WorldWideScience

Sample records for anti tb vaccine

  1. Progress and challenges in TB vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Gerald; Casimiro, Danilo; Neyrolles, Olivier; Williams, Ann; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; McShane, Helen; Hatherill, Mark; Fletcher, Helen A

    2018-01-01

    The Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccine can provide decades of protection against tuberculosis (TB) disease, and although imperfect, BCG is proof that vaccine mediated protection against TB is a possibility. A new TB vaccine is, therefore, an inevitability; the question is how long will it take us to get there? We have made substantial progress in the development of vaccine platforms, in the identification of antigens and of immune correlates of risk of TB disease. We have also standardized animal models to enable head-to-head comparison and selection of candidate TB vaccines for further development.  To extend our understanding of the safety and immunogenicity of TB vaccines we have performed experimental medicine studies to explore route of administration and have begun to develop controlled human infection models. Driven by a desire to reduce the length and cost of human efficacy trials we have applied novel approaches to later stage clinical development, exploring alternative clinical endpoints to prevention of disease outcomes. Here, global leaders in TB vaccine development discuss the progress made and the challenges that remain. What emerges is that, despite scientific progress, few vaccine candidates have entered clinical trials in the last 5 years and few vaccines in clinical trials have progressed to efficacy trials. Crucially, we have undervalued the knowledge gained from our "failed" trials and fostered a culture of risk aversion that has limited new funding for clinical TB vaccine development. The unintended consequence of this abundance of caution is lack of diversity of new TB vaccine candidates and stagnation of the clinical pipeline. We have a variety of new vaccine platform technologies, mycobacterial antigens and animal and human models.  However, we will not encourage progression of vaccine candidates into clinical trials unless we evaluate and embrace risk in pursuit of vaccine development.

  2. Anti-Vaccination Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    The current anti-vaccination movements that have established themselves in the United States as well as other regions in the world are like a hydra of discourse. Right when one effective measure is created to convince people to vaccinate two more anti-vaccination movements sprout up in its place. These anti-vaccination movements are driven by cultural beliefs, ideologies, medical exemption laws, non-medical exemption laws, distrust of the government, distrust of large pharmaceutical companies...

  3. Need for more TB vaccine field sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Helen

    2009-06-01

    Efforts to control the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic have been challenged by both the geographical overlap with the HIV pandemic, and the emergence of multi - and extensively - drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. There is, therefore, an urgent global need for an improved vaccine. However, the development of an improved vaccine is scientifically and logistically challenging. Immunological correlates or biomarkers of protection are not known and there is no perfect preclinical animal model with which to predict success in humans. Indeed, vaccine development in general is time-consuming and costly. One of the many road-blocks to the development of new TB vaccines is the availability of field sites that are suitable for large scale Phase IIb/III efficacy testing. Because disease incidence is low, even though prevalence is high, Phase IIb efficacy trials involve several thousand subjects, and require lengthy follow-up. Phase III licensure trials will need to be even larger, and are likely to require the involvement of multiple field sites. There is currently inadequate capacity within high-burden TB countries to conduct these essential trials. We need to invest now to expand current capacity if we are to reduce the time taken to develop new vaccines.

  4. Towards new TB vaccines: What are the challenges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockrell, Hazel M

    2016-06-01

    New and effective tuberculosis (TB) vaccines are urgently needed to control pulmonary TB, and in particular to prevent the spread of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These drug-resistant strains can range from those resistant to first-line drugs to those that are almost impossible to treat. To develop new and effective vaccines for HIV and malaria has been difficult and it is proving to be just as challenging for TB. TB is a complicated disease with a spectrum from apparently controlled latent infection to active clinical disease and so different types of preventive or post-exposure vaccine may be needed. Identifying the most promising vaccine candidates to move into clinical trials is difficult, as we lack biomarker signatures that can predict protective efficacy. There is a risk that the failure of the MVA-85A vaccine to show efficacy when given to previously BCG-vaccinated South African infants will impact on the resources available for the development and trials of other candidate TB vaccines. Continued support for the development of new TB vaccines should remain a priority as an effective vaccine would bring huge public health benefits.

  5. The second Geneva Consensus: Recommendations for novel live TB vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, K B; Brennan, M J; Ho, M M; Eskola, J; Thiry, G; Sadoff, J; Dobbelaer, R; Grode, L; Liu, M A; Fruth, U; Lambert, P H

    2010-03-08

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to be a major public health burden in most developing parts of the world and efforts to develop effective strategies for containing the disease remain a priority. It has long been evident that effective mass vaccination programmes are a cost effective and efficient approach to controlling communicable diseases in a public health setting and tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major target. One approach with increasing acceptance is based upon on live mycobacterial vaccines, either as recombinant BCG or rationally attenuated M. tuberculosis, thus generating a new live TB vaccine. The Geneva Consensus published in March 2005 set out the opinion on priorities and requirements for developing live mycobacterial vaccines for Phase I trials. In the intervening period much progress has been made in both preclinical and clinical development of new TB vaccines and has provided the impetus for organising the second Geneva Consensus (held at WHO headquarters, April 2009) to discuss issues, including: i. Explore the regulatory requirements for live TB vaccines to enter Phase I trials, in particular those based on attenuated M. tuberculosis. Particular attention was paid to the characterisation and safety package likely to be required, including issues of attenuation, the presence of antibiotic resistance markers in live vaccines and the nature of any attenuated vaccine phenotype. ii. To identify the general criteria for further clinical development from Phase I through to Phase III. iii. Obtain a perspective of the regulatory landscape of developing countries where Phase II and III trials are to be held. iv. Review manufacturing considerations for live TB vaccines and relevance of the WHO and European Pharmacopeia guidelines and requirements for BCG vaccine. v. Consider requirements and associated issues related to the use of these new vaccines within an existing BCG vaccination programme. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier

  6. A review of the literature on the economics of vaccination against TB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, H.A.; Vu, H.D.; Rozenbaum, M.H.; Woerdenbag, H.J.; Postma, M.J.

    The BCG vaccine was introduced in 1921 and remains the only licensed vaccine for the prevention of TB worldwide. Despite its extensive use, the BCG vaccine lacks the ability to fully control the TB-endemic and -pandemic situations. The BCG vaccine is most effective in preventing pediatric TB, in

  7. Prevalence and management out comes of anti TB drugs induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients and Methods: All TB patients admitted in the Hospital during the study period are the source of population, the study groups were been selected by detecting the possible confounding factors for jaundice. Base line LFT before anti TB initiation was determined before developed jaundice. Those patients, whom the ...

  8. Advocacy, partnership and political commitment for TB vaccine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Ole F; Chan, Sharon; Chappell, Janice; Guo, Yan; Leite, Luciana C C

    2016-08-01

    The 4th Global Forum on TB Vaccines, convened in Shanghai, China, from 21 - 24 April 2015, brought together a wide and diverse community involved in tuberculosis vaccine research and development to discuss the current status of, and future directions for this critical effort. This paper summarizes the sessions on Advancing the Pipeline: A Vision for the Next Decade, Engaging the BRICS: Basic Research to Manufacturing, and Regulatory and Access Issues for New TB Vaccines. Summaries of all sessions from the 4th Global Forum are compiled in a special supplement of Tuberculosis. [August 2016, Vol 99, Supp S1, S1-S30]. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental animal modelling for TB vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere-Joan Cardona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research for a novel vaccine to prevent tuberculosis is an urgent medical need. The current vaccine, BCG, has demonstrated a non-homogenous efficacy in humans, but still is the gold standard to be improved upon. In general, the main indicator for testing the potency of new candidates in animal models is the reduction of the bacillary load in the lungs at the acute phase of the infection. Usually, this reduction is similar to that induced by BCG, although in some cases a weak but significant improvement can be detected, but none of candidates are able to prevent establishment of infection. The main characteristics of several laboratory animals are reviewed, reflecting that none are able to simulate the whole characteristics of human tuberculosis. As, so far, no surrogate of protection has been found, it is important to test new candidates in several models in order to generate convincing evidence of efficacy that might be better than that of BCG in humans. It is also important to investigate the use of “in silico” and “ex vivo” models to better understand experimental data and also to try to replace, or at least reduce and refine experimental models in animals.

  10. A review of the literature on the economics of vaccination against TB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Hong-Anh T; Vu, Hoa D; Rozenbaum, Mark H; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Postma, Maarten J

    2012-03-01

    The BCG vaccine was introduced in 1921 and remains the only licensed vaccine for the prevention of TB worldwide. Despite its extensive use, the BCG vaccine lacks the ability to fully control the TB-endemic and -pandemic situations. The BCG vaccine is most effective in preventing pediatric TB, in particular, miliary TB and tuberculous meningitis. However, it has a limited effect in preventing pulmonary TB, which occurs more frequently in adults. BCG vaccination has now been implemented in more than 157 countries worldwide. For various countries, the benefits of vaccination are only limited and potentially not cost effective. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases had set the criteria for discontinuation of BCG vaccination in 1994. This decision, however, was not based on economic considerations. Many developed countries have met the criteria set by the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease and stopped universal BCG vaccination. For developing countries, the BCG vaccine is still an effective intervention in protecting young children from TB infection. A lot of effort has been spent on R&D of new TB vaccines, the first of which are expected to be available within 5-7 years from now. Novel TB vaccines are expected to be better and more effective than the current BCG vaccine and should provide a viable strategy in controlling TB morbidity and mortality. In this review, the aim is to explore economic evaluations that have been carried out for vaccination against TB worldwide. In addition to epidemiological evidence, economic evidence can play a crucial role in supporting the governments of countries in making proper public health decisions on BCG vaccination policies, in particular, to implement, continue, or discontinue.

  11. Anti-TB Polyynes from the roots of Angelica sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shixin; Wang, Yuehong; Inui, Taichi; Chen, Shao-Nong; Farnsworth, Norman R.; Cho, Sanghyun; Franzblau, Scott G.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2008-01-01

    Following chemotaxonomic evidence, the PE and CHCl3 extracts of the roots of the botanical Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels (Dang Gui) were investigated for in vitro anti-TB activity, in parallel to studying their serotonergic and GABAergic potential. The activities were confirmed to chemically overlap with the neurotropic active principles present in medium lipophilic fractions. Phytochemical investigations led to the isolation of five polyynes: falcarindiol (1), 9Z,17-octadecadiene-12,14-diyne-1,11,16-triol,1-acetate (2), oplopandiol (3), heptadeca-1-ene-9,10-epoxy-4,6-diyne-3,8-diol (4), and the new polyyne 8-hydroxy-1-methoxy-(Z)-9-heptadecene-4,6-diyn-3-one (5), as characterized by spectroscopic techniques including 1D, 2D NMR and HR-MS. All compounds were tested against two pathogenic strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv and Erdman) in vitro in a microplate Alamar Blue assay (MABA). The most potent anti-TB constituents were 1 and 2, exhibiting MIC values of 1.4-26.7 μg/ml; 3 showed moderate MICs (49.5 and 50.2 μg/ml, respectively) while 4 and 5 were weakly active (MIC> 60 μg/ml). Notably, none of the five compounds exhibited significant cytotoxicity against VERO cells. These findings not only reveal a new potential area of therapeutic value for A. sinensis, but also underline the role of polyynes as anti-TB active principles in ethnobotanical preparations, and as lead compounds. PMID:18567055

  12. Developing Anti-tick Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mallon, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Ticks are responsible for the transmission of viral, bacterial, and protozoal diseases of man and animals and also produce significant economic losses to cattle industry. The use of acaricides constitutes a major component of integrated tick control strategies. However, this is accompanied by the selection of acaricide-resistant ticks and contamination of environment and milk and meat products with drug residues. These issues highlight the need for alternative approaches to control tick infestations and have triggered the search for tick protective antigens for vaccine development. Vaccination as a tick control method has been practiced since the introduction of TickGARD and Gavac that were developed using the midgut glycoprotein Bm86 as antigen. Gavac within integrated tick management systems has proven to reduce the number of acaricidal applications per year that are required to control some strains of R. microplus ticks in different geographical regions. Nevertheless, it has limited or no efficacy against other tick species. These issues have stimulated research for additional tick protective antigens with critical functions in the tick. This chapter presents methodologies for the design and test of molecules as antigens against ticks. Considerations about different methods for the tick control compared to the immunological methods, the desirable characteristics for an anti-tick vaccine and the obstacles encountered for developing this kind of vaccines are discussed. Detailed methodologies for the establishment of a biological model to test new molecules as immunogens against ticks and to perform challenge trials with this model are presented. General considerations in the efficacy calculation for any anti-tick vaccine are also discussed.

  13. Exploring anti-TB leads from natural products library originated from marine microbes and medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueting; Chen, Caixia; He, Wenni; Huang, Pei; Liu, Miaomiao; Wang, Qian; Guo, Hui; Bolla, Krishna; Lu, Yan; Song, Fuhang; Dai, Huanqin; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Lixin

    2012-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and TB-HIV co-infection have become a great threat to global health. However, the last truly novel drug that was approved for the treatment of TB was discovered 40 years ago. The search for new effective drugs against TB has never been more intensive. Natural products derived from microbes and medicinal plants have been an important source of TB therapeutics. Recent advances have been made to accelerate the discovery rate of novel TB drugs including diversifying strategies for environmental strains, high-throughput screening (HTS) assays, and chemical diversity. This review will discuss the challenges of finding novel natural products with anti-TB activity from marine microbes and plant medicines, including biodiversity- and taxonomy-guided microbial natural products library construction, target- and cell-based HTS, and bioassay-directed isolation of anti-TB substances from traditional medicines.

  14. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis and Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiuying

    2017-01-18

    Anti- N -methyl-d-aspartate (Anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an acute autoimmune neurological disorder. The cause of this disease is often unknown, and previous studies revealed that it might be caused by a virus, vaccine or tumor. It occurs more often in females than in males. Several cases were reported to be related to vaccination such as the H1N1 vaccine and tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccines. In this study, we reported an anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis case that may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination. To investigate the association between anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and vaccination, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of the microRNAs, which significantly regulate these vaccine viruses or bacteria, and the phylogenetic relationship of these viruses and bacteria. This reveals that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination, as well as H1N1 vaccination or tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccinations, from the phylogenetic viewpoint.

  15. Preclinical Development of an In Vivo BCG Challenge Model for Testing Candidate TB Vaccine Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minassian, Angela M.; Ronan, Edward O.; Poyntz, Hazel; Hill, Adrian V. S.; McShane, Helen

    2011-01-01

    There is an urgent need for an immunological correlate of protection against tuberculosis (TB) with which to evaluate candidate TB vaccines in clinical trials. Development of a human challenge model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) could facilitate the detection of such correlate(s). Here we propose a novel in vivo Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) challenge model using BCG immunization as a surrogate for M.tb infection. Culture and quantitative PCR methods have been developed to quantify BCG in the skin, using the mouse ear as a surrogate for human skin. Candidate TB vaccines have been evaluated for their ability to protect against a BCG skin challenge, using this model, and the results indicate that protection against a BCG skin challenge is predictive of BCG vaccine efficacy against aerosol M.tb challenge. Translation of these findings to a human BCG challenge model could enable more rapid assessment and down selection of candidate TB vaccines and ultimately the identification of an immune correlate of protection. PMID:21629699

  16. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, a biomarker of response to anti-TB treatment in HIV/TB co-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhin, Janin; Pean, Polidy; Madec, Yoann; Chevalier, Mathieu F; Didier, Celine; Borand, Laurence; Blanc, François-Xavier; Scott-Algara, Daniel; Laureillard, Didier; Weiss, Laurence

    2017-05-01

    Despite the high frequency of tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/TB co-infected patients, no diagnostic test is available. Here, we investigated whether monocyte/macrophage activation markers can predict TB-IRIS occurrence and if they are modulated by anti-TB treatment. Frozen plasma was obtained from 127 HIV/TB co-infected adults naïve for antiretroviral therapy, enrolled in the CAMELIA trial, 36 of whom developed TB-IRIS. Concentrations of IL-1Ra, sCD14, and sCD163 were measured at anti-TB treatment onset (baseline), after 8 weeks of anti-TB treatment and at TB-IRIS time. At baseline, IL-1Ra and sCD14 concentrations were similar in TB-IRIS and non-IRIS patients. sCD163 concentrations, although significantly higher in TB-IRIS patients, did not remain associated with TB-IRIS occurrence in multivariate analysis. At the time of TB-IRIS, patients displayed higher concentrations of IL-1Ra (p = 0.002) and sCD14 (p TB treatment (median reduction: -63% (p TB-IRIS occurrence. However, repeated measurement of IL-1Ra could help for the diagnosis of TB-IRIS. The substantial reduction of IL-1Ra under treatment suggests that IL-1Ra could be a surrogate biomarker of anti-TB treatment response in HIV-infected patients. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stabilizing formulations for inhalable powders of an adenovirus 35-vectored tuberculosis (TB) vaccine (AERAS-402)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Tom H.; Tsao, Eric; Goudsmit, Jaap; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Sadoff, Jerald

    2010-01-01

    A powder vaccine intended for aerosol delivery was formulated by spray drying the Ad35-vectored tuberculosis (TB) AERAS-402 vaccine with mannitol-based stabilizers. Thermodynamic properties, water absorption, particle size distribution and morphology of the powders were evaluated. Virus survival

  18. Anti-vaccination movements and their interpretations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blume, S.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last two or three decades, growing numbers of parents in the industrialized world are choosing not to have their children vaccinated. In trying to explain why this is occurring, public health commentators refer to the activities of an anti-vaccination ‘movement’. In the light of three

  19. Comparative Tuberculosis (TB) Prevention Effectiveness in Children of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Vaccines from Different Sources, Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favorov, Michael; Ali, Mohammad; Tursunbayeva, Aigul; Aitmagambetova, Indira; Kilgore, Paul; Ismailov, Shakhimurat; Chorba, Terence

    2012-01-01

    Background Except during a 1-year period when BCG vaccine was not routinely administered, annual coverage of infants with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in Kazakhstan since 2002 has exceeded 95%. BCG preparations from different sources (Japan, Serbia, and Russia) or none were used exclusively in comparable 7-month time-frames, September through March, in 4 successive years beginning in 2002. Our objective was to assess relative effectiveness of BCG immunization. Methods/Findings We compared outcomes of birth cohorts from the 4 time-frames retrospectively. Three cohorts received vaccine from one of three manufacturers exclusively, and one cohort was not vaccinated. Cohorts were followed for 3 years for notifications of clinical TB and of culture-confirmed TB, and for 21 months for TB meningitis notifications. Prevention effectiveness based on relative risk of TB incidence was calculated for each vaccinated cohort compared to the non-vaccinated cohort. Although there were differences in prevention effectiveness observed among the three BCG vaccines, all were protective. The Japanese vaccine (currently used in Kazakhstan), the Serbian vaccine, and the Russian vaccine respectively were 69%, 43%, and 22% effective with respect to clinical TB notifications, and 92%, 82%, and 51% effective with respect to culture confirmed TB. All three vaccines were >70% effective with respect to TB meningitis. Limitations Potential limitations included considerations that 1) the methodology used was retrospective, 2) multiple risk factors could have varied between cohorts and affected prevention effectiveness measures, 3) most cases were clinically diagnosed, and TB culture-positive case numbers and TB meningitis case numbers were sparse, and 4) small variations in reported population TB burden could have affected relative risk of exposure for cohorts. Conclusions/Significance All three BCG vaccines evaluated were protective against TB, and prevention effectiveness varied by

  20. Comparative tuberculosis (TB prevention effectiveness in children of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccines from different sources, Kazakhstan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Favorov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Except during a 1-year period when BCG vaccine was not routinely administered, annual coverage of infants with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG in Kazakhstan since 2002 has exceeded 95%. BCG preparations from different sources (Japan, Serbia, and Russia or none were used exclusively in comparable 7-month time-frames, September through March, in 4 successive years beginning in 2002. Our objective was to assess relative effectiveness of BCG immunization. METHODS/FINDINGS: We compared outcomes of birth cohorts from the 4 time-frames retrospectively. Three cohorts received vaccine from one of three manufacturers exclusively, and one cohort was not vaccinated. Cohorts were followed for 3 years for notifications of clinical TB and of culture-confirmed TB, and for 21 months for TB meningitis notifications. Prevention effectiveness based on relative risk of TB incidence was calculated for each vaccinated cohort compared to the non-vaccinated cohort. Although there were differences in prevention effectiveness observed among the three BCG vaccines, all were protective. The Japanese vaccine (currently used in Kazakhstan, the Serbian vaccine, and the Russian vaccine respectively were 69%, 43%, and 22% effective with respect to clinical TB notifications, and 92%, 82%, and 51% effective with respect to culture confirmed TB. All three vaccines were >70% effective with respect to TB meningitis. LIMITATIONS: Potential limitations included considerations that 1 the methodology used was retrospective, 2 multiple risk factors could have varied between cohorts and affected prevention effectiveness measures, 3 most cases were clinically diagnosed, and TB culture-positive case numbers and TB meningitis case numbers were sparse, and 4 small variations in reported population TB burden could have affected relative risk of exposure for cohorts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: All three BCG vaccines evaluated were protective against TB, and prevention effectiveness

  1. Comparative tuberculosis (TB) prevention effectiveness in children of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines from different sources, Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favorov, Michael; Ali, Mohammad; Tursunbayeva, Aigul; Aitmagambetova, Indira; Kilgore, Paul; Ismailov, Shakhimurat; Chorba, Terence

    2012-01-01

    Except during a 1-year period when BCG vaccine was not routinely administered, annual coverage of infants with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in Kazakhstan since 2002 has exceeded 95%. BCG preparations from different sources (Japan, Serbia, and Russia) or none were used exclusively in comparable 7-month time-frames, September through March, in 4 successive years beginning in 2002. Our objective was to assess relative effectiveness of BCG immunization. We compared outcomes of birth cohorts from the 4 time-frames retrospectively. Three cohorts received vaccine from one of three manufacturers exclusively, and one cohort was not vaccinated. Cohorts were followed for 3 years for notifications of clinical TB and of culture-confirmed TB, and for 21 months for TB meningitis notifications. Prevention effectiveness based on relative risk of TB incidence was calculated for each vaccinated cohort compared to the non-vaccinated cohort. Although there were differences in prevention effectiveness observed among the three BCG vaccines, all were protective. The Japanese vaccine (currently used in Kazakhstan), the Serbian vaccine, and the Russian vaccine respectively were 69%, 43%, and 22% effective with respect to clinical TB notifications, and 92%, 82%, and 51% effective with respect to culture confirmed TB. All three vaccines were >70% effective with respect to TB meningitis. Potential limitations included considerations that 1) the methodology used was retrospective, 2) multiple risk factors could have varied between cohorts and affected prevention effectiveness measures, 3) most cases were clinically diagnosed, and TB culture-positive case numbers and TB meningitis case numbers were sparse, and 4) small variations in reported population TB burden could have affected relative risk of exposure for cohorts. All three BCG vaccines evaluated were protective against TB, and prevention effectiveness varied by manufacturer. When setting national immunization policy, consideration

  2. The Effects of Anti-Vaccine Conspiracy Theories on Vaccination Intentions

    OpenAIRE

    Jolley, Daniel; Douglas, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    The current studies investigated the potential impact of anti-vaccine conspiracy beliefs, and exposure to anti-vaccine conspiracy theories, on vaccination intentions. In Study 1, British parents completed a questionnaire measuring beliefs in anti-vaccine conspiracy theories and the likelihood that they would have a fictitious child vaccinated. Results revealed a significant negative relationship between anti-vaccine conspiracy beliefs and vaccination intentions. This effect was mediated by th...

  3. Non-adherence to anti-TB drugs among TB/HIV co-infected patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Non-adherence to treatment remains a major obstacle to efficient tuberculosis control in developing countries. The dual infection of Tuberculosis and HIV presents further adherence problems because of high pill burden and adverse effects. This poses a risk of increased multi-drug resistant TB. However, the ...

  4. The candidate TB vaccine, MVA85A, induces highly durable Th1 responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Tameris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vaccination against tuberculosis (TB should provide long-term protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb. The current TB vaccine, Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG, protects against disseminated childhood TB, but protection against lung TB in adolescents and adults is variable and mostly poor. One potential reason for the limited durability of protection may be waning of immunity through gradual attrition of BCG-induced T cells. We determined if a MVA85A viral-vector boost could enhance the durability of mycobacteria-specific T cell responses above those induced by BCG alone. METHODS: We describe a long-term follow-up study of persons previously vaccinated with MVA85A. We performed a medical history and clinical examination, a tuberculin skin test and measured vaccine-specific T cell responses in persons previously enrolled as adults, adolescents, children or infants into three different Phase II trials, between 2005 and 2011. RESULTS: Of 252 potential participants, 183 (72.6% consented and completed the study visit. Vaccine-induced Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cell responses were remarkably persistent in healthy, HIV-uninfected adults, adolescents, children and infants, up to 6 years after MVA85A vaccination. Specific CD4+ T cells expressed surface markers consistent with either CD45RA-CCR7+ central memory or CD45RA-CCR7- effector memory T cells. Similarly durable Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cell responses were detected in HIV-infected persons who were on successful antiretroviral therapy when MVA85A was administered. By contrast, Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cell frequencies in untreated MVA85A-vaccinated HIV-infected persons were mostly undetectable 3-5 years after vaccination. CONCLUSION: MVA85A induces remarkably durable T cell responses in immunocompetent persons. However, results from a recent phase IIb trial of MVA85A, conducted in infants from the same geographic area and study population, showed no vaccine efficacy, suggesting

  5. Anti-TB activity of Evodia elleryana bark extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Louis R.; Powan, Emma; Pond, Christopher D.; Matainaho, Teatulohi

    2009-01-01

    An ethyl acetate extract of bark from Evodia elleryana produced significant growth inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at concentrations only minimally inhibitory to human T cells. The crude extract yielded 95% inhibition of TB at 50 μg/ml. The crude extract yielded 29 % growth inhibition of human T-cells in culture at that concentration. PMID:17350179

  6. A mycobacterial growth inhibition assay (MGIA) for bovine TB vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepponi, Ilaria; Khatri, Bhagwati; Tanner, Rachel; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Vordermeier, Martin; McShane, Helen

    2017-09-01

    Human tuberculosis remains a significant cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. The global economic impact of bovine TB is considerable. An effective vaccine would be the most cost-effective way to control both epidemics, particularly in emerging economies. TB vaccine research would benefit from the identification of an immune correlate of protection with which vaccines could be gated at both preclinical and clinical levels. In-vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays (MGIA) are functional assays that include most aspects of the complex host immune response to mycobacteria, and they may serve as functional immune correlates for vaccine development. We applied to cattle an MGIA that was developed for use with human and murine samples. Several technical difficulties were encountered while transferring it to the cattle model. However, our data demonstrate that the assay was not discriminatory in cattle and further work is needed before using it for bovine TB vaccine development. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Future of anti-addiction vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosten, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    The medical rational for using anti-drug antibodies in the serum as a treatment is to reduce drug levels in the brain and to bind drug before it enters the brain. Drugs of abuse are small molecules that can readily cross the blood brain barrier, while antibodies are larger molecules that cannot get into the brain. Thus, any drug that is bound to antibody also cannot cross the blood brain barrier and cannot enter the brain. Active anti-drug vaccines stimulate the body to makes its own antibodies, but the small size of abused drugs prevents them from stimulating an immune response. Thus, individuals do not ordinarily produce antibodies to abused drugs, and vaccines to stimulate antibodies are made by chemically linking these abused drugs to toxins such as cholera toxin. Alternatively, passive immunotherapy uses monoclonal antibodies that are generated in a laboratory and then administered via intravenous injection. Antibodies can be used to treat drug overdose; to reduce drug use relapse; or to protect certain at risk populations who have not yet become drug dependent. The advantages of anti-addiction vaccines are that antibodies target the drug, not the drug's sites of action in the brain and antibody binding inactivates the drug. These vaccines can complement behavioral and other medical therapies with minimal side effects and are not addictive like some chemical agonists. Technology advances in manufacturing and delivery systems will improve future anti-addiction vaccines, but social acceptance of anti-addiction vaccines will depend on substance abuse program staff and the families of substance abusers, who have some values that oppose medical solutions to addictive diseases and view addictions as moral problems.

  8. The HyVac4 subunit vaccine efficiently boosts BCG-primed anti-mycobacterial protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Billeskov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The current vaccine against tuberculosis (TB, BCG, has failed to control TB worldwide and the protective efficacy is moreover limited to 10-15 years. A vaccine that could efficiently boost a BCG-induced immune response and thus prolong protective immunity would therefore have a significant impact on the global TB-burden. METHODS/FINDINGS: In the present study we show that the fusion protein HyVac4 (H4, consisting of the mycobacterial antigens Ag85B and TB10.4, given in the adjuvant IC31® or DDA/MPL effectively boosted and prolonged immunity induced by BCG, leading to improved protection against infection with virulent M. tuberculosis (M.tb. Increased protection correlated with an increased percentage of TB10.4 specific IFNγ/TNFα/IL-2 or TNFα/IL-2 producing CD4 T cells at the site of infection. Moreover, this vaccine strategy did not compromise the use of ESAT-6 as an accurate correlate of disease development/vaccine efficacy. Indeed both CD4 and CD8 ESAT-6 specific T cells showed significant correlation with bacterial levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H4-IC31® can efficiently boost BCG-primed immunity leading to an increased protective anti-M.tb immune response dominated by IFNγ/TNFα/IL-2 or TNFα/IL2 producing CD4 T cells. H4 in the CD4 T cell inducing adjuvant IC31® is presently in clinical trials.

  9. Construction of two Listeria ivanovii attenuated strains expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens for TB vaccine purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingqing; Zhou, Mengying; Xu, Zongkai; Khanniche, Asma; Shen, Hao; Wang, Chuan

    2015-02-20

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has failed in complete control of tuberculosis (TB), thus, novel tuberculosis vaccines are urgently needed. We have constructed several TB vaccine candidates, which are characterized by the use of Listeria ivanovii (LI) strain as an antigen delivery vector. Two L. ivanovii attenuated recombinant strains L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv0129c and L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv3875 were successfully screened. Results from genome PCR and sequencing showed that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen gene cassette coding for Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein respectively had been integrated into LI genome downstream of mpl gene. Western blot confirmed the secretion of Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein from the recombinant LI strains. These two recombinant strains showed similar growth curves as wide type strain in vitro. In vivo, they transiently propagated in mice spleen and liver, and induced specific CD8(+) IFN-γ secretion. Therefore, in this paper, two novel LI attenuated strains expressing specific TB antigens were successfully constructed. The promising growth characteristics in mice immune system and the capability of induction of IFN-γ secretion make them of potential interest for development of TB vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Opportunities and defiance of therapeutic anti-tumoral vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulie, P

    2007-01-01

    Therapeutic anti-cancer vaccines containing tumor-specific antigens recognized by T lymphocytes are thought to stimulate high numbers of anti-vaccine cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) which then can lyse the tumor cells. To understand why these vaccines are followed by tumor regressions in only 10% of the patients, we analysed the tumor-specific immune responses of these patients. Contrary to our expectations, the anti-vaccine CTL responses were of very low level. However, regressing tumors were massively infiltrated by anti-tumor T cells of other specificities, including new anti-tumor CTL clonotypes that emerged following vaccination. We now believe that the role of the anti-vaccine CTL is to activate or restimulate large numbers of other anti-tumor CTL. Their ability to initiate this response is probably more important than their number. These results have important consequences for the improvement of the clinical efficacy of anti-cancer vaccines.

  11. Graph Theoretical Analysis, In Silico Modeling, Synthesis, Anti-Microbial and Anti-TB Evaluation of Novel Quinoxaline Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Govindaraj; Selvam, Theivendren Panneer; Alagarsamy, Veerachamy; Kunjiappan, Selvaraj; Joshi, Shrinivas D; Indhumathy, Murugan; Kumar, Pandurangan Dinesh

    2017-10-24

    Background We designed to synthesize a number of 2-(2-(substituted benzylidene) hydrazinyl)-N-(4-((3-(phenyl imino)-3,4-dihydro quinoxalin-2(1 H)-ylidene)amino) phenyl) acetamide S1-S13 with the hope to obtain more active and less toxic anti-microbial and anti-TB agents. Methods A series of novel quinoxaline Schiff bases S1-S13 were synthesized from o-phenylenediamine and oxalic acid by a multistep synthesis. In present work, we are introducing graph theoretical analysis to identify drug target. In the connection of graph theoretical analysis, we utilised KEGG database and Cytoscape software. All the title compounds were evaluated for their in-vitro anti-microbial activity by using agar well diffusion method at three different concentration levels (50, 100 and 150 µg/ml). The MIC of the compounds was also determined by agar streak dilution method. Results The identified study report through graph theoretical analysis were highlights that the key virulence factor for pathogenic mycobacteria is a eukaryotic-like serine/threonine protein kinase, termed PknG. All compounds were found to display significant activity against entire tested bacteria and fungi. In addition the synthesized scaffolds were screened for their in vitro antituberculosis (anti-TB) activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain H 37 Ra using standard drug Rifampicin. Conclusion A number of analogs found markedly potent anti-microbial and anti-TB activity. The relationship between the functional group variation and the biological activity of the evaluated compounds were well discussed. The observed study report was showing that the compound S6 (4-nitro substitution) exhibited most potent effective anti-microbial and anti-TB activity out of various tested compounds. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Sendai Virus Mucosal Vaccination Establishes Lung-Resident Memory CD8 T Cell Immunity and Boosts BCG-Primed Protection against TB in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhidong; Wong, Ka-Wing; Zhao, Hui-Min; Wen, Han-Li; Ji, Ping; Ma, Hui; Wu, Kang; Lu, Shui-Hua; Li, Feng; Li, Zhong-Ming; Shu, Tsugumine; Xu, Jian-Qing; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2017-05-03

    Accumulating evidence has shown the protective role of CD8 + T cells in vaccine-induced immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) despite controversy over their role in natural immunity. However, the current vaccine BCG is unable to induce sufficient CD8 + T cell responses, especially in the lung. Sendai virus, a respiratory RNA virus, is here engineered firstly as a novel recombinant anti-TB vaccine (SeV85AB) that encodes Mtb immuno-dominant antigens, Ag85A and Ag85B. A single mucosal vaccination elicited potent antigen-specific T cell responses and a degree of protection against Mtb challenge similar to the effect of BCG in mice. Depletion of CD8 + T cells abrogated the protective immunity afforded by SeV85AB vaccination. Interestingly, only SeV85AB vaccination induced high levels of lung-resident memory CD8 + T (T RM ) cells, and this led to a rapid and strong recall of antigen-specific CD8 + T cell responses against Mtb challenge infection. Furthermore, when used in a BCG prime-SeV85AB boost strategy, SeV85AB vaccine significantly enhanced protection above that seen after BCG vaccination alone. Our findings suggest that CD8 + T RM cells that arise in lungs responding to this mucosal vaccination might help to protect against TB, and SeV85AB holds notable promise to improve BCG's protective efficacy in a prime-boost immunization regimen. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Actions of Vitamin D in Combating TB/HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Coussens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB disease activation is now believed to arise due to a lack of inflammatory homeostatic control at either end of the spectrum of inflammation: either due to immunosuppression (decreased antimicrobial activity or due to immune activation (excess/aberrant inflammation. Vitamin D metabolites can increase antimicrobial activity in innate immune cells, which, in the context of HIV-1 coinfection, have insufficient T cell-mediated help to combat Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB infection. Moreover, maintaining vitamin D sufficiency prior to MTB infection enhances the innate antimicrobial response to T cell-mediated interferon-γ. Conversely, vitamin D can act to inhibit expression and secretion of a broad range of inflammatory mediators and matrix degrading enzymes driving immunopathology during active TB and antiretroviral- (ARV- mediated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS. Adjunct vitamin D therapy during treatment of active TB may therefore reduce lung pathology and TB morbidity, accelerate resolution of cavitation and thereby decrease the chance of transmission, improve lung function following therapy, prevent relapse, and prevent IRIS in those initiating ARVs. Future clinical trials of vitamin D for TB prevention and treatment must be designed to detect the most appropriate primary endpoint, which in some cases should be anti-inflammatory and not antimicrobial.

  14. "The Impact of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Immune Evasion on Protective Immunity: Implications for TB Vaccine Design" - Meeting report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggiano, Cesar; Eichelberg, Katrin; Ramachandra, Lakshmi; Shea, Jaqueline; Ramakrishnan, Lalita; Behar, Samuel; Ernst, Joel D; Porcelli, Steven A; Maeurer, Markus; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2017-06-14

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the major cause of death from infectious diseases around the world, particularly in HIV infected individuals. TB vaccine design and development have been focused on improving Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and evaluating recombinant and viral vector expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins, for boosting BCG-primed immunity, but these approaches have not yet yielded significant improvements over the modest effects of BCG in protecting against infection or disease. On March 7-8, 2016, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) convened a workshop on "The Impact of Mtb Immune Evasion on Protective Immunity: Implications for TB Vaccine Design" with the goal of defining immune mechanisms that could be targeted through novel research approaches, to inform vaccine design and immune therapeutic interventions for prevention of TB. The workshop addressed early infection events, the impact of Mtb evolution on the development and maintenance of an adaptive immune response, and the factors that influence protection against and progression to active disease. Scientific gaps and areas of study to revitalize and accelerate TB vaccine design were discussed and prioritized. These included a comprehensive evaluation of innate and Mtb-specific adaptive immune responses in the lung at different stages of disease; determining the role of B cells and antibodies (Abs) during Mtb infection; development of better assays to measure Mtb burden following exposure, infection, during latency and after treatment, and approaches to improving current animal models to study Mtb immunogenicity, TB disease and transmission. Copyright © 2017.

  15. Adverse Events among HIV/MDR-TB Co-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral and Second Line Anti-TB Treatment in Mumbai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaakidis, Petros; Varghese, Bhanumati; Mansoor, Homa; Cox, Helen S.; Ladomirska, Joanna; Saranchuk, Peter; Da Silva, Esdras; Khan, Samsuddin; Paryani, Roma; Udwadia, Zarir; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Reid, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Background Significant adverse events (AE) have been reported in patients receiving medications for multidrug- and extensively-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB & XDR-TB). However, there is little prospective data on AE in MDR- or XDR-TB/HIV co-infected patients on antituberculosis and antiretroviral therapy (ART) in programmatic settings. Methods Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is supporting a community-based treatment program for drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a slum setting in Mumbai, India since 2007. Patients are being treated for both diseases and the management of AE is done on an outpatient basis whenever possible. Prospective data were analysed to determine the occurrence and nature of AE. Results Between May 2007 and September 2011, 67 HIV/MDR-TB co-infected patients were being treated with anti-TB treatment and ART; 43.3% were female, median age was 35.5 years (Interquartile Range: 30.5–42) and the median duration of anti-TB treatment was 10 months (range 0.5–30). Overall, AE were common in this cohort: 71%, 63% and 40% of patients experienced one or more mild, moderate or severe AE, respectively. However, they were rarely life-threatening or debilitating. AE occurring most frequently included gastrointestinal symptoms (45% of patients), peripheral neuropathy (38%), hypothyroidism (32%), psychiatric symptoms (29%) and hypokalaemia (23%). Eleven patients were hospitalized for AE and one or more suspect drugs had to be permanently discontinued in 27 (40%). No AE led to indefinite suspension of an entire MDR-TB or ART regimen. Conclusions AE occurred frequently in this Mumbai HIV/MDR-TB cohort but not more frequently than in non-HIV patients on similar anti-TB treatment. Most AE can be successfully managed on an outpatient basis through a community-based treatment program, even in a resource-limited setting. Concerns about severe AE in the management of co-infected patients are justified, however, they should not cause delays

  16. The effects of anti-vaccine conspiracy theories on vaccination intentions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Jolley

    Full Text Available The current studies investigated the potential impact of anti-vaccine conspiracy beliefs, and exposure to anti-vaccine conspiracy theories, on vaccination intentions. In Study 1, British parents completed a questionnaire measuring beliefs in anti-vaccine conspiracy theories and the likelihood that they would have a fictitious child vaccinated. Results revealed a significant negative relationship between anti-vaccine conspiracy beliefs and vaccination intentions. This effect was mediated by the perceived dangers of vaccines, and feelings of powerlessness, disillusionment and mistrust in authorities. In Study 2, participants were exposed to information that either supported or refuted anti-vaccine conspiracy theories, or a control condition. Results revealed that participants who had been exposed to material supporting anti-vaccine conspiracy theories showed less intention to vaccinate than those in the anti-conspiracy condition or controls. This effect was mediated by the same variables as in Study 1. These findings point to the potentially detrimental consequences of anti-vaccine conspiracy theories, and highlight their potential role in shaping health-related behaviors.

  17. The effects of anti-vaccine conspiracy theories on vaccination intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Daniel; Douglas, Karen M

    2014-01-01

    The current studies investigated the potential impact of anti-vaccine conspiracy beliefs, and exposure to anti-vaccine conspiracy theories, on vaccination intentions. In Study 1, British parents completed a questionnaire measuring beliefs in anti-vaccine conspiracy theories and the likelihood that they would have a fictitious child vaccinated. Results revealed a significant negative relationship between anti-vaccine conspiracy beliefs and vaccination intentions. This effect was mediated by the perceived dangers of vaccines, and feelings of powerlessness, disillusionment and mistrust in authorities. In Study 2, participants were exposed to information that either supported or refuted anti-vaccine conspiracy theories, or a control condition. Results revealed that participants who had been exposed to material supporting anti-vaccine conspiracy theories showed less intention to vaccinate than those in the anti-conspiracy condition or controls. This effect was mediated by the same variables as in Study 1. These findings point to the potentially detrimental consequences of anti-vaccine conspiracy theories, and highlight their potential role in shaping health-related behaviors.

  18. Profile and response to anti-tuberculosis treatment among elderly tuberculosis patients treated under the TB Control programme in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayutham, Banu Rekha Vaithilingam; Nair, Dina; Chandrasekaran, Vedachalam; Raman, Balambal; Sekar, Gomathy; Watson, Basilea; Charles, Niruparani; Malaisamy, Muniyandi; Thomas, Aleyamma; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    The demographic transition in India has resulted in an increase in the elderly population. There is limited data on the profile of elderly tuberculosis (TB) patients and their treatment outcomes in India. To compare the clinical profile, presentation and response to anti-TB treatment among elderly (≥ 60 yrs) and younger (15-59 yrs) TB patients treated under the Revised National TB Control programme. Retrospective cohort analysis of TB patients treated from May 1999 to December 2004 in one Tuberculosis Unit of Tiruvallur district, South India. Records of 865 elderly and 4343 younger TB patients were examined: elderly were more likely to be male (84% vs. 71%), smokers (46% vs.37%), illiterate (63% vs. 45%), identified by active case finding through survey (19% vs. 11%), have pulmonary TB (96% vs. 91%) and initial smear negative disease (46% vs. 36%) compared to younger (for all ptuberculosis susceptibility to first line anti-TB drugs did not differ (elderly 87% vs. younger 84%) (p = 0.20). Side effects related to anti-TB drugs were reported by a higher proportion of elderly patients (63% vs. 54%) (p = 0.005). Previously treated patients had similar treatment outcomes in both the groups. Elderly TB patients are less likely to have smear positive disease. Newly diagnosed elderly TB patients are more likely to be lost to follow-up or die and report drug side effects. Suitable interventions need to be developed for effective management and better treatment outcomes of TB in the elderly.

  19. Stereochemical Analysis of Leubethanol, an Anti-TB Active Serrulatane, from Leucophyllum frutescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Salinas, Gloria M.; Rivas-Galindo, Verónica M.; Said-Fernández, Salvador; Lankin, David C.; Muñoz, Marcelo A.; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro; Pauli, Guido F.; Waksman, Noemí

    2013-01-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the methanolic root bark extract of Leucophyllum frutescens (Berl.) I.M. Johnst. led to the identification of leubethanol (1), a new serrulatane-type diterpene with activity against both multi drug-resistant and drug-sensitive strains of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Leubethanol (1) was identified by 1D/2D NMR data, as a serrulatane closely related to erogorgiane (2), and exhibited anti-TB activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations in the range 6.25–12.50 µg/mL. Stereochemical evidence for 1 was gleaned from 1D and 2D NOE experiments, 1H-NMR full spin analysis, as well as by comparison of the experimental vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectrum to density functional theory calculated VCD spectra of two diastereomers. PMID:21859082

  20. A profile of anti-vaccination lobbying on the South African internet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The South African Vaccination and Immunisation Centre receives many requests to explain the validity of internet-based anti-vaccination claims. Previous global studies on internet-based anti-vaccination lobbying had not identified anti-vaccination web pages originating in South Africa (SA). Objective.

  1. Mycobacteria and TB

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaufmann, S. H. E. (Stephan H. E.); Hahn, Helmut

    2003-01-01

    .... Scientists investigating the epidemiology, immunology and molecular biology of TB or engaged in vaccine and drug development as well as physicians and social workers treating TB patients will benefit...

  2. Targeting multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) by therapeutic vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prabowo, Satria A.; Groeschel, Matthias I.; Schmidt, Ed D. L.; Skrahina, Alena; Mihaescu, Traian; Hasturk, Serap; Mitrofanov, Rotislav; Pimkina, Edita; Visontai, Ildik; de Jong, Bouke; Stanford, John L.; Cardona, Pere-Joan; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; van der Werf, Tjipke

    Tuberculosis (TB) has scourged humankind for millennia, and latent infection affects nearly one-third of today's world population. The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB is a major global threat and reflects treatment failure of drug-sensitive disease. MDR-TB management is a burden for

  3. Pharmacogenetic & pharmacokinetic biomarker for efavirenz based ARV and rifampicin based anti-TB drug induced liver injury in TB-HIV infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getnet Yimer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Implication of pharmacogenetic variations and efavirenz pharmacokinetics in concomitant efavirenz based antiviral therapy and anti-tubercular drug induced liver injury (DILI has not been yet studied. We performed a prospective case-control association study to identify the incidence, pharmacogenetic, pharmacokinetic and biochemical predictors for anti-tubercular and antiretroviral drugs induced liver injury (DILI in HIV and tuberculosis (TB co-infected patients. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Newly diagnosed treatment naïve TB-HIV co-infected patients (n = 353 were enrolled to receive efavirenz based ART and rifampicin based anti-TB therapy, and assessed clinically and biochemically for DILI up to 56 weeks. Quantification of plasma efavirenz and 8-hydroxyefaviernz levels and genotyping for NAT2, CYP2B6, CYP3A5, ABCB1, UGT2B7 and SLCO1B1 genes were done. The incidence of DILI and identification of predictors was evaluated using survival analysis and the Cox Proportional Hazards Model. The incidence of DILI was 30.0%, or 14.5 per 1000 person-week, and that of severe was 18.4%, or 7.49 per 1000 person-week. A statistically significant association of DILI with being of the female sex (p = 0.001, higher plasma efavirenz level (p = 0.009, efavirenz/8-hydroxyefavirenz ratio (p = 0.036, baseline AST (p = 0.022, ALT (p = 0.014, lower hemoglobin (p = 0.008, and serum albumin (p = 0.007, NAT2 slow-acetylator genotype (p = 0.039 and ABCB1 3435TT genotype (p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: We report high incidence of anti-tubercular and antiretroviral DILI in Ethiopian patients. Between patient variability in systemic efavirenz exposure and pharmacogenetic variations in NAT2, CYP2B6 and ABCB1 genes determines susceptibility to DILI in TB-HIV co-infected patients. Close monitoring of plasma efavirenz level and liver enzymes during early therapy and/or genotyping practice in HIV clinics is recommended for early identification

  4. [Anti-HPV vaccination against cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ph; Monnier, S; Buxant, F; Noël, J C

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a new light about the HPV infections, their spontaneous evolutions, and their consequences on the transformation of the target tissues. It enlightens the need for vaccination both as a preventive tool and therapeutic agent and the progresses reached so far. HPV infection is often transient and spontaneously reversible. HR HPV persistence is the major cause of cancerous transformation of several tissues. Preventive vaccination has already demonstrated a remarkable efficiency against the development of risk HPV ano-genital infections. Therapeutic vaccination is now also developed to cure the pre existing lesions. Some new screening protocol can be derived from these experiments. Both preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccinations will probably change within the next few years our approach for the screening and therapy of HPV related diseases. Mass vaccination of adolescent female should lower the frequency of these very frequently lethal affections.

  5. Radiation and Anti-Cancer Vaccines: A Winning Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Alexandra; Cushman, Taylor R; Anderson, Clark; Barsoumian, Hampartsoum B; Welsh, James W; Cortez, Maria Angelica

    2018-01-30

    The emerging combination of radiation therapy with vaccines is a promising new treatment plan in the fight against cancer. While many cancer vaccines such as MUC1, p53 CpG oligodeoxynucleotide, and SOX2 may be great candidates for antitumor vaccination, there still remain many investigations to be done into possible vaccine combinations. One fruitful partnership that has emerged are anti-tumor vaccines in combination with radiation. Radiation therapy was previously thought to be only a tool for directly or indirectly damaging DNA and therefore causing cancer cell death. Now, with much preclinical and clinical data, radiation has taken on the role of an in situ vaccine. With both cancer vaccines and radiation at our disposal, more and more studies are looking to combining vaccine types such as toll-like receptors, viral components, dendritic-cell-based, and subunit vaccines with radiation. While the outcomes of these combinatory efforts are promising, there is still much work to be covered. This review sheds light on the current state of affairs in cancer vaccines and how radiation will bring its story into the future.

  6. Detection of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific DNA by droplet digital PCR for vaccine evaluation in challenged monkeys and TB diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Neng; Tan, Yang; Zhang, Lingyun; Luo, Wei; Guan, Qing; Yan, Ming-Zhe; Zuo, Ruiqi; Liu, Weixiang; Luo, Feng-Ling; Zhang, Xiao-Lian

    2018-04-24

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) is emerging as a more serious pathogen due to the increased multidrug-resistant TB and co-infection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The development of an effective and sensitive detection method is urgently needed for bacterial load evaluation in vaccine development, early TB diagnosis, and TB treatment. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a newly developed sensitive PCR method for the absolute quantification of nucleic acid concentrations. Here, we used ddPCR to quantify the circulating virulent M. tb-specific CFP10 (10-kDa culture filtrate protein, Rv3874) and Rv1768 DNA copy numbers in the blood samples from Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-vaccinated and/or virulent M. tb H37Rv-challenged rhesus monkeys. We found that ddPCR was more sensitive compared to real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (qPCR), as the detection limits of CFP10 were 1.2 copies/μl for ddPCR, but 15.8 copies/μl for qPCR. We demonstrated that ddPCR could detect CFP10 and Rv1768 DNA after 3 weeks of infection and at least two weeks earlier than qPCR in M.tb H37Rv-challenged rhesus monkey models. DdPCR could also successfully quantify CFP10 and Rv1768 DNA copy numbers in clinical TB patients' blood samples (active pulmonary TB, extrapulmonary TB (EPTB), and infant TB). To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that ddPCR is an effective and sensitive method of measuring the circulating CFP10 and Rv1768 DNA for vaccine development, bacterial load evaluation in vivo, and early TB (including EPTB and infant TB) diagnosis as well.

  7. [Challenge of developing anti-parasite vaccines in the tropics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogier, C

    2007-08-01

    Much effort has been devoted to developing anti-parasite vaccines. The main obstacles to overcome involve problems in cultivating parasites, variability in antigens of cultivated parasites, insufficient immune responses that do not provide full protection, lack of animal models and difficulty in evaluating immune protection acquired naturally or after vaccination in populations living in endemic areas. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted and several parasite antigens, in particular against malaria, have been tested in endemic areas. Up to now no candidate vaccine has shown sufficient, long-term efficacy to justify its inclusion in public health program. However trials using anti-parasite vaccination under both experimental and field conditions clearly demonstrate that a certain level of clinical immunity against malaria, bilharziasis, and leishmaniasis.

  8. Adjuvants for anti-parasite vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomford, R

    1989-02-01

    To date the most successful human vaccines use attenuated living pathogens, but the advent of techniques in genetic engineering has meant that pure antigen can be provided in quantity. This has allowed the development of combined vaccines that use only the parasite antigens that convey protective immunity. However, isolated antigens lose immunogenicity so to regain potency, living attenuated carriers like Vaccinia or Salmonella can be used. To avoid the attendant drawbacks of carriers as immunopotentiating agents, adjuvants are under investigation as alternatives for use in vaccines against parasitic infections. In this review, Robert Bomford describes the adjuvants currently being examined for use in vaccines for both protozoan and helminth infections including Leishmania, malaria and Schistosoma. He also points out the drawbacks of using adjuvants and the dilemma of needing to stimulate cell'-mediated immunity while avoiding the immunopathological consequences of doing so.

  9. Effect of vaccine dose on the safety and immunogenicity of a candidate TB vaccine, MVA85A, in BCG vaccinated UK adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathan, Ansar A; Minassian, Angela M; Sander, Clare R; Rowland, Rosalind; Porter, David W; Poulton, Ian D; Hill, Adrian V S; Fletcher, Helen A; McShane, Helen

    2012-08-17

    A non-randomised, open-label, Phase I safety and immunogenicity dose-finding study to assess the safety and immunogenicity of the candidate TB vaccine Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara expressing Antigen 85A (MVA85A) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in healthy adult volunteers previously vaccinated with BCG. Healthy BCG-vaccinated volunteers were vaccinated with either 1×10(7) or 1×10(8)PFU of MVA85A. All adverse events were documented and antigen specific T cell responses were measured using an ex vivo IFN-γ ELISPOT assay. Safety and immunogenicity were compared between the 2 dose groups and with a previous trial in which a dose of 5×10(7)PFU MVA85A had been administered. There were no serious adverse events recorded following administration of either 1×10(7) or 1×10(8)PFU of MVA85A. Systemic adverse events were more frequently reported following administration of 1×10(8)PFU of MVA85A when compared to either 5×10(7) or 1×10(7)PFU of MVA85A but were mild or moderate in severity and resolved completely within 7 days of immunisation. Antigen specific T cell responses as measured by the IFN-γ ELISPOT were significantly higher following immunisation in adults receiving 1×10(8)PFU compared to the 5×10(7) and 1×10(7) doses. Additionally, a broader range of Ag85A epitopes are detected following 1×10(8)PFU of MVA85A. A higher dose of 1×10(8)PFU of MVA85A is well-tolerated, increases the frequency of IFN-γ secreting T cells detected following immunisation and broadens the range of Ag85A epitopes detected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transmission-Blocking Vaccines: Focus on Anti-Vector Vaccines against Tick-Borne Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakanta, Girish; Sultana, Hameeda

    2015-06-01

    Tick-borne diseases are a potential threat that account for significant morbidity and mortality in human population worldwide. Vaccines are not available to treat several of the tick-borne diseases. With the emergence and resurgence of several tick-borne diseases, emphasis on the development of transmission-blocking vaccines remains increasing. In this review, we provide a snap shot on some of the potential candidates for the development of anti-vector vaccines (a form of transmission-blocking vaccines) against wide range of hard and soft ticks that include Ixodes, Haemaphysalis, Dermacentor, Amblyomma, Rhipicephalus and Ornithodoros species.

  11. Uptake of Anti rabies vaccine by users of the Anti rabies centre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uptake of Anti rabies vaccine by users of the Anti rabies centre Douala, Cameroon : a descriptive cross sectional study. AA Bita Fouda, G Etapelong Sume, N Essomba, E Nguemne, C Anani, D Mbida, E Ekosso, A Feuhgouo, G Noufack Zambou, J Owona Manga ...

  12. A human type 5 adenovirus-based tuberculosis vaccine induces robust T cell responses in humans despite preexisting anti-adenovirus immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaill, Fiona; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Smieja, Marek; Medina, Maria Fe; Thanthrige-Don, Niroshan; Zganiacz, Anna; Yin, Cindy; Heriazon, Armando; Damjanovic, Daniela; Puri, Laura; Hamid, Jemila; Xie, Feng; Foley, Ronan; Bramson, Jonathan; Gauldie, Jack; Xing, Zhou

    2013-10-02

    There is an urgent need to develop new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines to safely and effectively boost Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-triggered T cell immunity in humans. AdHu5Ag85A is a recombinant human type 5 adenovirus (AdHu5)-based TB vaccine with demonstrated efficacy in a number of animal species, yet it remains to be translated to human applications. In this phase 1 study, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of AdHu5Ag85A in both BCG-naïve and previously BCG-immunized healthy adults. Intramuscular immunization of AdHu5Ag85A was safe and well tolerated in both trial volunteer groups. Moreover, although AdHu5Ag85A was immunogenic in both trial volunteer groups, it much more potently boosted polyfunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell immunity in previously BCG-vaccinated volunteers. Furthermore, despite prevalent preexisting anti-AdHu5 humoral immunity in most of the trial volunteers, we found little evidence that such preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity significantly dampened the potency of AdHu5Ag85A vaccine. This study supports further clinical investigations of the AdHu5Ag85A vaccine for human applications. It also suggests that the widely perceived negative effect of preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity may not be universally applied to all AdHu5-based vaccines against different types of human pathogens.

  13. Immunocastration of goats using anti-gonadotrophin releasing hormone vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lents, Maicon Pereira; Barbosa, Larissa Pires; Santana, Ana Lúcia Almeida; Pinheiro, Emmanuel Emydio Gomes; Mugabe, Lopes César; Biscarde, Carmo Emanuel Almeida; Kiya, Cláudia Kazumi; Machado, William Morais; Souza, Rosileia Silva

    2018-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immuno-sterilizing action of anti-gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (anti-GnRH) vaccine in goats. Eighteen male goats were randomly distributed to receive three treatments: T1 (control) - whole animals, and T2 and T3 - application of 0.5 and 1.0 mL of anti-GnRH vaccine, respectively, with six replicates and one goat per experimental unit. Vaccine was administered at 8 months of age and 30 days after the first immunization. Testicular biometry was evaluated monthly, along with seminal collections, for the physical and morphological evaluation of semen. At the time of slaughter, the testicle were collected, and fragments were measured and removed for histological evaluation. The data were evaluated for normality by the Shapiro-Wilk test, followed by appropriate statistical tests for each variable. A reduction in width and length of the right and left testicles was observed and, consequently, the scrotal circumference of the immunized animals reduced after the second vaccine application (P vaccine application, there was a negative effect on seminal production and quality; and 60 days after the second application, a pronounced reduction was observed in all seminal parameters in the vaccinated animals, including azoospermia (83.33% of animals; P Vaccine application reduced testicular weight, seminiferous tubule diameter, and gonadosomatic and tubulosomatic index (P  0.05). Two applications of the anti-GnRH conjugate are effective for the immunological castration of goats, and the 0.5 mL dose is recommended for use in crossbred goats. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Anti-S. typhi Vi IgG levels in children with and without typhoid vaccinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriandayani Sriandayani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Typhoid fever is endemic to Indonesia, with an annual incidence of 13/10,000 people. Vaccination has been shown to be an effective method to prevent typhoid fever. Of several vaccine types, the polysaccharide Vi vaccine is the most commonly used typhoid vaccine in developing countries. Results of previous studies remain inconclusive on the necessity of revaccination every 3 years. Objective To compare the mean serum anrioody titers of anti-S. typhi Vi IgG and the proportion of children with protective antibody levels between children with and without typhoid Vi vaccination. Methods We conducted a cross-secrional study at Tuminring District, 11anado from June to September 2012. Data was analyzed using independent T-test and Fisher's test. Serum anti-S. typhi Vi IgG levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. Results Seventy-six subjects were divided into two groups: 38 children who had received the typhoid Vi vaccination more than 3 years prior to this study and 38 children who never had typhoid vaccinations as a control group. No statistically significant difference in age and gender was found between the two groups. The mean serum anti-Vi IgG level was 0.55 ug/mL (SD 0.58; 95%CI 0.36 to 0.74 in the vaccinated group, significantly higher than that of the control group [0.31 ug/mL (SD 0.12; 950/£1 0.17 to 0.44; P0.0381. The proportion of children with protective antiNi antioody level was higher in the vaccinated group (23.7% than in the control group  (10.5%, howevet; this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.128. Conclusion The mean serum anti-S. typhi Vi IgG antibody level in children who had been vaccinated more than 3 years prior to the study is higher than in children who had never received typhoid vaccinations. Nevertheless, the mean antibody titers are generally non-protective in ooth groups. Also, the proportion of children with protective antibody levels is not significantly

  15. Profile and response to anti-tuberculosis treatment among elderly tuberculosis patients treated under the TB Control programme in South India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Rekha Vaithilingam Velayutham

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The demographic transition in India has resulted in an increase in the elderly population. There is limited data on the profile of elderly tuberculosis (TB patients and their treatment outcomes in India. OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical profile, presentation and response to anti-TB treatment among elderly (≥ 60 yrs and younger (15-59 yrs TB patients treated under the Revised National TB Control programme. METHODOLOGY: Retrospective cohort analysis of TB patients treated from May 1999 to December 2004 in one Tuberculosis Unit of Tiruvallur district, South India. RESULTS: Records of 865 elderly and 4343 younger TB patients were examined: elderly were more likely to be male (84% vs. 71%, smokers (46% vs.37%, illiterate (63% vs. 45%, identified by active case finding through survey (19% vs. 11%, have pulmonary TB (96% vs. 91% and initial smear negative disease (46% vs. 36% compared to younger (for all p<0.001. Among a total of 352 elderly and 1933 younger new smear positive pulmonary TB, the elderly had higher loss to follow-up (15% vs. 11%; p = 0.03 and death rates (9% vs. 4%; p<0.001. Mycobacterium tuberculosis susceptibility to first line anti-TB drugs did not differ (elderly 87% vs. younger 84% (p = 0.20. Side effects related to anti-TB drugs were reported by a higher proportion of elderly patients (63% vs. 54% (p = 0.005. Previously treated patients had similar treatment outcomes in both the groups. CONCLUSION: Elderly TB patients are less likely to have smear positive disease. Newly diagnosed elderly TB patients are more likely to be lost to follow-up or die and report drug side effects. Suitable interventions need to be developed for effective management and better treatment outcomes of TB in the elderly.

  16. Nitrofuranyl Methyl Piperazines as New Anti-TB Agents: Identification, Validation, Medicinal Chemistry, and PK Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Whole-cell screening of 20,000 drug-like small molecules led to the identification of nitrofuranyl methylpiperazines as potent anti-TB agents. In the present study, validation followed by medicinal chemistry has been used to explore the structure–activity relationship. Ten compounds demonstrated potent MIC in the range of 0.17–0.0072 μM against H37Rv Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and were further investigated against nonreplicating and resistant (RifR and MDR) strains of MTB. These compounds were also tested for cytotoxicity. Among the 10 tested compounds, five showed submicromolar to nanomolar potency against nonreplicating and resistant (RifR and MDR) strains of MTB along with a good safety index. Based on their overall in vitro profiles, the solubility and pharmacokinetic properties of five potent compounds were studied, and two analogues, 14f and 16g, were found to have comparatively better solubility than others tested and acceptable pharmacokinetic properties. This study presents the rediscovery of a nitrofuranyl class of compounds with improved aqueous solubility and acceptable oral PK properties, opening a new direction for further development. PMID:26487909

  17. Vaccination, squalene and anti-squalene antibodies: facts or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Targher, Giovanni; Franchini, Massimo

    2010-04-01

    Squalene, a hydrocarbon obtained for commercial purposes primarily from shark liver oil and other botanic sources, is increasingly used as an immunologic adjuvant in several vaccines, including seasonal and the novel influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic flu vaccines. Nearly a decade ago, squalene was supposed to be the experimental anthrax vaccine ingredient that caused the onset of Persian Gulf War syndrome in many veterans, since antibodies to squalene were detected in the blood of most patients affected by this syndrome. This evidence has raised a widespread concern about the safety of squalene containing adjuvants (especially MF59) of influenza vaccines. Nevertheless, further clinical evidence clearly suggested that squalene is poorly immunogenic, that low titres of antibodies to squalene can be also detected in sera from healthy individuals, and that neither the presence of anti-squalene antibodies nor their titre is significantly increased by immunization with vaccines containing squalene (or MF59) as an adjuvant. This review summarizes the current scientific evidence about the relationship between squalene, anti-squalene antibodies and vaccination. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Achieving STOP TB Partnership goals: perspectives on development of new diagnostics, drugs and vaccines for tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mwaba, Peter; McNerney, Ruth; Grobusch, Martin Peter; O'Grady, Justin; Bates, Matthew; Kapata, Nathan; Maeurer, Markus; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2011-01-01

    Global eradication of tuberculosis (TB) depends on identification and treatment of all active TB cases and of the two billion people who are estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The past decade has seen a renaissance of scientific activities and funder investment into

  19. Field Handling and Anti-Rabies Vaccine Efficacy | Oladokun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-rabies vaccine for dogs, earlier procured in 2008 from National Veterinary Research Institute, Vom was received for re-evaluation from the field. The field originated and reference samples of the same production batch (04/2008) were inoculated into 3-week old mice intracerebrally for comparison and observed daily for ...

  20. Story and science: How providers and parents can utilize storytelling to combat anti-vaccine misinformation

    OpenAIRE

    Shelby, Ashley; Ernst, Karen

    2013-01-01

    With little or no evidence-based information to back up claims of vaccine danger, anti-vaccine activists have relied on the power of storytelling to infect an entire generation of parents with fear of and doubt about vaccines. These parent accounts of perceived vaccine injury, coupled with Andrew Wakefield’s fraudulent research study linking the MMR vaccine to autism, created a substantial amount of vaccine hesitancy in new parents, which manifests in both vaccine refusal and the adoption of ...

  1. Use of anti-retroviral therapy in tuberculosis patients on second-line anti-TB regimens: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Arentz

    Full Text Available Use of antiretroviral therapy (ART during treatment of drug susceptible tuberculosis (TB improves survival. However, data from HIV infected individuals with drug resistant TB are lacking. Second line TB drugs when combined with ART may increase drug interactions and lead to higher rates of toxicity and greater noncompliance. This systematic review sought to determine the benefit of ART in the setting of second line drug therapy for drug resistant TB.We included individual patient data from studies that evaluated treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-1 infected individuals published between January 1980 and December of 2009. We evaluated the effect of ART on treatment outcomes, time to smear and culture conversion, and adverse events.Ten observational studies, including data from 217 subjects, were analyzed. Patients using ART during TB treatment had increased likelihood of cure (hazard ratio (HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.6-7.4 and decreased likelihood of death (HR 0.4, 95% CI 0.3-0.6 during treatment for drug resistant TB. These associations remained significant in patients with a CD4 less than 200 cells/mm(3 and less than 50 cells/mm(3, and when correcting for drug resistance pattern.We identified only observational studies from which individual patient data could be drawn. Limitations in study design, and heterogeneity in a number of the outcomes of interest had the potential to introduce bias.While there are insufficient data to determine if ART use increases adverse drug interactions when used with second line TB drugs, ART use during treatment of drug resistant TB appears to improve cure rates and decrease risk of death. All individuals with HIV appear to benefit from ART use during treatment for TB.

  2. Lowering the Age of Consent: Pushing Back against the Anti-Vaccine Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Allison M

    2016-09-01

    This article examines the rise of the anti-vaccination movement, the proliferation of laws allowing parental exemptions to mandatory school vaccines, and the impact of the movement on immunization rates for all vaccines. It uses the ongoing debate about the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine as an example to highlight the ripple effect and consequences of the anti-vaccine movement despite robust evidence of the vaccine's safety and efficacy. The article scrutinizes how state legislatures ironically promote vaccination while simultaneously deferring to the opposition by promulgating broad opt-outs from mandatory vaccine laws. This article concludes by offering an alternative legislative approach to specifically combat the anti-vaccine movement's impact on HPV vaccination rates. Lowering the age of consent has not been widely attempted or proposed and provides an alternative statutory mechanism to push back against vaccine resistance. © 2016 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics.

  3. QTF-Gold assay for monitoring of anti-tuberculosis therapy in subjects with active TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Sauzullo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The identification and characterization of two M. tuberculosis-specific antigens (ESAT-6 and CFP- 10 has led to the development of a whole blood new generation of M. tuberculosis specific diagnostic tests, that have several advantages over tuberculin skin test (TST, in terms of higher specificity, better correlation with surrogate measures of exposure to M. tuberculosis in low-incidence setting, and less cross-reactivity with M. bovis (BCG vaccine and environmental mycobacteria.The role of these new tests in evaluating post-therapy tuberculosis eradication has not been investigated yet. Aim of this longitudinal study was to determinate changes of response to M. tuberculosis-specific antigens in patients during the standard tuberculosis treatment and to investigate the in vitro effects of tuberculosis drugs on the IFN-γ release. Methods: 23 individuals with active tuberculosis were enrolled and followed over time.They were tested with QuantiFERON TB-Gold (QFT-Gold at four time points: at diagnosis (t0, after 3 and 6 months of treatment (t1- t2 and at the end of the specific treatment (t3. Results: At baseline all patients were positive by QFT-Gold.At second time-point 17 out of 23 (74% were positive, at third time-point 11 of 23 (47% were positive, at treatment completion 3/23 (13% were positive.The conversion to negative response to M. tuberculosis-specific antigens was found in 87% patients analyzed after successful therapy. Longitudinal QFT-Gold testing shown a significant decrease (p<0.001 of IFN-γ response during the therapy. No inhibitory effect on IFN-γ release was noted in vitro for chemotherapy using at concentrations compatible with those achieved in serum of treated patients.We have revealed an inhibitory effect only at concentrations 2-3 times greater than those previously tested. Conclusion: A successful therapy for tuberculosis causes a significant decrease of the ESAT-6 and CFP-10 response and this data suggest

  4. Anti-vaccine activists, Web 2.0, and the postmodern paradigm--an overview of tactics and tropes used online by the anti-vaccination movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kata, Anna

    2012-05-28

    Websites opposing vaccination are prevalent on the Internet. Web 2.0, defined by interaction and user-generated content, has become ubiquitous. Furthermore, a new postmodern paradigm of healthcare has emerged, where power has shifted from doctors to patients, the legitimacy of science is questioned, and expertise is redefined. Together this has created an environment where anti-vaccine activists are able to effectively spread their messages. Evidence shows that individuals turn to the Internet for vaccination advice, and suggests such sources can impact vaccination decisions - therefore it is likely that anti-vaccine websites can influence whether people vaccinate themselves or their children. This overview examines the types of rhetoric individuals may encounter online in order to better understand why the anti-vaccination movement can be convincing, despite lacking scientific support for their claims. Tactics and tropes commonly used to argue against vaccination are described. This includes actions such as skewing science, shifting hypotheses, censoring dissent, and attacking critics; also discussed are frequently made claims such as not being "anti-vaccine" but "pro-safe vaccines", that vaccines are toxic or unnatural, and more. Recognizing disingenuous claims made by the anti-vaccination movement is essential in order to critically evaluate the information and misinformation encountered online. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Serious treatment related adverse drug reactions amongst anti-retroviral naïve MDR-TB patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Van der Walt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Globally treatment outcomes for multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB remain poor and this is compounded by high drug toxicity. Little is known about the influence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs on treatment outcomes in South Africa. METHODS: We evaluated the impact of severe ADRs among a prospective cohort of MDR-TB patients in South Africa (2000-2004. The HIV-infected study participants were anti-retroviral naïve. RESULTS: Of 2,079 patients enrolled, 1,390 (66.8% were included in this analysis based on known HIV test results (39.1% HIV-infected. At least one severe ADR was reported in 83 (6.9% patients with ototoxicity being the most frequent ADR experienced (38.9%. CONCLUSIONS: We found that being HIV-infected but antiretroviral naïve did not increase occurrence of SADRs in patients on second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. Early screening and proactive management of ADRs in this patient population is essential, especially given the rollout of decentralized care and the potential for overlapping toxicity of concomitant MDR-TB and HIV treatment.

  6. Japanese anti- versus pro-influenza vaccination websites: a text-mining analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuhara, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Hirono; Okada, Masafumi; Kato, Mio; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2018-03-23

    Anti-vaccination sentiment exists worldwide and Japan is no exception. Health professionals publish pro-influenza vaccination messages online to encourage proactive seeking of influenza vaccination. However, influenza vaccine coverage among the Japanese population is less than optimal. The contents of pro- and anti-influenza vaccination websites may contribute to readers' acceptance of one or the other position. We aimed to use a text-mining method to examine frequently appearing content on websites for and against influenza vaccination. We conducted online searches in January 2017 using two major Japanese search engines (Google Japan and Yahoo! Japan). Targeted websites were classified as 'pro', 'anti' or 'neutral' depending on their claims, with author(s) classified as 'health professionals', 'mass media' or 'laypersons'. Text-mining analysis was conducted, and statistical analysis was performed using a chi-squared test. Of the 334 websites analyzed, 13 content topics were identified. The three most frequently appearing content topics on pro-vaccination websites were vaccination effect for preventing serious cases of influenza, side effects of vaccination, and efficacy rate of vaccination. The three most frequent topics on anti-vaccination websites were ineffectiveness of influenza vaccination, toxicity of vaccination, and side effects of vaccination. The main disseminators of each topic, by author classification, were also revealed. We discuss possible tactics of online influenza vaccination promotion to counter anti-vaccination websites.

  7. Innovative Approaches to Improve Anti-Infective Vaccine Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Michael R; Hennessey, John P

    2017-01-06

    Safe and efficacious vaccines are arguably the most successful medical interventions of all time. Yet the ongoing discovery of new pathogens, along with emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and a burgeoning population at risk of such infections, imposes unprecedented public health challenges. To meet these challenges, innovative strategies to discover and develop new or improved anti-infective vaccines are necessary. These approaches must intersect the most meaningful insights into protective immunity and advanced technologies with capabilities to deliver immunogens for optimal immune protection. This goal is considered through several recent advances in host-pathogen relationships, conceptual strides in vaccinology, and emerging technologies. Given a clear and growing risk of pandemic disease should the threat of infection go unmet, developing vaccines that optimize protective immunity against high-priority and antibiotic-resistant pathogens represents an urgent and unifying imperative.

  8. Resistance to first-line anti-TB drugs is associated with reduced nitric oxide susceptibility in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonna Idh

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of nitric oxide (NO to the killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human tuberculosis (TB is controversial, although this has been firmly established in rodents. Studies have demonstrated that clinical strains of M. tuberculosis differ in susceptibility to NO, but how this correlates to drug susceptibility and clinical outcome is not known.In this study, 50 sputum smear- and culture-positive patients with pulmonary TB in Gondar, Ethiopia were included. Clinical parameters were recorded and drug susceptibility profile and spoligotyping patterns were investigated. NO susceptibility was studied by exposing the strains to the NO donor DETA/NO.Clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis showed a dose- and time-dependent response when exposed to NO. The most frequent spoligotypes found were CAS1-Delhi and T3_ETH in a total of nine known spoligotypes and four orphan patterns. There was a significant association between reduced susceptibility to NO (>10% survival after exposure to 1 mM DETA/NO and resistance against first-line anti-TB drugs, in particular isoniazid (INH. Patients infected with strains of M. tuberculosis with reduced susceptibility to NO showed no difference in cure rate or other clinical parameters but a tendency towards lower rate of weight gain after two months of treatment, independent of antibiotic resistance.There is a correlation between resistance to first-line anti-TB drugs and reduced NO susceptibility in clinical strains of M. tuberculosis. Further studies including the mechanisms of reduced NO susceptibility are warranted and could identify targets for new therapeutic interventions.

  9. A qualitative analysis of the beliefs of Japanese anti-influenza vaccination website authors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Okuhara

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Influenza vaccine coverage among the Japanese population is less than optimal. Anti-vaccination sentiment exists worldwide, and Japan is no exception. Anti-influenza vaccination activists argue on the internet that influenza vaccine has little or no efficacy and a high risk of side effects, and they warn that people should forgo vaccination. We conducted a qualitative analysis to explore beliefs underlying the messages of anti-influenza vaccination websites, by focusing on the perceived value these beliefs provide to those who hold them. Methods: We conducted online searches in January 2017 using two major Japanese search engines (Google Japan and Yahoo! Japan. Targeted websites were classified as “pro”, “anti”, or “neutral” depending on their claims. We applied a dual analytic approach—inductive thematic analysis and deductive interpretative analysis—to textual data of the anti websites. Results: Of the 113 anti websites, we identified two themes that correspond to beliefs: it is necessary to 1 protect others against risks and exploitation related to influenza vaccination, and 2 educate others about hidden truths and self-determination. Authors of anti websites ascribed two values (people's “safety” and one's own “self-esteem” to their beliefs. Discussion: Website authors may engage in anti-vaccination activities because they want to feel they are virtuous, saving people from harm caused by vaccination, and to boost their self-esteem, thinking “I am enlightening uninformed people.” The anti-vaccination beliefs of website authors were considered to be strong. In promoting vaccination, it would be better not to target outright vaccine refusers, such as the authors of anti-vaccination websites; it is preferable to target vaccine-hesitant people who are more amenable to changing their attitudes toward vaccination. We discuss possible means of promoting vaccination in that target population. Keywords

  10. Prophylactic effect of a therapeutic vaccine against TB based on fragments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Vilaplana

    Full Text Available The prophylactic capacity of the RUTI® vaccine, based on fragmented cells of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has been evaluated in respect to aerosol challenge with virulent bacilli. Subcutaneous vaccination significantly reduced viable bacterial counts in both lungs and spleens of C57Bl mice, when challenged 4 weeks after vaccination. RUTI® protected the spleen less than BCG. Following a 9 month vaccination-challenge interval, protection was observed for the lungs, but not for the spleen. Survival of infected guinea pigs was prolonged by vaccination given 5 weeks before challenge. Inoculations of RUTI® shortly after infection significantly reduced the viable bacterial counts in the lungs, when compared with infected control mice. Thus, vaccination by RUTI® has potential for both the prophylaxis and immunotherapy of tuberculosis.

  11. Story and science: how providers and parents can utilize storytelling to combat anti-vaccine misinformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Ashley; Ernst, Karen

    2013-08-01

    With little or no evidence-based information to back up claims of vaccine danger, anti-vaccine activists have relied on the power of storytelling to infect an entire generation of parents with fear of and doubt about vaccines. These parent accounts of perceived vaccine injury, coupled with Andrew Wakefield's fraudulent research study linking the MMR vaccine to autism, created a substantial amount of vaccine hesitancy in new parents, which manifests in both vaccine refusal and the adoption of delayed vaccine schedules. The tools used by the medical and public health communities to counteract the anti-vaccine movement include statistics, research, and other evidence-based information, often delivered verbally or in the form of the CDC's Vaccine Information Statements. This approach may not be effective enough on its own to convince vaccine-hesitant parents that vaccines are safe, effective, and crucial to their children's health. Utilizing some of the storytelling strategies used by the anti-vaccine movement, in addition to evidence-based vaccine information, could potentially offer providers, public health officials, and pro-vaccine parents an opportunity to mount a much stronger defense against anti-vaccine messaging.

  12. A profile of anti-vaccination lobbying on the South African internet, 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Rosemary Joyce; von Gogh, Lauren Jennifer; Moloi, Molelekeng H; François, Guido

    2015-11-01

    The South African Vaccination and Immunisation Centre receives many requests to explain the validity of internet-based anti-vaccination claims. Previous global studies on internet-based anti-vaccination lobbying had not identified anti-vaccination web pages originating in South Africa (SA). To characterise SA internet-based anti-vaccination lobbying. In 2011, searches for anti-vaccination content were performed using Google, Yahoo and MSN-Bing, limited to English-language SA web pages. Content analysis was performed on web pages expressing anti-vaccination sentiment about infant vaccination. This was repeated in 2012 and 2013 using Google, with the first 700 web pages per search being analysed. Blogs/forums, articles and e-shops constituted 40.3%, 55.2% and 4.5% of web pages, respectively. Authors were lay people (63.5%), complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners (23.1%), medical professionals practising CAM (7.7%) and medical professionals practising only allopathic medicine (5.8%). Advertisements appeared on 55.2% of web pages. Of these, 67.6% were sponsored by or linked to organisations with financial interests in discrediting vaccines, with 80.0% and 24.0% of web pages sponsored by these organisations claiming respectively that vaccines are ineffective and that vaccination is profit driven. The vast majority of web pages (92.5%) claimed that vaccines are not safe, and 77.6% of anti-vaccination claims originated from the USA. South Africans are creating web pages or blogs for local anti-vaccination lobbying. Research is needed to understand what influence internet-based anti-vaccination lobbying has on the uptake of infant vaccination in SA.

  13. What are the reasons for patients not adhering to their anti-TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: The most important recommendation is to improve the relationship between patients and TB nurses through training in communication skills. A more holistic assessment of patients would help identify issues such as depression, and a more patient-centred approach would help to understand and address ...

  14. A Pilot Trial of Jawarish Amla as Adjuvant to Anti-Tubercular Treatment Drugs for Control of Adverse Reactions in DOTS Regime in Pulmonary TB

    OpenAIRE

    Sherwani, Arish Mohammad Khan; Zulkifle, Mohammad; Rehmatulla,

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives One of the greatest challenges of health care systems at the dawn of the 21st century is tuberculosis (TB). Drug resistant strains of TB are becoming a global public health risk. These strains commonly appear due to faulty therapies. Patients frequently stop treatment due to the toxicity of anti-tubercular treatment (ATT) drugs. Amla (Emblica officinalis) is a well-known Unani single drug. Jawarish amla is a Unani compound formulation which is commonly used to admini...

  15. The effects of booster vaccination on hepatitis B vaccine in anti-HBs negative infants of HBsAg-positive mothers after primary vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hua; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Wei; Lv, Huakun; Cheng, Suyun; Ling, Luoya; Xia, Shichang; Chen, Yongdi

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in anti-HBs IgG levels after booster vaccinations in anti-HBs negative infants of HBsAg-positive mothers. After primary vaccination, the immunization effects of different dosages of booster vaccinations of hepatitis B vaccine (CHO) were compared. A group of 472 newborns were vaccinated with three-dose hepatitis B vaccine at birth, 1 mo and 6 mo of age. Blood serum was collected within 6-12 mo after the third dose, and HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HBc levels were determined. Of this group, 101 infants who were both anti-HBs and HBsAg negative were revaccinated with 20 μg hepatitis B vaccine (CHO), and their antibody titers were monitored. Among these 101 infants, the anti- HBs positive rates (defined as anti-HBs ≥ 100 mIU/ml) differed after the first and the third dose (79% and 90%, respectively (panti-HBs GMTs after booster vaccination were 10-fold larger than those before booster vaccination. We conclude that a single booster dose is generally adequate for infants of HBsAg-positive mothers, whereas a further booster dose should be given for non-responders.

  16. Engineering new mycobacterial vaccine design for HIV–TB pediatric vaccine vectored by lysine auxotroph of BCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saubi, Narcís; Gea-Mallorquí, Ester; Ferrer, Pau; Hurtado, Carmen; Sánchez-Úbeda, Sara; Eto, Yoshiki; Gatell, Josep M; Hanke, Tomáš; Joseph, Joan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have engineered a new mycobacterial vaccine design by using an antibiotic-free plasmid selection system. We assembled a novel Escherichia coli (E. coli)–mycobacterial shuttle plasmid p2auxo.HIVA, expressing the HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector employs an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism for plasmid selection and maintenance based on glycine complementation in E. coli and lysine complementation in mycobacteria. This plasmid was first transformed into glycine auxotroph of E. coli strain and subsequently transformed into lysine auxotroph of Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain to generate vaccine BCG.HIVA2auxo. We demonstrated that the episomal plasmid p2auxo.HIVA was stable in vivo over a 7-week period and genetically and phenotypically characterized the BCG.HIVA2auxo vaccine strain. The BCG.HIVA2auxo vaccine in combination with modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). HIVA was safe and induced HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific interferon-γ-producing T-cell responses in adult BALB/c mice. Polyfunctional HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, which produce interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α and express the degranulation marker CD107a, were induced. Thus, we engineered a novel, safer, good laboratory practice–compatible BCG-vectored vaccine using prototype immunogen HIVA. This antibiotic-free plasmid selection system based on “double” auxotrophic complementation might be a new mycobacterial vaccine platform to develop not only recombinant BCG-based vaccines expressing second generation of HIV-1 immunogens but also other major pediatric pathogens to prime protective response soon after birth. PMID:26015961

  17. Irradiation-attenuated anti-parasite vaccines in ruminants. Present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    The only commercially available irradiated anti-parasite vaccine is Dictol, the anti-Dictyocaulus viviparus vaccine, which is still being widely used in cattle 20 years after its introduction. Several other similar helminth vaccines which showed promise early in their development or use have now been abandoned for reasons both scientific and commercial. Nevertheless, there is still active interest in the development of irradiated vaccines for fascioliasis and schistosomiasis, as recent field trials have shown that irradiated metacercarial and schistosomular vaccines are effective against F. hepatica and S. bovis in cattle. There are no commercially available irradiated vaccines against protozoal diseases. Although experiments showed that irradiated vaccines were effective against Babesia bigemina and Theileria parva in cattle, interest in these has waned as other forms of live vaccines have been introduced. Vaccination against African trypanosomiasis remains an intractable problem, because of the multiplicity of naturally occurring antigenically distinct strains. (author)

  18. The effects of booster vaccination of hepatitis B vaccine on anti-HBV surface antigen negative children 11-15 years after primary vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Ren, Jingjing; Shen, Lingzhi; Chen, Yongdi; Liang, Xiaofeng; Cui, Fuqiang; Li, Qian; Jiang, Zhenggang; Wang, Fuzhen

    2011-10-01

    The twin aims of this study were to investigate the changes in anti-HBs IgG levels after booster vaccinations and to compare the effects of different vaccine doses in children aged 11-15 years who were both negative for HBsAg and had an Anti-HBs vaccination. Children who were born between 1993 and 1998 and who had completed their Hepatitis B vaccination program in infancy were randomly recruited to the study. The participants were divided into three groups according to their anti-HBs IgG levels: group I had a level vaccination program comprised three (20μg) doses of HepB (CHO) vaccine administered at zero, one and six months after they are join this program: anti-HBs levels were measured one month after the first and third vaccinations. Among 448 HBsAg-negative infants, anti-HBs seroconversion rates (defined as an anti-HBs >= 10 mIU/mL) after the first and third vaccinations were 85.5% and 98.6% respectively - these observed differences were statistically significant (χ2 [1dof] = 50.11, pnegative (anti-HBsanti-HBs titer levels decay to 10mIU/ml in 11-15 years of age children completed HepB Basic immunization, which need for booster immunization. The effect is better for those children with a relatively higher antibody titer before booster, and the effect of three doses booster is best.

  19. Contents of Japanese pro- and anti-HPV vaccination websites: A text mining analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuhara, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Hirono; Okada, Masahumi; Kato, Mio; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2018-03-01

    In Japan, the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rate has sharply fallen to nearly 0% due to sensational media reports of adverse events. Online anti-HPV-vaccination activists often warn readers of the vaccine's dangers. Here, we aimed to examine frequently appearing contents on pro- and anti-HPV vaccination websites. We conducted online searches via two major search engines (Google Japan and Yahoo! Japan). Targeted websites were classified as "pro," "anti," or "neutral" according to their claims, with the author(s) classified as "health professionals," "mass media," or "laypersons." We then conducted a text mining analysis. Of the 270 sites analyzed, 16 contents were identified. The most frequently appearing contents on pro websites were vaccine side effects, preventable effect of vaccination, and cause of cervical cancer. The most frequently appearing contents on anti websites were vaccine side effects, vaccine toxicity, and girls who suffer from vaccine side effects. Main disseminators of each content according to the author's expertise were also revealed. Pro-HPV vaccination websites should supplement deficient contents and respond to frequent contents on anti-HPV websites. Effective tactics are needed to better communicate susceptibility to cervical cancer, frequency of side effects, and responses to vaccine toxicity and conspiracy theories. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. New finding of an anti-TB compound in the genus Marsypopetalum (Annonaceae) from a traditional herbal remedy of Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkington, Bethany G; Sydara, Kongmany; Newsome, Andrew; Hwang, Chang Hwa; Lankin, David C; Simmler, Charlotte; Napolitano, José G; Ree, Richard; Graham, James G; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte; Bouamanivong, Somsanith; Souliya, Onevilay; Pauli, Guido F; Franzblau, Scott G; Soejarto, Djaja Djendoel

    2014-02-03

    There is widespread use of traditional herbal remedies in the Lao PDR (Laos). It is common practice to treat many diseases with local plants. This research project documented and analysed some of these traditional remedies used to treat symptoms of tuberculosis (TB). This research was executed by interviewing healers about plants used traditionally to treat the symptoms of TB. Samples of some of the plants were collected, and extracts of 77 species were submitted to various in vitro assays in order to determine the amount of growth inhibition of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (Mtb), as opposed to other microbes and mammalian Vero cells. Interviews took place with 58 contemporary healers in 5 different provinces about plants currently used, giving a list of 341 plants. Bioassay-guided fractionation was performed on Marsypopetalum modestum (Pierre) B. Xue and R.M.K. Saunders (Annonaceae), leading to the isolation of dipyrithione, an anti-mycobacterial compound isolated for the first time from the genus Marsypopetalum through this research. This research has helped to increase awareness of Laos' rich diversity of medicinal plants and will hopefully provide incentive to preserve the undeveloped forested areas that remain, which still hold a wealth of medical information for future discoveries. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Difference in TB10.4 T-cell epitope recognition following immunization with recombinant TB10.4, BCG or infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billeskov, Rolf; Grandal, Michael V; Poulsen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Most novel vaccines against infectious diseases are based on recombinant Ag; however, only few studies have compared Ag-specific immune responses induced by natural infection with that induced by the same Ag in a recombinant form. Here, we studied the epitope recognition pattern of the tuberculosis...... vaccine Ag, TB10.4, in a recombinant form, or when expressed by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), or by the current anti-tuberculosis vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis BCG. We showed that BCG and M.tb induced a similar CD4(+) T-cell specific TB10.4 epitope-pattern, which differed completely from...... that induced by recombinant TB10.4. This difference was not due to post-translational modifications of TB10.4 or because TB10.4 is secreted from BCG and M.tb as a complex with Rv0287. In addition, BCG and TB10.4/CAF01 were both taken up by DC and macrophages in vivo, and in vitro uptake experiments revealed...

  2. 'Fight TB with BCG': mass vaccination campaigns in the British Caribbean, 1951-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altink, Henrice

    2014-10-01

    Based on a wide range of primary materials, including WHO reports and Colonial Office correspondence, this article examines the UNICEF/WHO-funded mass BCG campaigns that were carried out in seven Caribbean colonies between 1951 and 1956. It explores the reasons behind them, their nature and aftermath and also compares them to those in other non-European countries and discusses them within a context of decolonisation. In doing so, it not only adds to the scholarship on TB in non-European contexts, which had tended to focus on Africa and Asia, but also to the relatively new field of Caribbean medical history and the rapidly expanding body of work on international health, which has paid scant attention to the Anglophone Caribbean and the pre-independence period.

  3. High-throughput profiling of anti-glycan humoral responses to SIV vaccination and challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T Campbell

    Full Text Available Recent progress toward an HIV vaccine highlights both the potential of vaccines to end the AIDS pandemic and the need to boost efficacy by incorporating additional vaccine strategies. Although many aspects of the immune response can contribute to vaccine efficacy, the key factors have not been defined fully yet. A particular area that may yield new insights is anti-glycan immune responses, such as those against the glycan shield that HIV uses to evade the immune system. In this study, we used glycan microarray technology to evaluate anti-glycan antibody responses induced by SIV vaccination and infection in a non-human primate model of HIV infection. This comprehensive profiling of circulating anti-glycan antibodies found changes in anti-glycan antibody levels after both vaccination with the Ad5hr-SIV vaccine and SIV infection. Notably, SIV infection produced generalized declines in anti-glycan IgM antibodies in a number of animals. Additionally, some infected animals generated antibodies to the Tn antigen, which is a cryptic tumor-associated antigen exposed by premature termination of O-linked glycans; however, the Ad5hr-SIV vaccine did not induce anti-Tn IgG antibodies. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential contributions that glycan microarrays can make for HIV vaccine development.

  4. [Anti-pneumococcal vaccine coverage for hospitalized risk patients: Assessment and suggestions for improvements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, C; Le Garlantezec, P; Lamand, V; Rasamijao, V; Rapp, C

    2016-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae can cause invasive infections. Incidence and severity are linked to patients' risk factors. Due to the resistance to leading antibiotics, the anti-pneumococcal vaccination has become a major public health issue. The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the anti-pneumococcal vaccine coverage in a population of adults with risk factors. This was a prospective study that included patients with at least one recommendation for pneumococcal vaccination as indicated by the Weekly Epidemiological Bulletin (BEH), to which three further US recommendations were added (diabetes, obesity and age>65years). One hundred and thirty-four patients with an average age of 70 years were included. The physician could only confirm 68 % of the patients' vaccination status. Vaccination coverage as recommended by the BEH board was 30 % (n=54). All HIV patients were vaccinated (n=2) and the vaccination coverage was 75 % (n=8) for patients treated for autoimmune diseases and only 10 % (n=20) for patients treated with chemotherapy. Patients with no vaccination didn't know the existence of the vaccine or didn't know that vaccination was recommended to them. This study has highlighted a deficit in pneumococcal vaccination coverage and a high level of ignorance of the existence of recommended vaccination. In addition to awareness campaign for patients and caregiver training, the expansion of the vaccine e-book utilization could improve the vaccination status. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Forced Parents’ Decision of Vaccination as a Psychological Ground for an Anti-Vaccination Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Chernaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The existence of anti-vaccination paradigms hampers the vaccination coverage of infants in required for the population immunity formation volume. One of the significant factors of parents' refusal of immunization is that pediatricians don't have evidence-based tactics of interaction with them during the decision-making on their child's vaccination.Objective: Our aim was to study the psychological component of taking voluntary informed consent to vaccination by parents of a child-patient.Methods: Using structured interviews and research methods of problem situations in mothers of children-patients under 1 year, the alternative solutions for vaccination when posing the question in the first and third person were studied.Results: The interview was conducted with 76 mothers, 317 responses in the first person and 252 responses in the third were received according to 10 scenarios of decisionmaking. The received responses that reflect the courses of action were grouped into seven generic alternatives. It was found that 5 of 7 alternatives («get vaccinated,» «refuse vaccination», «falsify vaccination», «just wait, to postpone the decision,» «wait and obtain further consultation» are rarely considered in the first person as compared to the responses in the third person (4 and 8%, p = 0.043, the alternative of «get medical contraindication» in the first person is considered more often, the frequency of the alternative of «wait and keep watch over the child» did not change.Conclusion: The real consent to immunization is mentally stimulated in a large part of the parents. The discrepancy between the relative frequency of the parents-selected alternatives in the first and the third person, as well as a wider range of alternatives considered by parents, in comparison with physicians, indicates the desire of parents to accept psychologically independent, not imposed by a medical professional decision.

  6. Assessing and responding in real time to online anti-vaccine sentiment during a flu pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Neil; Ing, Alton; Rizo, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The perceived safety of vaccination is an important explanatory factor for vaccine uptake and, consequently, for rates of illness and death. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate Canadian attitudes around the safety of the H1N1 vaccine during the fall 2009 influenza pandemic and (2) to consider how public health communications can leverage the Internet to counteract, in real time, anti-vaccine sentiment. We surveyed a random sample of 175,257 Canadian web users from October 27 to November 19, 2009, about their perceptions of the safety of the HINI vaccine. In an independent analysis, we also assessed the popularity of online flu vaccine-related information using a tool developed for this purpose. A total of 27,382 unique online participants answered the survey (15.6% response rate). Of the respondents, 23.4% considered the vaccine safe, 41.4% thought it was unsafe and 35.2% reported ambivalence over its safety. Websites and blog posts with anti-vaccine sentiment remained popular during the course of the pandemic. Current public health communication and education strategies about the flu vaccine can be complemented by web analytics that identify, track and neutralize anti-vaccine sentiment on the Internet, thus increasing perceived vaccine safety. Counter-marketing strategies can be transparent and collaborative, engaging online "influencers" who spread misinformation.

  7. Awareness and Practice of Complete Hepatitis B Vaccination and Anti-HBs Testing in Vaccinated Health Care Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna G. Sajjan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis B is a serious and common infectious disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Health Care Workers (HCW are at an increased risk of occupational exposure to HBV and the incidence is 2-4 times higher than in the general population. Despite potential risks, awareness and vaccine compliance is poor among the HCWs. Aim: To assess the awareness of complete Hepatitis B vaccination, anti-HBs testing & protective titres and determine the anti HBs titres amongst vaccinated HCWs. Material & Methods: A total of 500 Health care workers of both sexes in the age group from 20- 60 years vaccinated against Hepatitis B were tested for anti-HBs titres by quantitative ELISA. Results: The rate of complete immunization was 81.4% in doctors, 63.3% in nursing staff and 90% in the technical staff. Amongst the 500 participants, 70.8% had received all the doses and 29.2% incomplete doses of the vaccine. Titres of ≥ 10 mIU/ml were demonstrated in 84.4% of HCWs who received all the doses and in 65.7% those who defaulted. Conclusions: The results of the study indicate lack of awareness about complete HB vaccination and the importance of post vaccination testing in HCWs.

  8. Quantitative assessment of the impact of partially protective anti-schistosomiasis vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsallaq, Ramzi A; Gurarie, David; Ndeffo Mbah, Martial; Galvani, Alison; King, Charles

    2017-04-01

    Mass drug administration (MDA) of praziquantel has been the intervention of choice against schistosomiasis but with limited success in interrupting the transmission. The development of anti-Schistosoma vaccines is underway. Our objective is to quantify the population-level impact of anti-Schistosoma vaccines when administered alone and in combination with mass drug administration (MDA) and determine factors in vaccine design and public health implementation that optimize vaccination role in schistosomiasis control and elimination. We developed a deterministic compartmental model simulation of schistosomiasis transmission in a high-risk Kenyan community, including stratification by age, parasite burden, and vaccination status. The modeled schistosomiasis vaccines differed in terms of vaccine duration of protection (durability) and three biological efficacies. These are vaccine susceptibility effect (SE) of reducing person's susceptibility to Schistosoma acquisition, vaccine mortality effect (ME) of reducing established worm burden and vaccine fecundity effect (FE) of reducing egg release by mature worms. We quantified the population-level impact of vaccination over two decades under diverse vaccination schemes (childhood vs. mass campaigns), with different age-targeting scenarios, different risk settings, and with combined intervention with MDA. We also assessed the sensitivity of our predictions to uncertainties in model parameters. Over two decades, our base case vaccine with 80% SE, FE, and ME efficacies, 10 years' durability, provided by mass vaccination every 10 years, reduced host prevalence, mean intensity, incidence, and patent snail prevalence to 31%, 20 eggs/10-ml sample/person, 0.87 worm/person-year, and 0.74%, from endemic-state values of 71%, 152, 3.3, and 0.98%, respectively. Lower impact was found when coverage did not encompass all potential contaminators, and childhood-only vaccination schemes showed delayed and lower impact. In lower prevalence

  9. Profile of tuberculosis and its response to anti-TB drugs among tuberculosis patients treated under the TB control programme at Felege-Hiwot Referral Hospital, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes Zenebe

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB is a global concern for both developing and developed countries. Currently it becomes more complex due to increasing levels of drug resistance and HIV co-infection. Delayed diagnosis and high case load are major factors contributing to continued transmission and failure to the treatment outcome. The study was conducted to determine the profile and treatment outcomes of TB patients at Felege-Hiwot Referral Hospital. Methods We analyzed the records of 1761 TB patients registered for treatment in Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital from July 2010 to June 2015. Data on patients’ socio-demographic characteristics, type of TB, HIV status and treatment outcome were analysed. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression models were used to present data. The odds ratio and the 95 % confidence intervals were calculated. A p-value of < 0.05 was considered statistical significant. Results The proportion of smear positive, smear-negative and extra-pulmonary TB were 205 (11.6 %, 548 (31.1 % and 1008 (57.2 %, respectively. The overall treatment success rate accounts 542(80.8 % with unsuccessful treatment of 129(19.2 %. The treatment outcome varied by the years from 68.9 to 97.4 %. Among tuberculosis patients, 459(26.1 % of them were HIV positive. Being HIV positive (AOR = 4.29, 95 % CI, 2.20–8.37 P = 0.001, retreatment (AOR = 5.32, 95 % CI, 1.92–14.3, P = 0.001, rural residency (AOR = 18.0, 95 % CI, 9.06–37.82, P = 0.001 and the age group of 15–24 years (AOR = 2.91, 95%CI, 1.00–8.45, P = 0.04 showed statistical significant association for poor treatment outcome. Conclusions In the studied region, the overall treatment success rate was still below the WHO target of success rate, 85 %. However, the trend of treatment success rate showed a promising increment. Patients at high risk of unsuccessful treatment outcome should be identified early and given additional

  10. Tuberculosis-specific CD8 cells in HLA A*02-positive TB- and LTBI patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløe, Andreas; Brix, Liselotte; Wejse, Christian

    Background: Understanding the CD8+ response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) may be a key to improved TB diagnostics and vaccine development. Aims and Objectives: To detect a CD8+ T-cell response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in active tuberculosis (TB) and latent TB (LTBI...... candidates, from which we constructed MHC multimers (Dextramers). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 7 TB-patients, 16 LTBI patients and 8 MTB-exposed, IGRA-negative, healthy subjects (HE), all HLA A*02 positive, were stained with the Dextramers and with anti-CD8 and anti-CD3, and analyzed...... on a flow cytometer. The MTB epitopes were analyzed in 5 pools (3-7 epitopes each). Positive responses included >0.001 % of CD8+, CD3+ cells, supported by inspection of flow cytometry plots. Results: MTB-specific CD8+ T-cells were detected more often in TB patients (57%) than in LTBI patients (41...

  11. Taking a Stab at Cancer; Oncolytic Virus-Mediated Anti-Cancer Vaccination Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Sadie Aitken

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines have classically been used for disease prevention. Modern clinical vaccines are continuously being developed for both traditional use as well as for new applications. Typically thought of in terms of infectious disease control, vaccination approaches can alternatively be adapted as a cancer therapy. Vaccines targeting cancer antigens can be used to induce anti-tumour immunity and have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy both pre-clinically and clinically. Various approaches now exist and further establish the tremendous potential and adaptability of anti-cancer vaccination. Classical strategies include ex vivo-loaded immune cells, RNA- or DNA-based vaccines and tumour cell lysates. Recent oncolytic virus development has resulted in a surge of novel viruses engineered to induce powerful tumour-specific immune responses. In addition to their use as cancer vaccines, oncolytic viruses have the added benefit of being directly cytolytic to cancer cells and thus promote antigen recognition within a highly immune-stimulating tumour microenvironment. While oncolytic viruses are perfectly equipped for efficient immunization, this complicates their use upon previous exposure. Indeed, the host’s anti-viral counter-attacks often impair multiple-dosing regimens. In this review we will focus on the use of oncolytic viruses for anti-tumour vaccination. We will explore different strategies as well as ways to circumvent some of their limitations.

  12. [Vaccination against hepatitis B on the Ivory Coast: study of the anti-HBs response in healthy adult subjects carrying only anti-HBc antibodies before vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, S A; Meite, M; Aron, Y

    1986-01-01

    A total of 103 volunteers, from 18 to 55 years of age, have received the hevac B Pasteur 5 micrograms vaccine subcutane on sly; one injection a month during three months and one booster injection after one year. The study of the anti-HBs reaction of the subjects, with regard to the serological status to the hepatite B virus before inoculation, has shown that only 78.8% of the subjects, who are only positive towards the anti-HBc antibody, will develop an anti-HBs response of primary type with a relatively low value. In contrast, all anti-HBc and/or anti-HBs subjects, who are positive before inoculation, react with relatively high anti-HBs values right after the first injection, of the seronegative subjects before inoculation. 93.3% will develop an anti-HBs seroconversion after the complete inoculation procedure.

  13. TB Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies Consortium Research Projects Publications TB Trials Consortium Study Descriptions Background Behavioral & Social Science Research Infection Control TB in Specific Populations African-American Community Stop TB in the African-American ...

  14. Geographic and demographic correlates of autism-related anti-vaccine beliefs on Twitter, 2009-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomeny, Theodore S; Vargo, Christopher J; El-Toukhy, Sherine

    2017-10-01

    This study examines temporal trends, geographic distribution, and demographic correlates of anti-vaccine beliefs on Twitter, 2009-2015. A total of 549,972 tweets were downloaded and coded for the presence of anti-vaccine beliefs through a machine learning algorithm. Tweets with self-disclosed geographic information were resolved and United States Census data were collected for corresponding areas at the micropolitan/metropolitan level. Trends in number of anti-vaccine tweets were examined at the national and state levels over time. A least absolute shrinkage and selection operator regression model was used to determine census variables that were correlated with anti-vaccination tweet volume. Fifty percent of our sample of 549,972 tweets collected between 2009 and 2015 contained anti-vaccine beliefs. Anti-vaccine tweet volume increased after vaccine-related news coverage. California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania had anti-vaccination tweet volume that deviated from the national average. Demographic characteristics explained 67% of variance in geographic clustering of anti-vaccine tweets, which were associated with a larger population and higher concentrations of women who recently gave birth, households with high income levels, men aged 40 to 44, and men with minimal college education. Monitoring anti-vaccination beliefs on Twitter can uncover vaccine-related concerns and misconceptions, serve as an indicator of shifts in public opinion, and equip pediatricians to refute anti-vaccine arguments. Real-time interventions are needed to counter anti-vaccination beliefs online. Identifying clusters of anti-vaccination beliefs can help public health professionals disseminate targeted/tailored interventions to geographic locations and demographic sectors of the population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CD4 and CD8 T cell responses to the M. tuberculosis Ag85B-TB10.4 promoted by adjuvanted subunit, adenovector or heterologous prime boost vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvang, Tara; Christensen, Jan P; Billeskov, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    and CD8 T cells. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To compare CD4 and CD8 responses against Ag85B-TB10.4 (H4), H4 was delivered as a subunit vaccine in cationic liposomes (CAF01), expressed in Ad5 (Ad-H4) or as a heterologous prime boost vaccination. H4/CAF01 induced primarily CD4 T cells and Ad-H4 gave......BACKGROUND: Although CD4 T cells are crucial for defense against M.tb, it is still not clear whether the optimal response against M.tb in fact involves both CD4 and CD8 T cells. To test this, we used a new vaccine strategy that generated a strong balanced T cell response consisting of both CD4...... on the priming of CD4 and CD8 cells and in terms of the protective capacity of the vaccine, and therefore represent an interesting new vaccine strategy against M.tb. However, CD4 and CD8 T cells respond very differently to live M.tb challenge, in a manner which supports the consensus that CD4 T cells do play...

  16. Bilateral neuro-retinitis following chick embryo cell anti-rabies vaccination – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai Harminder

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Optic nerve is rarely involved after sheep brain anti-rabies vaccination in the form of retrobulbar neuritis or papillitis. Bilateral neuroretinitis after chick embryo cell antirabies vaccination has not been reported. Case presentation We report the case of a 56 year old male who developed bilateral neuro-retinitis following three injections of antirabies vaccine prepared from the chick embryo. Conclusion The chick embryo cell antirabies vaccine can cause bilateral neuroretinits which has not been reported previously.

  17. Anti-Infectious Human Vaccination in Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, Enrico; Salemi, Simonetta; D'Amelio, Raffaele

    2016-05-03

    A brief history of vaccination is presented since the Jenner's observation, through the first golden age of vaccinology (from Pasteur's era to 1938), the second golden age (from 1940 to 1970), until the current period. In the first golden age, live, such as Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), and yellow fever, inactivated, such as typhoid, cholera, plague, and influenza, and subunit vaccines, such as tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, have been developed. In the second golden age, the cell culture technology enabled polio, measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines be developed. In the era of modern vaccines, in addition to the conjugate polysaccharide, hepatitis A, oral typhoid, and varicella vaccines, the advent of molecular biology enabled to develop hepatitis B, acellular pertussis, papillomavirus, and rotavirus recombinant vaccines. Great successes have been achieved in the fight against infectious diseases, including the smallpox global eradication, the nearly disappearance of polio, the control of tetanus, diphtheria, measles, rubella, yellow fever, and rabies. However, much work should still be done for improving old vaccines, such as BCG, anthrax, smallpox, plague, or for developing effective vaccines against old or emerging infectious threats, such as human-immunodeficiency-virus, malaria, hepatitis C, dengue, respiratory-syncytial-virus, cytomegalovirus, multiresistant bacteria, Clostridium difficile, Ebola virus. In addition to search for innovative and effective vaccines and global infant coverage, even risk categories should adequately be protected. Despite patients under immunosuppressive therapy are globally increasing, their vaccine coverage is lower than recommended, even in developed and affluent countries.

  18. The anti-vaccination movement and resistance to allergen-immunotherapy: a guide for clinical allergists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrmann Jason

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite over a century of clinical use and a well-documented record of efficacy and safety, a growing minority in society questions the validity of vaccination and fear that this common public health intervention is the root-cause of severe health problems. This article questions whether growing public anti-vaccine sentiments might have the potential to spill-over into other therapies distinct from vaccination, namely allergen-immunotherapy. Allergen-immunotherapy shares certain medical vernacular with vaccination (e.g., allergy shots, allergy vaccines, and thus may become "guilty by association" due to these similarities. Indeed, this article demonstrates that anti-vaccine websites have begun unduly discrediting this allergy treatment regimen. Following an explanation of the anti-vaccine movement, the article aims to provide guidance on how clinicians can respond to patient fears towards allergen-immunotherapy in the clinical setting. This guide focuses on the provision of reliable information to patients in order to dispel misconceived associations between vaccination and allergen-immunotherapy, and the discussion of the risks and benefits of both therapies in order to assist patients in making autonomous decisions about their choice of allergy treatment.

  19. Applying the Concept of Peptide Uniqueness to Anti-Polio Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduc, Darja; Fasano, Candida; Capone, Giovanni; Pesce Delfino, Antonella; Calabrò, Michele; Polimeno, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Although rare, adverse events may associate with anti-poliovirus vaccination thus possibly hampering global polio eradication worldwide. To design peptide-based anti-polio vaccines exempt from potential cross-reactivity risks and possibly able to reduce rare potential adverse events such as the postvaccine paralytic poliomyelitis due to the tendency of the poliovirus genome to mutate. Proteins from poliovirus type 1, strain Mahoney, were analyzed for amino acid sequence identity to the human proteome at the pentapeptide level, searching for sequences that (1) have zero percent of identity to human proteins, (2) are potentially endowed with an immunologic potential, and (3) are highly conserved among poliovirus strains. Sequence analyses produced a set of consensus epitopic peptides potentially able to generate specific anti-polio immune responses exempt from cross-reactivity with the human host. Peptide sequences unique to poliovirus proteins and conserved among polio strains might help formulate a specific and universal anti-polio vaccine able to react with multiple viral strains and exempt from the burden of possible cross-reactions with human proteins. As an additional advantage, using a peptide-based vaccine instead of current anti-polio DNA vaccines would eliminate the rare post-polio poliomyelitis cases and other disabling symptoms that may appear following vaccination.

  20. Applying the Concept of Peptide Uniqueness to Anti-Polio Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Kanduc

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although rare, adverse events may associate with anti-poliovirus vaccination thus possibly hampering global polio eradication worldwide. Objective. To design peptide-based anti-polio vaccines exempt from potential cross-reactivity risks and possibly able to reduce rare potential adverse events such as the postvaccine paralytic poliomyelitis due to the tendency of the poliovirus genome to mutate. Methods. Proteins from poliovirus type 1, strain Mahoney, were analyzed for amino acid sequence identity to the human proteome at the pentapeptide level, searching for sequences that (1 have zero percent of identity to human proteins, (2 are potentially endowed with an immunologic potential, and (3 are highly conserved among poliovirus strains. Results. Sequence analyses produced a set of consensus epitopic peptides potentially able to generate specific anti-polio immune responses exempt from cross-reactivity with the human host. Conclusion. Peptide sequences unique to poliovirus proteins and conserved among polio strains might help formulate a specific and universal anti-polio vaccine able to react with multiple viral strains and exempt from the burden of possible cross-reactions with human proteins. As an additional advantage, using a peptide-based vaccine instead of current anti-polio DNA vaccines would eliminate the rare post-polio poliomyelitis cases and other disabling symptoms that may appear following vaccination.

  1. Anti-ganglioside anti-idiotypic vaccination: more than molecular mimicry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María eHernández

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are standard modalities for cancer treatment, but the effectiveness of these treatments has reached a plateau. Thus, other strategies are being explored to combine with the current treatment paradigms in order to reach better clinical results. One of these approaches is the active immunotherapy based on the induction of anti-tumor responses by anti-idiotypic vaccination. This approach arose from Jerne’s idiotypic network theory, which postulates that B lymphocytes forms a functional network, with a role in the establishment of the immune repertoires, in the regulation of natural antibody production and even in the establishment of natural tolerance. Due to the large potential diversity of the immunoglobulin variable regions, the idiotypes repertoire can mimic the universe of self and foreign epitopes, even those of non-protein nature, like gangliosides. Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids that have been considered attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy, based on the qualitative and quantitative changes they suffer during malignant transformation and due to their importance for tumor biology. Although any idiotype could be able to mimic any antigen, only those related to antigens involved in functions relevant for organism homeostasis, and that in consequence has been fixed by evolution, would be able not only to mimic, but also to activate the idiotypic cascades related with the nominal antigen. The present review updates the results, failures and hopes, obtained with ganglioside mimicking anti-idiotypic antibodies and presents evidences of the existence of a natural response against gangliosides, suggesting that these glycolipids could be idiotypically relevant antigens.

  2. Anti-ganglioside anti-idiotypic vaccination: more than molecular mimicry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vázquez, Ana M. H.; Rodrèguez-Zhurbenko, Nely; López, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are standard modalities for cancer treatment, but the effectiveness of these treatments has reached a plateau. Thus, other strategies are being explored to combine with the current treatment paradigms in order to reach better clinical results. One of these approaches is the active immunotherapy based on the induction of anti-tumor responses by anti-idiotypic vaccination. This approach arose from Jerne’s idiotypic network theory, which postulates that B lymphocytes forms a functional network, with a role in the establishment of the immune repertoires, in the regulation of natural antibody production and even in the establishment of natural tolerance. Due to the large potential diversity of the immunoglobulin variable regions, the idiotypes repertoire can mimic the universe of self and foreign epitopes, even those of non-protein nature, like gangliosides. Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids that have been considered attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy, based on the qualitative and quantitative changes they suffer during malignant transformation and due to their importance for tumor biology. Although any idiotype could be able to mimic any antigen, only those related to antigens involved in functions relevant for organism homeostasis, and that in consequence has been fixed by evolution, would be able not only to mimic, but also to activate the idiotypic cascades related with the nominal antigen. The present review updates the results, failures and hopes, obtained with ganglioside mimicking anti-idiotypic antibodies and presents evidences of the existence of a natural response against gangliosides, suggesting that these glycolipids could be idiotypically relevant antigens.

  3. A readability comparison of anti- versus pro-influenza vaccination online messages in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuhara, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Hirono; Okada, Masahumi; Kato, Mio; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2017-06-01

    Historically, anti-vaccination sentiment has existed in many populations. Mass media plays a large role in disseminating and sensationalizing vaccine objections, especially via the medium of the Internet. Based on studies of processing fluency, we assumed that anti-influenza vaccination online messages to be more readable and more fluently processed than pro-influenza vaccination online messages, which may consequently sway the opinions of some audiences. The aim of this study was to compare readability of anti- and pro-influenza vaccination online messages in Japan using a measure of readability. Web searches were conducted at the end of August 2016 using two major Japanese search engines (Google.jp and Yahoo!.jp). The included websites were classified as "anti", "pro", or "both" depending on the claims, and "health professional" or "non-health professional" depending on the writers' expertise. Readability was determined using a validated measure of Japanese readability (the Japanese sentence difficulty discrimination system). Readability of "health professional" websites was compared with that of "non-health professional" websites, and readability of "anti" websites was compared with that of "pro" websites, using the t -test. From a total of 145 websites, the online messages written by non-health professionals were significantly easier to read than those written by health professionals ( p  = 0.002, Cohen's d  = 0.54). Anti-influenza vaccination messages were significantly easier to read than pro-influenza vaccination messages ( p  vaccination materials for publication online, we recommend they check for readability using readability assessment tools and improve the text for easy reading if necessary.

  4. TB incidence in an adolescent cohort in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahomed, Hassan; Ehrlich, Rodney; Hawkridge, Tony; Hatherill, Mark; Geiter, Lawrence; Kafaar, Fazlin; Abrahams, Deborah Ann; Mulenga, Humphrey; Tameris, Michele; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Hanekom, Willem Albert; Verver, Suzanne; Hussey, Gregory Dudley

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem globally. Little is known about TB incidence in adolescents who are a proposed target group for new TB vaccines. We conducted a study to determine the TB incidence rates and risk factors for TB disease in a cohort of school-going adolescents in a

  5. Two doses of candidate TB vaccine MVA85A in antiretroviral therapy (ART naïve subjects gives comparable immunogenicity to one dose in ART+ subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandakha N Dieye

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a global public health problem exacerbated by the HIV epidemic. Here we evaluate a candidate TB vaccine, MVA85A, in a Phase I study in HIV-infected adults in Senegal. 24 patients were enrolled: Group 1∶12, antiretroviral therapy (ART naïve, adults, with CD4 counts >300 and HIV RNA load 300, and an undetectable HIV RNA load. Safety was evaluated by occurrence of local and systemic adverse events (AEs and by monitoring of CD4 count, HIV RNA load, haematology and biochemistry. Immunogenicity was evaluated by ex-vivo interferon-gamma ELISpot assay. 87.7% of AEs were mild; 11.6% were moderate; and 0.7% were severe. 29.2% of AEs were systemic; 70.8% were expected local AEs. There were no vaccine-related Serious Adverse Events (SAEs or clinically significant effects on HIV RNA load or CD4 count. In ART naive subjects, the first MVA85A immunisation induced a significant immune response at 1 and 4 weeks post-immunisation, which contracted to baseline by 12 weeks. Durability of immunogenicity in subjects on ART persisted out to 24 weeks post-vaccination. A second dose of MVA85A at 12 months enhanced immunogenicity in ART naïve subjects. Subjects on ART had higher responses after the first vaccination compared with ART naïve subjects; responses were comparable after 2 immunisations. In conclusion, MVA85A is well-tolerated and immunogenic in HIV-infected subjects in Senegal. A two dose regimen in ART naïve subjects is comparable in immunogenicity to a single dose in subjects on ART. Clinicaltrials.gov trial identifier NCT00731471.

  6. Patients with humoral primary immunodeficiency do not develop protective anti-influenza antibody titers after vaccination with trivalent subunit influenza vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Assen, Sander; Holvast, Albert; Telgt, Denise S.C.; Benne, Cornelis A.; de Haan, Aalzen; Westra, Johanna; Kallenberg, Cornelis; Bijl, Marc

    Yearly influenza vaccination is recommended for patients with humoral primary immunodeficiency (hPID). However, humoral responses following vaccination can be expected to be reduced in these patients.The efficacy of influenza vaccination in patients with hPID, anti-influenza antibody responses was

  7. Evaluation of anti-measles and anti-mumps vaccination coverage in a cohort of youth in South-Centre of Sicily, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lo Magno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined a cohort of young people from South Centre Sicily, Italy, in order to evaluate anti-measles anti-mumps vaccination coverage. It is shown that, in proportion, an antibody protection against mumps is greater than an antibody protection against measles and also it causes acute episodes in some subjects vaccinated.

  8. Predicting response to HBV vaccination in people with positive anti-HBc but negative HBsAg and anti-HBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Ali; Keshvari, Maryam; Kashani, Amir Hossein Faghihi; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed

    2008-01-01

    There are 5.1-6.5% of people with positive anti-HBc in Iran. The aim of this study was to assess the predicting factors of response to hepatitis B vaccination in anti-HBc positive subjects. Total response rate to vaccination was 79.8% (75 cases) and 67.9% (38 cases) in cases and controls, respectively. Nineteen persons (20.2%) in cases and 18 persons (32.1%) of controls had negative anti-HBs even after three doses of HB vaccination. Factor associated with decreased response to vaccination was prior history of being HBsAg positive (OR = 1.3, p = 0.01). In a quasi-experimental study, 94 people with negative HBsAg, negative anti-HBs and positive anti-HBc (cases) and 56 persons with negative HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HBc (controls) were vaccinated at zero, one and six months with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine. Successful immunization was defined by anti-HBs antibody titer > or =10 mIU/mL. The rate of response to hepatitis B vaccination is nearly like other studies but somewhat different. Higher percent of married cases together with higher percent of positive HBsAg in spouses may explain the slight difference in the response to vaccination in cases in comparison with controls as a result of booster like effect that seldom happens because of recurrent contacts between the subjects and the HBsAg positive spouses spontaneously.

  9. Predictive factors for anti-HBs status after 1 booster dose of hepatitis B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, I-Cheng; Jean, Mei-Chu Yen; Lin, Chi-Wei; Chen, Wei-Hung; Perng, Daw-Shyong; Lin, Chih-Wen; Chuang, Hung-Yi

    2016-09-01

    In Taiwan, infants need to receive 3 doses of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine under the public health policy from the government. However, there are many young adults who even though received complete HBV vaccination in their childhood would lose the positive response of anti-hepatitis B surface antibody (HBs) and need the booster dose of HBV vaccine. The aim of our study is to determine the powerful predictive factor for screening the candidates who need only 1 booster dose of HB vaccine then they can regain positive postbooster anti-HBs status (≧10 mIU/mL) or protective postbooster anti-HBs status (≧100 mIU/mL).We recruited 103 university freshmen who were born after July 1986 with complete HBV vaccination in childhood, but displayed negative results for hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-HBs levels at their health examinations upon university entry. They received 1 booster dose of HB vaccine, and their anti-HBs titers were rechecked 4 weeks after the booster administration. Multivariate analysis logistic regression for positive postbooster anti-HBs status (≧10 mIU/mL, model 1) and protective postbooster anti-HBs status (≧100 mIU/mL, model 2) was done with predictive factors of prebooster anti-HBs level, body mass index, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase level, and sex.Twenty-four students got positive postbooster anti-HBs status (10-100 mIU/mL) and 50 students got protective postbooster anti-HBs status (≧100 mIU/mL). In the model of multivariate analysis logistic regression for positive postbooster anti-HBs status (≧10 mIU/mL), prebooster anti-HBs level was the strongest predictive factor. The odds ratio was 218.645 and the P value was 0.001. Even in the model of multivariate analysis logistic regression for protective postbooster anti-HBs status (≧100 mIU/mL), prebooster anti-HBs level was still the strongest predictive factor, but the odds ratio of a protective booster effect was 2.143, with 95% confidence interval between 1

  10. Autoimmune reaction after anti-tetanus vaccination-description of four cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhrman-Shahar, N; Torres-Ruiz, J; Rotman-Pikielny, P; Levy, Y

    2017-02-01

    Autoimmune reaction after vaccination is sporadically reported in the medical literature. Vaccinations are generally safe and have an important role in eradicating endemic diseases worldwide. Nevertheless, the question arises as to whether there is a possibility of post-vaccination autoimmune phenomena. The anti-tetanus vaccine is being used since 1924, and it is part of the recommended immunization schedules for children. There are few reports of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and anti-phospholipid syndrome after anti-tetanus vaccination. Herein, we describe four cases, of which we believe, show a clear temporal relation between anti-tetanus vaccination and the appearance of dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus and anti-phospholipid syndrome. We also suggest some of the pathogenic mechanisms that promote a pathogenic autoimmune response.

  11. [Anti-hepatitis B vaccination: after the health authorities' decision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, P; Micallef, J; Barrau, K; Manuel, C; Auquier, P

    1999-10-16

    In 1991, the WHO proposed that the antihepatitis B vaccine be included in national vaccination programs. In France, it was decided in 1994 to move on from a selective immunization scheme aimed at high-risk subjects to a general vaccination policy aimed first at adolescents in school and secondly infants. During this period, several cases of demyelinizing diseases after vaccination led to court actions and were magnified in the popular press, interfering with this new vaccination policy. On October 1, 1988, the French Secretary of Health decided to interrupt the school vaccination programs. This decision, taken as a precautionary measure, had some unexpected consequences. As had been feared by the WHO, there was an overall drop in the public's confidence in the vaccine. Health care professionals highly criticized the spectacular nature of the decision and the absence of scientific argumentation. These events lead us to raise a certain number of questions concerning the use of the public press in the management of health information, the notion of medical responsibility, and the rationality of political decisions in public health.

  12. A comparison of language use in pro- and anti-vaccination comments in response to a high profile Facebook post.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faasse, Kate; Chatman, Casey J; Martin, Leslie R

    2016-11-11

    Vaccinations are important for controlling the spread of disease, yet an increasing number of people are distrustful of vaccines, and choose not to (fully) vaccinate themselves and their children. One proposed contributor to this distrust is anti-vaccination misinformation available on the internet, where people search for and discuss health information. The language people use in these discussions can provide insights into views about vaccination. Following a prominent Facebook post about childhood vaccination, language used by participants in a comment thread was analysed using LIWC (Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count). Percentage of words used across a number of categories was compared between pro-vaccination, anti-vaccination, and unrelated (control) comments. Both pro- and anti-vaccination comments used more risk-related and causation words, as well as fewer positive emotion words compared to control comments. Anti-vaccine comments were typified by greater analytical thinking, lower authenticity, more body and health references, and a higher percentage of work-related word use in comparison to pro-vaccine comments, plus more money references than control comments. In contrast, pro-vaccination comments were more authentic, somewhat more tentative, and evidenced higher anxiety words, as well as more references to family and social processes when compared to anti-vaccination comments. Although the anti-vaccination stance is not scientifically-based, comments showed evidence of greater analytical thinking, and more references to health and the body. In contrast, pro-vaccination comments demonstrated greater comparative anxiety, with a particular focus on family and social processes. These results may be indicative of the relative salience of these issues and emotions in differing understandings of the benefits and risks of vaccination. Text-based analysis is a potentially useful and ecologically valid tool for assessing perceptions of health issues, and may provide

  13. Une plateforme pour la mise au point d'un vaccin anti-adénovirus ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Une plateforme pour la mise au point d'un vaccin anti-adénovirus non réplicatif contre les maladies aviaires. 09 avril 2018. Fonds d'innovation en vaccins pour le bétail. Photo: Sven Torfinn/Panos Pictures. La volaille constitue un élevage essentiel en Afrique subsaharienne, surtout pour la sécurité alimentaire et ...

  14. Autologous iPSC-Based Vaccines Elicit Anti-tumor Responses In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooreman, Nigel G; Kim, Youngkyun; de Almeida, Patricia E; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Diecke, Sebastian; Shao, Ning-Yi; Wei, Tzu-Tang; Yi, Hyoju; Dey, Devaveena; Nelakanti, Raman; Brouwer, Thomas P; Paik, David T; Sagiv-Barfi, Idit; Han, Arnold; Quax, Paul H A; Hamming, Jaap F; Levy, Ronald; Davis, Mark M; Wu, Joseph C

    2018-02-08

    Cancer cells and embryonic tissues share a number of cellular and molecular properties, suggesting that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may be harnessed to elicit anti-tumor responses in cancer vaccines. RNA sequencing revealed that human and murine iPSCs express tumor-associated antigens, and we show here a proof of principle for using irradiated iPSCs in autologous anti-tumor vaccines. In a prophylactic setting, iPSC vaccines prevent tumor growth in syngeneic murine breast cancer, mesothelioma, and melanoma models. As an adjuvant, the iPSC vaccine inhibited melanoma recurrence at the resection site and reduced metastatic tumor load, which was associated with fewer Th17 cells and increased CD11b + GR1 hi myeloid cells. Adoptive transfer of T cells isolated from vaccine-treated tumor-bearing mice inhibited tumor growth in unvaccinated recipients, indicating that the iPSC vaccine promotes an antigen-specific anti-tumor T cell response. Our data suggest an easy, generalizable strategy for multiple types of cancer that could prove highly valuable in clinical immunotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A postmodern Pandora's box: anti-vaccination misinformation on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kata, Anna

    2010-02-17

    The Internet plays a large role in disseminating anti-vaccination information. This paper builds upon previous research by analyzing the arguments proffered on anti-vaccination websites, determining the extent of misinformation present, and examining discourses used to support vaccine objections. Arguments around the themes of safety and effectiveness, alternative medicine, civil liberties, conspiracy theories, and morality were found on the majority of websites analyzed; misinformation was also prevalent. The most commonly proposed method of combating this misinformation is through better education, although this has proven ineffective. Education does not consider the discourses supporting vaccine rejection, such as those involving alternative explanatory models of health, interpretations of parental responsibility, and distrust of expertise. Anti-vaccination protestors make postmodern arguments that reject biomedical and scientific "facts" in favour of their own interpretations. Pro-vaccination advocates who focus on correcting misinformation reduce the controversy to merely an "educational" problem; rather, these postmodern discourses must be acknowledged in order to begin a dialogue. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effects of booster vaccination on combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine in both anti-HBs and anti-HAV negative children 5-15 years after hepatitis B vaccine primary immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongdi; Gu, Hua; Cheng, Suyun; Shen, Lingzhi; Cui, Fujiang; Wang, Fuzhen; Yao, Jun; Xia, Shichang; Lv, Huakun; Liang, Xiaofeng

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the changes in both anti-HAV lgG and anti-HBs lgG levels and compared the antibody seroconversion rates of different doses of combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine in children. Children who were vaccinated as infants with Hepatitis B vaccine were revaccinated at 5-15 y of age, then the antibody titers were monitored. Among 283 children, this study found that the anti-HAV seroconversion rates (defined as anti-HAV ≥ 1 mIU/ml) after the first and the third dose were 79.9% and 100% respectively; these observed differences were statistically significant (Panti-HBs seroconversion rates (defined as an anti-HBs ≥ 10 mIU/ml) were 82.3% and 99.0% respectively; these observed differences were statistically significant (Panti-HAV seroconversion rate was statistically significant in children aged 5-9 y and 10-15 y (Panti-HBs seroconversion, whereas after the third dose the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). This study demonstrated that the immunization effects of booster vaccination with combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine is successful for children. A single booster dose is adequate for younger children, while three doses are needed for older children.

  17. Resister's logic: the anti-vaccination arguments of Alfred Russel Wallace and their role in the debates over compulsory vaccination in England, 1870-1907.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichman, Martin; Keelan, Jennifer E

    2007-09-01

    In the 1880s, Alfred Russel Wallace, the celebrated co-discoverer of natural selection, launched himself into the centre of a politicised and polarised debate over the unpopular compulsory vaccination laws in England. Wallace never wavered in his belief that smallpox vaccination was useless and likely dangerous. Six years before his death, the anti-vaccinationists successfully secured a conscience clause that effectively dismantled the compulsory vaccination laws. Several other important Victorian scientists joined Wallace in the fight to repeal compulsory vaccination arguing that widely held views on the effectiveness of vaccination and evidence for immunity were inconclusive in the light of (then) contemporary standards of evidence. This article situates Wallace's anti-vaccination logic within the broader matrix of sociopolitical and cultural reform movements of the late Victorian era. Additionally it provides the first detailed analysis of his critique of vaccination science, in particular the role statistics played in his arguments. In this period, both pro-vaccinationists and anti-vaccinationists invested great efforts in collating and analysing statistical data sets that either supported or refuted the claims of vaccination's effectiveness. While each side presented 'controlled' case studies to support their assertions, without an unambiguous test to measure or demonstrate vaccination's effectiveness, the anti-vaccinationists continued to mount credible statistical critiques of vaccination science.

  18. Anti-Lyme Subunit Vaccines: Design and Development of Peptide-Based Vaccine Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Christina M; Mwangi, Waithaka; Esteve-Gassent, Maria D

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinology today has been presented with several avenues to improve protection against infectious disease. The recent employment of the reverse vaccinology technique has changed the face of vaccine development against many pathogens, including Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. Using this technique, genomics and in silico analyses come together to identify potentially antigenic epitopes in a high-throughput fashion. The forward methodology of vaccine development was used previously to generate the only licensed human vaccine for Lyme disease, which is no longer on the market. Using reverse vaccinology to identify new antigens and isolate specific epitopes to protect against B. burgdorferi, subunit vaccines will be generated that lack reactogenic and nonspecific epitopes, yielding more effective vaccine candidates. Additionally, novel epitopes are being utilized and are presently in the commercialization pipeline both for B. burgdorferi and other spirochaetal pathogens. The versatility and methodology of the subunit protein vaccine are described as it pertains to Lyme disease from conception to performance evaluation.

  19. Immunization of cows with novel core glycolipid vaccine induces anti-endotoxin antibodies in bovine colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Alan S; Karreman, Hubert J; Zhang, Lei; Rosenberg, Zeil; Opal, Steven M; Lees, Andrew

    2014-10-21

    Translocation of gut-derived Gram-negative bacterial (GNB) lipopolysaccharide (LPS, or endotoxin) is a source of systemic inflammation that exacerbates HIV, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal diseases and malnutrition. The oral administration of bovine colostrum (BC) reduces endotoxemia in patients with impaired gut barrier function. Consequently, BC enriched in antibodies to LPS may ameliorate endotoxemia-related morbidities. We developed a detoxified J5 LPS/group B meningococcal outer membrane protein (J5dLPS/OMP) vaccine that induces antibodies against a highly conserved core region of LPS and protects against heterologous GNB infection. We now examine the ability of this vaccine to elicit anti-core endotoxin antibodies in BC. Two cohorts of pregnant cows were immunized with this vaccine in combination with FICA (Cohort 1) or Emulsigen-D (Cohort 2) adjuvants. Antibody responses to the J5 core LPS antigen were measured in both serum and colostrum and compared to antibody levels elicited by a commercially available veterinary vaccine (J5 Bacterin) comprised of heat-killed Escherichia coli O111, J5 mutant bacteria, from which the J5 LPS was purified. The J5dLPS/OMP vaccine induced high titers of serum IgG antibody to J5 LPS in all seven cows. Both IgG and to a lesser extent IgA anti-J5 LPS antibodies were generated in the colostrum. The J5dLPS/OMP vaccine was significantly more immunogenic in mice than was the J5 Bacterin. BC enriched in anti-J5 LPS antibody reduced circulating endotoxin levels in neutropenic rats, a model of "leaky gut". The J5dLPS/OMP vaccine elicits high titers of serum anti-endotoxin antibodies in cows that is passed to the colostrum. This BC enriched in anti-core LPS antibodies has the potential to reduce endotoxemia and ameliorate endotoxin-related systemic inflammation in patients with impaired gut barrier function. Since this vaccine is significantly more immunogenic than the J5 Bacterin vaccine, this J5dLPS/OMP vaccine might prove to be

  20. Resistance to first-line anti-TB drugs is associated with reduced nitric oxide susceptibility in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idh, Jonna; Mekonnen, Mekidim; Abate, Ebba

    2012-01-01

    The relative contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to the killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human tuberculosis (TB) is controversial, although this has been firmly established in rodents. Studies have demonstrated that clinical strains of M. tuberculosis differ in susceptibility to NO, but how...

  1. DNA vaccines: technology and application as anti-parasite and anti-microbial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, J B; Waine, G W; McManus, D P

    1999-01-01

    DNA vaccines have been termed The Third Generation of Vaccines. The recent successful immunization of experimental animals against a range of infectious agents and several tumour models of disease with plasmid DNA testifies to the powerful nature of this revolutionary approach in vaccinology. Among numerous advantages, a major attraction of DNA vaccines over conventional vaccines is that they are able to induce protective cytotoxic T-cell responses as well as helper T-cell and humoral immunity. Here we review the current state of nucleic acid vaccines and cover a wide range of topics including delivery mechanisms, uptake and expression of plasmid DNA, and the types of immune responses generated. Further, we discuss safety issues, and document the use of nucleic acid vaccines against viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases, and cancer. The early potential promise of DNA vaccination has been fully substantiated with recent, exciting developments including the movement from testing DNA vaccines in laboratory models to non-human primates and initial human clinical trials. These advances and the emerging voluminous literature on DNA vaccines highlight the rapid progress that has been made in the DNA immunization field. It will be of considerable interest to see whether the progress and optimism currently prevailing can be maintained, and whether the approach can indeed fulfil the medical and commerical promise anticipated.

  2. The association of the vitamin D status with the persistence of anti-HBs antibody at 20years after primary vaccination with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, A; Keshavarz, J; Bagheri-Jamebozorgi, M; Nemati, M; Frootan, R; Shokri, F

    2017-02-01

    Vitamin D has potent immunoregulatory effects due to the expression of its receptor on the majority of immune cells. The aim was to evaluate the association of the vitamin D status with the persistence of anti-HBs antibody and immune response to booster immunization at 20years after primary vaccination with hepatitis B (HB) vaccine. Blood samples were collected from 300 adults 20years after completion of the primary HB vaccination in infancy. The serum levels of vitamin D and anti-HBs antibody were measured by ELISA. A single booster dose of a recombinant HB vaccine was administered to a total of 138 subjects, whose anti-HBs titer wasanti-HBs antibody, 4weeks after booster vaccination. At 20years after primary vaccination, the mean vitamin D concentrations were significantly higher in seroprotective subjects as compared to non-seroprotective individuals (Panti-HBs were significantly increased with advanced concentrations of vitamin D (PD were significantly higher in subjects with an anamnestic response to booster vaccination as compared with subjects without this response (PD status may influence the persistence of anti-HBs antibody and durability of protection after primary vaccination with a recombinant HB vaccine in infancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of anti-tick vaccines, recombinant serine protease inhibitors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A preliminary trial of a cocktail of recombinant RAS-1-2 and RIM 36 antigens was conducted in Uganda to assess the effects of ant-tick vaccines against Rhipicephalus appendiculatus tick feeding on Zebu cattle under both experimental and natural conditions. Under experimental conditions, over a period of 28 days, the ...

  4. [Development of the anti-influenza H5N1 vaccines worldwide and in Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, O I; Tsybalova, L M; Pokrovskiĭ, V I

    2006-01-01

    Article is dedicated to analytical investigation of the problem of current technologies in construction and manufacturing of anti-influenza vaccines. Epidemiological events in July-November 2005 in Russia (mainly in Siberia) and later in Ukraine showed that Health Care system was not ready for that turn over of epidemiological situation. It was completely the same situation in other countries. There are two general questions of a readiness in pre-pandemic situation: level of a diagnostic monitoring of epidemiological situation and preparedness to fast production of actual vaccine preparations. First task can be solved by immediate production of diagnostic sets for regional branches of National WHO Centers, and a second one depends on application of a novel approaches in construction of a anti-influenza vaccines. The construction of anti-influenza vaccines is based on genetic engineering (reverse genetics) and manipulation with plasmids carried out basic viral genes. Reassortation technology for preparation of hybrid viruses is going to the past by objective reasons. Advanced technologies are safety in laboratories and in manufacturing facilities. Moreover, genetic engineering in this field allows to planing the construction of vaccines bank, when the prognoses for actual viruses include more then two strains with different antigenic properties.

  5. Security 1E10 anti-idiotypic vaccine in patients with tumors of different locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Viada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death in Cuba and the world. Lung cancer is the leading cause of death, breast cancer is the second leading cause of death and colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of death. The 1E10 anti-idiotype vaccine is a new immunotherapeutic agent, registered for lung cancer by the Center for Molecular Immunology (CIM. You want to evaluate the safety of this vaccine in the treatment of various cancer sites. To determine the safety adverse events occurred in six clinical trials (one stage I lung, 3 phase II in breast, colon and lung, 1 phase II-III and program expanded use, both in lung were evaluated. 656 patients were studied. Demographic variables, the characteristics of the disease and adverse events were measured. The studies were balanced with respect to baseline characteristics. The most common adverse events were local reactions associated with 1E10 anti-idiotype vaccine and systemic reactions of mild or moderate intensity that were not related to the administration of the vaccine under study. The 1E10 anti-idiotype vaccine is safe for the low frequency and intensity of adverse events reported.

  6. Comparison of PPD test in household contacts of smear-positive and -negative tuberculosis (TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Azarkar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The most important way to prevent TB is omission of the disease transmission sources (TB patients by anti-TB treatment. Extensive studies are needed to ensure that contacts of patients with pulmonary TB are identified and appropriately screened.

  7. Effects of hepatitis B vaccine boosters on anti-HBs-negative children after primary immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shunshun; Ren, Jingjing; Li, Qian; Jiang, Zhenggang; Chen, Yongdi; Xu, Kaijin; Ruan, Bing; Yang, Shigui; Xie, Tiansheng; Yang, Linna; Li, Jing; Yao, Jun

    2017-04-03

    This study was aimed at evaluating the changes of hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) titer after booster vaccinations in 5-15-year-old children with negative antibodies (vaccination during infancy. The participants were divided into 3 groups according to their pre-booster anti-HBs level: Group I, vaccination (0-1-6 month, 20 µg), and changes in the levels of antibodies were examined at 4 time-points (one month after the first and the third dose, one year and 5 years after the third dose). The seroprotective rate (defined as anti-HBs ≥10.0 mIU/mL) among 225 subjects at the 4 time-points were 93.8%, 100%, 83.6% and 73.4%, respectively (χ 2 = 90.29, p anti-HBs geometric mean titer (GMT) in Group III were always higher than those in the other 2 groups (all p effect of a 3 -dose booster revaccination is good, and the booster-induced immune response was correlated with the pre-booster titer level, and ≥1.0 mIU/mL ensuring a robust positive response, whereas titers below this value may indicate the need for a course of booster vaccination.

  8. CT findings of TB in diabetic and non-diabetic patients: A comparison before and after anti-tuberculous therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wu

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: CT findings of tuberculosis in diabetic patients are different from those in non-diabetic patients, with a higher occurrence of non-segmental distribution and multiple cavities within a tuberculous lesion. By follow-up re-examination, diabetic patients show a slower and unobvious therapeutic response on CT scans compared to non-diabetic patients. CT can provide important information for the diagnosis and management of TB in diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  9. Defective anti-polysaccharide IgG vaccine responses in IgA deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Yoichi; Kirimanjeswara, Girish S; Roberts, Sean; Racine, Rachael; Wilson-Welder, Jennifer; Sanfilippo, Alan M; Salmon, Sharon L; Metzger, Dennis W

    2017-09-05

    We report that IgA -/- mice exhibit specific defects in IgG antibody responses to various polysaccharide vaccines (Francisella tularensis LPS and Pneumovax), but not protein vaccines such as Fluzone. This defect further included responses to polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (Prevnar and Haemophilus influenzae type b-tetanus toxoid vaccine). In agreement with these findings, IgA -/- mice were protected from pathogen challenge with protein- but not polysaccharide-based vaccines. Interestingly, after immunization with live bacteria, IgA +/+ and IgA -/- mice were both resistant to lethal challenge and their IgG anti-polysaccharide antibody responses were comparable. Immunization with live bacteria, but not purified polysaccharide, induced production of serum B cell-activating factor (BAFF), a cytokine important for IgG class switching; supplementing IgA -/- cell cultures with BAFF enhanced in vitro polyclonal IgG production. Taken together, these findings show that IgA deficiency impairs IgG class switching following vaccination with polysaccharide antigens and that live bacterial immunization can overcome this defect. Since IgA deficient patients also often show defects in antibody responses following immunization with polysaccharide vaccines, our findings could have relevance to the clinical management of this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [From the struggle for freedom to the denial of evidence: history of the anti-vaccination movements in Europe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafuri, S; Martinelli, D; Prato, R; Germinario, C

    2011-01-01

    The 1853 Vaccination Act, adopted in England during XIX century, was the first law about compulsory vaccination in Europe. The Act caused a violent movement of opposition with the birth of Victorian anti-vaccination. The modern anti-vaccination movement was born in 1998 following a paper of Andrew Wakefield published in the Lancet. In this paper Wakefield illustrated a study of twenty patients and concluded that the administration of the MMR vaccine caused autism and some forms of colitis. The publication was later disowned by almost all authors. However the study of Wakefield caused a reduction of compliance to the anti-MMR vaccination in the United Kingdom, resulting in lower coverage and new outbreaks. The theorethical principles of anti-vaccinationists of 19th and 20th century were: the hypothesis that vaccines cause illnesses; the presence of toxic substances in the vaccine; the violation of freedom Personal and People's; the ineffectiveness of vaccinations. Moreover, anti-vaccinationists always refused the scientific methods and the peer-review of their scientific studies.

  11. [HLA and hypo-responsivity to anti-HBV vaccination (genetic study of non-responder subjects to anti-hepatitis B viral vaccine)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichi, G; Cappellacci, S; Mola, A; Morellini, M; Lulli, P; Pescini, A

    1986-01-01

    The control of the immunization due to hepatitis B vaccines (HB-VAX and HEVAC B) showed that a low percentage of healthy adults vaccinated develop a non protective title of HBsAb or do not produce antibodies. The correlation between immunity and HLA has already been demonstrated: HLA is at the base of individual immunological response; this correlation directed our genetic study of low-responders or non-responders patients to anti-HBV vaccine. In our study 11 out of 97 subjects vaccinated (11.34%) with HB VAX or HEVAC B resulted hyporesponsive and underwent complete HLA typing to verify the relation between immune deficiency response and genetic system. There was an increase in phenotype HLA-DR7 incidence, with respect to a non-selective population and a decrease of HLA-DR1, as it has already been mentioned in the literature, the variations were not statistically significant taking into account the exiguity of the samples considered.

  12. Efficacy of the anti-VZV (anti-HSV3 vaccine in HSV1 and HSV2 recurrent herpes simplex disease: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Goaster J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Le Goaster,1 Sylvie Gonzalo,2 Patrice Bourée,1 Frederic Tangy,3 Anne-Lise Haenni41Department of Tropical Diseases, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire (CHU, University of Paris XI, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, 2Biomnis Laboratory, Ivry-sur-Seine, 3Retro-Virology, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, Pasteur Institute, Paris; 4Jacques Monod Institute, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, University of Paris VII, Paris, FranceBackground: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using the anti-varicella zoster virus (anti-VZV, also known as anti-HSV3 vaccine against orobuccal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 and genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV2. This was suggested by study of the phylogenetic tree of members of the herpes virus family, which showed a close relationship between VZV (HSV3 and the HSV1 and HSV2 herpes viruses.Methods: The present prospective study was conducted from January 2005 through January 2011. Twenty-four patients afflicted with HSV1 and HSV2 herpes recurrences over a period of years, numbering 6–8 and more recurrences per year, agreed to receive the anti-VZV vaccine. They were compared with 26 nonvaccinated patients presenting with herpes simplex diseases 2–5 times a year. All 50 patients were documented with anti-HSV1, anti-HSV2, and anti-VZV antibody serological testing.Results: From 2005 through 2011, for the 24 anti-VZV vaccinated patients, the average number of herpes relapses decreased to 0, correlated with an increased anti-VZV antibody level and clinical recovery of all patients, whereas no improvement was observed for the 26 nonvaccinated herpes patients.Conclusion: Data for the anti-VZV serological antibody levels tested before and after anti-VZV vaccination showed a significant (P < 0.001 increase among vaccinated patients. This suggests defective anti-VZV immune power in these patients. After 6 years of positive results for anti-VZV vaccine, this is a logical and

  13. The effect of current Schistosoma mansoni infection on the immunogenicity of a candidate TB vaccine, MVA85A, in BCG-vaccinated adolescents: An open-label trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Wajja

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infection may affect vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. Adolescents, a target population for tuberculosis booster vaccines, often have a high helminth burden. We investigated effects of Schistosoma mansoni (Sm on the immunogenicity and safety of MVA85A, a model candidate tuberculosis vaccine, in BCG-vaccinated Ugandan adolescents.In this phase II open label trial we enrolled 36 healthy, previously BCG-vaccinated adolescents, 18 with no helminth infection detected, 18 with Sm only. The primary outcome was immunogenicity measured by Ag85A-specific interferon gamma ELISpot assay. Tuberculosis and schistosome-specific responses were also assessed by whole-blood stimulation and multiplex cytokine assay, and by antibody ELISAs.Ag85A-specific cellular responses increased significantly following immunisation but with no differences between the two groups. Sm infection was associated with higher pre-immunisation Ag85A-specific IgG4 but with no change in antibody levels following immunisation. There were no serious adverse events. Most reactogenicity events were of mild or moderate severity and resolved quickly.The significant Ag85A-specific T cell responses and lack of difference between Sm-infected and uninfected participants is encouraging for tuberculosis vaccine development. The implications of pre-existing Ag85A-specific IgG4 antibodies for protective immunity against tuberculosis among those infected with Sm are not known. MVA85A was safe in this population.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02178748.

  14. In Vitro Preparation And Testing Of Anti-Salmonella Vaccine Against Abortion In Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flore CHIRILA

    2017-05-01

    There have been two booster inoculations of the initial administration, 7 and 14 days after. Before each dose of vaccine, blood was sampled from the marginal auricular vein in order to control the immunogenicity by anti-somatic ˮOˮ serum antibody (Ab titration using slow microplate agglutination test (Widal reaction. After three inoculations with the vaccine variant 1, Ab serum titer reached 1/128, and in types 2 and 3, 1/512 after 2 inoculations, decreasing to 1/256 after the second booster administered with no immunomodulator.

  15. In situ vaccination by radiotherapy to improve responses to anti-CTLA-4 treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanpouille-Box, Claire; Pilones, Karsten A; Wennerberg, Erik; Formenti, Silvia C; Demaria, Sandra

    2015-12-16

    Targeting immune checkpoint receptors has emerged as an effective strategy to induce immune-mediated cancer regression in the subset of patients who have significant pre-existing anti-tumor immunity. For the remainder, effective anti tumor responses may require vaccination. Radiotherapy, traditionally used to achieve local tumor control, has acquired a new role, that of a partner for immunotherapy. Ionizing radiation has pro-inflammatory effects that facilitate tumor rejection. Radiation alters the tumor to enhance the concentration of effector T cells via induction of chemokines, cytokines and adhesion molecules. In parallel, radiation can induce an immunogenic death of cancer cells, promoting cross-presentation of tumor-derived antigens by dendritic cells to T cells. Newly generated anti-tumor immune responses have been demonstrated post-radiation in both murine models and occasional patients, supporting the hypothesis that the irradiated tumor can become an in situ vaccine. It is in this role, that radiation can be applied to induce anti-tumor T cells in lymphocyte-poor tumors, and possibly benefit patients who would otherwise fail to respond to immune checkpoint inhibitors. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical data demonstrating that radiation acts in concert with antibodies targeting the immune checkpoint cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), to induce therapeutically effective anti-tumor T cell responses in tumors otherwise non responsive to anti-CTLA-4 therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anti-ganglioside antibody induction by swine (A/NJ/1976/H1N1) and other influenza vaccines: insights into vaccine-associated Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachamkin, Irving; Shadomy, Sean V; Moran, Anthony P; Cox, Nancy; Fitzgerald, Collette; Ung, Huong; Corcoran, Adrian T; Iskander, John K; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Chen, Robert T

    2008-07-15

    Receipt of an A/NJ/1976/H1N1 "swine flu" vaccine in 1976, unlike receipt of influenza vaccines used in subsequent years, was strongly associated with the development of the neurologic disorder Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Anti-ganglioside antibodies (e.g., anti-GM(1)) are associated with the development of GBS, and we hypothesized that the swine flu vaccine contained contaminating moieties (such as Campylobacter jejuni antigens that mimic human gangliosides or other vaccine components) that elicited an anti-GM(1) antibody response in susceptible recipients. Surviving samples of monovalent and bivalent 1976 vaccine, comprising those from 3 manufacturers and 11 lot numbers, along with several contemporary vaccines were tested for hemagglutinin (HA) activity, the presence of Campylobacter DNA, and the ability to induce anti-Campylobacter and anti-GM(1) antibodies after inoculation into C3H/HeN mice. We found that, although C. jejuni was not detected in 1976 swine flu vaccines, these vaccines induced anti-GM(1) antibodies in mice, as did vaccines from 1991-1992 and 2004-2005. Preliminary studies suggest that the influenza HA induces anti-GM(1) antibodies. Influenza vaccines contain structures that can induce anti-GM(1) antibodies after inoculation into mice. Further research into influenza vaccine components that elicit anti-ganglioside responses and the role played by these antibodies (if any) in vaccine-associated GBS is warranted.

  17. [Active surveillance evaluation of anti-HPV vaccine adverse events in Umbria region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfredi, V; Paoloni, M C; Villarini, M; Moretti, M

    2017-01-01

    The study is a part of the "Active surveillance of adverse events following HPV vaccination" project conducted in order to actively register all common adverse events in girls 9-26 years after anti-HPV vaccination. It is a multicenter cohort study which included 12 Regions and 87 local health authorities, coordinated by the National Centre for Epidemiology, Surveillance and Health Promotion (CNESPS) ISS. We included all adolescents, 12 years old, actively contacted for HPV vaccination, as well as all women aged 9-26 years who recived, in the period under review, the same vaccination at the local health authorities in Spoleto. Out of 147 girls enrolled in the program, only 102 have reported the diary filled after the first vaccine dose, 62 and 88 respectively after the second and third dose. The filled diaries shown that adverse events, if any, have occurred almost exclusively during the first 5 days of vaccination, with a strong prevalence of local reactions (erythema, pain and swelling at the injection site) followed by headache and muscles pain. Even though the results show a high number of reported adverse events, mainly due to the detection method (active surveillance), they are mild or moderate in almost all the cases. This is in line with that seen in previous trials.

  18. A high rate of neurological complications following Semple anti-rabies vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaddiwuthipong, W; Weniger, B G; Wattanasri, S; Warrell, M J

    1988-01-01

    A fatal case of encephalitis due to Semple (phenolized sheep-brain) anti-rabies vaccine prompted a search for neurological complications among 722 recipients of 2 vaccine batches administered in Bangkok, Thailand in June and July 1984. A review of all patients admitted with neurological symptoms from June through August 1984 to the 5 major teaching hospitals in Bangkok found 6 cases (0.83%), including the index case, who had received the vaccine. Rabies infection was ruled out in all 6 cases. 4 patients had meningitis, and 2 had meningo-encephalitis. Only the index case was fatal; the other patients recovered without neurological sequelae. The rate of neurological complications after receiving Semple vaccine was therefore a minimum of 8.31 cases per 1000 persons vaccinated (1:120). This complication rate was about 25 times higher than the overall complication rate of 0.33 per 1000 (1:3018) determined from 14 previous reports. The fatality rate was 1.39 per 1000 (1:722), about 15 times higher than the rate of 0.09 per 1000 (1:10805) calculated from the previous studies. It is urgent to find economically feasible alternatives to Semple vaccine.

  19. A Pilot Trial of Jawarish Amla as Adjuvant to Anti-Tubercular Treatment Drugs for Control of Adverse Reactions in DOTS Regime in Pulmonary TB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwani, Arish Mohammad Khan; Zulkifle, Mohammad; Rehmatulla

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges of health care systems at the dawn of the 21st century is tuberculosis (TB). Drug resistant strains of TB are becoming a global public health risk. These strains commonly appear due to faulty therapies. Patients frequently stop treatment due to the toxicity of anti-tubercular treatment (ATT) drugs. Amla (Emblica officinalis) is a well-known Unani single drug. Jawarish amla is a Unani compound formulation which is commonly used to administer amla. This study tested the efficacy of Jawarish amla as an adjuvant to ATT drugs in reducing their side effects. Half of forty eligible pulmonary tuberculosis patients were randomly assigned to Test (Group B) and the other half to Control (Group A). Six grams of Jawarish amla twice daily was administered to the test group, and the same dosage of placebo was administered to control group along with directly observed treatment, short course chemotherapy (DOTS) for 60 days. Fisher exact test and paired t-test were applied for efficacy evaluation. Grading of symptoms was done to assess the toxicity of ATT and outcome of the adjuvant. Significant improvements were observed in almost all subjective and objective parameters. The exceptions were serum creatine and serum uric acid, which showed non-significant slight elevations within normal limits. Jawarish amla was ascertained to be safe and effective adjuvant of DOTS in combating the adverse effects of ATT drugs.

  20. Anti-microbial peptide gene expression during oral vaccination: analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simuyandi, M; Kapulu, M; Kelly, P

    2016-11-01

    We have observed previously that micronutrient supplementation ameliorated suppression of α-defensin expression during diarrhoea. However, how interactions between anti-microbial peptide (AMP) expression and diarrhoeal disease are altered by micronutrient supplementation remain unclear. Using oral vaccination as a model of intestinal infection, we measured changes in AMP expression during multiple micronutrient supplementation. In the first part, volunteers underwent duodenal jejunal biopsy before and at 1, 2, 4 or 7 days after administration of one of three live, attenuated oral vaccines against rotavirus, typhoid and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. In the second part, participants were randomized to receive a multiple micronutrient supplement or placebo for 6 weeks before undergoing intestinal biopsy, vaccination against typhoid and rebiopsy after 14 days. Expression of human alpha-defensin (HD)5, HD6, hBD1, hBD2 and LL-37 was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Taken together, the bacterial vaccines, but not rotavirus vaccine, reduced HD5 expression (P = 0·02, signed-rank test) and reduced LL-37 expression in seven of the eight individuals whose biopsies had expression prevaccination (P = 0·03). hBD2 was not detected. In the controlled trial, HD5 and HD6 expression after vaccination was lower [median ratio 0·5, interquartile range (IQR) = 0·07-2·2 and 0·58, IQR = 0·13-2·3, respectively] than before vaccination. There was no significant effect detected of micronutrient supplementation on expression of HD5, HD6, hBD1 or LL-37. We conclude that live attenuated bacterial vaccines, but not rotavirus vaccine, can reduce intestinal α-defensins, and typhoid vaccine reduced LL-37 expression. We found no evidence that micronutrient supplementation in the short term had any impact on anti-microbial peptide expression. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  1. Accuracy of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube for diagnosing tuberculosis in a young pediatric population previously vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Genofre Vallada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of an interferongamma release assay (QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube for diagnosing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a young pediatric population. Methods: 195 children previously vaccinated with BCG were evaluated, being 184 healthy individuals with no clinical or epidemiological evidence of mycobacterial infection, and 11 with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, according to clinical, radiological, and laboratory parameters. A blood sample was obtained from each child and processed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The assay performance was evaluated by a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve. Results: In the group of 184 non-infected children, 130 (70.6% were under the age of four years (mean age of 35 months. In this group, 177 children (96.2% had negative test results, six (3.2% had indeterminate results, and one (0.5% had a positive result. In the group of 11 infected children, the mean age was 58.5 months, and two of them (18% had negative results. The ROC curve had an area under the curve of 0.88 (95%CI 0.82-0.92; p<0.001, disclosing a predictive positive value of 81.8% for the test (95%CI 46.3-97.4. The assay sensitivity was 81.8% (95%CI 48.2-97.2 and the specificity was 98.8% (95%CI 96-99.8. Conclusions: In the present study, the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube performance for diagnosing M. tuberculosis infection was appropriate in a young pediatric population.

  2. Saponin-based adjuvants create a highly effective anti-tumor vaccine when combined with in situ tumor destruction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brok, M.H.M.G.M. den; Nierkens, S.; Wagenaars, J.A.L.; Ruers, T.J.M.; Schrier, C.C.; Rijke, E.O.; Adema, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Today's most commonly used microbial vaccines are essentially composed of antigenic elements and a non-microbial adjuvant, and induce solid amounts of antibodies. Cancer vaccines mostly aim to induce anti-tumor CTL-responses, which require cross-presentation of tumor-derived antigens by dendritic

  3. Development of a peptide conjugate vaccine for inducing therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Amelia; Castagnoli, Riccardo; De Sando, Elisabetta; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2017-04-01

    Given the multifaceted effector functions of IgE in immediate hypersensitivity, late-phase reactions, regulation of IgE receptor expression and immune modulation, IgE antibodies have long represented an attractive target for therapeutic agents in asthma and other allergic diseases. Effective pharmacologic blockade of the binding of IgE to its receptors has become one of most innovative therapeutic strategies in the field of allergic diseases in the last 10 years. Areas covered: The latest strategies targeting IgE include the development of a therapeutic vaccine, able to trigger our own immune systems to produce therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies, potentially providing a further step forward in the treatment of allergic diseases. The aim of this review is to discuss the discovery strategy, preclinical and early clinical development of a peptide conjugate vaccine for inducing therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies. Expert opinion: Outside the area of development of humanized anti-IgE monoclonal antibodies, the research field of therapeutic IgE-targeted vaccines holds potential benefits for the treatment of allergic diseases. However, most of the experimental observations in animal models have not yet been translated into new treatments and evidence of human efficacy and safety of this new therapeutic strategy are still lacking.

  4. Development of a POC test for TB based on multiple immunodominant epitopes of M. tuberculosis specific cell-wall proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus M Gonzalez

    Full Text Available The need for an accurate, rapid, simple and affordable point-of-care (POC test for Tuberculosis (TB that can be implemented in microscopy centers and other peripheral health-care settings in the TB-endemic countries remains unmet. This manuscript describes preliminary results of a new prototype rapid lateral flow TB test based on detection of antibodies to immunodominant epitopes (peptides derived from carefully selected, highly immunogenic M. tuberculosis cell-wall proteins. Peptide selection was initially based on recognition by antibodies in sera from TB patients but not in PPD-/PPD+/BCG-vaccinated individuals from TB-endemic settings. The peptides were conjugated to BSA; the purified peptide-BSA conjugates striped onto nitrocellulose membrane and adsorbed onto colloidal gold particles to devise the prototype test, and evaluated for reactivity with sera from 3 PPD-, 29 PPD+, 15 PPD-unknown healthy subjects, 10 patients with non-TB lung disease and 124 smear-positive TB patients. The assay parameters were adjusted to determine positive/negative status within 15 minutes via visual or instrumented assessment. There was minimal or no reactivity of sera from non-TB subjects with the striped BSA-peptides demonstrating the lack of anti-peptide antibodies in subjects with latent TB and/or BCG vaccination. Sera from most TB patients demonstrated reactivity with one or more peptides. The sensitivity of antibody detection ranged from 28-85% with the 9 BSA-peptides. Three peptides were further evaluated with sera from 400 subjects, including additional PPD-/PPD+/PPD-unknown healthy contacts, close hospital contacts and household contacts of untreated TB patients, patients with non-TB lung disease, and HIV+TB- patients. Combination of the 3 peptides provided sensitivity and specificity>90%. While the final fully optimized lateral flow POC test for TB is under development, these preliminary results demonstrate that an antibody-detection based rapid POC

  5. A Rapid-Response Humoral Vaccine Platform Exploiting Pre-Existing Non-Cognate Populations of Anti-Vaccine or Anti-Viral CD4+ T Helper Cells to Confirm B Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Thomas; Jakeman, Phillip G; Carlisle, Robert C; Klenerman, Paul; Seymour, Leonard W; Cawood, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The need for CD4+ T cell responses to arise de novo following vaccination can limit the speed of B cell responses. Populations of pre-existing vaccine-induced or anti-viral CD4+ T cells recognising distinct antigens could be exploited to overcome this limitation. We hypothesise that liposomal vaccine particles encapsulating epitopes that are recognised, after processing and B cell MHCII presentation, by pre-existing CD4+ T cells will exploit this pre-existing T cell help and result in improved antibody responses to distinct target antigens displayed on the particle surface. Liposomal vaccine particles were engineered to display the malaria circumsporozoite (CSP) antigen on their surface, with helper CD4+ epitopes from distinct vaccine or viral antigens contained within the particle core, ensuring the B cell response is raised but focused against CSP. In vivo vaccination studies were then conducted in C57Bl/6 mice as models of either vaccine-induced pre-existing CD4+ T cell immunity (using ovalbumin-OVA) or virus-induced pre-existing CD4+ T cell immunity (murine cytomegalovirus-MCMV). Following the establishment of pre-existing by vaccination (OVA in the adjuvant TiterMax® Gold) or infection with MCMV, mice were administered CSP-coated liposomal vaccines containing the relevant OVA or MCMV core CD4+ T cell epitopes. In mice with pre-existing anti-OVA CD4+ T cell immunity, these vaccine particles elicited rapid, high-titre, isotype-switched CSP-specific antibody responses-consistent with the involvement of anti-OVA T helper cells in confirming activation of anti-CSP B cells. Responses were further improved by entrapping TLR9 agonists, combining humoral vaccination signals 'one', 'two' and 'three' within one particle. Herpes viruses can establish chronic infection and elicit significant, persistent cellular immune responses. We then demonstrate that this principle can be extended to re-purpose pre-existing anti-MCMV immunity to enhance anti-CSP vaccine responses

  6. The utility of Plasmodium berghei as a rodent model for anti-merozoite malaria vaccine assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Anna L.; Forbes, Emily K.; Williams, Andrew R.; Douglas, Alexander D.; de Cassan, Simone C.; Bauza, Karolis; Biswas, Sumi; Dicks, Matthew D. J.; Llewellyn, David; Moore, Anne C.; Janse, Chris J.; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M.; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Pleass, Richard J.; Draper, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    Rodent malaria species Plasmodium yoelii and P. chabaudi have been widely used to validate vaccine approaches targeting blood-stage merozoite antigens. However, increasing data suggest the P. berghei rodent malaria may be able to circumvent vaccine-induced anti-merozoite responses. Here we confirm a failure to protect against P. berghei, despite successful antibody induction against leading merozoite antigens using protein-in-adjuvant or viral vectored vaccine delivery. No subunit vaccine approach showed efficacy in mice following immunization and challenge with the wild-type P. berghei strains ANKA or NK65, or against a chimeric parasite line encoding a merozoite antigen from P. falciparum. Protection was not improved in knockout mice lacking the inhibitory Fc receptor CD32b, nor against a Δsmac P. berghei parasite line with a non-sequestering phenotype. An improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for protection, or failure of protection, against P. berghei merozoites could guide the development of an efficacious vaccine against P. falciparum. PMID:23609325

  7. Peptide-based anti-PCSK9 vaccines - an approach for long-term LDLc management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergana Galabova

    Full Text Available Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL hypercholesterolemia, and its associated cardiovascular diseases, are some of the leading causes of death worldwide. The ability of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9 to modulate circulating LDL cholesterol (LDLc concentrations made it a very attractive target for LDLc management. To date, the most advanced approaches for PCSK9 inhibition are monoclonal antibody (mAb therapies. Although shown to lower LDLc significantly, mAbs face functional limitations because of their relatively short in vivo half-lives necessitating frequent administration. Here, we evaluated the long-term efficacy and safety of PCSK9-specific active vaccines in different preclinical models.PCSK9 peptide-based vaccines were successfully selected by our proprietary technology. To test their efficacy, wild-type (wt mice, Ldlr+/- mice, and rats were immunized with highly immunogenic vaccine candidates. Vaccines induced generation of high-affine PCSK9-specific antibodies in all species. Group mean total cholesterol (TC concentration was reduced by up to 30%, and LDLc up to 50% in treated animals. Moreover, the PCSK9 vaccine-induced humoral immune response persisted for up to one year in mice, and reduced cholesterol levels significantly throughout the study. Finally, the vaccines were well tolerated in all species tested.Peptide-based anti-PCSK9 vaccines induce the generation of antibodies that are persistent, high-affine, and functional for up to one year. They are powerful and safe tools for long-term LDLc management, and thus may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the prevention and/or treatment of LDL hypercholesterolemia-related cardiovascular diseases in humans.

  8. Safety of herpes zoster vaccination among inflammatory bowel disease patients being treated with anti-TNF medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, N; Shah, Y; Trivedi, C; Lewis, J D

    2017-10-01

    The risk of herpes zoster (HZ) is elevated in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients treated with anti-TNF medications. While it is optimal to give herpes zoster vaccine prior to initiation of therapy clinical circumstances may not always allow this. To determine the safety of giving herpes zoster vaccine while patients are on anti-TNF therapy. We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving IBD patients who were followed in the Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system between 2001 and 2016. Patients who received herpes zoster vaccine while on anti-TNF medication were identified through vaccination codes and confirmed through individual chart review. Our outcome of interest was development of HZ between 0 and 42 days after herpes zoster vaccine administration. Fifty-six thousand four hundred and seventeen patients with IBD were followed in the VA healthcare system. A total of 59 individuals were on anti-TNF medication when they were given herpes zoster vaccine, and amongst them, 12 (20%) were also taking a thiopurine. Median age at the time of herpes zoster vaccine was 64.9 years and 95% of patients had a Charlson Comorbidity Index of ≥2. Median number of encounters within 42 days after receiving herpes zoster vaccine was two. No case of HZ was found within 0-42 days of HZV administration. Our data suggest that co-administering the herpes zoster vaccine to patients who are taking anti-TNF medications is relatively safe. This study significantly expands the evidence supporting the use of herpes zoster vaccine in this population, having included an elderly group of patients with a high Charlson Comorbidity Index who are likely at a much higher risk of developing HZ. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Tuberculosis (TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Tuberculosis Go to Information for Researchers ► Tuberculosis (TB) is ... are drug resistant. Why Is the Study of Tuberculosis a Priority for NIAID? Tuberculosis is one of ...

  10. Dectin-1-Syk-CARD9 Signaling Pathway in TB Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Matthew; Hoving, J Claire; Ndlovu, Hlumani; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J

    2018-01-01

    One of the first steps toward mounting an effective immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is recognition of the pathogen through pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed by innate immune cells. Activation of the PRR Dectin-1 by an unknown mycobacterial ligand triggers an intracellular signaling cascade involving numerous proteins, including spleen tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C-delta, and caspase recruitment domain family member 9, some of which have been shown to influence host immune response to TB infection. Here, we review the role of Dectin-1 signaling pathway in anti-mycobacterial immunity and discuss its contribution in the control of Mtb infection, and potential applications in TB vaccine adjuvanticity.

  11. Age-dependent decrease of anti-HBs titers and effect of booster doses using 2 different vaccines in Palestinian children vaccinated in early childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qawasmi, Mohammad; Samuh, Monjed; Glebe, Dieter; Gerlich, Wolfram H; Azzeh, Maysa

    2015-01-01

    Immunization against hepatitis B virus (HBV) has proven to be highly effective and led to significant reduction of new infections worldwide. However, protective immunity measured by anti-HBs titers may decrease to critical levels in the years after basal immunization, particularly in case of exposure to HBV variants different from the vaccine strain. We tested 400 Palestinian children between one and 19 years of age for their anti-HBs titer, challenged the immune memory of those with low or absent anti-HBs with 2 types of hepatitis B vaccines and determined thereafter the anti-HBs titer. At the age of one, 92.2% of the children presented with protective anti-HBs titers (≥10 mIU/ml) with the majority having ≥100 mIU/ml. Protective immunity was still high at ages 2 (87.5%) and 4 (95%), declining by age 5 and 6 (from 69.2% to 66.7%) and down to an average of 39.8% between the ages of 7 and 19. 160 children with a nonprotective or low immune response challenged with either the yeast-derived Engerix-B or the mammalian cell-derived preS1-containing Sci-B-Vac vaccine showed an anamnestic immune response. 92.4% and 85.9% of the children challenged with one dose Sci-B-Vac and Engerix-B presented with anti-HBs titers >100 mIU/ml respectively. Our results reveal that vaccine-induced protective anti-HBs titers against HBV decrease rapidly beyond the age of 6 in Palestinian children, but can be strongly enhanced with a single booster vaccine dose, independent of brand and antigen composition. Our data suggest that a booster vaccine dose against HBV during school years may be useful. PMID:25996579

  12. STUDY OF IMMUNISATION STATUS BY ESTIMATION OF ANTI-HBS ANTIBODY IN POST HEPATITIS B VACCINATED INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Pichika Lakshmanan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hepatitis B Virus (HBV infection is a major public health problem in India. Hepatitis B can be prevented by hepatitis B vaccine, which is the first anticancer vaccine, because it can prevent a form of liver cancer. The protective antibodies induced by vaccination wane gradually over period of time. The aim of the study is to- 1. Estimate serum levels of anti-HBs in individuals vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine. 2. Immunisation status of hepatitis B vaccination in individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS A serological study was carried out from March 2015 to the end of September 2016 aimed at estimating the level of HBsantibody. Total of 330 individuals from healthcare workers, staff and children who have received full course of hepatitis B vaccine were selected for study. In a cross-sectional study, anti-HBs antibody was determined by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA method. RESULTS Three hundred and thirty individuals were enrolled in the study, out of which, 136 were men and 194 were women. Majority were in the age group 20 to 40 years. Anti-HBs antibody titre was more than 100 IU/L in 74% individuals. Titre was between 10 IU/L-100 IU/L in 16% individuals. Anti-HBs titre was less than 10 IU/L in 10% individuals. There was a significant decline in the levels of antibody overtime post vaccination. Antibody titre was low in individuals with diabetes mellitus. Low antibody titre was noted in smokers. CONCLUSION In this study, majority had desirable immune response to the HBV vaccine. Diabetes mellitus, long duration post vaccination and positive smoking history have attributed to low anti-HBs titre in subjects who had inadequate levels in our study. As immunological memory persists for long time even in the absence of significant titre of anti-HBs, booster dose vaccination is routinely not advocated for general population. But, healthcare professionals are advised to receive booster dose vaccination at 5 years if anti-HBs value is

  13. Latent tuberculosis infection in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus infection: comparison of tuberculin skin test to the anti TB-IgM antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvi, S.M.; Nadimi, M.; Shokri, S.; Zamani, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    To determine Latent Tuberculosis Infection (LTBI) prevalence and compare TST results to the anti TB-IgM anti bodies (ATIA) for the diagnosis of LTBI in HIV infected individuals. Sixty two randomized sampled HIV infected subjects from an addict treatment center in Ahvaz southwest Iran underwent TST, using 5 TU of purified protein derivative, and measuring ATIA. Data were analyzed in SPSS (version 16, USA). Of 62 participants, 34 (54.8%) had positive result for TST, whereas 6(9.7%) had positive ATIA. Overall concordance between TST and ATIA was 45.2% (Kappa= 0.37, P = 0.32). In subjects with positive test results by either TST or ATIA, only 4.8% had positive test results by both tests. Discordant results were found in 54.8% of subjects. Positive results for both tests in subjects categorized in two groups (above and below 200 CD4-cell/mm3) had no significant difference (P>0.05). LTBI prevalence among HIV infected individuals in studied area is higher than other parts of the world. TST is a useful test for LTBI diagnosis and prefer to ATIA. Concordance between TST and ATIA is low. (author)

  14. Influence of initial vaccination with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine or 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine on anti-pneumococcal responses following subsequent pneumococcal vaccination in adults 50 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Lisa A; Gurtman, Alejandra; van Cleeff, Martin; Frenck, Robert W; Treanor, John; Jansen, Kathrin U; Scott, Daniel A; Emini, Emilio A; Gruber, William C; Schmoele-Thoma, Beate

    2013-08-02

    Unlike free polysaccharide vaccines, pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines (PCVs) induce a T cell-dependent immune response and have the potential to provide an extended duration of protection with repeated vaccinations. This was an extension of a previous study in pneumococcal vaccine-naïve adults aged 50-64 years in which adults 60-64 years of age were given 13-valent PCV (PCV13) or 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) and adults aged 50-59 were given PCV13. In this follow up study conducted about 4 years later, the 60-64 year olds initially given PCV13 received PCV13 or PPSV23, and those initially given PPSV23 received another PPSV23. All adults aged 50-59 years were re-vaccinated with PCV13. Anti-pneumococcal opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) titers were measured before and 1 month after vaccination. A second PCV13 given about 4 years after a first vaccination induced OPA titers that were significantly higher than those following the initial vaccination for 7 of 13 serotypes in the older group, and 6 of 13 serotypes in the younger group, and responses to the remaining serotypes were largely non-inferior. In contrast, OPA titers following revaccination with PPSV23 were statistically significantly lower for 9 of the 13 serotypes, and non-inferior for the remaining serotypes, when compared to the responses to the first PPSV23. OPA titers in the older adults who received PPSV23 after initial PCV13 were significantly higher than those following a first PPSV23 for 10 of the 13 serotypes. In adults 50 to 64 years of age, initial vaccination with PCV13 establishes an immune state that results in recall anti-pneumococcal responses upon subsequent vaccination with either conjugated or free polysaccharide vaccine. In contrast, initial vaccination with PPSV23 results in an immune state in which subsequent PPSV23 administration yields generally lower responses compared with the initial responses. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  15. Post-exposure Treatment with Anti-rabies VHH and Vaccine Significantly Improves Protection of Mice from Lethal Rabies Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terryn, Sanne; Francart, Aurélie; Rommelaere, Heidi; Stortelers, Catelijne; Van Gucht, Steven

    2016-08-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) against rabies infection consists of a combination of passive immunisation with plasma-derived human or equine immune globulins and active immunisation with vaccine delivered shortly after exposure. Since anti-rabies immune globulins are expensive and scarce, there is a need for cheaper alternatives that can be produced more consistently. Previously, we generated potent virus-neutralising VHH, also called Nanobodies, against the rabies glycoprotein that are effectively preventing lethal disease in an in vivo mouse model. The VHH domain is the smallest antigen-binding functional fragment of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies that can be manufactured in microbial expression systems. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of half-life extended anti-rabies VHH in combination with vaccine for PEP in an intranasal rabies infection model in mice. The PEP combination therapy of systemic anti-rabies VHH and intramuscular vaccine significantly delayed the onset of disease compared to treatment with anti-rabies VHH alone, prolonged median survival time (35 versus 14 days) and decreased mortality (60% versus 19% survival rate), when treated 24 hours after rabies virus challenge. Vaccine alone was unable to rescue mice from lethal disease. As reported also for immune globulins, some interference of anti-rabies VHH with the antigenicity of the vaccine was observed, but this did not impede the synergistic effect. Post exposure treatment with vaccine and human anti-rabies immune globulins was unable to protect mice from lethal challenge. Anti-rabies VHH and vaccine act synergistically to protect mice after rabies virus exposure, which further validates the possible use of anti-rabies VHH for rabies PEP.

  16. Post-exposure Treatment with Anti-rabies VHH and Vaccine Significantly Improves Protection of Mice from Lethal Rabies Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Terryn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP against rabies infection consists of a combination of passive immunisation with plasma-derived human or equine immune globulins and active immunisation with vaccine delivered shortly after exposure. Since anti-rabies immune globulins are expensive and scarce, there is a need for cheaper alternatives that can be produced more consistently. Previously, we generated potent virus-neutralising VHH, also called Nanobodies, against the rabies glycoprotein that are effectively preventing lethal disease in an in vivo mouse model. The VHH domain is the smallest antigen-binding functional fragment of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies that can be manufactured in microbial expression systems. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of half-life extended anti-rabies VHH in combination with vaccine for PEP in an intranasal rabies infection model in mice. The PEP combination therapy of systemic anti-rabies VHH and intramuscular vaccine significantly delayed the onset of disease compared to treatment with anti-rabies VHH alone, prolonged median survival time (35 versus 14 days and decreased mortality (60% versus 19% survival rate, when treated 24 hours after rabies virus challenge. Vaccine alone was unable to rescue mice from lethal disease. As reported also for immune globulins, some interference of anti-rabies VHH with the antigenicity of the vaccine was observed, but this did not impede the synergistic effect. Post exposure treatment with vaccine and human anti-rabies immune globulins was unable to protect mice from lethal challenge. Anti-rabies VHH and vaccine act synergistically to protect mice after rabies virus exposure, which further validates the possible use of anti-rabies VHH for rabies PEP.

  17. Post-exposure Treatment with Anti-rabies VHH and Vaccine Significantly Improves Protection of Mice from Lethal Rabies Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terryn, Sanne; Francart, Aurélie; Rommelaere, Heidi; Stortelers, Catelijne; Van Gucht, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) against rabies infection consists of a combination of passive immunisation with plasma-derived human or equine immune globulins and active immunisation with vaccine delivered shortly after exposure. Since anti-rabies immune globulins are expensive and scarce, there is a need for cheaper alternatives that can be produced more consistently. Previously, we generated potent virus-neutralising VHH, also called Nanobodies, against the rabies glycoprotein that are effectively preventing lethal disease in an in vivo mouse model. The VHH domain is the smallest antigen-binding functional fragment of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies that can be manufactured in microbial expression systems. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of half-life extended anti-rabies VHH in combination with vaccine for PEP in an intranasal rabies infection model in mice. The PEP combination therapy of systemic anti-rabies VHH and intramuscular vaccine significantly delayed the onset of disease compared to treatment with anti-rabies VHH alone, prolonged median survival time (35 versus 14 days) and decreased mortality (60% versus 19% survival rate), when treated 24 hours after rabies virus challenge. Vaccine alone was unable to rescue mice from lethal disease. As reported also for immune globulins, some interference of anti-rabies VHH with the antigenicity of the vaccine was observed, but this did not impede the synergistic effect. Post exposure treatment with vaccine and human anti-rabies immune globulins was unable to protect mice from lethal challenge. Anti-rabies VHH and vaccine act synergistically to protect mice after rabies virus exposure, which further validates the possible use of anti-rabies VHH for rabies PEP. PMID:27483431

  18. Pre-clinical toxicity and immunogenicity evaluation of a MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Boqi; Wang, Juan; Guo, Yingying; Chen, Tanxiu; Ni, Weihua; Yuan, Hongyan; Zhang, Nannan; Xie, Fei; Tai, Guixiang

    2016-04-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1), as an oncogene, plays a key role in the progression and tumorigenesis of many human adenocarcinomas and is an attractive target in tumor immunotherapy. Our previous study showed that the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine induced a MUC1-specific Th1-dominant immune response, simulated MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing activity, and could significantly inhibit MUC1-expression B16 cells' growth in mice. To help move the vaccine into a Phase I clinical trial, in the current study, a pre-clinical toxicity and immunogenicity evaluation of the vaccine was conducted. The evaluation was comprised of a single-dose acute toxicity study in mice, repeat-dose chronic toxicity and immunogenicity studies in rats, and pilot toxicity and immunogenicity studies in cynomolgus monkeys. The results showed that treatment with the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine did not cause any organ toxicity, except for arthritis or local nodules induced by BCG in several rats. Furthermore, the vaccine significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ in rats, indicating that Th1 cells were activated. In addition, the results showed that the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine induced a MUC1-specific IgG antibody response both in rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Collectively, these data are beneficial to move the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine into a Phase I clinical trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Safety and Immunogenicity of an Anti-Zika Virus DNA Vaccine - Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebas, Pablo; Roberts, Christine C; Muthumani, Kar; Reuschel, Emma L; Kudchodkar, Sagar B; Zaidi, Faraz I; White, Scott; Khan, Amir S; Racine, Trina; Choi, Hyeree; Boyer, Jean; Park, Young K; Trottier, Sylvie; Remigio, Celine; Krieger, Diane; Spruill, Susan E; Bagarazzi, Mark; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B; Maslow, Joel N

    2017-10-04

    trial, a DNA vaccine elicited anti-ZIKV immune responses. Further studies are needed to better evaluate the safety and efficacy of the vaccine. (Funded by GeneOne Life Science and others; ZIKA-001 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02809443 .).

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of a prototype anti-Chlamydia pecorum recombinant protein vaccine in lambs and pregnant ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desclozeaux, Marion; Jelocnik, Martina; Whitting, Katrina; Saifzadeh, Siamak; Bommana, Sankhya; Potter, Andrew; Gerdts, Volker; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2017-06-14

    Arthritis and kerato-conjunctivitis caused by Chlamydia pecorum in lambs are difficult to diagnose and treat. We tested the ability of a prototype C. pecorum vaccine (SC-vaccine), comprised of C. pecorum major outer membrane protein (MOMP-G) and polymorphic membrane protein G (PmpG), to trigger a Chlamydia-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune response in lambs and pregnant ewes. Vaccinations with the SC-vaccine (one and two injections) were very well tolerated by all ewes and lambs. Although the overall immune responses of ewes to SC-vaccination was poor, their lambs showed stronger antigen-specific immune response than lambs from control vaccine ewes. SC-vaccination in lambs triggered production of systemic anti-MOMP-G and anti-PmpG IgG antibodies and secretory IgA in the ocular mucosa. Double vaccination caused statistically significant increases in the height and duration of the humoral response. Antigen-specific IFN-γ was produced in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of vaccinated lambs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Imunidade conferida por vacinas anti-meningocócicas Immunity confered by anti-meningococci vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar Gonçalves Milagres

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Em razão da recente epidemia de doença meningocócica causada por N. meningitidis B na Grande São Paulo, Brasil, foi feita revisão das epidemias dessa doença ocorridas no Brasil desde o início do século e uma análise das vacinas atuais contra N. meningitidis A, C, Y e W135. Também são discutidos os mais recentes avanços no desenvolvimento e aplicação de vacina contra M meningitidis B, um desafio constante para os maiores centros de pesquisa de todo o mundo.In view of a recent epidemic of meningococcal disease caused by serogroup B N. meningitidis in the Greater S. Paulo area (Brazil, a review of the epidemics that occurred in Brazil during the period from 1900 to 1990 is presented. The current status of vaccines against N. meningitidis A.C.Y. and W135 is analysed. The recent advances in the development and effectiveness of B. meningococci vaccines are discussed.

  2. Monitoring of post-vaccination anti-HBs titles vaccine in children and adolescents in the pre-dialysis of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Cristina Pereira da Costa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Bacterial or viral diseases are one of the major causes of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. These patients show a quantitative reduction of levels of antibodies over time. Among the infectious diseases that affect CKD patients, stands out hepatitis B (HB. Immunization and control of antibodies levels against the hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs are ways to prevent the HB infection in this population. Patients with anti-HBs levels ≥10 IU/ml are considered adequate responders, whereas those with anti-HBs levels ≥ 100 IU/ml are considered excellent responders. Objective: To analyze the variation of the anti-HBs levels obtained after vaccination against HB in children and adolescents in the pre-dialysis stage of CKD. Methods: A retrospective cohort study on anti-HBs levels of children and adolescents in the pre-dialysis stage of CKD. Correlation between levels of anti-HBs titers and time since the vaccination were estimated. Results: From the total of 116 studied patients most of the studied patients were considered excellent responders, obtaining in the three anti-HBs titers percentages of 70.7%, 62.1% and 54.9% respectively. The anti-HBs titer levels showed a negative correlation with the time since vaccination (Kendall Tau-b = -0.16; p = 0.02. Conclusion: The majority of the studied population was vaccinated by PNI and showed excellent anti-HBs titer levels, even experiencing a progressive reduced response over the time.

  3. A therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine enhances anti-HIV-1 immune responses in patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Frank Y; Tung, Jack K; Pallikkuth, Suresh; Pahwa, Savita; Fischl, Margaret A

    2016-04-27

    HIV-1 specific cellular immunity plays an important role in controlling viral replication. In this first-in-human therapeutic vaccination study, a replication-defective HIV-1 vaccine (HIVAX) was tested in HIV-1 infected participants undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to enhance anti-HIV immunity (Clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT01428596). A010 was a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the safety and the immunogenicity of a replication defective HIV-1 vaccine (HIVAX) given as a subcutaneous injection to HIV-1 infected participants who were receiving HAART with HIV-1 viral load 500 cells/mm(3). HIV-1 specific immune responses were monitored by INF-γ enzyme linked immunospot (Elispot) and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assay after vaccination. Following the randomized placebo-controlled vaccination phase, subjects who received HIVAX vaccine and who met eligibility underwent a 12-week analytical antiretroviral treatment interruption (ATI). Viral load was monitored throughout the study. HIVAX was well tolerated in trial participants. Transient grade 1 to 2 (mild to moderate) injection site reactions occurred in 8 of 10 vaccinated participants. HIVAX was immunogenic in all vaccinated participants. The functionality of T cells was significantly enhanced after vaccination. Median viral load (3.45 log10 copies/ml, range of 96-12,830 copies/ml) at the end of the 12-week treatment interruption in HIVAX vaccinated group was significantly lower than the pre-treatment levels. Three vaccinated participants extended ATI for up to 2 years with stable CD4 cells and low viral loads. HIVAX vaccine is generally safe, elicits strong anti-HIV-1 immune responses, and may play an important role in controlling viral load during treatment interruption in HIV-1 infected participants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Decrease in Anti-HBs Antibodies over Time in Medical Students and Healthcare Workers after Hepatitis B Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. V. Sahana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis B is one of the most important occupational hazards among healthcare workers (HCWs. This study aimed to measure the anti-HBs titres among the medical students and HCWs vaccinated against hepatitis B virus and to determine the association between anti-HBs levels and time since vaccination. Materials and Methods. In this cross-sectional study, medical students and healthcare workers who had received all three doses of hepatitis B vaccination and completed at least six months after vaccination since the last dose were included. 3 ml blood was collected from subjects (n=340 and anti-HBs titre was estimated using ELISA. Results. A total of 340/400 subjects were aged between 18 and 60 years; 204 were females and 136 males. The median and interquartile range for time since vaccination were 5 and 5 years, respectively. Duration since vaccination was ≤5 years in 223 (65.5%, 6–10 years in 84 (24.7%, and >10 years in 33 (9.70%; among them, antibody titres were >10 mIU/ml in 94.1%, 79.7%, and 72.7% subjects, respectively. There was significant decline in antibody titres as duration of postvaccination increased. Conclusion. The proportion of subjects who were unprotected after 5 and 10 years after vaccination were 20% and 27%, respectively. The need for a booster dose can be made mandatory at least for healthcare professionals.

  5. Novel Anti-Nicotine Vaccine Using a Trimeric Coiled-Coil Hapten Carrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith D Miller

    Full Text Available Tobacco addiction represents one of the largest public health problems in the world and is the leading cause of cancer and heart disease, resulting in millions of deaths a year. Vaccines for smoking cessation have shown considerable promise in preclinical models, although functional antibody responses induced in humans are only modestly effective in preventing nicotine entry into the brain. The challenge in generating serum antibodies with a large nicotine binding capacity is made difficult by the fact that this drug is non-immunogenic and must be conjugated as a hapten to a protein carrier. To circumvent the limitations of traditional carriers like keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH, we have synthesized a short trimeric coiled-coil peptide (TCC that creates a series of B and T cell epitopes with uniform stoichiometry and high density. Here we compared the relative activities of a TCC-nic vaccine and two control KLH-nic vaccines using Alum as an adjuvant or GLA-SE, which contains a synthetic TLR4 agonist formulated in a stable oil-in-water emulsion. The results showed that the TCC's high hapten density correlated with a better immune response in mice as measured by anti-nicotine Ab titer, affinity, and specificity, and was responsible for a reduction in anti-carrier immunogenicity. The Ab responses achieved with this synthetic vaccine resulted in a nicotine binding capacity in serum that could prevent >90% of a nicotine dose equivalent to three smoked cigarettes (0.05 mg/kg from reaching the brain.

  6. Assessment of in vivo anti-tumor activity of human umbilical vein endothelial cell vaccines prepared by various antigen forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ling; Si, Chunfeng; Li, Defang; Lu, Meiyu; Zhong, Weilan; Xie, Zeping; Guo, Lin; Zhang, Shumin; Xu, Maolei

    2018-03-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) vaccine has been proved as an effective whole-cell vaccine, but the modest therapeutic anti-tumor efficiency limits its clinical use. Various antigen forms, including paraformaldehyde-fixed HUVEC, glutaraldehyde-fixed HUVEC, HUVEC lysate and live HUVEC, have been intensively used in HUVEC vaccine preparation, however, the most effective antigen form has not yet been identified. In the present study, these four commonly used antigen forms were used to prepare vaccines named Para-Fixed-EC, Glu-Fixed-EC, Lysate-EC, and Live-EC respectively, and the anti-tumor efficacy of these four vaccines was investigated. Results showed that Live-EC exhibited the most favorable anti-tumor growth and metastasis effects among the four vaccines in both H22 hepatocellular carcinoma and Lewis lung cancer models. High titer anti-HUVEC antibodies were detected in Live-EC immunized mice sera, and the immune sera of Live-EC group could significantly inhibit HUVEC proliferation and tube formation. Moreover, T cells isolated from Live-EC immunized mice exhibited strong cytotoxicity against HUVEC cells, with an increasing IFN-γ and decreasing Treg production in Live-EC immunized mice. Finally, CD31 immunohistochemical analysis of the excised tumors verified a significant reduction in vessel density after Live-EC vaccination, which was in accordance with the anti-tumor efficiency. Taken together, all the results proved that live HUVEC was the most effective antigen form to induce robust HUVEC specific antibody and CTL responses, which could lead to the significant inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis. We hope the present findings would provide a rationale for the further optimization of HUVEC vaccine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Depletion of regulatory T cells by anti-ICOS antibody enhances anti-tumor immunity of tumor cell vaccine in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Lijun; Chen, Qianmei; Zhang, Xinji; Shi, Xiaojun; Wei, Lili; Zheng, Dianpeng; Li, Hongwei; Gao, Jimin; Li, Jinlong; Hu, Zhiming

    2017-10-13

    ICOS + Treg cells exert important immunosuppressive effects in tumor immunity. We adopt a combination approach of ICOS + Treg cells depletion with tumor cell vaccine to evaluate anti-tumor immunity in mouse prostate cancer model. Streptavidin (SA)-mGM-CSF surface-modified RM-1 cells were prepared as the vaccine and the mouse subcutaneous prostate tumor model was used to evaluate the immunity. Tumor growth, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed to evaluate the therapeutic effects. Our results demonstrated that SA-mGM-CSF vaccine was prepared successfully and tumor growth was inhibited. The tumor size in the combination group was much smaller than that in the vaccine with IgG mAb group. The portions of dendritic cells, CD8 + and CD4 + T cells in the mice blood and tumor tissues were increased after treatment with vaccine. There were more immune-suppressing Tregs infiltrated into tumor after treatment with tumor cell vaccine, and ICOS blocking could deplete the infiltrated Tregs, and T lymphocytes increased more dramatically in the combination therapy group. The concentrations of interferon-γ were increased in all vaccine group, the concentrations of Interleukin-10 and Interleukin-4 were much lower in the combination group. Our study demonstrated that ICOS blocking could deplete the tumor-infiltrated ICOS + Treg cells. Combining GM-CSF surface-modified RM-1 cell vaccine with Anti-ICOS antibody could induce better antitumor immunity than a vaccine alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. resistant TB

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-01-24

    Jan 24, 2014 ... Background. Symptomatic symmetrical peripheral neuropathy (SSPN) is common in patients with HIV infection. It is also a common adverse event associated with both tuberculosis (TB) treatment and antiretroviral therapy (ART), particularly stavudine. While tenofovir is the one of recommended first-line ...

  9. TB incidence in an adolescent cohort in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mahomed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB is a major public health problem globally. Little is known about TB incidence in adolescents who are a proposed target group for new TB vaccines. We conducted a study to determine the TB incidence rates and risk factors for TB disease in a cohort of school-going adolescents in a high TB burden area in South Africa. METHODS: We recruited adolescents aged 12 to 18 years from high schools in Worcester, South Africa. Demographic and clinical information was collected, a tuberculin skin test (TST performed and blood drawn for a QuantiFERON TB Gold assay at baseline. Screening for TB cases occurred at follow up visits and by surveillance of registers at public sector TB clinics over a period of up to 3.8 years after enrolment. RESULTS: A total of 6,363 adolescents were enrolled (58% of the school population targeted. During follow up, 67 cases of bacteriologically confirmed TB were detected giving an overall incidence rate of 0.45 per 100 person years (95% confidence interval 0.29-0.72. Black or mixed race, maternal education of primary school or less or unknown, a positive baseline QuantiFERON assay and a positive baseline TST were significant predictors of TB disease on adjusted analysis. CONCLUSION: The adolescent TB incidence found in a high burden setting will help TB vaccine developers plan clinical trials in this population. Latent TB infection and low socio-economic status were predictors of TB disease.

  10. Chest Radiographs for Pediatric TB Diagnosis: Interrater Agreement and Utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaguthi, G.; Nduba, V.; Nyokabi, J.; Onchiri, F.; Gie, R.; Borgdorff, M.

    2014-01-01

    The chest radiograph (CXR) is considered a key diagnostic tool for pediatric tuberculosis (TB) in clinical management and endpoint determination in TB vaccine trials. We set out to compare interrater agreement for TB diagnosis in western Kenya. A pediatric pulmonologist and radiologist (experts), a

  11. Long Term Persistence of IgE Anti-Varicella Zoster Virus in Pediatric and Adult Serum Post Chicken Pox Infection and after Vaccination with Varicella Virus Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Norowitz, Tamar A; Josekutty, Joby; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Norowitz, Yitzchok M; Kohlhoff, Stephan; Nowakowski, Maja; Durkin, Helen G; Bluth, Martin H

    2009-12-01

    The production of IgE specific to different viruses (HIV-1, Parvovirus B19, RSV), and the ability for IgE anti-HIV-1 to suppress HIV-1 production in vitro, strongly suggest an important role for IgE and/or anti viral specific IgE in viral pathogenesis. Previous studies in our laboratory were the first to report the presence of IgE anti-varicella zoster virus (VZV) in an adolescent patient with shingles. However, the presence and long term persistence of IgE anti VZV antibodies has not been studied in adults. The presence of serum IgE in addition to IgE and IgG anti-VZV antibody in sera were studied in children (N=12) (0-16 y/o) and adults (N=9) (32-76 y/o) with either a past history of (wild type) chicken pox (N=7 children, 9 adults) or 5 years after vaccination with varicella zoster (N=2 children) (Varicella virus vaccine live, Oka/Merck), as well as in non-infected subjects (N=3 children). Of the patients who had a positive history of chicken pox 13 of 16 (81%) contained IgE anti-VZV antibodies; they were both serum IgEHi (>100 IU/ml) and IgELo (chicken pox or vaccination did not make either IgE or IgG anti-VZV antibodies. This is the first demonstration of the existence of IgE anti-VZV antibodies, and its long-term persistence in serum of previously infected subjects. Future studies regarding the functional role of anti-viral IgE and its relationship to VZV are warranted.

  12. [Anti-HBs persistence after revaccination with three doses of hepatitis B vaccine among low-responder infants following primary vaccination: 4-year of follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, J J; Yan, B Y; Liu, J Y; Feng, Y; Wu, W L; Liang, X F; Cui, F Q; Wang, F Z; Zhang, G M; Xu, A Q; Zhang, L

    2017-06-06

    Objective: Assess the 4-year antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) persistence after revaccination with 3-dose of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) among low-responder infants following primary vaccination. Methods: According to stratified cluster sampling, a total of 4 147 infants were enrolled and primarily vaccinated with 5 μg HepB derived in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (HepB-SC) at 0-1-6 months schedule from 75 towns of Jinan, Weifang, Yantai, Weihai prefectures, Shandong Province, China in Aug and Sep 2009. Blood samples were collected one to six months after the third dose of primary immunization and tested for anti-HBs using chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay (CMIA). 717 infants who appeared low response (10 mU/ml ≤ anti-HBsvaccination were collected. The risk factors associated with positive rate of anti-HBs and GMC of anti-HBs were identified by multiple non-conditional logistic regression analysis and multifactor linear regression model analysis, respectively. Results: Among 315 children, 165 (52.38%) were male and 150 (47.62%) were female. The positive rate was 83.81% (264/315) at T(0) and it decreased to 16.51% (149/529) at T(1). The corresponding GMC decreased from 473.15 mU/ml to 17.37 mU/ml. The average annual decreasing rate of positive rate and GMC was 33.38% and 56.23% from T(0) to T(1). Multivariable analysis showed the positive rate and GMC among those whose anti-HBs titer higher at T(0) were significantly higher at T(1). The positive rate at T(1) among those whose anti-HBs titer 400-low-responder infants, but still kept good protection. The anti-HBs persistence after revaccination was associated with anti-HBs level of titer one month after revaccination.

  13. Anti-HBs in immunized children with cuban hepatitis B vaccine and impact of booster dose after five years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahifar, H.; Mousavi, F.; Ghorbani, A.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection and associated diseases are a major public health problem. This study was planned to find out the persistence of antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen in Iranian vaccinated children after five years. Anti-HBs titers in a group of healthy good - responder children who were vaccinated with Cuban hepatitis B vaccine in infancy were measured after five years. Children with antibody titers <100 mlU/ml were revaccinated and retested after four weeks. Mean anti-HBs titers in 68 children (29 females, 39 males) were 482.1 mlU/ml at six months after the third dose of primary vaccination and 153 mlU/ml at five years later. Total mean anti-HBs titers in 36 (52.9%) children out of 68 (17 females, 19 males) were 38.3 mlU/ml and 4(5.8%) of 68 children (two of each sexes) had no detectable antibody after five years. Total mean anti-HBs titers in these hypo- responder and non- responder were 774.3 mlU/ml and 625.5 mlU/ml respectively after booster dose. In a group of children, who were immunized with Cuban hepatitis B vaccine from birth, anti-HBS titers fell at 6.5 years of age and almost half of children became hypo responder or no responder and their anti-HBs titers developed secondary rise after booster vaccination. All children showed immunologic memory to a booster dose. (author)

  14. Protective efficacy of a live attenuated anti-coccidial vaccine administered to 1-day-old chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, C F; Andrews, S J; Ward, R G; Francis, M J

    2003-06-01

    The efficacy of a live attenuated anti-coccidial vaccine, Paracox-5, administered to 1-day-old chicks was investigated by assessing protection against changes in weight gain following virulent challenge. Vaccinated birds were challenged independently 28 days later with each of the component species (Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria maxima, Eimeria mitis or Eimeria tenella), and protection was demonstrated against associated reduction in weight gain and lesion formation. In addition, an improvement in bird performance, in terms of feed conversion ratio, was also observed following vaccination. Furthermore, under conditions designed to more closely mimic those in the field and using hatchery spray administration, protection against a mixed virulent challenge introduced by 'seeder birds' was demonstrated evenly across a flock of broiler birds within 21 days after vaccination. These data demonstrate that Paracox-5 vaccine will protect broiler chickens against the adverse effects on performance induced by Eimeria spp.

  15. Physicochemical and biological characterization of 1E10 Anti-Idiotype vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Yoan J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 1E10 monoclonal antibody is a murine anti-idiotypic antibody that mimics N-glycolyl-GM3 gangliosides. This antibody has been tested as an anti-idiotypic cancer vaccine, adjuvated in Al(OH3, in several clinical trials for melanoma, breast, and lung cancer. During early clinical development this mAb was obtained in vivo from mice ascites fluid. Currently, the production process of 1E10 is being transferred from the in vivo to a bioreactor-based method. Results Here, we present a comprehensive molecular and immunological characterization of 1E10 produced by the two different production processes in order to determine the impact of the manufacturing process in vaccine performance. We observed differences in glycosylation pattern, charge heterogeneity and structural stability between in vivo-produced 1E10 and bioreactor-obtained 1E10. Interestingly, these modifications had no significant impact on the immune responses elicited in two different animal models. Conclusions Changes in 1E10 primary structure like glycosylation; asparagine deamidation and oxidation affected 1E10 structural stability but did not affect the immune response elicited in mice and chickens when compared to 1E10 produced in mice.

  16. Enhanced immune response to a dual-promoter anti-caries DNA vaccine orally delivered by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Hu, Yijun; Yang, Mei; Liu, Hao; Jiang, Guangshui

    2017-05-01

    The strength of immune responses induced by DNA vaccine is closely associated with the expression level of cloned antigens available to the antigen presenting cells (APCs). To acquire a larger and more persistent amount of antigen, a dual-promoter, which could double the target antigen output through its expression both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, was employed in the constructed anti-caries DNA vaccine with attenuated Salmonella as mucosal delivery vector in this study. Here, both CMV and nirB promoters were included in the plasmid that harbors the genes encoding the functional epitopes of two virulence factors of S. mutans, i.e. the saliva-binding region (SBR) of PAc and the glucan-binding region (GBR) of glucosyltransferase-I (GTF-I). Delivered by attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium strain SL3261, the anti-caries vaccine was administered intragastrointestinally to BALB/c mice for evaluation of the effectiveness of this immune regime. Specific anti-SBR and anti-GBR antibodies were detected in the serum and saliva of experimental animals by week 3 after immunization. These immune responses were further enhanced after a booster vaccination at week 16. However, in mice receiving Salmonella expressing SBR and GBR under the control of nirB alone these antibody responses were significantly (Panti-caries DNA vaccine when employing attenuated Salmonella as delivering vehicle for mucosal immunization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. NEW METHOD OF EPIDEMIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF THE INCIDENCE OF COMPLICATIONS AFTER ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS VACCINATION

    OpenAIRE

    S. N. Shugaeva; E. D. Savilov

    2016-01-01

    The article offers a new method for calculation of incidence of complications after primary anti-tuberculosis vaccination. Using the example of analysis of continuous sampling of complications after anti-tuberculosis vaccination (n = 110) in Irkutsk Region in 2005-2014 the article shows the advantage of the offered method compared to the existing ones.

  18. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    TheraCys® BCG ... TICE® BCG ... WHY is this medicine prescribed?BCG vaccine provides immunity or protection against tuberculosis (TB). The vaccine may be given to persons at high risk of developing TB. ...

  19. Optimization of TB/HIV co-treatment in Ethiopian patients

    OpenAIRE

    Degu, Wondwossen Amogne

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and HIV infection act with deadly synergy. HIV is the most important risk factor for latent TB reactivation and active TB progression following exposure or reinfection while TB accelerates HIV progression. TB is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV infection. Anti-TB therapy (ATT) must precede initiation of combination Antiretroviral Therapy (cART), TB being the most immediate threat. Undoubtedly cART benefits; however, important clinical ...

  20. Delivery route, MyD88 signaling and cross-priming events determine the anti-tumor efficacy of an adenovirus based melanoma vaccine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangalapura, B.N.; Oosterhoff, D.; Gupta, T.; Groot, J. de; Wijnands, P.G.J.T.B.; Beusechem, V.W. van; Haan, J.; Tuting, T.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Curiel, D.T.; Scheper, R.J.; Gruijl, T.D. de

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)-based vaccines are considered for cancer immunotherapy, yet, detailed knowledge on their mechanism of action and optimal delivery route for anti-tumor efficacy is lacking. Here, we compared the anti-tumor efficacy of an Ad-based melanoma vaccine after intradermal, intravenous,

  1. Combined cocaine hydrolase gene transfer and anti-cocaine vaccine synergistically block cocaine-induced locomotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn E Carroll

    Full Text Available Mice and rats were tested for reduced sensitivity to cocaine-induced hyper-locomotion after pretreatment with anti-cocaine antibody or cocaine hydrolase (CocH derived from human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE. In Balb/c mice, direct i.p. injection of CocH protein (1 mg/kg had no effect on spontaneous locomotion, but it suppressed responses to i.p. cocaine up to 80 mg/kg. When CocH was injected i.p. along with a murine cocaine antiserum that also did not affect spontaneous locomotion, there was no response to any cocaine dose. This suppression of locomotor activity required active enzyme, as it was lost after pretreatment with iso-OMPA, a selective BChE inhibitor. Comparable results were obtained in rats that developed high levels of CocH by gene transfer with helper-dependent adenoviral vector, and/or high levels of anti-cocaine antibody by vaccination with norcocaine hapten conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH. After these treatments, rats were subjected to a locomotor sensitization paradigm involving a "training phase" with an initial i.p. saline injection on day 1 followed by 8 days of repeated cocaine injections (10 mg/kg, i.p.. A 15-day rest period then ensued, followed by a final "challenge" cocaine injection. As in mice, the individual treatment interventions reduced cocaine-stimulated hyperactivity to a modest extent, while combined treatment produced a greater reduction during all phases of testing compared to control rats (with only saline pretreatment. Overall, the present results strongly support the view that anti-cocaine vaccine and cocaine hydrolase vector treatments together provide enhanced protection against the stimulatory actions of cocaine in rodents. A similar combination therapy in human cocaine users might provide a robust therapy to help maintain abstinence.

  2. Combined Cocaine Hydrolase Gene Transfer and Anti-Cocaine Vaccine Synergistically Block Cocaine-Induced Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Marilyn E.; Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Anker, Justin J.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.; Shen, Xiaoyun; Kinsey, Berma; Parks, Robin J.; Gao, Yang; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Mice and rats were tested for reduced sensitivity to cocaine-induced hyper-locomotion after pretreatment with anti-cocaine antibody or cocaine hydrolase (CocH) derived from human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). In Balb/c mice, direct i.p. injection of CocH protein (1 mg/kg) had no effect on spontaneous locomotion, but it suppressed responses to i.p. cocaine up to 80 mg/kg. When CocH was injected i.p. along with a murine cocaine antiserum that also did not affect spontaneous locomotion, there was no response to any cocaine dose. This suppression of locomotor activity required active enzyme, as it was lost after pretreatment with iso-OMPA, a selective BChE inhibitor. Comparable results were obtained in rats that developed high levels of CocH by gene transfer with helper-dependent adenoviral vector, and/or high levels of anti-cocaine antibody by vaccination with norcocaine hapten conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). After these treatments, rats were subjected to a locomotor sensitization paradigm involving a “training phase" with an initial i.p. saline injection on day 1 followed by 8 days of repeated cocaine injections (10 mg/kg, i.p.). A 15-day rest period then ensued, followed by a final “challenge" cocaine injection. As in mice, the individual treatment interventions reduced cocaine-stimulated hyperactivity to a modest extent, while combined treatment produced a greater reduction during all phases of testing compared to control rats (with only saline pretreatment). Overall, the present results strongly support the view that anti-cocaine vaccine and cocaine hydrolase vector treatments together provide enhanced protection against the stimulatory actions of cocaine in rodents. A similar combination therapy in human cocaine users might provide a robust therapy to help maintain abstinence. PMID:22912888

  3. Medicinal chemistry discoveries among 1,3,5-triazines: recent advances (2000-2013) as antimicrobial, anti-TB, anti-HIV and antimalarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rahul V; Keum, Young-Soo; Park, Se Won

    2014-01-01

    The chemistry and an extensive spectrum of biological activities of s-triazines have been examined since several decades and this heterocyclic core has received emerging consensus. This article aims to summarize recent advances (2000-2013) made towards the discovery of antimicrobial, antituberculosis, anti-HIV and antimalarial agents holding 1,3,5-triazine ring as a nucleus with the substitution of several types of nucleophiles. Molecular patterns associated with particular potency have been identified targeting several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and some fungal species, mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, HIV type I and HIV type II, particularly, HIV-1I IIB and HIV- 1ROD strains as well as a variety of P. falciparum malarial strains as chloroquine-resistant K1, chloroquine-susceptible NF54, chloroquine-sensitive 3D7, P. falciparum (D6 clone), P. falciparum (W2 clone), cycloguanil-resistant FCR-3, chloroquine sensitive RKL2. The report will be of considerable interest to gain useful information for the furtherance of drug discovery with extended 1,3,5-triazine designs.

  4. Research and development of anti-tick vaccines for use in Texas and Puerto Rico Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus control programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    This year marks the first time anti-tick vaccination will be used in the United States and Puerto Rico to control, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and R. annulatus. The 110-year-old Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program has eradicated the southern cattle fever tick from the majority of the Unite...

  5. Diversity and Vaccine Controversy

    OpenAIRE

    Frempong, Erica

    2010-01-01

    My area of research dealt with many different aspects of the vaccine movement, the main three were: anti-vaccine sentiments over the Internet, global instances of anti-vaccination efforts, and differences in social class and race in vaccine utilization. I have come to realize that there are two distinct issues arising in the organization that encompasses vaccines. The distinctions are the anti-vaccine movement - the spread of anti-vaccine sentiments over the Internet, and global instances ...

  6. Vaccination with Necroptotic Cancer Cells Induces Efficient Anti-tumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Løve Aaes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Successful immunogenic apoptosis in experimental cancer therapy depends on the induction of strong host anti-tumor responses. Given that tumors are often resistant to apoptosis, it is important to identify alternative molecular mechanisms that elicit immunogenic cell death. We have developed a genetic model in which direct dimerization of FADD combined with inducible expression of RIPK3 promotes necroptosis. We report that necroptotic cancer cells release damage-associated molecular patterns and promote maturation of dendritic cells, the cross-priming of cytotoxic T cells, and the production of IFN-γ in response to tumor antigen stimulation. Using both FADD-dependent and FADD-independent RIPK3 induction systems, we demonstrate the efficient vaccination potential of immunogenic necroptotic cells. Our study broadens the current concept of immunogenic cell death and opens doors for the development of new strategies in cancer therapy.

  7. Use of an anti-GnRF vaccine to suppress estrus in crossbred Iberian female pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau, A; Velarde, A; Rodríguez, P; Pedernera, C; Llonch, P; Fàbrega, E; Casal, N; Mainau, E; Gispert, M; King, V; Slootmans, N; Thomas, A; Mombarg, M

    2015-08-01

    Antibodies against GnRF elicited by vaccination with Improvac are expected to have the same effects on the gonads of female pigs as those observed in males and thus suppress estrus. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a 3- or a 4-dose regimen of Improvac was effective in inducing and maintaining suppression of estrus in intact Iberian female pigs through 14 months of age. Sixty 18-week-old gilts were randomly assigned to one of the following three treatment groups: control (PBS injected), V3 (3-dose Improvac regimen), and V4 (4-dose Improvac regimen). Animals were tested for the presence of standing estrus in the presence of a boar three times per week until study completion at 60 weeks of age. Blood samples were regularly collected to determine the serum levels of anti-GnRF antibodies and progesterone. The weight and size of the uterus and the weight and activity of the ovaries were assessed at the time of euthanasia. For both treatment groups V3 and V4, a large reduction in the incidence of standing estrus was observed when compared to the control group (P immunity of 2 weeks after the second vaccination and a long-lasting immunity of at least 20 weeks after the third vaccination were observed. In summary, both the 3-and 4-dose Improvac regimens were efficacious in reducing the incidence of standing estrus, serum progesterone levels, and the development of the uterus and ovaries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Humoral immune response of dogs to the inactivated suckling mouse brain vaccine used in anti-rabies campaigns in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, M F; Aguiar, E A; Martorelli, L A; Presotto, D; Brandão, M M; Pereira, O A

    1997-10-01

    An anti-rabies campaign is undertaken annually in Brazil with of the Fuenzalida & Palacios vaccine. The humoral immune response of dogs vaccinated during the campaigns was researched with the objective of evaluating whether the dogs presented a protective titer (0.5 UI/ml) 12 months after vaccination and how many of these achieved this titer 30 days after a buttressing vaccination. Three hundred and forty-one specimens of serum of dogs domicilied, 259 in the S. Paulo and 82 in the Paulinia counties, were analyzed utilizing the Rapid Fluorescence Focus Inhibition Test. The immune response was evaluated taking into consideration the nutritional state of the animal and the number of previous vaccinations. The larger number of the dogs had not achieved the 0.5 UI/ml titer after 12 months, independently of the nutritional state and the response to the buttressing vaccination was more apparent in dogs with two or more previous vaccinations. The cut off of 0.5 UI/ml as protective titer in dogs and the influence of the nutritional state and health conditions of the animals as responsible for humoral immune response are discussed.

  9. The Vi conjugate typhoid vaccine is safe, elicits protective levels of IgG anti-Vi, and is compatible with routine infant vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiem, Vu Dinh; Lin, Feng-Ying C; Canh, Do Gia; Son, Nguyen Hong; Anh, Dang Duc; Mao, Nguyen Duc; Chu, Chiayung; Hunt, Steven W; Robbins, John B; Schneerson, Rachel; Szu, Shousun C

    2011-05-01

    Typhoid fever remains a serious problem in developing countries. Current vaccines are licensed for individuals who are 5 years old or older. A conjugate of the capsular polysaccharide (CP) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Vi) bound to recombinant exoprotein A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Vi-rEPA) enhanced Vi immunogenicity and protected 2- to 5-year-olds in Vietnam. In this study, Vi-rEPA was evaluated for use in infants. A total of 301 full-term Vietnamese infants received Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) vaccines alone or with Vi-rEPA or Haemophilus influenzae type b-tetanus toxoid conjugate (Hib-TT) at 2, 4, and 6 months and Vi-rEPA or Hib-TT alone at 12 months. Infants were visited 6, 24, and 48 h after each injection to monitor adverse reactions. Maternal, cord, and infant sera were assayed for IgG anti-Vi and for IgG antibodies to Hib CP and the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis toxins at 7, 12, and 13 months. No vaccine-related serious adverse reactions occurred. In the Vi-rEPA group, the IgG anti-Vi geometric mean (GM) increased from the cord level of 0.66 to 17.4 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay units (EU) at 7 months, declined to 4.76 EU at 12 months, and increased to 50.1 EU 1 month after the 4th dose (95% of infants had levels of ≥ 3.5 EU, the estimated protective level). Controls had no increase of the IgG anti-Vi GM. Infants with cord anti-Vi levels of anti-Vi levels than those with levels of ≥ 3.5 EU. Anti-diphtheria, -tetanus, and -pertussis toxin levels were similar in all groups. Vi-rEPA was safe, induced protective anti-Vi levels, and was compatible with EPI vaccines, and it can be used in infants. High cord IgG anti-Vi levels partially suppressed infant responses to Vi-rEPA.

  10. Anti-idiotypic antibody with potential use as an Eimeria tenella sporozoite antigen surrogate for vaccination of chickens against coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhogal, B S; Nollstadt, K H; Karkhanis, Y D; Schmatz, D M; Jacobson, E B

    1988-01-01

    Anti-idiotypic antibodies were raised in rabbits against four monoclonal antibodies with specificity for the surface antigenic determinants of Eimeria tenella sporozoites, the infective stage of the coccidial parasite. Two of the monoclonal antibodies (1073 and 15-1) transferred passive protection in chickens against E. tenella infection. The polyclonal anti-idiotype antibody preparations against protective monoclonal antibodies contained specificities for the paratope-associated idiotypes of these monoclonal antibodies, as assessed by the competitive inhibition of binding of the homologous idiotype-anti-idiotype by the sporozoite antigen. Competitive inhibition of binding of homologous idiotype-anti-idiotype by the parasite antigen was not observed when the anti-idiotype antibody preparations against monoclonal antibodies 1546 and 1096 were tested. The anti-idiotype 1073 and 15-1 antibodies functioned as surrogate antigens in vivo when used for vaccination of young chickens, as evidenced by the induction of partial protective immunity against subsequent challenge infection with virulent parasites and induction of antisporozoite antibodies. These data clearly support the view that anti-idiotypic antibodies raised against the paratope-associated idiotypes can mimic pathogen antigens and therefore can provide a possible alternative approach for the vaccination of chickens against coccidiosis. PMID:3258583

  11. A dual vaccine against influenza & Alzheimer's disease failed to enhance anti-β-amyloid antibody responses in mice with pre-existing virus specific memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davtyan, Hayk; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Arpine; Cadagan, Richard; Marleau, Annette M; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-12-15

    Novel dual vaccine, WSN-Aβ(1-10), based on the recombinant influenza virus, expressing immunodominant B-cell epitope of β-amyloid, simultaneously induced therapeutically potent anti-Aβ and anti-influenza antibodies. In this study we showed that boosting of WSN-WT primed mice with WSN-Aβ(1-10) enhances anti-viral, but fails to induce anti-Aβ antibody responses. This inhibition is associated with expression of Aβ(1-10) within the context of an inactivated influenza virus vaccine. These results demonstrate that the use of an inactivated influenza virus as a carrier for AD vaccine may not be applicable due to the possible inhibition of anti-Aβ antibody response in individuals previously vaccinated or infected with influenza. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Testing for TB Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies Consortium Research Projects Publications TB Trials Consortium Study Descriptions Background Behavioral & Social Science Research Infection Control TB in Specific Populations African-American Community Stop TB in the African-American ...

  13. HIV-Exposed Infants Vaccinated with an MF59/Recombinant gp120 Vaccine Have Higher-Magnitude Anti-V1V2 IgG Responses than Adults Immunized with the Same Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Erin P; Fong, Youyi; Toote, Christopher; Cunningham, Coleen K; McFarland, Elizabeth J; Borkowsky, William; Barnett, Susan; Itell, Hannah L; Kumar, Amit; Gray, Glenda; McElrath, M Julianna; Tomaras, Georgia D; Permar, Sallie R; Fouda, Genevieve G

    2018-01-01

    In the RV144 vaccine trial, IgG responses against the HIV envelope variable loops 1 and 2 (V1V2) were associated with decreased HIV acquisition risk. We previously reported that infants immunized with an MF59-adjuvanted rgp120 vaccine developed higher-magnitude anti-V1V2 IgG responses than adult RV144 vaccinees. To determine whether the robust antibody response in infants is due to differences in vaccine regimens or to inherent differences between the adult and infant immune systems, we compared Env-specific IgG responses in adults and infants immunized with the same MF59- and alum-adjuvanted HIV envelope vaccines. At peak immunogenicity, the magnitudes of the gp120- and V1V2-specific IgG responses were comparable between adults and infants immunized with the alum/MNrgp120 vaccine (gp120 median fluorescence intensities [FIs] in infants = 7,118 and in adults = 11,510, P = 0.070; V1V2 median MFIs of 512 [infants] and 804 [adults], P = 0.50), whereas infants immunized with the MF59/SF-2 rgp120 vaccine had higher-magnitude antibody levels than adults (gp120 median FIs of 15,509 [infants] and 2,290 [adults], P Anti-V1V2 IgG3 antibodies that were associated with decreased HIV-1 risk in RV144 vaccinees were present in 43% of MF59/rgp120-vaccinated infants but only in 12% of the vaccinated adults ( P = 0.0018). Finally, in contrast to the rare vaccine-elicited Env-specific IgA in infants, rgp120 vaccine-elicited Env-specific IgA was frequently detected in adults. Our results suggest that vaccine adjuvants differently modulate gp120-specific antibody responses in adults and infants and that infants can robustly respond to HIV Env immunization. IMPORTANCE More than 150,000 pediatric HIV infections occur yearly, despite the availability of antiretroviral prophylaxis. A pediatric HIV vaccine could reduce the number of these ongoing infant infections and also prime for long-term immunity prior to sexual debut. We previously reported that immunization of infants with an MF59

  14. Persistence of the immune response induced by BCG vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blitz Rose

    2008-01-01

    majority of vaccinees, although the magnitude of the peripheral blood response wanes from 3 months to 12 months and from 12 months to 3 years post vaccination. The data presented here suggest that because of such waning in the response there may be scope for boosting anti-tuberculous immunity in BCG vaccinated children anytime from 3 months post-vaccination. This supports the prime boost strategies being employed for some new TB vaccines currently under development.

  15. Development of the Brazilian anti Schistosomiasis vaccine based on the recombinant FABP Sm14 +GLA-SE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam eTendler

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Data herein reported and discussed refer to vaccination with the recombinant Fatty Acid Binding protein family member of the Schistosomes, called Sm14, discovered and developed under a Brazilian platform leaded by the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, from the Health Ministry in Brazil, undertaken to assess safety and immunogenicity in healthy volunteers. This paper reviews past and recent outcomes of developmental phases of the Sm14 based anti Schistosomiasis vaccine addressed to, ultimately, impact transmission of the second most prevalent parasitic endemic disease worldwide.

  16. Get the shot or do the time: A moral defense of coerced anti-drug vaccinations given to criminal offenders

    OpenAIRE

    Wichmann, Søren Sofus

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis I defend giving drug addicted persons who are convicted of a crime the choice between an anti-drug vaccine and prison. My claim is that, should such a vaccine be developed, there would be no good moral reasons not to make such an offer. To support this claim I discuss and reject a series of objections to it. The objections are grouped in three different types; objections to paternalism, objections from theories of penal justice and objections from the rights of prisoners. Which...

  17. Avidity of anti-circumsporozoite antibodies following vaccination with RTS,S/AS01E in young children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ally Olotu

    Full Text Available The nature of protective immune responses elicited by immunization with the candidate malaria vaccine RTS,S is still incompletely understood. Antibody levels correlate with protection against malaria infection, but considerable variation in outcome is unexplained (e.g., children may experience malaria despite high anti-circumsporozoite [CS] titers.We measured the avidity index (AI of the anti-CS antibodies raised in subgroup of 5-17 month old children in Kenya who were vaccinated with three doses of RTS,S/AS01E between March and August 2007. We evaluated the association between the AI and the subsequent risk of clinical malaria. We selected 19 cases (i.e., with clinical malaria and 42 controls (i.e., without clinical malaria, matching for anti-CS antibody levels and malaria exposure. We assessed their sera collected 1 month after the third dose of the vaccine, in March 2008 (range 4-10 months after the third vaccine, and at 12 months after the third vaccine dose. The mean AI was 45.2 (95% CI: 42.4 to 48.1, 45.3 (95% CI: 41.4 to 49.1 and 46.2 (95% CI; 43.2 to 49.3 at 1 month, in March 2008 (4-10 months, and at 12 months after the third vaccination, respectively (p = 0.9 by ANOVA test for variation over time. The AI was not associated with protection from clinical malaria (OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.49 to 1.66; p = 0.74. The AI was higher in children with high malaria exposure, as measured using the weighted local prevalence of malaria, compared to those with low malaria exposure at 1 month post dose 3 (p = 0.035.Our data suggest that in RTS,S/AS01E-vaccinated children residing in malaria endemic countries, the avidity of anti-circumsporozoite antibodies, as measured using an elution ELISA method, was not associated with protection from clinical malaria. Prior natural malaria exposure might have primed the response to RTS,S/AS01E vaccination.

  18. Racotumomab: an anti-idiotype vaccine related to N-glycolyl-containing gangliosides – preclinical and clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vázquez, Ana M.; Hernández, Ana M.; Macías, Amparo; Montero, Enrique; Gómez, Daniel E.; Alonso, Daniel F.; Gabri, Mariano R.; Gómez, Roberto E.

    2012-01-01

    Neu-glycolyl (NeuGc)-containing gangliosides are attractive targets for immunotherapy with anti-idiotype mAbs, because these glycolipids are not normal components of the cytoplasmic membrane in humans, but their expression has been demonstrated in several human malignant tumors. Racotumomab is an anti-idiotype mAb specific to P3 mAb, an antibody which reacts to NeuGc-containing gangliosides, sulfatides, and other antigens expressed in tumors. Preparations containing racotumomab were able to induce a strong anti-metastatic effect in tumor-bearing mice. Different Phase I clinical trials have been conducted in patients with advanced melanoma, breast cancer, and lung cancer. The results of these clinical trials demonstrated the low toxicity and the high immunogenicity of this vaccine. The induced antibodies recognized and directly killed tumor cells expressing NeuGcGM3. A Phase II/III multicenter, controlled, randomized, double blind clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of aluminum hydroxide-precipitated racotumomab vaccine in overall survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The clinical results of this study showed a significant clinical benefit in the patients who were treated with the anti-idiotype vaccine.

  19. The immunosuppressive impact of PRRS virus on the immune response following anti - erysipelas vaccination in swine from various farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Chiurciu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available PRRS virus, the etiologic agent of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome by immunosuppressive action can significantly affect the immune response after vaccination. It was intended the following of the immunological reaction induced by the Erysipelothrix rhusopathiae vaccination from pigs from intensive system and from households. The biological material studied was provided from clinically healthy pigs of different ages. The animals were from four different locations. Serological examinations were performed by blood sampling [gathered from the confluence of jugular vein] before and after the vaccination. The investigations were performed by ELISA method. In the industrial breeding system, seroprevalence of anti PRRS presented high levels, in contrast to the low level of postvaccinal E. rhusopathiae antibodies. In households the incidence of PRRS virus was low and the seroconversion after the vaccination was raised. The morphopathological and bacteriological examinations performed from the lesions in various organs [lungs, lymph nodes, liver, spleen and intestine] has revealed the presence of germ association, pathogenic or potentially pathogenic. The results point the link between the existence of PRRS virus in the swine populations and post-vaccinal response, its presence interfering significantly with the vaccination protocols efficacy.

  20. The impact of anti HPV vaccination on cervical cancer incidence and HPV induced cervical lesions: consequences for clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, J A; Caffrey, A S; Muderspach, L I; Roman, L D; Kast, W M

    2005-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Screening for cervical cancer is accomplished utilizing a Pap smear and pelvic exam. While this technology is widely available and has reduced cervical cancer incidence in industrialized nations, it is not readily available in third world countries in which cervical cancer incidence and mortality is high. Development of cervical cancer is associated with infection with high risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) creating a unique opportunity to prevent or treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination strategies. Several strategies have been examined in clinical trials for both the prevention of HPV infection and the treatment of pre-existing HPV-related disease. Clinical trials utilizing prophylactic vaccines containing virus-like particles (VLPs) indicate good vaccine efficacy and it is predicted that a prophylactic vaccine may be available within the next five years. But, preclinical research in this area continues in order to deal with issues such as cost of vaccination in underserved third world populations. A majority of clinical trials using therapeutic agents which aim to prevent the progression of pre-existing HPV associated lesions or cancers have shown limited efficacy in eradicating established tumors in humans possibly due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Future trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents will examine patients with early stage cancers or pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field continue and include the further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. Given that cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions and prophylactic vaccination to

  1. Activation of host immune responses in neonatal calves and interference with TB diagnostics after immunization with a commercial heat-killed vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major drawback of current whole-cell vaccines for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the potential interference with diagnostic tests for bovine tuberculosis and paratuberculosis. The current study was designed to explore cross-reactivity of the current USDA commercial vaccine for MAP ...

  2. Regulatory T cell frequencies and phenotypes following anti-viral vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Charlotte M T de Wolf

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Treg function in the prevention of excessive inflammation and maintenance of immunological homeostasis. However, these cells may also interfere with resolution of infections or with immune reactions following vaccination. Effects of Treg on vaccine responses are nowadays investigated, but the impact of vaccination on Treg homeostasis is still largely unknown. This may be a relevant safety aspect, since loss of tolerance through reduced Treg may trigger autoimmunity. In exploratory clinical trials, healthy adults were vaccinated with an influenza subunit vaccine plus or minus the adjuvant MF59®, an adjuvanted hepatitis B subunit vaccine or a live attenuated yellow fever vaccine. Frequencies and phenotypes of resting (rTreg and activated (aTreg subpopulations of circulating CD4+ Treg were determined and compared to placebo immunization. Vaccination with influenza vaccines did not result in significant changes in Treg frequencies and phenotypes. Vaccination with the hepatitis B vaccine led to slightly increased frequencies of both rTreg and aTreg subpopulations and a decrease in expression of functionality marker CD39 on aTreg. The live attenuated vaccine resulted in a decrease in rTreg frequency, and an increase in expression of activation marker CD25 on both subpopulations, possibly indicating a conversion from resting to migratory aTreg due to vaccine virus replication. To study the more local effects of vaccination on Treg in lymphoid organs, we immunized mice and analyzed the CD4+ Treg frequency and phenotype in draining lymph nodes and spleen. Vaccination resulted in a transient local decrease in Treg frequency in lymph nodes, followed by a systemic Treg increase in the spleen. Taken together, we showed that vaccination with vaccines with an already established safe profile have only minimal impact on frequencies and characteristics of Treg over time. These findings may serve as a bench-mark of inter-individual variation

  3. Association of serum anti-rotavirus immunoglobulin A antibody seropositivity and protection against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis: analysis of clinical trials of human rotavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvart, Brigitte; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Steele, A Duncan; Cunliffe, Nigel; Madhi, Shabir A; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay; Vinals, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials of the human rotavirus vaccine Rotarix™ (RV1) have demonstrated significant reductions in severe rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in children worldwide. However, no correlate of vaccine efficacy (VE) has yet been established. This paper presents 2 analyses which aimed to investigate whether serum anti-RV IgA measured by ELISA 1 or 2 mo post-vaccination can serve as a correlate of efficacy against RVGE: (1) In a large Phase III efficacy trial (Rota-037), the Prentice criteria for surrogate endpoints was applied to anti-RV IgA seropositivity 1 mo post-vaccination. These criteria determine whether a significant vaccine group effect can be predicted from the surrogate, namely seropositivity (anti-RV IgA concentration>20 U/mL); (2) Among other GSK-sponsored RV1 VE studies, 8 studies which assessed immunogenicity at 1 or 2 mo post-vaccination in all or a sub-cohort of enrolled subjects and had at least 10 RVGE episodes were included in a meta-analysis to measure the regression between clinical VE and VE predicted from immunogenicity (VE1). In Rota-037, anti-RV IgA seropositivity post-vaccination was associated with a lower incidence of any or severe RVGE, however, the proportion of vaccine group effect explained by seropositivity was only 43.6% and 32.7% respectively. This low proportion was due to the vaccine group effect observed in seronegative subjects. In the meta-analysis, the slope of the regression between clinical VE and VE1 was statistically significant. These two independent analyses support the hypothesis that post-vaccination anti-RV IgA seropositivity (antibody concentration ≥20 U/mL) may serve as a useful correlate of efficacy in clinical trials of RV1 vaccines.

  4. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  5. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  6. Immunoprophylaxis of infectious diseases in children: achievements and problems. Anti-vaccine movement as a barrier factor in immunization of the population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Dmytruk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on the state of immunization against major vaccine-controlled infections in international and regional subnational aspects. Some factors of worsening the epidemiological situation in Ukraine and the role of vaccination in the surveillance for infections that are controlled by means of specific immunoprophylaxis are identified. The features and causes of the anti-vaccine movement and possible ways of counteracting it are highlighted.

  7. The Effectiveness of Anti-R. equi Hyperimmune Plasma against R. equi Challenge in Thoroughbred Arabian Foals of Mares Vaccinated with R. equi Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Erganis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a pregnant mare immunization of a Rhodococcus equi (R. equi vaccine candidate containing a water-based nanoparticle mineral oil adjuvanted (Montanide IMS 3012 inactive bacterin and virulence-associated protein A (VapA, as well as the administration of anti-R. equi hyperimmune (HI plasma against R. equi challenge in the mares’ foals. The efficacy of passive immunizations (colostral passive immunity by mare vaccination and artificial passive immunity by HI plasma administration was evaluated based on clinical signs, complete blood count, blood gas analysis, serological response (ELISA, interleukin-4 (IL-4 and interferon gamma (IFN-γ, total cell count of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF samples, reisolation rate of R. equi from BALF samples (CFU/mL, lung samples (CFU/gr, and lesion scores of the organs and tissue according to pathological findings after necropsy in the foals. The vaccination of pregnant mares and HI plasma administration in the foals reduced the severity of R. equi pneumonia and lesion scores of the organs and tissue by 3.54-fold compared to the control foals. This study thus indicates that immunization of pregnant mares with R. equi vaccine candidate and administration of HI plasma in mares’ foals effectively protect foals against R. equi challenge.

  8. Vaccination against M. tuberculosis – what next after BCG?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Fol

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB still remains a huge global health problem. An increase in TB has been observed in many parts of the world, especially in poor and densely populated sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Tuberculosis affects not only the developing countries but also the relatively wealthy regions of Europe, particularly Eastern Europe, where drug-resistant mycobacterial strains are increasingly reported.Control of tuberculosis expansion is very difficult. It requires the long-term use of anti-mycobacterial drugs. Additionally, the HIV epidemic and the phenomenon of multi-drug resistance are assumed to be responsible for the increase in TB cases. Therefore the most reasonable form of anti-TB protection seems to be effective vaccination.At the beginning of the twentieth century the BCG vaccine was introduced into general use as the first and so far the only immune protector against tuberculosis. Now it is known that this vaccine is not powerful enough and induces protection at a relatively low level. Hence ongoing research on the development of a more powerful anti-mycobacterial vaccine is still needed. Many of the new formulations are in phase II or III of clinical trials and the results are promising. The search for new vaccines involves several strategies: modified virulence-attenuated [i]Mycobacterium tuberculosis[/i] strains, recombination of attenuated M. bovis BCG bacilli, immunogenic mycobacterial proteins and DNA encoding selected proteins as well as unrelated microorganisms used as carriers of mycobacterial antigens. The wide range of concepts is extremely important because new vaccines should serve for immunization of the broadest possible population, not only healthy individuals but also those who are immunocompromised.

  9. Development of non-toxic (anti-idiotypic) mucosal vaccines to block the absorption of the chemical carcinogen 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbart, L.K.; Keren, D.F.; McDonald, R.A.; Goslinoski, L.; Brownlee, B.E.; Lash, C.; Smart, J.B. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-15

    One difficulty in developing mucosal vaccines to block carcinogen absorption has been the necessity of using carcinogen, or closely related structural analogs, coupled to carrier proteins in the vaccine preparation. The authors have developed anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) antibodies capable of mimicking the carcinogenic epitope. Anti-AAF antibodies (Ab{sub 1}) were prepared from three different sources. Groups of four female BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with 50 ug of either the rabbit polyclonal IgG anti-AAF, or the most anti-AAF monoclonal IgG{sub 1}-KLH conjugate in a 50:50 emulsion of complete Freund's adjuvant; booster doses were given four weeks later. A third group of two mice was immunized with approximately 1 ug of affinity-purified rat IgG anti-AAF, and boosted four weeks later, then one year later. Retro-orbital blood samples were collected and assayed for anti-Id activity by ELISA. Although all three groups produced anti-idiotypic antibodies, the strongest response was observed in mice receiving the affinity-purified polyclonal rat IgG anti-AAF. Once anti-Id producing hybridoma clones have been isolated, the anti-Id antibodies will replace the carcinogen in vaccine preparations designed to elicit anti-carcinogen antibodies.

  10. Patients with Crohn's disease on anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy are at significant risk of inadequate response to the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Kyun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Ye, Byong Duk; Lee, Kang-Moon; Kim, You Sun; Rhee, Sang Youl; Kim, Hyo-Jong; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Moon, Won; Koo, Ja-Seol; Lee, Suck-Ho; Seo, Geom Seog; Park, Soo Jung; Choi, Chang Hwan; Jung, Sung-Ae; Hong, Sung Noh; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Eun Soo

    2014-05-01

    The effect of immunosuppressants on the efficacy of a variety of vaccines is a controversial issue in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this study we determined whether specific immunosuppressants impair the serological response to the standard 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) in a large cohort of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). This was a multi-center, prospective observational study of adult patients with CD at 15 academic teaching hospitals in Korea. The study population received one intramuscular injection of PPSV23. Anti-pneumococcal IgG antibody titers were measured by immunoassay prior to and 4weeks after vaccination. All vaccination-related adverse events and the effect of the vaccine on disease activity were also evaluated. The overall serological response rate was 67.5% (133/197). The serological response rate was significantly lower in patients on anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy (50.0% on anti-TNF alone; 58.0% on anti-TNF combined with an immunomodulator, IM) than patients on 5-aminosalicylate (78.4%; all P-values vs. 5-aminosalicylaterisk of an inadequate response to PPSV23. The pneumococcal vaccination strategy should be optimized for patients with CD on anti-TNF therapy. © 2013 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Outcomes of TB/HIV co-infected patients presenting with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    induced liver injury. ... South Africa has a significant burden of tuberculosis (TB). Anti-TB drug-induced liver injury (TB DILI) is one of the ... The rate of death/loss to follow-up was higher in the ART/TB DILI group (18.9% v. 14.5%). Conclusion.

  12. Find TB. Treat TB. Working together to eliminate TB.

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-26

    In this podcast, Dr. Sundari Mase, Medical Team Lead in the Field Services and Evaluation Branch in the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses World TB Day and the 2014 theme.  Created: 2/26/2014 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/26/2014.

  13. Effect of Complement Factor H on anti-FHbp Serum Bactericidal Antibody Responses of Infant Rhesus Macaques Boosted with a Licensed Meningococcal Serogroup B Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Beernink, Peter T.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2015-01-01

    FHbp is a major serogroup B meningococcal vaccine antigen. Binding of complement Factor H (FH) to FHbp is specific for human and some non-human primate FH. In previous studies, FH binding to FHbp vaccines impaired protective anti-FHbp antibody responses. In this study we investigated anti-FHbp antibody responses to a third dose of a licensed serogroup B vaccine (MenB-4C) in infant macaques vaccinated in a previous study with MenB-4C. Six macaques with high binding of FH to FHbp (FHhigh), and six with FHlow baseline phenotypes, were immunized three months after dose 2. After dose 2, macaques with the FHlow baseline phenotype had serum anti-FHbp antibodies that enhanced FH binding to FHbp (functionally converting them to a FHhigh phenotype). In this group, activation of the classical complement pathway (C4b deposition) by serum anti-FHbp antibody, and anti-FHbp serum bactericidal titers were lower after dose 3 than after dose 2 (pbactericidal titers were similar after doses 2 and 3. Two macaques developed serum anti-FH autoantibodies after dose 2, which were not detected after dose 3. In conclusion, in macaques with the FHlow baseline phenotype whose post-dose 2 serum anti-FHbp antibodies had converted them to FHhigh, the anti-FHbp antibody repertoire to dose 3 was skewed to less protective epitopes than after dose 2. Mutant FHbp vaccines that eliminate FH binding may avoid eliciting anti-FHbp antibodies that enhance FH binding, and confer greater protection with less risk of inducing anti-FH autoantibodies than FHbp vaccines that bind FH. PMID:26562320

  14. Effect of complement Factor H on anti-FHbp serum bactericidal antibody responses of infant rhesus macaques boosted with a licensed meningococcal serogroup B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-12-16

    FHbp is a major serogroup B meningococcal vaccine antigen. Binding of complement Factor H (FH) to FHbp is specific for human and some non-human primate FH. In previous studies, FH binding to FHbp vaccines impaired protective anti-FHbp antibody responses. In this study we investigated anti-FHbp antibody responses to a third dose of a licensed serogroup B vaccine (MenB-4C) in infant macaques vaccinated in a previous study with MenB-4C. Six macaques with high binding of FH to FHbp (FH(high)), and six with FH(low) baseline phenotypes, were immunized three months after dose 2. After dose 2, macaques with the FH(low) baseline phenotype had serum anti-FHbp antibodies that enhanced FH binding to FHbp (functionally converting them to a FH(high) phenotype). In this group, activation of the classical complement pathway (C4b deposition) by serum anti-FHbp antibody, and anti-FHbp serum bactericidal titers were lower after dose 3 than after dose 2 (pb deposition and bactericidal titers were similar after doses 2 and 3. Two macaques developed serum anti-FH autoantibodies after dose 2, which were not detected after dose 3. In conclusion, in macaques with the FH(low) baseline phenotype whose post-dose 2 serum anti-FHbp antibodies had converted them to FH(high), the anti-FHbp antibody repertoire to dose 3 was skewed to less protective epitopes than after dose 2. Mutant FHbp vaccines that eliminate FH binding may avoid eliciting anti-FHbp antibodies that enhance FH binding, and confer greater protection with less risk of inducing anti-FH autoantibodies than FHbp vaccines that bind FH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of antiretroviral therapy in reducing TB incidence and mortality in high HIV-TB burden countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D Harries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With the adoption of the new Sustainable Development Goals in 2016, all countries have committed to end the tuberculosis (TB epidemic by 2030, defined as dramatic reductions in TB incidence and mortality combined with zero TB-induced catastrophic costs for families. This paper explores how antiretroviral therapy (ART in high HIV-TB burden countries may help in reducing TB incidence and mortality and thus contribute to the ambitious goal of ending TB. ART in people living with HIV has a potent TB preventive effect, with this being most apparent in those with the most advanced immunodeficiency. Early ART also significantly reduces the risk of TB, and with new World Health Organization guidance released in 2015 about initiating ART in all persons living with HIV irrespective of CD4 count, there is the potential for enormous benefit at the population level. Already, several countries with high HIVTB burdens have seen dramatic declines in TB case notification rates since ART scale up started in 2004. In patients already diagnosed with HIV-associated TB, mortality can be significantly decreased by ART, especially if started within 2–8 weeks of anti-TB treatment. The benefits of ART on TB incidence and TB mortality can be further augmented respectively by the addition of isoniazid preventive therapy and cotrimoxazole preventive therapy. These interventions must be effectively implemented and scaled up in order to end the TB epidemic by 2030.

  16. Chest Radiographs for Pediatric TB Diagnosis: Interrater Agreement and Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kaguthi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chest radiograph (CXR is considered a key diagnostic tool for pediatric tuberculosis (TB in clinical management and endpoint determination in TB vaccine trials. We set out to compare interrater agreement for TB diagnosis in western Kenya. A pediatric pulmonologist and radiologist (experts, a medical officer (M.O, and four clinical officers (C.Os with basic training in pediatric CXR reading blindly assessed CXRs of infants who were TB suspects in a cohort study. C.Os had access to clinical findings for patient management. Weighted kappa scores summarized interrater agreement on lymphadenopathy and abnormalities consistent with TB. Sensitivity and specificity of raters were determined using microbiologically confirmed TB as the gold standard (n=8. A total of 691 radiographs were reviewed. Agreement on abnormalities consistent with TB was poor; k=0.14 (95% CI: 0.10–0.18 and on lymphadenopathy moderate k=0.26 (95% CI: 0.18–0.36. M.O [75% (95% CI: 34.9%–96.8%] and C.Os [63% (95% CI: 24.5%–91.5%] had high sensitivity for culture confirmed TB. TB vaccine trials utilizing expert agreement on CXR as a nonmicrobiologically confirmed endpoint will have reduced specificity and will underestimate vaccine efficacy. C.Os detected many of the bacteriologically confirmed cases; however, this must be interpreted cautiously as they were unblinded to clinical features.

  17. Pre-Clinical Development of BCG.HIVACAT, an Antibiotic-Free Selection Strain, for HIV-TB Pediatric Vaccine Vectored by Lysine Auxotroph of BCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saubi, Narcís; Mbewe-Mvula, Alice; Gea-Mallorqui, Ester; Rosario, Maximillian; Gatell, Josep Maria; Hanke, Tomáš; Joseph, Joan

    2012-01-01

    In the past, we proposed to develop a heterologous recombinant BCG prime-recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost dual pediatric vaccine platform against transmission of breast milk HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In this study, we assembled an E. coli-mycobacterial shuttle plasmid pJH222.HIVACAT expressing HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector employs an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism based on Operator-Repressor Titration (ORT) system for plasmid selection and maintenance in E. coli and lysine complementation in mycobacteria. This shuttle plasmid was electroporated into parental lysine auxotroph (safer) strain of BCG to generate vaccine BCG.HIVACAT. All procedures complied with Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs). We demonstrated that the episomal plasmid pJH222.HIVACAT was stable in vivo over a 20-week period, and genetically and phenotypically characterized the BCG.HIVACAT vaccine strain. The BCG.HIVACAT vaccine in combination with MVA.HIVA induced HIV-1- and Mtb-specific interferon γ-producing T-cell responses in newborn and adult BALB/c mice. On the other hand, when adult mice were primed with BCG.HIVACAT and boosted with MVA.HIVA.85A, HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and CD107a were induced. To assess the biosafety profile of BCG.HIVACAT-MVA.HIVA regimen, body mass loss of newborn mice was monitored regularly throughout the vaccination experiment and no difference was observed between the vaccinated and naïve groups of animals. Thus, we demonstrated T-cell immunogenicity of a novel, safer, GLP-compatible BCG-vectored vaccine using prototype immunogen HIVA. Second generation immunogens derived from HIV-1 as well as other major pediatric pathogens can be constructed in a similar fashion to prime protective responses soon after birth. PMID:22927933

  18. Combination of TB lymphadenitis and metastatic LAP in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhassan Talaiezadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB may present as pulmonary and extra-pulmonary. TB lymphadenitis is the most common presentation of extra-pulmonary TB. TB lymphadenitis should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of different disorders such as metastatic lymphadenopathy. The reported patient was a 65-year-old lady with breast cancer and conglomerated and matted axillary lymphadenopathy who received chemotherapy. She presented with more extensive axillary LAP contrary to our expectation. Modified radical mastectomy was done and pathology analysis reported TB lymphadenitis associated with metastatic LAP. Under cover of anti-TB therapy adjuvant chemoradiation therapy was started. Accordingly, we recommend TB be ruled out in every patient who needs chemotherapy in the endemic region because chemotherapy may cause the extension of TB in the body.

  19. [Anti-HBs persistence following revaccination with three doses of hepatitis B vaccine among low-responsive adults after primary vaccination: a 4-year follow-up study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, J J; Yin, X W; Yan, B Y; Liu, J Y; Feng, Y; Wu, W L; Chen, S Y; Zhou, L B; Liang, X F; Cui, F Q; Wang, F Z; Zhang, L; Xu, A Q

    2016-06-01

    To assess the 4-year anti-HBs persistence after revaccination with 3-dose of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) among low-responsive adults. A total of 24 237 healthy adults who had no history of hepatitis B infection and hepatitis B vaccination, resided in the local area for more than six months and were aged 18-49 years were selected from 79 villages of Zhangqiu county, Shandong province, China in 2009. Blood samples were obtained and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) and antibody against hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) were detected using ELISA method. A total of 11 590 persons who were negative for all of these indicators were divided into four groups by cluster sampling method. Each group was vaccinated with one of the following four types of HepB at 0-1-6 months schedule: 20 μg HepB derived in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (HepB-SC), 20 μg HepB derived in Chinese hamster ovary cell (HepB-CHO), 10 μg HepB-SC and 10 μg HepB derived in Hansenula polymorpha (HepB-HP). Blood samples were collected one month after the third dose of primary immunization and tested for anti-HBs using chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay (CMIA). The 892 low-responders were revaccinated with three doses of HepB at 0-1-6 months schedule and the type of HepB was the same as which was used for primary immunization. During the follow-up to low-responders, the following informations were collected: the demographic characteristics (including age, gender), histories of hepatitis B infection, hepatitis B vaccination, smoking, drinking and chronic diseases. Blood samples were collected one month (T1) and four years after revaccination and anti-HBs, anti-HBc and HBsAg (if anti-HBs low-responders. Among 529 participants, 276 (52.2%) were males and 253 (47.8%) were females. The positive rate was 82.6% (437/529) at T1 and it decreased to 28.2% (149/529) four years after revaccination. The corresponding GMC decreased from 542.06 (95% CI

  20. The influence of antigen targeting to sub-cellular compartments on the anti-allergic potential of a DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Esther E; Isakovic, Almedina; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ramsauer, Christina; Reiter, Katrin; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-12-09

    Gene vaccines offer attractive rationales for prophylactic as well as therapeutic treatments of type I allergies. DNA and mRNA vaccines have been shown to prevent from allergic sensitization and to counterbalance established allergic immune reactions. Recent advances in gene vaccine manipulation offer additional opportunities for modulation of T helper cell profiles by specific targeting of cellular compartments. DNA vaccines encoding the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.0101 were equipped with different leader sequences to shuttle the antigen to lysosomes (LIMP-II), to trigger cellular secretion (hTPA), or to induce proteasomal degradation via forced ubiquitination (ubi). Mice were pre-vaccinated with these constructs and the protective efficacy was tested by subcutaneous Th2-promoting challenges, followed by allergen inhalation. IgG antibody subclass distribution and allergen-specific IgE as well as cytokine profiles from re-stimulated splenocytes and from BALFs were assessed. The cellular composition of BALFs, and lung resistance and compliance were determined. Immunization with all targeting variants protected from allergic sensitization, i.e. IgE induction, airway hyperresponsiveness, lung inflammation, and systemic and local Th2 cytokine expression. Surprisingly, protection did not clearly correlate with the induction of a systemic Th1 cytokine profile, but rather with proliferating CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory cells in splenocyte cultures. Targeting the allergen to proteasomal or lysosomal degradation severely down-regulated antibody induction after vaccination, while T cell responses remained unaffected. Although secretion of antigen promoted the highest numbers of Th1 cells, this vaccine type was the least efficient in suppressing the establishment of an allergic immune response. This comparative analysis highlights the modulatory effect of antigen targeting on the resulting immune response, with a special emphasis on prophylactic anti-allergy DNA

  1. Current status of new tuberculosis vaccine in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yu; Zhao, Aihua; Cohen, Chad; Kang, Wanli; Lu, Jie; Wang, Guozhi; Zhao, Yanlin; Zheng, Suhua

    2016-04-02

    Pediatric tuberculosis contributes significantly to the burden of TB disease worldwide. In order to achieve the goal of eliminating TB by 2050, an effective TB vaccine is urgently needed to prevent TB transmission in children. BCG vaccination can protect children from the severe types of TB such as TB meningitis and miliary TB, while its efficacy against pediatric pulmonary TB ranged from no protection to very high protection. In recent decades, multiple new vaccine candidates have been developed, and shown encouraging safety and immunogenicity in the preclinical experiments. However, the limited data on protective efficacy in infants evaluated by clinical trials has been disappointing, an example being MVA85A. To date, no vaccine has been shown to be clinically safer and more effective than the presently licensed BCG vaccine. Hence, before a new vaccine is developed with more promising efficacy, we must reconsider how to better use the current BCG vaccine to maximize its effectiveness in children.

  2. Peptide vaccination against multiple myeloma using peptides derived from anti-apoptotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nicolai Grønne; Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Abildgaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family of proteins play a crucial role in multiple myeloma (MM), contributing to lacking apoptosis which is a hallmark of the disease. This makes the Bcl-2 proteins interesting targets for therapeutic peptide vaccination. We report a phase I trial of therapeutic...... vaccination with peptides from the proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Mcl-1 in patients with relapsed MM. Vaccines were given concomitant with bortezomib. Out of 7 enrolled patients, 4 received the full course of 8 vaccinations. The remaining 3 patients received fewer vaccinations due to progression, clinical...... decision of lacking effect and development of hypercalcemia, respectively. There were no signs of toxicity other than what was to be expected from bortezomib. Immune responses to the peptides were seen in all 6 patients receiving more than 2 vaccinations. Three patients had increased immune responses after...

  3. High Titers of Mucosal and Systemic anti-PrP Antibodies Abrogates Oral Prion Infection in Mucosal Vaccinated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi, Fernando; Chabalgoity, Jose A.; Prelli, Frances; Schreiber, Fernanda; Scholtzova, Henrieta; Chung, Erika; Kascsak, Richard; Kascsak, Regina; Brown, David R.; Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Significant outbreaks of prion disease linked to oral exposure of the prion agent have occurred in animal and human populations. These disorders are associated with a conformational change of a normal protein, PrPC, to a toxic and infectious form, PrPSc. None of the prionoses currently have an effective treatment. Some forms of prion disease are thought to be spread by oral ingestion of PrPSc, such as chronic wasting disease and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Attempts to obtain an active immunization in wild-type animals have been hampered by auto-tolerance to PrP and potential toxicity. Previously, we demonstrated that it is possible to overcome tolerance and obtain a specific anti-PrP antibody response by oral inoculation of the PrP protein expressed in an attenuated Salmonella vector. This past study showed that 30% of vaccinated animals were free of disease more than 350 days post-challenge. In the current study we have both optimized the vaccination protocol and divided the vaccinated mice into low and high immune responder groups prior to oral challenge with PrPSc scrapie strain 139A. These methodological refinements lead to a significantly improved therapeutic response. 100% of mice with a high mucosal anti-PrP titer IgA and a high systemic IgG titer, prior to challenge, remained without symptoms of PrP infection at 400 days (long-rank test poral route PMID:18407424

  4. Dectin-1-Syk-CARD9 Signaling Pathway in TB Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Wagener

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the first steps toward mounting an effective immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is recognition of the pathogen through pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs expressed by innate immune cells. Activation of the PRR Dectin-1 by an unknown mycobacterial ligand triggers an intracellular signaling cascade involving numerous proteins, including spleen tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C-delta, and caspase recruitment domain family member 9, some of which have been shown to influence host immune response to TB infection. Here, we review the role of Dectin-1 signaling pathway in anti-mycobacterial immunity and discuss its contribution in the control of Mtb infection, and potential applications in TB vaccine adjuvanticity.

  5. Enhanced synergistic anti-Lewis lung carcinoma effect of a DNA vaccine harboring a MUC1-VEGFR2 fusion gene used with GM-CSF as an adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Junzhong; Duan, Yong; Li, Fugen; Wang, Zitong

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve a synergistic effect on anti-tumour and anti-angiogenesis activity, we designed and constructed a DNA vaccine that expresses MUC1and VEGFR2 in the same reading frame. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-tumour activity of this DNA vaccine. Furthermore, we also investigated the enhanced synergistic anti-Lewis lung carcinoma effect of this DNA vaccine by using GM-CSF as an adjuvant. A series of DNA plasmids encoding MUC1, VEGFR2, GM-CSF, and their conjugates were constructed and injected into mice intramuscularly (i.m.) followed by an electric pulse. The humoral and cellular immune responses after immunization were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT), respectively. To evaluate the anti-tumour efficacy of these plasmids, murine models with MUC1-expressing tumours were generated. After injection into the tumour-bearing mouse model, the plasmid carrying the fusion gene of MUC1 and VEGFR2 showed stronger inhibition of tumour growth than the plasmid expressing MUC1 or VEGFR2 alone, which indicated that MUC1 and VEGFR2 could exert a synergistic anti-tumour effect. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with the combination of the GM-CSF expressing plasmid and the plasmid carrying the fusion gene of MUC1 and VEGFR2 showed an increased inhibition in the growth of MUC1-expressing tumours and prolonged mouse survival. These observations emphasize the potential of the synergistic anti-tumour and anti-angiogenesis strategy used in DNA vaccines, and the potential of the GM-CSF gene as an adjuvant for DNA vaccines, which could represent a promising approach for tumour immunotherapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. [Cost-utility analysis on universal childhood hepatitis A vaccination in regions with different anti-HAV prevalence rates of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xin-juan; Feng, Yan-ming; Zhuang, Gui-hua

    2012-08-01

    To explore the inputs and outputs of areas with different anti-HAV prevalence rates on universal childhood vaccination, and to provide a scientific basis for the formulation of the immunization strategy. Since hepatitis A vaccination was scheduled at 12 and 18 months of age for all the healthy children, a single cohort including 1 000 000 individuals was formed in 2009, using the Chinese inactivated vaccine. Decision analysis was used to build Markov-decision tree model. The universal childhood hepatitis A vaccination was compared with non-vaccination group to evaluate the number of symptomatic infection, hospitalization, death, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) lost, and the incremental cost-utility from the health system and the societal perspectives. Outcomes of the vaccination for the next 70 years were also predicted. The process of analysis was run separately in five regions defined by the anti-HAV prevalence rates (around 50%, 50% - 69%, 70% - 79%, 80% - 89% and > 90%). Sensitivity analysis was performed to test the stability or reliability of the results, and to identify sensitive variables. The study projected that, in the lowest, lower, and intermediate infection regions, the cost and output indicators of universal childhood hepatitis A vaccination were all lower than non-vaccinated group. Universal vaccination could gain QALYs and save both costs from the health system or the society. In the regions with higher infection rate, the output indicators of universal childhood hepatitis A vaccination were lower than in those non-vaccinated groups, except for the number of death due to hepatitis A, which had a 20 cases of increase. The model also predicted that in the highest infected region, universal vaccination would increase 4 560 814 and 5 840 430 RMB Yuan in the total costs from both the health system and the societies, respectively, when compared to the non-vaccination groups. Universal vaccination would also decrease the numbers of symptomatic

  7. [The long controversy over anti-tuberculosis vaccination in Canada: the Calmette-Guerin bacillus (BCG), 1925-1975].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malissard, P

    1998-01-01

    The focus of this article is the history of Canada's reception of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), an anti-tuberculosis vaccine which has almost constantly been plagued with controversy. The article examines this vaccine NRCC sponsored introduction in 1925, which led to the creation of the Associate Committee on Tuberculosis Research, a committee almost unique for its acrimonious debates. It also analyzes the interests at stakes in the ultimate rejection of the BCG by the federal Department of Agriculture veterinary services and, with the exception of Quebec and Newfoundland, by almost all public health authorities in Canada. Based on sources never taped before, this paper sheds a light on the multiple ramifications of a little known episode of the Canadian public health history.

  8. The pig as a large preclinical model for therapeutic human anti-cancer vaccine development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Welner, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Development of therapeutic cancer vaccines has largely been based on rodent models and the majority failed to establish therapeutic responses in clinical trials. We therefore used pigs as a large animal model for human cancer vaccine development due to the large similarity between the porcine...

  9. Results of a study of the reactogenic and immunogenic properties of live anti-poliomyelitis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SMORODINTSEV, A A; DAVIDENKOVA, E F; DROBYSHEVSKA YA, A I; ILYENKO, V I; GOREV, N E; KURNOSOVA, L M; KLYUCHAREVA, T E

    1959-01-01

    The authors have studied the harmlessness and immunogenic properties of live poliomyelitis vaccine made in Leningrad from Sabin strains of low pathogenicity for monkeys. More than 20 000 children of pre-school (6 months to 3 years) and school age (7-14 years) were each given 100 000 tissue-culture infective doses of virus of types 1, 2 and 3, injected either in three stages at monthly intervals in the form of monovaccines, or in two stages, a monovaccine of type 1 being followed after a month's interval by injection of a divalent vaccine of types 2 and 3. The vaccination caused no symptoms of lesions of the central nervous system or other organs. In the blood of the inoculated children there was a regular build-up of virus-neutralizing antibodies to the serotypes mentioned, the intensity of which depended on the antibody level before vaccination and was in a constant relationship to the multiplication of the virus in the intestinal canal. The antibody titre was maintained at high levels for 6-9 months after immunization and fell a little after 12-18 months. The vaccinal virus is easily transferred from vaccinated children to contact groups, which are gradually vaccinated by this natural means.Lengthy and numerous passages of vaccinal strains through the intestinal canal of normal, susceptible children showed that strains may periodically appear which have a higher neurotropic activity for monkeys. This activity, however, did not increase in subsequent passage and returned to the initial level.

  10. Anti-botulism single-shot vaccine using chitosan for protein encapsulation by simple coacervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Roger S; de Almeida, Anna Christina; Cangussu, Alex S R; Jorge, Edson V; Mozzer, Otto D; Santos, Hércules Otacílio; Quintilio, Wagner; Brandi, Igor Viana; Andrade, Viviane Aguiar; Miguel, Angelo Samir M; Sobrinho Santos, Eliane M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the potency and safety of vaccines against Clostridium botulinum (C. botulinum) type C and D formulated with chitosan as controlled release matrix and vaccines formulated in conventional manner using aluminum hydroxide. Parameters were established for the development of chitosan microspheres, using simple coacervation to standardize the use of this polymer in protein encapsulation for vaccine formulation. To formulate a single shot vaccine inactivated antigens of C. botulinum type C and D were used with original toxin titles equal to 5.2 and 6.2 log LD50/ml, respectively. For each antigen a chitosan based solution of 50 mL was prepared. Control vaccines were formulated by mixing toxoid type C and D with aluminum hydroxide [25% Al(OH) 3 , pH 6.3]. The toxoid sterility, innocuity and potency of vaccines were evaluated as stipulated by MAPA-BRASIL according to ministerial directive no. 23. Encapsulation efficiency of BSA in chitosan was 32.5-40.37%, while that the encapsulation efficiency to toxoid type C was 41,03% (1.94 mg/mL) and of the toxoid type D was 32.30% (1.82 mg/mL). The single shot vaccine formulated using chitosan for protein encapsulation through simple coacervation showed potency and safety similar to conventional vaccine currently used in Brazilian livestock (10 and 2 IU/mL against C. botulinum type C and D, respectively). The present work suggests that our single shot vaccine would be a good option as a cattle vaccine against these C. botulinum type C and D. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Serum Anti-HBs Level Among Children Who Received Routine Hepatitis B Vaccination During Infancy in Mianyang City, China: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fang; Ma, Yuan-ji; Zhou, Tao-you; Duan, Jin-chao; Wang, Jun-feng; Ji, Yu-lin; Li, Hong; Zhang, Ju-ying; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) prevalence has declined remarkably in children due to nationwide universal vaccination program for HBV in China. However, the persistence of immune response against HBV infection and the optimal time point when a booster vaccination should be performed remain to be elucidated. To assess the persistence and level of antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) in a representative population of age 15 and younger who received routine hepatitis B vaccination in Mianyang City, China. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011. One thousand five hundred twenty-six children of age 15 and younger who received three doses of 5 μg hepatitis B vaccine series during infancy but did not receive a booster vaccination later were enrolled. Of the 1,526 children, the mean age was 8.2 ± 4.1 and 739 children were male. The median anti-HBs level was 23.0 mIU/mL, and the total percentage of anti-HBs levels ≥10 mIU/mL was 60.9%. With an increase of age, median anti-HBs level, percentage of anti-HBs levels ≥10 mIU/mL, and percentage of anti-HBs levels ≥100 mIU/mL declined remarkably in the early period and reached the lowest level at the age of 3 and then remained relatively stable. The median anti-HBs level, the percentage of anti-HBs levels ≥10 mIU/mL, and the percentage of anti-HBs levels ≥100 mIU/mL in 1- and 2-year-old children were much higher than that in children aged 3-15 (p children of 15 and younger who received three doses of 5 μg hepatitis B vaccine series during infancy in China. Three dosages of 10 μg hepatitis B vaccine for infants and repeated vaccination or additional booster vaccination for some children at or before age 3 should be provided to get much more powerful immunity to HBV.

  12. Studying anti-vaccination behavior and attitudes: A systematic review of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eritsyan, Ksenia Y.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunization is one of the most significant achievements of public health over the last 100 years. Recently, however, people have been increasingly refusing to vaccinate. There are a large number of separate studies on how pervasive this behavior is and what fac- tors influence it, but no systematic review has been undertaken so far that looked at these studies as a whole. To conduct an analysis of studies that examine vaccine refusal and negative attitudes towards vaccination, focusing on the methodological approaches to the study of these problems and evaluation of their quality. A systematic review of English-language studies published between 1980 and 2015, using the Web of ScienceTM Core Collection database. The final review dealt with 31 papers. The studies in question were mainly conducted in North America and Western Europe. They were published three years after conclusion, on average. We have identified five different approaches to the study of these problems: 1 studies of parents’ attitudes and behavior; 2 analysis of vaccination records; 3 studies of attitudes and behavior among the general population; 4 studies of medical professionals’ attitudes, behavior, and experience; and 5 others. We found that theoretical models were not commonly used at the planning stage, while the studies also lacked a common approach to the operationalization of vaccine refusal, as well as of negative attitudes towards vaccination. Several promising directions have been identified for future studies on vaccine refusal and negative attitudes towards vac- cination.

  13. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not work well for all pets. Your veterinarian will determine a vaccination schedule most appropriate for ... programs, but in some instances may help your veterinarian determine if your pet has a reasonable expectation ...

  14. DNA plasmid vaccine carrying Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) major outer membrane and human papillomavirus 16L2 proteins for anti-Ct infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ledan; Cai, Yiqi; Xiong, Yirong; Du, Wangqi; Cen, Danwei; Zhang, Chanqiong; Song, Yiling; Zhu, Shanli; Xue, Xiangyang; Zhang, Lifang

    2017-05-16

    Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is one of the most frequently encountered sexual infection all over the world, yielding tremendous reproductive problems (e.g. infertility and ectopic pregnancy) in the women. This work described the design of a plasmid vaccine that protect mice from Ct infection, and reduce productive tract damage by generating effective antibody and cytotoxic T cell immunity. The vaccine, s was composed of MOMP multi-epitope and HPV16L2 genes carried in pcDNA plasmid (i.e. pcDNA3.1/MOMP/HPV16L). In transfection, the vaccine expressed the chimeric genes (i.e. MOMP and HPV16L2), as demonstrated via western blot, RT-PCR and fluorescence imaging. In vitro, the vaccine transfected COS-7 cells and expressed the proteins corresponding to the genes carried in the vaccine. Through intramuscular immunization in BALB/c mice, the vaccine induced higher levels of anti-Ct IgG titer, anti-HPV16L2 IgG titer in serum and IgA titer in local mucosal secretions, compared to plasmid vaccines that carry only Ct MOMP multi-epitope or HPV16L2 chimeric component only. In mice intravaginally challenged with Ct, the vaccines pcDNA3.1/MOMP/HPV16L2 generated a higher level of genital protection compared to other vaccine formulations. Additionally, histochemical staining indicated that pcDNA3.1/MOMP/HPV16L2 eliminated mouse genital tract tissue pathologies induced by Ct infection. This work demonstrated that pcDNA/MOMP/HPV16L2 vaccine can protect against Ct infection by regulating antibody production, cytotoxic T cell killing functions and reducing pathological damage in mice genital tract. This work can potentially offer us a new vaccine platform against Ct infection.

  15. A flow cytometry-based workflow for detection and quantification of anti-plasmodial antibodies in vaccinated and naturally exposed individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajua, Anthony; Engleitner, Thomas; Esen, Meral

    2012-01-01

    information about natural exposure and vaccine immunogenicity. A novel, cytometry-based workflow for the quantitative detection of anti-plasmodial antibodies in human serum is presented. METHODS: Fixed red blood cells (RBCs), infected with late stages of P. falciparum were utilized to detect malaria......-specific antibodies by flow cytometry with subsequent automated data analysis. Available methods for data-driven analysis of cytometry data were assessed and a new overlap subtraction algorithm (OSA) based on open source software was developed. The complete workflow was evaluated using sera from two GMZ2 malaria...... children vaccinated with 100 mug GMZ2 was present and in vaccinated adults from the same region we measured a baseline-corrected 1.23-fold, vaccine-induced increase in mean fluorescence intensity of positive cells (p=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The current workflow advances detection and quantification of anti...

  16. Protection status against hepatitis B infection assessed fromanti-HBs level, history of vaccination andhistory of infection based on anti-HBc in medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annisa; Zain, LH; Loesnihari, R.

    2018-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most contagious pathogens where the risk of exposure is very high among health care workers, especially students in the clerkship. This study describes the protection status by measuring anti-HBs level, history of vaccination, and history of HBV infection in medical students.Forty-four (44) students over 18 years old were randomly selected, interviewed for their vaccination history and then had their blood serum taken for anti-HBs and anti-HBc examinations to determine the protectivity and history of infection.There were 81.8% students without a protective anti-HBs level. Before starting their clerkship, 18.2% students received thevaccination, and only one-fourth formed protective antibody level above 10mIU/mL. Seventeen (38.6%) students had been exposed to HBV(positive anti-HBc), and only six of them showed protective anti-HBs level. None of the students that received vaccine underwent a post-vaccination serological test (PVST) to determine their immune response. These results indicated the vulnerability of medical students to the risk of HBV transmission while performing medical care. With the high incidence of HBV transmission, educational institutions are encouraged to make provisions for vulnerable students to receive a booster and an adequate PVST before their clerkship.

  17. Selection of a novel anti-nicotine vaccine: influence of antigen design on antibody function in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Pryde

    Full Text Available Anti-nicotine vaccines may aid smoking cessation via the induction of anti-nicotine antibodies (Ab which reduce nicotine entering the brain, and hence the associated reward. Ab function depends on both the quantity (titer and the quality (affinity of the Ab. Anti-nicotine vaccines tested previously in clinical studies had poor efficacy despite high Ab titer, and this may be due to inadequate function if Ab of low affinity were induced. In this study, we designed and synthesized a series of novel nicotine-like haptens which were all linked to diphtheria toxoid (DT as carrier, but which differed in the site of attachment of linker to nicotine, the nature of linker used, and the handle used to attach the hapten to DT. The resulting hapten conjugates were evaluated in a mouse model, using CpG (a TLR9 agonist and aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH3 as adjuvants, whereby Ab titers, affinity and function were evaluated using a radiolabeled nicotine challenge model. A series of additional linkers varying in length, rigidity and polarity were used with a single hapten to generate additional DT-conjugates, which were also tested in mice. Conjugates made with different haptens resulted in various titers of anti-nicotine Ab. Several haptens gave similarly high Ab titers, but among these, Ab affinity and hence function varied considerably. Linker also influenced Ab titer, affinity and function. These results demonstrate that immune responses induced in mice by nicotine-conjugate antigens are greatly influenced by hapten design including site of attachment of linker to nicotine, the nature of linker used, and the handle used to attach the hapten to DT. While both Ab titer and affinity contributed to function, affinity was more sensitive to antigen differences.

  18. A readability comparison of anti- versus pro-influenza vaccination online messages in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Okuhara

    2017-06-01

    When health professionals prepare pro-influenza vaccination materials for publication online, we recommend they check for readability using readability assessment tools and improve the text for easy reading if necessary.

  19. Une plateforme pour la mise au point d'un vaccin anti-adénovirus ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    il y a 5 jours ... Un contrôle de la MN par la vaccination est l'intervention la plus rentable, surtout dans les secteurs à faible revenu où d'autres options, telles que des mesures sanitaires, sont irréalisables. Les vaccins actuels de MN, qui sont une forme vivante mais affaiblie du virus, fournissent une protection médiocre et ...

  20. Acute hepatitis B virus infection with simultaneous high HBsAg and high anti-HBs signals in a previously HBV vaccinated HIV-1 positive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dommelen, Laura; Verbon, Annelies; van Doorn, H Rogier; Goossens, Valère J

    2010-03-01

    We present a case of a clinical manifest hepatitis B virus infection and a potentially misleading HBV serological profile in an HIV-1 positive patient despite previous HBV vaccination. The patient presented with an acute hepatitis B and there was no indication of chronic HBV infection or the presence of a mutation in the 'a' determinant. Remarkably, simultaneously with high HBV surface antigen and HBV viral load, high anti-HBs antibodies were present. If, due to previous HBV vaccination only anti-HBs was tested in this patient, the result of the high anti-HBs antibodies could be very misleading and offering a false sense of security. Our findings contribute to the ongoing discussion on how to assess HBV specific immunological memory and determining the role of HBV booster vaccinations in immunocompromised individuals.

  1. Systematic Information to Health-Care Professionals about Vaccination Guidelines Improves Adherence in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Anti-TNFα Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Katrine R; Steenholdt, Casper; Buhl, Sine S

    2015-01-01

    (32%) and insufficient consultation time (26%). Patient-perceived barriers were costs of vaccinations (35%) and forgetfulness (25%). CONCLUSIONS: Gastroenterologists' limited knowledge of vaccination guidelines during anti-TNFα therapy can be overcome by systematic education of health......OBJECTIVES: Implementation of guidelines for prevention of infectious diseases during anti-TNFα therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is important but difficult. We investigated whether systematic information to health-care professionals about these guidelines improves patients......' adherence. METHODS: The study comprised three parts: (1) cross-sectional evaluation of baseline vaccination status in all IBD patients in anti-TNFα therapy (reference group; n=130); (2) prospective interventional study, where health-care professionals received systematic oral and written information about...

  2. Functional anti-polysaccharide IgG titres induced by unadjuvanted pneumococcal-conjugate vaccine when delivered by microprojection-based skin patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Frances E; Muller, David A; Roalfe, Lucy; Zancolli, Marta; Goldblatt, David; Kendall, Mark A F

    2015-11-27

    Adequate access to effective and affordable vaccines is essential for the prevention of mortality due to infectious disease. Pneumonia--a consequence of Streptococcus pneumoniae infection--is the world's leading cause of death in children aged under 5 years. The development of a needle-free, thermostable pneumococcal-conjugate vaccine (PCV) could revolutionise the field by reducing cold-chain and delivery constraints. Skin patches have been used to deliver a range of vaccines, with some inducing significantly higher vaccine-specific immunogenicity than needle-injected controls in pre-clinical models, though they have yet to be used to deliver a PCV. We dry-coated a licensed PCV onto a microprojection-based patch (the Nanopatch) and delivered it to mouse skin. We analysed resulting anti-polysaccharide IgG responses. With and without adjuvant, anti-polysaccharide IgG titres induced by Nanopatch immunisation were significantly higher than dose-matched intramuscular controls. These improved responses were primarily obtained against pneumococcal serotypes 4 and 14. Importantly, capsule-specific IgG correlated with functionality in an opsonophagocytic killing assay. We demonstrate enhanced anti-PCV immunogenicity when delivered by Nanopatch over intramuscular injection. As the first study of a PCV delivered by a skin vaccination technology, this report indicates the potential for reduced costs and greater global distribution of such a vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A TLR9 agonist enhances the anti-tumor immunity of peptide and lipopeptide vaccines via different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ying-Chyi; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2015-07-28

    The toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonists CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) have been recognized as promising adjuvants for vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. However, the role of TLR9 signaling in the regulation of antigen uptake and presentation is not well understood. Therefore, to investigate the effects of TLR9 signaling, this study used synthetic peptides (IDG) and lipopeptides (lipoIDG), which are internalized by dendritic cells (DCs) via endocytosis-dependent and endocytosis-independent pathways, respectively. Our data demonstrated that the internalization of lipoIDG and IDG by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was not enhanced in the presence of CpG ODNs; however, CpG ODNs prolonged the co-localization of IDG with CpG ODNs in early endosomes. Surprisingly, CpG ODNs enhanced CD8(+) T cell responses, and the anti-tumor effects of IDG immunization were stronger than those of lipoIDG immunization. LipoIDG admixed with CpG ODNs induced low levels of CD8(+) T cells and partially inhibit tumor growth. Our findings suggest that CpG ODNs increase the retention of antigens in early endosomes, which is important for eliciting anti-tumor immunity. These results will facilitate the application of CpG adjuvants in the design of different vaccines.

  4. Intradermal injection of an anti-Langerin-HIVGag fusion vaccine targets epidermal Langerhans cells in nonhuman primates and can be tracked in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salabert, Nina; Todorova, Biliana; Martinon, Frédéric; Boisgard, Raphaël; Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandra; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Cosma, Antonio; Kortulewski, Thierry; Banchereau, Jacques; Levy, Yves; Le Grand, Roger; Chapon, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    The development of new immunization strategies requires a better understanding of early molecular and cellular events occurring at the site of injection. The skin is particularly rich in immune cells and represents an attractive site for vaccine administration. Here, we specifically targeted vaccine antigens to epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) using a fusion protein composed of HIV antigens and a monoclonal antibody targeting Langerin. We developed a fluorescence imaging approach to visualize, in vivo, the vaccine-targeted cells. Studies were performed in nonhuman primates (NHPs) because of their relevance as a model to assess human vaccines. We directly demonstrated that in NHPs, intradermally injected anti-Langerin-HIVGag specifically targets epidermal LCs and induces rapid changes in the LC network, including LC activation and migration out of the epidermis. Vaccine targeting of LCs significantly improved anti-HIV immune response without requirement of an adjuvant. Although the co-injection of the TLR-7/8 synthetic ligand, R-848 (resiquimod), with the vaccine, did not enhance significantly the antibody response, it stimulated recruitment of HLA-DR+ inflammatory cells to the site of immunization. This study allowed us to characterize the dynamics of early local events following the injection of a vaccine-targeted epidermal LCs and R-848. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  6. The levels of anti-HPV16/18 and anti-HPV31/33/35/45/52/58 antibodies among AS04-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccinated and non-vaccinated Ugandan girls aged 10–16 years

    OpenAIRE

    Makalembe, Miriam; Banura, Cecily; Namujju, Proscovia; Mirembe, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Background Data on Human Papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine immune response in sub-Saharan Africa is still sparse yet such knowledge is critical for optimal implementation and monitoring of HPV vaccines. Our primary objective was to evaluate levels of anti-HPV-16/18 antibodies and six other ‘high risk’ HPV (hrHPV) types among the vaccinated and unvaccinated Ugandan girls. Methods We conducted a cross sectional study among AS04-adjuvanted HPV-16/18 vaccinated and unvaccinated school girl...

  7. The levels of anti-HPV16/18 and anti-HPV31/33/35/45/52/58 antibodies among AS04-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccinated and non-vaccinated Ugandan girls aged 10–16 years

    OpenAIRE

    Nakalembe, Miriam; Banura, Cecily; Namujju, Proscovia B; Mirembe, Florence M

    2014-01-01

    Background Data on Human Papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine immune response in sub-Saharan Africa is still sparse yet such knowledge is critical for optimal implementation and monitoring of HPV vaccines. Our primary objective was to evaluate levels of anti-HPV-16/18 antibodies and six other ‘high risk’ HPV (hrHPV) types among the vaccinated and unvaccinated Ugandan girls. Methods We conducted a cross sectional study among AS04-adjuvanted HPV-16/18 vaccinated and unvaccinated school girls aged 10–1...

  8. A high incidence of neurological complications following Semple anti-rabies vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaddiwudhipong, W; Prayoonwiwat, N; Kunasol, P; Choomkasien, P

    1987-12-01

    A study was conducted to determine the incidence of neurological complications among a cohort of 6,980 recipients of Semple vaccine administered in Bangkok and 5 nearby provinces in 1984. A review of all patients admitted to public hospitals in these 6 provinces discovered a total of 32 cases, with neurological complications following Semple vaccine. Twenty-two cases (68.8%) were encephalitis or myelitis. The complication rate was 3.6 times higher for males than females and the rate was lowest in the 0-14 year age group. Vaccinees receiving large daily dose of vaccine had a higher rate of complications than those with low dose regimen. One patient died, giving the case-fatality rate of 3.13 per cent. Since the search was limited, the rate of neurological complications to Semple vaccine was a minimum of 4.6 cases per 1,000 vaccinees [1:220]. This complication rate was much higher than most rates reported previously. It is imperative to find economically feasible alternatives to Semple vaccine.

  9. Enhancing graft-versus-leukemia after transplant: the rise of anti-cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusic, Ana; Wu, Catherine J

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the only truly effective curative treatment for refractory hematological malignancies. Unfortunately, relapse and transplant rejection continue to be of major concern. In order to enhance the effectiveness of the HSCT, various strategies have been explored to amplify the graft versus leukemia (GvL) effect. Cancer vaccines have emerged in recent years as a promising strategy for the immunotherapeutic treatment of cancer. Evidence shows that they are most likely to have the greatest effect in the setting of minimal residual disease and as adjuvant agents. With this in mind, researchers have begun to explore the use of cancer vaccines in conjunction with HSCT, with exciting results. There has also been recent work examining the effect of novel adjuvants or blockers of negative immune regulation to augment the effect of cancer vaccines in both the transplant and non-transplant settings. The addition of these agents may prove.

  10. Broad cross-protective anti-hemagglutination responses elicited by influenza microconsensus DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian; Morrow, Matthew P; Chu, Jaemi S; Racine, Trina; Reed, Charles C; Khan, Amir S; Broderick, Kate E; Kim, J Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B

    2017-10-31

    Despite the routine development and distribution of seasonal influenza vaccines, influenza remains an important pathogen contributing to significant human morbidity as well as mortality each year. The seasonal variability of influenza creates a significant issue for vaccine development of seasonal strains that can afford protection from infection or disease based on serotype matching. It is appreciated that the globular head of the HA antigen contained in the vaccines generates antibodies that result in HAI activity that are a major correlates of the protection against a particular strain. Due to seasonal genetic changes in the HA protein, however, new vaccine strains are needed to be developed continually to match the new HA antigen of that seasons virus. A distinct advantage in seasonal vaccine development would be if a small group of antigens could be developed that could span many seasons without needed to be replaced due to this genetic drift. Here we report on a synthetic microconsensus approach that relies on a small collection of 4 synthetic H1HA DNA antigens which together induce broad protective HAI immunity spanning decades of H1 influenza viruses in mice, guinea pigs and non-human primates. The protective HAI titers induced by microconsensus immunogens are fully functional in vivo as immunized ferrets were completely protected from A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009 virus infection and morbidity associated with lethal challenge. These results are encouraging that a limited easy-to-formulate collection of invariant antigens can be developed which can span seasonal vaccine changes allowing for continued immune protection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The role of anti-NHba antibody in bactericidal activity elicited by the meningococcal serogroup B vaccine, MenB-4C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Elizabeth; Lujan, Eduardo; Giuntini, Serena; Vu, David M; Granoff, Dan M

    2017-07-24

    MenB-4C (Bexsero®) is a multicomponent serogroup B meningococcal vaccine. For vaccine licensure, efficacy was inferred from serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) against three antigen-specific indicator strains. The bactericidal role of antibody to the fourth vaccine antigen, Neisserial Heparin binding antigen (NHba), is incompletely understood. We identified nine adults immunized with two or three doses of MenB-4C who had sufficient volumes of sera and >3-fold increases in SBA titer against a strain with high NHba expression, which was mismatched with the other three MenB-4C antigens that elicit SBA. Using 1month-post-immunization sera we measured the effect of depletion of anti-NHba and/or anti-Factor H binding protein (FHbp) antibodies on SBA. Against three strains matched with the vaccine only for NHba, depletion of anti-NHba decreased SBA titers by an average of 43-79% compared to mock-adsorbed sera (Pvaccine antigen), depletion of anti-FHbp antibodies also decreased SBA by 45-64% (Pvaccine antigen, depletion of anti-NHba decreased SBA by an average of 26%, compared to mock-adsorbed sera (Panti-FHbp antibody decreased SBA by 92% (PAnti-NHba antibody can contribute to SBA elicited by MenB-4C, particularly in concert with anti-FHbp antibody. However, some high NHba-expressing strains are resistant, even with an exact match between the amino acid sequence of the vaccine and strain antigens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fate of challenge schistosomula in the murine anti-schistosome vaccine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Lichtenberg, F.; Correa-Oliveira, R.; Sher, A.

    1985-01-01

    Mice exposed to irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni develop a partial resistance to subsequent parasite challenge. In this study the authors utilized histopathologic methods to investigate the fate of both the immunizing and challenge cercariae in C57BL/6J mice. After immunization by percutaneous infection, a large number of the 50 Kr irradiated organisms could be detected in tissue sections of lung. However, as early as 2 weeks after immunization, the majority of these schistosomula apparently had died, leaving residual inflammatory foci. The numbers of these foci then gradually declined during the next 4 weeks of examination. Cercarial challenge of mice vaccinated 4 weeks previously provoked an intense eosinophil-enriched inflammatory response in percutaneously exposed ear pinnae. Despite these pronounced tissue reactions, no evidence of significant parasite damage or attrition was detected in this migration site. In contrast, schistosomula arriving in the lungs of vaccinated mice produced a greater number of residual inflammatory foci than did larvae appearing in the lungs of normal mice. In addition, challenge schistosomula were cleared from the lungs of vaccinated mice at a slower rate than they were from the lungs of control mice. These observations suggest that the lung is a major site of parasite attrition for both immunizing and challenge infections in the mouse irradiated vaccine model

  13. ANTIDotE: anti-tick vaccines to prevent tick-borne diseases in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sprong, H.; Trentelman, J.; Seemann, I.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Rego, Ryan O. M.; Hajdušek, Ondřej; Kopáček, Petr; Šíma, Radek; Nijhof, A.M.; Anguita, J.; Winter, P.; Rotter, B.; Havlíková, S.; Klempa, B.; Schetters, T.P.; Hovius, J.W.R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, FEB 2014 (2014), s. 77 ISSN 1756-3305 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Ixodes ricinus * vaccine * Lyme borreliosis * tick-borne encephalitis * babesiosis * public health Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.430, year: 2014

  14. Risk factors for poor treatment outcomes in patients with MDR-TB and XDR-TB in China: retrospective multi-center investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shenjie; Tan, Shouyong; Yao, Lan; Li, Fujian; Li, Li; Guo, Xinzhi; Liu, Yidian; Hao, Xiaohui; Li, Yanqiong; Ding, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Zhanjun; Tong, Li; Huang, Jianan

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of patients with MDR- and XDR-TB is usually more complex, toxic and costly and less effective than treatment of other forms of TB. However, there is little information available on risk factors for poor outcomes in patients with MDR- and XDR-TB in China. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of HIV-negative TB Patients with culture-proven MDR- or XDR-TB who were registered from July 2006 to June 2011 at five large-scale Tuberculosis Specialized Hospitals in China. Among 1662 HIV-seronegative TB cases which were culture-positive for M. tuberculosis complex and had positive sputum-smear microscopy results, 965 cases (58.1%) were DR-TB, and 586 cases (35.3%) were classified as having MDR-TB, accounting for 60.7% of DR-TB. 169 cases (10.2%) were XDR-TB, accounting for 17.5% of DR-TB, 28.8% of MDR-TB. The MDR-TB patients were divided into XDR-TB group (n=169) and other MDR-TB group (non-XDR MDR-TB) (n=417). In total, 240 patients (40.95%) had treatment success, and 346 (59.05%) had poor treatment outcomes. The treatment success rate in other MDR-TB group was 52.2%, significantly higher than that in the XDR-TB group (13%, PChina.The presence of extensive drug resistance, low BMI, hypoalbuminemia, comorbidity, cavitary disease and previous anti-TB treatment are independent prognostic factors for poor outcome in patients with MDR-TB.

  15. Treatment: Latent TB Infection (LTBI) and TB Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies Consortium Research Projects Publications TB Trials Consortium Study Descriptions Background Behavioral & Social Science Research Infection Control TB in Specific Populations African-American Community Stop TB in the African-American ...

  16. Original paper Assessment of the level of vaccine-induced anti-HBs antibodies in children with inflammatory systemic connective tissue diseases treated with immunosuppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Szczygielska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Protective vaccinations are the most effective method of prevention of type B virus hepatitis. The aim of the study was to determine whether in children receiving immunosuppressive therapy due to inflammatory systemic connective tissue diseases the protective concentration of the anti-HBs antibodies produced after vaccination against type B virus hepatitis in infancy is maintained. Material and methods : The concentration of anti-HBs antibodies was assessed in the sera of 50 children with inflammatory connective tissue diseases – 37 girls (74% and 13 boys (26%, aged 1.5–17.5 years – during the immunosuppressive treatment, which lasted at least 6 months. The control group consisted of 50 healthy children – 28 girls (56% and 22 boys (44% aged 2–17 years. All children were vaccinated in infancy with Engerix B vaccine according to the 0–1–6 months schedule. The antibody concentration of ≥ 10 mIU/ml in patients is regarded as protective. Results: No protective antibody concentrations were found in 25 cases (50% in the group of diseased children and only in 2 children in the control group (4%. Conclusions : The concentration of vaccine-induced antibodies should be assessed in children with inflammatory systemic connective tissue diseases and, in case of the absence of a protective concentration, revaccination should be started. The use of glucocorticosteroids, synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs is no contraindication to vaccination against hepatitis B.

  17. Comportamento imunológico das vacinas anti-meningocócicas Immunological behavior of the meningococcal vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry I. Z. Requejo

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available A doença meningocócica continua sendo um grande problema de saúde pública em todos os continentes, e as vacinas anti-meningocócicas têm sido indicadas na prevenção e controle de epidemias. As vacinas polissacarídicas A e C são relativamente eficazes, com comportamentos imunológicos distintos frente às faixas etárias; no entanto, para o sorogrupo B, embora existam numerosos estudos internacionais até agora já desenvolvidos, ainda não se tem uma vacina altamente segura e eficaz de ampla aceitação. O polissacáride capsular do meningococo B não é imunogênico devido ao seu mimetismo com componentes celulares do hospedeiro. Tentativas de se introduzir carreadores protéicos vêm sendo feitas para se obter uma vacina que seja imunogênica em todas as faixas etárias e de preferência protetora contra todos os meningococos. Foi feita revisão da literatura com o objetivo de estudar o comportamento imunológico de todas as vacinas, até então desenvolvidas, e mostrar os esforços que estão sendo empreendidos no sentido de se buscar um produto seguro e eficaz para o controle da doença meningocócicaMeningococcal disease continues to be a great health problem on all continents and the meningococcal vaccines have been proposed for their prevention and epidemic control. The polysaccharide A and C vaccines are relatively efficacious with distinct immunological behavior with regard to the different age groups, however, up to the present no highly efficacious vaccine for meningococcal B disease exists. The meningococcal B capsular polysaccharide is not immunogenic due to the structural mimicry of mammalian tissues and efforts to produce carrier proteins have been proposed in order to obtain an immunogenic vaccine for all age groups that would if possible, protect against all the meningococci. This review of the literature presents the study of the development of the immunological behavior of all the meningococcal vaccines undergoing

  18. PLGA particulate subunit tuberculosis vaccines promote humoral and Th17 responses but do not enhance control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashhurst, Anneliese S; Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Chan, John Gar Yan; Lin, Leon C W; Flórido, Manuela; West, Nicholas P; Chan, Hak-Kim; Britton, Warwick J

    2018-01-01

    Tuberculosis places a staggering burden on human health globally. The new World Health Organisation End-TB Strategy has highlighted the urgent need for more effective TB vaccines to improve control of the disease. Protein-based subunit vaccines offer potential as safe and effective generators of protective immunity, and the use of particulate vaccine formulation and delivery by the pulmonary route may enhance local immunogenicity. In this study, novel particulate subunit vaccines were developed utilising biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) slow-release particles as carriers for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein MPT83, together with the adjuvants trehalose-dibehenate (TDB) or Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). Following delivery by the pulmonary or subcutaneous routes, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of these vaccines were assessed in a murine model of M. tuberculosis infection. When delivered peripherally, these vaccines induced modest, antigen-specific Th1 and Th17 responses, but strong anti-MPT83 antibody responses. Mucosal delivery of the PLGA(MPT83) vaccine, with or without TDB, increased antigen-specific Th17 responses in the lungs, however, PLGA-encapsulated vaccines did not provide protection against M. tuberculosis challenge. By contrast, peripheral delivery of DDA liposomes containing MPT83 and TDB or MPL, stimulated both Th1 and Th17 responses and generated protection against M. tuberculosis challenge. Therefore, PLGA-formulated vaccines primarily stimulate strong humoral immunity, or Th17 responses if used mucosally, and may be a suitable carrier for vaccines against extracellular pathogens. This study emphasises the critical nature of the vaccine carrier, adjuvant and route of delivery for optimising vaccine efficacy against TB.

  19. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Mycobacterium bovis and BCG Vaccine Strains

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Ge

    2013-09-01

    BCG is the only licensed human vaccine currently available against TB. Derived from a virulent strain of M. bovis, the vaccine was thought to have struck a balance between reduced virulence and preserved immunogenicity. Nowadays, BCG vaccine strains used in different countries and vaccination programs show clear variations in their genomes and immune protective properties. The aim of this study was to characterize the proteomic profile on Mycobacterium bovis and five BCG strains Pasteur, Tokyo, Danish, Phipps and Birkhaug by Tandem Mass Tag® (TMT®)-labeling quantitative proteomic approach. In total, 420 proteins were identified and 377 of them were quantitated for their relative abundance. We reported the number and relationship of differential expressed proteins in BCG strains compared to M. bovis and investigated their functions by bioinformatics analysis. Several interesting up-regulated and down-regulated protein targets were found. The identified proteins and their quantitative expression profiles provide a basis for further understanding of the cellular biology of M. bovis and BCG vaccine strains, and hopefully would assist in the design of better anti-TB vaccine and drugs.

  20. Advantages of a synthetic peptide immunogen over a protein immunogen in the development of an anti-pilus vaccine for Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Daniel J; Hodges, Robert S

    2009-07-01

    The type IV pilus is an important adhesin in the establishment of infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We have previously reported on a synthetic peptide vaccine targeting the receptor-binding domain of the main structural subunit of the pilus, PilA. The receptor-binding domain is a 14-residue disulfide loop at the C-terminal end of the pilin protein. The objective of this study was to compare the immunogenicity of a peptide-conjugate to a protein subunit immunogen to determine which was superior for use in an anti-pilus vaccine. BALB/c mice were immunized with the native PAK strain pilin protein and a synthetic peptide of the receptor-binding domain conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin. A novel pilin protein with a scrambled receptor-binding domain was used to characterize receptor-binding domain-specific antibodies. The titres against the native pilin of the animals immunized with the synthetic peptide-conjugate were higher than the titres of animals immunized with the pilin protein. In addition, the affinities of anti-peptide sera for the intact pilin receptor-binding domain were significantly higher than affinities of anti-pilin protein sera. These results have significant implications for vaccine design and show that there are significant advantages in using a synthetic peptide-conjugate over a subunit pilin protein for an anti-pilus vaccine.

  1. Prevalence of anti-hepatitis B surface antibodies among children and adolescents vaccinated in infancy and effect of booster dose administered within a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassal, R; Markovich, M P; Weil, M; Shinar, E; Carmeli, Y; Dan, M; Sofer, D; Mendelson, E; Cohen, D; Shohat, T

    2017-10-01

    We determined the prevalence of anti-hepatitis B surface antibodies (anti-HBs) among children and adolescents vaccinated for hepatitis B virus in infancy as part of the routine vaccination programme. A representative serum sample of the Israeli population age 0-19 was tested. In a separate pilot study, a booster dose of hepatitis B vaccine was administered to 31 candidates for national service, who were fully vaccinated in infancy and tested negative for hepatitis B surface antibodies at age 17-19 years and anti-HBs antibodies were assessed 8 weeks later. Of the 1273 samples tested, 631 (49·6%) were positive to anti-HBs antibodies. Seropositivity rates were 89·5% among infants aged 6-12 months and declined significantly with age to 20·7% at age 19 years. No differences in seropositivity rates were observed between Jews and Arabs, males and females and those born in Israel and in other countries. Seroconversion rate among the 31 individuals who received a booster dose was 90·3% (95% CI: 75·1-96·6%). We recommend a booster dose for healthcare personnel before starting to work at the health care facility.

  2. New TB treatments hiding in plain sight

    OpenAIRE

    Olive, Andrew J; Sassetti, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    As tuberculosis (TB) toll is revised upward according to the WHO's last estimates, the lack of vaccine strategy and the lengthy antibiotic treatments that unfortunately promote the emergence of drug resistance are a major set back in the fight against this pathogen. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Schiebler et?al (Mtb) propose a novel and compelling new approach to target Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) by pharmacologically stimulating intracellular mycobacteria clearance through a...

  3. TB in Captive Elephants

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-27

    Dr. Barry Kreiswirth, founding director of the Public Health Research Institute, TB Center, at Rutgers University, discusses TB in three captive elephants.  Created: 4/27/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2017.

  4. Immune Response Induction and New Effector Mechanisms Possibly Involved in Protection Conferred by the Cuban Anti-Meningococcal BC Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Oliver; Lastre, Miriam; Lapinet, José; Bracho, Gustavo; Díaz, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Taboada, Carlos; Sierra, Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    This report explores the participation of some afferent mechanisms in the immune response induced by the Cuban anti-meningococcal vaccine VA-MENGOC-BC. The induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity in nursing babies and lymphocyte proliferation after immunization is demonstrated. The presence of gamma interferon IFN-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNAs but absence of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 mRNAs were observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from immunized subjects after in vitro challenge with outer membrane vesicles. In addition, some effector functions were also explored. The presence of opsonic activity was demonstrated in sera from vaccinees. The role of neutrophils as essential effector cells was shown. In conclusion, we have shown that, at least in the Cuban adult population, VA-MENGOC-BC induces mechanisms with a T-helper 1 pattern in the afferent and effector branches of the immune response. PMID:11401992

  5. Questions and Answers about TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies Consortium Research Projects Publications TB Trials Consortium Study Descriptions Background Behavioral & Social Science Research Infection Control TB in Specific Populations African-American Community Stop TB in the African-American ...

  6. Optimized transitory ectopic expression of promastigote surface antigen protein in Nicotiana benthamiana, a potential anti-leishmaniasis vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Séverine; Bangratz, Martine; Brizard, Jean-Paul; Petitdidier, Elodie; Pagniez, Julie; Sérémé, Drissa; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Brugidou, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, plants have been shown to be an efficient alternative expression system for high-value pharmaceuticals such as vaccines. However, constitutive expression of recombinant protein remains uncertain on their level of production and biological activity. To overcome these problems, transitory expression systems have been developed. Here, a series of experiments were performed to determine the most effective conditions to enhance vaccine antigen transient accumulation in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using the promastigote surface antigen (PSA) from the parasitic protozoan Leishmania infantum. This protein has been previously identified as the major antigen of a licensed canine anti-leishmaniasis vaccine. The classical prokaryote Escherichia coli biosystem failed in accumulating PSA. Consequently, the standard plant system based on N. benthamiana has been optimized for the production of putatively active PSA. First, the RNA silencing defense mechanism set up by the plant against PSA ectopic expression was abolished by using three viral suppressors acting at different steps of the RNA silencing pathway. Then, we demonstrated that the signal peptide at the N-terminal side of the PSA is required for its accumulation. The PSA ER signaling and retention with the PSA signal peptide and the KDEL motif, respectively were optimized to significantly increase its accumulation. Finally, we demonstrate that the production of recombinant PSA in N. benthamiana leaves allows the conservation of its immunogenic property. These approaches demonstrate that based on these optimizations, plant based systems can be used to effectively produce the biological active PSA protein. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacteriophages support anti-tumor response initiated by DC-based vaccine against murine transplantable colon carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elzbieta; Rossowska, Joanna; Duś, Danuta; Weber-Dabrowska, Beata; Zabłocka, Agnieszka; Górski, Andrzej

    2008-02-15

    Bacteriophages in eukaryotic hosts may behave as particulate antigens able to activate the innate immune system and generate adaptive immunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in the initiation of the immune response, mainly by priming T cell-mediated immunity. For this reason, they are increasingly applied as an adjuvant for effective anti-tumor therapies in animal models as well as in a few clinical trials. The presented study focused on the application of mouse DCs which were activated with T4 bacteriophages (T4 phages, T4) and further loaded with tumor antigens (TAg) in inducing an anti-tumor response. The activation of bone marrow-derived DCs with T4 phages and TAg resulted in augmentation of their differentiation marker expression accompanied by an enhanced ability to prime T cells for IFN-gamma production. These activated DCs (BM-DC/T4+TAg) were used in experimental immunotherapy of C57BL/6 mice bearing advanced MC38 colon carcinoma tumors. As a result of their triple application, a significant tumor growth delay, up to 19 days, was observed compared with the controls - treated with BM-DCs activated only with T4 phages, TAg, or lipopolysaccharide solution ["solvent"], where the tumor growth delay did not exceed 7 days. The percentage of tumor growth inhibition estimated 10 days after the third cell injection ranged from 32% (for animals treated with BM-DC/TAg cells) to 76% (for animals treated with BM-DC/T4+TAg cells) over the tumor-bearing untreated control mice. The obtained data indicate that in vitro interactions between T4 phages and BM-DCs followed by TAg activation caused augmentation of the anti-tumor effect when DCs were used as a vaccine for tumor-bearing mice treatment. Therefore, pretreatment of DCs with the phages may be considered as a beneficial element of a novel strategy in anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  8. Profile of HIV-1 RNA viral load among HIV-TB co-infected patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The overlapping epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and tuberculosis (TB) is expected in Nigeria that is ranked 10th amongst the 22 countries that bears the burden of TB worldwide. This study aims to estimate the HIV-1 RNA viral load and impact of anti TB therapy (ATT) in a CD4 cell count ...

  9. Metronomic Cyclophosphamide and Methotrexate Chemotherapy Combined with 1E10 Anti-Idiotype Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soriano, J.L.; Batista, N.; Lima, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Garcia, R.; Zarza, Y.; Lopez, M.V.; Rodriguez, M.; Loys, J.L.; Montejo, N.; Santiesteban, E.; Aguirre, F.; Macias, A.; Vazquez, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of low doses of cytotoxic agents continuously for prolonged periods is an alternative for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer who have developed resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The combination of metronomic chemotherapy with therapeutic vaccines might increase the efficacy of the treatment. Twenty one patients with metastatic breast cancer in progression and a Karnosky index =60%, were treated with metronomic chemotherapy (50?mg of cyclophosphamide orally daily and 2.5 mg of methotrexate orally bi-daily), in combination with five bi-weekly subcutaneous injections of 1 mg of aluminum hydroxide-precipitated 1E10 anti-idiotype MAb (1E10-Alum), followed by re immunizations every 28 days. Five patients achieved objective response, eight showed stable disease and eight had disease progression. Median time to progression was 9,8 months, while median overall survival time was 12,93 months. The median duration of the response (CR+PR+SD) was 18,43 months (12,20-24,10 months), being higher than 12 months in 76,9% of the patients. Overall toxicity was generally mild. Metronomic chemotherapy combined with 1E10-Alum vaccine immunotherapy might be a useful therapeutic option for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer due to its potential impact on survival and patient quality of live, low toxicity and advantages of the administration.

  10. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a Live Vaccine Vehicle for the Induction of Protective Anti-Viral Cell-Mediated Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Slifka, Mark K.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Jensen, Eric R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Miller, Jeff F.

    1995-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive bacterium that is able to enter host cells, escape from the endocytic vesicle, multiply within the cytoplasm, and spread directly from cell to cell without encountering the extracellular milieu. The ability of LM to gain access to the host cell cytosol allows proteins secreted by the bacterium to efficiently enter the pathway for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen processing and presentation. We have established a genetic system for expression and secretion of foreign antigens by recombinant strains, based on stable site-specific integration of expression cassettes into the LM genome. The ability of LM recombinants to induce protective immunity against a heterologous pathogen was demonstrated with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). LM strains expressing the entire LCMV nucleoprotein or an H-2L^d-restricted nucleoprotein epitope (aa 118-126) were constructed. Immunization of mice with LM vaccine strains conferred protection against challenge with virulent strains of LCMV that otherwise establish chronic infection in naive adult mice. In vivo depletion of CD8^+ T cells from vaccinated mice abrogated their ability to clear viral infection, showing that protective anti-viral immunity was due to CD8^+ T cells.

  11. Metronomic Cyclophosphamide and Methotrexate Chemotherapy Combined with 1E10 Anti-Idiotype Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Soriano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of low doses of cytotoxic agents continuously for prolonged periods is an alternative for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer who have developed resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The combination of metronomic chemotherapy with therapeutic vaccines might increase the efficacy of the treatment. Twenty one patients with metastatic breast cancer in progression and a Karnosky index ≥60%, were treated with metronomic chemotherapy (50 mg of cyclophospamide orally daily and 2.5 mg of methotrexate orally bi-daily, in combination with five bi-weekly subcutaneous injections of 1 mg of aluminum hydroxide-precipitated 1E10 anti-idiotype MAb (1E10-Alum, followed by reimmunizations every 28 days. Five patients achieved objective response, eight showed stable disease and eight had disease progression. Median time to progression was 9,8 months, while median overall survival time was 12,93 months. The median duration of the response (CR+PR+SD was 18,43 months (12,20–24,10 months, being higher than 12 months in 76,9% of the patients. Overall toxicity was generally mild. Metronomic chemotherapy combined with 1E10-Alum vaccine immunotherapy might be a useful therapeutic option for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer due to its potential impact on survival and patient quality of live, low toxicity and advantages of the administration.

  12. EpCAM peptide-primed dendritic cell vaccination confers significant anti-tumor immunity in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Jin Choi

    Full Text Available Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs may play a key role in tumor initiation, self-renewal, differentiation, and resistance to current treatments. Dendritic cells (DCs play a vital role in host immune reactions as well as antigen presentation. In this study, we explored the suitability of using CSC peptides as antigen sources for DC vaccination against human breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC with the aim of achieving CSC targeting and enhancing anti-tumor immunity. CD44 is used as a CSC marker for breast cancer and EpCAM is used as a CSC marker for HCC. We selected CD44 and EpCAM peptides that bind to HLA-A2 molecules on the basis of their binding affinity, as determined by a peptide-T2 binding assay. Our data showed that CSCs express high levels of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs as well as major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. Pulsing DCs with CD44 and EpCAM peptides resulted in the efficient generation of mature DCs (mDCs, thus enhancing T cell stimulation and generating potent cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs. The activation of CSC peptide-specific immune responses by the DC vaccine in combination with standard chemotherapy may provide better clinical outcomes in advanced carcinomas.

  13. The one year effects of three doses of hepatitis B vaccine as a booster in anti-HBs-negative children 11-15 years after primary immunization; China, 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Shan, Huan; Chen, Yongdi; Jiang, Zheng-gang; Dai, Xue-wei; Ren, Jing-jing; Xu, Kai-jin; Ruan, Bing; Yang, Shi-gui; Li, Qian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) levels one year after hepatitis B booster vaccination in anti-HBs-negative (vaccination. Anti-HBs titers were examined in 235 children who were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HBs, and hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc). The children were then divided into 3 groups based on their anti-HBs levels pre-booster: Group I, vaccinated with 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine (0-1-6 month, 20 ug), and anti-HBs levels were measured. One month after the first dose, the anti-HBs positive rates (≥ 10 mIU/mL) in Groups I-III were 56.14%, 83.61% and 100%. One month after the third dose, the anti-HBs-positive rates in Groups I-III were 96.49%, 98.36% and 100%. One year after the third dose, the anti-HBs-positive rates in Groups I-III were 73.68%, 75.41% and 98.29%, respectively. Protective levels declined more rapidly for those with lower titers. Children with pre-booster anti-HBs titers of 1-9.9 mIU/mL might not need any booster dose, and the children with pre-booster titers of 0.1-0.9 and vaccination.

  14. The anti-tumour effect of a DNA vaccine carrying a fusion gene of human VEGFR2 and IL-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Wen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of tumour dependence on angiogenesis, anti-angiogenic therapy has become the most attractive area of basic and clinical study in the field of cancer research. In order to create a synergistic effect on angiogenesis and immune regulation, we designed and constructed a new type of DNA vaccine that can express VEGFR2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and the prostate cancer antigen IL-12 (interleukin 12 in the same reading frame. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-tumour activity of a eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying a fusion gene of human VEGFR2 and IL-12. According to the gene sequences in GenBank, we synthesized the human VEGFR2 and IL-12 genes. VEGFR2 and IL-12 were joined by a sequence encoding a Furin recognition site and a 2A cleavage site, and the resulting fusion gene was cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 to construct the expression plasmid pVAX1-VEGFR2-F2A-IL-12. The expression of VEGFR2 and IL-12 could be detected in 293T cells transfected with pVAX1-VEGFR2-F2A-IL-12 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Each of these proteins, and in particular co-expression of both proteins, can result in humoral and cellular immune responses in C57BL/6 mice. After injection into the tumour-bearing mouse model, the plasmid showed stronger inhibition of tumour growth than a plasmid expressing VEGFR2 alone. Our results demonstrate that a DNA vaccine carrying a fusion gene of human VEGFR2 and IL-12 could represent a promising approach for tumour immunotherapy.

  15. Genotypes of Pestivirus RNA detected n anti influenza virus vaccines for human use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Giangaspero

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Nine polyvalent human influenza virus vaccines were tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for the presence of pestivirus RNA. Samples were selected from manufacturers in Europe and the USA. Three samples of the nine vaccines tested (33.3% gave positive results for pestivirus RNA. The 5´-untranslated genomic region sequence of the contaminant pestivirus RNA was analysed based on primary nucleotide sequence homology and on secondary sequence structures characteristic to genotypes. Two sequences belonged to Pestivirus type-1 (bovine viral diarrhoea virus [BVDV] species, genotypes BVDV-1b and BVDV-1e. These findings confirm previous reports, suggesting an improvement in preventive measures against contamination of biological products for human use.

  16. The psychological roots of anti-vaccination attitudes: A 24-nation investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsey, Matthew J; Harris, Emily A; Fielding, Kelly S

    2018-04-01

    Strengthening of antivaccination movements in recent decades has coincided with unprecedented increases in the incidence of some communicable diseases. Many intervention programs work from a deficit model of science communication, presuming that vaccination skeptics lack the ability to access or understand evidence. However, interventions focusing on evidence and the debunking of vaccine-related myths have proven to be either nonproductive or counterproductive. Working from a motivated reasoning perspective, we examine the psychological factors that might motivate people to reject scientific consensus around vaccination. To assist with international generalizability, we examine this question in 24 countries. We sampled 5,323 participants in 24 countries, and measured their antivaccination attitudes. We also measured their belief in conspiracy theories, reactance (the tendency for people to have a low tolerance for impingements on their freedoms), disgust sensitivity toward blood and needles, and individualistic/hierarchical worldviews (i.e., people's beliefs about how much control society should have over individuals, and whether hierarchies are desirable). In order of magnitude, antivaccination attitudes were highest among those who (a) were high in conspiratorial thinking, (b) were high in reactance, (c) reported high levels of disgust toward blood and needles, and (d) had strong individualistic/hierarchical worldviews. In contrast, demographic variables (including education) accounted for nonsignificant or trivial levels of variance. These data help identify the "attitude roots" that may motivate and sustain vaccine skepticism. In so doing, they help shed light on why repetition of evidence can be nonproductive, and suggest communication solutions to that problem. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Prophylactic DNA vaccine targeting Foxp3+ regulatory T cells depletes myeloid-derived suppressor cells and improves anti-melanoma immune responses in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdar, Afshin; Mirzaei, Reza; Memarnejadian, Arash; Boghosian, Roobina; Samadi, Morteza; Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Farajifard, Hamid; Zavar, Mehdi; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Elahi, Shokrollah; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Rezaei, Abbas; Hadjati, Jamshid

    2018-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are the two important and interactive immunosuppressive components of the tumor microenvironment that hamper anti-tumor immune responses. Therefore, targeting these two populations together might be beneficial for overcoming immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. We have recently shown that prophylactic Foxp3 DNA/recombinant protein vaccine (Foxp3 vaccine) promotes immunity against Treg in tumor-free conditions. In the present study, we investigated the immune modulatory effects of a prophylactic regimen of the redesigned Foxp3 vaccine in the B16F10 melanoma model. Our results indicate that Foxp3 vaccination continuously reduces Treg population in both the tumor site and the spleen. Surprisingly, Treg reduction was associated with a significant decrease in the frequency of MDSC, both in the spleen and in the tumor environment. Furthermore, Foxp3 vaccination resulted in a significant reduction of arginase-1(Arg-1)-induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and suppressed MDSC activity. Moreover, this concurrent depletion restored production of inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ and enhanced tumor-specific CTL response, which subsequently resulted in the reduction of tumor growth and the improved survival rate of vaccinated mice. In conclusion, our results revealed that Foxp3 vaccine promotes an immune response against tumor by targeting both Treg and MDSC, which could be exploited as a potential immunotherapy approach.

  18. Long term persistence of anti-HBs protective levels in young patients with type 1 diabetes after recombinant hepatitis B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marseglia, G; Alibrandi, A; d'Annunzio, G; Gulminetti, R; Avanzini, M A; Marconi, M; Tinelli, C; Lorini, R

    2000-11-22

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the persistence of anti-hepatitis B protective levels in young patients with type 1 diabetes, successfully immunised with a recombinant hepatitis B vaccine. We re-evaluated, after a 4 year follow-up, 54 patients and 70 age and sex-matched healthy subjects. Protective antibodies levels were found in 50/54 (92%) patients and in 67/70 (96%) controls. Moreover, anti-HBs levels were similar in diabetic patients and controls (means of log-titre and (sd); 1.95 (0.88) and 2.18 (0.64) patients and controls, respectively; P=0.11). No cases of clinical hepatitis were reported and all patients and controls remained HBc negative. These data demonstrate the persistence of anti-HBs levels in children, adolescents and young patients with type 1 diabetes after recombinant hepatitis B vaccine showing evidence of longterm immunogenity and protective effect.

  19. Review: New Vaccine Against Tuberculosis: Current Developments and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a global health threat. BCG was developed as an attenuated live vaccine for tuberculosis control nearly a century ago. Despite being the most widely used vaccine in human history, BCG is not an ideal vaccine and has two major limitations: its poor efficacy against adult pulmonary TB and its disconcerting safety in immunocompromised individuals. A safer and more effective TB vaccine is urgently needed. This review article discusses current strategies to develop the next generation of TB vaccines to replace BCG. While some progresses have been made in the past decade, significant challenges lie ahead.

  20. Oral bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine against tuberculosis: why not?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Monteiro-Maia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine is the only licensed vaccine for human use against tuberculosis (TB. Although controversy exists about its efficacy, the BCG vaccine is able to protect newborns and children against disseminated forms of TB, but fails to protect adults against active forms of TB. In the last few years, interest in the mucosal delivery route for the vaccine has been increasing owing to its increased capacity to induce protective immune responses both in the mucosal and the systemic immune compartments. Here, we show the importance of this route of vaccination in newly developed vaccines, especially for vaccines against TB.

  1. Combined antiretroviral and anti- tuberculosis drug resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these epidemics, many challenges remain.[3] Antiretroviral and anti-TB drug resistance pose considerable threats to the control of these epidemics.[4,5]. The breakdown in HIV/TB control within prisons is another emerging threat.[6,7] We describe one of the first reports of combined antiretroviral and anti-TB drug resistance ...

  2. Characteristics and programme-defined treatment outcomes among childhood tuberculosis (TB patients under the national TB programme in Delhi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinath Satyanarayana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Childhood tuberculosis (TB patients under India's Revised National TB Control Programme (RNTCP are managed using diagnostic algorithms and directly observed treatment with intermittent thrice-weekly short-course treatment regimens for 6-8 months. The assignment into pre-treatment weight bands leads to drug doses (milligram per kilogram that are lower than current World Health Organization (WHO guidelines for some patients. OBJECTIVES: The main aim of our study was to describe the baseline characteristics and treatment outcomes reported under RNTCP for registered childhood (age <15 years TB patients in Delhi. Additionally, we compared the reported programmatic treatment completion rates between children treated as per WHO recommended anti-TB drug doses with those children treated with anti-TB drug doses below that recommended in WHO guidelines. METHODS: For this cross-sectional retrospective study, we reviewed programme records of all 1089 TB patients aged <15 years registered for TB treatment from January to June, 2008 in 6 randomly selected districts of Delhi. WHO disease classification and treatment outcome definitions are used by RNTCP, and these were extracted as reported in programme records. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Among 1074 patients with records available, 651 (61% were females, 122 (11% were <5 years of age, 1000 (93% were new cases, and 680 (63% had extra-pulmonary TB (EP-TB--most commonly peripheral lymph node disease [310 (46%]. Among 394 pulmonary TB (PTB cases, 165 (42% were sputum smear-positive. The overall reported treatment completion rate was 95%. Similar reported treatment completion rates were found in all subgroups assessed, including those patients whose drug dosages were lower than that currently recommended by WHO. Further studies are needed to assess the reasons for the low proportion of under-5 years of age TB case notifications, address challenges in reaching all childhood TB patients by RNTCP, the

  3. Outcomes of TB treatment in HIV co-infected TB patients in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional analytic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Ahmed Ali

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TB and HIV are the most prevalent communicable diseases of major public health importance in the populations of sub-Saharan African countries, and an estimated 30 % of HIV infected persons have dual infection with TB. TB is the leading cause of death in HIV infected individuals, and HIV co-infected TB patients have multiple individual, disease specific and treatment related factors that can adversely affect their treatment outcomes. There is lack of evidence on the individual patient outcomes of HIV co-infected TB patients who receive anti-TB treatment. It is relevant to understand the differential patient outcomes of HIV co-infected TB patients and identify the factors that are associated with these outcomes. Methods A comparative analysis was done on the data from a random sample of 575 TB patients who were enrolled for TB treatment from January 2013 to December 2013 at eight health facilities in Ethiopia. A descriptive analysis was done on the data, and chi-square test and logistic regression analysis was conducted to compare TB treatment outcomes based on HIV status and to identify factors associated with these outcomes. Results Out of a total of 575 TB patients enrolled into the study, 360 (62.6 % were non-HIV infected, 169 (29.4 % were HIV co-infected, and 46 (8 % had no documented HIV status. The overall treatment success rate was 91.5 % for all the study participants. HIV co-infected TB patients have a treatment success rate of 88.2 % compared with 93.6 % for non-HIV infected study participants (P = 0.03. HIV co-infected TB patients had a significantly higher rate (11.8 % versus 6.4 %, P = 0.03 of unfavourable outcomes. The cure rate was significantly lower (10.1 % versus 24.2 %, P = 0.001 and the death rate higher in HIV co-infected TB patients (8.3 % versus 2.5 %, P = 0.014. Age and TB classification were significantly associated with treatment outcome. No association was found with starting ART

  4. Chicken anti-Campylobacter vaccine – comparison of various carriers and routes of immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Anna Kobierecka

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter spp, especially the species Campylobacter jejuni, are important human enteropathogens responsible for millions of cases of gastro-intestinal disease worldwide every year. C. jejuni is a zoonotic pathogen, and poultry meat that has been contaminated by microorganisms is recognized as a key source of human infections. Although numerous strategies have been developed and experimentally checked to generate chicken vaccines, the results have so far had limited success. In this study, we explored the potential use of non-live carriers of Campylobacter antigen to combat Campylobacter in poultry. First, we assessed the effectiveness of immunization with orally or subcutaneously delivered GEM (Gram-positive Enhancer Matrix particles carrying two Campylobacter antigens: CjaA and CjaD. These two immunization routes using GEMs as the vector did not protect against Campylobacter colonization. Thus, we next assessed the efficacy of in ovo immunization using various delivery systems: GEM particles and liposomes. The hybrid protein CjaAD, which is CjaA presenting CjaD epitopes on its surface, was employed as a model antigen. We found that CjaAD administered in ovo at embryonic development day 18 by both delivery systems resulted in significant levels of protection after challenge with a heterologous Campylobacter jejuni strain. In practice, in ovo chicken vaccination is used by the poultry industry to protect birds against several viral diseases. Our work showed that this means of delivery is also efficacious with respect to commensal bacteria such as Campylobacter. In this study, we evaluated the protection after one dose of vaccine given in ovo. We speculate that the level of protection may be increased by a post-hatch booster of orally delivered antigens.

  5. In Vitro Preparation And Testing Of Anti-Salmonella Vaccine Against Abortion In Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Flore CHIRILA; George Cosmin NADAS; Sorin RAPUNTEAN; Cosmina Maria BOUARI; Septimiu TOADER; Petru BERCE; Andreea SZEKELY; Nicodim Iosif FIT

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: In March 2016, the microbiology laboratory of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine in Cluj-Napoca, 3 type of antisalmonella vaccine for sheep were prepared. For type 1, 24 hours salmonella on brain heart infusion (BHI) broth culture, heat inactivated for 1 hour at 60°C, then with formaldehyde in a concentration of 3 ‰. Variant 2 - the culture supernatant obtained on solid BHI medium, washed with PBS, frozen-thawed 6 times, centrifuged at 4000 rpm for 15 minutes, filtered through 0....

  6. The media-driven risk society, the anti-vaccination movement and risk of autismo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos-Silva, Paulo Roberto; Castiel, Luis David; Griep, Rosane Härter

    2015-02-01

    Marked changes have been seen in the epidemiological profile of infectious diseases among middle-class families in industrialized countries due to beliefs related to the risks of vaccination. These beliefs are proliferating globally due to internet sites, blogs and the influence of celebrities in the mass communication media. Due to the complexity of a cultural phenomenon of this nature, contemporary concepts aligned to the idea of reflexivity in the risk society are analyzed. The concept of a receptive media-driven society in which the announcement of danger and protection in mutual reference and contradiction are also assessed. The frequent emergence of tensions derived from cycles of utterances and baseless comments construed as symbolic "biovalues" are discussed. The persistent effect of threatening biotechnological and fraudulent utterances has influenced virtual networks for almost three decades, supporting the debate about the connection between autism and vaccines. The conclusion reached is that the processes of production of significance interconnect at various levels in which representations circulate that support communication and group identity based on historical and cultural references.

  7. Comparison of bacteriological conversion and treatment outcomes among MDR-TB patients with and without diabetes in Mexico: Preliminary data

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz-Torrico, M.; Caminero Luna, J.; Migliori, G.B.; D’Ambrosio, L.; Carrillo-Alduenda, J.L.; Villareal-Velarde, H.; Torres-Cruz, A.; Flores-Ergara, H.; Martínez-Mendoza, D.; García-Sancho, C.; Centis, R.; Salazar-Lezama, M.Á.; Pérez-Padilla, R.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a well-known risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). However, it is not known to what extent DM affects the outcome in patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) treated with second-line anti-TB drugs.The objective of this study was to compare the microbiological evolution (sputum smear and culture conversion) and final outcomes of MDR/XDR-TB patients with and without DM, managed at the national TB reference centre in Mexico City...

  8. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  9. More significance of TB-IGRA except for the diagnose of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun-Chi; Li, Ze-Yi; Chen, Xin-Nian; Shi, Cui-Lin; Wu, Mei-Ying; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Song, Hua-Feng; Wu, Min-Juan; Xu, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB)-interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) test has the characteristics of short time, high specificity, and high sensitivity, but it lacks the correlation research between TB-IGRA test results and body's immune cells, disease progression and prognosis, which is explored in this study. A retrospective study was carried out on positive TB-IGRA patients who were infected with TB and diagnosed at our hospital from January 2014 to June 2015. The TB-IGRA, routine blood test, T-cell subgroup data were collected for statistical analysis. TB-IGRA results were in positive proportion to the lymphocytes, CD4 + T cells and CD4 + CD28 + T cells, whereas negative to the Treg cells. Patient with unilateral pulmonary lesion had higher TB-IGRA than those with bilateral pulmonary lesions. After the stimulation of TB-specific antigen, the proportion of CD4 + IFN-γ + and CD8 + IFN-γ + T Tcells were both increased and the CD4 + IFN-γ + T had positive correlation with the value of TB-IGRA. IFN-γ was tested with TB-IGRA in patients with TB by the specific TB T cells and correlated with the lymphocytes, while the lymphocytes also closely related to the host's anti-TB immunity and disease outcome. Hence the result of TB-IGRA could reflect the specific anti-TB immunity ability of the host, disease progression and prognosis. This study further expands the application scope of TB-IGRA technology in the diagnosis of TB and lays a foundation for clinical practice to understand the immunity state of the patients with TB and the application of auxiliary clinical immunity regulators. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis: Treatment Tuberculosis: Treatment Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... or bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Tuberculosis: Diagnosis Tuberculosis: History Clinical Trials For more than ...

  11. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV and Opportunistic Infections, Coinfections, and Conditions Home Understanding ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) Last Reviewed: July 26, 2017 ...

  12. Effect of revaccination using different schemes among adults with low or undetectable anti-HBs titers after hepatitis B virus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao-Shuang; Xie, Shi-Bin; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Chong, Yu-Tian; Gao, Zhi-Liang

    2010-10-01

    Our objective was to investigate the effect of various reimmunization schemes for hepatitis B in adults with low or undetectable anti-HBs titers. Over 2 years, 10 μg of Saccharomyces cerevisiae-recombinant hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine (synthesized in China) was used in at least one standardized scheme to immunize 2,310 healthy male and nonpregnant female adults. Of these, 240 subjects tested negative for hepatitis B markers. These 240 subjects were equally divided into 4 groups. The first group, designated Engerix-40, was revaccinated with 40 μg Engerix-B; the second, Engerix-20, was revaccinated with 20 μg Engerix-B; the third, Chinese-20, was revaccinated with 20 μg Chinese-made yeast-recombinant vaccine; and the last group, Chinese-10, was revaccinated with 10 μg Chinese-made yeast-recombinant vaccine. Blood samples were collected before and 1, 2, 8, and 12 months after the first injection. The anti-HBs-positive conversion rates of the Engerix-40, Engerix-20, and Chinese-20 groups were higher than that of the Chinese-10 group (P anti-HBs conversion rate increased in all groups, but values were significantly different from those for the other groups only in the Chinese-10 group (P anti-HBs geometric mean titers (GMTs) of the Engerix-40, Engerix-20, and Chinese-20 groups were higher than in the Chinese-10 group (P anti-HBs titers in subjects with low or undetectable titers after HBV vaccination.

  13. Low prevalence of hepatitis B and C among tuberculosis patients in Duhok Province, Kurdistan: Are HBsAg and anti-HCV prerequisite screening parameters in tuberculosis control program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merza, Muayad A; Haji, Safer M; Alsharafani, Abid Mohialdeen Hasan; Muhammed, Shivan U

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), infections and tuberculosis (TB) are a global public health concern. Co-infection with HBV or HCV among TB patients may potentiate the risk of hepatotoxicity induced by anti-TB drugs. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of HBV and HCV among TB patients included in the Duhok National Tuberculosis Program (NTP). The Duhok NTP Center is a specialized institution in Duhok City, Iraq, concerned with management and follow-up of TB patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the center between June 2015 and May 2016. All documented TB patients were analyzed on the basis of socio-demographic and other characteristics. Thereafter, all patients underwent screening for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HCV, and anti-HIV using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results obtained were analyzed by entering the data in binary format into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. A p value of Kurdistan, the negative history of injection drug use, and adherence to universal infection-control measures, including vaccination for HBV. Both history of dental intervention and belonging to a Syrian population were independent risk factors for HBV/TB co-infection. Copyright © 2016 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Real-time monitoring of anti-influenza vaccination in the 65 and over population in France based on vaccine sales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivette, M; Auvigne, V; Guérin, P; Mueller, J E

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a tool based on vaccine sales to estimate vaccination coverage against seasonal influenza in near real-time in the French population aged 65 and over. Vaccine sales data available on sale-day +1 came from a stratified sample of 3004 pharmacies in metropolitan France. Vaccination coverage rates were estimated between 2009 and 2014 and compared with those obtained based on vaccination refund data from the general health insurance scheme. The seasonal vaccination coverage estimates were highly correlated with those obtained from refund data. They were also slightly higher, which can be explained by the inclusion of non-reimbursed vaccines and the consideration of all individuals aged 65 and over. We have developed an online tool that provides estimates of daily vaccination coverage during each vaccination campaign. The developed tool provides a reliable and near real-time estimation of vaccination coverage among people aged 65 and over. It can be used to evaluate and adjust public health messages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Multi-stage subunit vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis: an alternative to the BCG vaccine or a BCG-prime boost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Farzad; Derakhshan, Mohammad; Yousefi-Avarvand, Arshid; Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Soleimanpour, Saman

    2018-01-01

    More than two billion people are latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Most tuberculosis (TB)-subunit vaccines currently in various stages of clinical trials are designed for prevention of active TB, but not to prevent reactivation of latent TB-infection. Thus, there is an urgent need for an effective multi-stage vaccine based on early-expressed and latently-expressed antigens that prevents both acute and latent infections. Areas covered: Here, we reviewed the published pre-clinical and clinical studies of multi-stage subunit vaccines against TB, and the protective capacities of the vaccines were compared with BCG, either alone or in combination with different vaccine delivery systems/adjuvants. The results revealed that multi-stage subunit vaccines induced a wide variety of immune-responses to all forms of TB, including CD8 + T-cell-mediated cytolytic and IFN-γ responses comparable to those induced by the BCG. They could potentially be used as a booster vaccine to improve the efficacy of the BCG. Expert commentary: Multi-stage TB-vaccines could boost BCG-primed immunity, decrease bacterial loads and provide efficient protection against progressive TB-infection, especially in the latent phase. These types of vaccines administered before and after TB-infection can act as pre-exposure, post-exposure and even therapeutic vaccines. In the near future, these vaccines could provide a new generation of prime-vaccines or BCG prime-boosters.

  16. Nonpathologic Infection of Macaques by an Attenuated Mycobacterial Vaccine Is Not Reactivated in the Setting of HIV Co-Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Taylor W; Veatch, Ashley V; LoBato, Denae N; Didier, Peter J; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Lackner, Andrew A; Kousoulas, Konstantin G; Khader, Shabaana A; Kaushal, Deepak; Mehra, Smriti

    2017-12-01

    Failure to replace Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccines with efficacious anti-tuberculosis (TB) vaccines have prompted outside-the-box thinking, including pulmonary vaccination to elicit local immunity. Inhalational MtbΔsigH, a stress-response-attenuated strain, protected against lethal TB in macaques. While live mycobacterial vaccines show promising efficacy, HIV co-infection and the resulting immunodeficiency prompts safety concerns about their use. We assessed the persistence and safety of MtbΔsigH, delivered directly to the lungs, in the setting of HIV co-infection. Macaques were aerosol-vaccinated with ΔsigH and subsequently challenged with SIVmac 239 . Bronchoalveolar lavage and tissues were sampled for mycobacterial persistence, pathology, and immune correlates. Only 35% and 3.5% of lung samples were positive for live bacilli and granulomas, respectively. Our results therefore suggest that the nonpathologic infection of macaque lungs by ΔsigH was not reactivated by simian immunodeficiency virus, despite high viral levels and massive ablation of pulmonary CD4 + T cells. Protective pulmonary responses were retained, including vaccine-induced bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue and CD8 + effector memory T cells. Despite acute simian immunodeficiency virus infection, all animals remained asymptomatic of pulmonary TB. These findings highlight the efficacy of mucosal vaccination via this attenuated strain and will guide its further development to potentially combat TB in HIV-endemic areas. Our results also suggest that a lack of pulmonary pathology is a key correlate of the safety of live mycobacterial vaccines. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. BCG vaccination status may predict sputum conversion in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis: a new consideration for an old vaccine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeremiah, Kidola; Praygod, George Amani; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Failure to convert (persistent sputum and/or culture positivity) while on antituberculosis (anti-TB) treatment at the end of the second month of anti-TB therapy has been reported to be a predictor of treatment failure. Factors that could be associated with persistent bacillary positivity at the end...... of the second month after initiation of anti-TB treatment were assessed....

  18. DNA vaccine molecular adjuvants SP-D-BAFF and SP-D-APRIL enhance anti-gp120 immune response and increase HIV-1 neutralizing antibody titers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sachin; Clark, Emily S; Termini, James M; Boucher, Justin; Kanagavelu, Saravana; LeBranche, Celia C; Abraham, Sakhi; Montefiori, David C; Khan, Wasif N; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2015-04-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) specific for conserved epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) are believed to be essential for protection against multiple HIV-1 clades. However, vaccines capable of stimulating the production of bNAbs remain a major challenge. Given that polyreactivity and autoreactivity are considered important characteristics of anti-HIV bNAbs, we designed an HIV vaccine incorporating the molecular adjuvants BAFF (B cell activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) with the potential to facilitate the maturation of polyreactive and autoreactive B cells as well as to enhance the affinity and/or avidity of Env-specific antibodies. We designed recombinant DNA plasmids encoding soluble multitrimers of BAFF and APRIL using surfactant protein D as a scaffold, and we vaccinated mice with these molecular adjuvants using DNA and DNA-protein vaccination strategies. We found that immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine encoding BAFF or APRIL multitrimers, together with interleukin 12 (IL-12) and membrane-bound HIV-1 Env gp140, induced neutralizing antibodies against tier 1 and tier 2 (vaccine strain) viruses. The APRIL-containing vaccine was particularly effective at generating tier 2 neutralizing antibodies following a protein boost. These BAFF and APRIL effects coincided with an enhanced germinal center (GC) reaction, increased anti-gp120 antibody-secreting cells, and increased anti-gp120 functional avidity. Notably, BAFF and APRIL did not cause indiscriminate B cell expansion or an increase in total IgG. We propose that BAFF and APRIL multitrimers are promising molecular adjuvants for vaccines designed to induce bNAbs against HIV-1. Recent identification of antibodies that neutralize most HIV-1 strains has revived hopes and efforts to create novel vaccines that can effectively stimulate HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. However, the multiple immune evasion properties of HIV have hampered these efforts. These include the instability of

  19. Conjugated and Entrapped HPMA-PLA Nano-Polymeric Micelles Based Dual Delivery of First Line Anti TB Drugs: Improved and Safe Drug Delivery against Sensitive and Resistant Mycobacterium Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Seema; Khan, Iliyas; Gothwal, Avinash; Pachouri, Praveen K; Bhaskar, N; Gupta, Umesh D; Chauhan, Devendra S; Gupta, Umesh

    2017-09-01

    First line antiTB drugs have several physical and toxic manifestations which limit their applications. RIF is a hydrophobic drug and has low water solubility and INH is hepatotoxic. The main objective of the study was to synthesize, characterize HPMA-PLA co-polymeric micelles for the effective dual delivery of INH and RIF. HPMA-PLA co-polymer and HPMA-PLA-INH (HPI) conjugates were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR and 1 H-NMR spectroscopy. Later on RIF loaded HPMA-PLA-INH co-polymeric micelles (PMRI) were formulated and characterized for size, zeta potential and surface morphology (SEM, TEM) as well as critical micellar concentration. The safety was assessed through RBC's interaction study. The prepared PMRI were evaluated through MABA assay against sensitive and resistant strains of M. Tuberculosis. Size, zeta and entrapment efficiency for RIF loaded HPMA-PLA-INH polymeric micelles (PMRI) was 87.64 ± 1.98 nm, -19 ± 1.93 mV and 97.2 ± 1.56%, respectively. In vitro release followed controlled and sustained delivery pattern. Sustained release was also supported by release kinetics. Haemolytic toxicity of HPI and PMRI was 8.57 and 7.05% (p PLA polymeric micelles (PMRI) were more effective against sensitive and resistant M tuberculosis. The developed approach can lead to improved patient compliance and reduced dosing in future, offering improved treatment of tuberculosis.

  20. The fully synthetic MAG-Tn3 therapeutic vaccine containing the tetanus toxoid-derived TT830-844 universal epitope provides anti-tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubreton, Daphné; Bay, Sylvie; Sedlik, Christine; Artaud, Cécile; Ganneau, Christelle; Dériaud, Edith; Viel, Sophie; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Amigorena, Sebastian; Gérard, Catherine; Lo-Man, Richard; Leclerc, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Malignant transformations are often associated with aberrant glycosylation processes that lead to the expression of new carbohydrate antigens at the surface of tumor cells. Of these carbohydrate antigens, the Tn antigen is particularly highly expressed in many carcinomas, especially in breast carcinoma. We designed MAG-Tn3, a fully synthetic vaccine based on three consecutive Tn moieties that are O-linked to a CD4+ T cell epitope, to induce anti-Tn antibody responses that could be helpful for therapeutic vaccination against cancer. To ensure broad coverage within the human population, the tetanus toxoid-derived peptide TT830-844 was selected as a T-helper epitope because it can bind to various HLA-DRB molecules. We showed that the MAG-Tn3 vaccine, which was formulated with the GSK proprietary immunostimulant AS15 and designed for human cancer therapy, is able to induce an anti-Tn antibody response in mice of various H-2 haplotypes, and this response correlates with the ability to induce a specific T cell response against the TT830-844 peptide. The universality of the TT830-844 peptide was extended to new H-2 and HLA-DRB molecules that were capable of binding this T cell epitope. Finally, the MAG-Tn3 vaccine was able to induce anti-Tn antibody responses in cynomolgus monkeys, which targeted Tn-expressing tumor cells and mediated tumor cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, MAG-Tn3 is a highly promising anticancer vaccine that is currently under evaluation in a phase I clinical trial.

  1. EphA2-derived peptide vaccine with amphiphilic poly(gamma-glutamic acid) nanoparticles elicits an anti-tumor effect against mouse liver tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Takehara, Tetsuo; Sasakawa, Akira; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kohga, Keisuke; Miyagi, Takuya; Kanto, Tatsuya; Hiramastu, Naoki; Akagi, Takami; Akashi, Mitsuru; Hayashi, Norio

    2010-05-01

    The prognosis of liver cancer remains poor, but recent advances in nanotechnology offer promising possibilities for cancer treatment. Novel adjuvant, amphiphilic nanoparticles (NPs) composed of L: -phenylalanine (Phe)-conjugated poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA-Phe NPs) having excellent capacity for carrying peptides, were found to have the potential for use as a peptide vaccine against tumor models overexpressing artificial antigens, such as ovalbumin (OVA). However, the anti-tumor potential of gamma-PGA-Phe NPs vaccines using much less immunogenic tumor-associated antigen (TAA)-derived peptide needs to be clarified. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of immunization with EphA2, recently identified TAA, derived peptide-immobilized gamma-PGA-Phe NPs (Eph-NPs) against mouse liver tumor of MC38 cells (EphA2-positive colon cancer cells). Immunization of normal mice with Eph-NPs resulted in generation of EphA2-specific type-1 CD8+ T cells. Immunization with Eph-NPs tended to provide a degree of anti-MC38 liver tumor protection more than that observed for immunization with the mixture of EphA2-derived peptide and complete Freund's adjuvant (Eph + CFA). Neither Eph-NPs nor Eph + CFA vaccines inhibited tumor growth of BL6, EphA2-negative melanoma cells. Splenocytes isolated from MC38-bearing mice treated with Eph-NPs showed strong and specific cytotoxic activity against MC38 cells. Immunization with Eph + CFA induced liver damage as evidenced by elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase, while Eph-NPs vaccination did not exhibit any toxic damage to the liver. These results demonstrated that immunization with Eph-NPs displayed anti-tumor effects against liver tumor by generating acquired immunity equivalent to the toxic adjuvant CFA, suggesting that safe gamma-PGA-Phe NPs could be applied clinically for the vaccine treatment of liver cancer.

  2. Accumulation of memory precursor CD8 T cells in regressing tumors following combination therapy with vaccine and anti-PD-1 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyampudi, Lavakumar; Lamichhane, Purushottam; Scheid, Adam D; Kalli, Kimberly R; Shreeder, Barath; Krempski, James W; Behrens, Marshall D; Knutson, Keith L

    2014-06-01

    Immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment blunts vaccine-induced immune effectors. PD-1/B7-H1 is an important inhibitory axis in the tumor microenvironment. Our goal in this study was to determine the effect of blocking this inhibitory axis during and following vaccination against breast cancer. We observed that using anti-PD-1 antibody and a multipeptide vaccine (consisting of immunogenic peptides derived from breast cancer antigens, neu, legumain, and β-catenin) as a combination therapy regimen for the treatment of breast cancer-bearing mice prolonged the vaccine-induced progression-free survival period. This prolonged survival was associated with increase in number of Tc1 and Tc2 CD8 T cells with memory precursor phenotype, CD27+IL-7RhiT-betlo, and decrease in number of PD-1+ dendritic cells (DC) in regressing tumors and enhanced antigen reactivity of tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cells. It was also observed that blockade of PD-1 on tumor DCs enhanced IL-7R expression on CD8 T cells. Taken together, our results suggest that PD-1 blockade enhances breast cancer vaccine efficacy by altering both CD8 T cell and DC components of the tumor microenvironment. Given the recent success of anti-PD-1 monotherapy, our results are encouraging for developing combination therapies for the treatment of patients with cancer in which anti-PD-1 monotherapy alone may be ineffective (i.e., PD-L1-negative tumors). ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. MUC1 and survivin combination tumor gene vaccine generates specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects in a murine melanoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haihong; Liu, Chenlu; Zhang, Fangfang; Geng, Fei; Xia, Qiu; Lu, Zhenzhen; Xu, Ping; Xie, Yu; Wu, Hui; Yu, Bin; Wu, Jiaxin; Yu, Xianghui; Kong, Wei

    2016-05-23

    MUC1 and survivin are ideal tumor antigens. Although many cancer vaccines targeting survivin or MUC1 have entered clinical trials, no vaccine combining MUC1 and survivin have been reported. Due to tumor heterogeneity, vaccines containing a combination of antigens may have improved efficacy and coverage of a broader spectrum of cancer targets. Here, cellular responses and anti-tumor activities induced by a combination of DNA vaccine targeting MUC1 and survivin (MS) were evaluated. Results showed that CTL activity and inhibition of tumor growth were obviously enhanced in mice immunized with the combined vaccine in a protection assay. However, in order to enhance the therapeutic effect in the treatment assay, a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vaccine expressing MUC1 and survivin (Ad-MS) was used as a booster following the DNA vaccine prime. Meanwhile, IL-2 promoting T cell proliferation was used as an immunoadjuvant for the DNA vaccine. Results showed that the CTL activity response to the DNA vaccine was enhanced nearly 200% when boosted by the rAd vaccine and was further enhanced by nearly 60% when combined with the IL-2 adjuvant. Therefore, DNA prime combined with rAd boost and IL-2 (MS/IL2/Ad-MS) adjuvant was considered as the best strategy and further evaluated. Multiple cytokines promoting cellular immune responses were shown to be greatly enhanced in mice immunized with MS/IL2/Ad-MS. Moreover, in the treatment assay, the tumor inhibition rate of MS/IL2/Ad-MS reached up to 50.1%, which may be attributed to the enhancement of immune responses and reduction of immunosuppressive factors in tumor-bearing mice. These results suggested that immunization with the combination vaccine targeting MUC1 and survivin using a DNA prime-rAd boost strategy along with IL-2 adjuvant may be an effective method for breaking through immune tolerance to tumors expressing these antigens with potential therapeutic benefits in melanoma cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Schistosoma mansoni major egg antigen Smp40: molecular modeling and potential immunoreactivity for anti-pathology vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F Abouel-Nour

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Schistosoma mansoni infection is largely determined by host T-cell mediated immune responses such as the granulomatous response to tissue deposited eggs and subsequent fibrosis. The major egg antigens have a valuable role in desensitizing the CD4+ Th cells that mediate granuloma formation, which may prevent or ameliorate clinical signs of schistosomiasis.S. mansoni major egg antigen Smp40 was expressed and completely purified. It was found that the expressed Smp40 reacts specifically with anti-Smp40 monoclonal antibody in Western blotting. Three-dimensional structure was elucidated based on the similarity of Smp40 with the small heat shock protein coded in the protein database as 1SHS as a template in the molecular modeling. It was figured out that the C-terminal of the Smp40 protein (residues 130 onward contains two alpha crystallin domains. The fold consists of eight beta strands sandwiched in two sheets forming Greek key. The purified Smp40 was used for in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients infected with S. mansoni using phytohemagglutinin mitogen as a positive control. The obtained results showed that there is no statistical difference in interferon-g, interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13 levels obtained with Smp40 stimulation compared with the control group (P > 0.05 for each. On the other hand, there were significant differences after Smp40 stimulation in IL-5 (P = 0.006 and IL-10 levels (P < 0.001 compared with the control group. Gaining the knowledge by reviewing the literature, it was found that the overall pattern of cytokine profile obtained with Smp40 stimulation is reported to be associated with reduced collagen deposition, decreased fibrosis, and granuloma formation inhibition. This may reflect its future prospect as a leading anti-pathology schistosomal vaccine candidate.

  5. Werther Goes Viral: Suicidal Contagion, Anti-Vaccination, and Infectious Sympathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubert, Michelle

    The fear that suicidality could spread through textual contagion-that textually represented suicide could enter the reader's mind and cause self-destruction-took hold long before Émile Durkheim theorized it in the Victorian period. This article argues that the fear of suicidal contagion and the horror of vaccination, both of which raged in Britain in the long eighteenth century, were linked to ideas about sympathy and the importation of the Other into the Self. With reference to the psychoanalytic notions of extimité and étrangerété; the eighteenth-century medical theories of William Rowley and Edward Jenner; the philosophy of "sympathy," as adumbrated in the work of John Locke, Adam Smith, David Hume and Edmund Burke; and two key novels of sensibility (Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Julie and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther), this article examines the root of a belief that exists even today: that, in a suicidal process, the invading Other could become the Self and, Trojan horse-style, destroy it from the inside.

  6. Investigation of structure-activity relationships of synthetic anti-gonadotropin releasing hormone vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chenghung; Varamini, Pegah; Giddam, Ashwini Kumar; Mansfeld, Friederike M; D'Occhio, Michael J; Toth, Istvan

    2015-05-01

    The immunoneutralization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) can be used for the treatment of human hormone-dependent male and female cancers or as immunocontraceptives in animals. Vaccine candidates 1 [Th(K-LP)GnRH], 2 [GnRH(K-LP)Th], 3 [GnRH(K-Th)LP], and 4 [Th(K-GnRH)LP] (for which K=lysine, LP=lipopeptide Ser-Ser-C16 -C16 , and Th=T helper cell epitope influenza HA2), were synthesized by assembling a CD4(+) T helper cell epitope (Th), GnRH, and an adjuvanting lipid moiety (LP) in various spatial arrangements. All compounds were efficiently taken up by antigen-presenting cells with significant immunogenicity without an external adjuvant. Compounds 2, 3, and 4, in which GnRH is conjugated through its C terminus, produced higher GnRH-specific antibody responses than construct 1, in which the GnRH moiety is conjugated through its N terminus. All four constructs induced a significant antiproliferative effect (up to 55 %) on GnRH-receptor-positive LNCaP cells, but showed weaker activity in the GnRH-receptor-negative SKOV-3 cell line. Marked degenerative changes were observed in morphology and follicular development in the ovaries of immunized mice, with approximately 30 % higher degenerative antral and atretic follicles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Measles lessons in an anti-vaccination era: public health is a social duty, not a political option

    OpenAIRE

    Lancella, L.; Di Camillo, C.; Vittucci, A. C.; Boccuzzi, E.; Bozzola, E.; Villani, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Measles virus, member of the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae, is a highly contagious human pathogen. An effective live-attenuated vaccine is available and its use has the potential to eradicate the disease from the human population. Although the vaccine was introduced in national vaccination schedules, several measles outbreaks have occurred because of insufficient vaccination coverage. Since early January 2017, a new outbreak of measles in Italy has been observed...

  8. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  9. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What ...

  10. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  11. A systematic review of anti-rotavirus serum IgA antibody titer as a potential correlate of rotavirus vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish; Glass, Roger I; Jiang, Baoming; Santosham, Mathuram; Lopman, Ben; Parashar, Umesh

    2013-07-15

    Identifying an immunological correlate of protection for rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix [RV1] and RotaTeq [RV5]) would substantially facilitate testing of interventions for improving efficacy in developing countries and evaluating additional candidate rotavirus vaccines. We accessed PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov to identify immunogenicity and efficacy trials for RV1 and RV5 to correlate anti-rotavirus serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody titers vs efficacy in regions stratified by all-cause under-5 mortality rates (u5MR). We established a cutoff point for IgA geometric mean concentration or titer (GMC) that predicted lower efficacy and calculated pooled vaccine efficacy among countries with high vs low IgA titers. We observed an inverse correlation between u5MR and IgA titers for RV1 (r(2) = 0.72; P rotavirus IgA GMC 90 (85%; 95% CI, 82-88). We observed a significant correlation between IgA titers and rotavirus vaccine efficacy and hypothesize that a critical level of IgA antibody titer is associated with a sufficient level of sustained protection after rotavirus vaccination.

  12. A single serum dilution enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determining anti-human papillomavirus (HPV) antibody titres in humans immunised with prophylactic HPV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yingji; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Yim, Ga Won; Kim, Young Tae; Chang, Don Yong; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2012-07-01

    Two types of prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are currently available. However, there is no simple monitoring system for assessing acquired immunity that can cope simultaneously with large numbers of serum samples. Approximately 30% of women with normal cytology are known to be seropositive for HPV types 16 and 18 because of the high prevalence of these HPV types. Therefore, to be useful the monitoring system has to discriminate clearly between vaccine recipients and other serology groups. However, there has never been any focus on developing a method to satisfy this condition. In this study, we developed a high-throughput single-serum-dilution enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) system for determining anti-HPV antibody titres following vaccination. We optimised the conditions for each ELISA step to increase its accuracy and precision and to avoid the high background of non-specific reactions that is a major problem for serology assays. The new ELISA system has superior linearity, accuracy and reproducibility. Moreover, it clearly discriminated between antibody levels in vaccine recipients and those in other serology groups such as individuals with normal cervical cytology and those with cervical cancer. Therefore, this single-serum-dilution ELISA should be very useful for assessing the acquired immunity of HPV vaccine recipients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential induction of anti-V3 crown antibodies with cradle- and ladle-binding modes in response to HIV-1 envelope vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Preetha; Kumar, Rajnish; Williams, Constance; Itri, Vincenza; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Hessell, Ann J; Haigwood, Nancy L; Sinangil, Faruk; Higgins, Keith W; Liu, Lily; Li, Liuzhe; Nyambi, Phillipe; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Totrov, Maxim; Nadas, Arthur; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Hioe, Catarina E

    2017-03-07

    The V3 loop in the HIV envelope gp120 is one of the immunogenic sites targeted by Abs. The V3 crown in particular has conserved structural elements recognized by cross-reactive neutralizing Abs, indicating its potential contribution in protection against HIV. Crystallographic analyses of anti-V3 crown mAbs in complex with the V3 peptides have revealed that these mAbs recognize the conserved sites on the V3 crown via two distinct strategies: a cradle-binding mode (V3C) and a ladle-binding (V3L) mode. However, almost all of the anti-V3 crown mAbs studied in the past were isolated from chronically HIV-infected individuals. The extents to which the two types of anti-V3 crown Abs are generated by vaccination are unknown. This study analyzed the prevalence of V3C-type and V3L-type Ab responses in HIV-infected individuals and in HIV envelope-immunized humans and animals using peptide mimotopes that distinguish the two Ab types. The results show that both V3L-type and V3C-type Abs were generated by the vast majority of chronically HIV-infected humans, although the V3L-type were more prevalent. In contrast, only one of the two V3 Ab types was elicited in vaccinated humans or animal models, irrespective of HIV-1 envelope clades, envelope constructs (oligomeric or monomeric), and protocols (DNA plus protein or protein alone) used for vaccinations. The V3C-type Abs were produced by vaccinated humans, macaques, and rabbits, whereas the V3L-type Abs were made by mice. The V3C-type and V3L-type Abs generated by the vaccinations were able to mediate virus neutralization. These data indicate the restricted repertoires and the species-specific differences in the functional V3-specific Ab responses induced by the HIV envelope vaccines. The study implies the need for improving immunogen designs and vaccination strategies to broaden the diversity of Abs in order to target the different conserved epitopes in the V3 loop and, by extension, in the entire HIV envelope. Published by

  14. Carrier priming or suppression: understanding carrier priming enhancement of anti-polysaccharide antibody response to conjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobre, Karl; Tashani, Mohamed; Ridda, Iman; Rashid, Harunor; Wong, Melanie; Booy, Robert

    2014-03-14

    With the availability of newer conjugate vaccines, immunization schedules have become increasingly complex due to the potential for unpredictable immunologic interference such as 'carrier priming' and 'carrier induced epitopic suppression'. Carrier priming refers to an augmented antibody response to a carbohydrate portion of a glycoconjugate vaccine in an individual previously primed with the carrier protein. This review aims to provide a critical evaluation of the available data on carrier priming (and suppression) and conceptualize ways by which this phenomenon can be utilized to strengthen vaccination schedules. We conducted this literature review by searching well-known databases to date to identify relevant studies, then extracted and synthesized the data on carrier priming of widely used conjugate polysaccharide vaccines, such as, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenCV) and Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines (HibV). We found evidence of carrier priming with some conjugate vaccines, particularly HibV and PCV, in both animal and human models but controversy surrounds MenCV. This has implications for the immunogenicity of conjugate polysaccharide vaccines following the administration of tetanus-toxoid or diphtheria-toxoid containing vaccine (such as DTP). Available evidence supports a promising role for carrier priming in terms of maximizing the immunogenicity of conjugate vaccines and enhancing immunization schedule by making it more efficient and cost effective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Comparative Study for Anti-Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Titers Based on Two Measurement Methods: Using Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Hepatitis B Vaccinated Recipients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oone, Kumiko; Kani, Satomi; Oohashi, Minoru; Shinkai, Noboru; Inoue, Takako; Wakimoto, Yukio; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2015-08-01

    As anti-hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) titers vary depending on the measurement methods, we compared two different methods to measure anti-HBs titers in sera and HBs monoclonal antibodies. The sera from 182 HB virus-resolved patients who were negative for HBsAg but positive for antiHB core protein (HBc) and/or anti-HBs were obtained. The measurement of anti-HBs was compared using either Lumipulse G1200 or Architect i2000SR. Six different monoclonal antibody (mAbs) clones isolated from healthy individuals inoculated with hepatitis B vaccine Bimmugen (genotype C) were used. A statistically significant correlation in anti-HBs titers was found between the two methods tested (Y = 0.951X + 100.7, R = 0.813, p Lumipulse and 12 (6.6%) were opposite results. Measuring 2 mAbs with HBV neutralizing activity, the titers of the 116 antibody (1.0 μg/mL) were comparable (689.3 mIU/mL by Lumipulse and 440.7 mIU/mL by Architect), whereas those of the 478 antibody (1.0 μg/mL) were much lower by Architect than by Lumipulse (42.6 vs. 818.6 mIU/mL, respectively). Of four other mAbs without HBV neutralizing activity, equal titers were observed for one; two mAbs had less anti-HB titers by Architect; and one was below the cut-off index (Lumipulse, and the potential ability to detect the 478 antibody with neutralizing activity is low, indicating that Architect might underestimate anti-HBs titers. Future studies should standardize the anti-HBs titer measurement system.

  16. Anti-O-specific polysaccharide (OSP) immune responses following vaccination with oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR correlate with protection against cholera after infection with wild-type Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Inaba in North American volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Kamrul; Hossain, Motaher; Kelly, Meagan; Mayo Smith, Leslie M; Charles, Richelle C; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Kováč, Pavol; Xu, Peng; LaRocque, Regina C; Calderwood, Stephen B; Simon, Jakub K; Chen, Wilbur H; Haney, Douglas; Lock, Michael; Lyon, Caroline E; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Cohen, Mitchell; Levine, Myron M; Gurwith, Marc; Harris, Jason B; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T

    2018-04-01

    Cholera is an acute voluminous dehydrating diarrheal disease caused by toxigenic strains of Vibrio cholerae O1 and occasionally O139. A growing body of evidence indicates that immune responses targeting the O-specific polysaccharide (OSP) of V. cholerae are involved in mediating protection against cholera. We therefore assessed whether antibody responses against OSP occur after vaccination with live attenuated oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR, and whether such responses correlate with protection against cholera. We assessed adult North American volunteers (n = 46) who were vaccinated with 5 × 108 colony-forming units (CFU) of oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR and then orally challenged with approximately 1 × 105 CFU of wild-type V. cholerae O1 El Tor Inaba strain N16961, either 10 or 90 days post-vaccination. Vaccination was associated with induction of significant serum IgM and IgA anti-OSP and vibriocidal antibody responses within 10 days of vaccination. There was significant correlation between anti-OSP and vibriocidal antibody responses. IgM and IgA anti-OSP responses on day 10 following vaccination were associated with lower post-challenge stool volume (r = -0.44, P = 0.002; r = -0.36, P = 0.01; respectively), and none of 27 vaccinees who developed a ≥1.5 fold increase in any antibody isotype targeting OSP on day 10 following vaccination compared to baseline developed moderate or severe cholera following experimental challenge, while 5 of 19 who did not develop such anti-OSP responses did (P = 0.01). Oral vaccination with live attenuated cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR induces antibodies that target V. cholerae OSP, and these anti-OSP responses correlate with protection against diarrhea following experimental challenge with V. cholerae O1. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01895855.

  17. Development of an anti-IL-12 p40 auto-vaccine: protection in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis at the expense of increased sensitivity to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyttenhove, Catherine; Arendse, Berenice; Stroobant, Vincent; Brombacher, Frank; Van Snick, Jacques

    2004-12-01

    IL-12 and IL-23, which share the IL-12 p40 subunit, have been ascribed central roles in many autoimmune disorders. We describe here an anti-IL-12 (alphaIL-12) auto-vaccine that potentially blocks both factors in vivo. Immunization of mice with mouse IL-12 coupled to OVA or Pan DR epitope (PADRE) peptide induced Ab directed against the IL-12 p40 subunit, which prevented IFN-gamma production in response to IL-12 administration in vivo. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an IL-23-dependent disease model, induced in SJL mice with a proteolipid protein (PLP) peptide was almost undetectable after alphaIL-12 vaccination. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced disease in C57BL/6 mice was also significantly inhibited. This protection correlated with inhibited Th1 cytokine responses in vitro and with an increase in the IgG1/IgG2a anti-PLP Ab balance. Detrimental consequences of alphaIL-12 vaccination were evaluated in C57BL/6 mice infected with Leishmania major (L.m.). While delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) suppression and immunoglobulin as well as interleukin production patterns reflected a major shift toward a Th2-type response, L.m. growth was still significantly retarded as compared to that seen in susceptible BALB/c mice. However, vaccinated animals ultimately failed to control parasite expansion. These results suggest that some chronic autoimmune diseases may benefit from alphaIL-12 vaccination at the expense of reduced, but not completely abrogated, cell-mediated immunity.

  18. Single N277A substitution in C2 of simian immunodeficiency virus envelope influences vaccine-elicited CD4i neutralizing and anti-V2 antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xian; Guo, Jia; Cheng, Lin; Sun, Caijun; Liu, Li; Zuo, Teng; Wang, Hui; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Linqi; Chen, Zhiwei

    2017-05-02

    An effective HIV vaccine remains elusive, and immunogens capable of eliciting protective host humoral immunity have not yet been identified. Although HIV/SIV infections result in the abundant production of CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies (Abs), these Abs are not protective due to steric restrictions following gp120 binding to CD4 on target cells. Here we report that both DNA- and vaccinia-based vaccines encoding SIV mac239 gp160 readily elicited high levels of CD4i Abs in experimental animals. We identified a highly conserved N-linked glycosylation site N277 in the C2 region which strongly affected the immunogenicity of the CD4i Ab domain. Moreover, a single N277A substitution significantly enhanced the immunogenicity of the V2 domain yielding higher titers and frequency of anti-V2 Ab responses as determined by ELISA and yeast antigen display mapping, respectively. Importantly, immune sera elicited by the N277A-mutated gp160 exhibited elevated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. ADCC activity correlated positively with the anti-V2 Ab titer yet, inversely with CD4i Ab titer. Thus, we identified a determinant of the CD4i domain that might affect vaccine-elicited anti-V2 Ab and ADCC responses to SIV mac239 . Our findings may have implications for design of immunogens to direct B cell recognition in the development of an Ab-based HIV vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Discovery of dormancy associated antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis : novel targets for the development of post-exposure or therapeutic tuberculosis vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, May Young

    2009-01-01

    The growing number of tuberculosis (TB) casualties urges development of not only more effective drugs and preventive vaccines but also development of post-exposure/therapeutic TB vaccines. Post-exposure/therapeutic TB vaccines are needed since 2 billion people worldwide harbor a latent Mycobacterium

  20. First Phase I human clinical trial of a killed whole-HIV-1 vaccine: demonstration of its safety and enhancement of anti-HIV antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunsil; Michalski, Chad J; Choo, Seung Ho; Kim, Gyoung Nyoun; Banasikowska, Elizabeth; Lee, Sangkyun; Wu, Kunyu; An, Hwa-Yong; Mills, Anthony; Schneider, Stefan; Bredeek, U Fritz; Coulston, Daniel R; Ding, Shilei; Finzi, Andrés; Tian, Meijuan; Klein, Katja; Arts, Eric J; Mann, Jamie F S; Gao, Yong; Kang, C Yong

    2016-11-28

    Vaccination with inactivated (killed) whole-virus particles has been used to prevent a wide range of viral diseases. However, for an HIV vaccine this approach has been largely negated due to inherent safety concerns, despite the ability of killed whole-virus vaccines to generate a strong, predominantly antibody-mediated immune response in vivo. HIV-1 Clade B NL4-3 was genetically modified by deleting the nef and vpu genes and substituting the coding sequence for the Env signal peptide with that of honeybee melittin signal peptide to produce a less virulent and more replication efficient virus. This genetically modified virus (gmHIV-1 NL4-3 ) was inactivated and formulated as a killed whole-HIV vaccine, and then used for a Phase I human clinical trial (Trial Registration: Clinical Trials NCT01546818). The gmHIV-1 NL4-3 was propagated in the A3.01 human T cell line followed by virus purification and inactivation with aldrithiol-2 and γ-irradiation. Thirty-three HIV-1 positive volunteers receiving cART were recruited for this observer-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase I human clinical trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity. Genetically modified and killed whole-HIV-1 vaccine, SAV001, was well tolerated with no serious adverse events. HIV-1 NL4-3 -specific PCR showed neither evidence of vaccine virus replication in the vaccine virus-infected human T lymphocytes in vitro nor in the participating volunteers receiving SAV001 vaccine. Furthermore, SAV001 with adjuvant significantly increased the pre-existing antibody response to HIV-1 proteins. Antibodies in the plasma of vaccinees were also found to recognize HIV-1 envelope protein on the surface of infected cells as well as showing an enhancement of broadly neutralizing antibodies inhibiting tier I and II of HIV-1 B, D, and A subtypes. The killed whole-HIV vaccine, SAV001, is safe and triggers anti-HIV immune responses. It remains to be determined through an appropriate trial whether this immune response prevents

  1. Enhanced anti-tumor effect of a gene gun-delivered DNA vaccine encoding the human papillomavirus type 16 oncoproteins genetically fused to the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Diniz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Anti-cancer DNA vaccines have attracted growing interest as a simple and non-invasive method for both the treatment and prevention of tumors induced by human papillomaviruses. Nonetheless, the low immunogenicity of parenterally administered vaccines, particularly regarding the activation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses, suggests that further improvements in both vaccine composition and administration routes are still required. In the present study, we report the immune responses and anti-tumor effects of a DNA vaccine (pgD-E7E6E5 expressing three proteins (E7, E6, and E5 of the human papillomavirus type 16 genetically fused to the glycoprotein D of the human herpes simplex virus type 1, which was administered to mice by the intradermal (id route using a gene gun. A single id dose of pgD-E7E6E5 (2 µg/dose induced a strong activation of E7-specific interferon-γ (INF-γ-producing CD8+ T cells and full prophylactic anti-tumor effects in the vaccinated mice. Three vaccine doses inhibited tumor growth in 70% of the mice with established tumors. In addition, a single vaccine dose consisting of the co-administration of pgD-E7E6E5 and the vector encoding interleukin-12 or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor further enhanced the therapeutic anti-tumor effects and conferred protection to 60 and 50% of the vaccinated mice, respectively. In conclusion, id administration of pgD-E7E6E5 significantly enhanced the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of the DNA vaccine, representing a promising administration route for future clinical trials.

  2. Oxidative Stress Markers in Tuberculosis and HIV/TB Co-Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajopadhye, Shreewardhan Haribhau; Mukherjee, Sandeepan R; Chowdhary, Abhay S; Dandekar, Sucheta P

    2017-08-01

    Dysfunction of redox homeostasis has been implicated in many pathological conditions. An imbalance of pro- and anti-oxidants have been observed in Tuberculosis (TB) and its co-morbidities especially HIV/AIDS. The pro inflammatory milieu in either condition aggravates the physiological balance of the redox mechanisms. The present study therefore focuses on assessing the redox status of patients suffering from TB and HIV-TB co-infection. To assess the oxidative stress markers in the HIV-TB and TB study cohort. The current prospective study was conducted in Haffkine Institute, Parel, Maharashtra, India, during January 2013 to December 2015. Blood samples from 50 patients each suffering from active TB and HIV-TB co-infection were collected from Seth G.S.Medical College and KEM Hospital Mumbai and Group of Tuberculosis Hospital, Sewree Mumbai. Samples were processed and the experiments were carried out at the Department of Biochemistry, Haffkine Institute. Samples from 50 healthy volunteers were used as controls. Serum was assessed for pro-oxidant markers such as Nitric Oxide (NO), Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Species (TBARS), C-Reactive Protein (CRP), superoxide anion. Antioxidant markers such as catalase and Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) were assessed. Total serum protein, was also assessed. Among the pro-oxidants, serum NO levels were decreased in TB group while no change was seen in HIV-TB group. TBARS and CRP levels showed significant increase in both groups; superoxide anion increased significantly in HIV-TB group. Catalase levels showed decreased activities in TB group. SOD activity significantly increased in HIV-TB but not in TB group. The total serum proteins were significantly increased in HIV-TB and TB groups. The values of Control cohort were with the normal reference ranges. In the present study, we found the presence of oxidative stress to be profound in the TB and HIV-TB co-infection population.

  3. Safety and immunogenicity of inactivated varicella-zoster virus vaccine in adults with hematologic malignancies receiving treatment with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrino, Janie; McNeil, Shelly A; Lawrence, Steven J; Kimby, Eva; Pagnoni, Marco F; Stek, Jon E; Zhao, Yanli; Chan, Ivan S F; Kaplan, Susan S

    2017-03-27

    Immunocompromised patients can experience significant morbidity and occasional mortality from complications associated with herpes zoster (HZ), but live attenuated HZ vaccine is contraindicated for these patients. Inactivated zoster vaccine (ZV IN ) is in development for prevention of HZ in immunocompromised patients. However, there are limited data in the literature regarding the effect of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies on vaccine-related cell-mediated immune response. This study evaluated safety and immunogenicity of ZV IN in patients with hematologic malignancies (HM) receiving anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (alone or in combination chemotherapy regimens) and not likely to undergo hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) (n=80). This was an open-label, single-arm, multicenter Phase I study (NCT01460719) of a 4-dose ZV IN regimen (∼30days between doses) in patients ⩾18years old. Blood samples were collected prior to dose 1 and 28days Postdose 4 to measure varicella zoster virus (VZV)-specific T-cell responses using interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ ELISPOT). The primary hypothesis was that ZV IN would elicit significant VZV-specific immune responses at ∼28days Postdose 4, with a geometric fold rise (GMFR) >1.0. All vaccinated patients were evaluated for adverse events (AE) through 28days Postdose 4. ZV IN elicited a statistically significant VZV-specific immune response measured by IFN-γ ELISPOT at 28days Postdose 4 (GMFR=4.34 [90% CI:3.01, 6.24], p-valuevaccination by the investigator. Frequencies of AEs did not increase with subsequent doses of vaccine. No recipient of ZV IN had rash polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for VZV vaccine strain. In adults with HM receiving anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, ZV IN was well-tolerated and elicited statistically significant VZV-specific T-cell responses ∼28days Postdose 4. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV identifier: NCT01460719. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phase I clinical study of anti-apoptosis protein, survivin-derived peptide vaccine therapy for patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minamida Hidetoshi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP family containing a single baculovirus IAP repeat domain. It is expressed during fetal development but becomes undetectable in terminally differentiated normal adult tissues. We previously reported that survivin and its splicing variant survivin-2B was expressed abundantly in various types of tumor tissues as well as tumor cell lines and was suitable as a target antigen for active-specific anti-cancer immunization. Subsequently, we identified an HLA-A24-restricted antigenic peptide, survivin-2B80-88 (AYACNTSTL recognized by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs. We, therefore, started a phase I clinical study assessing the efficacy of survivin-2B peptide vaccination in patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer expressing survivin. Vaccinations with survivin-2B peptide were given subcutaneously six times at 14-day intervals. Of 15 patients who finished receiving the vaccination schedule, three suffered slight toxicities, including anemia (grade 2, general malaise (grade 1, and fever (grade 1. No severe adverse events were observed in any patient. In 6 patients, tumor marker levels (CEA and CA19-9 decreased transiently during the period of vaccination. Slight reduction of the tumor volume was observed in one patient, which was considered a minor responder. No changes were noted in three patients while the remaining eleven patients experienced tumor progression. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes of one patient using HLA-A24/peptide tetramers revealed an increase in peptide-specific CTL frequency from 0.09% to 0.35% of CD8+ T cells after 4 vaccinations. This phase I clinical study indicates that survivin-2B peptide-based vaccination is safe and should be further considered for potential immune and clinical efficacy in HLA-A24-expression patients with colorectal cancer.

  5. Anti-radiation vaccine: Immunologically-based Prophylaxis of Acute Toxic Radiation Syndromes Associated with Long-term Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Jones, Jeffrey; Casey, Rachael C.

    2007-01-01

    functional conditions of impacted cells/organisms. The administration of an experimental anti-radiation vaccine may provide an immunologically based, adjunct method of prevention or prophylaxis against clinical ARS. The administration of experimental anti-radiation serum (ARS) and the use of the blood dialysis methods, such as immune plasma-sorption, may assist in the clearance of radiation-specific toxins and may enhance established strategies for the mitigation of the biological effects leading to ARS, and should be evaluated for use on exploration-class space missions.

  6. Antibody and cytokine serum levels in patients subjected to anti-rabies prophylaxis with serum-vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Ayres

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is considered a fatal disease once clinical symptoms have developed. The aim of this study was to evaluate epidemiological aspects and immune response in patients attacked by domestic and wild animals and subjected to post-exposure rabies treatment with equine serum and associated vaccine. Thirty-three patients were evaluated; they were between 13 and 65 years old, 75.8% were male and 24.2% female, and from the Botucatu neighborhood. Twenty healthy control individuals with the same age range were also studied. Specific antibodies to equine immunoglobulins and IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10 production were evaluated by ELISA. IgM, IgE, IgG and subclasses, and rabies virus antibodies serum levels were determined by nephelometry and seroneutralization methods, respectively. No anaphylactic or serum sickness allergic reactions were observed in patients after treatment. Anti-equine IgG levels were significantly higher than those of IgM after 14 and 28 days of treatment. Protective antibodies to rabies virus > 0.5 UI/ml were detected in 84.6% and 75% of patients at days 14 and 28, respectively. IFN-gamma, IL-2 and IL-10 levels in patients before and 48h after treatment were significantly higher than in controls suggesting that both Th1 and Th2 cells were activated in the patients. Serum IgM levels were higher at day 14, and IgG2 and IgE levels were higher at day 28 of treatment. These results suggest that post-exposure rabies treatment in humans induces significant alterations in patient immune response characterized by increased levels of cytokines, serum levels of specific rabies virus antibodies, and the equine serum components employed in the treatment.

  7. Epidemiology of animal bites and other potential rabies exposures and anti-rabies vaccine utilization in a rural area in Southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M Ramos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The presented report describes the epidemiology of potential rabies exposures and examines the utilization of anti-rabies vaccine in a rural area of Ethiopia during a period of 43 months. A total of 683 persons (51.1% females, 73% children with animal- related bites were included in the retrospective, registry-based study. The most common site of exposure was the leg (66.8%. In children under 8 years of age the face was more often involved than in adults (9.5% vs. 4.8%; p=0.03. The main type of exposure was a bite with bleeding (66.3% followed by contamination of mucous membranes with saliva (19.7%. The primary sources were dogs (93.4% followed by cats (2.6%. Children under 15 years were more likely to be exposed to dogs (94.9% than adults (88.7% (p=0.01. The most common way of coming in contact with animals was ‘walking by’ (83.9%. Children came in contact with animals while ‘playing with’ (10.7% more often than adults (1.1% (p<0.001. All the patients received an anti-rabies nervous-tissue vaccine, 99% of whom completed the vaccination course. Animal bites continue to be a problem in rural Ethiopia, mainly among children. Efforts to protect children against animal bites must be of paramount importance in preventing rabies in this population.

  8. Emergence in Western African Countries of MDR-TB, Focus on Côte d’Ivoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euloge Ekaza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is responsible for a high mortality rate (2.5% worldwide, mainly in developing countries with a high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The emergence of multiresistant strains of TB poses an extreme risk for TB outbreaks and highlights the need for global TB control strategies. Among Western African countries, Côte d’Ivoire (CI represents a specific example of a country with great potential to prevent TB. Specifically, CI has a promising healthcare system for monitoring diseases, including vaccination programs. However, military and political conflict in CI favors the spread of infectious diseases, TB being among the most devastating. Compilation of the studies identifying common causes of TB would be extremely beneficial for the development of treatment and prevention strategies. Therefore, the purpose of this comprehensive review is to evaluate the epidemiology of TB in CI, describe the factors involved in pathogenesis, and suggest simple and applicable prevention strategies.

  9. TB or not TB?: a case of isolated testicular TB with scrotal involvement.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bhargava, A

    2009-06-01

    Despite the genitourinary tract being the most common site affected by extrapulmonary TB, isolated testicular TB remains a rare clinical entity. In patients with co-morbidities such as hepatic impairment, treatment proves a challenge, as first-line hepatotoxic pharmaceuticals are contraindicated. Here, we report a case of isolated testicular TB with scrotal involvement, on a background of hepatic dysfunction.

  10. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination elicits IgG anti-AB blood group antibodies in healthy individuals and patients with Type I diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendelin Wolfram

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypothesis: Blood group antibodies are natural antibodies that develop early in life in response to cross-reactive environmental antigens in the absence of antigen encounter. Even later in life structural similarities in saccharide composition between environmental antigens such as bacterial polysaccharides and blood group A/B antigens could lead to changes in serum levels, IgM/IgG isotype and affinity maturation of blood group anti-A/B antibodies. We adressed the question whether immunization with pneumococcal polysaccharide (PnP vaccine (PPV Pneumovax®23 could have such an effect in patients with with type I diabetes mellitus (DM I, an autoimmune disease where an aberrant immune response to microbial antigens likely plays a role.Methods: Anti-PnP IgM and IgG responses were determined by ELISA and the Diamed-ID Micro Typing System was used to screen anti-A/B antibody titer before and after Pneumovax®23 immunization in 28 healthy individuals and 16 patients with DM I. In addition, surface plasmon resonance (SPR technology using the Biacore® device and a synthetic blood group A/B trisaccharide as the antigen was applied to investigate IgM and IgG anti-A/B antibodies and to measure antibody binding dynamics. Results: All healthy individuals and DM I patients responded with anti-PnP IgM and IgG antibody production four to six weeks after Pneumovax®23 (Pn23 immunization, while no increase in blood group anti-A/B antibody titer was observed when measured by the Diamed-ID Micro Typing System. Interestingly, isotype-specific testing by SPR-technology revealed an increase in blood group anti-A/B IgG, but not IgM, following Pn23 immunization in both patients and controls. No change in binding characteristics of blood group anti-A/B antibodies could be detected following Pn23 vaccination, supporting the assumption of an increase in IgG antibody titer with no or very little affinity maturation.Conclusion: The study provides evidence for epitope sharing

  11. Seroprevalence of anti-rubella and anti-measles IgG antibodies in pregnant women in Shiraz, Southern Iran: outcomes of a nationwide measles-rubella mass vaccination campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarvar, Behnam; Moghadami, Mohsen; Moattari, Afagh; Emami, Amir; Odoomi, Neda; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    Nonimmune pregnant women are at risk of developing congenital rubella syndrome and measles complications. We aimed to identify pregnant women susceptible to rubella or measles in order to determine the need for immunity screening and supplemental immunization in women of childbearing age. This seroprevalence survey was conducted by convenience sampling in obstetric hospitals affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (southern Iran). Serum IgG levels were measured by ELISA. Mean age of the 175 pregnant women was 27.3±5.3 (range 16 to 42) years. The geometric mean concentration of anti-rubella IgG was 14.9 IU/mL (CI 95%,14.1-15.5), and that of anti-measles IgG was 13.8 IU/mL (CI 95%, 13-14.5). One hundred sixty-eight women (96%) had a protective serologic level (>11 IU/mL) of IgG against rubella, and 143 (81.7%) had a protective level against measles. Except for a significant inverse correlation that was showed by univariate analysis between anti-rubella IgG and the women's age (P = 0.01), immunity did not correlate with demographic or obstetric characteristics or medical history. There was no significant correlation between anti-rubella and anti-measles IgG levels (P = 0.25). Nearly a decade after Iran's nationwide measles-rubella vaccination campaign for the population aged 5-25 years, most pregnant women up to 34 years of age had humoral immunity against rubella. We recommend rubella immunity screening or catch-up immunization for women older than 35 years who wish to become pregnant, and measles immunity screening and appropriate vaccination for all women of childbearing age.

  12. Seroprevalence of anti-rubella and anti-measles IgG antibodies in pregnant women in Shiraz, Southern Iran: outcomes of a nationwide measles-rubella mass vaccination campaign.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Honarvar

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nonimmune pregnant women are at risk of developing congenital rubella syndrome and measles complications. We aimed to identify pregnant women susceptible to rubella or measles in order to determine the need for immunity screening and supplemental immunization in women of childbearing age. METHOD: This seroprevalence survey was conducted by convenience sampling in obstetric hospitals affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (southern Iran. Serum IgG levels were measured by ELISA. RESULT: Mean age of the 175 pregnant women was 27.3±5.3 (range 16 to 42 years. The geometric mean concentration of anti-rubella IgG was 14.9 IU/mL (CI 95%,14.1-15.5, and that of anti-measles IgG was 13.8 IU/mL (CI 95%, 13-14.5. One hundred sixty-eight women (96% had a protective serologic level (>11 IU/mL of IgG against rubella, and 143 (81.7% had a protective level against measles. Except for a significant inverse correlation that was showed by univariate analysis between anti-rubella IgG and the women's age (P = 0.01, immunity did not correlate with demographic or obstetric characteristics or medical history. There was no significant correlation between anti-rubella and anti-measles IgG levels (P = 0.25. CONCLUSION: Nearly a decade after Iran's nationwide measles-rubella vaccination campaign for the population aged 5-25 years, most pregnant women up to 34 years of age had humoral immunity against rubella. We recommend rubella immunity screening or catch-up immunization for women older than 35 years who wish to become pregnant, and measles immunity screening and appropriate vaccination for all women of childbearing age.

  13. Access to and affordability of healthcare for TB patients in China: issues and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shenglan; Wang, Lixia; Wang, Hong; Chin, Daniel P

    2016-01-29

    This paper introduces the background, aim and objectives of the project entitled "China-the Gates Foundation Collaboration on TB Control in China" that has been underway for many years. It also summarizes the key findings of the nine papers included in this special issue, which used data from the baseline survey of Phase II of the project. Data were collected from the survey of TB and MDR-TB patients, from designated hospitals, health insurance agencies and the routine health information systems, as well as key informant interviews and focus group discussions with relevant key stakeholders. Key issues discussed in this series of papers include the uses of TB services and anti-TB medicines and their determining factors related to socio-economic and health systems development; expenditures on TB care and the financial burden incurred on TB patients; and the impact of health insurance schemes implemented in China on financial protection.

  14. Trypanosomiasis-induced B cell apoptosis results in loss of protective anti-parasite antibody responses and abolishment of vaccine-induced memory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Radwanska

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes of the Trypanosoma brucei species are extra-cellular parasites that cause human African trypanosomiasis (HAT as well as infections in game animals and livestock. Trypanosomes are known to evade the immune response of their mammalian host by continuous antigenic variation of their surface coat. Here, we aim to demonstrate that in addition, trypanosomes (i cause the loss of various B cell populations, (ii disable the hosts' capacity to raise a long-lasting specific protective anti-parasite antibody response, and (iii abrogate vaccine-induced protective response to a non-related human pathogen such as Bordetella pertussis. Using a mouse model for T. brucei, various B cell populations were analyzed by FACS at different time points of infection. The results show that during early onset of a T. brucei infection, spleen remodeling results in the rapid loss of the IgM(+ marginal zone (IgM(+MZ B cell population characterized as B220(+IgM(HighIgD(Int CD21(HighCD23(LowCD1d(+CD138(-. These cells, when isolated during the first peak of infection, stained positive for Annexin V and had increased caspase-3 enzyme activity. Elevated caspase-3 mRNA levels coincided with decreased mRNA levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R, indicating the onset of apoptosis. Moreover, affected B cells became unresponsive to stimulation by BCR cross-linking with anti-IgM Fab fragments. In vivo, infection-induced loss of IgM(+ B cells coincided with the disappearance of protective variant-specific T-independent IgM responses, rendering the host rapidly susceptible to re-challenge with previously encountered parasites. Finally, using the well-established human diphtheria, tetanus, and B. pertussis (DTPa vaccination model in mice, we show that T. brucei infections abrogate vaccine-induced protective responses to a non-related pathogen such as B. pertussis. Infections with T. brucei parasites result in the rapid loss of T

  15. Trypanosomiasis-induced B cell apoptosis results in loss of protective anti-parasite antibody responses and abolishment of vaccine-induced memory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanska, Magdalena; Guirnalda, Patrick; De Trez, Carl; Ryffel, Bernard; Black, Samuel; Magez, Stefan

    2008-05-30

    African trypanosomes of the Trypanosoma brucei species are extra-cellular parasites that cause human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) as well as infections in game animals and livestock. Trypanosomes are known to evade the immune response of their mammalian host by continuous antigenic variation of their surface coat. Here, we aim to demonstrate that in addition, trypanosomes (i) cause the loss of various B cell populations, (ii) disable the hosts' capacity to raise a long-lasting specific protective anti-parasite antibody response, and (iii) abrogate vaccine-induced protective response to a non-related human pathogen such as Bordetella pertussis. Using a mouse model for T. brucei, various B cell populations were analyzed by FACS at different time points of infection. The results show that during early onset of a T. brucei infection, spleen remodeling results in the rapid loss of the IgM(+) marginal zone (IgM(+)MZ) B cell population characterized as B220(+)IgM(High)IgD(Int) CD21(High)CD23(Low)CD1d(+)CD138(-). These cells, when isolated during the first peak of infection, stained positive for Annexin V and had increased caspase-3 enzyme activity. Elevated caspase-3 mRNA levels coincided with decreased mRNA levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R), indicating the onset of apoptosis. Moreover, affected B cells became unresponsive to stimulation by BCR cross-linking with anti-IgM Fab fragments. In vivo, infection-induced loss of IgM(+) B cells coincided with the disappearance of protective variant-specific T-independent IgM responses, rendering the host rapidly susceptible to re-challenge with previously encountered parasites. Finally, using the well-established human diphtheria, tetanus, and B. pertussis (DTPa) vaccination model in mice, we show that T. brucei infections abrogate vaccine-induced protective responses to a non-related pathogen such as B. pertussis. Infections with T. brucei parasites result in the rapid loss of T

  16. Trypanosomiasis-Induced B Cell Apoptosis Results in Loss of Protective Anti-Parasite Antibody Responses and Abolishment of Vaccine-Induced Memory Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanska, Magdalena; Guirnalda, Patrick; De Trez, Carl; Ryffel, Bernard; Black, Samuel; Magez, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    African trypanosomes of the Trypanosoma brucei species are extra-cellular parasites that cause human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) as well as infections in game animals and livestock. Trypanosomes are known to evade the immune response of their mammalian host by continuous antigenic variation of their surface coat. Here, we aim to demonstrate that in addition, trypanosomes (i) cause the loss of various B cell populations, (ii) disable the hosts' capacity to raise a long-lasting specific protective anti-parasite antibody response, and (iii) abrogate vaccine-induced protective response to a non-related human pathogen such as Bordetella pertussis. Using a mouse model for T. brucei, various B cell populations were analyzed by FACS at different time points of infection. The results show that during early onset of a T. brucei infection, spleen remodeling results in the rapid loss of the IgM+ marginal zone (IgM+MZ) B cell population characterized as B220+IgMHighIgDInt CD21HighCD23LowCD1d+CD138−. These cells, when isolated during the first peak of infection, stained positive for Annexin V and had increased caspase-3 enzyme activity. Elevated caspase-3 mRNA levels coincided with decreased mRNA levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R), indicating the onset of apoptosis. Moreover, affected B cells became unresponsive to stimulation by BCR cross-linking with anti-IgM Fab fragments. In vivo, infection-induced loss of IgM+ B cells coincided with the disappearance of protective variant-specific T-independent IgM responses, rendering the host rapidly susceptible to re-challenge with previously encountered parasites. Finally, using the well-established human diphtheria, tetanus, and B. pertussis (DTPa) vaccination model in mice, we show that T. brucei infections abrogate vaccine-induced protective responses to a non-related pathogen such as B. pertussis. Infections with T. brucei parasites result in the rapid loss of T–cell independent IgM+MZ B

  17. H3N2 influenza infection elicits more cross-reactive and less clonally expanded anti-hemagglutinin antibodies than influenza vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Anthony Moody

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the recent H1N1 influenza pandemic, excess morbidity and mortality was seen in young but not older adults suggesting that prior infection with influenza strains may have protected older subjects. In contrast, a history of recent seasonal trivalent vaccine in younger adults was not associated with protection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To study hemagglutinin (HA antibody responses in influenza immunization and infection, we have studied the day 7 plasma cell repertoires of subjects immunized with seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV and compared them to the plasma cell repertoires of subjects experimentally infected (EI with influenza H3N2 A/Wisconsin/67/2005. The majority of circulating plasma cells after TIV produced influenza-specific antibodies, while most plasma cells after EI produced antibodies that did not react with influenza HA. While anti-HA antibodies from TIV subjects were primarily reactive with single or few HA strains, anti-HA antibodies from EI subjects were isolated that reacted with multiple HA strains. Plasma cell-derived anti-HA antibodies from TIV subjects showed more evidence of clonal expansion compared with antibodies from EI subjects. From an H3N2-infected subject, we isolated a 4-member clonal lineage of broadly cross-reactive antibodies that bound to multiple HA subtypes and neutralized both H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. This broad reactivity was not detected in post-infection plasma suggesting this broadly reactive clonal lineage was not immunodominant in this subject. CONCLUSION: The presence of broadly reactive subdominant antibody responses in some EI subjects suggests that improved vaccine designs that make broadly reactive antibody responses immunodominant could protect against novel influenza strains.

  18. HIV-1 adenoviral vector vaccines expressing multi-trimeric BAFF and 4-1BBL enhance T cell mediated anti-viral immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana Kanagavelu

    Full Text Available Adenoviral vectored vaccines have shown considerable promise but could be improved by molecular adjuvants. Ligands in the TNF superfamily (TNFSF are potential adjuvants for adenoviral vector (Ad5 vaccines based on their central role in adaptive immunity. Many TNFSF ligands require aggregation beyond the trimeric state (multi-trimerization for optimal biological function. Here we describe Ad5 vaccines for HIV-1 Gag antigen (Ad5-Gag adjuvanted with the TNFSF ligands 4-1BBL, BAFF, GITRL and CD27L constructed as soluble multi-trimeric proteins via fusion to Surfactant Protein D (SP-D as a multimerization scaffold. Mice were vaccinated with Ad5-Gag combined with Ad5 expressing one of the SP-D-TNFSF constructs or single-chain IL-12p70 as adjuvant. To evaluate vaccine-induced protection, mice were challenged with vaccinia virus expressing Gag (vaccinia-Gag which is known to target the female genital tract, a major route of sexually acquired HIV-1 infection. In this system, SP-D-4-1BBL or SP-D-BAFF led to significantly reduced vaccinia-Gag replication when compared to Ad5-Gag alone. In contrast, IL-12p70, SP-D-CD27L and SP-D-GITRL were not protective. Histological examination following vaccinia-Gag challenge showed a dramatic lymphocytic infiltration into the uterus and ovaries of SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF-treated animals. By day 5 post challenge, proinflammatory cytokines in the tissue were reduced, consistent with the enhanced control over viral replication. Splenocytes had no specific immune markers that correlated with protection induced by SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF versus other groups. IL-12p70, despite lack of anti-viral efficacy, increased the total numbers of splenic dextramer positive CD8+ T cells, effector memory T cells, and effector Gag-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting that these markers are poor predictors of anti-viral immunity in this model. In conclusion, soluble multi-trimeric 4-1BBL and BAFF adjuvants led to strong protection from

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Isoniazid, Pyrazinamide, and Ethambutol in newly diagnosed pulmonary TB patients in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denti, Paolo; Jeremiah, Kidola; Chigutsa, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to lower-than-therapeutic levels of anti-tuberculosis drugs is likely to cause selection of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treatment failure. The first-line anti-tuberculosis (TB) regimen consists of rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, and correct...... management reduces risk of TB relapse and development of drug resistance. In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of standard of care plus nutritional supplementation versus standard care on the pharmacokinetics of isoniazid, pyrazinamide and ethambutol among sputum smear positive TB patients...... with and without HIV. In a clinical trial in 100 Tanzanian TB patients, with or without HIV infection, drug concentrations were determined at 1 week and 2 months post initiation of anti-TB medication. Data was analysed using population pharmacokinetic modelling. The effect of body size was described using...

  20. Measles lessons in an anti-vaccination era: public health is a social duty, not a political option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancella, L; Di Camillo, C; Vittucci, A C; Boccuzzi, E; Bozzola, E; Villani, A

    2017-11-15

    Measles virus, member of the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae, is a highly contagious human pathogen. An effective live-attenuated vaccine is available and its use has the potential to eradicate the disease from the human population. Although the vaccine was introduced in national vaccination schedules, several measles outbreaks have occurred because of insufficient vaccination coverage. Since early January 2017, a new outbreak of measles in Italy has been observed. We analyzed all the patients admitted to the Emergency Department of Bambino Gesù Children Hospital of Rome from the 1st of January 2017 to the end of May 2017 and discharged with diagnosis of suspected or confirmed measles or admitted to the Pediatric and Infectious Disease Unit. For each confirmed case, demographic data, vaccination history, exposure to source case, clinical presentation, date of onset of symptoms, hospitalization, laboratory test results, complications and therapy were collected. From the 1st of January 2017 to the 31st of May 2017, we enrolled 139 patients who were conducted to the Emergency Department of Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital because of measles: 33 patients were discharged with the diagnosis of suspected measles by clinical manifestations; 33 discharged with the diagnosis of confirmed measles by laboratory tests and 73 were admitted to the Pediatric and Infectious Disease Unit. Seven patients, who were exposed to mothers with measles, were admitted to receive treatment with Measles Immune Globulin intravenously. Among the 66 patients admitted to the hospital with measles, 31 cases (47%) occurred in unvaccinated individuals who were age-eligible for measles vaccination; 29 (44%) were infants too young to be vaccinated; only five patients (8%) received one dose of measles-containing vaccine. Out of the 66 patients, 35 (53%) developed complications. Acute respiratory failure was the most reported complications (20%). Death, due to multiorgan failure by

  1. Tuberculosis Vaccines and Prevention of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Tracey A.; Scriba, Thomas J.; Hatherill, Mark; Hanekom, Willem A.; Evans, Thomas G.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Kublin, James G.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Self, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of death worldwide despite the availability of effective chemotherapy for over 60 years. Although Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination protects against active TB disease in some populations, its efficacy is suboptimal. Development of an effective TB vaccine is a top global priority that has been hampered by an incomplete understanding of protective immunity to TB. Thus far, preventing TB disease, rather than infection, has been the primary target for vaccine development. Several areas of research highlight the importance of including preinfection vaccines in the development pipeline. First, epidemiology and mathematical modeling studies indicate that a preinfection vaccine would have a high population-level impact for control of TB disease. Second, immunology studies support the rationale for targeting prevention of infection, with evidence that host responses may be more effective during acute infection than during chronic infection. Third, natural history studies indicate that resistance to TB infection occurs in a small percentage of the population. Fourth, case-control studies of BCG indicate that it may provide protection from infection. Fifth, prevention-of-infection trials would have smaller sample sizes and a shorter duration than disease prevention trials and would enable opportunities to search for correlates of immunity as well as serve as a criterion for selecting a vaccine product for testing in a larger TB disease prevention trial. Together, these points support expanding the focus of TB vaccine development efforts to include prevention of infection as a primary goal along with vaccines or other interventions that reduce the rate of transmission and reactivation. PMID:25428938

  2. Induction of protective and therapeutic anti-pancreatic cancer immunity using a reconstructed MUC1 DNA vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong, Yefei; Jin, Dayong; Wu, Wenchuan; Lou, Wenhui; Wang, Danshong; Kuang, Tiantao; Ni, Xiaoling; Qin, Xinyu

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a common, highly lethal disease with a rising incidence. MUC1 is a tumor-associated antigen that is over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Active immunotherapy that targets MUC1 could have great treatment value. Here we investigated the preventive and therapeutic effect of a MUC1 DNA vaccine on the pancreatic cancer. MUC1-various tandem repeat units(VNTR) DNA vaccine was produced by cloning one repeat of VNTR and inserting the cloned gene into the pcDNA3.1. In the preventive group, female C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the vaccine, pcDNA3.1 or PBS; and challenged with panc02-MUC1 or panc02 cell. In the therapeutic group the mice were challenged with panc02-MUC1 or panc02 cell, and then immunized with the vaccine, pcDNA3.1 or PBS. The tumor size and the survival time of the animals were compared between these groups. The DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-VNTR could raise cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity specific for MUC1. In the preventive experiment, the mice survival time was significantly longer in the vaccine group than in the control groups (P < 0.05). In the therapeutic experiment, the DNA vaccine prolonged the survival time of the panc02-MUC1-bearing mice (P < 0.05). In both the preventive and therapeutic experiments, the tumor size was significantly less in the vaccine group than in the control groups (P < 0.05). This pcDNA3.1-VNTR vaccine, however, could not prevent the mice attacked by panc02 cells and had no therapeutic effect on the mice attacked by panc02 cells. The MUC1 DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-VNTR could induce a significant MUC1-specific CTL response; and had both prophylactic and therapeutic effect on panc02-MUC1 tumors. This vaccine might be used as a new adjuvant strategy against pancreatic cancer

  3. Childhood Tuberculosis: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Sheng Tsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the existence of a government-run tuberculosis (TB control program, the current nationwide burden of TB continues to be a public health problem in Taiwan. Intense current and previous efforts into diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive interventions have focused on TB in adults, but childhood TB has been relatively neglected. Children are particularly vulnerable to severe disease and death following infection, and children with latent infections become reservoirs for future transmission following disease reactivation in adulthood, thus fueling future epidemics. Additional research, understanding, and prevention of childhood TB are urgently needed. This review assesses the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and relevant principles of TB vaccine development and presents efficacy data for the currently licensed vaccines.

  4. Evaluation on the persistence of anti-HPV immune responses to the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in Chinese females and males: Up to 3.5 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Teng; Liu, Youping; Li, Yanping; Liao, Yuqin; Shou, Qiong; Zheng, Minghuan; Liao, Xueyan; Li, Rongcheng

    2018-03-07

    This was an extension study of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled immunogenicity and safety study of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) (HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18) vaccine conducted in Chinese female subjects aged 9-45 years and male subjects aged 9-15 years. To investigate the persistence of anti-HPV 6, -11, -16, and -18 responses among Chinese subjects, subjects enrolled in the base study were followed up at around month 42 (approximately 3.5 years after vaccination). Among 600 subjects enrolled in the base study, a total of 468 subjects consented for participation in the extension study. Anti-HPV 6, -11, -16, and -18 antibodies were detected by the competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA) and total IgG Luminex immunoassay (IgG LIA). Among the female subjects who received the qHPV vaccine, the proportions of subjects remained seropositive were high with both the cLIA and IgG LIA for HPV type 6, 11, and 16 through approximately 42 months following the first dose vaccination. For HPV 18, the seropositivity rate remained high as 82.0% with the IgG LIA, while it decreased to 53.6% with the cLIA, which was similar to the findings observed in other studies. The seropositivity rates remained high at month 42 for all qHPV types with both the cLIA and IgG LIA among the male subjects. Administration of a 3-dose regimen of qHPV vaccine induces durable anti-HPV 6, anti-HPV 11, anti-HPV 16, and anti-HPV 18 responses among Chinese subjects for at least 3.5 years after vaccination. ClinicalTrials.gov registry:NCT01427777. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Modeling protective anti-tumor immunity via preventative cancer vaccines using a hybrid agent-based and delay differential equation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter S; Lee, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    A next generation approach to cancer envisions developing preventative vaccinations to stimulate a person's immune cells, particularly cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), to eliminate incipient tumors before clinical detection. The purpose of our study is to quantitatively assess whether such an approach would be feasible, and if so, how many anti-cancer CTLs would have to be primed against tumor antigen to provide significant protection. To understand the relevant dynamics, we develop a two-compartment model of tumor-immune interactions at the tumor site and the draining lymph node. We model interactions at the tumor site using an agent-based model (ABM) and dynamics in the lymph node using a system of delay differential equations (DDEs). We combine the models into a hybrid ABM-DDE system and investigate dynamics over a wide range of parameters, including cell proliferation rates, tumor antigenicity, CTL recruitment times, and initial memory CTL populations. Our results indicate that an anti-cancer memory CTL pool of 3% or less can successfully eradicate a tumor population over a wide range of model parameters, implying that a vaccination approach is feasible. In addition, sensitivity analysis of our model reveals conditions that will result in rapid tumor destruction, oscillation, and polynomial rather than exponential decline in the tumor population due to tumor geometry.

  6. Induction of broadly reactive anti-hemagglutinin stalk antibodies by an H5N1 vaccine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Wohlbold, Teddy John; Hirsh, Ariana; Hai, Rong; Sjursen, Haakon; Palese, Peter; Cox, Rebecca J; Krammer, Florian

    2014-11-01

    Influenza virus infections are a major public health concern and cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current vaccines are effective but strain specific due to their focus on the immunodominant globular head domain of the hemagglutinin (HA). It has been hypothesized that sequential exposure of humans to hemagglutinins with divergent globular head domains but conserved stalk domains could refocus the immune response to broadly neutralizing epitopes in the stalk. Humans have preexisting immunity against H1 (group 1 hemagglutinin), and vaccination with H5 HA (also group 1)--which has a divergent globular head domain but a similar stalk domain--represents one such sequential-exposure scenario. To test this hypothesis, we used novel reagents based on chimeric hemagglutinins to screen sera from an H5N1 clinical trial for induction of stalk-specific antibodies by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization assays. Importantly, we also investigated the biological activity of these antibodies in a passive transfer in a mouse challenge model. We found that the H5N1 vaccine induced high titers of stalk-reactive antibodies which were biologically active and protective in the passive-transfer experiment. The induced response showed exceptional breadth toward divergent group 1 hemagglutinins but did not extend to group 2 hemagglutinins. These data provide evidence for the hypothesis that sequential exposure to hemagglutinins with divergent globular head domains but conserved stalk domains can refocus the immune response toward the conserved stalk domain. Furthermore, the results support the concept of a chimeric hemagglutinin universal influenza virus vaccine strategy that is based on the same principle. Influenza virus vaccines have to be reformulated and readministered on an annual basis. The development of a universal influenza virus vaccine could abolish the need for this cumbersome and costly process and would also enhance our

  7. An update on vaccines for tuberculosis - there is more to it than just waning of BCG efficacy with time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Marta; Huygen, Kris

    2012-12-01

    Apart from better diagnostics and new anti-microbial drugs, an effective vaccine for tuberculosis is urgently needed to halt this poverty-related disease, afflicting millions of people worldwide. After a general introduction on the global threat of tuberculosis, the pros and cons of the existing M. bovis BCG vaccine are discussed. As the correlates of protection against tuberculosis remain largely unknown, new findings in biomarker research are described. Next, an update on the ongoing Phase I and Phase II clinical trials is given. Finally, some of the most promising novel pre-clinical developments using live attenuated vaccines, sub-unit vaccines, prime-boost strategies, and new vaccination routes are discussed. The field has made considerable progress and 12 vaccine candidates have now actually entered Phase I or Phase IIa and IIb clinical trials. It is argued that the variable protection conferred by the existing BCG vaccine against reactivation of latent TB is caused not only by waning of its efficacy with time but also by its weak induction of MHC class I restricted responses. Prime-boost strategies based on the actual BCG vaccine may not be sufficient to overcome this hurdle. The use of plasmid DNA vaccination might offer a solution.

  8. Difference Between Latent TB Infection and Active TB Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ATS) and CDC. Diagnostic standards and classification of tuberculosis in adults and children. (PDF) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2000 ; 161. http: / / ajrccm. atsjournals. org/ cgi/ content/ full/ 161/ 4/ 1376 2. ... Tuberculosis (MDR TB) . http: / / www. cdc. gov/ tb/ publications/ ...

  9. Impact of insurgency on tuberculosis treatment uptake among TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The damage on health facilities caused by activities of insurgents in addition to grounding socioeconomic activities, cutting off social amenities and supplies to northeastern Nigeria has had serious health implications. To compare anti-TB medication uptake before serious insurgency (2007- 2010) and during peak of ...

  10. Vaccines for Drug Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Current medications for drug abuse have had only limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines to elicit antibodies that block the pharmacological effects of drugs have great potential for treating drug abuse. We review the status for two vaccines that are undergoing clinical trials (cocaine and nicotine) and two that are still in pre-clinical development (methamphetamine and heroin). We also outline the challenges and ethical concerns for anti-addiction vaccine development and their use as future...

  11. Short and long-term immunogenicity and safety following the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients under conventional DMARDs with or without anti-TNF therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Nadia E; França, Ivan L A; Ribeiro, Ana C; Sallum, Adriana M E; Bonfa, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2015-01-29

    To assess immunogenicity and safety of the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV23) in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients under conventional DMARDs with or without anti-TNF therapy. The influences of demographic data, disease activity and treatment on immune response and the potential deleterious effects of vaccine on disease itself were also evaluated. 17 JIA patients immediately pre-etanercept (Group 1) and 10 JIA patients on stable dose of methotrexate (Group 2) received one dose of PPV23. All patients were evaluated pre-vaccination, 2 months and 12 months post-vaccination for seven pneumoccocal serotypes. Serology was performed by enzyme immunoassay and the immunogenicity endpoints included seroprotection (SP), seroconversion (SP) and geometric mean concentration of antibodies(GMC). Clinical and laboratorial parameters of JIA were evaluated before and after vaccination. Groups 1 and 2 were comparable regarding age, gender, disease duration and other DMARDs use (p>0.05). Pre-immunization SP and GMC were alike in patients with and without anti-TNF therapy (p>0.05). The frequencies of patients achieving adequate vaccine response (seroconversion in ≥50% of all serotypes) at 2 months (53 vs. 30%, p=0.424) and 12 months (36 vs. 40%, p=1.0) were similar in JIA patients with and without anti-TNF therapy. Further comparison of patients with and without adequate response at 2 months revealed no influence of demographic, clinical and laboratorial JIA parameters (p>0.05). Serious adverse events were not observed. Anti-TNF therapy in JIA patients does not seem to have an additional deleterious effect on short/long-term PPV23 immunogenicity compared to MTX alone and no influence on disease parameters was observed with this vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Catalonian elderly people, 2002-2009: serotype coverage for different anti-pneumococcal vaccine formulations at the beginning of the new conjugate vaccines era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Corcoles, Angel; Ochoa-Gondar, Olga; Gomez-Bertomeu, Frederic; Raga-Luria, Xavier

    2011-10-06

    Population-based surveillance study conducted among persons 65 years or older from the region of Tarragona (Southern Catalonia, Spain) during 2002-2009. All cases with isolation of pneumococcus from normally sterile bodily fluids were included. Incidence rates of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and prevalence of infections caused by serotypes included in different pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) and the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV-23) were calculated. Overall, 176 IPD cases were observed, which means an incidence of 48 episodes per 100,000 person-year throughout the study period. The most dominant serotypes were 7F (10.1%), 14 (9.4%), 19A (9.4%), 3 (8.6%), 6A (7.9%) and 1 (7.2%). IPD cases due to PCV-7 types (from 37.2% to 14.6%; p=0.003) and PCV-10 types (from 60.5% to 32.3%; p=0.002) considerably decreased between 2002-2005 and 2006-2009 periods. Percentage of cases due to PCV-13 types (76.7% vs 62.5%; p=0.099) and PPV-23 types (81.4% vs 68.8%; p=0.122) did not significantly change between both periods. As main conclusion, in our setting, the PCV-13 has almost similar serotype coverage to the PPV-23 in preventing IPD among the elderly population, which suggests a possible future use of the conjugate vaccine in all age groups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vaccine Controversy Medical Oversight

    OpenAIRE

    Casady, Megan

    2010-01-01

    The anti-vaccination movement has gained significant influence because of its extremely diverse underlying support. From distrust of governmental policies regarding vaccination to scientific data that seemingly proves the dangers of vaccination, the discourses are able to reach and impact a large number of the public. My research this semester focused on the expansion of recommendations made by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) concerning the seasonal influenza vaccine, the...

  14. TB in Children in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies Consortium Research Projects Publications TB Trials Consortium Study Descriptions Background Behavioral & Social Science Research Infection Control TB in Specific Populations African-American Community Stop TB in the African-American ...

  15. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies Consortium Research Projects Publications TB Trials Consortium Study Descriptions Background Behavioral & Social Science Research Infection Control TB in Specific Populations African-American Community Stop TB in the African-American ...

  16. Serum anti-Müllerian hormone dynamics in mares following immunocontraception with anti-zona pellucida or -GnRH vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joonè, C J; Schulman, M. L.; Fosgate, G T; Claes, A N J; Gupta, S K; Botha, A E; Human, A.; Bertschinger, H J

    Circulating anti-Müllerian hormone concentration (AMH) is positively correlated to the number of small growing follicles in the mare and may reflect ovarian function. Dynamics of AMH during immunocontraception have not previously been investigated. This study aimed to compare serum AMH in mares

  17. Preclinical development of BCG.HIVA2auxo.int, harboring an integrative expression vector, for a HIV-TB Pediatric vaccine. Enhancement of stability and specific HIV-1 T-cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahant, Aakash; Saubi, Narcís; Eto, Yoshiki; Guitart, Núria; Gatell, Josep Ma; Hanke, Tomáš; Joseph, Joan

    2017-08-03

    One of the critical issues that should be addressed in the development of a BCG-based HIV vaccine is genetic plasmid stability. Therefore, to address this issue we have considered using integrative vectors and the auxotrophic mutant of BCG complemented with a plasmid carrying a wild-type complementing gene. In this study, we have constructed an integrative E. coli-mycobacterial shuttle plasmid, p2auxo.HIVA int , expressing the HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector uses an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism for plasmid selection and maintenance. It was first transformed into a glycine auxotrophic E. coli strain and subsequently transformed into a lysine auxotrophic Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain to generate the vaccine BCG.HIVA 2auxo.int . Presence of the HIVA gene sequence and protein expression was confirmed. We demonstrated that the in vitro stability of the integrative plasmid p2auxo.HIVA int was increased 4-fold, as compared with the BCG strain harboring the episomal plasmid, and was genetically and phenotypically characterized. The BCG.HIVA 2auxo.int vaccine in combination with modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA).HIVA was found to be safe and induced HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific interferon-γ-producing T-cell responses in adult BALB/c mice. We have engineered a more stable and immunogenic BCG-vectored vaccine using the prototype immunogen HIVA. Thus, the use of integrative expression vectors and the antibiotic-free plasmid selection system based on "double" auxotrophic complementation are likely to improve the mycobacterial vaccine stability in vivo and immunogenicity to develop not only recombinant BCG-based vaccines expressing second generation of HIV-1 immunogens but also other major pediatric pathogens to prime protective responses shortly following birth.

  18. Measurements in international units of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen(anti-HBs) after immunization with a yeast-derived, subtype adr hepatitis B vaccine are considerably different between chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) and chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Norio

    2006-04-01

    The worldwide consensus of the minimum protective anti-HBs level against HBV infection is 10 mIU/mL on assays standardized by the World Health Organization (WHO) reference preparations. To investigate whether this value could be applied to recipients of yeast-derived recombinant HB vaccine containing the major surface protein of subtype adr (Bimmugen, Astellas Pharmaceutical, Tokyo), we compared anti-HBs measurements between chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) (Architect Ausab, Abbott Japan, Tokyo) and chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) (Lumipulse Forte, Fujirebio, Tokyo) in given serum samples obtained from the vaccinees. The vaccine and the two assay methods are currently in a wide use in Japan. The study included 300 medical students who completed a standard vaccination course (0, 1 and 6 months). Serum samples obtained 1 month or 13 months after completing the vaccination were simultaneously tested for anti-HBs by CLIA and CLEIA. In 147 samples with quantifiable values on both CLIA and CLEIA (10 to 1000 mIU/mL) the geometric mean titer on CLEIA (225.0 mIU/mL) was significantly higher than that on CLIA (94.5 mIU/mL) (p < 0.0001). Of 26 subjects with CLIA measurements below 10 mIU/mL, 15 samples (57.7%) showed CLEIA measurements more than 10 mIU/mL. Thus, in the subtype adr-vaccinees CLEIA demonstrated considerably high serum anti-HBs measurements compared to CLIA and discordance in determining critical anti-HBs level of 10 mIU/mL was observed in more than half the samples. This suggests that the minimum HBV-protective anti HBs titer of 10 mIU/mL is difficult to be introduced to Japan where subtype adr-HB vaccines or -HBV infection are prevalent, unless characteristics of assay methods are carefully evaluated.

  19. Chemo-immunotherapy using saffron and its ingredients followed by E7-NT (gp96) DNA vaccine generates different anti-tumor effects against tumors expressing the E7 protein of human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavari, Afshin; Bolhassani, Azam; Alizadeh, Fatemeh; Bathaie, S Zahra; Balaram, Prabha; Agi, Elnaz; Vahabpour, Rouhollah

    2015-02-01

    Saffron and its components have been suggested as promising candidates for cancer prevention. Carotenoids and monoterpene aldehydes are two potent ingredients of saffron. The goal of the current study was to investigate the anti-tumor effect of chemo-immunotherapy using saffron and its ingredients followed by E7-NT (gp96) DNA vaccine against tumors expressing the E7 protein of human papillomavirus. The in vitro cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of aqueous saffron extract and its components were evaluated in malignant TC-1 and non-malignant COS-7 cell lines. Then, multimodality treatments using E7-NT (gp96) DNA vaccine combined with saffron extract and its ingredients as well as single-modality treatments were tested for their efficacy in inhibiting large and bulky tumor growth. Saffron and its components exerted a considerable anti-tumor effect through prevention of cell growth and stimulation of programmed cell death. Furthermore, 100 % of mice treated with crocin were tumor-free, in contrast to DNA vaccine alone (~66.7 %) and DNA + crocin (~33.3 %) indicating the high potency of crocin as a chemotherapeutic agent. Interestingly, the multimodality treatment using DNA vaccine along with picrocrocin augmented the anti-tumor effects of picrocrocin. Thus, the combination of DNA vaccine with saffron extract and crocin at certain concentrations did not potentiate protective and therapeutic effects compared to mono-therapies for the control of TC-1 tumors.

  20. Tuberculosis: looking beyond BCG vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Abu S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease of international importance and ranks among the top 10 causes of death in the World. About one-third of the world′s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Every year, approximately eight million people develop active disease and two million die of TB. The currently used BCG vaccines have shown variable protective efficacies against TB in different parts of the world. Moreover, being a live vaccine, BCG can be pathogenic in immunocompromised recipients. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new vaccines against TB. The comparative genome analysis has revealed the existence of several M. tuberculosis-specific regions that are deleted in BCG. The work carried out to determine the immunological reactivity of proteins encoded by genes located in these regions revealed several major antigens of M. tuberculosis, including the 6 kDa early secreted antigen target (ESAT6. Immunization with ESAT6 and its peptide (aa51-70 protects mice challenged with M. tuberculosis. The protective efficacy of immunization further improves when ESAT6 is recombinantly fused with M. tuberculosis antigen 85B. In addition, ESAT6 delivered as a DNA vaccine is also protective in mice. Whether these vaccines would be safe or not cannot be speculated. The answer regarding the safety and efficacy of these vaccines has to await human trials in different parts of the world.

  1. Enhance the anti-renca carcinoma effect of a DNA vaccine targeting G250 gene by co-expression with cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen-4(CTLA-4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youguang; Wei, Zhitao; Yang, Hang; Li, Xiaowei; Wang, Qiwu; Wang, Liang; Li, Shadan

    2017-06-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is a negative regulator of T cell activation, which competes with CD28 for B7.1/B7.2 binding with a greater affinity. Co-expression specific antigens and extracellular domain of CTLA4 represents a promising approach to increase the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In this study, we evaluated this interesting approach for its enhancement on G250/MN/CA IX (G250)-specific immune responses and its anti-tumor effects in renal carcinoma mice model. Consequently, we constructed a DNA vaccine containing the G250 and the CTLA-4 gene. Vaccination with the co-expression DNA not only induced much higher level of anti-CTLA4 and anti-G250 antibody, but also increased G250-specific T cell response in mice. To evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of the plasmids, murine models with G250-expressing tumors were generated. After injection into the tumor-bearing mouse model, the plasmid carrying the co-expression gene of CTLA4 and G250 showed stronger inhibition of tumor growth than the plasmid expressing CTLA4 or G250 alone. These observations emphasize the potential of the CTLA4 and G250 co-expression DNA vaccine, which could represent a promising approach for tumor immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Differential cellular recognition pattern to M. tuberculosis targets defined by IFN-γ and IL-17 production in blood from TB + patients from Honduras as compared to health care workers: TB and immune responses in patients from Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Corrales, Nancy; Ahmed, Raija K; Rodriguez, Carol A; Balaji, Kithiganahalli N; Rivera, Rebeca; Sompallae, Ramakrishna; Vudattu, Nalini K; Hoffner, Sven E; Zumla, Alimuddin; Pineda-Garcia, Lelany; Maeurer, Markus

    2013-03-06

    A better understanding of the quality of cellular immune responses directed against molecularly defined targets will guide the development of TB diagnostics and identification of molecularly defined, clinically relevant M.tb vaccine candidates. Recombinant proteins (n = 8) and peptide pools (n = 14) from M. tuberculosis (M.tb) targets were used to compare cellular immune responses defined by IFN-γ and IL-17 production using a Whole Blood Assay (WBA) in a cohort of 148 individuals, i.e. patients with TB + (n = 38), TB- individuals with other pulmonary diseases (n = 81) and individuals exposed to TB without evidence of clinical TB (health care workers, n = 29). M.tb antigens Rv2958c (glycosyltransferase), Rv2962c (mycolyltransferase), Rv1886c (Ag85B), Rv3804c (Ag85A), and the PPE family member Rv3347c were frequently recognized, defined by IFN-γ production, in blood from healthy individuals exposed to M.tb (health care workers). A different recognition pattern was found for IL-17 production in blood from M.tb exposed individuals responding to TB10.4 (Rv0288), Ag85B (Rv1886c) and the PPE family members Rv0978c and Rv1917c. The pattern of immune target recognition is different in regard to IFN-γ and IL-17 production to defined molecular M.tb targets in PBMCs from individuals frequently exposed to M.tb. The data represent the first mapping of cellular immune responses against M.tb targets in TB patients from Honduras.

  3. A imunidade na febre tifóide I. A vacinação anti-tifoídica de Wright, 1896 a 1979 Immunity in typhoid fever. I. The anti-typhoid vaccine of Wristh, 1896 to 1979

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlete Moreira Milhomem

    1982-03-01

    período, enquanto duas doses (intervalo de 4 semanas dão maior proteção e por tempo mais longo; g a proteção oferecida pela vacinação é maior nos jovens que nos adultos; h a vacina oral inativada (Typhoral não oferece proteção mesmo em doses elevadas. Algumas experiências com animais (camundongos, chimpanzés e voluntários humanos indicaram que uma melhor proteção foi obtida com vacinas vivas atenuadas. Contudo em tais experiências houve persistência tanto da amostra vacinante como da amostra desafio e ainda uma relação significante entre a amostra da vacina rugosa utilizada para imunização e lesões renais abacterianas de natureza desconhecida.The present comprehensive review deals with the available literature on anti-typhoid vaccines. Among the biological products, no other has raised as much controversy regarding efficacy as this commom preventive, since its early introduction by Wright, Pfeiffer & Kole. From the beginning the lack of an adequate experimental procedure for testing the vaccine potency was felt, and only poor and partial data were gathered, both from human and animal models, in relation to the basic immunological mechanism of the response to vaccination. For this reason a number of different methods have been proposed and used leading to variations in such aspects as: a the nature of bacterial strains for preparing the vaccine; b the handling of vaccine strains-killed by heat, various chemicals (alcohol, ether acetone or lysed, or employing avirulent strains; c the addition of different components (preservatives and related microrganisms; d the route of application (subcutaneous, intradermal, oral, etc; e the dose (number of organisms; f the time schedule for application. Many field trials failed to be conclusive. It is considered that the early field trials lacked proper controls, which were introduced later, in the well planned investigations sponsored by World Health Organization, in several parts of the World (Yugoslavia

  4. Optimal MHC-II-restricted tumor antigen presentation to CD4+ T helper cells: the key issue for development of anti-tumor vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Accolla Roberto S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Present immunoprevention and immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer suffer from the limitation of being not “sterilizing” procedures, as very poor protection against the tumor is obtained. Thus newly conceived anti-tumor vaccination strategies are urgently needed. In this review we will focus on ways to provide optimal MHC class II-restricted tumor antigen presentation to CD4+ T helper cells as a crucial parameter to get optimal and protective adaptive immune response against tumor. Through the description of successful preventive or therapeutic experimental approaches to vaccinate the host against the tumor we will show that optimal activation of MHC class II-restricted tumor specific CD4+ T helper cells can be achieved in various ways. Interestingly, the success in tumor eradication and/or growth arrest generated by classical therapies such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy in some instances can be re-interpreted on the basis of an adaptive immune response induced by providing suitable access of tumor-associated antigens to MHC class II molecules. Therefore, focussing on strategies to generate better and suitable MHC class II–restricted activation of tumor specific CD4+ T helper cells may have an important impact on fighting and defeating cancer.

  5. Vaccines against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Adrian V S

    2011-10-12

    There is no licenced vaccine against any human parasitic disease and Plasmodium falciparum malaria, a major cause of infectious mortality, presents a great challenge to vaccine developers. This has led to the assessment of a wide variety of approaches to malaria vaccine design and development, assisted by the availability of a safe challenge model for small-scale efficacy testing of vaccine candidates. Malaria vaccine development has been at the forefront of assessing many new vaccine technologies including novel adjuvants, vectored prime-boost regimes and the concept of community vaccination to block malaria transmission. Most current vaccine candidates target a single stage of the parasite's life cycle and vaccines against the early pre-erythrocytic stages have shown most success. A protein in adjuvant vaccine, working through antibodies against sporozoites, and viral vector vaccines targeting the intracellular liver-stage parasite with cellular immunity show partial efficacy in humans, and the anti-sporozoite vaccine is currently in phase III trials. However, a more effective malaria vaccine suitable for widespread cost-effective deployment is likely to require a multi-component vaccine targeting more than one life cycle stage. The most attractive near-term approach to develop such a product is to combine existing partially effective pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidates.

  6. Preclinical efficacy and safety of an anti-IL-1β vaccine for the treatment of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunther Spohn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutralization of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β is a promising new strategy to prevent the β-cell destruction, which leads to type 2 diabetes. Here, we describe the preclinical development of a therapeutic vaccine against IL-1β consisting of a detoxified version of IL-1β chemically cross-linked to virus-like particles of the bacteriophage Qβ. The vaccine was well tolerated and induced robust antibody responses in mice, which neutralized the biological activity of IL-1β, as shown both in cellular assays and in challenge experiments in vivo. Antibody titers were long lasting but reversible over time and not associated with the development of potentially harmful T cell responses against IL-1β. Neutralization of IL-1β by vaccine-induced antibodies had no influence on the immune responses of mice to Listeria monocytogenes and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In a diet-induced model of type 2 diabetes, immunized mice showed improved glucose tolerance, which was mediated by improved insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cells. Hence, immunization with IL-1β conjugated to virus-like particles has the potential to become a safe, efficacious, and cost-effective therapy for the prevention and long-term treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  7. Detectemos la TB. Tratemos la TB. Trabajemos juntos para eliminar la TB. (Find TB. Treat TB. Working together to eliminate TB.)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-26

    Este podcast trata sobre el Día Mundial de la Tuberculosis y el tema de los CDC para el año 2014.  Created: 2/26/2014 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/26/2014.

  8. Mixed vaccination strategy for the control of tuberculosis: A case study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siyu; Li, Yong; Bi, Yingjie; Huang, Qingdao

    2017-06-01

    This study first presents a mathematical model of TB transmission considering BCG vaccination compartment to investigate the transmission dynamics nowadays. Based on data reported by the National Bureau of Statistics of China, the basic reproduction number is estimated approximately as R0=1.1892. To reach the new End TB goal raised by WHO in 2015, considering the health system in China, we design a mixed vaccination strategy. Theoretical analysis indicates that the infectious population asymptotically tends to zero with the new vaccination strategy which is the combination of constant vaccination and pulse vaccination. We obtain that the control of TB is quicker to achieve with the mixed vaccination. The new strategy can make the best of current constant vaccination, and the periodic routine health examination provides an operable environment for implementing pulse vaccination in China. Numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the theoretical results and help to design the final mixed vaccination strategy once the new vaccine comes out.

  9. Strategic use of anti-GnRH vaccine allowing selection of breeding boars without adverse effects on reproductive or production performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, Claudio; Ollila, Anna; Andersson, Magnus; Heinonen, Mari; Voutila, Liisa; Serenius, Timo; Peltoniemi, Olli

    2016-02-01

    Boar stations raise only entire male pigs for selection as reproductive boars, but the majority of them will fail the selection process, ending at slaughter with a high risk of boar tainted meat. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a single dose of Improvac given to 16-week old boars had a negative effect on their subsequent sperm numbers and motility in 16 artificial insemination boars. We also aimed to generate more knowledge on incidence of boar taint at slaughter among Finnish pigs, compare production performances as average daily gain, feed conversion ratio, and carcass and meat quality (lean meat percentage, back fat, pH, color, androstenone, and skatole) of immunocastrated boars (n = 248) with those of entire boars (n = 268). Moreover, we aimed also to explore whether a fat biopsy taken at 16 weeks of age could already reveal the presence of boar taint compounds and be predictive of boar taint development at slaughter age. We found that 32% of entire boars (Figen Landrace, Figen Large White, and their crossbreed) slaughtered at an age of 25 weeks presented levels of androstenone and/or skatole above the threshold for boar taint in their meat. These boars (control) had higher androstenone and skatole levels in the back fat samples at slaughter (0.77 ± 0.55 and 0.09 ± 0.06 μg/g, respectively, mean ± standard deviation) than those in the immuno group (0.20 ± 0.25 and 0.06 ± 0.03 μg/g, respectively, P artificial insemination. We found no difference in the levels of testosterone, anti-GnRH antibodies titers, testicle morphology, and sperm numbers and motility between the boars vaccinated once, at 16 weeks of age, with anti-GnRH vaccine and the control boars (no vaccination). There were no differences in average daily gain, feed conversion ratio, lean meat percentage, and back fat between the immunocastrated boars and entire boars. Meat from immunocastrated boars had a higher pH and better color than meat from entire boars (P meat quality

  10. Viral hepatitis and HIV-associated tuberculosis: Risk factors and TB treatment outcomes in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likanonsakul Sirirat

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occurrence of tuberculosis (TB, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and viral hepatitis infections in the same patient poses unique clinical and public health challenges, because medications to treat TB and HIV are hepatotoxic. We conducted an observational study to evaluate risk factors for HBsAg and/or anti-HCV reactivity and to assess differences in adverse events and TB treatment outcomes among HIV-infected TB patients. Methods Patients were evaluated at the beginning, during, and at the end of TB treatment. Blood samples were tested for aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total bilirubin (BR, complete blood count, and CD4+ T lymphocyte cell count. TB treatment outcomes were assessed at the end of TB treatment according to international guidelines. Results Of 769 enrolled patients, 752 (98% had serologic testing performed for viral hepatitis: 70 (9% were reactive for HBsAg, 237 (31% for anti-HCV, and 472 (63% non-reactive for both markers. At the beginning of TB treatment, 18 (26% patients with HBsAg reactivity had elevated liver function tests compared with 69 (15% patients non-reactive to any viral marker (p = 0.02. At the end of TB treatment, 493 (64% were successfully treated. Factors independently associated with HBsAg reactivity included being a man who had sex with men (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–4.3 and having low TB knowledge (AOR, 1.8; CI, 1.0–3.0. Factors most strongly associated with anti-HCV reactivity were having injection drug use history (AOR, 12.8; CI, 7.0–23.2 and living in Bangkok (AOR, 15.8; CI, 9.4–26.5. The rate of clinical hepatitis and death during TB treatment was similar in patients HBsAg reactive, anti-HCV reactive, both HBsAg and anti-HCV reactive, and non-reactive to any viral marker. Conclusion Among HIV-infected TB patients living in Thailand, markers of viral hepatitis infection, particularly hepatitis C virus

  11. Detection of hepatitis B virus DNA in sera from 18 alcoholic carriers of "anti-HBc alone" and response to a single dose of hepatitis B vaccine Pesquisa de DNA do vírus da hepatite B no soro de 18 alcoolistas portadores de "anti-HBc isolado" e resposta a uma dose da vacina para hepatite B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Marques de Oliveira

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the possibility of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV infection in alcoholics carriers of "anti-HBc alone", and to verify the behavior of this serological pattern after a single dose of hepatitis B vaccine, 18 alcoholics who had this serological profile were evaluated by the polymerase chain reaction method, and 17 of them were vaccined. All were negative for HBV DNA. Nine (52.9% of those vaccined had anamnestic response, mainly those with positive anti-HBe (8/10; 80%. "Anti-HBc alone" was compatible with low levels of anti-HBs in half of the patients, and probably with false positive results for anti-HBc in the others.Para avaliar a possibilidade de infecção oculta pelo vírus da hepatite B em alcoolistas com "anti-HBc isolado" e a resposta a uma dose da vacina para a hepatite B, 18 alcoolistas com este perfil sorológico foram avaliados pelo método de reação em cadeia da polimerase e 17 deles foram vacinados. Todos tiveram negativos os exames para o VHB DNA. Nove (52,9% dos vacinados tiveram resposta anamnéstica, principalmente aqueles com anti-HBe positivo (8/10; 80%. "Anti-HBc isolado" foi compatível com baixos títulos de anti-HBs em metade dos pacientes, e provavelmente com resultado falso-positivo para o anti-HBc nos demais.

  12. Vaccine-Derived Immunity in Children With Cancer-Analysis of Anti-Tetanus and Anti-Diphtheria Antibodies Changes after Completion of Antineoplastic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Gowin, Ewelina; Bocian, Joanna; Zając-Spychała, Olga; Małecka, Ilona; Stryczyńska-Kazubska, Joanna; Kałużna, Ewelina; Avonts, Dirk; Wysocka-Leszczyńska, Joanna; Wysocki, Jacek

    2015-12-01

    Cancer survival rates and longevity of patients after therapy have significantly improved during the last decades. Thus durable protection against infections should be provided. The aim of the study was to compare the levels of vaccine-derived antibodies in children with cancer compared to those of healthy children and to investigate how therapy influences the levels of specific antibodies. A group of 40 children, diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or solid tumor (ST), followed in Poznan University of Medical Sciences Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, were recruited for evaluation of humoral immunity. Antibody levels were checked before treatment and 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. In patients with ALL or ST, levels of IgG against tetanus and diphtheria were significantly lower than in the control group. Among ALL patients, 9% remained negative for tetanus and diphtheria antibodies 12 months after therapy. Among patients with ST 3 months after chemotherapy, there were no protective antibodies in 12% against tetanus, and in 18% against diphtheria. All patients reconstituted immunity 6 and 12 months after therapy. Our data show that a considerable number of cancer patients lose immunity against diphtheria and tetanus after therapy. Compared to ST, patients with ALL lose protective antibody levels more often. Patients with ST reconstituted antibodies after the treatment cessation, while levels in ALL patients remained low. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Características testiculares de touros imunizados com vacina anti-hormônio liberador do hormônio luteinizante Testicular characteristics of bulls immunosterilized with anti-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Zanella

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a ação imunoesterilizadora de uma vacina anti-hormônio liberador de hormônio luteinizante (LHRH, composta por ovalbumina-LHRH-7 e tiorredoxina-LHRH-7, em touros mestiços Nelore. Vinte e seis touros, com dois anos de idade, foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em dois grupos de 13 animais. No grupo I, os animais receberam uma dose e dois reforços da vacina nos dias 0, 141, e 287 do experimento. No grupo II, os animais não receberam nenhum tratamento (controle. Para avaliar o efeito da vacina nos touros, foi realizada a mensuração da circunferência escrotal no início do experimento e no dia do abate, 741 dias depois. Por ocasião do abate, também foi coletada uma amostra dos testículos para avaliação histológica. O grupo imunizado apresentou circunferência escrotal ao abate de 22±5,98 cm, menor do que a do grupo controle que foi de 35,6±2,4 cm. Na análise histológica dos animais do grupo imunizado, foi observada degeneração testicular com ausência de espermatozoides em 85% dos animais avaliados, os outros 15% apresentaram redução no número de espermatozoides, em comparação aos animais do grupo controle. A vacina anti-LHRH, com fusão de proteínas, é efetiva na castração imunológica de touros e deve ser considerada como alternativa para utilização na produção bovina extensiva no Brasil.The objective of this study was to evaluate the immunosterilization action of the anti-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH vaccine, composed with ovalbumin-LHRH-7 and thioredoxin-LHRH-7, in Nelore-cross bulls. Twenty-six 2-year old bulls were randomly assigned in two groups of 13 animals each. The animals of group I received a primary and two booster injections of the vaccine on days 0, 141, and 287 of the experiment. In group II, the control group, the bulls did not receive any type of treatment. Scrotal circumference was measured in the beginning of the experiment and at slaughter

  14. Helicobacter pylori CagA: from pathogenic mechanisms to its use as an anti-cancer vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eStein

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of more than 50% of the human population, causing chronic inflammation, which however is largely asymptomatic. Nevertheless, H. pylori-infected subjects can develop chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, and gastric cancer. Chronic exposure to the pathogen and its ability to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT through the injection of CagA into gastric epithelial cells may be key triggers of carcinogenesis. By deregulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions as well as DNA methylation, histone modifications, expression of micro RNAs, and resistance to apoptosis, EMT can actively contribute to early stages of the cancer formation. Host response to the infection significantly contributes to disease development and the concomitance of particular genotypes of both pathogen and host may turn into the most severe outcomes. T regulatory cells (Treg have been recently demonstrated to play an important role in H. pylori-related disease development and at the same time the Treg-induced tolerance has been proposed as a possible mechanism that leads to less severe disease. Efficacy of antibiotic therapies of H. pylori infection has significantly dropped. Unfortunately, no vaccine against H. pylori is currently licensed, and protective immunity mechanisms against H. pylori are only partially understood. In spite of promising results obtained in animal models of infection with a number of vaccine candidates, few clinical trials have been conducted so far and with no satisfactory outcomes. However, prophylactic vaccination may be the only means to efficiently prevent H. pylori-associated cancers.

  15. Helicobacter pylori CagA: From Pathogenic Mechanisms to Its Use as an Anti-Cancer Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Markus; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rappuoli, Rino; Bagnoli, Fabio

    2013-10-15

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of more than 50% of the human population, causing chronic inflammation, which however is largely asymptomatic. Nevertheless, H. pylori-infected subjects can develop chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric cancer. Chronic exposure to the pathogen and its ability to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) through the injection of cytotoxin-associated gene A into gastric epithelial cells may be key triggers of carcinogenesis. By deregulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions as well as DNA methylation, histone modifications, expression of micro RNAs, and resistance to apoptosis, EMT can actively contribute to early stages of the cancer formation. Host response to the infection significantly contributes to disease development and the concomitance of particular genotypes of both pathogen and host may turn into the most severe outcomes. T regulatory cells (Treg) have been recently demonstrated to play an important role in H. pylori-related disease development and at the same time the Treg-induced tolerance has been proposed as a possible mechanism that leads to less severe disease. Efficacy of antibiotic therapies of H. pylori infection has significantly dropped. Unfortunately, no vaccine against H. pylori is currently licensed, and protective immunity mechanisms against H. pylori are only partially understood. In spite of promising results obtained in animal models of infection with a number of vaccine candidates, few clinical trials have been conducted so far and with no satisfactory outcomes. However, prophylactic vaccination may be the only means to efficiently prevent H. pylori-associated cancers.

  16. Pretreatment antigen-specific immunity and regulation - association with subsequent immune response to anti-tumor DNA vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Laura E; Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2017-07-18

    Immunotherapies have demonstrated clinical benefit for many types of cancers, however many patients do not respond, and treatment-related adverse effects can be severe. Hence many efforts are underway to identify treatment predictive biomarkers. We have reported the results of two phase I trials using a DNA vaccine encoding prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in patients with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer. In both trials, persistent PAP-specific Th1 immunity developed in some patients, and this was associated with favorable changes in serum PSA kinetics. In the current study, we sought to determine if measures of antigen-specific or antigen non-specific immunity were present prior to treatment, and associated with subsequent immune response, to identify possible predictive immune biomarkers. Patients who developed persistent PAP-specific, IFNγ-secreting immune responses were defined as immune "responders." The frequency of peripheral T cell and B cell lymphocytes, natural killer cells, monocytes, dendritic cells, myeloid derived suppressor cells, and regulatory T cells were assessed by flow cytometry and clinical laboratory values. PAP-specific immune responses were evaluated by cytokine secretion in vitro, and by antigen-specific suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity to a recall antigen in an in vivo SCID mouse model. The frequency of peripheral blood cell types did not differ between the immune responder and non-responder groups. Non-responder patients tended to have higher PAP-specific IL-10 production pre-vaccination (p = 0.09). Responder patients had greater preexisting PAP-specific bystander regulatory responses that suppressed DTH to a recall antigen (p = 0.016). While our study population was small (n = 38), these results suggest that different measures of antigen-specific tolerance or regulation might help predict immunological outcome from DNA vaccination. These will be prospectively evaluated in an ongoing randomized, phase II trial.

  17. Priming B cell-mediated anti-HIV envelope responses by vaccination allows for the long-term control of infection in macaques exposed to a R5-tropic SHIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckner, Clarisa; Gines, Leoned G.; Saunders, Cheryl J.; Vojtech, Lucia; Srivastava, Indresh; Gettie, Agegnehu; Bohm, Rudolph; Blanchard, James; Barnett, Susan W.; Safrit, Jeffrey T.; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2004-01-01

    The potential of vaccine-elicited anti-HIV envelope antibodies to control HIV-infection was evaluated by immunizing macaques with the HIV envelope protein and transiently depleting them of their CD8+ cells before intravenous challenge with the pathogenic CCR5-tropic SIV/HIV chimeric virus, SHIV SF162P4 . Although sterilizing immunity was not achieved, all vaccinated animals effectively controlled infection and remained free of disease for the duration of observation (over 3 years). In contrast, during the same period, the control animals progressed to disease. Both the vaccinees and the controls developed robust cell-mediated antiviral and neutralizing antibody responses following infection. A comparative analysis of these responses suggests that the more effective long-term control of infection by the vaccinated animals is due to the more rapid development of anti-HIV envelope antibodies. These studies suggest that priming by vaccination of B cell anti-HIV envelope responses maybe crucial for the long-term control of HIV infection

  18. TB in healthcare workers in the UK: a cohort analysis 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jennifer A; Lalor, Maeve K; Anderson, Laura F; Tamne, Surinder; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Thomas, H Lucy

    2017-07-01

    To describe the burden of TB in healthcare workers (HCWs) in the UK and determine whether HCWs are at increased risk of TB due to occupational exposure. Retrospective cohort analysis of national UK TB surveillance and genotyping data between 2009 and 2013. The rate of TB in HCWs compared with non-HCWs to calculate incidence rate ratios stratified by country of birth. 2320 cases of TB in HCWs were notified in the study period, 85% were born abroad. The TB rate in HCWs was 23.4 (95% CI 22.5 to 24.4) per 100 000 compared with 16.2 (95% CI 16.0 to 16.3) per 100 000 in non-HCWs. After stratifying by country of birth, there was not an increased TB incidence in HCWs for the majority of countries of birth, including in the UK-born. Using combined genotyping and epidemiological data, only 10 confirmed nosocomial transmission events involving HCWs were identified between 2010 and 2012. Of these, only two involved transmission to patients. The lack of an increased risk of TB after stratifying by country of birth, and the very few transmission events involving nosocomial transmission in the UK suggests that TB in HCWs in the UK is not generally acquired through UK occupational exposure. The majority of cases in foreign-born HCWs are likely to result from reactivation of latent TB infection (LTBI) acquired abroad, and is not likely to be prevented by BCG vaccination in the UK. Testing and treatment of LTBI in HCWs with exposure to high TB burden countries should be the focus of occupational health prevention activities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Protection in simian immunodeficiency virus-vaccinated monkeys correlates with anti-HLA class I antibody response

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Our earlier reports demonstrated that Cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with either inactivated partially purified simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), fixed SIV-infected C8166 (a human T lymphoblastoid cell line) cells, or fixed uninfected C8166 cells can be protected against a challenge infection with the 32H isolate of SIVmac 251 (grown in C8166) (Stott, E. J., W. L. Chan, K. H. G. Mills, M. Page, F. Taffs, M. Cranage, P. Greenway, and P. Kitchin. 1990. Lancet. 336:1538; Stott, E. J., P. A. K...

  20. High Antigen Dose Is Detrimental to Post-Exposure Vaccine Protection against Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Billeskov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis (TB, causes 1.8M deaths annually. The current vaccine, BCG, has failed to eradicate TB leaving 25% of the world’s population with latent Mtb infection (LTBI, and 5–10% of these people will reactivate and develop active TB. An efficient therapeutic vaccine targeting LTBI could have an enormous impact on global TB incidence, and could be an important aid in fighting multidrug resistance, which is increasing globally. Here we show in a mouse model using the H56 (Ag85B-ESAT-6-Rv2660 TB vaccine candidate that post-exposure, but not preventive, vaccine protection requires low vaccine antigen doses for optimal protection. Loss of protection from high dose post-exposure vaccination was not associated with a loss of overall vaccine response magnitude, but rather with greater differentiation and lower functional avidity of vaccine-specific CD4 T cells. High vaccine antigen dose also led to a decreased ability of vaccine-specific CD4 T cells to home into the Mtb-infected lung parenchyma, a recently discovered important feature of T cell protection in mice. These results underscore the importance of T cell quality rather than magnitude in TB-vaccine protection, and the significant role that antigen dosing plays in vaccine-mediated protection.

  1. Delayed Sputum Conversion in TB-HIV Co-Infected Patients with Low Isoniazid and Rifampicin Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekaggya-Wiltshire, Christine; von Braun, Amrei; Lamorde, Mohammed; Ledergerber, Bruno; Buzibye, Allan; Henning, Lars; Musaazi, Joseph; Gutteck, Ursula; Denti, Paolo; de Kock, Miné; Jetter, Alexander; Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Eberhard, Nadia; Matovu, Joshua; Joloba, Moses; Muller, Daniel; Manabe, Yukari C; Kamya, Moses R; Corti, Natascia; Kambugu, Andrew; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Fehr, Jan S

    2018-03-03

    The relationship between concentrations of anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs, sputum conversion and treatment outcome remains unclear. We sought to determine the association between anti-TB drug concentrations and sputum conversion among TB-HIV co-infected patients on first-line anti-TB drugs. We enrolled HIV-infected Ugandans with pulmonary TB. Estimation of first-line anti-TB drug concentrations was performed 1, 2, and 4 hours after drug intake at 2, 8, and 24 weeks of TB treatment. Serial sputum cultures were performed at each visit. Time-to-event analysis was used to determine factors associated with sputum culture conversion. We enrolled 268 HIV-infected patients. Patients with low isoniazid and rifampicin concentrations were less likely to have sputum culture conversion before the end of TB treatment or by the end of follow-up; Hazard ratio (HR) 0.54: 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.37-0.77, P=0.001 and HR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.44-0.85, P=0.003, respectively. Patients in the highest AUC quartile for rifampicin and isoniazid were approximately two times more likely to experience sputum conversion. Rifampicin and isoniazid concentrations below the thresholds and being in a weight band TB treatment outcomes. Only 4.4% of the participants had treatment failure. Although low anti-TB drug concentrations did not translate to a high proportion of patients with treatment failure, the association between low concentrations of rifampicin and isoniazid and delayed culture conversion may have implications on TB transmission.

  2. Effects of Vaccine Efficacy on Basic Reproduction Number of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper addresses the effect of vaccine efficacy rate on a vaccination model of tuberculosis (TB) epidemic. Numerical simulations was performed on the model using Maple 15 computation software. Our results showed that as the levels of vaccine efficacy increase, the basic reproduction number, R0, decreases.

  3. Determinants of vaccine hesitancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braczkowska, Bogumiła; Kowalska, Małgorzata; Braczkowski, Ryszard; Barański, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy is a worrying phenomenon due to its range and health-related consequences. Secondary epidemiological data on the current situation of vaccination in Poland were analyzed. The source of the analyzed data were obtained from the reports of the National Sanitary Inspection and the National Institute of Public Health–National Institute of Hygiene in Warsaw. Legal basis on vaccination and the responsibilities of physicians related to these regulations were also discussed. Considering the opinions of ECDC experts, factors influencing vaccine hesitancy were identified. Attention was paid to the activities of the anti-vaccination movements, their range of activity and a strategy of action.

  4. Utility of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in Moroccan children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Azbaoui, S; Sabri, A; Ouraini, S; Hassani, A; Asermouh, A; Agadr, A; Abilkassem, R; Dini, N; Kmari, M; Akhaddar, A; Laktati, Z; Aieche, S; El Hafidi, N; Ben Brahim, F; Bousfiha, A A; Ailal, F; Deswarte, C; Schurr, E; Amar, L; Bustamante, J; Boisson-Dupuis, S; Casanova, J L; Abel, L; El Baghdadi, J

    2016-12-01

    The utility of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs), such as the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test, in diagnosing active tuberculosis (TB) in children is unclear and depends on the epidemiological setting. To evaluate the performance of QFT-GIT for TB diagnosis in children living in Morocco, an intermediate TB incidence country with high bacille Calmette-Gurin vaccination coverage. We prospectively recruited 109 Moroccan children hospitalised for clinically suspected TB, all of whom were tested using QFT-GIT. For 81 of the 109 children, the final diagnosis was TB. The remaining 28 children did not have TB. QFT-GIT had a sensitivity of 66% (95%CI 5277) for the diagnosis of TB, and a specificity of 100% (95%CI 88100). The tuberculin skin test (TST) had lower sensitivity, at 46% (95%CI 3360), and its concordance with QFT-GIT was limited (69%). Combining QFT-GIT and TST results increased sensitivity to 83% (95%CI 6992). In epidemiological settings such as those found in Morocco, QFT-GIT is more sensitive than the TST for active TB diagnosis in children. Combining the TST and QFT-GIT would be useful for the diagnosis of active TB in children, in combination with clinical, radiological and laboratory data.

  5. Breaking Transmission with Vaccines: The Case of Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo-Asensio, Jesus; Aguilo, Nacho; Marinova, Dessislava; Martin, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) have evolved causing tuberculosis (TB) in different mammalian hosts. MTBC ecotypes have adapted to diverse animal species, with M. bovis being the most common cause of TB in livestock. Cattle-to-human transmission of M. bovis through ingestion of raw milk was common before introduction of the pasteurization process. TB in humans is mainly caused by M. tuberculosis . This bacterium is considered a genetically clonal pathogen that has coevolved with humans due to its ability to manipulate and subvert the immune response. TB is a major public health problem due to airborne person-to-person transmission of M. tuberculosis . The essential yet unanswered question on the natural history of TB is when M. tuberculosis decides to establish latent infection in the host (resambling the lysogenic cycle of lambda phage) or to cause pulmonary disease (comparable to the lytic cycle of lambda phage). In this latter case, M. tuberculosis kills the host with the aim of achieving transmission to new hosts. Combating the TB epidemic requires stopping transmission. M. bovis BCG, the present vaccine against TB, is derived from M. bovis and only protects against disseminated forms of TB. Thus, a priority in TB research is development of new effective vaccines to prevent pulmonary disease. Attenuated vaccines based on M. tuberculosis as MTBVAC are potential candidates that could contribute to break the TB transmission cycle.

  6. Current and developing therapies for the treatment of multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyandi, Malaisamy; Ramachandran, Rajeswari

    2017-09-01

    India accounts for 25% of the global burden of MDR-TB. In 2016, the India's Revised National TB Control Programme reported a success rate of 46% among 19,298 MDR-TB patients treated under the programme. This suboptimal treatment outcome warrants an urgent need for newer drugs and newer regimens in the treatment of MDR-TB. India requires new shorter, cheap, safe and effective anti-TB regimen to treat MDR-TB. Areas covered: We used different search strategies to obtain relevant literature from PubMed, on Indian experiences of developing therapies for the treatment of MDR-TB. Further information from the Central TB Division Government of India on programmatic management of resistant TB was collected. Expert opinion: In 2016 WHO recommended a shorter MDR-TB regimen of 9-12 months (4-6 Km-Mfx-Pto-Cfz-Z-Hhigh-dose-E /5 Mfx-Cfz-Z-E) may be used instead of longer regimens. Currently, conducting trials involving newer drugs such as bedaquiline, have been proposed. The regimen will be of a shorter duration containing isoniazid, prothionamide, bedaquiline, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide (STREAM regimen). To successfully treat MDR-TB one requires new classes of antibiotic and newer diagnostic tests. This represents an enormous financial and technical challenge to the programme managers and policy makers.

  7. Litigation as TB Rights Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract One thousand people die every day in India as a result of TB, a preventable and treatable disease, even though the Constitution of India, government schemes, and international law guarantee available, accessible, acceptable, quality health care. Failure to address the spread of TB and to provide quality treatment to all affected populations constitutes a public health and human rights emergency that demands action and accountability. As part of a broader strategy, health activists in India employ Public Interest Litigation (PIL) to hold the state accountable for rights violations and to demand new legislation, standards for patient care, accountability for under-spending, improvements in services at individual facilities, and access to government entitlements in marginalized communities. Taking inspiration from right to health PIL cases (PILs), lawyers in a New Delhi-based rights organization used desk research, fact-findings, and the Right To Information Act to build a TB PIL for the Delhi High Court, Sanjai Sharma v. NCT of Delhi and Others (2015). The case argues that inadequate implementation of government TB schemes violates the Constitutional rights to life, health, food, and equality. Although PILs face substantial challenges, this paper concludes that litigation can be a crucial advocacy and accountability tool for people living with TB and their allies. PMID:27781000

  8. Effect of glycemic control and type of diabetes treatment on unsuccessful TB treatment outcomes among people with TB-Diabetes: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Deepak Shewade

    Full Text Available Stringent glycemic control by using insulin as a replacement or in addition to oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs has been recommended for people with tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus (TB-DM. This systematic review (PROSPERO 2016:CRD42016039101 analyses whether this improves TB treatment outcomes.Among people with drug-susceptible TB and DM on anti-TB treatment, to determine the effect of i glycemic control (stringent or less stringent compared to poor glycemic control and ii insulin (only or with OHAs compared to 'OHAs only' on unsuccessful TB treatment outcome(s. We looked for unfavourable TB treatment outcomes at the end of intensive phase and/or end of TB treatment (minimum six months and maximum 12 months follow up. Secondary outcomes were development of MDR-TB during the course of treatment, recurrence after 6 months and/or after 1 year post successful treatment completion and development of adverse events related to glucose lowering treatment (including hypoglycemic episodes.All interventional studies (with comparison arm and cohort studies on people with TB-DM on anti-TB treatment reporting glycemic control, DM treatment details and TB treatment outcomes were eligible. We searched electronic databases (EMBASE, PubMed, Google Scholar and grey literature between 1996 and April 2017. Screening, data extraction and risk of bias assessment were done independently by two investigators and recourse to a third investigator, for resolution of differences.After removal of duplicates from 2326 identified articles, 2054 underwent title and abstract screening. Following full text screening of 56 articles, nine cohort studies were included. Considering high methodological and clinical heterogeneity, we decided to report the results qualitatively and not perform a meta-analysis. Eight studies dealt with glycemic control, of which only two were free of the risk of bias (with confounder-adjusted measures of effect. An Indian study reported 30% fewer

  9. Effect of glycemic control and type of diabetes treatment on unsuccessful TB treatment outcomes among people with TB-Diabetes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewade, Hemant Deepak; Jeyashree, Kathiresan; Mahajan, Preetam; Shah, Amar N; Kirubakaran, Richard; Rao, Raghuram; Kumar, Ajay M V

    2017-01-01

    Stringent glycemic control by using insulin as a replacement or in addition to oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) has been recommended for people with tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus (TB-DM). This systematic review (PROSPERO 2016:CRD42016039101) analyses whether this improves TB treatment outcomes. Among people with drug-susceptible TB and DM on anti-TB treatment, to determine the effect of i) glycemic control (stringent or less stringent) compared to poor glycemic control and ii) insulin (only or with OHAs) compared to 'OHAs only' on unsuccessful TB treatment outcome(s). We looked for unfavourable TB treatment outcomes at the end of intensive phase and/or end of TB treatment (minimum six months and maximum 12 months follow up). Secondary outcomes were development of MDR-TB during the course of treatment, recurrence after 6 months and/or after 1 year post successful treatment completion and development of adverse events related to glucose lowering treatment (including hypoglycemic episodes). All interventional studies (with comparison arm) and cohort studies on people with TB-DM on anti-TB treatment reporting glycemic control, DM treatment details and TB treatment outcomes were eligible. We searched electronic databases (EMBASE, PubMed, Google Scholar) and grey literature between 1996 and April 2017. Screening, data extraction and risk of bias assessment were done independently by two investigators and recourse to a third investigator, for resolution of differences. After removal of duplicates from 2326 identified articles, 2054 underwent title and abstract screening. Following full text screening of 56 articles, nine cohort studies were included. Considering high methodological and clinical heterogeneity, we decided to report the results qualitatively and not perform a meta-analysis. Eight studies dealt with glycemic control, of which only two were free of the risk of bias (with confounder-adjusted measures of effect). An Indian study reported 30% fewer

  10. Mielitis transversa relacionada con vacunación anti-influenza A(H1N1 Transverse myelitis associated with anti-influenza A (H1N1 vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Florencia Arcondo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available La mielitis transversa es una enfermedad inflamatoria que se caracteriza por disfunción de la médula espinal. Las causas reconocidas de mielitis transversa son autoinmunes, enfermedades desmielinizantes, post infecciosas y post vacunales, aunque hasta el 50% de los casos son idiopáticas. Las vacunas contra la rubéola, paperas, rabia y gripe estacional han sido asociadas a diversos trastornos neurológicos, como el Síndrome de Guillain Barré, la encefalomielitis diseminada aguda (ADEM y la mielitis transversa. Como mecanismo preventivo luego de la pandemia de 2009, en febrero del año 2010 se inició en nuestro país la campaña de vacunación contra la Influenza A (H1N1. Se presenta el caso de una paciente con hipoestesias que aparecieron cuatro días después de haber recibido la vacuna monovalente anti-influenza A (H1N1 y progresaron con evidente nivel sensitivo. La paciente cumplía criterios diagnósticos de mielitis transversa, según el Transverse Myelitis Consortium Working Group. Tuvo remisión de las imágenes de la resonancia magnética y estabilidad clínica sin tratamiento con corticoides. Se discuten aspectos diagnósticos, pronósticos y terapéuticos de esta entidad clínica.Transverse myelitis is an inflammatory disorder characterized by spinal cord dysfunction. Infectious, autoimmune, postinfectious and postvaccination diseases are the most common recognized causes of transverse myelitis, but near 50% of the cases are finally assumed as idiopathic. Rubeolla, mumps, rabies and influenza vaccines were associated with many neurologic complications, such as Guillain Barré Syndrome, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM and transverse myelitis. As a prevention measure after the 2009 pandemia, in February 2010 a National Campaigne of Vaccination against the Influenza A (H1N1 was started in our country. We report a case of a woman who received a monovalent Influenza A (H1N1 vaccine and four days after, began with sensory

  11. TB deaths reach historic levels. International (global).

    Science.gov (United States)

    More tuberculosis (TB)-related deaths occurred in 1995 than in any other year in history (almost 3 million, vs. 2.1 million for the TB epidemic around 1990). In the next 50 years, as many as 500 million people may develop TB if current rates continue. More and more of these people will develop multidrug resistant TB. TB affects all social groups. It is the leading fatal infection in youth and adults. HIV positive people are more likely to die from TB than any other condition. More women die from TB than all causes of maternal mortality combined. Almost 50% of the world's refugees may have TB. All people are at risk of TB since TB bacteria, which enter the air via coughing or sneezing, can be suspended in the air for hours. Increased air travel and migration have brought TB back to industrialized countries. Multi-drug resistant TB has emerged in New York City, London, Milan, Paris, Atlanta, Chicago, and cities in developing countries. Governments of industrialized and developing countries have been slow to understand the effects of multi-drug resistant TB for public health. During the 1970s and 1980s, TB was greatly neglected resulting in the current multi-drug resistant TB epidemic. Policy makers have not applied the tools discovered by scientists to help eliminate TB. The World Health Organization recommends directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) to fight TB. DOTS can increase the number of cured TB patients two-fold. It can cure almost 95% of TB patients with medicines costing less than $11 in some areas of the world. Yet DOTS is being used to cure only 10% of all TB patients in the world. If it were used in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russian Federation, South Africa, and Zaire, about 75% of all TB cases would be cured. In DOTS, health workers, not the TB patient, are responsible for curing the TB patient. Poor patient compliance is responsible for the current TB epidemic because TB patients remain

  12. Novel GMO-Based Vaccines against Tuberculosis: State of the Art and Biosafety Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leunda, Amaya; Baldo, Aline; Goossens, Martine; Huygen, Kris; Herman, Philippe; Romano, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Novel efficient vaccines are needed to control tuberculosis (TB), a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Several TB vaccine candidates are currently in clinical and preclinical development. They fall into two categories, the one of candidates designed as a replacement of the Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) to be administered to infants and the one of sub-unit vaccines designed as booster vaccines. The latter are designed as vaccines that will be administered to individuals already vaccinated with BCG (or in the future with a BCG replacement vaccine). In this review we provide up to date information on novel tuberculosis (TB) vaccines in development focusing on the risk assessment of candidates composed of genetically modified organisms (GMO) which are currently evaluated in clinical trials. Indeed, these vaccines administered to volunteers raise biosafety concerns with respect to human health and the environment that need to be assessed and managed. PMID:26344627

  13. Novel GMO-Based Vaccines against Tuberculosis: State of the Art and Biosafety Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Leunda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Novel efficient vaccines are needed to control tuberculosis (TB, a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Several TB vaccine candidates are currently in clinical and preclinical development. They fall into two categories, the one of candidates designed as a replacement of the Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG to be administered to infants and the one of sub-unit vaccines designed as booster vaccines. The latter are designed as vaccines that will be administered to individuals already vaccinated with BCG (or in the future with a BCG replacement vaccine. In this review we provide up to date information on novel tuberculosis (TB vaccines in development focusing on the risk assessment of candidates composed of genetically modified organisms (GMO which are currently evaluated in clinical trials. Indeed, these vaccines administered to volunteers raise biosafety concerns with respect to human health and the environment that need to be assessed and managed.

  14. Novel GMO-Based Vaccines against Tuberculosis: State of the Art and Biosafety Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leunda, Amaya; Baldo, Aline; Goossens, Martine; Huygen, Kris; Herman, Philippe; Romano, Marta

    2014-06-16

    Novel efficient vaccines are needed to control tuberculosis (TB), a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Several TB vaccine candidates are currently in clinical and preclinical development. They fall into two categories, the one of candidates designed as a replacement of the Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) to be administered to infants and the one of sub-unit vaccines designed as booster vaccines. The latter are designed as vaccines that will be administered to individuals already vaccinated with BCG (or in the future with a BCG replacement vaccine). In this review we provide up to date information on novel tuberculosis (TB) vaccines in development focusing on the risk assessment of candidates composed of genetically modified organisms (GMO) which are currently evaluated in clinical trials. Indeed, these vaccines administered to volunteers raise biosafety concerns with respect to human health and the environment that need to be assessed and managed.

  15. Cellular immune response in MDR-TB patients to different protein expression of MDR and susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Rv0147, a novel MDR-TB biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadizadeh Tasbiti, Alireza; Yari, Shamsi; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Tabarsi, Payam; Saeedfar, Kayvan; Yari, Fatemeh

    2018-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a crucial public health problem with prevalence of multidrug resistant (MDR) rising. An accurate TB biomarker is urgently needed to monitor the response to treatment in patients with MDR tuberculosis. To analyze interaction between selected MDR-TB purified protein and immune cells, dendritic cells from MDR-TB patients and healthy subjects were stimulated by 55KDa protein fractions (Rv0147). The purified proteins identified by proteomic techniques (two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry) and peptide sequences are known to bind a MHC class I alleles which are extracted from the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource database ( www.iedb.org ). T cells were isolated from PBMC by negative selection and cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 at 37 °C and 5% CO 2 . Cell culture was assayed for cytokine IL-10 and INF-γ by ELISA. We found that INF-γ production was significantly (335 ± 35.5 pg/ml, P ˂ 0.05) upregulated after protein candidate (Rv0147) stimulation by dendritic cells from MDR-TB patients, whereas IL-10 production was greatly reduced compared with production in healthy subjects (212 ± 9.94 pg/ml, P ˂ 0.05). In fact, the purified protein, Rv0147, stimulated dendritic cells from MDR-TB patients, failed to produce IL-10 and directly stimulates INF-γ production by T cells. These results suggest that the purified protein, Rv0147, may stimulate Th1 type protective cytokine response in MDR-TB patients but not in normal subjects. The production of INF-γ but not IL-10 in the presence of purified protein, Rv0147, may be shifted to Th1 responses in MDR-TB patients and supports its potential as protein vaccine candidates against TB.

  16. In vivo immunogenicity of Tax(11-19) epitope in HLA-A2/DTR transgenic mice: implication for dendritic cell-based anti-HTLV-1 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Divya; Masih, Shet; Schell, Todd; Jacobson, Steven; Comber, Joseph D; Philip, Ramila; Wigdahl, Brian; Jain, Pooja; Khan, Zafar K

    2014-05-30

    Viral oncoprotein Tax plays key roles in transformation of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1)-infected T cells leading to adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), and is the key antigen recognized during HTLV-associated myelopathy (HAM). In HLA-A2+ asymptomatic carriers as well as ATL and HAM patients, Tax(11-19) epitope exhibits immunodominance. Here, we evaluate CD8 T-cell immune response against this epitope in the presence and absence of dendritic cells (DCs) given the recent encouraging observations made with Phase 1 DC-based vaccine trial for ATL. To facilitate these studies, we first generated an HLA-A2/DTR hybrid mouse strain carrying the HLA-A2.1 and CD11c-DTR genes. We then studied CD8 T-cell immune response against Tax(11-19) epitope delivered in the absence or presence of Freund's adjuvant and/or DCs. Overall results demonstrate that naturally presented Tax epitope could initiate an antigen-specific CD8T cell response in vivo but failed to do so upon DC depletion. Presence of adjuvant potentiated Tax(11-19)-specific response. Elevated serum IL-6 levels coincided with depletion of DCs whereas decreased TGF-β was associated with adjuvant use. Thus, Tax(11-19) epitope is a potential candidate for the DC-based anti-HTLV-1 vaccine and the newly hybrid mouse strain could be used for investigating DC involvement in human class-I-restricted immune responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Vaccines today, vaccines tomorrow: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucq, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines are considered as one of the major contributions of the 20th century and one of the most cost effective public health interventions. The International Vaccine Institute has as a mission to discover, develop and deliver new and improved vaccines against infectious diseases that affects developing nations. If Louis Pasteur is known across the globe, vaccinologists like Maurice Hilleman, Jonas Salk and Charles Mérieux are known among experts only despite their contribution to global health. Thanks to a vaccine, smallpox has been eradicated, polio has nearly disappeared, Haemophilus influenzae B, measles and more recently meningitis A are controlled in many countries. While a malaria vaccine is undergoing phase 3, International Vaccine Institute, in collaboration with an Indian manufacturer has brought an oral inactivated cholera vaccine to pre-qualification. The field of vaccinology has undergone major changes thanks to philanthropists such as Bill and Melinda Gates, initiatives like the Decade of Vaccines and public private partnerships. Current researches on vaccines have more challenging targets like the dengue viruses, malaria, human immunodeficiency virus, the respiratory syncytial virus and nosocomial diseases. Exciting research is taking place on new adjuvants, nanoparticles, virus like particles and new route of administration. An overcrowded infant immunization program, anti-vaccine groups, immunizing a growing number of elderlies and delivering vaccines to difficult places are among challenges faced by vaccinologists and global health experts.

  18. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  19. Biomarkers of latent TB infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhwald, Morten; Ravn, Pernille

    2009-01-01

    For the last 100 years, the tuberculin skin test (TST) has been the only diagnostic tool available for latent TB infection (LTBI) and no biomarker per se is available to diagnose the presence of LTBI. With the introduction of M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-gamma release assays (IGRAs), a new area...... of in vitro immunodiagnostic tests for LTBI based on biomarker readout has become a reality. In this review, we discuss existing evidence on the clinical usefulness of IGRAs and the indefinite number of potential new biomarkers that can be used to improve diagnosis of latent TB infection. We also present...... early data suggesting that the monocyte-derived chemokine inducible protein-10 may be useful as a novel biomarker for the immunodiagnosis of latent TB infection....

  20. Major Challenges in Clinical Management of TB/HIV Coinfected Patients in Eastern Europe Compared with Western Europe and Latin America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efsen, Anne Marie W; Schultze, Anna; Post, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rates of TB/HIV coinfection and multi-drug resistant (MDR)-TB are increasing in Eastern Europe (EE). We aimed to study clinical characteristics, factors associated with MDR-TB and predicted activity of empiric anti-TB treatment at time of TB diagnosis among TB/HIV coinfected patients...... in EE, Western Europe (WE) and Latin America (LA). DESIGN AND METHODS: Between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013, 1413 TB/HIV patients (62 clinics in 19 countries in EE, WE, Southern Europe (SE), and LA) were enrolled. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between EE (N = 844), WE (N = 152......% of participants in EE compared with 90-96% in other regions (pmanagement of TB/HIV patients in EE requires...

  1. Analysis of time to regulatory and ethical approval of SATVI TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Tuberculosis (TB) vaccine trials in South Africa must be approved by the Medicines Control Council (MCC) and by a human research ethics committee (HREC). Delays in regulatory and ethical approval may affect operational and budget planning and clinical development of the product. Aim. Our aim was to ...

  2. [Antibody response to trivalent anti-influenza vaccination (inactivated virus) A/Texas/1/77 H3N2), A/URSS/90/77 (H1N1), B/Hong Kong/8/73].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, G; Andreoni, M; Arangio-Ruiz, G; Sarrecchia, C; Donatelli, I; Resta, S; Rozera, C; Sordillo, P; Rocchi, G

    1982-05-01

    Seventy-five young recruits received an intramuscular dose of anti-influenza virus vaccine containing 300 U.I. of A/Texas/1/77 (H3N2), A/URSS/90/77 (H1N1), B/Hong Kong/8/73 strains. Antibody responses were detected by HI and SRH tests: immunogenicity of the preparation was different for the individual vaccine strain in spite of the similar amount of antigenic content, and the immunity conferred by vaccine strains did not significantly extend to new influenza virus strains which prevailed in 1979/80 winter season with the exception for A/Brazil/11/78 (H1N1).

  3. Elaboration and quality control of the inoculum of the experimental vaccine Brucella S19-tn7-GFP for use in white animals and associated serological test for the detection of anti-GFP antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas Alfaro, Dariana

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of the inoculum of the experimental vaccine Brucella S19-Tn7-GFP is optimized for application in white animals. An associated serological test has allowed differentiating infected animals from those vaccinated with the experimental strain. The same bacteriological and biological properties of the B. abortus S19-Tn7-GFP strain have maintained in the parental vaccine strain S19 and is stable over time. A protocol for the inoculums of strain S19-Tn7-GFP is established for its preparation and use in white animals and quality control. The inoculum stability is evaluated through the simulation of conditions that can be presented in the transportation and application process in the field. An enzyme immunoassay ELISA is optimized for the detection of anti-GFP antibodies in cattle [es

  4. BCG Re-vaccination of Adults with Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Induces Long-lived BCG-Reactive Natural Killer Cell Responses1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Sara; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Johnson, John L.; Hughes, Jane E.; Smit, Erica; Murphy, Melissa; Toefy, Asma; Lerumo, Lesedi; Hopley, Christiaan; Pienaar, Bernadette; Chheng, Phalkun; Nemes, Elisa; Hoft, Daniel F.; Hanekom, Willem A.; Boom, W. Henry

    2016-01-01

    One third of the global population is estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb). We performed a phase 1 randomized, controlled trial of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) before re-vaccination with Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) in healthy, tuberculin skin test positive (≥15mm induration), HIV-negative, South African adults. We hypothesised that pre-clearance of latent bacilli with IPT modulates BCG immunogenicity following re-vaccination. Frequencies and co-expression of IFNγ, TNFα, IL-2, IL-17, and/or IL-22 in CD4, and IFNγ-expressing CD8, γδ T, CD3+CD56+ NKT-like and NK cells in response to BCG were measured using whole blood intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometry. We analyzed 72 participants who were BCG re-vaccinated after IPT (n=33) or without prior IPT (n=39). IPT had little effect on frequencies or cytokine co-expression patterns of M.tb- or BCG-specific responses. Re-vaccination transiently boosted BCG-specific Th1 cytokine-expressing CD4, CD8 and γδ T cells. Despite high frequencies of IFNγ-expressing BCG-reactive CD3+CD56+ NKT-like, CD3−CD56dim and CD3−CD56hi NK cells at baseline, BCG re-vaccination boosted these responses, which remained elevated up to one year after re-vaccination. Such BCG-reactive memory NK cells were induced by BCG vaccination in infants, while in vitro IFN-γ expression by NK cells upon BCG stimulation was dependent on IL-12 and IL-18. Our data suggest that isoniazid pre-clearance of M.tb bacilli has little effect on the magnitude, persistence or functional attributes of lymphocyte responses boosted by BCG re-vaccination. Our study highlights surprising durability of BCG-boosted memory NKT-like and NK cells expressing anti-mycobacterial effector molecules, which may be novel targets for TB vaccines. PMID:27412415

  5. Schistosomiasis vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Afzal A.; Siddiqui, Bilal A.; Ganley-Leal, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major neglected tropical disease of public health importance to a billion people. An estimated 200 million people are currently infected; an additional 779 million individuals are at risk to acquire the infection in 74 countries. Despite many years of implementation of mass anti-parasitic drug therapy programs and other control measures, this disease has not been contained and continues to spread to new geographic areas.  The discovery of a protective vaccine still remain...

  6. Screening contacts of patients with extrapulmonary TB for latent TB infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Anna; Abbara, Aula; Williams, Sion; John, Laurence; Corrah, Tumena; McGregor, Alastair; Davidson, Robert N

    2018-03-01

    2016 TB National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines imply that contacts of extrapulmonary TB do not require screening for latent TB infection. At our high TB prevalence site, we identified 189 active cases of TB for whom there were 698 close contacts. 29.1% of the contacts of pulmonary TB and 10.7% of the contacts of extrapulmonary TB had active or latent TB infection. This supports screening contacts of extrapulmonary TB at our site and presents a way to access high-risk individuals. We propose to continue to screen the contacts of our patients with extrapulmonary TB and recommend other TB units audit their local results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. The effects of different dosage levels of hepatitis B vaccine as booster on anti-HBs-negative children 5-15 y after primary immunization; China, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongdi; Lv, Huakun; Gu, Hua; Cui, Fujiang; Wang, Fuzhen; Yao, Jun; Xia, Shichang; Liang, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    The changes in lgG antibody levels to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and in antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs) seroconversion rates due to different dosages of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) were compared in 2106 children. Children who had been previously vaccinated as infants with HepB were revaccinated at 5-15 y of age, after which the antibody titers were determined. After the first booster dose, the anti-HBs seroconversion rate (defined as an anti-HBs ≥10 mIU/ml) with 10 μg of HepB (93.6%) was significantly greater than the rate with 5 µg of HepB (90.3%) (Panti-HBs seroconversion rate in 10-15-y-old boys vaccinated with 10 μg of HepB (90.9%) was significantly greater than the rate with 5 µg of HepB (84.3%) (Panti-HBs seroconversion rates after the third booster dose with 5 or 10 μg of HepB were greater than those after the first booster dose (99.6% and 99.7%, vs. 90.3% and 93.6%, Peffects of booster vaccination with 3 doses of HepB with 5 or 10 µg are effective; a single booster dose with 10 µg of HepB for 10-15-y-old boys and with 5 or 10 µg of HepB for 5-9 y old boys and for 5-15-y-old girls are effective in generating protective antibody against HBV; however, for anti-HBs-negative children after a single dose of booster, 3 doses are needed.

  8. Overexpression of a Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85B-EsxH Fusion Protein in Recombinant BCG Improves Experimental Buruli Ulcer Vaccine Efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan E Hart

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU vaccine design faces similar challenges to those observed during development of prophylactic tuberculosis treatments. Multiple BU vaccine candidates, based upon Mycobacterium bovis BCG, altered Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU cells, recombinant MU DNA, or MU protein prime-boosts, have shown promise by conferring transient protection to mice against the pathology of MU challenge. Recently, we have shown that a recombinant BCG vaccine expressing MU-Ag85A (BCG MU-Ag85A displayed the highest level of protection to date, by significantly extending the survival time of MU challenged mice compared to BCG vaccination alone. Here we describe the generation, immunogenicity testing, and evaluation of protection conferred by a recombinant BCG strain which overexpresses a fusion of two alternative MU antigens, Ag85B and the MU ortholog of tuberculosis TB10.4, EsxH. Vaccination with BCG MU-Ag85B-EsxH induces proliferation of Ag85 specific CD4+ T cells in greater numbers than BCG or BCG MU-Ag85A and produces IFNγ+ splenocytes responsive to whole MU and recombinant antigens. In addition, anti-Ag85A and Ag85B IgG humoral responses are significantly enhanced after administration of the fusion vaccine compared to BCG or BCG MU-Ag85A. Finally, mice challenged with MU following a single subcutaneous vaccination with BCG MU-Ag85B-EsxH display significantly less bacterial burden at 6 and 12 weeks post-infection, reduced histopathological tissue damage, and significantly longer survival times compared to vaccination with either BCG or BCG MU-Ag85A. These results further support the potential of BCG as a foundation for BU vaccine design, whereby discovery and recombinant expression of novel immunogenic antigens could lead to greater anti-MU efficacy using this highly safe and ubiquitous vaccine.

  9. Overexpression of a Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85B-EsxH Fusion Protein in Recombinant BCG Improves Experimental Buruli Ulcer Vaccine Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bryan E; Lee, Sunhee

    2016-12-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) vaccine design faces similar challenges to those observed during development of prophylactic tuberculosis treatments. Multiple BU vaccine candidates, based upon Mycobacterium bovis BCG, altered Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU) cells, recombinant MU DNA, or MU protein prime-boosts, have shown promise by conferring transient protection to mice against the pathology of MU challenge. Recently, we have shown that a recombinant BCG vaccine expressing MU-Ag85A (BCG MU-Ag85A) displayed the highest level of protection to date, by significantly extending the survival time of MU challenged mice compared to BCG vaccination alone. Here we describe the generation, immunogenicity testing, and evaluation of protection conferred by a recombinant BCG strain which overexpresses a fusion of two alternative MU antigens, Ag85B and the MU ortholog of tuberculosis TB10.4, EsxH. Vaccination with BCG MU-Ag85B-EsxH induces proliferation of Ag85 specific CD4+ T cells in greater numbers than BCG or BCG MU-Ag85A and produces IFNγ+ splenocytes responsive to whole MU and recombinant antigens. In addition, anti-Ag85A and Ag85B IgG humoral responses are significantly enhanced after administration of the fusion vaccine compared to BCG or BCG MU-Ag85A. Finally, mice challenged with MU following a single subcutaneous vaccination with BCG MU-Ag85B-EsxH display significantly less bacterial burden at 6 and 12 weeks post-infection, reduced histopathological tissue damage, and significantly longer survival times compared to vaccination with either BCG or BCG MU-Ag85A. These results further support the potential of BCG as a foundation for BU vaccine design, whereby discovery and recombinant expression of novel immunogenic antigens could lead to greater anti-MU efficacy using this highly safe and ubiquitous vaccine.

  10. Overexpression of a Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85B-EsxH Fusion Protein in Recombinant BCG Improves Experimental Buruli Ulcer Vaccine Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bryan E.

    2016-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) vaccine design faces similar challenges to those observed during development of prophylactic tuberculosis treatments. Multiple BU vaccine candidates, based upon Mycobacterium bovis BCG, altered Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU) cells, recombinant MU DNA, or MU protein prime-boosts, have shown promise by conferring transient protection to mice against the pathology of MU challenge. Recently, we have shown that a recombinant BCG vaccine expressing MU-Ag85A (BCG MU-Ag85A) displayed the highest level of protection to date, by significantly extending the survival time of MU challenged mice compared to BCG vaccination alone. Here we describe the generation, immunogenicity testing, and evaluation of protection conferred by a recombinant BCG strain which overexpresses a fusion of two alternative MU antigens, Ag85B and the MU ortholog of tuberculosis TB10.4, EsxH. Vaccination with BCG MU-Ag85B-EsxH induces proliferation of Ag85 specific CD4+ T cells in greater numbers than BCG or BCG MU-Ag85A and produces IFNγ+ splenocytes responsive to whole MU and recombinant antigens. In addition, anti-Ag85A and Ag85B IgG humoral responses are significantly enhanced after administration of the fusion vaccine compared to BCG or BCG MU-Ag85A. Finally, mice challenged with MU following a single subcutaneous vaccination with BCG MU-Ag85B-EsxH display significantly less bacterial burden at 6 and 12 weeks post-infection, reduced histopathological tissue damage, and significantly longer survival times compared to vaccination with either BCG or BCG MU-Ag85A. These results further support the potential of BCG as a foundation for BU vaccine design, whereby discovery and recombinant expression of novel immunogenic antigens could lead to greater anti-MU efficacy using this highly safe and ubiquitous vaccine. PMID:27941982

  11. BCG vaccination status may predict sputum conversion in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis: a new consideration for an old vaccine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeremiah, Kidola; Praygod, George Amani; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Failure to convert (persistent sputum and/or culture positivity) while on antituberculosis (anti-TB) treatment at the end of the second month of anti-TB therapy has been reported to be a predictor of treatment failure. Factors that could be associated with persistent bacillary positivity at the e...

  12. Evaluation of Xpert® MTB/RIF Assay in Induced Sputum and Gastric Lavage Samples from Young Children with Suspected Tuberculosis from the MVA85A TB Vaccine Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyasi, Erick Wekesa; Tameris, Michele; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Schmidt, Bey-Marrie; Luabeya, Angelique Kany Kany; Mulenga, Humphrey; Scriba, Thomas J; Hanekom, Willem A; Mahomed, Hassan; McShane, Helen; Hatherill, Mark

    2015-01-01

    and gastric lavage to justify selection of one sampling method over the other, in young children with suspected pulmonary TB. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00953927.

  13. Increasing the ex vivo antigen-specific IFN-γ production in subpopulations of T cells and NKp46+ cells by anti-CD28, anti-CD49d and recombinant IL-12 costimulation in cattle vaccinated with recombinant proteins from Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Riber, Ulla; Davis, William C.

    2013-01-01

    -γ secretion by CD4, CD8, γδ T cells and NK cells. Age matched male jersey calves, experimentally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), were vaccinated with a cocktail of recombinant MAP proteins or left unvaccinated. Vaccine induced ex vivo recall responses were measured through Ag......T cells, which encounter specific antigen (Ag), require additional signals to mount a functional immune response. Here, we demonstrate activation of signal 2, by anti-CD28 mAb (aCD28) and other costimulatory molecules (aCD49d, aCD5), and signal 3, by recombinant IL-12, enhance Ag-specific IFN...

  14. Effects of anti-cocaine vaccine and viral gene transfer of cocaine hydrolase in mice on cocaine toxicity including motor strength and liver damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; Orson, Frank; Kinsey, Berma; Kosten, Thomas R; Shen, Xiaoyun; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2013-03-25

    In developing an vivo drug-interception therapy to treat cocaine abuse and hinder relapse into drug seeking provoked by re-encounter with cocaine, two promising agents are: (1) a cocaine hydrolase enzyme (CocH) derived from human butyrylcholinesterase and delivered by gene transfer; (2) an anti-cocaine antibody elicited by vaccination. Recent behavioral experiments showed that antibody and enzyme work in a complementary fashion to reduce cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity in rats and mice. Our present goal was to test protection against liver damage and muscle weakness in mice challenged with massive doses of cocaine at or near the LD50 level (100-120 mg/kg, i.p.). We found that, when the interceptor proteins were combined at doses that were only modestly protective in isolation (enzyme, 1mg/kg; antibody, 8 mg/kg), they provided complete protection of liver tissue and motor function. When the enzyme levels were ~400-fold higher, after in vivo transduction by adeno-associated viral vector, similar protection was observed from CocH alone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New Anti-Schistosoma Approaches in The People's Republic of China: Development of Diagnostics, Vaccines and Other New Techniques Belonging to the 'Omics' Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S-B; Ai, L; Hu, W; Xu, J; Bergquist, R; Qin, Z-Q; Chen, J-H

    2016-01-01

    A new national schistosomiasis elimination programme will be implemented for the period 2016-20. To support this approach, we have performed a systematic review to assess anti-schistosome approaches in The People's Republic of China and defined research priorities for the coming years. A systematic search was conducted for articles published from January 2000 to March 2015 in international journals. Totally 410 references were published in English between 2000 and 2015 related to schistosomiasis after unrelated references and reviews or comments were further excluded. A set of research priorities has been identified for the near future that would improve the progress toward schistosomiasis elimination in The People's Republic of China. In particular, there is a lack of sensitive and specific tests for the detection of schistosomiasis cases with low parasite burdens, as well as an effective vaccine against schistosomiasis, and there is a need for surveillance tools that can evaluate the epidemic status for guiding the elimination strategy. Hence, we think that schistosomiasis control and elimination will be improved in The People's Republic of China through development of new tools. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Recombinant BCG Expressing ESX-1 of Mycobacterium marinum Combines Low Virulence with Cytosolic Immune Signaling and Improved TB Protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gröschel, Matthias I.; Sayes, Fadel; Shin, Sung Jae; Frigui, Wafa; Pawlik, Alexandre; Orgeur, Mickael; Canetti, Robin; Honore, Nadine; Simeone, Roxane; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Bitter, Wilbert; Cho, Sang-Nae; Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Recent insights into the mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of human tuberculosis, is recognized by cytosolic nucleotide sensors have opened new avenues for rational vaccine design. The only licensed anti-tuberculosis vaccine, Mycobacteriumbovis BCG, provides limited

  17. PRODUCTION OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS TB10.4 RECOMBINANT PROTEIN IN ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Dukhovlinov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays tuberculosis is considered one of the most dangerous infectious diseases occurring everywhere, and it remains a cause of death of millions of people around the world. According to the World Health Organization data, in 2013 tuberculosis caused more than 9 million cases worldwide and about 1.5 million of infected people died. The causative agent of tuberculosis in most cases is Mycobacterium tuberculosis. But sometimes it can be Mycobacterium bovis or Mycobacterium africanum. Mainly as a result of infection, a bacterial infection affects the lungs, but the disease may develop in other organs and tissues. Now for the prevention of tuberculosis vaccination of newborns with attenuated vaccine BCG is widely used. The production of this vaccine is cheap and it is safe to use. Thus today, vaccination is the primary means of prevention of tuberculosis. However dubious efficacy and a number of side effects observed after vaccination, makes the scientific community to develop new effective methods for the treatment of tuberculosis. One of the ways to develop new vaccines against tuberculosis is to provide a subunit vaccine based on recombinant proteins. Advantages of subunit vaccines are that the preparation containing the purified protein is stable and secure, its chemical properties are known, it does not contain additional proteins and nucleic acids, which could cause undesirable effects in the human body. One of the most promising antigens for use as components in new vaccines is considered a low molecular weight secreted protein TB10.4. TB10.4 protein is recognized at an early stage of tuberculous infection and contributes to the proliferation of lymphocytes responsible for the production of IFNγ. TB10.4 protein also possesses an adjuvant effect when administered in combination with mycobacterial proteins. Given these properties, the recombinant protein TB10.4 can be used to generate new candidate vaccines against tuberculosis. During the

  18. TB in Wild Asian Elephants

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-05-10

    Dr. Susan Mikota, co-founder of Elephant Care International, discusses TB in wild Asian elephants.  Created: 5/10/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/10/2017.

  19. Community Involvement in TB Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Werf (Marloes); S.G. Heumann (Silke); E.M.H. Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWhile communities at risk have been both drivers and partners in HIV research, their important role in TB research is yet to be fully realized. Involvement of communities in tuberculosis care and prevention is currently on the international agenda. This creates opportunities and

  20. Extensively Drug-Resistant TB

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-12-16

    Dr. Charlotte Kvasnovsky, a surgery resident and Ph.D. candidate in biostatistics, discusses various types of drug resistance in TB patients in South Africa.  Created: 12/16/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/16/2016.

  1. TB control: challenges and opportunities for India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Madhukar; Daftary, Amrita; Satyanarayana, Srinath

    2016-03-01

    India's TB control programme has treated over 19 million patients, but the incidence of TB continues to be high. TB is a major killer and drug-resistant TB is a growing threat. There are several likely reasons, including social conditions and co-morbidities that fuel the TB epidemic: under-investment by the government, weak programme implementation and management, suboptimal quality of care in the private sector, and insufficient advocacy around TB. Fortunately, India possesses the technical know-how, competence and resources to address these challenges. The End TB Strategy by WHO offers India an excellent blueprint to advance the agenda of TB control. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Mechanism of action for anti-radiation vaccine in reducing the biological impact of high-dose gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after high-dose gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naïve animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which they mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  3. Mechanism of Action for Anti-Radiation Vaccine in Reducing the Biological Impact of High-Dose Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then collected and circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naive animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. We partially analyzed the biochemical characteristics of the SRDs. The SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which the mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  4. Mechanism of Action for Anti-radiation Vaccine in Reducing the Biological Impact of High-dose Gamma Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then collected and circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naive animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which the mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  5. Successes and failures in human tuberculosis vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenteno-Cuevas, Roberto

    2017-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused mainly by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In 2016, the WHO estimated 10.5 million new cases and 1.8 million deaths, making this disease the leading cause of death by an infectious agent. The current and projected TB situation necessitates the development of new vaccines with improved attributes compared to the traditional BCG method. Areas covered: In this review, the authors describe the most promising candidate vaccines against TB and discuss additional key elements in vaccine development, such as animal models, new adjuvants and immunization routes and new strategies for the identification of candidate vaccines. Expert opinion: At present, around 13 candidate vaccines for TB are in the clinical phase of evaluation; however, there is still no substitute for the BCG vaccine. One major impediment to developing an effective vaccine is our lack of understanding of several of the mechanisms associated with infection and the immune response against TB. However, the recent implementation of an entirely new set of technological advances will facilitate the proposal of new candidates. Finally, development of a new vaccine will require a major coordination of effort in order to achieve its effective administration to the people most in need of it.

  6. Low prevalence of hepatitis B and C among tuberculosis patients in Duhok Province, Kurdistan: Are HBsAg and anti-HCV prerequisite screening parameters in tuberculosis control program?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muayad A Merza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective/background: Viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, infections and tuberculosis (TB are a global public health concern. Co-infection with HBV or HCV among TB patients may potentiate the risk of hepatotoxicity induced by anti-TB drugs. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of HBV and HCV among TB patients included in the Duhok National Tuberculosis Program (NTP. Methods: The Duhok NTP Center is a specialized institution in Duhok City, Iraq, concerned with management and follow-up of TB patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the center between June 2015 and May 2016. All documented TB patients were analyzed on the basis of socio-demographic and other characteristics. Thereafter, all patients underwent screening for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The results obtained were analyzed by entering the data in binary format into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. A p value of <.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Two-hundred fourteen documented TB patients were recruited in this study, with 127 (59.3% males and 87 (40.7% females. The mean age of the patients was 40.34 years (±20.29. Of the total number of patients, four cases (1.8% were HBsAg-positive and one case (0.9% was positive for anti-HCV. The variables significantly associated with HBV were history of surgical dental procedure [odds ratio (OR, 0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI, −0.01 to 0.04; p = .03], and nationality (OR, 13.67; 95% CI, 0.46–210.85; p = .007. Conclusion: The prevalence of HBV and HCV co-infection among TB patients in this study was low. This may be explained by the low rate of blood transfusion among the patients, the very low prevalence of HIV infections in Kurdistan, the negative history of injection drug use, and adherence to universal infection-control measures, including vaccination for HBV

  7. Staying on Track with TB Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will help show if your TB medicines are working the right way and how your body is handling the medicine. If you are being treated for TB disease, you may also get additional chest x-rays. • If you have TB disease along with other ...

  8. Vaccines against drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X Y; Orson, F M; Kosten, T R

    2012-01-01

    The currently available medications for the treatment of drug abuse have had only limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines, aimed at eliciting antibodies that block the pharmacological effects of drugs, have great potential for treating drug abuse. We review the status of two vaccines that are undergoing clinical trials (for cocaine and nicotine addiction) and two that are still in preclinical development (for methamphetamine and heroin addiction). We also outline the challenges and ethical concerns associated with the development of anti-addiction vaccines and their use as future therapeutics.

  9. Application of Fluorescent Protein Expressing Strains to Evaluation of Anti-Tuberculosis Therapeutic Efficacy In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Kong

    Full Text Available The slow growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, hinders development of new diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines. Using non-invasive real-time imaging technologies to monitor the disease process in live animals would facilitate TB research in all areas. We developed fluorescent protein (FP expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains for in vivo imaging, which can be used to track bacterial location, and to quantify bacterial load in live animals. We selected an optimal FP for in vivo imaging, by first cloning six FPs: tdTomato, mCherry, mPlum, mKate, Katushka and mKeima, into mycobacteria under either a mycobacterial Hsp60 or L5 promoter, and compared their fluorescent signals in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence from each FP-expressing strain was measured with a multimode reader using the optimal excitation and emission wavelengths for the FP. After normalizing bacterial numbers with optical density, the strain expressing L5-tdTomato displayed the highest fluorescence. We used the tdTomato-labeled M. bovis BCG to obtain real-time images of pulmonary infections in living mice and rapidly determined the number of bacteria present. Further comparison between L5-tdTomato and Hsp60-tdTomato revealed that L5-tdTomato carried four-fold more tdTomato gene copies than Hsp60-tdTomato, which eventually led to higher protein expression of tdTomato. Evaluating anti-TB efficacy of rifampicin and isoniazid therapy in vitro and in vivo using the L5-tdTomato strain demonstrated that this strain can be used to identify anti-TB therapeutic efficacy as quickly as 24 h post-treatment. These M. bovis BCG reporter strains represent a valuable new tool for evaluation of therapeutics, vaccines and virulence.

  10. Tratamento das complicações neurológicas da vacinação anti-rábica Treatment of neurological complications in anti-rabies vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A. P. Saraiva

    1968-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores estudaram 33 pacientes com complicações neurológicas da vacinação anti-rábica (tipo Fermi modificada dividindo-os, quanto ao tratamento, em três grupos: atratamento sintomático e de manutenção (9 pacientes; btratamento igual ao do grupo aacrescido de ACTH e/ou corticosteróides pelas vias oral, muscular ou venosa (15 pacientes; c tratamento igual ao do grupo aacrescido da administração de acetato de metilprednosolona em suspensão por via intratecal (9 pacientes. Referem os autores um caso com seqüela no grupo a; dois óbitos, um caso com seqüela, 6 melhorados e 6 considerados curados no grupo b;um óbito (acidente com o respirador e nenhuma outra complicação ou seqüela com os pacientes do grupo c no qual 7 foram considerados curados e um melhorado. A impressão clínica, justificada pela recuperação mais rápida e completa, foi a de que os melhores resultados foram obtidos no grupo c.Neurological complications in 33 patients following antirabies vaccination (modified Fermi vaccine were studied. For analysing purposes of the therapeutic effects the patients were divided in three groups: the first group with symptomatic treatment only (9 patients; the second with symptomatic treatment plus intravenous or intramuscular ACTH or corticosteroids (15 patients; the third with symptomatic treatment plus intrathecal methylprednisolone acetate (9 patients. In the first group one of the patients remained with a neurological sequel. In the second group one patient also had a neurological sequel, two died, six improved and six had complete recovery. In the third group a patient died from a respirator accident, one improved and seven had complete recovery. The authors had the clinical impression that the results were considerably better in the third group of cases.

  11. Measurement of 160Tb and 161Tb in nuclear forensics samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, J.; Davies, A.V.; Britton, R.E.

    2017-01-01

    160 Tb and 161 Tb are important radionuclides to measure when analysing a Nuclear Forensics sample. An analytical method for the measurement of both 160 Tb and 161 Tb was developed in this study. Terbium was separated and purified using exchange resin and TrisKem LN Resin. The purified fraction containing 160 Tb and 161 Tb was measured by gamma spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting. The counting efficiencies of 160 Tb and 161 Tb were determined using the CIEMAT/NIST efficiency tracing method. The LSC count rate ratio, R160 Tb /R161 Tb , on the reference date was determined by sequential counting and calculated using a custom script based on their half-lives. (author)

  12. Mouse models of human TB pathology: roles in the analysis of necrosis and the development of host-directed therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramnik, Igor; Beamer, Gillian

    2016-03-01

    A key aspect of TB pathogenesis that maintains Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the human population is the ability to cause necrosis in pulmonary lesions. As co-evolution shaped M . tuberculosis (M.tb) and human responses, the complete TB disease profile and lesion manifestation are not fully reproduced by any animal model. However, animal models are absolutely critical to understand how infection with virulent M.tb generates outcomes necessary for the pathogen transmission and evolutionary success. In humans, a wide spectrum of TB outcomes has been recognized based on clinical and epidemiological data. In mice, there is clear genetic basis for susceptibility. Although the spectra of human and mouse TB do not completely overlap, comparison of human TB with mouse lesions across genetically diverse strains firmly establishes points of convergence. By embracing the genetic heterogeneity of the mouse population, we gain tremendous advantage in the quest for suitable in vivo models. Below, we review genetically defined mouse models that recapitulate a key element of M.tb pathogenesis-induction of necrotic TB lesions in the lungs-and discuss how these models may reflect TB stratification and pathogenesis in humans. The approach ensures that roles that mouse models play in basic and translational TB research will continue to increase allowing researchers to address fundamental questions of TB pathogenesis and bacterial physiology in vivo using this well-defined, reproducible, and cost-efficient system. Combination of the new generation mouse models with advanced imaging technologies will also allow rapid and inexpensive assessment of experimental vaccines and therapies prior to testing in larger animals and clinical trials.

  13. Diagnostic utility of QuantiFERON–TB Gold In-Tube test in pediatric tuberculosis disease in Taiwanese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin-Sun Wong

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: QFG-IT assay was more sensitive for the diagnosis of TB disease than TST in an intermediate burden population with universal neonatal BCG vaccination. The increased recognition of BCG induced osteitis in recent years has alerted physicians that BCG induced lesions should be suspected when TST is positive but QFG-IT is negative. Despite higher costs for QFG-IT than TST, they have additional value for the diagnosis of active TB and should be performed when a diagnosis of TB remains in doubt.

  14. Primary and secondary anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in Hitossa District of Arsi Zone, Oromia Regional State, Central Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shallo Daba Hamusse

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB drugs which is resistant to the major first-line anti-TB drugs, Isoniazid and Rifampicin, has become a major global challenge in tuberculosis (TB control programme. However, its burden at community level is not well known. Thus, the aim of study was to assess the prevalence of primary and secondary resistance to any first line anti-TB drugs and MDR TB in Hitossa District of Oromia Regional State, Central Ethiopia. Methods Population based cross- sectional study was conducted on individuals aged ≥15 years. Those with symptoms suggestive of TB were interviewed and two sputum specimens were collected from each and examined using Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ culture medium. Further, the isolates were confirmed by the Ziehl-Neelsen microscopic examination method. Drug susceptibility test (DST was also conducted on LJ medium using a simplified indirect proportion method. The resistance strains were then determined by percentage of colonies that grew on the critical concentration of Isoniazid, Streptomycin, Rifampicin and Ethambutol. Results The overall resistance of all forms of TB to any first-line anti-TB drug was 21.7 %. Of the total new and previously treated culture positive TB cases, 15.3 and 48.8 % respectively were found to be a resistant to any of the first-line anti-TB drugs. Further, of all forms of TB, the overall resistance of MDR-TB was 4.7 %. However, of the total new TB cases, 2.4 % had primary while 14.3 % had secondary MDR-TB. Resistance to any of the first-line anti-TB drugs (adjusted odd ratio (AOR, 8.1; 95 % CI: 2.26–29.30 and MDR-TB (AOR, 7.1; 95 % CI: 2.6–43.8 was found to be linked with previous history of anti-TB treatment. Conclusions The study has identified a high rate of primary and secondary resistance to any of the first-line anti-TB drugs and MDR-TB in the study area. The resistance may have resulted from sub-optimal performance of directly observed

  15. Relationship between National TB program and prevalence of TB drug resistance in Algeria, 1965 to 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Fadila Boulahbal

    2015-01-01

    The Algerian National TB program was first implemented in Algeria in 1965. Since 1965, the Ministry of Health has endorsed many instructions which have given important improvements in the fight against tuberculosis (TB) in the country. The government has actively participated in the fight against TB as expressed in its endorsement of many decisions to this end, such as the withdrawal of TB medications from the private pharmacies, the free-of-charge diagnostics and the treatment for TB pati...

  16. Anti-Glycoprotein G Antibodies of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Contribute to Complete Protection after Vaccination in Mice and Induce Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Mediated Cytolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Görander

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of antibodies against the mature portion of glycoprotein G (mgG-2 of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 in protective immunity after vaccination. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with mgG-2 and oligodeoxynucleotides containing two CpG motifs plus alum as adjuvant. All C57BL/6 mice survived and presented no genital or systemic disease. High levels of immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies were detected and re-stimulated splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced IFN-γ. None of the sera from immunized mice exhibited neutralization, while all sera exerted antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and complement-mediated cytolysis (ACMC activity. Passive transfer of anti-mgG-2 monoclonal antibodies, or immune serum, to naive C57BL/6 mice did not limit disease progression. Immunized B‑cell KO mice presented lower survival rate and higher vaginal viral titers, as compared with vaccinated B-cell KO mice after passive transfer of immune serum and vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Sera from mice that were vaccinated subcutaneously and intranasally with mgG-2 presented significantly lower titers of IgG antibodies and lower ADCC and ACMC activity. We conclude that anti-mgG-2 antibodies were of importance to limit genital HSV‑2 infection. ADCC and ACMC activity are potentially important mechanisms in protective immunity, and could tentatively be evaluated in future animal vaccine studies and in clinical trials.

  17. Anti-glycoprotein g antibodies of herpes simplex virus 2 contribute to complete protection after vaccination in mice and induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görander, Staffan; Ekblad, Maria; Bergström, Tomas; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-11-12

    We investigated the role of antibodies against the mature portion of glycoprotein G (mgG-2) of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) in protective immunity after vaccination. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with mgG-2 and oligodeoxynucleotides containing two CpG motifs plus alum as adjuvant. All C57BL/6 mice survived and presented no genital or systemic disease. High levels of immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) and IgG2 antibodies were detected and re-stimulated splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced IFN-γ. None of the sera from immunized mice exhibited neutralization, while all sera exerted antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytolysis (ACMC) activity. Passive transfer of anti-mgG-2 monoclonal antibodies, or immune serum, to naive C57BL/6 mice did not limit disease progression. Immunized B‑cell KO mice presented lower survival rate and higher vaginal viral titers, as compared with vaccinated B-cell KO mice after passive transfer of immune serum and vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Sera from mice that were vaccinated subcutaneously and intranasally with mgG-2 presented significantly lower titers of IgG antibodies and lower ADCC and ACMC activity. We conclude that anti-mgG-2 antibodies were of importance to limit genital HSV‑2 infection. ADCC and ACMC activity are potentially important mechanisms in protective immunity, and could tentatively be evaluated in future animal vaccine studies and in clinical trials.

  18. Tuberculosis case finding for vaccine trials in young children in high-incidence settings: a randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moyo, S.; Verver, S.; Hawkridge, A.; Geiter, L.; Hatherill, M.; Workman, L.; Ontong, C.; Msemburi, W.; Tameris, M.; Geldenhuys, H.; Mulenga, H.; Snowden, M. A.; Hanekom, W. A.; Hussey, G.; Mahomed, H.

    2012-01-01

    SETTING: A high tuberculosis (TB) burden rural area in South Africa. OBJECTIVE: To compare TB case yield and disease profile among bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccinated children using two case-finding strategies from birth until 2 years of age. DESIGN: BCG-vaccinated infants were enrolled within

  19. Immune events associated with protection in C57BL/6 mice immunized with anti-idiotypic antibodies mimicking protective antigens shared between gamma-irradiated cercariae vaccine and human resistance model of Schistosoma haematobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeen, Sherif H

    2010-01-01

    Immunoregulation is central for successful manipulation of schistosomiasis. Unlike schistosome vaccine development strategies that relied on direct selection of antigens from crude responses leading to selection of mildly protective antigens, the present study tested the utility of selection of potentially protective antigens encompassed rounds of immunoregulation via idiotypic network. Anti-idiotypic antibodies (Ab2) were purified from sera of New Zealand white rabbits multiply immunized with gamma-irradiated cercariae of S. haematobium, using adult worm specific idiotypes (Ab1) purified from sera of subjects resistant to reinfection. Ab2 was used for immunization of C57BL/6 mice and consequences of immunization were monitored before and after challenge infection with S. haematobium. Results showed an increase of splenic T cell expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) upon immunization (average % stimulated cells 54.9 vs. 20.4, P anti-anti-ids (Ab3) reactivity against antigens of approximate molecular weight 40, 80 and 160 kDa of adult worms, which were also recognized by Ab1. However, in contrast to Ab1, Ab3 showed no surface binding to 3 hr schistosomula. Strikingly, mice immunized with Ab2 showed strong resistance to challenge infection (approximately 82% reduction in worm burden, P vaccine development strategy appears to filter out non-protective antigens. Indeed Ab3 recognizes much fewer numbers of antigens, which passed through two rounds of immune regulation. These antigens appear to represent a significant proportion of the protective response in the gamma-irradiated cercariae vaccine and human resistance model as well, providing the basis for an alternative vaccine for schistosomiasis.

  20. Universal screening for latent and active tuberculosis (TB) in asylum seeking children, Bochum and Hamburg, Germany, September 2015 to November 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Hermelink, Maya; Kobbe, Robin; Methling, Benedikt; Rau, Cornelius; Schulze-Sturm, Ulf; Auer, Isa; Ahrens, Frank; Brinkmann, Folke

    2018-03-01

    BackgroundIn Germany, the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in children has been on the rise since 2009. High numbers of foreign-born asylum seekers have contributed considerably to the disease burden. Therefore, effective screening strategies for latent TB infection (LTBI) and active TB in asylum seeking children are needed. Aim: Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of LTBI and active TB in asylum seeking children up to 15 years of age in two geographic regions in Germany. Methods: Screening for TB was performed in children in asylum seeker reception centres by tuberculin skin test (TST) or interferon gamma release assay (IGRA). Children with positive results were evaluated for active TB. Additionally, country of origin, sex, travel time, TB symptoms, TB contact and Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination status were registered. Results: Of 968 screened children 66 (6.8%) had TB infection (58 LTBI, 8 active TB). LTBI prevalence was similar in children from high (Afghanistan) and low (Syria) incidence countries (8.7% vs 6.4%). There were no differences regarding sex, age or travel time between infected and non-infected children. Children under the age of 6 years were at higher risk of progression to active TB (19% vs 2% respectively, p=0,07). Most children (7/8) with active TB were asymptomatic at the time of diagnosis. None of the children had been knowingly exposed to TB. Conclusions: Asylum seeking children from high and low incidence countries are both at risk of developing LTBI or active TB. Universal TB screening for all asylum seeking children should be considered.

  1. Molecular confirmation of Bacillus Calmette Guerin vaccine related adverse events among Saudi Arabian children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahal Al-Hajoj

    Full Text Available Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG is the only available vaccine for tuberculosis (TB. Low grade complications in healthy recipients and disseminated vaccine associated complications among immuno-suppressed individuals were noticed globally after administration. Recently a series of clinically suspected BCG associated suppurative and non-suppurative lymphadenitis cases were reported from different regions of Saudi Arabia. However a molecular confirmative analysis was lacking to prove these claims.During 2009-2010, 42 Mycobacterium bovis BCG suspected clinical isolates from children diagnosed with suppurative lymphadenitis from different provinces of the country were collected and subjected to 24 loci based MIRU-VNTR typing, spoligotyping and first line anti-TB drugs susceptibility testing.Of the total 42 cases, 41 (97.6% were Saudi nationals and particularly male (64.3%. Majority of the cases were aged below 6 months (83.3% with a median of age 4 months. All the enrolled subjects showed left axillary mass which suppurated in a median of 4 months after vaccination. Among the study subjects, 1 (2.4% case was reactive to HIV antigen and 2 (4.8% case had severe combined immunodeficiency. Genotyping results showed that, 41 (97.6% isolates were identical to the vaccine strain Danish 1331 and one to Tokyo 172-1. Phylogenetic analysis revealed all the Danish 1331 isolates in a single cluster.Elevated proportion of suppurative lymphadenitis caused by M. bovis BCG reported in the country recently is majorly related to the vaccine strain Danish 1331. However lack of nationwide data on real magnitude of BCG related adverse events warrants population centric, long term future studies.

  2. The pig as a model for therapeutic human anti-cancer vaccine development, elucidating the T-cell reactivity against IDO and RhoC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Welner, Simon

    Immunotherapy against cancer has shown increased overall survival of metastatic cancer patients and is a promising new vaccine target. For this to succeed, appropriate tailoring of vaccine formulations to mount in vivo cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses towards co-delivered cancer antigens...... is important. Previous development of therapeutic cancer vaccines has largely been based on studies in mice and the majority of these candidate vaccines failed to establish therapeutic responses in subsequent human clinical trials. Since the porcine immunome is more closely related to the human counterpart, we...... here introduce pigs as a superior large animal model for human cancer vaccine development via the use of our unique technology for swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) production. IDO and RhoC, both known to be important in human cancer development and progression, were used as vaccine targets. Pigs were...

  3. Revaccination of cattle with bacille Calmette-Guérin two years after first vaccination when immunity has waned, boosted protection against challenge with Mycobacterium bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlane, Natalie A; Shu, Dairu; Subharat, Supatsak; Wedlock, D Neil; Rehm, Bernd H A; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Buddle, Bryce M

    2014-01-01

    In both humans and animals, controversy exists concerning the duration of protection induced by BCG vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and whether revaccination enhances protection. A long-term study was undertaken to determine whether BCG-vaccinated calves would be protected against challenge with Mycobacterium bovis 2½ years after vaccination and to determine the effect of revaccination after 2 years. Seventy-nine calves were divided into five groups (n = 15-17 calves/group) with four of the groups vaccinated subcutaneously with 105 CFU of BCG Danish at 2-4 weeks of age and the fifth group serving as non-vaccinated controls. Three of the four BCG-vaccinated groups were revaccinated 2 years after the initial vaccination. One BCG-vaccinated group was revaccinated with BCG. A second group was vaccinated subcutaneously with a TB protein vaccine consisting of biopolyester particles (Biobeads) displaying two mycobacterial proteins, ESAT-6 and Antigen 85A, mixed with an adjuvant. A third group was vaccinated with TB proteins from M. bovis culture filtrate, mixed with an adjuvant. Twenty-three weeks after the BCG revaccination, all animals were challenged endotracheally with virulent M. bovis and a further 13 weeks later, animals were killed and necropsied to determine protection against TB. The BCG-vaccinated animals produced positive tuberculin caudal fold intradermal (15 of 62 animals) and IFN-γ TB test responses (six of 62 animals) at 6 months after vaccination, but not at subsequent time-points compared to the non-vaccinated animals. Calves receiving a single vaccination with BCG vaccine 2½ years prior to challenge were not protected against TB, while those revaccinated with BCG 2 years after the initial vaccination displayed significant reductions in lung and pulmonary lymph node lesion scores compared to the non-vaccinated animals. In contrast, no reduction in lesion scores was observed in the animals revaccinated with the TB protein vaccines with their immune

  4. A New Decade of Vaccines

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2011-09-01

    The call for a new decade of vaccines was made in December 2010. The aims are to secure the further discovery, development and delivery of vaccination. The first challenge is the acquisition of funds for the research and development of 20 new vaccines1. The Gates Foundation has pledged $10 billion for this venture. The other major players are WHO, UNICEF and the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. The top priorities are TB, AIDS and Malaria. It is hoped that a Malaria vaccine will available in 3 years. The ambitious target of saving the lives of over 7 million children has been set. The programme must also address the need for vaccines in insulin dependent diabetes, cancers and degenerative diseases2.

  5. TB Anywhere Is TB Everywhere: The Intersection of U.S. Immigration Enforcement Policy and TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    is not the primary goal (e.g., in high turnover jails or in some homeless shelters ).316 The ACET does not define a “high turnover jail,” but the...conflicts with religious practices, a stigma associated with TB infection, lack of financial resources, poor access to healthcare, frequently changing...residences, and an inability to attend DOT sessions due to lack of transportation or work schedule.125 D. TUBERCULOSIS IN SELECTED COUNTRIES OF INTEREST

  6. Coinjection of a vaccine and anti-viral agents can provide fast-acting protection from foot-and-mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Taeseong; Choi, Joo-Hyung; Park, Gundo; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Byounghan; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Su-Mi; Park, Jong-Hyeon

    2017-07-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is the cause of an economically devastating animal disease. With commercial inactivated FMD vaccines, the protection against FMD virus (FMDV) begins a minimum of 4 days post vaccination (dpv). Therefore, antiviral agents could be proposed for rapid protection and to reduce the spread of FMDV during outbreaks until vaccine-induced protective immunity occurs. In previous studies, we have developed two recombinant adenoviruses that simultaneously express porcine interferon-α and interferon-γ (Ad-porcine IFN-αγ) and multiple siRNAs that target the non-structural protein-regions of FMDV (Ad-3siRNA), and we have shown that the combination of the two antiviral agents (referred to here as Ad combination) induced robust protection against FMDV in pigs. In an attempt to provide complete protection against FMDV, we co-administered Ad combination and the FMD vaccine to mice and pigs. In the C57BL/6 mice model, we observed rapid and continuous protection against homologous FMDV challenge from 1 to 3 dpv-the period in which vaccine-mediated immunity is absent. In the pig experiments, we found that most of the pigs (five out of six) that received vaccine + Ad combination and were challenged with FMDV at 1 or 2 dpv were clinically protected from FMDV. In addition, most of the pigs that received vaccine + Ad combination and all pigs inoculated with the vaccine only were clinically protected from an FMDV challenge at 7 dpv. We believe that the antiviral agent ensures early protection from FMDV, and the vaccine participates in protection after 7 dpv. Therefore, we can say that the combination of the FMD vaccine and effective antiviral agents may offer both fast-acting and continuous protection against FMDV. In further studies, we plan to design coadministration of Ad combination and novel vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of an Adenovirus-based Anti-cocaine Vaccine to Reduce Cocaine Self-administration and Reacqusition using a Choice Procedure in Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Suzette M.; Foltin, Richard W.; Hicks, Martin J.; Rosenberg, Jonathan B.; De, Bishnu P.; Janda, Kim D.; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunopharmacotherapy offers an approach for treating cocaine abuse by specifically targeting the cocaine molecule and preventing its access to the CNS. dAd5GNE is a novel cocaine vaccine that attenuates the stimulant and the reinforcing effects of cocaine in rats. The goal of this study was to extend and validate dAd5GNE vaccine efficacy in non-human primates. Six experimentally naïve adult female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to self-administer 0.1 mg/kg/injection intravenous (i.v.) cocaine or receive candy; then 4 monkeys were administered the vaccine and 2 monkeys were administered vehicle intramuscularly, with additional vaccine boosts throughout the study. The reinforcing effects of cocaine were measured during self-administration, extinction, and reacquisition (relapse) phases. Serum antibody titers in the vaccinated monkeys remained high throughout the study. There was no change in the preference for cocaine over candy over a 20-week period in 5 of the 6 monkeys; only one of the 4 (25%) vaccinated monkeys showed a decrease in cocaine choice. All 6 monkeys extinguished responding for cocaine during saline extinction testing; vaccinated monkeys tended to take longer to extinguish responding than control monkeys (17.5 vs. 7.0 sessions). Vaccination substantially retarded reacquisition of cocaine self-administration; control monkeys resumed cocaine self-administration within 6–41 sessions and 1 vaccinated monkey resumed cocaine self-administration in 19 sessions. The other 3 vaccinated monkeys required between 57–94 sessions to resume cocaine self-administration even in the context of employing several manipulations to encourage cocaine reacquisition. These data suggest that the dAdGNE vaccine may have therapeutic potential for humans who achieve cocaine abstinence as part of a relapse prevention strategy. PMID:27697554

  8. Transfer of Anti-Rotavirus Antibodies during Pregnancy and in Milk Following Maternal Vaccination with a Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Amplicon Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Anita F; Suter, Mark; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Humbel, Bruno M; Tobler, Kurt; Ackermann, Mathias; Laimbacher, Andrea S

    2017-02-16

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are important enteric pathogens of newborn humans and animals, causing diarrhea and in rare cases death, especially in very young individuals. Rotavirus vaccines presently used are modified live vaccines that lack complete biological safety. Previous work from our laboratory suggested that vaccines based on in situ produced, non-infectious rotavirus-like particles (RVLPs) are efficient while being entirely safe. However, using either vaccine, active mucosal immunization cannot induce protective immunity in newborns due to their immature immune system. We therefore hypothesized that offspring from vaccinated dams are passively immunized either by transfer of maternal antibodies during pregnancy or by taking up antibodies from milk. Using a codon optimized polycistronic gene expression cassette packaged into herpesvirus particles, the simultaneous expression of the RV capsid genes led to the intracellular formation of RVLPs in various cell lines. Vaccinated dams developed a strong RV specific IgG antibody response determined in sera and milk of both mother and pups. Moreover, sera of naïve pups nursed by vaccinated dams also had RV specific antibodies suggesting a lactogenic transfer of antibodies. Although full protection of pups was not achieved in this mouse model, our observations are important for the development of improved vaccines against RV in humans as well as in various animal species.

  9. Using 15 DHS surveys to study epidemiological correlates of TB courtesy stigma and health-seeking behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, E J J; Mergenthaler, C; Bakker, M I; Redwood, L; Mitchell, E M H

    2017-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) stigma is thought to delay or prevent the decision to seek health care, but the strength of this association and the prevalence of anticipated TB stigma in the general population in most countries is unknown. To examine epidemiological, cultural and sociodemographic factors associated with TB courtesy stigma in 15 surveys across 13 countries, and its link to health seeking for cough in children under five. A multilevel survey weighted logistic regression model was used to analyse how individual characteristics and social contexts affect the occurrence of TB courtesy stigma. The same modelling approach was used to analyse associations between TB courtesy stigma and individual-level predictors of health-seeking behaviour of mothers for children with cough. TB courtesy stigma varies greatly among countries. TB courtesy stigma was negatively correlated with knowledge of TB's curability (adjusted OR [aOR] 0.82; 95%CI 0.78-0.86) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) accepting attitudes (proxy for HIV stigma) (aOR 0.15, 95%CI 0.15-0.16). Mothers' health-seeking behaviour for children under five with cough was found to be positively correlated with HIV accepting attitudes (OR 1.16, 95%CI 1.08-1.25), but was marginally affected by TB courtesy stigma (OR 0.99, 95%CI 0.98-1.00). Improving the general awareness of the effectiveness of anti-tuberculosis treatment will help to diminish TB courtesy stigma, and should be prioritised over expanding knowledge of mode of transmission. Efforts to reduce HIV and TB stigma may increase care seeking for childhood TB symptoms.

  10. Evaluation of immune response to hepatitis A vaccination and vaccine safety in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muferet Erguven

    2011-05-01

    Conclusion: Hepatitis A vaccine was safe in patients with JIA, and response to vaccine did not differ between healthy children and patients with JIA except for children with active systemic JIA receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha drugs.

  11. Comparison of bacteriological conversion and treatment outcomes among MDR-TB patients with and without diabetes in Mexico: Preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muñoz-Torrico

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a well-known risk factor for tuberculosis (TB. However, it is not known to what extent DM affects the outcome in patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB treated with second-line anti-TB drugs.The objective of this study was to compare the microbiological evolution (sputum smear and culture conversion and final outcomes of MDR/XDR-TB patients with and without DM, managed at the national TB reference centre in Mexico City. Results: Ninety patients were enrolled between 2010 and 2015: 73 with MDR-TB (81.1%, 11 with pre-XDR-TB (e.g. MDR-TB with additional resistance to one injectable drug or a fluoroquinolone, 12.2% and 6 (6.7% with XDR-TB. Out of these, 49 (54.4% had DM and 42 (86% were undergoing insulin treatment.No statistically significant differences were found in treatment outcomes comparing DM vs. non-DM MDR-TB cases: 18/32 (56.3% of DM cases and 19/24 (79.2% non DM patients achieved treatment success (p = 0.07. The time to sputum smear and culture conversion was longer (although not statistically in patients without DM, as follows: the mean (±SD time to sputum smear conversion was 53.9 (±31.4 days in DM patients and 65.2 (±34.8 days in non-DM ones (p = 0.15, while the time to culture conversion was 66.2 (±27.6 days for DM and 81.4 (±37.7 days for non-DM MDR-TB cases (p = 0.06. Conclusions: The study results support the Mexican National TB programme to strengthen its collaboration with the DM programme, as an entry point for TB (and latent TB infection screening and management. Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, Delay, Sputum and culture conversion, MDR-TB, High treatment adherence

  12. TB

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculous spondylitis/spondylodiscitis is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacillus. The features of the disease were first described by. Percival Pott. The disease has potentially serious morbidity with severe neurological impairment and disfiguring deformity. Also known as Pott's disease, spinal infection follows ...

  13. Molecular epidemiology of TB – Its impact on multidrug-resistant tuberculosis control in China☆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao Xu

    2015-01-01

    Results: In total, 238 bacteriologic confirmed pulmonary TB patients from DQ and 393 from GY diagnosed between 2008 and 2011 were recruited in the study. Of the 631 isolates, 220 (34.9% were resistant to at least one anti-TB drug, including 95 (15.1% simultaneously resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin or MDR, albeit with the similar distribution between DQ and GY (32/238 vs. 63/393; p, 0.378. The MIRU-VNTR genotyping revealed 35 isolates from DQ and 86 from GY exhibited 15 and 32 clustering patterns with four patterns shared between two counties. Compared with GY county, DQ had a significantly lower clustering proportion in MTB isolates susceptible to first-line drugs (25/167 vs. 46/198; p, 0.047 and total drug resistant TB isolates (12/71 vs. 44/149; p, 0.044, but a similar clustering proportion in MDR-TB isolates (8/32 vs. 18/63; p, 0.712. A significant higher clustering proportion was observed in the previously treated patients in both counties, but in the sputum smear-positive patients with cavitaries only in GY. Comparing the previously treated patients between the two counties, the proportion of MDR-TB and clustering proportion exhibited a similar distribution, while the average age of previously treated patients in DQ is significantly older than that in GY. Conclusions: A lower proportion of recent transmissions was observed in the county with long-term DOTS implementation. However, DOTS itself might not have worked enough on blocking the recent transmission of MDR-TB. This observation suggests the urgent needs of implementing the Stop-TB strategies; in particular, accelerating the use of rapid molecularbasedTBdiagnosisand drug susceptibility testing, providing active case findings in a high risk population of MDR-TB and enhancing infection control in high MDR-TB burden countries.

  14. Mucosal BCG Vaccination Induces Protective Lung-Resident Memory T Cell Populations against Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo, Carolina; Zedler, Ulrike; Kühl, Anja A.; Lozza, Laura; Saikali, Philippe; Sander, Leif E.; Vogelzang, Alexis; Kupz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), yet its moderate efficacy against pulmonary TB calls for improved vaccination strategies. Mucosal BCG vaccination generates superior protection against TB in animal models; however, the mechanisms of protection remain elusive. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been implicated in protective immune responses against viral infections, but the role of TRM cells following mycobacterial infection is unknown. Using a mouse model of TB, we compared protection and lung cellular infiltrates of parenteral and mucosal BCG vaccination. Adoptive transfer and gene expression analyses of lung airway cells were performed to determine the protective capacities and phenotypes of different memory T cell subsets. In comparison to subcutaneous vaccination, intratracheal and intranasal BCG vaccination generated T effector memory and TRM cells in the lung, as defined by surface marker phenotype. Adoptive mucosal transfer of these airway-resident memory T cells into naive mice mediated protection against TB. Whereas airway-resident memory CD4+ T cells displayed a mixture of effector and regulatory phenotype, airway-resident memory CD8+ T cells displayed prototypical TRM features. Our data demonstrate a key role for mucosal vaccination-induced airway-resident T cells in the host defense against pulmonary TB. These results have direct implications for the design of refined vaccination strategies. PMID:27879332

  15. Correlation of mRNA Profiles, miRNA Profiles, and Functional Immune Response in Rainbow Trout (Oncorrhynkus Mykiss) During Infection With Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) and in Fish Vaccinated With an Anti-VHSV DNA Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    fish. Linking mRNA and miRNA profiles with phenotypic, genotypic, and immunological data will provide an integrated view of the mechanisms of resistance and the strong protective immune responses provided by vaccination. This information is important in designing effective strategies to mitigate......-mediated) responses. MRNA and miRNA profiles will be correlated and combined with in vitro work in cell culture to describe target relationships between miRNAs and mRNAs and the effect of this targeting in fish. Vaccinated fish will also be used for mRNA/miRNA profiling and in challenge studies alongside non-vaccinated...

  16. Heterologous prime-boost vaccinations for poverty-related diseases: advantages and future prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radosević, Katarina; Rodriguez, Ariane; Lemckert, Angelique; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2009-01-01

    Classical vaccination approaches, based on a single vaccine administered in a homologous prime-boost schedule and optimized to induce primarily neutralizing antibodies, are unlikely to be sufficiently efficacious to prevent TB, malaria or HIV infections. Novel vaccines, capable of inducing a more

  17. Single top and $V$$_{tb}$ measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Soureek

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of single top quark production are presented, performed using LHC data collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7, 8 and 13 TeV, respectively. The cross sections for the electroweak production of single top quarks in the t-channel and in association with W-bosons are measured and the results are used to estimate the CKM matrix element $V_{tb}$. In the t-channel, the ratio of top and anti-top production cross sections is determined and compared with predictions from different parton density distribution functions. Searches dedicated to the experimental observation of the s-channel production at the LHC are also discussed. Searches for presence of any anomalous interactions at the tWb vertex beyond the predictions of standard model of particle physics are also presented. These searches are carried out in the t-channel production mode by performing measurements of top polarization, helicities etc. from its decay products. Limits are obtained to constrain new physics.

  18. TB and HIV Therapeutics: Pharmacology Research Priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E. Dooley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An unprecedented number of investigational drugs are in the development pipeline for the treatment of tuberculosis. Among patients with tuberculosis, co-infection with HIV is common, and concurrent treatment of tuberculosis and HIV is now the standard of care. To ensure that combinations of anti-tuberculosis drugs and antiretrovirals are safe and are tested at doses most likely to be effective, selected pharmacokinetic studies based on knowledge of their metabolic pathways and their capacity to induce or inhibit metabolizing enzymes of companion drugs must be conducted. Drug interaction studies should be followed up by evaluations in larger populations to evaluate safety and pharmacodynamics more fully. Involving patients with HIV in trials of TB drugs early in development enhances the knowledge gained from the trials and will ensure that promising new tuberculosis treatments are available to patients with HIV as early as possible. In this review, we summarize current and planned pharmacokinetic and drug interaction studies involving investigational and licensed tuberculosis drugs and antiretrovirals and suggest priorities for tuberculosis-HIV pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and drug-drug interaction studies for the future. Priority studies for children and pregnant women with HIV and tuberculosis co-infection are briefly discussed.

  19. Why healthcare workers are sick of TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne von Delft

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dr Thato Mosidi never expected to be diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB, despite widely prevalent exposure and very limited infection control measures. The life-threatening diagnosis of primary extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB came as an even greater shock. The inconvenient truth is that, rather than being protected, Dr Mosidi and thousands of her healthcare colleagues are at an increased risk of TB and especially drug-resistant TB. In this viewpoint paper we debunk the widely held false belief that healthcare workers are somehow immune to TB disease (TB-proof and explore some of the key factors contributing to the pervasive stigmatization and subsequent non-disclosure of occupational TB. Our front-line workers are some of the first to suffer the consequences of a progressively more resistant and fatal TB epidemic, and urgent interventions are needed to ensure the safety and continued availability of these precious healthcare resources. These include the rapid development and scale-up of improved diagnostic and treatment options, strengthened infection control measures, and focused interventions to tackle stigma and discrimination in all its forms. We call our colleagues to action to protect themselves and those they care for.

  20. Use of the T-spot.TB test for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Amodeo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:Tuberculosis (TB represents a major health problem both in developing and both in industrialized countries.The identification of individuals latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb play a key role for the efficacy of TB control. These individuals with a latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI, especially those with high risk of reactivation (e.g. HIV + / AIDS-infected individuals, patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy and children younger than 5 years could benefit from a preventive treatment with isoniazid reducing the risk of progression from LTBI to active TB. Until recently, detection of LTBI has relied on the tuberculin skin test (TST, but despite the widespread use in clinical practice,TST does not reliably diagnose LTBI because several drawbacks, e.g. lacking in specificity, particularly in who were exposed to non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM or were vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG In addition, in young subjects,TST sensitivity is hampered by impaired T cell function leading frequently to false negative results.These several drawbacks limit the use of TST for the diagnose an LTBI in patients who may benefit from preventive chemotherapy. On the other hand, an accurate diagnosis of LTBI avoid the over-treatment of those patients with a positive TST results but not latently infected with Mtb. Recently, new tests based on the detection of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ after stimulation with Mtb-specific antigens: Early secretory Antigenic Target-6 (ESAT-6 and Culture Filtrate Protein-10 (CFP-10 have been proposed for the diagnosis of active TB and LTBI. Methods: During the period from January 2009 to June 2009, in our laboratory 70 patients were tested with T-SPOT.TB (Oxford Immunotech, Abingdon, United Kingdom.We enrolled transplant patients and subjects ongoing transplant, patients immigrants from high prevalence TB countries, patients screened for immunosuppressive treatment, HIV / AIDS – infected

  1. [BCG vaccination--controversy and compromise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, B

    2000-11-29

    In Sweden, BCG-vaccination is recommended to certain risk groups only, as the incidence of TB is very low. Children from high-endemic areas, as well as health care personnel, especially those working in risk areas, are the most important target groups. The efficacy of BCG vaccination has varied in different investigations, but early Nordic studies have shown approximately 80 percent protection. Vaccination prevents disseminated but not localized pulmonary disease. There are no data supporting revaccination. Today some Swedish children are vaccinated without a clear indication, due to caretakers' fear of TB. The risk of new infection is very low in Sweden today, and is for all practical purposes limited to the closest family members of affected individuals. If large numbers of refugees from high-endemic countries arrive in Sweden, the epidemiological situation must be closely monitored.

  2. Relationship between National TB program and prevalence of TB drug resistance in Algeria, 1965 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadila Boulahbal

    2015-01-01

    The different steps will be presented of the development of the National TB program in Algeria between 1964 and 2014, and in the same way the variations of the prevalence rate of TB drug resistance to demonstrate that the drug resistance surveillance is an acceptable indicator of the performance of TB control program in the country.

  3. Detection of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.I. Aminu, A.D. Tukur. Abstract. The Emergence of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains especially multidrug resistant-TB (MDR-TB) and indeed extensively drug resistant TB (XDR-TB) is considered a real threat to achieving TB control. Thus, the WHO identified the need for accelerated access to rapid testing ...

  4. Consensus statement: Management of drug-induced liver injury in HIV-positive patients treated for TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Jong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced liver injury (DILI in HIV/tuberculosis (TB co-infected patients is a common problem in the South African setting, and re-introduction of anti-TB drugs can be challenging for the healthcare worker. Although international guidelines on the re-introduction of TB treatment are available, the definition of DILI is not uniform, management of antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV co-infection is not mentioned, and the guidance on management is not uniform and lacks a practical approach. In this consensus statement, we summarise important aspects of DILI and provide practical guidance for healthcare workers for different patient groups and healthcare settings on the re-introduction of anti-TB drugs and ART in HIV/TB co-infected individuals presenting with DILI.

  5. Stop TB in My Lifetime: A Call for a World Free of TB - World TB Day 2013

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-12

    In this podcast Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses World TB Day, the 2013 slogan and theme.  Created: 3/12/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/13/2012.

  6. Concordant or discordant results by the tuberculin skin test and the quantiFERON-TB test in children reflect immune biomarker profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhanasekaran, S; Jenum, S; Stavrum, R

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON-TB-Gold-In-tube (QFTGIT) are adjunctive tests used in the diagnosis of pediatric tuberculosis (TB). Neither test can rule out TB; however, a positive test usually triggers preventive treatment in TB contacts aged <5 years. TST and QFTGIT can give div...... with discordant test results displayed a mixed profile with activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. TST and/or QFTGIT positivity appears to reflect distinct but overlapping aspects of host immunity....

  7. Mortality among MDR-TB cases: comparison with drug-susceptible tuberculosis and associated factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocfa Chung-Delgado

    Full Text Available An increase in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB cases is evident worldwide. Its management implies a complex treatment, high costs, more toxic anti-tuberculosis drug use, longer treatment time and increased treatment failure and mortality. The aims of this study were to compare mortality between MDR and drug-susceptible cases of tuberculosis, and to determine risk factors associated with mortality among MDR-TB cases.A retrospective cohort study was performed using data from clinical records of the National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in Lima, Peru. In the first objective, MDR-TB, compared to drug-susceptible cases, was the main exposure variable and time to death, censored at 180 days, the outcome of interest. For the second objective, different variables obtained from clinical records were assessed as potential risk factors for death among MDR-TB cases. Cox regression analysis was used to determine hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI. A total of 1,232 patients were analyzed: mean age 30.9 ±14.0 years, 60.0% were males. 61 patients (5.0% died during treatment, whereas the MDR-TB prevalence was 19.2%. MDR-TB increased the risk of death during treatment (HR = 7.5; IC95%: 4.1-13.4 when compared to presumed drug-susceptible cases after controlling for potential confounders. Education level (p = 0.01, previous TB episodes (p<0.001, diabetes history (p<0.001 and HIV infection (p = 0.04 were factors associated with mortality among MDR-TB cases.MDR-TB is associated with an increased risk of death during treatment. Lower education, greater number of previous TB episodes, diabetes history, and HIV infection were independently associated with mortality among MDR-TB cases. New strategies for appropriate MDR-TB detection and management should be implemented, including drug sensitivity tests, diabetes and HIV screening, as well as guarantee for a complete adherence to therapy.

  8. Enhanced anti-tumor therapeutic efficacy of DNA vaccine by fusing the E7 gene to BAFF in treating human papillomavirus-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao-Chih; Wu, Fang-Cih; Hsu, Yun-Tin; Hsiao, Yu-Chia; Yang, Yuh-Cheng; Chang, C Allen; Chang, Chih-Long

    2017-05-16

    B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) belongs to the tumor necrosis factor family that not only stimulates B and T cells but also counteracts immune tolerance. BAFF is also a type II membrane protein, which is secreted through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi apparatus pathway. Fusing an antigen to BAFF might enhance the presentation of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. These characteristics represent an opportunity to enhance the antitumor effects of DNA vaccines. Therefore, we fused BAFF to human papillomavirus type 16 E7 as a DNA vaccine and evaluated its antitumor effects. We found that this vaccine increased E7-specific CD8+ T-cell immune responses, engendered major antitumor effects against E7-expressing tumors, and prolonged the survival of the immunized mice. Interestingly, vaccinating B-cell-deficient mice with BAFF-E7 revealed considerable E7-specific CD8+ T-cell immune responses, suggesting that B cells do not contribute to this immune response. Image analysis through confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that fusing BAFF to E7 targeted the protein to the ER, but not BAFF lacking 128 N-terminal residues that generated a lower number of E7-specific CD8+ T cells in the