The electron loss is due to ambipolar diffusion in the presence of magnetic field. The electron energy loss involves ionization, Coulomb interaction and diffusion. The ohmic heating converter gives the initial voltage necessary to disruption. (M.C.K.)

  6. Manuel′s asteroid disruption technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel John

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A seventy-year-old male presented with dense asteroid hyalosis in both eyes. He had undergone cataract extraction in one eye 3 years ago, and the other eye had immature cataract. Both the autorefractor and dilated streak retinoscopy did not give readings and subjective visual improvement could not be achieved. Immediately following YAG posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitreous asteroid disruption, the vision improved to 20/20 with recordable auto refractor and streak retinoscopy values. Our initial experience indicates that the treatment is simple, safe and effective but needs controlled and prospective studies to confirm its long-term safety.

  7. Disruptive Innovation in Air Measurement Technology: Reality ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation is a big picture overview on the changing state of air measurement technology in the world, with a focus on the introduction of low-cost sensors into the market place. The presentation discusses how these new technologies may be a case study in disruptive innovation for the air pollution measurement field. The intended audience is primarily those with experience in air pollution measurement methods, but much of the talk is accessible to the general public. This is a keynote presentation on emerging air monitoring technology, to be provided at the AWMA measurements conference in March, 2016.

  8. Disruption management in the airline industry

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, Carlotta

    2015-01-01

    The first point of the study purpose is taken into account in the second and third chapter of this work. It helps to create the ground of the successive argument and it also shows the main problem that could generate a delays or a disruptions in the airline industry. We know that the structure of airlines is divided into various phase and they are strategic, tactical and operational phases. part of the strategic phase are Routes, Type of aircraft (size), Price / policy, Out-sou...

  9. Multimedia data mining and analytics disruptive innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Baughman, Aaron; Pan, Jia-Yu; Petrushin, Valery A

    2015-01-01

    This authoritative text/reference provides fresh insights into the cutting edge of multimedia data mining, reflecting how the research focus has shifted towards networked social communities, mobile devices and sensors. Presenting a detailed exploration into the progression of the field, the book describes how the history of multimedia data processing can be viewed as a sequence of disruptive innovations. Across the chapters, the discussion covers the practical frameworks, libraries, and open source software that enable the development of ground-breaking research into practical applications.

  10. The mass disruption of Oort cloud comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, Harold F; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Dones, Luke; Jedicke, Robert; Wiegert, Paul A; Bottke, William F

    2002-06-21

    We have calculated the number of dormant, nearly isotropic Oort cloud comets in the solar system by (i) combining orbital distribution models with statistical models of dormant comet discoveries by well-defined surveys and (ii) comparing the model results to observations of a population of dormant comets. Dynamical models that assume that comets are not destroyed predict that we should have discovered approximately 100 times more dormant nearly isotropic comets than are actually seen. Thus, as comets evolve inward from the Oort cloud, the majority of them must physically disrupt.

  11. Radioimmunoassay method for detection of gonorrhea antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A novel radioimmunoassay for the detection of gonorrhea antibodies in serum is described. A radionuclide is bound to gonorrhea antigens produced by a growth culture. In the presence of gonorrhea antibodies in the serum, an antigen-antibody conjugate is formed, the concentration of which can be measured with conventional radiometric methods. The radioimmunoassay is highly specific

  12. Antibodies Against Melanin | Wassermann | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports on unsuccessful attempts to produce antibodies against melanoprotein in rabbits. Available evidence suggests antibodies against melanocytes in the aetiology of vitiligo, but there is no convincing evidence for antibodies against melanin per se. It is suggested that the demonstration of antibodif's against ...

  13. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irna Sufiawati

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD. Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  14. Development of rabbit monoclonal antibodies for detection of alpha-dystroglycan in normal and dystrophic tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa J Fortunato

    Full Text Available Alpha-dystroglycan requires a rare O-mannose glycan modification to form its binding epitope for extracellular matrix proteins such as laminin. This functional glycan is disrupted in a cohort of muscular dystrophies, the secondary dystroglycanopathies, and is abnormal in some metastatic cancers. The most commonly used reagent for detection of alpha-dystroglycan is mouse monoclonal antibody IIH6, but it requires the functional O-mannose structure for recognition. Therefore, the ability to detect alpha-dystroglycan protein in disease states where it lacks the full O-mannose glycan has been limited. To overcome this hurdle, rabbit monoclonal antibodies against the alpha-dystroglycan C-terminus were generated. The new antibodies, named 5-2, 29-5, and 45-3, detect alpha-dystroglycan from mouse, rat and pig skeletal muscle by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In a mouse model of fukutin-deficient dystroglycanopathy, all antibodies detected low molecular weight alpha-dystroglycan in disease samples demonstrating a loss of functional glycosylation. Alternately, in a porcine model of Becker muscular dystrophy, relative abundance of alpha-dystroglycan was decreased, consistent with a reduction in expression of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in affected muscle. Therefore, these new rabbit monoclonal antibodies are suitable reagents for alpha-dystroglycan core protein detection and will enhance dystroglycan-related studies.

  15. Detection of antibodies to co-trimoxazole (preservative drug interfering with routine red cell antibody screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Sachan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-dependent antibodies can rarely cause interference in pretransfusion antibody screening. The diluents for commercial reagent red blood cells contain different antibiotics, such as chloramphenicol, neomycin sulfate, and gentamycin as a preservative. The presence of antibodies to a given drug in patient may lead to positive results when performing antibody identification. We present a rare case of detection of anti-co-trimoxazole antibody during routine antibody screening in a female patient undergoing neurosurgery. These antibodies mimicked as antibody against high-frequency red cell antigens reacting in both saline phase as well as antiglobulin phase. Anti-co-trimoxazole antibody was confirmed by repeating antibody screen using reagent red cells of different manufacturers with and without co-trimoxazole drug as preservative as well as using washed red cell panels. There were no associated clinical or laboratory evidence of hemolysis.

  16. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sanchez

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive events features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive events, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA).

  17. Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baweja R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Raman Baweja, Susan D Mayes, Usman Hameed, James G Waxmonsky Department of Psychiatry, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA Abstract: Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD was introduced as a new diagnostic entity under the category of depressive disorders in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5. It was included in DSM-5 primarily to address concerns about the misdiagnosis and consequent overtreatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. DMDD does provide a home for a large percentage of referred children with severe persistent irritability that did not fit well into any DSM, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV diagnostic category. However, it has been a controversial addition to the DSM-5 due to lack of published validity studies, leading to questions about its validity as a distinct disorder. In this article, the authors discuss the diagnostic criteria, assessment, epidemiology, criticism of the diagnosis, and pathophysiology, as well as treatment and future directions for DMDD. They also review the literature on severe mood dysregulation, as described by the National Institute of Mental Health, as the scientific support for DMDD is based primarily on studies of severe mood dysregulation. Keywords: disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, persistent irritability, temper outbursts 

  18. Smog induces oxidative stress and microbiota disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tit-Yee Wong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Smog is created through the interactions between pollutants in the air, fog, and sunlight. Air pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, heavy metals, nitrogen oxides, ozone, sulfur dioxide, volatile organic vapors, and particulate matters, can induce oxidative stress in human directly or indirectly through the formation of reactive oxygen species. The outermost boundary of human skin and mucous layers are covered by a complex network of human-associated microbes. The relation between these microbial communities and their human host are mostly mutualistic. These microbes not only provide nutrients, vitamins, and protection against other pathogens, they also influence human's physical, immunological, nutritional, and mental developments. Elements in smog can induce oxidative stress to these microbes, leading to community collapse. Disruption of these mutualistic microbiota may introduce unexpected health risks, especially among the newborns and young children. Besides reducing the burning of fossil fuels as the ultimate solution of smog formation, advanced methods by using various physical, chemical, and biological means to reduce sulfur and nitrogen contains in fossil fuels could lower smog formation. Additionally, information on microbiota disruption, based on functional genomics, culturomics, and general ecological principles, should be included in the risk assessment of prolonged smog exposure to the health of human populations.

  19. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Sanchez

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive events features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive events, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA)

  20. Modeling Steroidogenesis Disruption Using High-Throughput ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental chemicals can elicit endocrine disruption by altering steroid hormone biosynthesis and metabolism (steroidogenesis) causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. Historically, a lack of assays resulted in few chemicals having been evaluated for effects on steroidogenesis. The steroidogenic pathway is a series of hydroxylation and dehydrogenation steps carried out by CYP450 and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, yet the only enzyme in the pathway for which a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay has been developed is aromatase (CYP19A1), responsible for the aromatization of androgens to estrogens. Recently, the ToxCast HTS program adapted the OECD validated H295R steroidogenesis assay using human adrenocortical carcinoma cells into a high-throughput model to quantitatively assess the concentration-dependent (0.003-100 µM) effects of chemicals on 10 steroid hormones including progestagens, androgens, estrogens and glucocorticoids. These results, in combination with two CYP19A1 inhibition assays, comprise a large dataset amenable to clustering approaches supporting the identification and characterization of putative mechanisms of action (pMOA) for steroidogenesis disruption. In total, 514 chemicals were tested in all CYP19A1 and steroidogenesis assays. 216 chemicals were identified as CYP19A1 inhibitors in at least one CYP19A1 assay. 208 of these chemicals also altered hormone levels in the H295R assay, suggesting 96% sensitivity in the

  1. Smog induces oxidative stress and microbiota disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tit-Yee

    2017-04-01

    Smog is created through the interactions between pollutants in the air, fog, and sunlight. Air pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, heavy metals, nitrogen oxides, ozone, sulfur dioxide, volatile organic vapors, and particulate matters, can induce oxidative stress in human directly or indirectly through the formation of reactive oxygen species. The outermost boundary of human skin and mucous layers are covered by a complex network of human-associated microbes. The relation between these microbial communities and their human host are mostly mutualistic. These microbes not only provide nutrients, vitamins, and protection against other pathogens, they also influence human's physical, immunological, nutritional, and mental developments. Elements in smog can induce oxidative stress to these microbes, leading to community collapse. Disruption of these mutualistic microbiota may introduce unexpected health risks, especially among the newborns and young children. Besides reducing the burning of fossil fuels as the ultimate solution of smog formation, advanced methods by using various physical, chemical, and biological means to reduce sulfur and nitrogen contains in fossil fuels could lower smog formation. Additionally, information on microbiota disruption, based on functional genomics, culturomics, and general ecological principles, should be included in the risk assessment of prolonged smog exposure to the health of human populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Cool Core Disruption in Abell 1763

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Edmund; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Randall, Scott W.; Edwards, Louise O. V.; Sabry, Ziad

    2017-01-01

    We present the analysis of a 20 ksec Chandra archival observation of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1763. A model-subtracted image highlighting excess cluster emission reveals a large spiral structure winding outward from the core to a radius of ~950 kpc. We measure the gas of the inner spiral to have significantly lower entropy than non-spiral regions at the same radius. This is consistent with the structure resulting from merger-induced motion of the cluster’s cool core, a phenomenon seen in many systems. Atypical of spiral-hosting clusters, an intact cool core is not detected. Its absence suggests the system has experienced significant disruption since the initial dynamical encounter that set the sloshing core in motion. Along the major axis of the elongated ICM distribution we detect thermal features consistent with the merger event most likely responsible for cool core disruption. The merger-induced transition towards non-cool core status will be discussed. The interaction between the powerful (P1.4 ~ 1026 W Hz-1) cluster-center WAT radio source and its ICM environment will also be discussed.

  3. Disrupting Law School: How Disruptive Innovation Will Revolutionize the Legal World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone, Michele R.; Horn, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Facing dramatic declines in enrollment, revenue, and student quality at the same time that their cost structure continues to rise and public support has waned, law schools are in crisis. A key driver of the crisis is shrinking employment opportunities for recent graduates, which stem in part from the disruption of the traditional business model…

  4. Comparison of Advanced Machine Learning Tools for Disruption Prediction and Disruption Studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Odstrčil, Michal; Murari, A.; Mlynář, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 7 (2013), s. 1751-1759 ISSN 0093-3813 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2055 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Learning Machines * Support Vector Machines * Neural Network * ASDEX Upgrade * JET * Disruption mitigation * Tokamaks * ITER Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.950, year: 2013

  5. Disruptive Conduct: The Impact of Disruptive Technologies on Social Relations in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) have invested significantly in digital technologies for learning and teaching. However, technologies provided by HEIs have not been universally successful in terms of adoption and usage. Meanwhile, both students and lecturers use disruptive technologies to support learning and teaching. This article examines…

  6. Tactile acuity is disrupted in osteoarthritis but is unrelated to disruptions in motor imagery performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanton, T.R.; Lin, C.W.; Bray, H.; Smeets, R.J.P.; Taylor, D.; Law, R.Y.; Moseley, G.L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether tactile acuity is disrupted in people with knee OA and to determine whether tactile acuity, a clinical signature of primary sensory cortex representation, is related to motor imagery performance (MIP; evaluates working body schema) and pain. METHODS: Experiment 1:

  7. Solid phase double-antibody radioimmunoassay procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niswender, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is concerned with the radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure for assaying body fluid content of an antigenic substance which may either be an antigen itself or a hapten capable of being converted, such as by means of reaction with a protein, to an antigenic material. The present invention is concerned with a novel and improved modification of a double-antibody RIA technique in which there is a first antibody that is specific to the antigenic substance suspected to be present in a body fluid from which the assay is intended. The second antibody, however, is not specific to the antigenic substance or analyte, but is an antibody against the first antibody

  8. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140?250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such a...

  9. Antibody pretargeting advances cancer radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, David M; Sharkey, Robert M; Paganelli, Giovanni; Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-François

    2006-02-10

    This article reviews the methods of pretargeting, which involve separating the targeting antibody from the subsequent delivery of an imaging or therapeutic agent that binds to the tumor-localized antibody. This provides enhanced tumor:background ratios and the delivery of a higher therapeutic dose than when antibodies are directly conjugated with radionuclides, as currently practiced in cancer radioimmunotherapy. We describe initial promising clinical results using streptavidin-antibody constructs with biotin-radionuclide conjugates in the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas, and of bispecific antibodies with hapten-radionuclides in the therapy of tumors expressing carcinoembryonic antigen, such as medullary thyroid and small-cell lung cancers.

  10. Serum Antibody Biomarkers for ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    45-56. Singh VK. (2009) Phenotypic expression of autoimmune autistic disorder (AAD): A major subset of autism. Ann Clin Psychiat. 21:148-160. 5...spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in communication (verbal and nonverbal), social interactions, and... autoimmunity ; in particular, the generation of antibodies reactive against brain and CNS proteins. The goal of this grant is to identify serum

  11. Antibody Repertoire Development in Swine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butler, J. E.; Wertz, N.; Šinkora, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, FEB 17 (2017), s. 255-279 ISSN 2165-8102 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02274S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09296S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : swine * pre-immune antibody repertoire * ileal Peyer's patches Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.708, year: 2016

  12. Oculocutaneous albinism: developing novel antibodies targeting the proteins associated with OCA2 and OCA4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Taisuke; Namiki, Takeshi; Coelho, Sergio G; Valencia, Julio C; Hearing, Vincent J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) have severely decreased pigmentation of their skin, hair and eyes. OCA2 and OCA4 result from mutations of the OCA2 and SLC45A2 genes, respectively, both of which disrupt the trafficking of the critical melanogenic enzyme tyrosinase to melanosomes. Both proteins encoded by those loci (termed P and MATP, respectively) have 12 putative transmembrane regions and are thought to function as transporters, although their functions and subcellular localizations remain to be characterized. To generate specific antibodies against unique synthetic peptides encoded by P and MATP that could be used to characterize their functions and subcellular localizations. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the specificity of antibodies and to colocalize P and MATP proteins with various subcellular markers. Specific antibodies to the P and MATP proteins were generated that work well for Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The localizations of P and MATP with various subcellular organelles were characterized using confocal microscopy, which revealed that they colocalize to some extent with LAMP2, but do not significantly colocalize with markers of the ER, Golgi or melanosomes. Interestingly, both P and MATP colocalize significantly with BLOC-1, a sorting component involved in the intracellular trafficking of melanosomal/lysosomal constituents. These results provide a basis to understand how disrupted functions of P or MATP result in the misrouting of tyrosinase and cause the hypopigmentation seen in OCA2 and OCA4. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Disruptive change and the reconfiguration of innovation ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Dedehayir

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This conceptual paper extends the traditional view of disruptive change, which considers the effects of rivalry between an incumbent and new entrant firm, by examining the impact of disruption upon the ‘innovation ecosystem’ in its entirety – the group of organisations that collaborate in creating a holistic value proposition for the end-user. Following Adner’s “ecosystem-as-structure” perspective, we develop propositions that anticipate structural differences between incumbent and disruptive innovation ecosystems, and then review these propositions in the context of three historical, disruptive innovation cases; Bakelite (a synthetic plastic, microwave oven, and photocopier. Through these cases, we illustrate that the manner of innovation ecosystem reconfiguration is likely to depend on the design attributes of the product, as well as the type of disruption experienced. We conclude by reflecting upon contemporary cases of disruption enabled through digital technologies, and proposing a framework that can guide future research.

  14. Disruption of Conscious Access in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitch, Lucie; Dehaene, Stanislas; Gaillard, Raphaël

    2017-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe and complex psychiatric disorder resulting in delusions, hallucinations, and cognitive impairments. Across a variety of paradigms, an elevated threshold for conscious perception has been repeatedly observed in persons with schizophrenia. Remarkably, even subtle measures of subliminal processing appear to be preserved. We argue here that the dissociation between impaired conscious access and intact unconscious processing may be due to a specific disruption of top-down attentional amplification. This proposal is compatible with the neurophysiological disturbances observed in schizophrenia, including dysconnectivity, abnormal neural oscillations, and glutamatergic and cholinergic dysregulation. Therefore, placing impaired conscious access as a central feature of schizophrenia can help researchers develop a coherent and parsimonious pathophysiological framework of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Endocrine disrupter - estradiol - in Chesapeake Bay tributaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorabawila, Nelum [University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States); Gupta, Gian [University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States)]. E-mail: gcgupta@umes.edu

    2005-04-11

    Exogenous chemicals that interfere with natural hormonal functions are considered endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Estradiol (17{beta}-estradiol or E2) is the most potent of all xenoestrogens. Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) production in male fish occurs at E2 concentrations as low as 1 ng l{sup -1}. E2 reaches aquatic systems mainly through sewage and animal waste disposal. Surface water samples from ponds, rivers (Wicomico, Manokin and Pocomoke), sewage treatment plants (STPs), and coastal bays (Assawoman, Monie, Chincoteague, and Tangier Sound - Chesapeake Bay) on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were analyzed for E2 using enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). E2 concentrations in river waters varied between 1.9 and 6.0 ng l{sup -1}. Highest E2 concentrations in river waters were observed immediately downstream of STPs. E2 concentrations in all the coastal bays tested were 2.3-3.2 ng l{sup -1}.

  16. Endocrine disrupter - estradiol - in Chesapeake Bay tributaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorabawila, Nelum; Gupta, Gian

    2005-01-01

    Exogenous chemicals that interfere with natural hormonal functions are considered endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Estradiol (17β-estradiol or E2) is the most potent of all xenoestrogens. Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) production in male fish occurs at E2 concentrations as low as 1 ng l -1 . E2 reaches aquatic systems mainly through sewage and animal waste disposal. Surface water samples from ponds, rivers (Wicomico, Manokin and Pocomoke), sewage treatment plants (STPs), and coastal bays (Assawoman, Monie, Chincoteague, and Tangier Sound - Chesapeake Bay) on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were analyzed for E2 using enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). E2 concentrations in river waters varied between 1.9 and 6.0 ng l -1 . Highest E2 concentrations in river waters were observed immediately downstream of STPs. E2 concentrations in all the coastal bays tested were 2.3-3.2 ng l -1

  17. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. King

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report

  18. Metabolism Disrupting Chemicals and Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindel, Jerrold J.; Blumberg, Bruce; Cave, Mathew; Machtinger, Ronit; Mantovani, Alberto; Mendez, Michelle A.; Nadal, Angel; Palanza, Paola; Panzica, Giancarlo; Sargis, Robert; Vandenberg, Laura N.; Saal, Frederick vom

    2016-01-01

    The recent epidemics of metabolic diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes(T2D), liver lipid disorders and metabolic syndrome have largely been attributed to genetic background and changes in diet, exercise and aging. However, there is now considerable evidence that other environmental factors may contribute to the rapid increase in the incidence of these metabolic diseases. This review will examine changes to the incidence of obesity, T2D and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the contribution of genetics to these disorders and describe the role of the endocrine system in these metabolic disorders. It will then specifically focus on the role of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the etiology of obesity, T2D and NAFLD while finally integrating the information on EDCs on multiple metabolic disorders that could lead to metabolic syndrome. We will specifically examine evidence linking EDC exposures during critical periods of development with metabolic diseases that manifest later in life and across generations. PMID:27760374

  19. Disruptive Innovation in Chinese and Indian Businesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    With the rapid development of China and India as new economic powers in global competition, an obvious question is whether these emerging economies are great opportunities or threats. Whilst answers are bound to differ depending on one's perspective, it is increasingly clear that more local firms......, especially local entrepreneurs, from these emerging economies will play a more critical role in global competition by becoming challengers to global incumbents. Indeed, the fact that the majority of their populations are at the bottom of the pyramid, and thus cannot afford products designed for the developed...... or services, which originate in lower-end market segments, but later move up to compete with those provided by incumbent firms. This book sheds new light on disruptive innovations both from and for the bottom of the pyramid in China and India, from the point of view of local entrepreneurs and international...

  20. Disruptions seen arising from nuclear rate shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utroska, D.

    1984-01-01

    Recent reports by the public utility industry and Price Waterhouse conclude that the rate shock associated with some of the over 40 nuclear plants coming on-line in the next few years could disrupt local economies and change the way certain crisis-state electric companies report their financial dealings. Passing the full cost of a plant along to ratepayers can result in a direct reduction in electricity demand and a corresponding flight of consumers from the region. Another effect may be to eliminate allowance for funds used during construction (AFUDC) as an accounting tool if there is no possibility of recovering costs from ratepayers. One report estimates that the lifetime value of nuclear plant costs will likely exceed lifetime fuel savings by $82 to $266 billion. Rate phase-in could mitigate the shock and make it more equitable. 1 table

  1. The Disruptive Effect of Think Aloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janni; Yssing, Carsten

    Thinking Aloud Thinking Aloud is the most commonly used technique used to test users´ interaction with computers. The assumption is that Think Aloud gives access to what goes on in the users´ minds. However, interfaces are multi modal and play heavily on user´s visual perception. Reflecting upon...... Think Aloud (TA), we ask the question: what happens when users are required to verbalise their visual perceptions and interactions? We argue that TA may have a disruptive effect, suggesting that other techniques be considered. With a theoretical distinction between focal and subsidiary awareness...... and a focus on the sense making process, we develop a frame for test of user´s visual interaction which rely on the coordination between hand/mouse and eye/cursor.Author Keywords: Think Aloud, visual perception, interaction, test...

  2. Action-specific disruption of perceptual confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Stephen M; Maniscalco, Brian; Ko, Yoshiaki; Amendi, Namema; Ro, Tony; Lau, Hakwan

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical models of perception assume that confidence is related to the quality or strength of sensory processing. Counter to this intuitive view, we showed in the present research that the motor system also contributes to judgments of perceptual confidence. In two experiments, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to manipulate response-specific representations in the premotor cortex, selectively disrupting postresponse confidence in visual discrimination judgments. Specifically, stimulation of the motor representation associated with the unchosen response reduced confidence in correct responses, thereby reducing metacognitive capacity without changing visual discrimination performance. Effects of TMS on confidence were observed when stimulation was applied both before and after the response occurred, which suggests that confidence depends on late-stage metacognitive processes. These results place constraints on models of perceptual confidence and metacognition by revealing that action-specific information in the premotor cortex contributes to perceptual confidence. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Disrupting neuronal transmission: Mechanism of DBS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi eChiken

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Applying high-frequency stimulation to deep brain rain structure, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS, has now been recognized an effective therapeutic option for a wide range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. DBS targeting the basal ganglia thalamo-cortical loop, especially the internal segment of the globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus and thalamus, has been widely employed as a successful surgical therapy for movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia and tremor. However, the neurophysiological mechanism underling the action of DBS remains unclear and is still under debate: does DBS inhibit or excite local neuronal elements? In this review, we will examine this question and propose the alternative interpretation: DBS dissociates inputs and outputs, resulting in disruption of abnormal signal transmission.

  4. Endocrine disrupting chemicals and growth of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botton, Jérémie; Kadawathagedara, Manik; de Lauzon-Guillain, Blandine

    2017-06-01

    According to the "environmental obesogen hypothesis", early-life (including in utero) exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may disturb the mechanisms involved in adipogenesis or energy storage, and thus may increase the susceptibility to overweight and obesity. Animal models have shown that exposure to several of these chemicals could induce adipogenesis and mechanisms have been described. Epidemiological studies are crucial to know whether this effect could also be observed in humans. We aimed at summarizing the literature in epidemiology on the relationship between EDCs exposure and child's growth. Overall, epidemiological studies suggest that pre- and/or early postnatal exposure to some EDCs may increase the risk of overweight or obesity during childhood. In that review, we present some limitations of these studies, mainly in exposure assessment, that currently prevent to conclude about causality. Recent advances in epidemiology should bring further knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The disruptive effect of Think Aloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janni; Yssing, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    Thinking Aloud Thinking Aloud is the most commonly used technique used to test users´ interaction with computers. The assumption is that Think Aloud gives access to what goes on in the users´ minds. However, interfaces are multi modal and play heavily on user´s visual perception. Reflecting upon...... Think Aloud (TA), we ask the question: what happens when users are required to verbalise their visual perceptions and interactions? We argue that TA may have a disruptive effect, suggesting that other techniques be considered. With a theoretical distinction between focal and subsidiary awareness...... and a focus on the sense making process, we develop a frame for test of user´s visual interaction which rely on the coordination between hand/mouse and eye/cursor.Author Keywords: Think Aloud, visual perception, interaction, test...

  6. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. King

    2004-03-31

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report.

  7. Identifikasi Pembayaran Bergerak (Mobile Payment) yang Mengganggu (Disruptive) di Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Mawarrini, Robertta Indira

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to identify disruptive mobile payment in Indonesia. Mobile payment as a sector of financial technology is enabling the lifestyle transformation of electronic banking. The future of retail banking is a smartphone experience that gladden and customers also aspire for a “bank in my pocket”. Mobile payment as the second sector most likely to be disrupted in the intersection of finance and technology industry. The promising approach of disruptive innovations is proposed by Profe...

  8. Disruption of Trophic Inhibitory Signaling in Autism Sepctrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0433 TITLE: Disruption of Trophic Inhibitory Signaling in Autism Sepctrum Disorders PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Anis...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Disruption of Trophic Inhibitory Signaling in Autism Sepctrum Disorders 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0433 5c. PROGRAM...chloride co-transporters that control EGABA could be used as a corrective strategy for the synaptic and circuit disruptions demonstrated in the

  9. A bright year for tidal disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Stone, Nicholas C.

    2016-09-01

    When a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (SMBH), roughly half of its mass falls back to the SMBH at super-Eddington rates. As this gas is tenuously gravitationally bound and unable to cool radiatively, only a small fraction fin ≪ 1 may accrete, with the majority instead becoming unbound in an outflow of velocity ˜104 km s-1. The outflow spreads laterally as it expands to large radii, encasing the SMBH and blocking the inner disc's EUV/X-ray radiation, which becomes trapped in a radiation-dominated nebula. Ionizing nebular radiation heats the inner edge of the ejecta, converting the emission to optical/near-UV wavelengths where photons more readily escape due to the lower opacity. This can explain the unexpectedly low and temporally constant effective temperatures of optically discovered tidal disruption event (TDE) flares. For high-mass SMBHs, M• ≳ 107 M⊙, the ejecta can become fully ionized at an earlier stage, or for a wider range of viewing angles, producing a TDE flare accompanied by thermal X-ray emission. The peak optical luminosity is suppressed as the result of adiabatic losses in the inner disc wind when M• ≪ 107 M⊙, possibly contributing to the unexpected dearth of optical TDEs in galaxies with low-mass SMBHs. In the classical picture, where fin ≈ 1, TDEs de-spin supermassive SMBHs and cap their maximum spins well below theoretical accretion physics limits. This cap is relaxed in our model, and existing Fe Kα spin measurements provide preliminary evidence that fin < 1.

  10. Donor-derived HLA antibody production in patients undergoing SCT from HLA antibody-positive donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, K; Yoshihara, S; Maruya, E; Ikegame, K; Kaida, K; Hayashi, K; Kato, R; Inoue, T; Fujioka, T; Tamaki, H; Okada, M; Onuma, T; Fujii, N; Kusunoki, Y; Soma, T; Saji, H; Ogawa, H

    2012-10-01

    Pre-existing donor-specific HLA antibodies in patients undergoing HLA-mismatched SCT have increasingly been recognized as a risk factor for primary graft failure. However, the clinical implications of the presence of HLA antibodies in donors remain unknown. We prospectively examined 123 related donors for the presence of HLA antibodies by using a Luminex-based single antigen assay. Of these, 1/57 (1.8%) male, 6/27 (22%) parous female and 0/39 (0%) nonparous female donors were HLA antibody-positive. Then, we determined the presence of HLA antibodies in seven patients who received SCT from antibody-positive donors. Of these, four became HLA antibody-positive after SCT. The specificities of the antibodies that emerged in the patients closely resembled those of the antibodies found in the donors, indicating their production by donor-derived plasma cells. Moreover, the kinetics of the HLA antibody levels were similar in all four patients: levels started increasing within 1 week after SCT and peaked at days 10-21, followed by a gradual decrease. These results suggest that donor-derived HLA antibody production frequently occurs in patients undergoing SCT from antibody-positive donors. Further studies are warranted for clarifying the clinical significance of donor-derived HLA antibodies, including the role of these antibodies in post transplant platelet transfusion refractoriness.

  11. Technology and plasma-materials interaction processes of tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, R.T.; Kellman, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    A workshop on the technology and plasma-materials interaction processes of tokamak disruptions was held April 3, 1992 in Monterey, California, as a satellite meeting of the 10th International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions. The objective was to bring together researchers working on disruption measurements in operating tokamaks, those performing disruption simulation experiments using pulsed plasma gun, electron beam and laser systems, and computational physicists attempting to model the evolution and plasma-materials interaction processes of tokamak disruptions. This is a brief report on the workshop. 4 refs

  12. Stabilization of tearing modes to suppress major disruptions in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.A.; Carreras, B.; Hicks, H.R.; Lynch, S.J.; Waddell, B.V.

    1979-02-01

    It is shown, for q-profiles which lead to a disruption, that the control of the amplitude of the 2/1 tearing mode avoids the disruption. Q-profiles measured in T-4 and PLT before a major disruption were studied. Two methods of controlling the 2/1 mode amplitude have been considered: (1) Feedback stabilization with the feedback signal locked in phase with the 2/1 mode. (2) Heating slightly outside the q = 2 surface. In both cases it is only necessary to decrease the 2/1 mode amplitude to suppress the disruption. It is not always necessary to stabilize the unstable modes fully

  13. Construction of Rabbit Immune Antibody Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha; Lee, Jong Seo; Shim, Hyunbo

    2018-01-01

    Rabbits have distinct advantages over mice as a source of target-specific antibodies. They produce higher affinity antibodies than mice, and may elicit strong immune response against antigens or epitopes that are poorly immunogenic or tolerated in mice. However, a great majority of currently available monoclonal antibodies are of murine origin because of the wider availability of murine fusion partner cell lines and well-established tools and protocols for fusion and cloning of mouse hybridoma. Phage-display selection of antibody libraries is an alternative method to hybridoma technology for the generation of target-specific monoclonal antibodies. High-affinity monoclonal antibodies from nonmurine species can readily be obtained by constructing immune antibody libraries from B cells of the immunized animal and screening the library by phage display. In this article, we describe the construction of a rabbit immune Fab library for the facile isolation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies. After immunization, B-cell cDNA is obtained from the spleen of the animal, from which antibody variable domain repertoires are amplified and assembled into a Fab repertoire by PCR. The Fab genes are then cloned into a phagemid vector and transformed to E. coli, from which a phage-displayed immune Fab library is rescued. Such a library can be biopanned against the immunization antigen for rapid identification of high-affinity, target-specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies.

  14. Update on antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Michelle Remião Ugolini; Danowski, Adriana; Funke, Andreas; Rêgo, Jozelia; Levy, Roger; Andrade, Danieli Castro Oliveira de

    2017-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. Most APS events are directly related to thrombotic events, which may affect small, medium or large vessels. Other clinical features like thrombocytopenia, nephropathy, cardiac valve disease, cognitive dysfunction and skin ulcers (called non-criteria manifestations) add significant morbidity to this syndrome and represent clinical situations that are challenging. APS was initially described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but it can occur in patients without any other autoimmune disease. Despite the autoimmune nature of this syndrome, APS treatment is still based on anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy.

  15. Short- and long-term health consequences of sleep disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medic, Goran; Wille, Micheline; Hemels, Michiel Eh

    2017-01-01

    Sleep plays a vital role in brain function and systemic physiology across many body systems. Problems with sleep are widely prevalent and include deficits in quantity and quality of sleep; sleep problems that impact the continuity of sleep are collectively referred to as sleep disruptions. Numerous factors contribute to sleep disruption, ranging from lifestyle and environmental factors to sleep disorders and other medical conditions. Sleep disruptions have substantial adverse short- and long-term health consequences. A literature search was conducted to provide a nonsystematic review of these health consequences (this review was designed to be nonsystematic to better focus on the topics of interest due to the myriad parameters affected by sleep). Sleep disruption is associated with increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, metabolic effects, changes in circadian rhythms, and proinflammatory responses. In otherwise healthy adults, short-term consequences of sleep disruption include increased stress responsivity, somatic pain, reduced quality of life, emotional distress and mood disorders, and cognitive, memory, and performance deficits. For adolescents, psychosocial health, school performance, and risk-taking behaviors are impacted by sleep disruption. Behavioral problems and cognitive functioning are associated with sleep disruption in children. Long-term consequences of sleep disruption in otherwise healthy individuals include hypertension, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, weight-related issues, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and colorectal cancer. All-cause mortality is also increased in men with sleep disturbances. For those with underlying medical conditions, sleep disruption may diminish the health-related quality of life of children and adolescents and may worsen the severity of common gastrointestinal disorders. As a result of the potential consequences of sleep disruption, health care

  16. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  17. The future of antibodies as cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M; Dhimolea, Eugen

    2012-09-01

    Targeted therapeutics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have proven successful as cancer drugs. To profile products that could be marketed in the future, we examined the current commercial clinical pipeline of mAb candidates for cancer. Our analysis revealed trends toward development of a variety of noncanonical mAbs, including antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), bispecific antibodies, engineered antibodies and antibody fragments and/or domains. We found substantial diversity in the antibody sequence source, isotype, carbohydrate residues, targets and mechanisms of action (MOA). Although well-validated targets, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and CD20, continue to provide opportunities for companies, we found notable trends toward targeting less-well-validated antigens and exploration of innovative MOA such as the generation of anticancer immune responses or recruitment of cytotoxic T cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Preferred Home for Disrupted Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Observed burps from the shredding of stars by supermassive black holes suggest that this behavior is more common in an unusual type of galaxy. A new study has examined NGC 3156, an example from this galaxy type, to better understand what causes this preference.Stellar BetrayalAn artists illustration of a tidal disruption event, in which a star is sent on a plunging orbit near a supermassive black hole and is subsequently torn apart by the black holes tidal forces. [NASA/CXC/M.Weiss]Tidal disruption events (TDEs) are events where a star plunges too close to a supermassive black hole and is torn apart by the black holes tidal forces. Weve observed roughly a dozen of these violent events in the last five years, and we expect to finds hundreds to thousands more with future surveys.TDEs are triggered when a star is sent on a plunging orbit close to a supermassive black hole. But what sends the star into harms way? One possible culprit is a dynamical mechanism known as two-body relaxation. In this process, stars orbiting a black hole undergo individual starstar interactions that, with a close enough encounter, can send them on plunging orbits.Choosing an Unusual HostOne puzzle with TDEs is that they tend to be preferentially found in rather unusual galaxies: galaxies that recently exhibited a lot of star formation but are now quiescent. In particular, several of the TDEs have been discovered in what are known as E+A galaxies, a rare subtype of elliptical galaxy that has recently undergone a major starburst.Since this subtype makes up only ~0.1% of all galaxies, its surprising that weve found so many TDEs in E+A galaxies so far. So why the preference?In an effort to answer this question, two scientists, Nicholas Stone (Einstein Fellow at Columbia University) and Sjoert van Velzen (Hubble Fellow at Johns Hopkins University), have teamed up to examine a nearby E+A galaxy, NGC 3156.Tidal disruption rates as a function of central supermassive-black-hole mass. The blue curve

  19. Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfa, Theodosia A

    2016-12-02

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare and heterogeneous disease that affects 1 to 3/100 000 patients per year. AIHA caused by warm autoantibodies (w-AIHA), ie, antibodies that react with their antigens on the red blood cell optimally at 37°C, is the most common type, comprising ∼70% to 80% of all adult cases and ∼50% of pediatric cases. About half of the w-AIHA cases are called primary because no specific etiology can be found, whereas the rest are secondary to other recognizable underlying disorders. This review will focus on the postulated immunopathogenetic mechanisms in idiopathic and secondary w-AIHA and report on the rare cases of direct antiglobulin test-negative AIHA, which are even more likely to be fatal because of inherent characteristics of the causative antibodies, as well as because of delays in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. Then, the characteristics of w-AIHA associated with genetically defined immune dysregulation disorders and special considerations on its management will be discussed. Finally, the standard treatment options and newer therapeutic approaches for this chronic autoimmune blood disorder will be reviewed. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  20. Novice Teachers' Opinions on Students' Disruptive Behaviours: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Senol

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: It is recognised worldwide that novice teachers encounter various disruptive behaviours and face many challenges that stem from problematic students. Disruptive behaviours are seen as some of the most pervasive challenges widely affecting the teaching experience of novice teachers. In this study, the aim was to determine novice teachers'…

  1. Teachers' Perceptions of Disruptive Behaviour in Schools: A Psychological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Poppy; Schlösser, Annette; Scarr, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into school teachers' perceptions of disruptive behaviour from a psychological perspective. The inter-disciplinary nature of this research bridges the understanding between educational and psychological perspectives on disruptive behaviour. This article discusses evidence that for the most troubled pupils,…

  2. Disruptive behaviour in the Foundation Phase of schooling | Marais ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the passage of legislation banning corporal punishment in South African schools, disruptive behaviour in schools has become an issue of national concern. Against this background a research project was undertaken in which the types and causes of disruptive behaviour occurring most frequently in the Foundation ...

  3. Disruptive Behaviour in the Foundation Phase of Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Petro; Meier, Corinne

    2010-01-01

    Since the passage of legislation banning corporal punishment in South African schools, disruptive behaviour in schools has become an issue of national concern. Against this background a research project was undertaken in which the types and causes of disruptive behaviour occurring most frequently in the Foundation Phase of schooling were…

  4. Why looking at social media at work disrupts your concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Wiewiura, Joachim Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    You might have heard of the bystander-effect, but what about the Pinball-effect, which disrupts your attention on important tasks?......You might have heard of the bystander-effect, but what about the Pinball-effect, which disrupts your attention on important tasks?...

  5. Plasma-material interaction under simulated disruption conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhtin, V.P.; Safronov, V.M.; Toporkov, D.A.; Vasenin, S.G.; Wurz, H.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Sudden evaporation of divertor plate surface under high heat load during tokamak plasma disruption instantaneously produces a vapor shield. The cloud of vaporized material prevents the divertor plates from the bulk of incoming energy flux and thus reduces the further material erosion. Dynamics and effectiveness of the vapor shield are studied experimentally at the 2MK-200 facility under simulated disruption conditions. (orig.)

  6. In vitro screening for endocrine disruptive activity in selected South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various waterborne anthropogenic contaminants disrupt the endocrine systems of wildlife and humans, targeting reproductive pathways, among others. Very little is known, however, regarding the occurrence of endocrine disruptive activity in South African freshwater ecosystems, and coastal ecosystems have not been ...

  7. High trait anxiety: a challenge for disrupting fear memory reconsolidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeter, M.; Kindt, M.

    2013-01-01

    Disrupting reconsolidation may be promising in the treatment of anxiety disorders but the fear-reducing effects are thus far solely demonstrated in the average organism. A relevant question is whether disrupting fear memory reconsolidation is less effective in individuals who are vulnerable to

  8. Disruption management of the vehicle routing problem with vehicle breakdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Q; Fu, Z; Lysgaard, Jens

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a new class of problem, the disrupted vehicle routing problem (VRP), which deals with the disruptions that occur at the execution stage of a VRP plan. The paper then focuses on one type of such problem, in which a vehicle breaks down during the delivery and a new routing...

  9. Disruptive change and the reconfiguration of innovation ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dedehayir, Ozgur; Ortt, J.R.; Seppänen, Marko

    2017-01-01

    This conceptual paper extends the traditional view of disruptive change, which considers the effects of rivalry between an incumbent and new entrant firm, by examining the impact of disruption upon the ‘innovation ecosystem’ in its entirety – the group of organisations that collaborate in

  10. Biomarkers used in Environmental Health with focus on Endocrine Disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Tanja; Ghisari, Mandana; Long, Manhai

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are compounds that either mimic or block endogenous hormones and can disrupt the normal function of the body. Bio-monitoring is the assessment of internal doses of EDCs and has been used for decades to provide information about exposures to chemicals giving...

  11. Disruption Management of Rolling Stock in Passenger Railway Transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.K. Nielsen (Lars Kjaer); G. Maróti (Gábor)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis paper deals with real-time disruption management of rolling stock in passenger railway transportation. We present a generic framework for modeling disruptions in railway rolling stock schedules. The framework is presented as an online combinatorial decision problem where the

  12. Railway disruption management challenges and possible solution directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghaemi, N.; Cats, O.; Goverde, R.M.P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the challenges of railway traffic controllers in dealing with big disruptions and the kind of support tools that could help to improve their task in terms of performance, lead time and workload. The disruption handling process can be partitioned into three phases

  13. Sleep disruption and the sequelae associated with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Smith, Kelly E; Nguyen, Linda; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Jackson, Garrett J; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L; Miller, Diane B

    2015-08-01

    Sleep disruption, which includes a loss of sleep as well as poor quality fragmented sleep, frequently follows traumatic brain injury (TBI) impacting a large number of patients each year in the United States. Fragmented and/or disrupted sleep can worsen neuropsychiatric, behavioral, and physical symptoms of TBI. Additionally, sleep disruption impairs recovery and can lead to cognitive decline. The most common sleep disruption following TBI is insomnia, which is difficulty staying asleep. The consequences of disrupted sleep following injury range from deranged metabolomics and blood brain barrier compromise to altered neuroplasticity and degeneration. There are several theories for why sleep is necessary (e.g., glymphatic clearance and metabolic regulation) and these may help explain how sleep disruption contributes to degeneration within the brain. Experimental data indicate disrupted sleep allows hyperphosphorylated tau and amyloid β plaques to accumulate. As sleep disruption may act as a cellular stressor, target areas warranting further scientific investigation include the increase in endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress following acute periods of sleep deprivation. Potential treatment options for restoring the normal sleep cycle include melatonin derivatives and cognitive behavioral therapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Plasma-material interaction under simulated disruption conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.I. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Bakhtin, V.P. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Toporkov, D.A. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Vasenin, S.G. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Wurz, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INR (Germany); Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Sudden evaporation of divertor plate surface under high heat load during tokamak plasma disruption instantaneously produces a vapor shield. The cloud of vaporized material prevents the divertor plates from the bulk of incoming energy flux and thus reduces the further material erosion. Dynamics and effectiveness of the vapor shield are studied experimentally at the 2MK-200 facility under simulated disruption conditions. (orig.).

  15. An anti vimentin antibody promotes tube formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mathias Lindh; Møller, Carina Kjeldahl; Rasmussen, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    antibody technology, promotes tube formation of endothelial cells in a 2D matrigel assay. By binding vimentin, the antibody increases the tube formation by 21% after 5 hours of incubation. Addition of the antibody directly to cultured endothelial cells does not influence endothelial cell migration...... or proliferation. The enhanced tube formation can be seen for up to 10 hours where after the effect decreases. It is shown that the antibody-binding site is located on the coil 2 domain of vimentin. To our knowledge this is the first study that demonstrates an enhanced tube formation by binding vimentin in a 2D...

  16. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2018-04-10

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  17. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Gearhart

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations.

  18. High throughput discovery of influenza virus neutralizing antibodies from phage-displayed synthetic antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Chien; Chiu, Yi-Kai; Yu, Chung-Ming; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Tung, Chao-Ping; Tsou, Yueh-Liang; Huang, Yi-Jen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chen, Hong-Sen; Wang, Andrew H-J; Yang, An-Suei

    2017-10-31

    Pandemic and epidemic outbreaks of influenza A virus (IAV) infection pose severe challenges to human society. Passive immunotherapy with recombinant neutralizing antibodies can potentially mitigate the threats of IAV infection. With a high throughput neutralizing antibody discovery platform, we produced artificial anti-hemagglutinin (HA) IAV-neutralizing IgGs from phage-displayed synthetic scFv libraries without necessitating prior memory of antibody-antigen interactions or relying on affinity maturation essential for in vivo immune systems to generate highly specific neutralizing antibodies. At least two thirds of the epitope groups of the artificial anti-HA antibodies resemble those of natural protective anti-HA antibodies, providing alternatives to neutralizing antibodies from natural antibody repertoires. With continuing advancement in designing and constructing synthetic scFv libraries, this technological platform is useful in mitigating not only the threats of IAV pandemics but also those from other newly emerging viral infections.

  19. Not All Antibodies Are Created Equal: Factors That Influence Antibody Mediated Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie L. Butler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Consistent with Dr. Paul Terasaki’s “humoral theory of rejection” numerous studies have shown that HLA antibodies can cause acute and chronic antibody mediated rejection (AMR and decreased graft survival. New evidence also supports a role for antibodies to non-HLA antigens in AMR and allograft injury. Despite the remarkable efforts by leaders in the field who pioneered single antigen bead technology for detection of donor specific antibodies, a considerable amount of work is still needed to better define the antibody attributes that are associated with AMR pathology. This review highlights what is currently known about the clinical context of pre and posttransplant antibodies, antibody characteristics that influence AMR, and the paths after donor specific antibody production (no rejection, subclinical rejection, and clinical dysfunction with AMR.

  20. Supply Chain Disruptions Theory and Practice of Managing Risk

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrotra, Anuj; Ray, Saibal

    2012-01-01

    One of the most critical issues facing supply chain managers in today’s globalized and highly uncertain business environments is how to deal proactively with disruptions that might affect the complicated supply networks characterizing modern enterprises. Supply Chain Disruptions: Theory and Practice of Managing Risk presents a state-of the-art perspective on this particular issue. Supply Chain Disruptions: Theory and Practice of Managing Risk demonstrates that effective management of supply disruptions necessitates both strategic and tactical measures – the former involving optimal design of supply networks; the latter involving inventory, finance and demand management. It shows that managers ought to use all available levers at their disposal throughout the supply network – like sourcing and pricing strategies, providing financial subsidies, encouraging information sharing and incentive alignment between supply chain partners – in order to tackle supply disruptions. The editors combine up-to-date aca...

  1. Neuroimaging findings in disruptive behavior disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rosalind H; Clanton, Roberta L; Rogers, Jack C; De Brito, Stéphane A

    2015-08-01

    Decades of research have shown that youths with disruptive behavior disorders (DBD) are a heterogeneous population. Over the past 20 years, researchers have distinguished youths with DBD as those displaying high (DBD/HCU) versus low (DBD/LCU) callous-unemotional (CU) traits. These traits include flat affect and reduced empathy and remorse, and are associated with more severe, varied, and persistent patterns of antisocial behavior and aggression. Conduct problems in youths with HCU and LCU are thought to reflect distinct causal vulnerabilities, with antisocial behavior in youths with DBD/HCU reflecting a predominantly genetic etiology, while antisocial behavior in youths with DBD/LCU is associated primarily with environmental influences. Here we selectively review recent functional (fMRI) and structural (sMRI) magnetic resonance imaging research on DBD, focusing particularly on the role of CU traits. First, fMRI studies examining the neural correlates of affective stimuli, emotional face processing, empathy, theory of mind, morality, and decision-making in DBD are discussed. This is followed by a review of the studies investigating brain structure and structural connectivity in DBD. Next, we highlight the need to further investigate females and the role of sex differences in this population. We conclude the review by identifying potential clinical implications of this research.

  2. Fungal laccases degradation of endocrine disrupting compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macellaro, Gemma; Pezzella, Cinzia; Cicatiello, Paola; Sannia, Giovanni; Piscitelli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, water pollution by trace organic compounds (ng/L) has become one of the key environmental issues in developed countries. This is the case of the emerging contaminants called endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). EDCs are a new class of environmental pollutants able to mimic or antagonize the effects of endogenous hormones, and are recently drawing scientific and public attention. Their widespread presence in the environment solicits the need of their removal from the contaminated sites. One promising approach to face this challenge consists in the use of enzymatic systems able to react with these molecules. Among the possible enzymes, oxidative enzymes are attracting increasing attention because of their versatility, the possibility to produce them on large scale, and to modify their properties. In this study five different EDCs were treated with four different fungal laccases, also in the presence of both synthetic and natural mediators. Mediators significantly increased the efficiency of the enzymatic treatment, promoting the degradation of substrates recalcitrant to laccase oxidation. The laccase showing the best performances was chosen to further investigate its oxidative capabilities against micropollutant mixtures. Improvement of enzyme performances in nonylphenol degradation rate was achieved through immobilization on glass beads.

  3. Disruption of myelination by diagnostic US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellisman, M.H.; Palmer, D.E.; Andre, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to test for possible effects of US on myelination, the authors exposed 20 unanesthetized rat pups to US intensities consistent with those used for imaging a human fetus in utero. The rats were 3-5 days old and at a stage of myelination similar to that of a human fetus of about 4-5 months. Then animals were exposed for 30 minutes to the beam from a 3.5-MHz transducer (ADR 2130 real-time linear array, SPTA intensity of 0.4 mW/cm/sup 2/ and SATA intensity of 0.05 mW/cm/sup 2/). Control animals were bound and placed in the tank but not exposed for 30 minutes, and taken straight from the cage. Some animals were killed and tissues were processed for electron microscopy immediately after exposure, others were killed after recovery periods of up to 24 hours. Enlargements of the periaxonal space was visible with separation of adjacent paranodal loops and disruption of Schwann cell-axonal junctions in all exposed animals. Paranodal demyelination was also noted in several nodes. Nodes exhibiting this microedematous morphology were apparent even after a 24-hour recovery period but were not found in control preparations

  4. Disrupted functional connectivity in adolescent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Lopez, Laura; Contreras-Rodriguez, Oren; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A; Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with brain alterations characterised by poorer interaction between a hypersensitive reward system and a comparatively weaker prefrontal-cognitive control system. These alterations may occur as early as in adolescence, but this notion remains unclear, as no studies so far have examined global functional connectivity in adolescents with excess weight. We investigated functional connectivity in a sample of 60 adolescents with excess weight and 55 normal weight controls. We first identified parts of the brain displaying between-group global connectivity differences and then characterised the extent of the differences in functional network integrity and their association with reward sensitivity. Adolescent obesity was linked to neuroadaptations in functional connectivity within brain hubs linked to interoception (insula), emotional memory (middle temporal gyrus) and cognitive control (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) (pFWE adolescent obesity is linked to disrupted functional connectivity in brain networks relevant to maintaining balance between reward, emotional memories and cognitive control. Our findings may contribute to reconceptualization of obesity as a multi-layered brain disorder leading to compromised motivation and control, and provide a biological account to target prevention strategies for adolescent obesity.

  5. Disruptive innovation: the future of healthcare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellowlees, Peter; Odor, Alberto; Patrice, Kesha; Parish, Michelle Burke; Nafiz, Najia; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Hilty, Donald

    2011-04-01

    The traditional face-to-face doctor-patient relationship is the core of conventional medical practice. One key aspect of this changing relationship is the increasing dependency on asynchronous data collection in clinical consultations. Such electronic communications and data streams may be numeric, text-based, audio, digitized still pictures, video and radiologic, as well as emanating from multiple medical devices. While asynchronous medicine may be established in specialties like radiology and dermatology, there is little research regarding the use of asynchronous medicine in areas of medicine that traditionally rely on the physical doctor-patient interaction such as primary care, internal medicine, geriatrics, and psychiatry. The practice of psychiatry stands out as a discipline that is highly dependent on the quality of the physical meeting between the doctor and the patient, yet even in this specialty it is possible to utilize asynchronous medicine for some types of psychiatric consultations. Asynchronous medicine has the potential to be significantly disruptive to our current healthcare processes, as well as more clinically and economically efficient.

  6. Reward disrupts reactivated human skill memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Eran; Laor-Maayany, Rony; Censor, Nitzan

    2016-06-16

    Accumulating evidence across species and memory domains shows that when an existing memory is reactivated, it becomes susceptible to modifications. However, the potential role of reward signals in these mechanisms underlying human memory dynamics is unknown. Leaning on a wealth of findings on the role of reward in reinforcing memory, we tested the impact of reinforcing a skill memory trace with monetary reward following memory reactivation, on strengthening of the memory trace. Reinforcing reactivated memories did not strengthen the memory, but rather led to disruption of the memory trace, breaking down the link between memory reactivation and subsequent memory strength. Statistical modeling further revealed a strong mediating role for memory reactivation in linking between memory encoding and subsequent memory strength only when the memory was replayed without reinforcement. We suggest that, rather than reinforcing the existing memory trace, reward creates a competing memory trace, impairing expression of the original reward-free memory. This mechanism sheds light on the processes underlying skill acquisition, having wide translational implications.

  7. Passive hand movements disrupt adults’ counting strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke eImbo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we experimentally tested the role of hand motor circuits in simple-arithmetic strategies. Educated adults solved simple additions (e.g., 8+3 or simple subtractions (e.g., 11–3 while they were required to retrieve the answer from long-term memory (e.g., knowing that 8+3 = 11, to transform the problem by making an intermediate step (e.g., 8+3 = 8+2+1 = 10+1 = 11 or to count one-by-one (e.g., 8+3 = 8…9…10…11. During the process of solving the arithmetic problems, the experimenter did or did not move the participants’ hand on a 4-point matrix. The results show that passive hand movements disrupted the counting strategy while leaving the other strategies unaffected. This pattern of results is in agreement with a procedural account, showing that the involvement of hand motor circuits in adults’ mathematical abilities is reminiscent of finger counting during childhood.

  8. Oncogenomic disruptions in arsenic-induced carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Adam P; Minatel, Brenda C; Ng, Kevin W; Stewart, Greg L; Dummer, Trevor J B; Lam, Wan L; Martinez, Victor D

    2017-04-11

    Chronic exposure to arsenic affects more than 200 million people worldwide, and has been associated with many adverse health effects, including cancer in several organs. There is accumulating evidence that arsenic biotransformation, a step in the elimination of arsenic from the human body, can induce changes at a genetic and epigenetic level, leading to carcinogenesis. At the genetic level, arsenic interferes with key cellular processes such as DNA damage-repair and chromosomal structure, leading to genomic instability. At the epigenetic level, arsenic places a high demand on the cellular methyl pool, leading to global hypomethylation and hypermethylation of specific gene promoters. These arsenic-associated DNA alterations result in the deregulation of both oncogenic and tumour-suppressive genes. Furthermore, recent reports have implicated aberrant expression of non-coding RNAs and the consequential disruption of signaling pathways in the context of arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. This article provides an overview of the oncogenomic anomalies associated with arsenic exposure and conveys the importance of non-coding RNAs in the arsenic-induced carcinogenic process.

  9. Disruption in the diabetic device care market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojha U

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Utkarsh Ojha,1 Raihan Mohammed2 1Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK; 2Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Abstract: As diabetes mellitus (DM has approached pandemic proportions, the pressure for effective glycemic management is mounting. The starting point for managing and living well with DM involves early diagnosis and monitoring blood glucose levels. Therefore, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG can help patients maintain their blood glucose levels within the appropriate range. The general principle behind the current SMBG method involves a finger prick test to obtain a blood drop, which is applied onto a reagent strip and read by an automated device. Novel techniques are currently under evaluation to create the next generation of painless and accurate glucose monitoring for DM. We began by outlining how the emerging technology of the noninvasive glucose monitoring devices (NIGMDs provides both economic and clinical benefits for health systems and patients. We further explored the engineering and techniques behind these upcoming devices. Finally, we evaluated how the NIGMDs disrupt the diabetic device care market and drive health care consumerism. We postulated that the NIGMDs play a pivotal role in the implementation of next generation of diabetes prevention strategies. Keywords: medical devices, medical technology, diabetes management, innovation

  10. Lesbian disclosure: disrupting the taken for granted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Carol

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this interpretive inquiry was to generate understandings about the experience of lesbian disclosure. The inquiry relied on Gadamerian hermeneutic and feminist philosophical thought and was situated in women's health. In a feminist understanding of women's health, experiences of health are inseparable from the everyday experiences of an embodied life and are constituted within each woman's social, material, and discursive realities.The study was informed by conversations with 15 women who self-identified as lesbian for the purpose of the inquiry, accounts of women in the media, and the researcher's reflective journals. The findings move us towards new understandings about the multiple meanings of "lesbian". "They challenge nurses to consider the binary categories of homosexual and heterosexual as inadequate signifiers for the reality of women's lives, to consider the particular arrangements of each woman's life, and to disrupt assumptions of heterosexism in order to reduce the negative impact of social exclusion, isolation, discrimination, and stigmatization as social determinants of health.

  11. Fungal Laccases Degradation of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Macellaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, water pollution by trace organic compounds (ng/L has become one of the key environmental issues in developed countries. This is the case of the emerging contaminants called endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs. EDCs are a new class of environmental pollutants able to mimic or antagonize the effects of endogenous hormones, and are recently drawing scientific and public attention. Their widespread presence in the environment solicits the need of their removal from the contaminated sites. One promising approach to face this challenge consists in the use of enzymatic systems able to react with these molecules. Among the possible enzymes, oxidative enzymes are attracting increasing attention because of their versatility, the possibility to produce them on large scale, and to modify their properties. In this study five different EDCs were treated with four different fungal laccases, also in the presence of both synthetic and natural mediators. Mediators significantly increased the efficiency of the enzymatic treatment, promoting the degradation of substrates recalcitrant to laccase oxidation. The laccase showing the best performances was chosen to further investigate its oxidative capabilities against micropollutant mixtures. Improvement of enzyme performances in nonylphenol degradation rate was achieved through immobilization on glass beads.

  12. Plasma temperature measurements in disruption simulated experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.I. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Bakhtin, V.P. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Toporkov, D.A. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Vasenin, S.G. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Wurz, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INR (Germany); Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Results are reported of experiments to measure the temporal and spatial distributions of a temperature and radiation of a near surface plasma cloud appearing in the disruption simulated experiments. These measurements are needed to verificate the different numerical models of vapor shielding layer which appears to arise near the divertor plates surface and prevents them from the bulk of the incoming energy. Experiments with graphite and tungsten samples were carried out at the 2MK-200 plasma facility. Long CUSP trap was used as a source of high temperature deuterium plasma with a power density W = 10 MW/cm{sup 2} and time duration t = 20 mcs. Laser scattering, space and time resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy was employed to measure the plasma cloud temperature and radiation. The different behaviour of shielding layer parameters was shown for a graphite and tungsten samples. For a tungsten the sharp boundary existed between the incoming deuterium plasma and the thin layer of ablated material plasma and the strong gradient of electron temperature took place in this zone. For a graphite this boundary was broadened at the distance and the main part of the screening layer consisted of the mixture of the incoming deuterium and ablated carbon plasma. (orig.).

  13. Real Time Simulation of Power Grid Disruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinthavali, Supriya [ORNL; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Groer, Christopher S [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL; Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Shankar, Mallikarjun [ORNL; Spafford, Kyle L [ORNL; Vacaliuc, Bogdan [ORNL

    2012-11-01

    DOE-OE and DOE-SC workshops (Reference 1-3) identified the key power grid problem that requires insight addressable by the next generation of exascale computing is coupling of real-time data streams (1-2 TB per hour) as the streams are ingested to dynamic models. These models would then identify predicted disruptions in time (2-4 seconds) to trigger the smart grid s self healing functions. This project attempted to establish the feasibility of this approach and defined the scientific issues, and demonstrated example solutions to important smart grid simulation problems. These objectives were accomplished by 1) using the existing frequency recorders on the national grid to establish a representative and scalable real-time data stream; 2) invoking ORNL signature identification algorithms; 3) modeling dynamically a representative region of the Eastern interconnect using an institutional cluster, measuring the scalability and computational benchmarks for a national capability; and 4) constructing a prototype simulation for the system s concept of smart grid deployment. The delivered ORNL enduring capability included: 1) data processing and simulation metrics to design a national capability justifying exascale applications; 2) Software and intellectual property built around the example solutions; 3) demonstrated dynamic models to design few second self-healing.

  14. Antibody-Drug Conjugates (ADCs) for Personalized Treatment of Solid Tumors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, John M; Morris, Charles Q

    2017-05-01

    Attaching a cytotoxic "payload" to an antibody to form an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) provides a mechanism for selective delivery of the cytotoxic agent to cancer cells via the specific binding of the antibody to cancer-selective cell surface molecules. The first ADC to receive marketing authorization was gemtuzumab ozogamicin, which comprises an anti-CD33 antibody conjugated to a highly potent DNA-targeting antibiotic, calicheamicin, approved in 2000 for treating acute myeloid leukemia. It was withdrawn from the US market in 2010 following an unsuccessful confirmatory trial. The development of two classes of highly potent microtubule-disrupting agents, maytansinoids and auristatins, as payloads for ADCs resulted in approval of brentuximab vedotin in 2011 for treating Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and approval of ado-trastuzumab emtansine in 2013 for treating HER2-positive breast cancer. Their success stimulated much research into the ADC approach, with >60 ADCs currently in clinical evaluation, mostly targeting solid tumors. Five ADCs have advanced into pivotal clinical trials for treating various solid tumors-platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, mesothelioma, triple-negative breast cancer, glioblastoma, and small cell lung cancer. The level of target expression is a key parameter in predicting the likelihood of patient benefit for all these ADCs, as well as for the approved compound, ado-trastuzumab emtansine. The development of a patient selection strategy linked to target expression on the tumor is thus critically important for identifying the population appropriate for receiving treatment.

  15. Human anti-Dectin-1 antibody, hybridoma producing said antibody and applications thereof

    OpenAIRE

    Kremer, Leonor; Llorente Gómez, María de las Mercedes; Casasnovas, José María; Fernández Ruíz, Elena; Galán Díez, Marta

    2008-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to hybridoma MGD3 and the monoclonal antibody produced thereby (also called MGD3), which specifically recognises the human Dectin-1 membrane receptor. Antibody MGD3 is capable of inhibiting the binding of Dectin-1 to the natural ligand thereof, the ss-glucans that are components of the fungal wall. In addition, the aforementioned antibody specifically blocks binding to Candida albicans and the secretion of cytokines induced thereby. The MGD3 antibody obtained enable...

  16. Stratification of Antibody-Positive Subjects by Antibody Level Reveals an Impact of Immunogenicity on Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A.; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J.; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2012-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic....

  17. Antibody-mediated immunotoxicity in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, J E; Bortolotti, G R

    2001-02-23

    endocrine-disrupting behavior of PCBs. Both suppression and stimulation of the antibody response are undesirable because this indicates that the immune system is not able to respond normally to challenges by infectious or other disease-causing agents.

  18. Anti-idiotypic antibodies to poliovirus antibodies in commercial immunoglubulin preparations, human serum and milk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hahn-Zoric; B. Carlsson; S. Jeansson; H.P. Ekre; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); D. Roberton; L.A. Hanson

    1993-01-01

    textabstractOur previous studies have suggested that fetal antibody production can be induced by maternal antiidiotypic antibodies transferred to the fetus via the placenta. We tested commercial Ig, sera, and milk for the presence of anti-idiotypic antibodies to poliovirus type 1, using affinity

  19. Monoclonal antibodies in pediatric allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Licari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs involving human-mouse hybrid cells was first described in 1970s, but these biologics are now used for a variety of diseases including cancers, autoimmune disorders and allergic diseases. The aim of this article is to review current and future applications of mAbs, in particular focusing on anti-IgE therapy, in the field of pediatric allergy. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  20. Update on antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Remião Ugolini Lopes

    Full Text Available Summary Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease characterized by antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. Most APS events are directly related to thrombotic events, which may affect small, medium or large vessels. Other clinical features like thrombocytopenia, nephropathy, cardiac valve disease, cognitive dysfunction and skin ulcers (called non-criteria manifestations add significant morbidity to this syndrome and represent clinical situations that are challenging. APS was initially described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE but it can occur in patients without any other autoimmune disease. Despite the autoimmune nature of this syndrome, APS treatment is still based on anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy.

  1. Developmental programming: rescuing disruptions in preovulatory follicle growth and steroidogenesis from prenatal testosterone disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Lopez, A; Moeller, J; Abbott, D H; Padmanabhan, V

    2016-06-29

    Prenatal testosterone (T) excess from days 30-90 of gestation disrupts gonadotropin surge and ovarian follicular dynamics and induces insulin resistance and functional hyperandrogenism in sheep. T treatment from days 60-90 of gestation produces a milder phenotype, albeit with reduced fecundity. Using this milder phenotype, the aim of this study was to understand the relative postnatal contributions of androgen and insulin in mediating the prenatal T induced disruptions in ovarian follicular dynamics. Four experimental groups were generated: 1) control (vehicle treatment), 2) prenatal T-treated (100 mg i.m. administration of T propionate twice weekly from days 60-90 of gestation), 3) prenatal T plus postnatal anti-androgen treated (daily oral dose of 15 mg/kg/day of flutamide beginning at 8 weeks of age) and 4) prenatal T and postnatal insulin sensitizer-treated (daily oral dose of 8 mg/day rosiglitazone beginning at 8 weeks of age). Follicular response to a controlled ovarian stimulation protocol was tested during their third breeding season. Main outcome measures included the determination of number and size of ovarian follicles and intrafollicular concentrations of steroids. At the end of the controlled ovarian stimulation, the number of follicles approaching ovulatory size (≥6 mm) were ~35 % lower in prenatal T-treated (6.5 ± 1.8) compared to controls (9.8 ± 2.0). Postnatal anti-androgen (10.3 ± 1.9), but not insulin sensitizer (5.0 ± 0.9), treatment prevented this decrease. Preovulatory sized follicles in the T group had lower intrafollicular T, androstenedione, and progesterone compared to that of the control group. Intrafollicular steroid disruption was partially reversed solely by postnatal insulin sensitizer treatment. These results demonstrate that the final preovulatory follicular growth and intrafollicular steroid milieu is impaired in prenatal T-treated females. The findings are consistent with the lower fertility rate

  2. PMA synergistically enhances apicularen A-induced cytotoxicity by disrupting microtubule networks in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kang-Sik; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Kim, Jong-Seok; Park, Ji-Hoon; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Yun, Eun-Jin; Park, Jong-Il; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Yoon, Wan-Hee; Lim, Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Combination therapy is key to improving cancer treatment efficacy. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a well-known PKC activator, increases the cytotoxicity of several anticancer drugs. Apicularen A induces cytotoxicity in tumor cells through disrupting microtubule networks by tubulin down-regulation. In this study, we examined whether PMA increases apicularen A-induced cytotoxicity in HeLa cells. Cell viability was examined by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium (MTT) assays. To investigate apoptotic potential of apicularen A, DNA fragmentation assays were performed followed by extracting genomic DNA, and caspase-3 activity assays were performed by fluorescence assays using fluorogenic substrate. The cell cycle distribution induced by combination with PMA and apicularen A was examined by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide (PI). The expression levels of target proteins were measured by Western blotting analysis using specific antibodies, and α-tubulin mRNA levels were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). To examine the effect of combination of PMA and apicularen A on the microtubule architecture, α-tubulin protein and nuclei were visualized by immunofluorescence staining using an anti-α-tubulin antibody and PI, respectively. We found that apicularen A induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HeLa cells. PMA synergistically increased cytotoxicity and apoptotic sub-G 1 population induced by apicularen A. These effects were completely blocked by the PKC inhibitors Ro31-8220 and Go6983, while caspase inhibition by Z-VAD-fmk did not prevent cytotoxicity. RNA interference using siRNA against PKCα, but not PKCβ and PKCγ, inhibited cytotoxicity induced by combination PMA and apicularen A. PMA increased the apicularen A-induced disruption of microtubule networks by further decreasing α- and β-tubulin protein levels in a PKC-dependent manner. These results suggest that the synergy between PMA and apicularen A is involved by

  3. Nano antibody therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatachallam, M.; Sivakumar, T.; Nazeema; Venkateswari, P.

    2011-01-01

    Nanomedicine, an offshoot of nanotechnology, refers to highly specific medical intervention at the molecular scale for curing disease or repairing damaged tissues, such as bone, muscle, or nerve. Nanotechnology can have an early, paradigm-changing impact on how clinicians will detect cancer in its earliest stages. Exquisitely sensitive devices constructed of nanoscale components-such as nanocantilevers, nanowires and nanochannels-offer the potential for detecting even the rarest molecular signals associated with malignancy. One of the most pressing needs in clinical oncology is for imaging agents that can identify tumors that are far smaller than is possible with today's technology, at a scale of 100,000 cells rather than 1,000,000,000 cells. A new approach in nanotechnology for treating cancer incorporates nano iron particles and attaches them to an antibody that has targets only cancer cells and not healthy cells. The treatment works in two steps. This treatment is an ingenious way to make localized tumor ablation a systemic treatment. The advantages are incredible. There are absolutely no side effects from this treatment. It is not painful or even uncomfortable. The iron particles get flushed harmlessly from the body. It is not a drug and so the cancer cannot build up a resistance to the treatment. It is a systematic treatment; even cancer cells and tumors that are not known about get heated up and ablated. This treatment can even be used to enhance imaging of the cancer because once the cancer cells are coated with the iron particles, they are easy to identify. Everything depends on how reliably the antibodies target cancer cells and not healthy cells. When used in conjunction with other systemic treatments, such as vaccine treatments, we could be looking at a time when even advanced cancers can be brought under control. (author)

  4. [Radiolabeled antibodies for cancer treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-François; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise

    2009-12-01

    The first treatment ever by radio-immunotherapy (RIT) was performed by William H. Beierwaltes in 1951 and was a success. Fifty years later, the main question is to find ways of extending the success of radiolabelled anti-CD20 antibodies in indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma to other forms of cancer. Solid tumours are much more radioresistant than lymphomas, but they respond to RIT if the lesions are small. Clinical situations of residual or minimal disease are thus the most likely to benefit from RIT in the adjuvant or consolidation settings. For disseminated disease, like leukemias or myelomas, the problem is different: beta- particles emitted by the radioactive atoms classically used for cancer treatment (iodine-131 or yttrium-90) disperse their energy in large volumes (ranges 1 mm to 1 cm) and are not very effective against isolated cells. Advances in RIT progress in two directions. One is the development of pretargeting strategies in which the antibody is not labelled but used to provide binding sites to small molecular weight radioactivity vectors (biotin, haptens). These techniques have been shown to increase tumour to non-target uptake ratios and anti-tumour efficacy has been demonstrated in the clinic. The other approach is the use of radionuclides adapted to the various clinical situations. Lutetium-177 or copper-67, because of the lower energy of their emission, their relatively long half-life and good gamma emission, may significantly improve RIT efficacy and acceptability. Beyond that, radionuclides emitting particles such as alpha particles or Auger electrons, much more efficient to kill isolated tumour cells, are being tested for RIT in the clinic. Finally, RIT should be integrated with other cancer treatment approaches in multimodality protocols. Thus RIT, now a mature technology, should enter a phase of well designed and focused clinical developments that may be expected to afford significant therapeutic advances.

  5. Applications of recombinant antibodies in plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Angelika; Torrance, Lesley

    2002-09-01

    Summary Advances in molecular biology have made it possible to produce antibody fragments comprising the binding domains of antibody molecules in diverse heterologous systems, such as Escherichia coli, insect cells, or plants. Antibody fragments specific for a wide range of antigens, including plant pathogens, have been obtained by cloning V-genes from lymphoid tissue, or by selection from large naive phage display libraries, thus avoiding the need for immunization. The antibody fragments have been expressed as fusion proteins to create different functional molecules, and fully recombinant assays have been devised to detect plant viruses. The defined binding properties and unlimited cheap supply of antibody fusion proteins make them useful components of standardized immunoassays. The expression of antibody fragments in plants was shown to confer resistance to several plant pathogens. However, the antibodies usually only slowed the progress of infection and durable 'plantibody' resistance has yet to be demonstrated. In future, it is anticipated that antibody fragments from large libraries will be essential tools in high-throughput approaches to post-genomics research, such as the assignment of gene function, characterization of spatio-temporal patterns of protein expression, and elucidation of protein-protein interactions.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies against rat leukocyte surface antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, T. K.; Puklavec, M. J.; Barclay, A. N.; Dijkstra, C. D.

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proven to be powerful tools for studying the properties of leukocyte surface antigens and the cells that express them. In the past decades many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for identifying the different rat leukocyte surface antigens have been described. A list of mAb is

  7. Quantitative Changes In Antibodies Against Onchocercal Native ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative Changes In Antibodies Against Onchocercal Native Antigens Two Months Postivermectin Treatment Of Onchocerciasis Patients. ... Those without onchocercal skin disease, OSD (n=18) had a significant increase of 20.5±29.6%, with pre- and posttreatment values of 0.59±0.15 versus 0.68±0.13 for IgG antibody ...

  8. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  9. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  10. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  11. Serum Antiphospholipid Antibodies Among Healthy Adults In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Antiphospholipid antibodies have been associated with variety of conditions. There is no standard health associated reference values required for the interpretation of antiphospholipid antibodies result available among adults in North- eastern Nigeria and Nigeria in general. The aim of this study is to determine ...

  12. Radiolabeled antibodies for cancer imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Jacques; Bardiès, Manuel; Bourgeois, Mickael; Chatal, Jean-François; Chérel, Michel; Davodeau, François; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Gestin, Jean-François; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies were studied first for tumor detection by single-photon imaging, but FDG PET stopped these developments. In the meantime, radiolabeled antibodies were shown to be effective in the treatment of lymphoma. Radiolabeling techniques are well established and radiolabeled antibodies are a clinical and commercial reality that deserves further studies to advance their application in earlier phase of the diseases and to test combination and adjuvant therapies including radiolabeled antibodies in hematological diseases. In solid tumors, more resistant to radiations and less accessible to large molecules such as antibodies, clinical efficacy remains limited. However, radiolabeled antibodies used in minimal or small-size metastatic disease have shown promising clinical efficacy. In the adjuvant setting, ongoing clinical trials show impressive increase in survival in otherwise unmanageable tumors. New technologies are being developed over the years: recombinant antibodies and pretargeting approaches have shown potential in increasing the therapeutic index of radiolabeled antibodies. In several cases, clinical trials have confirmed preclinical studies. Finally, new radionuclides, such as lutetium-177, with better physical properties will further improve the safety of radioimmunotherapy. Alpha particle and Auger electron emitters offer the theoretical possibility to kill isolated tumor cells and microscopic clusters of tumor cells, opening the perspective of killing the last tumor cell, which is the ultimate challenge in cancer therapy. Preliminary preclinical and preliminary clinical results confirm the feasibility of this approach.

  13. Determination of antiphospholipid antibodies and Thrombophilia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recurrent miscarriage is a critical problem in which many factors play a crucial role such as antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) and anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA). Recent studies pointed to a potential role of thrombophilias as a possible cause of recurrent miscarriage (RM). Objectives: This study was ...

  14. A novel polyclonal antibody against human cytomegalovirus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Future research should be directed to epitope screening of synthetic HMCV peptides, which could help to understand HCMV infection and virus-neutralising antibodies more fully and to prepare HCMV vaccines and antiviral drugs. Key words: Human cytomegalovirus, AD169 strain, Towne strains, polyclonal antibody.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  16. Disrupted functional connectome in antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weixiong; Shi, Feng; Liao, Jian; Liu, Huasheng; Wang, Tao; Shen, Celina; Shen, Hui; Hu, Dewen; Wang, Wei; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-08-01

    Studies on antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) subjects focus on brain functional alterations in relation to antisocial behaviors. Neuroimaging research has identified a number of focal brain regions with abnormal structures or functions in ASPD. However, little is known about the connections among brain regions in terms of inter-regional whole-brain networks in ASPD patients, as well as possible alterations of brain functional topological organization. In this study, we employ resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) to examine functional connectome of 32 ASPD patients and 35 normal controls by using a variety of network properties, including small-worldness, modularity, and connectivity. The small-world analysis reveals that ASPD patients have increased path length and decreased network efficiency, which implies a reduced ability of global integration of whole-brain functions. Modularity analysis suggests ASPD patients have decreased overall modularity, merged network modules, and reduced intra- and inter-module connectivities related to frontal regions. Also, network-based statistics show that an internal sub-network, composed of 16 nodes and 16 edges, is significantly affected in ASPD patients, where brain regions are mostly located in the fronto-parietal control network. These results suggest that ASPD is associated with both reduced brain integration and segregation in topological organization of functional brain networks, particularly in the fronto-parietal control network. These disruptions may contribute to disturbances in behavior and cognition in patients with ASPD. Our findings may provide insights into a deeper understanding of functional brain networks of ASPD.

  17. Disruptive Event Biosphere Doser Conversion Factor Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Wasiolek

    2000-12-28

    The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to, and the results of, development of radionuclide-, exposure scenario-, and ash thickness-specific Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postulated postclosure extrusive igneous event (volcanic eruption) at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations were done for seventeen radionuclides. The selection of radionuclides included those that may be significant dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, as well as radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure. The approach documented in this report takes into account human exposure during three different phases at the time of, and after, volcanic eruption. Calculations of disruptive event BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. The pathway analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. BDCFs for volcanic eruption, when combined with the concentration of radioactivity deposited by eruption on the soil surface, allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculation of radioactivity deposition is outside the scope of this report and so is the transport of contaminated ash from the volcano to the location of the receptor. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA), in which doses are calculated to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

  18. Ecosystem regime shifts disrupt trophic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempson, Tessa N; Graham, Nicholas A J; MacNeil, M Aaron; Hoey, Andrew S; Wilson, Shaun K

    2018-01-01

    Regime shifts between alternative stable ecosystem states are becoming commonplace due to the combined effects of local stressors and global climate change. Alternative states are characterized as substantially different in form and function from pre-disturbance states, disrupting the delivery of ecosystem services and functions. On coral reefs, regime shifts are typically characterized by a change in the benthic composition from coral to macroalgal dominance. Such fundamental shifts in the benthos are anticipated to impact associated fish communities that are reliant on the reef for food and shelter, yet there is limited understanding of how regime shifts propagate through the fish community over time, relative to initial or recovery conditions. This study addresses this knowledge gap using long-term data of coral reef regime shifts and recovery on Seychelles reefs following the 1998 mass bleaching event. It shows how trophic structure of the reef fish community becomes increasingly dissimilar between alternative reef ecosystem states (regime-shifted vs. recovering) with time since disturbance. Regime-shifted reefs developed a concave trophic structure, with increased biomass in base trophic levels as herbivorous species benefitted from increased algal resources. Mid trophic level species, including specialists such as corallivores, declined with loss of coral habitat, while biomass was retained in upper trophic levels by large-bodied, generalist invertivores. Recovering reefs also experienced an initial decline in mid trophic level biomass, but moved toward a bottom-heavy pyramid shape, with a wide range of feeding groups (e.g., planktivores, corallivores, omnivores) represented at mid trophic levels. Given the importance of coral reef fishes in maintaining the ecological function of coral reef ecosystems and their associated fisheries, understanding the effects of regime shifts on these communities is essential to inform decisions that enhance ecological

  19. Dexamethasone Chemotherapy Does Not Disrupt Orexin Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kram, David E.; Krasnow, Stephanie M.; Levasseur, Peter R.; Zhu, Xinxia; Stork, Linda C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Steroid-induced sleep disturbance is a common and highly distressing morbidity for children receiving steroid chemotherapy for the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Sleep disturbance can negatively impact overall quality of life, neurodevelopment, memory consolidation, and wound healing. Hypothalamic orexin neurons are influential wake-promoting neurons, and disturbances in orexin signaling leads to abnormal sleep behavior. A new class of drug, the orexin receptor antagonists, could be an intriguing option for sleep disorders caused by increased orexinergic output. Our aim was to examine the impact of ALL treatment doses of corticosteroids on the orexin system in rodents and in children undergoing treatment for childhood ALL. Methods We administered repeated injections of dexamethasone to rodents and measured responsive orexin neural activity compared to controls. In children with newly diagnosed standard risk B-cell ALL receiving dexamethasone therapy per Children’s Oncology Group (COG) induction therapy from 2014–2016, we collected pre- and during-steroids matched CSF samples and measured the impact of steroids on CSF orexin concentration. Results In both rodents, all markers orexin signaling, including orexin neural output and orexin receptor expression, were preserved in the setting of dexamethasone. Additionally, we did not detect a difference in pre- and during-dexamethasone CSF orexin concentrations in children receiving dexamethasone. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that rodent and human orexin physiology is largely preserved in the setting of high dose dexamethasone. The data obtained in our experimental model fail to demonstrate a causative role for disruption of the orexin pathway in steroid-induced sleep disturbance. PMID:27997622

  20. Cost Sharing in the Prevention of Supply Chain Disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the influence of cost-sharing mechanism on the disruption prevention investment in a supply chain with unreliable suppliers. When a supply chain faces considerable loss following a disruption, supply chain members are motivated toward investing in manners that reduce their disruption probability. In improving supply chain reliability, the cost-sharing mechanism must be set appropriately to realize the efficiency of the disruption prevention investment. In a supply chain where the focal manufacturing company has its own subsidiary supplier and an outsourcing supplier, we analyze different forms of cost-sharing mechanisms when both suppliers confront disruption risks. Through the cost-sharing mechanisms presented in this study, supply chain members can improve their reliability via disruption prevention investments without considerably increasing the total supply chain cost. We present two concepts, the cost-sharing structure and the cost-sharing ratio, in this study. As the two key components of cost-sharing mechanism, these two elements constitute a practicable cost allocation mechanism to facilitate disruption prevention.

  1. Enzymatic cell disruption of microalgae biomass in biorefinery processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuez, Marie; Mahdy, Ahmed; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; González-Fernández, Cristina; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2015-10-01

    When employing biotechnological processes for the procurement of biofuels and bio-products from microalgae, one of the most critical steps affecting economy and yields is the "cell disruption" stage. Currently, enzymatic cell disruption has delivered effective and cost competitive results when compared to mechanical and chemical cell disruption methods. However, the introduction of enzymes implies additional associated cost within the overall process. In order to reduce this cost, autolysis of microalgae is proposed as alternative enzymatic cell disruption method. This review aims to provide the state of the art of enzymatic cell disruption treatments employed in biorefinery processes and highlights the use of endopeptidases. During the enzymatic processes of microalgae life cycle, some lytic enzymes involved in cell division and programmed cell death have been proven useful in performing cell lysis. In this context, the role of endopeptidases is emphasized. Mirroring these natural events, an alternative cell disruption approach is proposed and described with the potential to induce the autolysis process using intrinsic cell enzymes. Integrating induced autolysis within biofuel production processes offers a promising approach to reduce overall global costs and energetic input associated with those of current cell disruption methods. A number of options for further inquiry are also discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. On the computation of the disruption forces in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovitov, V. D.; Rubinacci, G.; Villone, F.

    2017-12-01

    The currents and forces induced in the tokamak vacuum vessel (wall) during the disruption are calculated for different values of wall resistivity. Several consequences and new developments are derived from the general result that the global disruption force acting on the perfectly conducting wall must be exactly opposite to the similar force acting on the plasma, which is inherently small in tokamaks. This theoretical prediction is tested and confirmed here for the ITER tokamak with disruption modelled as the fast thermal quench followed by slower current quench that develops into the vertical displacement event. The plasma is simulated by the evolutionary equilibrium code CarMa0NL. One of the results is that the computed integral force on a perfectly conducting wall is zero at each instant during a disruption. This in turn highlights the importance of having good models for the plasma (in which the equilibrium constraint is explicitly imposed) and for the structures (able to correctly describe the induced currents and the resistive effects). The dependence of the disruption force on the magnetic field penetration through the wall is demonstrated. Also the concept of a disruption force damper is proposed, able to ‘absorb’ a significant part of the force that would arise on a resistive wall during a disruption.

  3. Sleep disruption among cancer patients following autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashley M; Jim, Heather S L; Small, Brent J; Nishihori, Taiga; Gonzalez, Brian D; Cessna, Julie M; Hyland, Kelly A; Rumble, Meredith E; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2018-03-01

    Despite a high prevalence of sleep disruption among hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, relatively little research has investigated its relationships with modifiable cognitive or behavioral factors or used actigraphy to characterize sleep disruption in this population. Autologous HCT recipients who were 6-18 months post transplant completed self-report measures of cancer-related distress, fear of cancer recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors upon enrollment. Patients then wore an actigraph for 7 days and completed a self-report measure of sleep disruption on day 7 of the study. Among the 84 participants (age M = 60, 45% female), 41% reported clinically relevant sleep disruption. Examination of actigraph data confirmed that, on average, sleep was disrupted (wake after sleep onset M = 66 min) and sleep efficiency was less than recommended (sleep efficiency M = 78%). Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors were related to self-reported sleep disruption (p valuesdisruption after transplant. Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and maladaptive sleep behaviors are related to self-reported sleep disruption and should be considered targets for cognitive behavioral intervention in this population.

  4. Designing reliable supply chain network with disruption risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bozorgi Amiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although supply chains disruptions rarely occur, their negative effects are prolonged and severe. In this paper, we propose a reliable capacitated supply chain network design (RSCND model by considering random disruptions in both distribution centers and suppliers. The proposed model determines the optimal location of distribution centers (DC with the highest reliability, the best plan to assign customers to opened DCs and assigns opened DCs to suitable suppliers with lowest transportation cost. In this study, random disruption occurs at the location, capacity of the distribution centers (DCs and suppliers. It is assumed that a disrupted DC and a disrupted supplier may lose a portion of their capacities, and the rest of the disrupted DC's demand can be supplied by other DCs. In addition, we consider shortage in DCs, which can occur in either normal or disruption conditions and DCs, can support each other in such circumstances. Unlike other studies in the extent of literature, we use new approach to model the reliability of DCs; we consider a range of reliability instead of using binary variables. In order to solve the proposed model for real-world instances, a Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II is applied. Preliminary results of testing the proposed model of this paper on several problems with different sizes provide seem to be promising.

  5. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors...... such as structure, accessibility and amino acid composition are crucial. Since small peptides tend not to be immunogenic, it may be necessary to conjugate them to carrier proteins in order to enhance immune presentation. Several strategies for conjugation of peptide-carriers applied for immunization exist...

  6. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  7. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody...... response was studied with serum samples collected in 1992 from 56 CF patients in a cross-sectional study and with serum samples from 18 CF patients in a longitudinal study. Anti-beta-lactamase immunoglobulin G antibodies were present in all of the serum samples from the patients with chronic...... bronchopulmonary P. aeruginosa infection (CF + P) but in none of the CF patients with no or intermittent P. aeruginosa infection. Anti-beta-lactamase antibodies were present in serum from CF + P patients after six antipseudomonal courses (median) and correlated with infection with a beta-lactam-resistant strain...

  8. Onconeural antibodies: improved detection and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storstein, Anette; Monstad, Sissel Evy; Haugen, Mette; Mazengia, Kibret; Veltman, Dana; Lohndal, Emilia; Aarseth, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Onconeural antibodies are found in many patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) and define the disease as paraneoplastic. The study describes the presence of onconeural antibodies and PNS in 555 patients with neurological symptoms and confirmed cancer within five years, and compares the diagnostic accuracy of different antibody assays (immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence and immunoblot). Onconeural antibodies were found in 11.9% of the patients by immunoprecipitation, in 7.0% by immunofluorescence and in 6.3% by immunoblot. PNS were present in 81.8% of the cancer patients that were seropositive by immunoprecipitation. Immunofluorescence and immunoblot failed to detect onconeural antibodies in almost one third of the PNS cases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Erosion of melt layers developed during a plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1995-01-01

    Material erosion of plasma-facing components during a tokamak disruption is a serious problem that limits reactor operation and economical reactor lifetime. In particular, metallic low-Z components such as Be will be subjected to severe melting during disruptions and edge localized modes (ELMs). Loss of the developed melt layer will critically shorten the lifetime of these components, severely contaminate the plasma, and seriously inhibit successful and reliable operation of the reactor. In this study mechanisms responsible for melt-layer loss during a disruption are modeled and evaluated. Implications of melt-layer loss on the performance of metallic facing components in the reactor environment are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Disruptive behaviour in the Foundation Phase of schooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro Marais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the passage of legislation banning corporal punishment in South African schools, disruptive behaviour in schools has become an issue of national concern. Against this background a research project was undertaken in which the types and causes of disruptive behaviour occurring most frequently in the Foundation Phase of schooling were identified, with a view to providing strategies for teachers to manage behaviour of this kind. A qualitative research approach was applied. Data collection was done by conducting interviews comprising semistructured questions with Foundation Phase teachers. Strategies purposely devised to deal specifically with the identified types and causes of disruptive behaviour are explained.

  11. Making CVE Work: A Focused Approach Based on Process Disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Berger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest barriers to designing a comprehensive Countering Violent Extremism (CVE programme is defining its scope. This paper argues for a narrow approach, focusing on disengagement and the disruption of recruitment. The author develops a simplified model of radicalisation and the concurrent terrorist recruitment process, proposing concrete themes for disruptive intervention and messaging. After analysing case studies of disengagement, the author offers recommendations for specific action to accomplish CVE goals by disrupting recruitment processes and deploying targeted messaging within the framework of the correlated models.

  12. Sleep Deprivation and Circadian Disruption: Stress, Allostasis, and Allostatic Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Bruce S; Karatsoreos, Ilia N

    2015-03-01

    Sleep has important homeostatic functions, and circadian rhythms organize physiology and behavior on a daily basis to insure optimal function. Sleep deprivation and circadian disruption can be stressors, enhancers of other stressors that have consequences for the brain and many body systems. Whether the origins of circadian disruption and sleep disruption and deprivation are from anxiety, depression, shift work, long-distance air travel, or a hectic lifestyle, there are consequences that impair brain functions and contribute to the cumulative wear and tear on body systems caused by too much stress and/or inefficient management of the systems that promote adaptation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Faniband

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends.

  14. Criteria for endocrine disrupters: report from the Danish centre on Endocrine Disrupters (CEHOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Bjerregaard, Poul; Hass, Ulla

    The aim of this session is to give a presentation of the report (both ENV and HH) on criteria carried out by the Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters (CEHOS) as a project contracted by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. CEHOS is an interdisciplinary scientific network without walls and ...... and gives examples of available ED data and relevant placement in groups. The overall purpose of the report is to provide scientific background for Danish input to the ongoing EU work within this field....... and the main purpose of the Centre is to build and gather new knowledge on endocrine disrupters (EDs) with focus on information needed for the preventive work of the regulatory authorities. The aim of the report was to propose scientific criteria for the identification of ED substances of concern for human...... health and the environment. A number of issues relevant for the development of criteria for EDs were considered such as definition, potency, lead effects, specificity and relevance for humans and the environment. The proposed criteria divide substances into three categories dependent on the available...

  15. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, Amin I.; Khawli, Leslie A.

    1991-01-01

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabelled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody.

  16. Docking of Antibodies into Cavities in DNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quyang, X; Stefano, Mattia De; Krissanaprasit, Abhichart

    2017-01-01

    microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) validated efficient antibody immobilization in the origami structures. The increased ability to control the orientation of antibodies in nanostructures and at surfaces has potential for directing the interactions of antibodies with targets...

  17. Tebuconazole disrupts steroidogenesis in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Rikke; Luong, Xuan; Hansen, Martin; Styrishave, Bjarne; Hayes, Tyrone

    2015-11-01

    A 27-day controlled exposure study of adult male African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) was conducted to examine the mechanism by which tebuconazole may disrupt steroidogenesis. The fungicide was measured by LC-MS/MS in tank water and in target tissues (adipose, kidney, liver, and brain), and we observed tissue-specific bioconcentration with BCF up to 238. Up to 10 different steroid hormones were quantified in gonads using LC-MS/MS and in plasma using GC-MS/MS and a radioimmunoassay was performed for further measurement of androgens. In order to assess whether effects increased with exposure or animals adapted to the xenobiotic, blood samples were collected 12 days into the study and at termination (day 27). After 12 days of exposure to 100 and 500μgL(-1) tebuconazole, plasma levels of testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) were increased, while plasma 17β-estradiol (E2) concentrations were greatly reduced. Exposure to 0.1μgL(-1), on the other hand, resulted in decreased levels of T and DHT, with no effects observed for E2. After 27 days of exposure, effects were no longer observed in circulating androgen levels while the suppressive effect on E2 persisted in the two high-exposure groups (100 and 500μgL(-1)). Furthermore, tebuconazole increased gonadal concentrations of T and DHT as well as expression of the enzyme CYP17 (500μgL(-1), 27 days). These results suggest that tebuconazole exposure may supress the action of CYP17 at the lowest exposure (0.1μgL(-1)), while CYP19 suppression dominates at higher exposure concentrations (increased androgens and decreased E2). Increased androgen levels in plasma half-way into the study and in gonads at termination may thus be explained by compensatory mechanisms, mediated through increased enzymatic expression, as prolonged exposure had no effect on circulating androgen levels. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Recollecting positive and negative autobiographical memories disrupts working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Richard J; Schaefer, Alexandre; Falcon, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The present article reports two experiments examining the impact of recollecting emotionally valenced autobiographical memories on subsequent working memory (WM) task performance. Experiment 1 found that negatively valenced recollection significantly disrupted performance on a supra-span spatial WM task. Experiment 2 replicated and extended these findings to a verbal WM task (digit recall), and found that both negative and positive autobiographical recollections had a detrimental effect on verbal WM. In addition, we observed that these disruptive effects were more apparent on early trials, immediately following autobiographical recollection. Overall, these findings show that both positive and negative affect can disrupt WM when the mood-eliciting context is based on autobiographical memories. Furthermore, these results indicate that the emotional disruption of WM can take place across different modalities of WM (verbal and visuo-spatial). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Towards A Research Agenda on Digital Platform Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazan, Erol; Tan, Chee-Wee; Lim, Eric T. K.

    Digital platforms are disruptive IT artifacts, because they facilitate the quick release of innovative platform derivatives from third parties. This study endeavors to unravel the disruptive potential, caused by distinct designs and configurations of digital platforms on market environments. We...... postulate that the disruptive potential of digital platforms is determined by the degree of alignment among the business, technology and platform profiles. Furthermore, we argue that the design and configuration of the aforementioned three elements dictates the extent to which open innovation is permitted....... To shed light on the disruptive potential of digital platforms, we opted for digital payment platforms as our unit of analysis. Through interviews with experts and payment providers, we seek to gain an in-depth appreciation of how contemporary digital payment platforms are designed and configured...

  20. Characterization of disruptions in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment, MTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Makowski, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) has a substantial number of fast diagnostics, especially for electrons, as part of its mission for pulsed, high-power electron cyclotron heating. As part of its contribution to ITER R ampersand D, these diagnostics are being used to characterize disruptions in MTX. This report is the first of two, with the second planned for submittal in September 1990, at the end of the ITER conceptual design activity. Here, we analyze the characteristics of disruptions during normal operation of MTX, discuss some new data pertaining to the ''Granetz limit,'' and describe preliminary data on ramped density shorts which will be used for fast measurements on density limit disruptions. The final report will discuss measurements using the fast diagnostics to characterize the disruption