WorldWideScience

Sample records for anthroposophic outpatient settings

  1. Anthroposophic therapy for children with chronic disease: a two-year prospective cohort study in routine outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamre, Harald J; Witt, Claudia M; Kienle, Gunver S; Meinecke, Christoph; Glockmann, Anja; Willich, Stefan N; Kiene, Helmut

    2009-06-19

    Many children with chronic disease use complementary therapies. Anthroposophic treatment for paediatric chronic disease is provided by physicians and differs from conventional treatment in the use of special therapies (art therapy, eurythmy movement exercises, rhythmical massage therapy) and special medications. We studied clinical outcomes in children with chronic diseases under anthroposophic treatment in routine outpatient settings. In conjunction with a health benefit program, consecutive outpatients starting anthroposophic treatment for any chronic disease participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcome was disease severity (Disease and Symptom Scores, physicians' and caregivers' assessment on numerical rating scales 0-10). Disease Score was documented after 0, 6, and 12 months, Symptom Score after 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. A total of 435 patients were included. Mean age was 8.2 years (standard deviation 3.3, range 1.0-16.9 years). Most common indications were mental disorders (46.2% of patients; primarily hyperkinetic, emotional, and developmental disorders), respiratory disorders (14.0%), and neurological disorders (5.7%). Median disease duration at baseline was 3.0 years (interquartile range 1.0-5.0 years). The anthroposophic treatment modalities used were medications (69.2% of patients), eurythmy therapy (54.7%), art therapy (11.3%), and rhythmical massage therapy (6.7%). Median number of eurythmy/art/massage therapy sessions was 12 (interquartile range 10-20), median therapy duration was 118 days (interquartile range 78-189 days).From baseline to six-month follow-up, Disease Score improved by average 3.00 points (95% confidence interval 2.76-3.24 points, p therapies within the first six study months. Children under anthroposophic treatment had long-term improvement of chronic disease symptoms. Although the pre-post design of the present study does not allow for conclusions about comparative effectiveness, study findings suggest that

  2. Anthroposophic therapy for children with chronic disease: a two-year prospective cohort study in routine outpatient settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willich Stefan N

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many children with chronic disease use complementary therapies. Anthroposophic treatment for paediatric chronic disease is provided by physicians and differs from conventional treatment in the use of special therapies (art therapy, eurythmy movement exercises, rhythmical massage therapy and special medications. We studied clinical outcomes in children with chronic diseases under anthroposophic treatment in routine outpatient settings. Methods In conjunction with a health benefit program, consecutive outpatients starting anthroposophic treatment for any chronic disease participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcome was disease severity (Disease and Symptom Scores, physicians' and caregivers' assessment on numerical rating scales 0–10. Disease Score was documented after 0, 6, and 12 months, Symptom Score after 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Results A total of 435 patients were included. Mean age was 8.2 years (standard deviation 3.3, range 1.0–16.9 years. Most common indications were mental disorders (46.2% of patients; primarily hyperkinetic, emotional, and developmental disorders, respiratory disorders (14.0%, and neurological disorders (5.7%. Median disease duration at baseline was 3.0 years (interquartile range 1.0–5.0 years. The anthroposophic treatment modalities used were medications (69.2% of patients, eurythmy therapy (54.7%, art therapy (11.3%, and rhythmical massage therapy (6.7%. Median number of eurythmy/art/massage therapy sessions was 12 (interquartile range 10–20, median therapy duration was 118 days (interquartile range 78–189 days. From baseline to six-month follow-up, Disease Score improved by average 3.00 points (95% confidence interval 2.76–3.24 points, p Conclusion Children under anthroposophic treatment had long-term improvement of chronic disease symptoms. Although the pre-post design of the present study does not allow for conclusions about comparative effectiveness, study

  3. Anthroposophic therapy for asthma: A two-year prospective cohort study in routine outpatient settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald J Hamre

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Harald J Hamre1, Claudia M Witt2, Gunver S Kienle1, Christof Schnürer3, Anja Glockmann1, Renatus Ziegler4, Stefan N Willich2, Helmut Kiene11Institute for Applied Epistemology and Medical Methodology, Freiburg, Germany; 2Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charité University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany; 3Internal Medicine Practice, A Fraenkel Centrum, Badenweiler, Germany; 4Society for Cancer Research, Arlesheim, SwitzerlandBackground: Anthroposophic treatment for asthma includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications.Methods: We studied consecutive outpatients starting anthroposophic treatment for asthma under routine conditions in Germany. Main outcomes were average asthma severity (0–10, primary outcome; symptoms (1–4; and asthma-related quality of life at 12-month follow-up (Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire [AQLQ] overall score, 1–7, for adults; KINDL Questionnaire for Measuring Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents, asthma module, 0–100, for children at 12-month follow-up.Results: Ninety patients (54 adults, 36 children were included. Anthroposophic treatment modalities used were medications (88% of patients, n = 79/90; eurythmy therapy (22%; art therapy (10%; and rhythmical massage therapy (1%. Median number of eurythmy/art/massage sessions was 12 (interquartile range 10–20, median therapy duration was 120 days (84–184. From baseline to 12-month follow-up, all outcomes improved significantly (P < 0.001 for all comparisons. Average improvements were: average asthma severity 2.61 points (95% confidence interval CI: 1.90–3.32; cough 0.93 (95% CI: 0.60–1.25; dyspnea 0.92 (95% CI: 0.56–1.28; exertion-induced symptoms 0.95 (95% CI: 0.64–1.25; frequency of asthma attacks 0.78 (95% CI:0.41–1.14; awakening from asthma 0.90 (95% CI: 0.58–1.21; AQLQ overall score 1.44 (95% CI:0.97–1.92; and KINDL asthma module 14.74 (95% CI: 9.70–19

  4. Anthroposophic therapy for attention deficit hyperactivity: a two-year prospective study in outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamre, Harald J; Witt, Claudia M; Kienle, Gunver S; Meinecke, Christoph; Glockmann, Anja; Ziegler, Renatus; Willich, Stefan N; Kiene, Helmut

    2010-08-30

    Anthroposophic treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications. We studied 61 consecutive children starting anthroposophic treatment for ADHD symptoms under routine outpatient conditions. Primary outcome was FBB-HKS (a parents' questionnaire for ADHD core symptoms, 0-3), and secondary outcomes were disease and symptom scores (physicians' and parents' assessment, 0-10) and quality of life (KINDL(®) total score, 0-100). A total of 67% of patients fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for ADHD, 15% had an exclusion diagnosis such as pervasive developmental disorders, while 18% did not fulfill ADHD criteria for another reason. Anthroposophic treatment modalities used were eurythmy therapy (in 56% of patients), art therapy (20%), rhythmical massage therapy (8%), and medications (51%). From baseline to six-month follow-up, all outcomes improved significantly; average improvements were FBB-HKS total score 0.30 points (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.18-0.43; P < 0.001), FBB-HKS inattention 0.36 (95% CI: 0.21-0.50; P < 0.001), FBB-HKS hyperactivity 0.29 (95% CI: 0.14-0.44; P < 0.001), FBB-HKS impulsivity 0.22 (95% CI: 0.03-0.40; P < 0.001), disease score 2.33 (95% CI: 1.84-2.82; P < 0.001), symptom score 1.66 (95% CI: 1.17-2.16; P < 0.001), and KINDL 5.37 (95% CI: 2.27-8.47; P = 0.001). Improvements were similar in patients not using stimulants (90% of patients at months 0-6) and were maintained until last follow-up after 24 months. Children with ADHD symptoms receiving anthroposophic treatment had long-term improvement of symptoms and quality of life.

  5. Anthroposophic therapy for attention deficit hyperactivity: A two-year prospective study in outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald J Hamre

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Harald J Hamre1, Claudia M Witt2, Gunver S Kienle1, Christoph Meinecke3, Anja Glockmann1, Renatus Ziegler4, Stefan N Willich2, Helmut Kiene11Institute for Applied Epistemology and Medical Methodology, Freiburg, Germany; 2Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charité University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany; 3Pediatric Consultant, Community Hospital Havelhöhe, Berlin, Germany; 4Society for Cancer Research, Arlesheim, SwitzerlandBackground: Anthroposophic treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications.Methods: We studied 61 consecutive children starting anthroposophic treatment for ADHD symptoms under routine outpatient conditions. Primary outcome was FBB-HKS (a parents’ questionnaire for ADHD core symptoms, 0–3, and secondary outcomes were disease and symptom scores (physicians’ and parents’ assessment, 0–10 and quality of life (KINDL® total score, 0–100.Results: A total of 67% of patients fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for ADHD, 15% had an exclusion diagnosis such as pervasive developmental disorders, while 18% did not fulfill ADHD criteria for another reason. Anthroposophic treatment modalities used were eurythmy therapy (in 56% of patients, art therapy (20%, rhythmical massage therapy (8%, and medications (51%. From baseline to six-month follow-up, all outcomes improved significantly; average improvements were FBB-HKS total score 0.30 points (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.18–0.43; P < 0.001, FBB-HKS inattention 0.36 (95% CI: 0.21–0.50; P < 0.001, FBB-HKS hyperactivity 0.29 (95% CI: 0.14–0.44; P < 0.001, FBB-HKS impulsivity 0.22 (95% CI: 0.03–0.40; P < 0.001, disease score 2.33 (95% CI: 1.84–2.82; P < 0.001, symptom score 1.66 (95% CI: 1.17–2.16; P < 0.001, and KINDL 5.37 (95% CI: 2.27–8.47; P = 0.001. Improvements were similar in patients not using stimulants (90% of patients at months 0–6 and

  6. Predictors of outcome after 6 and 12 months following anthroposophic therapy for adult outpatients with chronic disease: a secondary analysis from a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willich Stefan N

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthroposophic medicine is a physician-provided complementary therapy system involving counselling, artistic and physical therapies, and special medications. The purpose of this analysis was to identify predictors of symptom improvement in patients receiving anthroposophic treatment for chronic diseases. Methods 913 adult outpatients from Germany participated in a prospective cohort study. Patients were starting anthroposophic treatment for mental (30.4% of patients, n = 278/913, musculoskeletal (20.2%, neurological (7.6%, genitourinary (7.4% or respiratory disorders (7.2% or other chronic indications. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was performed with the improvement of Symptom Score (patients' assessment, 0: not present, 10: worst possible after 6 and 12 months as dependent variables. 61 independent variables pertaining to socio-demographics, life style, disease status, co-morbidity, health status (SF-36, depression, and therapy factors were analysed. Results Compared to baseline, Symptom Score improved by average 2.53 points (95% confidence interval 2.39-2.68, p Conclusion In adult outpatients receiving anthroposophic treatment for chronic diseases, symptom improvement after 6 and 12 months was predicted by baseline symptoms, health status, disease duration, education, and therapy goal. Other variables were not associated with the outcome. This secondary predictor analysis of data from a pre-post study does not allow for causal conclusions; the results are hypothesis generating and need verification in subsequent studies.

  7. Pain management in the outpatient surgical setting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-14

    May 14, 2003 ... Pain management in the outpatient surgical setting. Robert S. Wolf MD. American Sports Medicine Institute. Birmingham, AL USA emptive and post-operative setting. These medications inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, promote analgesia, and consequently decrease the post-operative demand for opioids.

  8. Psychosocial risk factors and personality disorders in outpatient cardiology setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Suárez-Bagnasco

    2015-01-01

    Psychological risk factors and personality disorders comorbidities are more frequent than psychological risk factors only or personality disorders only in outpatient cardiology setting without cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Nuclear technology and anthroposophic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leben, S.

    1982-01-01

    The construction of nuclear power plants as a solution to the current energy, crisis is controversial. That was not so in the beginning of the 'peaceful' utilization of nuclear power; with thousands of millions to promote it given as subsidies by the governments it was developing fast, until citizens' initiatives asked ecologic and moral questions delaying the further extension of this energy production. Both positions can be substantiated. But can a first judgement, too, be given with any degree of safety. And what cognitive aids are provided by the anthroposophic theory. This is demonstrated in some aspects. From the contents: The energy crisis and its apparent way out; of the causes: modern scientific methods; New forces: some facts and phenomena; Destructive powers as viewed by ancient mysteries; Of desirable states of conscience and technical forms; spelling their distortion; Nuclear powers and morality; Untimeliness in historicity; 'What's the stance of anthroposophic theory with regard to nuclear technology'. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Transitional care management in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldonado, Analiza; Hawk, Ofelia; Ormiston, Thomas; Nelson, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Patients who are high risk high cost (HRHC), those with severe or multiple medical issues, and the chronically ill elderly are major drivers of rising health care costs.1 The HRHC patients with complex health conditions and functional limitations may likely go to emergency rooms and hospitals, need more supportive services, and use long-term care facilities.2 As a result, these patient populations are vulnerable to fragmented care and "falling through the cracks".2 A large county health and hospital system in California, USA introduced evidence-based interventions in accordance with the Triple AIM3 focused on patient-centered health care, prevention, health maintenance, and safe transitions across the care continuum. The pilot program embedded a Transitional Care Manager (TCM) within an outpatient Family Medicine clinic to proactively assist HRHC patients with outreach assistance, problem-solving and facilitating smooth transitions of care. This initiative is supported by a collaborative team that included physicians, nurses, specialists, health educator, and pharmacist. The initial 50 patients showed a decrease in Emergency Department (ED) encounters (pre-vs post intervention: 33 vs 17) and hospital admissions (pre-vs post intervention: 32 vs 11), improved patient outcomes, and cost saving. As an example, one patient had 1 ED visit and 5 hospital admission with total charges of $217,355.75 in the 6 months' pre-intervention with no recurrence of ED or hospital admissions in the 6 months of TCM enrollment. The preliminary findings showed improvement of patient-centered outcomes, quality of care, and resource utilization however more data is required.

  11. Anthroposophic therapy for chronic depression: a four-year prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willich Stefan N

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive disorders are common, cause considerable disability, and do not always respond to standard therapy (psychotherapy, antidepressants. Anthroposophic treatment for depression differs from ordinary treatment in the use of artistic and physical therapies and special medication. We studied clinical outcomes of anthroposophic therapy for depression. Methods 97 outpatients from 42 medical practices in Germany participated in a prospective cohort study. Patients were aged 20–69 years and were referred to anthroposophic therapies (art, eurythmy movement exercises, or rhythmical massage or started physician-provided anthroposophic therapy (counselling, medication for depression: depressed mood, at least two of six further depressive symptoms, minimum duration six months, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, German version (CES-D, range 0–60 points of at least 24 points. Outcomes were CES-D (primary outcome and SF-36 after 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 months. Data were collected from July 1998 to March 2005. Results Median number of art/eurythmy/massage sessions was 14 (interquartile range 12–22, median therapy duration was 137 (91–212 days. All outcomes improved significantly between baseline and all subsequent follow-ups. Improvements from baseline to 12 months were: CES-D from mean (standard deviation 34.77 (8.21 to 19.55 (13.12 (p Conclusion In outpatients with chronic depression, anthroposophic therapies were followed by long-term clinical improvement. Although the pre-post design of the present study does not allow for conclusions about comparative effectiveness, study findings suggest that the anthroposophic approach, with its recourse to non-verbal and artistic exercising therapies can be useful for patients motivated for such therapies.

  12. Psychosocial risk factors and personality disorders in outpatient cardiology setting

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Suárez-Bagnasco; María Laura Brandani; Martin Lobo; Walter Masson; Bruno Peressotti; Nadia Jorge; Juan Gagliardi; Claudio Higa; Horacio Zylbersztejn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to describe psychological risk factors and personality disorders in an outpatient cardiology setting in patients without cardiovascular diseases. Materials and methods A cross sectional and multicenter study was conducted. Outpatients over 21 years old without cardiovascular diseases were enrolled. Psychosocial risk factors and personality disorders were assessed. For data analysis, patients were grouped according to the number of cardiovascular risk fa...

  13. Outpatient healthcare settings and transmission of Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy A Jury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent reports suggest that community-associated Clostridium difficile infection (CDI (i.e., no healthcare facility admission within 90 days may be increasing in frequency. We hypothesized that outpatient clinics could be an important source for acquisition of community-associated CDI. METHODS: We performed a 6-month prospective study of CDI patients to determine frequency of and risk factors for skin and environmental shedding during outpatient visits and to derive a prediction rule for positive cultures. We performed a point-prevalence culture survey to assess the frequency of C. difficile contamination in outpatient settings and evaluated the frequency of prior outpatient visits in patients with community-associated CDI. RESULTS: Of 67 CDI patients studied, 54 (81% had 1 or more outpatient visits within 12 weeks after diagnosis. Of 44 patients cultured during outpatient visits, 14 (32% had skin contamination and 12 (27% contaminated environmental surfaces. Decreased mobility, fecal incontinence, and treatment with non-CDI antibiotics were associated with positive cultures, whereas vancomycin taper therapy was protective. In patients not on CDI therapy, a prediction rule including incontinence or decreased mobility was 90% sensitive and 79% specific for detection of spore shedding. Of 84 clinic and emergency department rooms cultured, 12 (14% had 1 or more contaminated environmental sites. For 33 community-associated CDI cases, 31 (94% had an outpatient visit during the 12 weeks prior to onset of diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with recent CDI present a significant risk for transmission of spores during outpatient visits. The outpatient setting may be an underappreciated source of community-associated CDI cases.

  14. Different methods for the induction of labour in outpatient settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowswell, Therese; Kelly, Anthony J; Livio, Stefania; Norman, Jane E; Alfirevic, Zarko

    2014-01-01

    Background Induction of labour is carried out for a variety of indications and using a range of pharmacological, mechanical and other methods. For women at low risk, some methods of induction of labour may be suitable for use in outpatient settings. Objectives To examine pharmacological and mechanical interventions to induce labour in outpatient settings in terms of feasibility, effectiveness, maternal satisfaction, healthcare costs and, where information is available, safety. The review complements existing reviews on labour induction examining effectiveness and safety. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (December 2009) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials examining outpatient cervical ripening or induction of labour with pharmacological agents or mechanical methods. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data and assessed eligible papers for risk of bias. We checked all data after entry into review manager software. Main results We included 28 studies with 2616 women examining different methods of induction of labour where women received treatment at home or were sent home after initial treatment and monitoring in hospital. Studies examined vaginal and intracervical PGE2, vaginal and oral misoprostol, isosorbide mononitrate, mifepristone, oestrogens, and acupuncture. Overall, the results demonstrate that outpatient induction of labour is feasible and that important adverse events are rare. There was no strong evidence that agents used to induce labour in outpatient settings had an impact (positive or negative) on maternal or neonatal health. There was some evidence that, compared to placebo or no treatment, induction agents reduced the need for further interventions to induce labour, and shortened the interval from intervention to birth. We were unable to pool results on outcomes relating to progress in labour as

  15. Anthroposophic therapy for chronic depression: a four-year prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamre, Harald J; Witt, Claudia M; Glockmann, Anja; Ziegler, Renatus; Willich, Stefan N; Kiene, Helmut

    2006-12-15

    Depressive disorders are common, cause considerable disability, and do not always respond to standard therapy (psychotherapy, antidepressants). Anthroposophic treatment for depression differs from ordinary treatment in the use of artistic and physical therapies and special medication. We studied clinical outcomes of anthroposophic therapy for depression. 97 outpatients from 42 medical practices in Germany participated in a prospective cohort study. Patients were aged 20-69 years and were referred to anthroposophic therapies (art, eurythmy movement exercises, or rhythmical massage) or started physician-provided anthroposophic therapy (counselling, medication) for depression: depressed mood, at least two of six further depressive symptoms, minimum duration six months, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, German version (CES-D, range 0-60 points) of at least 24 points. Outcomes were CES-D (primary outcome) and SF-36 after 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 months. Data were collected from July 1998 to March 2005. Median number of art/eurythmy/massage sessions was 14 (interquartile range 12-22), median therapy duration was 137 (91-212) days. All outcomes improved significantly between baseline and all subsequent follow-ups. Improvements from baseline to 12 months were: CES-D from mean (standard deviation) 34.77 (8.21) to 19.55 (13.12) (p therapies were followed by long-term clinical improvement. Although the pre-post design of the present study does not allow for conclusions about comparative effectiveness, study findings suggest that the anthroposophic approach, with its recourse to non-verbal and artistic exercising therapies can be useful for patients motivated for such therapies.

  16. Anthroposophic medical therapy in chronic disease: a four-year prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willich Stefan N

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The short consultation length in primary care is a source of concern, and the wish for more consultation time is a common reason for patients to seek complementary medicine. Physicians practicing anthroposophic medicine have prolonged consultations with their patients, taking an extended history, addressing constitutional, psychosocial, and biographic aspect of patients' illness, and selecting optimal therapy. In Germany, health benefit programs have included the reimbursement of this additional physician time. The purpose of this study was to describe clinical outcomes in patients with chronic diseases treated by anthroposophic physicians after an initial prolonged consultation. Methods In conjunction with a health benefit program in Germany, 233 outpatients aged 1–74 years, treated by 72 anthroposophic physicians after a consultation of at least 30 min participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcomes were disease severity (Disease and Symptom Scores, physicians' and patients' assessment on numerical rating scales 0–10 and quality of life (adults: SF-36, children aged 8–16: KINDL, children 1–7: KITA. Disease Score was documented after 0, 6 and 12 months, other outcomes after 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and (Symptom Score and SF-36 48 months. Results Most common indications were mental disorders (17.6% of patients; primarily depression and fatigue, respiratory diseases (15.5%, and musculoskeletal diseases (11.6%. Median disease duration at baseline was 3.0 years (interquartile range 0.5–9.8 years. The consultation leading to study enrolment lasted 30–60 min in 51.5% (120/233 of patients and > 60 min in 48.5%. During the following year, patients had a median of 3.0 (interquartile range 1.0–7.0 prolonged consultations with their anthroposophic physicians, 86.1% (167/194 of patients used anthroposophic medication. All outcomes except KITA Daily Life subscale and KINDL showed significant improvement between

  17. Sleep hygiene use in a psychiatry outpatient setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyne, J

    2012-02-01

    Non-pharmacological measures are recommended prior to use of hypnotics in the latest NICE guidance. This study investigated if non-pharmacological measures are utilised prior to hypnotic prescribing in a general adult psychiatry outpatient setting, and further reviewed patient\\'s sleep quality following implementation of sleep hygiene education. Interviews were conducted with 85 patients, and poor adherence with NICE guidance was found among the 74 (87%) patients previously prescribed a hypnotic. Just five (6.8%) patients recalled use of non-pharmacological measures prior to hypnotic prescription, 47 (63.5%) indicated non-pharmacological measures had not been discussed, while a further 22 (29.7%) could not remember. Improvement in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores following implementation of sleep hygiene education was also noted (P = 0.03). These findings suggest that increased awareness of sleep hygiene education for clinicians may be beneficial.

  18. Perception of acceptable antibiotic stewardship strategies in outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauffrey, V; Kivits, J; Pulcini, C; Boivin, J M

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are still often inappropriately prescribed in France despite specific measures being taken for over 10years. The 25% decrease in antibiotic prescription advocated in the 2011-2016 National Antibiotic Plan seems difficult to achieve. One of the strategies currently considered in France is the use of a specific prescription form dedicated to antibiotics, with an educational message for patients. We aimed to evaluate the acceptability - by primary care prescribers - of this measure and to evaluate their perception of other antibiotic stewardship strategies. Qualitative study conducted among family physicians, pediatricians, dermatologists, dentists, and ENT specialists using semi-structured interviews. A thematic and framework analysis was then performed. Thirty prescribing physicians practicing in a specific region of France were included in the study. The dedicated prescription form for antibiotics was deemed excessive and questionable. Other measures, not directly targeting prescribers, were rather well perceived: the unit sales of antibiotics, the restricted reporting of susceptibility tests, or the limitation of the number of molecules available in outpatient settings. The results of this exploratory study may guide the national antibiotic stewardship policy in France. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  19. [Comorbidity in 207 cannabis users in a specific outpatient setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillem, E; Arbabzadeh-Bouchez, S; Vorspan, F; Bellivier, F

    2015-06-01

    Health care seeking for a problematic use of cannabis is in progress in France. The aim is to assess the addictive and psychiatric comorbidity in cannabis users seen in the specific setting at the Lariboisière hospital. Two hundred and seven cannabis users were included from January 2004 to December 2009. Twelve-month and lifetime diagnosis of abuse and dependence (cannabis, alcohol, cocaine/crack) (DSM-IV), current and lifetime mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders and psychotic disorders were assessed (Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview). Logistic regression analyses identified adjusted odds ratios associated with the gender and the health care seeking (P=0.01). One hundred and forty-seven men (71%) and 60 women (29%), 29.3±8.6 years (15.2-51.6 years). Most of the outpatients ask for health care themselves (59.7%), whereas 19.4% are asked to seek health care by relatives (19.4%) or because of an academic, health or justice injunction (20.4%). In total, 49.3% of the outpatients are single, 35.7% are cohabitating, 9.3% are married and 6.3% are separated/divorced. About 20.4% of the outpatients are students, 35.7% have a professional activity, 19% are jobless, 2.4% are impaired, 0.5% are retired, at home and 12.1% do not have an official income. Twelve-month and lifetime prevalence of abuse/dependence are: cannabis (10.1/82.1% and 8.7/88.4%), alcohol (9.7/8.7% and 19.3/18.8%), cocaine/crack (2.4/3.4% and 4.8/11.6%). The mean duration of cannabis dependence for the current dependent users is 8.4±5.8 years. The mean number of "joints" during the last 6 months is 6±4.3, the mean amount of cannabis per week is 12.5±11.3g. About 51.3% of the dependent users report externalized and/or internalized disorders at school during childhood and adolescence. In total, 19.4% of the dependent users have a suicide attempt history and 18.9% have a psychiatric hospitalisation history, more frequently women (Pdisorder, females more frequently than males

  20. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in an outpatient setting | Awori | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) typically affects hospitalized patients with critical illness. Outpatient AAC is reported to occur in elderly males with cardiovascular comorbidities. We report the presentation of acute acalculous cholecystitis in two young African men admitted for the first time within days of each other.

  1. 48 Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis in an Outpatient Setting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) typically affects hospitalized patients with critical illness. Outpatient AAC is reported to occur in elderly males with cardiovascular comorbidities. We report the presentation of acute acalculous cholecystitis in two young African men admitted for the first time within days of ...

  2. Vaccination coverage for measles, mumps and rubella in anthroposophical schools in Gelderland, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, J.H.; Lier, A. van; Ruijs, W.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Social clustering of unvaccinated children in anthroposophical schools occurs, as inferred from various measles outbreaks that can be traced to these schools. However, accurate vaccination coverage data of anthroposophical schools are not widely available. METHODS: In 2012, we performed

  3. The opinion of Greek parents on the advantages and disadvantages of the outpatient pediatric oncology setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matziou, Vasiliki; Servitzoglou, Marina; Vlahioti, Efrosini; Deli, Haralampia; Matziou, Theodora; Megapanou, Efstathia; Perdikaris, Pantelis

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess parental opinions on the advantages and disadvantages of a pediatric oncology outpatient setting in comparison to the inpatient oncology ward. The sample of the study consisted of 104 parents whose children were diagnosed and treated for pediatric cancer. The survey took place at the Pediatric Oncology Wards, as well as their respective outpatient settings of the two General Children's Hospitals in Athens, Greece from May 2010 to August 2010. According to parents' view the outpatient setting was preferable due to the maintenance keeping of their daily routine (x(2) = 75.9, p = 0.000), maintaining the family life (x(2) = 90.1, p = 0.000) and young patients' participation in activities (x(2) = 25.6, p = 0.000). Moreover, young patients were more happy, less anxious and less scared when they were attending in the daily clinic (x(2) = 25.9, p = 0.000). According to parents' view, the outpatient setting has many advantages. The judgment of children and parents on the services offered by the Pediatric Oncology Unit overall, in both inpatient and outpatient setting can give the necessary feedback to improve the qualitative provided care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Physician perspectives on quality and error in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwell, Linda Baier; Williams, Eric S; Babbott, Stewart; Rabatin, Joseph S; Linzer, Mark

    2009-05-01

    Little is known about the influence of the primary care workplace on patient care. Assessing physician opinion through focus groups can elucidate factors related to safety and error in this setting. During phase 1 of the Minimizing Error, Maximizing Outcome (MEMO) Study, 9 focus groups were conducted with 32 family physicians and general internists from 5 areas in the upper Midwest and New York City. The physicians described challenging settings with rapidly changing conditions. Patients are medically and psychosocially complex and often underinsured. Communication is complicated by multiple languages, time pressure, and inadequate information systems. Complex processes of care have missing elements including medication lists and test results. Physicians are pressed to be more productive, and key administrative decisions are made without their input. Targeted areas to improve safety and reduce error included teamwork, aligned leadership values, diversity, collegiality, and respect. Primary care physicians clearly described positive and negative workplace factors related to safety and error. The themes suggest that systems of care and their dynamic nature warrant attention. Enhancing positive and ameliorating negative cultures and processes of care could bring real benefits to patients, physicians, and ambulatory office settings.

  5. Use of Brief Experimental Analyses in Outpatient Clinic and Home Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, David; Berg, Wendy; Harding, Jay; Cooper-Brown, Linda

    2004-01-01

    We describe the historic and current use of brief experimental analysis procedures in outpatient clinic and home settings. We discuss some applications of the designs and suggest design modifications for improving internal validity. We describe our application of the designs to longitudinal, in-home programs for children with severe behavior…

  6. Vitamin D deficiency in Crohn's disease: prevalence, risk factors and supplement use in an outpatient setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Suibhne, Treasa Nic

    2012-03-01

    Vitamin D deficiency impacts on bone health and has potential new roles in inflammation. We aimed to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for vitamin D deficiency and to explore vitamin D supplement usage in patients with Crohn\\'s disease (CD) in an outpatient setting, compared with controls.

  7. Residents' perceived needs in communication skills training across in- and outpatient clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Sommer, Johanna; Hudelson, Patricia; Demaurex, Florence; Luthy, Christophe; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Nendaz, Mathieu; De Grave, Willem; Dolmans, Diana; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-05-01

    Residents' perceived needs in communication skills training are important to identify before designing context-specific training programmes, since learrners' perceived needs can influence the effectiveness of training. To explore residents' perceptions of their training needs and training experiences around communication skills, and whether these differ between residents training in inpatient and outpatient clinical settings. Four focus groups (FG) and a self-administered questionnaire were conducted with residents working in in- and outpatient medical service settings at a Swiss University Hospital. Focus groups explored residents' perceptions of their communication needs, their past training experiences and suggestions for future training programmes in communication skills. Transcripts were analysed in a thematic way using qualitative analytic approaches. All residents from both settings were asked to complete a questionnaire that queried their sociodemographics and amount of prior training in communication skills. In focus groups, outpatient residents felt that communication skills were especially useful in addressing chronic diseases and social issues. In contrast, inpatient residents emphasized the importance of good communication skills for dealing with family conflicts and end-of-life issues. Felt needs reflected residents' differing service priorities: outpatient residents saw the need for skills to structure the consultation and explore patients' perspectives in order to build therapeutic alliances, whereas inpatient residents wanted techniques to help them break bad news, provide information and increase their own well-being. The survey's overall response rate was 56%. Its data showed that outpatient residents received more training in communication skills and more of them than inpatient residents considered communication skills training to be useful (100% vs 74%). Outpatient residents' perceived needs in communication skills were more patient

  8. Successful Treatment of Suspected Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome Using Haloperidol in the Outpatient Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Jones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic use of cannabis can result in a syndrome of hyperemesis characterized by cyclical vomiting without any other identifiable causes. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS is seldom responsive to traditional antiemetic therapies. Despite frequent nausea and vomiting, patients may be reluctant to discontinue use of cannabis. We report a case of severe, refractory CHS with complete resolution of nausea and vomiting after treatment with haloperidol in the outpatient setting. After review of the literature, we believe this is the first reported successful outpatient treatment of CHS and suggests a potential treatment for refractory patients.

  9. Fever: Views in Anthroposophic Medicine and Their Scientific Validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To conduct a scoping review to characterize how fever is viewed in anthroposophic medicine (AM and discuss the scientific validity of these views. Methods. Systematic searches were run in Medline, Embase, CAMbase, and Google Scholar. Material from anthroposophic medical textbooks and articles was also used. Data was extracted and interpreted. Results. Most of the anthroposophic literature on this subject is in the German language. Anthroposophic physicians hold a beneficial view on fever, rarely suppress fever with antipyretics, and often use complementary means of alleviating discomfort. In AM, fever is considered to have the following potential benefits: promoting more complete recovery; preventing infection recurrences and atopic diseases; providing a unique opportunity for caregivers to provide loving care; facilitating individual development and resilience; protecting against cancer and boosting the anticancer effects of mistletoe products. These views are discussed with regard to the available scientific data. Conclusion. AM postulates that fever can be of short-term and long-term benefit in several ways; many of these opinions have become evidence-based (though still often not practiced while others still need empirical studies to be validated, refuted, or modified.

  10. Patterns of psychiatric diagnoses in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAHAD D. ALOSAIMI

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study aimed to explore the current patterns of psychiatric diagnoses in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia. Methods Cross-sectional study was conducted on patients seeking psychiatric advice at six hospitals in the five main regions of Saudi Arabia. The data were primarily obtained by reviewing patient charts. Results Total of 1,205 patients were recruited. The majority was unemployed (71.4%, had a low level of education (85.5%, and had low income (61.9%. The most common psychiatric diagnoses among inpatients were schizophrenia (55.8%, bipolar disorder (23.3% and major depressive disorder (7.2%. The most common psychiatric diagnoses among outpatients were major depressive disorder (29.3%, schizophrenia (28.9%, generalized anxiety disorder (15.6% and bipolar disorder (11.5%. Primary psychotic disorders and secondary psychiatric disorders were significantly more frequent among men whereas primary bipolar disorders and depressive disorders were significantly more frequent among women in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Psychotic and bipolar disorders were significantly more frequent among younger patients whereas depressive disorders were significantly more frequent among older patients; anxiety disorders were of similar frequency in all age groups. Discussion The most common psychiatric diagnoses among inpatients were schizophrenia and bipolar disorder whereas the most common psychiatric diagnoses among outpatients were major depressive disorder and schizophrenia.

  11. Sensitivity to change of mobility measures in musculoskeletal conditions on lower extremities in outpatient rehabilitation settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Pujalte, Esther; Gacto-Sánchez, Mariano; Montilla-Herrador, Joaquina; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; Ángeles Franco-Sierra, María; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2018-01-12

    Prospective longitudinal study. To examine the sensitivity of the Mobility Activities Measure for lower extremities and to compare it to the sensitivity of the Physical Functioning Scale (PF-10) and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) at week 4 and week 8 post-hospitalization in outpatient rehabilitation settings. Mobility Activities Measure is a set of short mobility measures to track outpatient rehabilitation progress: its scales have shown good properties but its sensitivity to change has not been reported. Patients with musculoskeletal conditions were recruited at admission in three outpatient rehabilitation settings in Spain. Data were collected at admission, week 4 and week 8 from an initial sample of 236 patients (mean age ± SD = 36.7 ± 11.1). Mobility Activities Measure scales for lower extremity; PF-10; and PSFS. All the Mobility Activities Measure scales were sensitive to both positive and negative changes (the Standardized Response Means (SRMs) ranged between 1.05 and 1.53 at week 4, and between 0.63 and 1.47 at week 8). The summary measure encompassing the three Mobility Activities Measure scales detected a higher proportion of participants who had improved beyond the minimal detectable change (MDC) than detected by the PSFS and the PF-10 both at week 4 (86.64% vs. 69.81% and 42.23%, respectively) and week 8 (71.14% vs. 55.65% and 60.81%, respectively). The three Mobility Activities Measure scales assessing the lower extremity can be used across outpatient rehabilitation settings to provide consistent and sensitive measures of changes in patients' mobility. Implications for rehabilitation All the scales of the Mobility Activities Measure for the lower extremity were sensitive to both positive and negative change across the follow-up periods. Overall, the summary measure encompassing the three Mobility Activities Measure scales for the lower extremity appeared more sensitive to positive changes than the Physical Functioning Scale

  12. A comparison of burnout among oncology nurses working in adult and pediatric inpatient and outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Shoni; Lind, Bonnie K; Sorensen, Celeste

    2013-07-01

    To investigate differences in burnout among oncology nurses by type of work setting, coping strategies, and job satisfaction. Descriptive. A metropolitan cancer center. A convenience sample of 74 oncology nurses. Participants completed a demographic data form, the Nursing Satisfaction and Retention Survey, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Burnout, coping strategies, job satisfaction, and oncology work setting (inpatient versus outpatient and adult versus pediatric). The participants most often used spirituality and coworker support to cope. Emotional exhaustion was lowest for youngest nurses and highest for outpatient RNs. Personal accomplishment was highest in adult settings. Job satisfaction correlated inversely with emotional exhaustion and the desire to leave oncology nursing. The findings support that the social context within the work environment may impact emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and that demographics may be more significant in determining burnout than setting. The findings raise questions of whether demographics or setting plays a bigger role in burnout and supports organizational strategies that enhance coworker camaraderie, encourage nurses to discuss high-stress situations, and share ways to manage their emotions in oncology settings. Spirituality and coworker relationships were positive coping strategies among oncology nurses to prevent emotional exhaustion. Nurses who rely on supportive social networks as a coping mechanism have lower levels of depersonalization. Age was inversely related to emotional exhaustion.

  13. The Patient–Healthcare Professional Relationship and Communication in the Oncology Outpatient Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prip, Anne; Møller, Kirsten Alling; Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Today, cancer care and treatment primarily take place in an outpatient setting where encounters between patients and healthcare professionals are often brief. OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to summarize the literature of adult patients’ experiences of and need for relationships...... Institute Evidence Based Practice Database. RESULTS:: Nine studies were included, qualitative (n = 5) and quantitative (n = 4). The studies identified that the relationship between patients and healthcare professionals was important for the patients’ ability to cope with cancer and has an impact...... on satisfaction of care, that hope and positivity are both a need and a strategy for patients with cancer and were facilitated by healthcare professionals, and that outpatient clinic visits framed and influenced communication and relationships. CONCLUSIONS:: The relationship and communication between patients...

  14. The metabolic syndrome and related characteristics in major depression : inpatients and outpatients compared Metabolic differences across treatment settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luppino, Floriana S.; Bouvy, Paul F.; Giltay, Erik J.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Zitman, Frans G.

    Objective: We aimed to systematically compare patients with major depressive disorder from three different treatment settings (a primary care outpatient, a secondary care outpatient and one inpatient sample), with regard to metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) prevalences, individual MetSyn components and

  15. The metabolic syndrome and related characteristics in major depression: inpatients and outpatients compared metabolic differences across treatment settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luppino, F.S.; Bouvy, P.F.; Giltay, E.J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Zitman, F. G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to systematically compare patients with major depressive disorder from three different treatment settings (a primary care outpatient, a secondary care outpatient and one inpatient sample), with regard to metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) prevalences, individual MetSyn components and

  16. Development of a Computerized Adverse Drug Event (ADE) Monitor in the Outpatient Setting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seger, Andrew C; Gandhi, Tejal K; Hope, Carol; Overhage, J. M; Murray, Michael D; Weber, David; Fiskio, Julie; Teal, Evgenia; Bates, David W

    2005-01-01

    ...) monitor using electronic medical records from outpatient practices. We describe the steps involved in ADE monitor development and rule validation at large outpatient practices at Boston and Indianapolis...

  17. Perfectionism Group Treatment for Eating Disorders in an Inpatient, Partial Hospitalization, and Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Cheri A; Brosof, Leigh C; Vanzhula, Irina A; Bumberry, Laura; Zerwas, Stephanie; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-11-01

    Perfectionism is elevated in individuals with eating disorders and is posited to be a risk factor, maintaining factor, and treatment barrier. However, there has been little literature testing the feasibility and effectiveness of perfectionism interventions in individuals specifically with eating disorders in an open group format. In the current study, we tested the feasibility of (a) a short cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism intervention delivered in an inpatient, partial hospitalization, and outpatient for eating disorders setting (combined N = 28; inpatient n = 15; partial hospital n = 9; outpatient n = 4), as well as (b) a training for disseminating the treatment in these settings (N = 9). Overall, we found that it was feasible to implement a perfectionism group in each treatment setting, with both an open and closed group format. This research adds additional support for the implementation of perfectionism group treatment for eating disorders and provides information on the feasibility of implementing such interventions across multiple settings. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  18. Twelve-month discontinuation of etonogestrel implant in an outpatient pediatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlan, Elise; Mizraji, Kelly; Bonny, Andrea E

    2016-07-01

    The etonogestrel (ENG) contraceptive implant is the most effective reversible contraceptive method. Uptake remains limited in adolescents, a population at high risk for unintended pregnancy. The objectives of this study were to determine the 12-month discontinuation rate of the ENG implant among adolescents in an outpatient setting and to characterize risk factors for discontinuation. A retrospective chart review identified adolescent females aged 12 to 22years who received the ENG implant in one pediatric institution between January 1, 2011, and April 15, 2014. Patients were categorized into ENG discontinuers (removed prior to 12months) and ENG continuers (continued for ≥12months). Associations between demographic, clinical and postplacement characteristics with ENG discontinuation category were assessed with t tests, χ(2)/Fisher's Exact Tests and backwards stepwise logistic regression. Of the 750 patients who had an ENG implant inserted, 77 (10.3%) had the device removed prior to 12months of use. The mean length of implant use for those who discontinued was 7.5months. Problematic bleeding was the most commonly cited reason for discontinuation. Older age at time of insertion, history of pregnancy and ≥1 medical visit for implant concerns (not including removal) were independently predictive (p<.01) of method discontinuation. The vast majority of adolescents continued the ENG implant at 12months, making it an excellent contraceptive choice for adolescents within the outpatient pediatric setting. Greater efforts should be made to increase its use by pediatric providers. The ENG implant is an excellent contraceptive option for adolescents in the outpatient pediatric setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Simple, Safe Technique for Thorough Seroma Evacuation in the Outpatient Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie E. Park, MD, FACS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Seroma formation, a common postoperative complication in reconstructive cases, can lead to capsular contracture and increased office visits and expenses. The authors present a safe, novel technique for ensuring the thorough removal of serous fluid in the outpatient setting. By relying on access with an angiocatheter, potential injury to permanent implants is minimized. The use of low continuous wall suction obviates the need of manual suction via multiple syringes and offers a rapid and thorough evacuation of all types of seromas.

  20. A casemix study of patients seen by a dermatology trainee in rural and urban outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilakaratne, Dev; Warren, Lachlan; Menz, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    For 8 years South Australian dermatologists have provided an outreach service to the Northern Territory (NT), including rural and remote areas. In 2012 and 2013, a trainee accompanied a dermatologist on these outreach visits. This is the first prospective study that documents the spectrum of dermatological diseases requiring outpatient specialist input in various settings in the NT, and also the first study to compare the clinical experience of one Australian dermatology trainee in urban and rural settings. Characteristics of patients managed primarily by the outreach dermatology registrar were recorded prospectively from February 2013 to July 2013. The data from the trainee's urban encounters were compared to that of the rural centres. The spectrum of conditions seen in these two settings was placed in the disease categories specified in the Australasian College of Dermatologists (ACD) curriculum. The Royal Adelaide Hospital outpatient experience provided greater exposure to skin neoplasms, lymphoproliferative and myeloproliferative disorders and non-infectious neutrophilic/eosinophilic disorders. The outreach sites provided greater exposure to infections, adnexal diseases and genodermatoses. Both urban and rural experiences provided a broad exposure to the disease categories outlined in the ACD curriculum. The spectrum of disease requiring specialist dermatology input varies between urban South Australia and rural NT. The inclusion of dermatology trainees in outreach visits broadens their clinical exposure. It is recommended that other dermatology service providers in Australia consider documenting clinical casemix comparisons to assess dermatology demand, outcomes and trainee exposure. © 2014 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  1. Patterns of psychotropic medication use in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alosaimi FD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fahad D Alosaimi,1 Abdulhadi Alhabbad,2 Mohammed F Abalhassan,3 Ebtihaj O Fallata,4 Nasser M Alzain,5 Mohammad Zayed Alassiry,6 Bander Abdullah Haddad71Department of Psychiatry, King Saud University, Riyadh, 2Department of Psychiatry, Prince Mohammed Medical City, Aljouf, 3Department of Medicine, Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj, 4Department of Psychiatry, Mental Health Hospital, Jeddah, 5Department of Psychiatry, Al-Amal Complex for Mental Health, Dammam, 6Medical Services Department, Abha Psychiatric Hospital, Abha, 7Department of Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Ministry of National Guard, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaObjective: To study the pattern of psychotropic medication use and compare this pattern between inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia.Method: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted between July 2012 and June 2014 on patients seeking psychiatric advice at major hospitals in five main regions of Saudi Arabia. Male (n=651 and female (n=594 patients who signed the informed consent form and were currently or had been previously using psychotropic medications, irrespective of the patient’s type of psychiatric diagnosis and duration of the disease, were included. A total of 1,246 patients were found to be suitable in the inclusion criteria of whom 464 were inpatients while 782 were outpatients.Results: Several studied demographic factors have shown that compared with outpatients, inpatients were more likely to be male (P=0.004, unmarried (P<0.001, have less number of children (1–3; P=0.002, unemployed (P=0.001, have a lower family income (<3,000 SR; P<0.001, live in rural communities (P<0.001, have a lower body mass index (P=0.001, and are smokers (P<0.001; however, there were no differences with regard to age or educational levels. The current frequency of use of psychotropic medications in overall patients was antipsychotics (76.6%, antidepressants (41.4%, mood stabilizers

  2. The consumer quality index anthroposophic healthcare: a construction and validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Evi B; Ong, Rob R S; Heybroek, Rachel; Delnoij, Diana M J; Baars, Erik W

    2014-04-02

    Accounting for the patients' perspective on quality of care has become increasingly important in the development of Evidence Based Medicine as well as in governmental policies. In the Netherlands the Consumer Quality (CQ) Index has been developed to measure the quality of care from the patients' perspective in different healthcare sectors in a standardized manner. Although the scientific accountability of anthroposophic healthcare as a form of integrative medicine is growing, patient experiences with anthroposophic healthcare have not been measured systematically. In addition, the specific anthroposophic aspects are not measured by means of existing CQ Indexes. To enable accountability of quality of the anthroposophic healthcare from the patients' perspective the aim of this study is the construction and validation of a CQ Index for anthroposophic healthcare. Construction in three phases: Phase 1. Determining anthroposophic quality aspects: literature study and focus groups. Phase 2. Adding new questions and validating the new questionnaire. Research population: random sample from 7910 patients of 22 anthroposophic GPs. survey, mixed mode by means of the Dillman method. Measuring instrument: experience questionnaire: CQ Index General Practice (56 items), added with 27 new anthroposophic items added and an item-importance questionnaire (anthroposophic items only). Factor analysis, scale construction, internal consistency (Chronbach's Alpha), inter-item-correlation, discriminative ability (Intra Class Correlation) and inter-factor-correlations. Phase 3. Modulation and selection of new questions based on results. Criteria of retaining items: general: a limited amount of items, statistical: part of a reliable scale and inter-item-correlation <0,7, and theoretical. Phase 1. 27 anthroposophic items. Phase 2. Two new anthroposophic scales: Scale AntroposophicTreatmentGP: seven items, Alpha=0,832, ICC=4,2 Inter-factor-correlation with existing GP-scales range from r=0

  3. Estimating the health care costs associated with recurrent cellulitis managed in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, Jessica; Strazzula, Lauren; Vedak, Priyanka; Kroshinsky, Daniela

    2018-04-01

    Recurrent cellulitis is diagnosed in 22% to 49% of all cellulitis cases, but little is known about the costs associated with these cases. To characterize patients with recurrent cellulitis in the outpatient setting and estimate the associated costs. A retrospective chart review was conducted for adult patients who presented to the outpatient facilities at our institution from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2011, with recurrent cellulitis. Data provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services were used. A total of 157 patients were identified; 56% were male, with a mean age of 62.7 years. The mean number of episodes of cellulitis per patient was 3. Antibiotics were prescribed for all patients with a diagnosis of recurrent cellulitis, with 93% treated with oral antibiotics and 17.6% treated with intravenous antibiotics. A total of 1081 laboratory and 175 radiologic imaging tests were ordered. The minimum average cost per cellulitis episode was $586.91; the average cost per visit was $292.50. Retrospective study; use of a single, large academic institution; and utilization of cost estimates that may not adequately reflect the variation of costs across closed-system sites or geographic regions. There was no accounting for the nonfinancial or opportunity costs associated with hospitalization, such as lost days of employment or child care and any long-term morbidities, among others. Recurrent cellulitis in the outpatient setting costs about $586.91 per episode. Although there is no criterion standard for diagnosis or treatment of cellulitis, our analysis demonstrates the need for more evidence-based management to achieve better outcomes and reduce the significant health care costs. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Anthroposophic lifestyle influences the concentration of metals in placenta and cord blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerstedt, Sara [The Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Kippler, Maria [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, 171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Scheynius, Annika; Gutzeit, Cindy [Department of Medicine Solna, Translational Immunology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Mie, Axel [The Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Alm, Johan [The Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Sachs' Children and Youth Hospital, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden); Vahter, Marie, E-mail: marie.vahter@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, 171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-01-15

    Allergic diseases develop in genetically susceptible individuals in a complex interplay with the environment, usually early in life. We have previously shown that the anthroposophic lifestyle is associated with reduced risk of allergic disease in children, but details on the influencing environmental factors are largely unknown. This study aims to elucidate if anthroposophic lifestyle influences fetal exposure to selected toxic and essential elements. Randomly selected non-smoking mothers with (n=40) and without (n=40) anthroposophic lifestyle from the prospective birth cohort ALADDIN were included. Concentrations of 12 toxic and essential elements were analyzed in full term placentas and in the erythrocyte fractions of maternal peripheral blood and of umbilical cord blood, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Cadmium concentrations in maternal blood and placenta were significantly higher in mothers with an anthroposophic lifestyle (p<0.001), while concentrations in cord blood were generally low, irrespective of lifestyle. Cobalt concentrations were higher in both maternal blood, placenta and cord blood in the anthroposophic group. Lead concentrations were higher in maternal blood and cord blood, but not placenta, of mothers with anthroposophic lifestyle. Analysis of covariance, including lifestyle, parity, maternal age, gestational age, vegetarian diet, use of herbal medicine and occupation in the model, showed that mainly the anthroposophic lifestyle was significantly associated with cadmium concentrations. In conclusion, women with an anthroposophic lifestyle had higher concentrations of cadmium, cobalt and lead concentrations. Cadmium concentrations might have been influenced by a diet rich in vegetables and/or low iron status of the mothers. - Highlights: • Toxic elements in mother–newborn pairs in relation to anthroposophic lifestyle. • Anthroposophic lifestyle was associated with higher levels of cadmium, cobalt and lead. • A diet rich

  5. Anthroposophic lifestyle influences the concentration of metals in placenta and cord blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagerstedt, Sara; Kippler, Maria; Scheynius, Annika; Gutzeit, Cindy; Mie, Axel; Alm, Johan; Vahter, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Allergic diseases develop in genetically susceptible individuals in a complex interplay with the environment, usually early in life. We have previously shown that the anthroposophic lifestyle is associated with reduced risk of allergic disease in children, but details on the influencing environmental factors are largely unknown. This study aims to elucidate if anthroposophic lifestyle influences fetal exposure to selected toxic and essential elements. Randomly selected non-smoking mothers with (n=40) and without (n=40) anthroposophic lifestyle from the prospective birth cohort ALADDIN were included. Concentrations of 12 toxic and essential elements were analyzed in full term placentas and in the erythrocyte fractions of maternal peripheral blood and of umbilical cord blood, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Cadmium concentrations in maternal blood and placenta were significantly higher in mothers with an anthroposophic lifestyle (p<0.001), while concentrations in cord blood were generally low, irrespective of lifestyle. Cobalt concentrations were higher in both maternal blood, placenta and cord blood in the anthroposophic group. Lead concentrations were higher in maternal blood and cord blood, but not placenta, of mothers with anthroposophic lifestyle. Analysis of covariance, including lifestyle, parity, maternal age, gestational age, vegetarian diet, use of herbal medicine and occupation in the model, showed that mainly the anthroposophic lifestyle was significantly associated with cadmium concentrations. In conclusion, women with an anthroposophic lifestyle had higher concentrations of cadmium, cobalt and lead concentrations. Cadmium concentrations might have been influenced by a diet rich in vegetables and/or low iron status of the mothers. - Highlights: • Toxic elements in mother–newborn pairs in relation to anthroposophic lifestyle. • Anthroposophic lifestyle was associated with higher levels of cadmium, cobalt and lead. • A diet rich

  6. Management of lower respiratory tract infection in outpatient settings: Focus on clarithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Mahashur

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI is a broad terminology which includes acute bronchitis, pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/chronic bronchitis (AECB, and acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis. Acute LRTIs (ALRTIs are one of the common clinical problems in community and hospital settings. Management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and AECB may pose challenges because of diagnostic difficulty in differentiating infections caused by typical and atypical microorganisms and rising rates of antimicrobial resistance. Beta-lactam antibiotics, macrolides, and fluoroquinolones are routinely prescribed medicines for the management of ALRTIs. Macrolides are time-tested and effective agents for the treatment of LRTIs. Clarithromycin, a macrolide, offers several benefits in the management of ALRTIs. In this article, we discuss the management approach of LRTIs with focus on clarithromycin in the management of mild-to-moderate LRTIs (CAP and AECB, i.e., in outpatient settings.

  7. Self-esteem in adolescents treated in an outpatient mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrcin-Talbott, M A; Pullen, L; Ehrenberger, H; Zandstra, K; Muenchen, B

    1998-01-01

    Although self-esteem is an important concept, nursing has only begun to focus on the significance of self-esteem as a mechanism for achieving wellness among adolescents, and as a variable for targeted intervention. Nursing studies identifying self-esteem as the primary focus of their research in an adolescent population seeking treatment in mental health settings are scarce. The Roy Adaptation Model's Theory of a Person as an Adaptive System was used to guide this descriptive, correlational study. Research examined the self-report of self-esteem on age, gender, smoking, exercise, depression, anger, and parental alcohol use in a sample of adolescents ages 12-19 years who were being treated in an outpatient mental health setting.

  8. Intimate partner violence perpetrators in a forensic psychiatric outpatient setting: criminal history, psychopathology, and victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrichs, Jens; Bogaerts, Stefan; Sijtsema, Jelle; Klerx-van Mierlo, Fanny

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated criminological, psychopathological, and victimological profiles of intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators in a sample of 119 Dutch female and male forensic psychiatric outpatients aged 18 to 58 years. In addition, differences in criminological, psychopathological, and victimological factors between IPV perpetrators (n = 61, 51.3%) and non-intimate violence (NIV) perpetrators (n = 58, 48.7%) were examined. All data, including information on demographics, criminal history, history of psychological, sexual, and physical victimization during childhood or adolescence, family history of psychopathology, history of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence, and mental disorders, were derived from archival electronic medical records. Mental disorders were measured using structured psychiatric interviews and final consensus diagnoses were established during weekly case consultations. Both IPV and NIV perpetrators displayed high rates of criminal history, psychopathology, and previous victimization, but the two groups did not differ in these factors with two exceptions. IPV perpetrators were significantly more likely to have higher rates of previous physical victimization and intermittent explosive disorder than NIV perpetrators. The current study suggests that a history of physical victimization and intermittent explosive disorder are specific characteristics of IPV perpetrators in a forensic psychiatric outpatient setting. Future research should focus on mechanisms explaining the association of childhood victimization and IPV and increase our understanding of the role of intermittent explosive disorder in IPV. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Antipsychotic Polypharmacy among Children and Young Adults in Office-Based or Hospital Outpatient Department Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minji Sohn

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was three-fold: (1 to estimate the national trends in antipsychotic (AP polypharmacy among 6- to 24-year-old patients in the U.S.; (2 to identify frequently used AP agents and mental disorder diagnoses related to AP polypharmacy; and (3 to assess the strength of association between AP polypharmacy and patient/provider characteristics. We used publicly available ambulatory health care datasets to evaluate AP polypharmacy in office-based or hospital outpatient department settings to conduct a cross-sectional study. First, national visit rates between 2007 and 2011 were estimated using sampling weights. Second, common diagnoses and drugs used in AP polypharmacy were identified. Third, a multivariate logistic regression model was developed to assess the strength of association between AP polypharmacy and patient and provider characteristics. Between 2007 and 2011, approximately 2% of office-based or hospital outpatient department visits made by 6- to 24-year-old patients included one or more AP prescriptions. Of these visits, 5% were classified as AP polypharmacy. The most common combination of AP polypharmacy was to use two or more second-generation APs. Also, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia were the two most frequent primary mental disorder diagnoses among AP polypharmacy visits. The factors associated with AP polypharmacy were: older age (young adults, black, having one or more non-AP prescriptions, and having schizophrenia or ADHD.

  10. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of body-psychotherapy in out-patient settings (EEBP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koemeda-Lutz, Margit; Kaschke, Martin; Revenstorf, Dirk; Scherrmann, Thomas; Weiss, Halko; Soeder, Ulrich

    2006-12-01

    Results from a multi-center evaluation study of body-psychotherapies are reported. The design is naturalistic and evaluates the effectiveness of routine applications of body-psychotherapy in outpatient settings. 3 German and 5 Swiss member institutes of the European Association for Body Psychotherapy (EABP: 38 members) participated, the Swiss institutes also being members of the Schweizer Charta für Psychotherapie. At three points of measurement (at intake, after 6 months and at the end of therapy [after two years at maximum]) well established questionnaires (e. g. BAI, BDI, SCL-90-R, IIP-D) were administered. Meanwhile we also have catamnestic data at 1 year after termination of therapy (n = 42). Patients who seek body-psychotherapeutic treatment (n = 342 participated in the study) compare to other outpatient psychotherapeutic patients concerning sociodemographic data, level of impairment and psychopathology. After six months of therapy (n = 253) these patients have significantly improved with small to moderate intraclass effect sizes. At the end of therapy or after two years of treatment at maximum (n = 160) large effect sizes are attained in all scales. These are lasting results according to catamnestic data (n = 42). This naturalistic prospective field study claims to supply evidence for the effectiveness of the evaluated body-psychotherapeutic methods and to classify as phase IV- ("routine application") and level I-evidence.

  11. Health Services OutPatient Experience questionnaire: factorial validity and reliability of a patient-centered outcome measure for outpatient settings in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coluccia A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Anna Coluccia, Fabio Ferretti, Andrea PozzaDepartment of Medical Sciences, Surgery and Neurosciences, Santa Maria alle Scotte University Hospital, University of Siena, Siena, ItalyPurpose: The patient-centered approach to health care does not seem to be sufficiently developed in the Italian context, and is still characterized by the biomedical model. In addition, there is a lack of validated outcome measures to assess outpatient experience as an aspect common to a variety of settings. The current study aimed to evaluate the factorial validity, reliability, and invariance across sex of the Health Services OutPatient Experience (HSOPE questionnaire, a short ten-item measure of patient-centeredness for Italian adult outpatients. The rationale for unidimensionality of the measure was that it could cover global patient experience as a process common to patients with a variety of diseases and irrespective of the phase of treatment course.Patients and methods: The HSOPE was compiled by 1,532 adult outpatients (51% females, mean age 59.22 years, standard deviation 16.26 receiving care in ten facilities at the Santa Maria alle Scotte University Hospital of Siena, Italy. The sample represented all the age cohorts. Twelve percent were young adults, 57% were adults, and 32% were older adults. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to evaluate factor structure. Reliability was evaluated as internal consistency using Cronbach’s α. Factor invariance was assessed through multigroup analyses.Results: Both exploratory and confirmatory analyses suggested a clearly defined unidimensional structure of the measure, with all the ten items having salient loadings on a single factor. Internal consistency was excellent (α=0.95. Indices of model fit supported a single-factor structure for both male and female outpatient groups. Young adult outpatients had significantly lower scores on perceived patient-centeredness relative to older adults. No

  12. Penile prosthesis surgery in out-patient setting: Effectiveness and costs in the “spending review” era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Mondaini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Penile implant patients are required to remain in the hospital after the operation for monitoring, antibiotic and analgesia administration. Cost containment, however, has resulted in the increased use of ambulatory surgery settings for many surgical procedures. Few studies have studied the feasibility of performing penile prosthesis insertion in an outpatient setting. The results are controversial and nowadays, in the most of centers that deal with prosthetic surgery, patients are still hospitalized. Aim: The aim of our investigation was to compare the feasibility of the performance as well as the complication profiles of penile implant surgery performed in an in-patient and an outpatient setting at a single center by a single surgeon. Methods: From January 2009 to June 2014, 50 patients of the same uro-andrological unit underwent penile prosthesis implantation performed by a single surgeon (N.M.. Twenty implantations were performed in an ambulatory day surgery setting. Main outcome measures: Effectiveness and costs of outpatient setting versus the in-patient setting of the penile prosthesis surgery. Results: There were some differences between the two groups in the intra-operative parameters, such as, operating time. Time lost from work was similar in both groups approximating 14 days. The mean number of analgesic pills ingested by the patients post-operatively was similar in both groups, averaging just under 25 pills per patient. There weren’t post-operative complications in the outpatient group. Cost were 17% less in outpatient clinic. Conclusions: The outpatient setting for this surgery is safe and effective even in patients with comorbidities or in case of secondary procedures. Costs are reduced by 17%.

  13. Caring touch--patients' experiences in an anthroposophic clinical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte; Hörberg, Ulrica; Dahlberg, Karin

    2015-12-01

    This study describes the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspective in an anthroposophic clinical context where caring touch is often used to promote health and alleviate suffering. The aim of the study was to explore and phenomenologically describe the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspectives. The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach in order to understand and describe human existential phenomena. Ten female patients were interviewed in an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden. The findings show how caring touch has multifaceted meanings and makes the patients' feel present and anchored in a meaningful context. The patients' feel that they are seen, accepted and confirmed. Furthermore, touch creates a caring space where the patients become receptive for care and has the power to alleviate the patients' suffering, as well as to frighten and cause or worsen the suffering. In order to take advantage of the caring potential, the patient needs to be invited to a respectful and sensitive form of touch. An interpersonal flexible space is necessary where the touch can be effective, and where a dynamic interplay can develop. In conclusion, caring touch is an opportunity for carers to support well-being and health. The carers need to approach their patients in both a sensitive and reflective way. A caring science perspective can serve as a help to further understand touch as a unique caring act. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  14. The fastest of three trials is recommended for Timed Up & Go testing of functional mobility in an outpatient geriatric setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Mette Linding

    The fastest of three trials is recommended for Timed Up & Go testing of functional mobility in an outpatient geriatric setting Bloch, Mette; Metropol; mettebloch@hotmail.com Tange Kristensen Morten; Department of Physiotherapy and Orthopaedic Surgery. Background/Introduction: The Timed Up & Go (TUG...... trials are needed to produce the best performance. Purpose: To examine if the fastest of three timed TUG trials producesbetter (faster) results than the recording of the second trial in elderly people when following an outpatient geriatric rehabilitation programme. Material and Methods: A total of 32...... the TUG test is performed among elderly people in an outpatient geriatric setting. In addition, we found a significant correlation between the modified CST, age and the TUG test when using the fastest of three TUG trials. References: Bohannon RW. Reference values for the timed up and go test:a descriptive...

  15. Quality of care in the oncology outpatient setting from patients' perspective: a systematic review of questionnaires' content and psychometric performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brédart, A.; Kop, J.L.; Efficace, F.; Beaudeau, A.; Brito, T.; Dolbeault, S.; Aaronson, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer care is increasingly provided in the outpatient setting, requiring specific monitoring of care quality. The patients' perspective is an important indicator of care quality and needs to be assessed with well designed, psychometrically sound questionnaires. We performed a systematic

  16. Use of STOP Bang Questionnaire in Outpatient Setting: Increasing Both Identification of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients and Polysomnography Referral Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-16

    Outpatient Setting: Increasing Both Identification of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients and Polysomnographv Referral Accuracy presented at/published to...NO F\\RIDN G SCURCE: 9 00 YOU NEED FlJ NDING SUPFORT FO.~ FUBLICATICN PURPOSES : LYES 18) r...r.> 𔃽. IS THIS M.-."TERfAJ.. CLJ\\SSIFIED? C: YES ZJ .NO

  17. Screening for body dysmorphic disorder in a dermatology outpatient setting at a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fibin Thanveer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: A distressing pre-occupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance with a marked negative effect on the patient's life is the core symptom of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD. Aim: To screen the patients attending a dermatology clinic at a tertiary care centre for BDD using the BDD-dermatology version (DV questionnaire. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study enrolled 245 consecutive patients from the dermatology outpatients clinic. Methods: The demographic details were collected and the DV of BDD screening questionnaire was administered. A 5-point Likert scale was used for objective scoring of the stated concern and patients who scored ≥3 were excluded from the study. Statistical Analysis Used: The results were statistically analysed. Differences between the groups were investigated by Chi-square analysis for categorical variables, and Fisher exact test wherever required. Results: A total of 177 patients completed the study, and of these, eight patients screened positive for BDD. The rate of BDD in patients presenting with cosmetic complaints was 7.5% and in those with general dermatology, complaints were 2.1%, with no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.156. Facial flaws (62.5% were the most common concern followed by body asymmetry (25%. Conclusion: The rates of BDD found in this study are comparable but at a lower rate than that reported in literature data.

  18. Resistance and utilisation pattern of antibacterial agents in outpatient settings in two Teaching Hospitals in Colombo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senadheera, G P; Sri Ranganathan, S; Patabendige, G; Fernando, G H; Gamage, D; Maneke, R M; Fernandopulle, B M

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial resistance (ABR) is a public threat. Sri Lanka is a country with limited surveillance of ABR in the community. The WHO methodology was adapted to identify ABR in outpatient settings (nonhospitalised patients) and its link to consumption of antibiotics. It was a cross-sectional descriptive community based study to collect ABR data from Out Patient Department (OPD) of two leading Teaching Hospitals in Colombo district. The indicator organism Escherichia coli (E. coli) was obtained from the urine specimens of patients who were suspected to have urinary tract infections. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed for commonly used oral antibiotics using disc diffusion method. The antibiotic consumption aggregate data were collected from the OPD pharmacies of the said hospitals and expressed as Defined Daily Doses (DDD) per 1000 inhabitants per 1000 day. Of the 2183 urine samples, pathogenic E. coli was isolated in 9.3% (204), and 8% (n=16) of them were Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamase (ESBL) producers. E.coli was most resistant to ampicillin (85%), followed by nalidixic acid (58.5%), trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (47.1%), ciprofloxacin (46.2%), norfloxacin (43.7%) amoxicillin /clavulanic acid (36.3%) and nitrofurantoin (15%). Multi-drug resistance was seen in 44%. Amoxicillin was the most frequently consumed antibacterial agent (2.65 DDD per 1000 inhabitants per day). There is an alarmingly high antibiotic resistance in the non-hospitalised patients indicating high prevalence of E. coli resistance in the community.

  19. Resident Documentation of Social Determinants of Health: Effects of a Teaching Tool in the Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Milani; Bathory, Eleanor; Scholnick, Jenna; White-Davis, Tanya; Choi, Jaeun; Braganza, Sandra

    2018-04-01

    Social determinants of health (SDH) significantly affect the health of children and thus, screening is important in pediatric primary care. We assessed the use of a formal social history taking tool after a 2-phase intervention. The first phase (P1) was a teaching module describing SDH and community resources and the second phase (P2) consisted of visual reminders to use the tool. Patient charts (n = 322) were reviewed pre- and postintervention. Residents had higher documentation rates of Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program use and housing subsidies at post-P1 and at post-P(1 + 2) (WIC, P = .01 and P = .03, respectively; housing, P = .02 and P = .04, respectively), and higher documentation rates of food stamp utilization at post-P(1 + 2) ( P = .04), as compared with baseline. Implementation of a simple teaching tool in the outpatient setting enabled residents to document income benefits and housing. Further studies should be done to evaluate effective teaching methods to elicit other important SDH.

  20. Development of Quality Metrics to Evaluate Pediatric Hematologic Oncology Care in the Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichman, Jennifer; Punnett, Angela; Gupta, Sumit

    2017-03-01

    There are currently no clinic-level quality of care metrics for outpatient pediatric oncology. We sought to develop a list of quality of care metrics for a leukemia-lymphoma (LL) clinic using a consensus process that can be adapted to other clinic settings. Medline-Ovid was searched for quality indicators relevant to pediatric oncology. A provisional list of 27 metrics spanning 7 categories was generated and circulated to a Consensus Group (CG) of LL clinic medical and nursing staff. A Delphi process comprising 2 rounds of ranking generated consensus on a final list of metrics. Consensus was defined as ≥70% of CG members ranking a metric within 2 consecutive scores. In round 1, 19 of 27 (70%) metrics reached consensus. CG members' comments resulted in 4 new metrics and revision of 8 original metrics. All 31 metrics were included in round 2. Twenty-four of 31 (77%) metrics reached consensus after round 2. Thirteen were chosen for the final list based on highest scores and eliminating redundancy. These included: patient communication/education; pain management; delay in access to clinical psychology, documentation of chemotherapy, of diagnosis/extent of disease, of treatment plan and of follow-up scheme; referral to transplant; radiation exposure during follow-up; delay until chemotherapy; clinic cancellations; and school attendance. This study provides a model of quality metric development that other clinics may use for local use. The final metrics will be used for ongoing quality improvement in the LL clinic.

  1. The metabolic syndrome and related characteristics in major depression: inpatients and outpatients compared: metabolic differences across treatment settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luppino, Floriana S; Bouvy, Paul F; Giltay, Erik J; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Zitman, Frans G

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to systematically compare patients with major depressive disorder from three different treatment settings (a primary care outpatient, a secondary care outpatient and one inpatient sample), with regard to metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) prevalences, individual MetSyn components and related metabolic variables. The outpatient samples were drawn from the ongoing Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (302 primary care and 445 secondary care outpatients). The inpatient sample (n=80) was recruited from five Dutch mental health hospitals. The assessments of MetSyn and related variables [waist circumference (WC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), LDL and total cholesterol (TC)] were compared using analysis of (co)variance and regression analysis, whereas medication analyses examined the extent to which clinical differences (e.g., depression severity or medication use) mediated the observed metabolic differences across setting. MetSyn prevalences (26% primary, 24% secondary care and 28% inpatients) did not significantly differ (P=.71). WC, BMI, LDL cholesterol, glucose and DBP were not significantly different across settings. However, WHR, TC and triglyceride levels were higher in inpatients than in both outpatients groups, while HDL cholesterol levels and SBP were lower. There was some mediating role for tricyclic and non-selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor antidepressant use, but overall, the mediating role of clinical differences was limited. Although overall MetSyn prevalences did not differ, patterns of individual MetSyn-related variables differed more markedly across depressed inpatients and outpatients. Inpatients showed more adverse WHR and serum lipid profiles, while SBP levels were lower. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Systematic Review on Communication and Relations between Health Care Professionals and Patients with Cancer in Outpatient Settings Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prip, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Background: The development in cancer care has shifted towards shorter hospital stays and more outpatient treatment. Today, cancer care and treatment predominantly takes place in outpatient settings where encounters between patients and health care professionals are often brief. This development...... will probably continue internationally as the global cancer burden seems to be growing significantly. Furthermore, the number of patients who require ambulatory treatments such as chemotherapy is increasing. Research has shown there is a possible risk of overlooking cancer patients´ needs when the time allotted...

  3. Intimate partner violence perpetrators in a forensic psychiatric outpatient setting : Criminal history, psychopathology, and victimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrichs, J.; Bogaerts, S.; Sijtsema, J.J.; Klerx, F.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated criminological, psychopathological, and victimological profiles of intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators in a sample of 119 Dutch female and male forensic psychiatric outpatients aged 18 to 58 years. In addition, differences in criminological, psychopathological, and

  4. Penile prosthesis surgery in out-patient setting: Effectiveness and costs in the “spending review” era

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Mondaini; Enrico Sarti; Gianluca Giubilei; Andrea Gavazzi; Antonio Costanzi; Arben Belba; Tommaso Cai; Riccardo Bartoletti

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Penile implant patients are required to remain in the hospital after the operation for monitoring, antibiotic and analgesia administration. Cost containment, however, has resulted in the increased use of ambulatory surgery settings for many surgical procedures. Few studies have studied the feasibility of performing penile prosthesis insertion in an outpatient setting. The results are controversial and nowadays, in the most of centers that deal with prosthetic surgery, patients a...

  5. [Sociodemographic profiles, addictive and mental comorbidity in cannabis users in an outpatient specific setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillem, E; Pelissolo, A; Vorspan, F; Bouchez-Arbabzadeh, S; Lépine, J-P

    2009-06-01

    In the 1990s, cannabis consumption in France increased considerably. So, in 10 years, the number of adolescents reporting regular cannabis use (10 or more times during the last 12 months) tripled. In 2004, an official program to address problems related to cannabis addiction was implemented. As part of this program, specific outpatient settings for cannabis use disorders were created. We present the sociodemographic characteristics, the prevalence of cannabis, alcohol and others psychoactive substances and the prevalence of mental disorders in 90 cannabis users seen at an outpatient specific setting for cannabis use disorders in the Lariboisière hospital (a university hospital in Paris). Twelve months prevalence of substance abuse and dependence, psychiatric diagnoses based on the DSM-IV and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) results are described. The study population had the following characteristics: 67% male, mean age 27.5 (S.D.=8.4) years and 59% single or divorced. Approximately, two-thirds of the users (67%) were students or currently working and 32% were unemployed. Twenty-two percent of the cannabis users received unemployment, welfare or disability benefits and 11% declared no source of revenue. Most of the users (63%) decided on their own to seek care at the setting. Seventy-three percent of the subjects had seen a psychologist or a psychiatrist in the past, with or without relation to cannabis use. By far, most of the users were cannabis dependent (82%) and 9% cannabis abusers in the last 12 months according to DSM-IV criteria prior to their visit. Seven percent of the cannabis users had alcohol dependence and 7% were abusers. The 12 months prevalence of cocaine or ecstasy dependence was 2% and the prevalence of benzodiazepines, heroin or stimulants dependence 1%. The main substances used over lifetime were tobacco (99%); alcohol (96%); cocaine (41%); benzodiazepines and hypnotics (41%); ecstasy (40%) and heroin (23%). Four

  6. Transition of Care from the Emergency Department to the Outpatient Setting: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad S. Kessler

    2018-02-01

    expectations and multiple barriers to effective communication. This study highlights the need to optimize technology for an effective transition of care from the ED to the outpatient setting.

  7. Transition of Care from the Emergency Department to the Outpatient Setting: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Chad S.; Schwarz, Whitney W.; Schmitz, Gillian R.; Oh, Laura; Smith, Michael D.; Gross, Eric A.; House, Hans; Wadman, Michael C.; Lo, Bruce M.

    2018-01-01

    and multiple barriers to effective communication. This study highlights the need to optimize technology for an effective transition of care from the ED to the outpatient setting.

  8. Patient safety culture in China: a case study in an outpatient setting in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaojie; Liu, Weiwei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhihong; Wang, Peng

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the patient safety culture in an outpatient setting in Beijing and explore the meaning and implications of the safety culture from the perspective of health workers and patients. A mixed methods approach involving a questionnaire survey and in-depth interviews was adopted. Among the 410 invited staff members, 318 completed the Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Culture (HSOPC). Patient safety culture was described using 12 subscale scores. Inter-subscale correlation analysis, ANOVA and stepwise multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify the determinants of the patient safety culture scores. Interviewees included 22 patients selected through opportunity sampling and 27 staff members selected through purposive sampling. The interview data were analysed thematically. The survey respondents perceived high levels of unsafe care but had personally reported few events. Lack of 'communication openness' was identified as a major safety culture problem, and a perception of 'penalty' was the greatest barrier to the encouragement of error reporting. Cohesive 'teamwork within units', while found to be an area of strength, conversely served as a protective and defensive mechanism for medical practice. Low levels of trust between providers and consumers and lack of management support constituted an obstacle to building a positive patient safety culture. This study in China demonstrates that a punitive approach to error is still widespread despite increasing awareness of unsafe care, and managers have been slow in acknowledging the importance of building a positive patient safety culture. Strong 'teamwork within units', a common area of strength, could fuel the concealment of errors. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Documentation of chemotherapy administration by nursing staff in inpatient and outpatient oncology/hematology settings: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Allison; Stephenson, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    Documentation of chemotherapy administration by nursing staff is undertaken in a written and electronic form at the Canberra Hospital and has been identified as requiring improvement in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Safe prescribing, dispensing, administration and documentation are essential to patient safety, outcomes and quality of care, and to staff safety. Due to the limited available research and evidence on this topic, recommended safety standards for the safe administration of chemotherapy formed the framework for audit criteria and documentation requirements. The aim of this evidence implementation project was to improve documentation of chemotherapy administration by nursing staff in inpatient and outpatient oncology/hematology units, thereby improving patient care and safety, as well as meeting the legal and educational responsibilities of the nursing staff. This evidence implementation project used the JBI Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice audit and feedback tool. A baseline audit was conducted to assess current practice and identify areas requiring improvement, followed by reflection on results and design, and implementation of strategies for documentation improvement. Lastly, a follow-up audit was conducted to assess compliance and practice improvement. The baseline audit results highlighted areas of good current practice, areas requiring improvement and barriers to data collection and practice improvement. Strategies based on raising awareness of best practice guidelines, education and useful tools were developed and implemented. It was evident that the electronic documentation prompts used in the outpatient setting, compared to paper-based documentation in the inpatient setting, contributed to better compliance to documentation guidelines. The follow-up audit demonstrated improved practices across both the inpatient and outpatient settings. The aim of improving documentation after

  10. "Ten Commandments" for the Appropriate use of Antibiotics by the Practicing Physician in an Outpatient Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levy-Hara, Gabriel; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F; Gould, Ian

    2011-01-01

    A multi-national working group on antibiotic stewardship, from the International Society of Chemotherapy, put together ten recommendations to physicians prescribing antibiotics to outpatients. These recommendations are: (1) use antibiotics only when needed; teach the patient how to manage symptoms...

  11. Psychotherapeutic interventions for cannabis abuse and/or dependence in outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, C; Lavie, E; Fatséas, M; Auriacombe, M

    2006-07-19

    problems related to cannabis use were not consistently different. The included studies were too heterogenous and could not allow to draw up a clear conclusion. The studies comparing different therapeutic modalities raise important questions about the duration, intensity and type of treatment. The generalizability of findings is also unknown because the studies have been conducted in a limited number of localities with fairly homogenous samples of treatment seekers. However, the low abstinence rate indicated that cannabis dependence is not easily treated by psychotherapies in outpatient settings.

  12. Challenges of making a diagnosis in the outpatient setting: a multi-site survey of primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Urmimala; Bonacum, Doug; Strull, William; Spitzmueller, Christiane; Jin, Nancy; López, Andrea; Giardina, Traber Davis; Meyer, Ashley N D; Singh, Hardeep

    2012-08-01

    Although misdiagnosis in the outpatient setting leads to significant patient harm and wasted resources, it is not well studied. The authors surveyed primary care physicians (PCPs) about barriers to timely diagnosis in the outpatient setting and assessed their perceptions of diagnostic difficulty. Surveys of PCPs practicing in an integrated health system across 10 geographically dispersed states in 2005. The survey elicited information on key cognitive failures (including in clinical knowledge or judgement) for a specific case, and solicited strategies for reducing diagnostic delays. Content analysis was used to categorise cognitive failures and strategies for improvement. The authors examined the extent and predictors of diagnostic difficulty, defined as reporting >5% patients difficult to diagnose. Of 1817 physicians surveyed, 1054 (58%) responded; 848 (80%) respondents primarily practiced in outpatient settings and had an assigned patient panel (inclusion sample). Inadequate knowledge (19.9%) was the most commonly reported cognitive factor. Half reported >5% of their patients were difficult to diagnose; more experienced physicians reported less diagnostic difficulty. In adjusted analyses, problems with information processing (information availability and time to review it) and the referral process were associated with greater diagnostic difficulty. Strategies for improvement most commonly involved workload issues (panel size, non-visit tasks). PCPs report a variety of reasons for diagnostic difficulties in primary care practice. In this study, knowledge gaps appear to be a prominent concern. Interventions that address these gaps as well as practice level issues such as time to process diagnostic information and better subspecialty input may reduce diagnostic difficulties in primary care.

  13. Misuse of antibiotics reserved for hospital settings in outpatients: a prospective clinical audit in a university hospital in Southern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Manon; Bornet, Charléric; Monges, Philippe; Stein, Andreas; Gensollen, Sophie; Seng, Piseth

    2016-07-01

    Some antibiotics are reserved essentially for hospital settings owing to cost effectiveness and in order to fight the emerging antibiotic resistance crisis. In some cases, antibiotics reserved exclusively for use in hospitals may be prescribed in outpatients for serious infections or in the absence of a therapeutic alternative. A 30-day prospective audit of outpatient prescriptions of antibiotics reserved exclusively for use in hospitals was performed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relevance of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions by measuring appropriateness according to guidelines. During the study period, 53 prescriptions were included, only 40% of which were appropriate. Among the 32 inappropriate prescriptions, 4 cases lacked microbial arguments, 1 case was not adequate for the infection type, 1 case involved an incorrect antibiotic dosage, 1 case involved an incorrect interval of dose administration, 3 cases had a therapeutic alternative and 22 cases were not recommended. Of the 53 prescriptions, 66% were started in hospital and 34% in outpatients. Only 25% of cases were prescribed with infectious diseases specialist (IDS) advice, 64% were based on microbiological documentation and 13% had a negative bacterial culture. Inappropriate prescriptions were usually observed in antibiotic lock therapy, skin infections, Clostridium difficile colitis, intra-abdominal infections and intravascular catheter-related infections. Outpatient prescriptions of antimicrobial drugs reserved exclusively for use in hospitals are frequently inappropriate. We recommend a real-time analysis algorithm with the involvement of an IDS for monitoring prescriptions to improve the quality of these prescriptions and possibly to prevent antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  14. Determinants of Smoking Cessation in Patients With COPD Treated in the Outpatient Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttenborg, Sandra S.; Thomsen, Reimar W.; Johnsen, Søren P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The beneficial effects of smoking cessation on the progression of COPD are well established. Nevertheless, many patients with COPD continue to smoke. METHODS: In this nationwide hospital-based prospective follow-up study, we examined rates of smoking cessation and clinical...... and sociodemographic determinants of smoking cessation in 3,233 patients with COPD who smoked on outpatient contact during 2008 to 2012. Using multivariate Cox regression, we calculated hazard ratios (HRs) of quitting. RESULTS: Within 1 and 5 years from first outpatient contact, the probability of quitting was 19...... timely smoking cessation. A novel finding is that patients with milder COPD are less likely to quit. The findings suggest a need for interventional studies focusing on these subgroups to ensure abstinence to halt disease progression....

  15. Collaborative care for depression symptoms in an outpatient cardiology setting: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Robert M; Freedland, Kenneth E; Steinmeyer, Brian C; Rubin, Eugene H; Ewald, Gregory

    2016-09-15

    Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. Finding effective methods for identifying and treating depression in these patients is a high priority. The purpose of this study was to determine whether collaborative care (CC) for patients who screen positive for depression during an outpatient cardiology visit results in greater improvement in depression symptoms and better medical outcomes than seen in patients who screen positive for depression but receive only usual care (UC). Two hundred-one patients seen in an outpatient cardiology clinic who screened positive for depression during an outpatient visit were randomized to receive either CC or UC. Recommendations for depression treatment and ongoing support and monitoring of depression symptoms were provided to CC patients and their primary care physicians (PCPs) for up to 6months. There were no differences between the arms in mean Beck Depression Inventory-II scores(CC, 15.9; UC, 17.4; p=.45) or in depression remission rates(CC, 32.5%; UC, 26.2%; p=0.34) after 6months, or in the number of hospitalizations after 12months (p=0.73). There were fewer deaths among the CC (1/100) than UC patients (8/101) (p=0.03). This trial did not show that CC produces better depression outcomes than UC. Screening led to a higher rate of depression treatment than was expected in the UC group, and delays in obtaining depression treatment from PCPs may have reduced treatment effectiveness for the CC patients. A different strategy for depression treatment following screening in outpatient cardiology services is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Creation and Implementation of an Outpatient Pathway for Atrial Fibrillation in the Emergency Department Setting: Results of an Expert Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Christopher W; Clark, Carol L; Wilson, Jason W; Stiell, Ian G; Kocheril, Abraham G; Luck, Krista K; Myers, Troy D; Pollack, Charles V; Roumpf, Steven K; Tomassoni, Gery F; Williams, James M; Patel, Brian B; Wu, Fred; Pines, Jesse M

    2018-03-10

    Atrial fibrillation and flutter (AF) is a common condition among emergency department (ED) patients in the United States. Traditionally, ED care for primary complaints related to AF focus on rate control, and patients are often admitted to an inpatient setting for further care. Inpatient care may include further telemetry monitoring and diagnostic testing, rhythm control, a search for identification of AF etiology, and stroke prophylaxis. However, many patients are eligible for safe and effective outpatient management pathways. They are widely used in Canada and other countries but less widely adopted in the United States. In this project, we convened an expert panel to create a practical framework for the process of creating, implementing, and maintaining an outpatient AF pathway for emergency physicians to assess and treat AF patients, safely reduce hospitalization rates, ensure appropriate stroke prophylaxis, and effectively transition patients to longitudinal outpatient treatment settings from the ED and/or observation unit. To support local pathway creation, the panel also reached agreement on a protocol development plan, a sample pathway, consensus recommendations for pathway components, sample pathway metrics, and a structured literature review framework using a modified Delphi technique by a technical expert panel of emergency medicine, cardiology, and other stakeholder groups. © 2018 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. Integration of fuzzy set theory and TOPSIS into HFMEA to improve outpatient service for elderly patients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ren-Jieh; Wu, Yung-Hung; Hsu, Tsung-Shin

    2012-07-01

    Taiwan became a World Health Organization-defined aging country in 1993, and it is estimated to become an aged country by 2017, surpassing Japan as the fastest aging country in the world. However, healthcare services in Taiwan need a wide range of improvements to cope with the challenges of population aging. Healthcare failure mode and effects analysis (HFMEA) developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs' National Center for Patient Safety (NCPS) was used to evaluate the inconvenience of outpatient registration process for elderly patients. Also, fuzzy set theory was used along with technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) method in multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) to rank the failure risks in the HFMEA. The top three failure modes ranked by the TOPSIS method were "short consultation time," "possible complications of the checkup or treatment were not told," and "opinions and feelings of patients and relatives were not respected." Based on those failure modes, improvements were proposed and results were feedback to hospitals. A random sample of 40 elderly patients was selected for interview at the outpatient department of a tertiary medical center in Taiwan. Thirty-seven out of the 40 elderly patients (92.5%) agreed with the executive expert team. This meant the improvement proposals were effective. In this study, HFMEA was extended to explore the impacts of geriatric outpatient service process failures on elderly patients. Using fuzzy set theory and the TOPSIS method in multiple criteria decision making to rank the severity of the failure modes, the risk assessment of the geriatric outpatient service process was more objective when analyzed with quantitative data. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Pain and disease according to integral anthroposophical dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Regina Lulo Galitesi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From an academic standpoint, the university format, in general, has been nurturing a "paradigm of expertise" and, consequently, the relationship between specialties has declined. The upshot is that recent college dental graduates have adopted a clinical performance focusing on system parts and their specificities, in detriment to a more comprehensive view of the mouth and of the patient as a whole, with his/her vital, emotional and individual attributes. An interaction between the several different areas of human knowledge is needed imminently to decrease the dichotomy in professional behavior, because the demand for professionals and dental patients interested in a more comprehensive approach are increasing day by day. Patients want to know: "What, in fact, is behind the etiological extrinsic and intrinsic factors that maintain neuropathic pain, recurrent thrush, or persistent halitosis," among other questions, "even under the care of a dentist?" or "Why is this disease affecting me?" There are several issues composing the paradigm of salutogenesis: What are the essential aspects that constitute a healthy individual, overlapping the usual investigation: How to destroy, avoid and quell the pathological agents? A proposed approach is based on salutogenesis, which examines such issues. According to this approach, anthroposophical dentistry includes determinant factors, determinants of health, basic research and the development of oral health promotion, thus connecting dental academia with integrative thinking, while also complementing and gathering information that subsidizes basic research with the primordial concepts on laws governing the parameters involved in the vital processes of nature.

  19. Pharmacotherapy of elderly patients in everyday anthroposophic medical practice: a prospective, multicenter observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockelbrink Angelina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacotherapy in the older adult is a complex field involving several different medical professionals. The evidence base for pharmacotherapy in elderly patients in primary care relies on only a few clinical trials, thus documentation must be improved, particularly in the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM like phytotherapy, homoeopathy, and anthroposophic medicine. This study describes diagnoses and therapies observed in elderly patients treated with anthroposophic medicine in usual care. Methods Twenty-nine primary care physicians in Germany participated in this prospective, multicenter observational study on prescribing patterns. Prescriptions and diagnoses were reported for each consecutive patient. Data were included if patients were at least 60 years of age. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with anthroposophic prescriptions. Results In 2005, a total of 12 314 prescriptions for 3076 patients (68.1% female were included. The most frequent diagnoses were hypertension (11.1%, breast cancer (3.5%, and heart failure (3.0%. In total, 30.5% of the prescriptions were classified as CAM remedies alone, 54.4% as conventional pharmaceuticals alone, and 15.1% as a combination of both. CAM remedies accounted for 41.7% of all medications prescribed (35.5% anthroposophic. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR for receiving an anthroposophic remedy was significantly higher for the first consultation (AOR = 1.65; CI: 1.52-1.79, treatment by an internist (AOR = 1.49; CI: 1.40-1.58, female patients (AOR = 1.35; CI: 1.27-1.43, cancer (AOR = 4.54; CI: 4.12-4.99, arthropathies (AOR = 1.36; CI: 1.19-1.55, or dorsopathies (AOR = 1.34; CI: 1.16-1.55 and it decreased with patient age (AOR = 0.97; CI: 0.97-0.98. The likelihood of being prescribed an anthroposophic remedy was especially low for patients with hypertensive diseases (AOR = 0.36; CI: 0.32-0.39, diabetes mellitus (AOR = 0.17; CI: 0

  20. Inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation after herniated disc surgery? - Setting-specific preferences, participation and outcome of rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrit Löbner

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine rehabilitation preferences, participation and determinants for the choice of a certain rehabilitation setting (inpatient vs. outpatient and setting-specific rehabilitation outcomes. METHODS: The longitudinal observational study referred to 534 consecutive disc surgery patients (18-55 years. Face-to-face baseline interviews took place about 3.6 days after disc surgery during acute hospital stay. 486 patients also participated in a follow-up interview via telephone three months later (dropout-rate: 9%. The following instruments were used: depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, pain intensity (numeric analog scale, health-related quality of life (Short Form 36 Health Survey, subjective prognosis of gainful employment (SPE-scale as well as questions on rehabilitation attendance, return to work, and amount of sick leave days. RESULTS: The vast majority of patients undergoing surgery for a herniated disc attended a post-hospital rehabilitation treatment program (93%. Thereby two-thirds of these patients took part in an inpatient rehabilitation program (67.9%. Physical, psychological, vocational and health-related quality of life characteristics differed widely before as well as after rehabilitation depending on the setting. Inpatient rehabilitees were significantly older, reported more pain, worse physical quality of life, more anxiety and depression and a worse subjective prognosis of gainful employment before rehabilitation. Pre-rehabilitation differences remained significant after rehabilitation. More than half of the outpatient rehabilitees (56% compared to only one third of the inpatient rehabilitees (33% returned to work three months after disc surgery (p<.001. CONCLUSION: The results suggest a "pre-selection" of patients with better health status in outpatient rehabilitation. Gaining better knowledge about setting-specific selection processes may help optimizing rehabilitation allocation procedures

  1. Inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation after herniated disc surgery? - Setting-specific preferences, participation and outcome of rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbner, Margrit; Luppa, Melanie; Konnopka, Alexander; Meisel, Hans J; Günther, Lutz; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Stengler, Katarina; Angermeyer, Matthias C; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2014-01-01

    To examine rehabilitation preferences, participation and determinants for the choice of a certain rehabilitation setting (inpatient vs. outpatient) and setting-specific rehabilitation outcomes. The longitudinal observational study referred to 534 consecutive disc surgery patients (18-55 years). Face-to-face baseline interviews took place about 3.6 days after disc surgery during acute hospital stay. 486 patients also participated in a follow-up interview via telephone three months later (dropout-rate: 9%). The following instruments were used: depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), pain intensity (numeric analog scale), health-related quality of life (Short Form 36 Health Survey), subjective prognosis of gainful employment (SPE-scale) as well as questions on rehabilitation attendance, return to work, and amount of sick leave days. The vast majority of patients undergoing surgery for a herniated disc attended a post-hospital rehabilitation treatment program (93%). Thereby two-thirds of these patients took part in an inpatient rehabilitation program (67.9%). Physical, psychological, vocational and health-related quality of life characteristics differed widely before as well as after rehabilitation depending on the setting. Inpatient rehabilitees were significantly older, reported more pain, worse physical quality of life, more anxiety and depression and a worse subjective prognosis of gainful employment before rehabilitation. Pre-rehabilitation differences remained significant after rehabilitation. More than half of the outpatient rehabilitees (56%) compared to only one third of the inpatient rehabilitees (33%) returned to work three months after disc surgery (p<.001). The results suggest a "pre-selection" of patients with better health status in outpatient rehabilitation. Gaining better knowledge about setting-specific selection processes may help optimizing rehabilitation allocation procedures and improve rehabilitation effects such as return

  2. Assessing the economic value of avoiding hospital admissions by shifting the management of gram+ acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections to an outpatient care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ektare, V; Khachatryan, A; Xue, M; Dunne, M; Johnson, K; Stephens, J

    2015-01-01

    To estimate, from a US payer perspective, the cost offsets of treating gram positive acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSI) with varied hospital length of stay (LOS) followed by outpatient care, as well as the cost implications of avoiding hospital admission. Economic drivers of care were estimated using a literature-based economic model incorporating inpatient and outpatient components. The model incorporated equal efficacy, adverse events (AE), resource use, and costs from literature. Costs of once- and twice-daily outpatient infusions to achieve a 14-day treatment were analyzed. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Costs were adjusted to 2015 US$. Total non-drug medical cost for treatment of ABSSSI entirely in the outpatient setting to avoid hospital admission was the lowest among all scenarios and ranged from $4039-$4924. Total non-drug cost for ABSSSI treated in the inpatient setting ranged from $9813 (3 days LOS) to $18,014 (7 days LOS). Inpatient vs outpatient cost breakdown was: 3 days inpatient ($6657)/11 days outpatient ($3156-$3877); 7 days inpatient ($15,017)/7 days outpatient ($2495-$2997). Sensitivity analyses revealed a key outpatient cost driver to be peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) costs (average per patient cost of $873 for placement and $205 for complications). Drug and indirect costs were excluded and resource use was not differentiated by ABSSSI type. It was assumed that successful ABSSSI treatment takes up to 14 days per the product labels, and that once-daily and twice-daily antibiotics have equal efficacy. Shifting ABSSSI care to outpatient settings may result in medical cost savings greater than 53%. Typical outpatient scenarios represent 14-37% of total medical cost, with PICC accounting for 28-43% of the outpatient burden. The value of new ABSSSI therapies will be driven by eliminating the need for PICC line, reducing length of stay and the ability to completely avoid a hospital stay.

  3. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 shortens acute infectious diarrhea in a pediatric outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ener Cagri Dinleyici

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Two randomized controlled clinical trials have shown thatLactobacillus (L reuteri DSM 17938 reduces the duration of diarrhea in children hospitalized due to acute infectious diarrhea. This was the first trial evaluating the efficacy of L. reuteri DSM 17938 in outpatient children with acute infectious diarrhea.METHODS: This was a multicenter, randomized, single-blinded, case control clinical trial in children with acute watery diarrhea. A total of 64 children who presented at outpatient clinics were enrolled. The probiotic group received 1 × 108 CFU L. reuteri DSM 17938 for five days in addition to oral rehydration solution (ORS and the second group was treated with ORS only. The primary endpoint was the duration of diarrhea (in hours. The secondary endpoint was the number of children with diarrhea at each day of the five days of intervention. Adverse events were also recorded.RESULTS: The mean duration of diarrhea was significantly reduced in the L. reuteri group compared to the control group (approximately 15 h, 60.4 ± 24.5 h [95% CI: 51.0-69.7 h] vs. 74.3 ± 15.3 h [95% CI: 68.7-79.9 h], p < 0.05. The percentage of children with diarrhea was lower in the L. reuteri group (13/29; 44.8% after 48 h than the control group (27/31; 87%; RR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.34-0.79,p < 0.01. From the 72nd hour of intervention onwards, there was no difference between the two groups in the percentage of children with diarrhea. No adverse effects related to L. reuteri were noted.CONCLUSION:L. reuteri DSM 17938 is effective, safe, and well-tolerated in outpatient children with acute infectious diarrhea.

  4. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 shortens acute infectious diarrhea in a pediatric outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Dalgic, Nazan; Guven, Sirin; Metin, Ozge; Yasa, Olcay; Kurugol, Zafer; Turel, Ozden; Tanir, Gonul; Yazar, Ahmet Sami; Arica, Vefik; Sancar, Mesut; Karbuz, Adem; Eren, Makbule; Ozen, Metehan; Kara, Ates; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Two randomized controlled clinical trials have shown that Lactobacillus (L) reuteri DSM 17938 reduces the duration of diarrhea in children hospitalized due to acute infectious diarrhea. This was the first trial evaluating the efficacy of L. reuteri DSM 17938 in outpatient children with acute infectious diarrhea. This was a multicenter, randomized, single-blinded, case control clinical trial in children with acute watery diarrhea. A total of 64 children who presented at outpatient clinics were enrolled. The probiotic group received 1×10(8)CFU L. reuteri DSM 17938 for five days in addition to oral rehydration solution (ORS) and the second group was treated with ORS only. The primary endpoint was the duration of diarrhea (in hours). The secondary endpoint was the number of children with diarrhea at each day of the five days of intervention. Adverse events were also recorded. The mean duration of diarrhea was significantly reduced in the L. reuteri group compared to the control group (approximately 15h, 60.4±24.5h [95% CI: 51.0-69.7h] vs. 74.3±15.3h [95% CI: 68.7-79.9h], pL. reuteri group (13/29; 44.8%) after 48h than the control group (27/31; 87%; RR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.34-0.79, pL. reuteri were noted. L. reuteri DSM 17938 is effective, safe, and well-tolerated in outpatient children with acute infectious diarrhea. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Reducing socioeconomic inequalities in COPD care in the hospital outpatient setting - A nationwide initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttenborg, Sandra Søgaard; Lange, Peter; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2017-01-01

    socioeconomic differences. Methods: A mandatory national quality improvement initiative has since 2008 monitored the quality of COPD care at all national pulmonary specialized outpatient clinics in Denmark using six evidence-based process performance measures. We followed patients aged ≥30 years with a first......-ever outpatient contact for COPD during 2008–2012 (N = 23,741). Adjusted year-specific relative risks (RR) of fulfilling all relevant process performance measures was compared according to ethnicity, education, income, employment, and cohabitation using Poisson regression. Results: Quality of care improved.......18–0.74), disability pensioners (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.46–0.87) and patients living alone (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.60–0.97) were less likely to receive all relevant care processes, whereas those with highest education (RR 1.22, 95% CI 0.92–1.63) were more likely to receive these processes. These differences were eliminated...

  6. Introduction of antineoplastic drug NSC631570 in an inpatient and outpatient setting: Comparative evaluation of biological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariia Rudyk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of moderate physical exercise and treatment time on the organism's response to NSC631570. The sensitivity of circulating phagocytes to the drug at different times of day was estimated in in vitro experiments. NSC631570 was administered intravenously to healthy volunteers (eleven men, 23 ± 2 years in a single therapeutic dose in an inpatient and an outpatient setting. Blood samples were obtained before the drug administration, 30 min after the drug injection and every fourth hour throughout the 24 hour period. Biochemical parameters were determined using the hematological analyzer. Flow cytometry was used to evaluate phagocyte metabolism. Treatment of circulating phagocytes with NSC631570 in vitro resulted in an increase in ROS production along with a decrease in their phagocytic activity, most expressed in the morning time. Drug injection to sedentary persons resulted in pro-inflammatory metabolic polarization of circulating phagocytes. Introduction of NSC631570 to active persons was accompanied by a significant increase in phagocyte endocytosis along with a decrease in the daily mean of ROS generation. Significant oscillation (but in the normal ranges of urea, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase after NSC631570 introduction in the outpatient setting was shown during the day. Physical activity interferes with immunomodulatory action of NSC631570 and abrogates pro-inflammatory shift of circulating phagocytes. Biochemical parameters of blood from patients treated with NSC631570 in the outpatient setting must be interpreted cautiously considering the effect of physical activity on some metabolic biomarkers.

  7. Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: Symptom-Triggered versus Fixed-Schedule Treatment in an Outpatient Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elholm, B.; Larsen, Klaus; Hornnes, N.

    2011-01-01

    , time to relapse and patient satisfaction were measured. Patients assessed their symptoms using the Short Alcohol Withdrawal Scale (SAWS). Patient satisfaction was monitored by the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire. We used the Well-Being Index and the European addiction severity index...... for the 1-year follow-up. Results: We found no differences in the quantity of medication consumed, time to relapse, well being or treatment satisfaction. Conclusion: Symptom-triggered self-medication was as safe as fixed-schedule medication in treating outpatients with AD and mild to moderate symptoms...... of AWS. The SAWS is a powerful monitoring tool, because it is brief and permits the subject to log the withdrawal symptoms....

  8. Does cognitive/physical screening in an outpatient setting predict institutionalization after hip fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongisto, Markus T; Nuotio, Maria; Luukkaala, Tiina; Väistö, Olli; Pihlajamäki, Harri K

    2016-10-22

    Institutionalization after hip fracture is a socio-economical burden. We examined the predictive value of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) for institutionalization after hip fracture to identify patients at risk for institutionalization. Fragility hip fracture patients ≥65 years of age (n = 584) were comprehensively examined at a geriatric outpatient clinic 4 to 6 months after surgery and followed 1 year postoperatively. A telephone interview with a structured inquiry was performed at 1, 4, and 12 months after hip fracture. Age-adjusted univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that IADL and MMSE scores measured at the outpatient clinic were significantly associated with living arrangements 1 year after hip fracture. Multivariate logistic regression analysis established that institutionalization 1 year after hip fracture was significantly predicted by institutionalization at 4 months (odds ratio [OR] 16.26, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 7.37-35.86), IADL institutionalization. During the time period from 4 to 12 months, 66 (11 %) patients changed living arrangements, and 36 (55 %) of these patients required more supportive accommodations. IADL and MMSE scores obtained 4 to 6 months after hospital discharge may be applicable for predicting institutionalization among fragility hip fracture patients ≥65 years of age at 1 year after hip fracture. An IADL score of ≥5 predicted the ability to remain in the community. Changes in living arrangements also often occur after 4 months.

  9. Vaccination coverage for measles, mumps and rubella in anthroposophical schools in Gelderland, The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomp, Judith H E; van Lier, Alies; Ruijs, Wilhelmina L M

    2015-06-01

    Social clustering of unvaccinated children in anthroposophical schools occurs, as inferred from various measles outbreaks that can be traced to these schools. However, accurate vaccination coverage data of anthroposophical schools are not widely available. In 2012, we performed a survey to estimate the vaccination coverage in three different grades of 11 anthroposophical schools in Gelderland, The Netherlands. We also gauged the opinion on childhood vaccination of the parents and compared these with the results of a national survey. In 2014, we were also able to obtain the registered total vaccination coverage per school from the national vaccination register to compare this with our survey data. The self-reported MMR vaccination coverage (2012) in the three grades of the schools in our study was 83% (range 45-100% per school). The registered total vaccination coverage (2014) was 78% (range 59-88% per school). The 95% confidence intervals of the two different vaccination coverages overlap for all schools. The parents in this study were less convinced about the beneficial effect of vaccinations and more worried about the possible side effects of vaccination compared with parents in general. Despite high overall vaccination coverage, the WHO goal to eliminate measles and rubella will not easily be achieved when social clustering of unvaccinated children in anthroposophical schools remains. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacy students provide care comparable to pharmacists in an outpatient anticoagulation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Kavita; McCall, Kenneth L; Fike, David S; Horton, Niambi; Allen, April

    2010-10-11

    To evaluate whether student participation in ambulatory clinics influenced the percentage of therapeutic international normalized ratio (INR) results among patients on chronic warfarin therapy. Medical records in outpatient anticoagulation clinics managed by pharmacists under physician protocol were reviewed retrospectively in 2 university-affiliated clinics in Amarillo and Lubbock, TX. Pharmacy student activities included patient interviews, vital sign measurements, fingersticks, counseling, and documentation. Patient visits were conducted by a precepted pharmacy student or a pharmacist without a student, and the INR was measured at the subsequent patient visit. Records of 1,958 anticoagulation patient visits were reviewed; 865 patients were treated by pharmacists, and 1093 were treated by precepted students. The follow-up INR was therapeutic for 48.5% of third-year (P3) students' patients, 45.6% of fourth-year (P4) students' patients, 51.2% of residents' patients, and 44.7% of pharmacists's patients (p = 0.23). Eight variables were associated with the follow-up INR (baseline INR, warfarin noncompliance, held warfarin doses, a warfarin dosage adjustment, diet change, alcohol use, tobacco use, and any medication changes). Student participation in the patient-care process did not compromise patient care and no significant difference in patient outcomes was found between patients in an anticoagulation clinic cared for by precepted students and those cared for by pharmacists.

  11. Factors that influence vaccination decision-making by parents who visit an anthroposophical child welfare center: a focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, I.A.; Ruiter, R.A.C.; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.; Mollema, L.; Kok, G.; de Melker, H.E.R.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, parents have become more disparaging towards childhood vaccination. One group that is critical about the National Immunization Program (NIP) and participates less comprises parents with an anthroposophical worldview. Despite the fact that various studies have identified

  12. Burden of Childhood Rotavirus Disease in the Outpatient Setting of the Russian Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobzin, Yury V; Kharit, Susanna M; Goveia, Michelle G; O'Brian, Megan A; Podkolzin, Alexander T; Blokhin, Boris M; Bekhtereva, Maria K; Rudakova, Alla V; Tikunova, Nina V

    2017-05-01

    This is a prospective, multicentered study conducted in 9 large urban areas in Russia, in order to determine the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children rotavirus season. From November 2012 to May 2013, surveillance was conducted in Moscow, Saint-Petersburg, Vologda, Krasnodar, Krasnoyarsk, Novosibirsk, Yaroslavl, Khanty-Mansiysk and Vladivostok. Children rotavirus and positive samples were P- and G-typed. Clinical symptoms were captured by physicians and parents on Day 1. Symptom severity was analyzed by Vesikari scoring system. The direct expenses of parents caused by AGE were obtained from questionnaires provided to parents by phone. A total of 501 were children enrolled. Stool samples were analyzed for 487 (97%) children, and 151 (31%) of those were rotavirus positive. Rotavirus gastroenteritis was associated with more severe clinical course (Vesikari score 11.4 ± 2.2) versus non-rotavirus gastroenteritis (Vesikari score 9 ± 3). The identified serotypes were G4P[8] 38.9%, G1P[8] 34.2%, G3P[8] 6%, G9P[8] 6%, G2P[4] 2% and G4P[4] 0.7%. The mean overall expenses of parents caused by rotavirus and non-rotavirus gastroenteritis were 143.7 USD and 128.8 USD, respectively. Rotavirus accounted for 31% of all AGE-related outpatient visits. The major rotavirus genotypes were G1P[8] and G4P[8]. Rotavirus gastroenteritis was associated with significantly more severe clinical symptoms than non-rotavirus gastroenteritis. The average costs of rotavirus cases for parents of children were elevated against the same indications for non-rotavirus. These findings underscore the need for a safe and effective rotavirus vaccine in Russia.

  13. Effectiveness of a Patient Education Module on Diabetic Foot Care in Outpatient Setting: An Open-label Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Hammadur Sk; Jyotsna, Viveka P; Sreenivas, V; Krishnan, Anand; Tandon, Nikhil

    2018-01-01

    A large number of patients with diabetes mellitus are unaware of foot care and are at risk of developing foot ulcer and amputation. This increases healthcare burden due to preventable complication of diabetes. We conducted this study to assess the effectiveness of a foot care education module for diabetes developed by us. One hundred and twenty-seven patients with diabetes mellitus attending our outpatient were randomized into intervention ( n = 63) and control groups ( n = 64). At first visit, 1 and 3 months later, both groups filled a questionnaire regarding foot care knowledge and practice. The intervention group was administered foot care education module and the control group received routine care at baseline and 1 month. Patient education module consisted of an audio-visual display and a pamphlet on diabetes foot care. Change in score at 3 months was assessed by Student's t -test. Knowledge scores in the intervention group at first, second, and third visits were 9.8 ± 1.8, 10.2 ± 1.6, and 11.0 ± 1.7, respectively. The knowledge scores in the control group at first, second, and third visits were 9.9 ± 1.7, 9.8 ± 1.6, and 10.0 ± 1.8, respectively. The change in knowledge score was statistically significant ( P education module in outpatient setting is an effective means to improve foot care knowledge and practice in patients with diabetes.

  14. Being an outpatient with rheumatoid arthritis - a focus group study on patients' self-efficacy and experiences from participation in a short course and one of three different outpatient settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Jette; Wagner, Lis; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    A Danish study compared three different outpatient settings for persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). All participants completed a short course before random allocation to one of three groups. A third of the patients continued with planned medical consultations. A third was allocated to a shared...

  15. Ambulatory screening of diabetic neuropathy and predictors of its severity in outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, M S; Iqbal, M; Zahoor, S; Ali, J; Javed, M U

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most common causes of chronic neuropathic symptomatology and the most disabling and difficult-to-treat diabetic microangiopathic complication. The neuropathies associated with diabetes are typically classified into generalized, focal and multifocal varieties. There exists a scarcity of literature studying the correlation of different patient- and disease-related variables with severity of neuropathy. This study aims to delineate the prevalence of diabetic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes, describe its characteristics and find out predictors of its severity. Eight hundred consecutive diabetic patients presenting to outpatient department (OPD) of Khan Research Labs (KRL) General Hospital and Centre for Diabetes and Liver diseases, Islamabad, during March-June, 2015 were made to complete a self-administered questionnaire (Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument-MNSI) and underwent a thorough physical examination according to MNSI protocols. A score of >2 was considered to be diagnostic for DPN. Patient and disease variables were noted. MNSI score was used as an index of severity of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Correlation of several patient- and disease-related variables with the severity of DPN was determined using multivariate regression. Out of a total 800 patients screened, 90 (11.25%) were found to have diabetic neuropathy. Of these 90, 45.5% were males, the median age was 54.47 ± 10.87 years and the median duration of diabetes was 11.12 ± 9.8 years. The most common symptom was found to be numbness (63.6%) followed by generalized body weakness (61.5%). The common findings on physical examination were dry skin/callus (38.7%) and deformities (14.7%). Duration of diabetes was found to be the strongest predictor for development and severity of diabetic neuropathy followed by glycemic controls (HbA1c values) and age. Duration of diabetes rather than diabetic controls predicts better the development and severity of

  16. Hysteroscopic sterilization success in outpatient vs office setting is not affected by patient or procedural characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ted L; Yunker, Amanda C; Scheib, Stacey A; Callahan, Tamara L

    2013-01-01

    To determine factors associated with hysteroscopic sterilization success and whether it differs between the operating room and office settings. Retrospective cohort analysis (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Major university medical center. Six hundred thirty-eight women who underwent hysteroscopic sterilization between July 1, 2005, and June 30, 2011. Data collected included age, body mass index, previous office procedures, previous cesarean section, and presence of myomas or retroverted uterus. Place of surgery, experience of surgeon, insurance type, bilateral device placement, compliance with hysterosalpingography, and confirmation of occlusion were also recorded. Bivariate analysis of patient characteristics between groups was performed using χ(2) and independent t tests, and identified confounders and associated variables. Multivariate analysis was performed using logistic regression to assess for association and to adjust for confounders. Procedures were performed in the operating room (57%) or in the office (43%). There was no association between success in bilateral device placement or occlusion and any patient characteristic, regardless of surgery setting. Private insurance, patient age, and performance of procedures in the office setting were positively associated with likelihood of compliance with hysterosalpingography. Successful device placement and tubal occlusion are independent of patient age, body mass index, or setting of the procedure. Association between insurance type and completing hysterosalpingography illustrates an important public health problem. Patients who fail to undergo hysterosalpingography to confirm tubal occlusion may unknowingly be at risk of pregnancy and increased risk of ectopic pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dose and Duration of Opioid Use in Patients with Cancer and Noncancer Pain at an Outpatient Hospital Setting in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, Che S; Rahman, Norny A; Ismail, Che R; Choy, Leong W

    2017-07-01

    There are currently limited data available on the patterns of opioid prescribing in Malaysia. This study investigated the patterns of opioid prescribing and characterized the dosing and duration of opioid use in patients with noncancer and cancer pain. This retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted at an outpatient hospital setting in Malaysia. All prescriptions for opioids (dihydrocodeine, fentanyl, morphine, and oxycodone) issued between January 2013 and December 2014 were examined. The number of prescriptions and patients, the distribution of mean daily dose, annual total days covered with opioids, and annual total opioid dose at the individual level were calculated and stratified by noncancer and cancer groups. A total of 1015 opioid prescriptions were prescribed for 347 patients from 2013 to 2014. Approximately 41.5% of patients (N = 144/347) and 58.5% (N = 203/347) were associated with noncancer and cancer diagnosis, respectively. Oxycodone (38.0%) was the highest prescribed primarily for the noncancer group. The majority of patients in both noncancer (74.3%) and cancer (60.4%) groups were receiving mean daily doses of 90 days per year) was associated with 21.8% of patients in the noncancer group and 17.5% in the cancer group. The finding from this study showed that 41.5% of opioid users at an outpatient hospital setting in Malaysia received opioids for noncancer pain and 21.8% of these users were using opioids for longer than 90 days. The average daily dose in the majority of patients in both groups of noncancer and cancer was modest. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  18. Cognitive-behavioural therapy for outpatients with eating disorders: effectiveness for a transdiagnostic group in a routine clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Hannah; Marshall, Emily; Stopa, Lusia; Waller, Glenn

    2015-05-01

    Whilst there is a growing evidence to support the impact of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) in the treatment of adults with eating disorders, much of this evidence comes from tightly controlled efficacy trials. This study aimed to add to the evidence regarding the effectiveness of CBT when delivered in a routine clinical setting. The participants were 203 adults presenting with a range of eating disorder diagnoses, who were offered CBT in an out-patient community eating disorders service in the UK. Patients completed measures of eating disorder pathology at the start of treatment, following the sixth session, and at the end of treatment. Symptoms of anxiety, depression, and psychosocial functioning were measured pre- and post-treatment. Approximately 55% of patients completed treatment, and there were no factors that predicted attrition. There were significant improvements in eating disorder psychopathology, anxiety, depression and general functioning, with particular changes in eating attitudes in the early part of therapy. Effect sizes were medium to large for both completer and intention to treat analyses. These findings confirm that evidence-based forms of CBT can be delivered with strong outcomes in routine clinical settings. Clinicians should be encouraged to deliver evidence-based treatments when working in these settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a Communication Strategy to Increase Interprofessional Collaboration in the Outpatient Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Phillips Renfro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing patient health is a complex task, requiring the support of an interprofessional healthcare team. Collaboration between neighboring community pharmacies and primary care practices can be an alternate solution for team-based patient care. The purpose of this project was to design and implement a communication strategy for patients with diabetes and hypertension between a community pharmacy and physician practice. An interprofessional team for the practice settings was formed to develop a strategy for collaboration. After agreeing on the common goals and target patient population for the disease states, the team devised a way to communicate via electronic health record (EHR. The communication strategy allowed for more frequent follow-up with the patients which has the potential to result in better clinical outcomes. A communication strategy between a community pharmacy and a physician practice office can be achieved using EHR technology. The greatest outcome of this project was the formation of the collaborative team between the practice settings that continues to work together on additional patient-centered initiatives. Further research is warranted to allow for incorporation of patient perspectives in development of communication strategies.

  20. Development of a Communication Strategy to Increase Interprofessional Collaboration in the Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfro, Chelsea Phillips; Ferreri, Stefanie; Barber, Tiffany Graham; Foley, Stephanie

    2018-01-06

    Managing patient health is a complex task, requiring the support of an interprofessional healthcare team. Collaboration between neighboring community pharmacies and primary care practices can be an alternate solution for team-based patient care. The purpose of this project was to design and implement a communication strategy for patients with diabetes and hypertension between a community pharmacy and physician practice. An interprofessional team for the practice settings was formed to develop a strategy for collaboration. After agreeing on the common goals and target patient population for the disease states, the team devised a way to communicate via electronic health record (EHR). The communication strategy allowed for more frequent follow-up with the patients which has the potential to result in better clinical outcomes. A communication strategy between a community pharmacy and a physician practice office can be achieved using EHR technology. The greatest outcome of this project was the formation of the collaborative team between the practice settings that continues to work together on additional patient-centered initiatives. Further research is warranted to allow for incorporation of patient perspectives in development of communication strategies.

  1. Self-management support intervention to control cancer pain in the outpatient setting: a randomized controlled trial study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstenbach, Laura M J; Courtens, Annemie M; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; van Kleef, Maarten; de Witte, Luc P

    2015-05-19

    Pain is a prevalent and distressing symptom in patients with cancer, having an enormous impact on functioning and quality of life. Fragmentation of care, inadequate pain communication, and reluctance towards pain medication contribute to difficulties in optimizing outcomes. Integration of patient self-management and professional care by means of healthcare technology provides new opportunities in the outpatient setting. This study protocol outlines a two-armed multicenter randomized controlled trial that compares a technology based multicomponent self-management support intervention with care as usual and includes an effect, economic and process evaluation. Patients will be recruited consecutively via the outpatient oncology clinics and inpatient oncology wards of one academic hospital and one regional hospital in the south of the Netherlands. Irrespective of the stage of disease, patients are eligible when they are diagnosed with cancer and have uncontrolled moderate to severe cancer (treatment) related pain defined as NRS≥4 for more than two weeks. Randomization (1:1) will assign patients to either the intervention or control group; patients in the intervention group receive self-management support and patients in the control group receive care as usual. The intervention will be delivered by registered nurses specialized in pain and palliative care. Important components include monitoring of pain, adverse effects and medication as well as graphical feedback, education, and nurse support. Effect measurements for both groups will be carried out with questionnaires at baseline (T0), after 4 weeks (T1) and after 12 weeks (T2). Pain intensity and quality of life are the primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes include self-efficacy, knowledge, anxiety, depression and pain medication use. The final questionnaire contains also questions for the economic evaluation that includes both cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis. Data for the process evaluation will be

  2. Assessing obesity and other related health problems of mentally ill Hispanic patients in an urban outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellerstein, David J; Almeida, Goretti; Devlin, Michael J; Mendelsohn, Nathaniel; Helfand, Stacia; Dragatsi, Dianna; Miranda, Raquel; Kelso, Julie R; Capitelli, Lucia

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the role of an agency Clinical Director in developing a project to assess and begin to address obesity-related health problems of patients treated in a community-based mental health clinic in New York City. After a five year review of outpatient deaths revealed a high rate of deaths from cardiovascular and diabetes-related issues, the Clinical Director assembled a group of clinicians, researchers, and administrative staff to design a pilot project to assess health and nutrition status of primarily Hispanic day treatment patients with severe and persistent mental illness. About 69 of the 105 patients at the clinic were assessed by chart review, interview about nutritional habits and medical care, and somatic measurements for blood pressure, weight, girth, body mass index (BMI), glucose and lipid levels. Patients were predominantly between the ages of 25 and 64 years, 51% were female, and 78% were Hispanic. Around 57% were diagnosed with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, 86% were receiving antipsychotic medications, and 25% were on two or more antipsychotics. Only 11% of the women and 41% of the men had normal weight. A total of 29% of the women and 18% of the men were overweight (BMI = 25-29.9); and an additional 60% of the women and 41% of the men were obese (BMI > or = 30). Atypical antipsychotic treatment was significantly associated with obesity (BMI > or = 30) (chi sq = 5.5, df = 1, P or = 140/90. About 53% had elevated random blood glucoses (>110 mg/dl). On the positive side, patients generally had had recent medical follow-up, and most had adequate cooking facilities. This project revealed that these predominantly Hispanic, severely mentally ill individuals were at high risk for cardiac illness, highlighting the need for developing culturally-sensitive interventions in urban outpatient psychiatric settings. Findings were disseminated in educational presentations and clinical discussions, and have mobilized an institutional effort to

  3. Eva between anxiety and hope: integrating anthroposophic music therapy in supportive oncology care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Ben-Arye

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Music therapy is a significant modality in the treatment of patients with cancer, who suffer emotional and spiritual distress as well as chemotherapy side effects that impair their quality of life. In this article, we present a case study of a patient challenged with recurrent ovarian cancer who received, concomitant with chemotherapy, a special form of music therapy based on anthroposophic medicine (AM aimed at alleviating anxiety and improving her general well-being. AM-centered music therapy goals are discussed in regard to two modes of treatment: receptive listening and clinical composition. Next, these two treatment modes are discussed in a broader context by reviewing conventional music therapy interventions during chemotherapy on two axes: a. standardized vs. individualized treatment; b. patient’s involvement on a passive to active continuum. In conclusion, psycho-oncology care can be enriched by adding anthroposophic medicine-oriented music therapy integrated within patients’ supportive care.

  4. A Retrospective Case-Matched Cost Comparison of Surgical Treatment of Melanoma and Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer in the Outpatient Versus Operating Room Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ryan P; Butala, Niraj; Alam, Murad; Lawrence, Naomi

    2017-07-01

    To date, no study has used authentic billing data in a case-control matched fashion to examine the cost of treating skin cancer in different settings. To compare the cost of surgical treatment of skin cancer in the outpatient versus operating room setting using matched cases based on patient and skin cancer characteristics. ICD-9 diagnosis codes for skin cancers were used to find patients who had a malignant excision current procedural terminology code in the operating room setting during 2010 to 2014. Patient and skin cancer characteristics were used to match cases to those treated as an outpatient. A total of 36 cases (18 operating room and 18 outpatient) had the required information and characteristics to be matched and analyzed for cost. Health status was determined using the American Society of Anesthesiologists anesthesia grading scale. No statistically significant differences were found in the age (p > 0.9) or American Society of Anesthesiologists scores (p > 0.6) of the outpatient and operating room cases. The median cost for outpatient cases was $1,745. For operating room cases, the median cost was $11,323. This was a statistically significant difference (p skin cancer compared with the operating room.

  5. Pharmacists providing care in the outpatient setting through telemedicine models: a narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littauer SL

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine refers to the delivery of clinical services using technology that allows two-way, real time, interactive communication between the patient and the clinician at a distant site. Commonly, telemedicine is used to improve access to general and specialty care for patients in rural areas. This review aims to provide an overview of existing telemedicine models involving the delivery of care by pharmacists via telemedicine (including telemonitoring and video, but excluding follow-up telephone calls and to highlight the main areas of chronic-disease management where these models have been applied. Studies within the areas of hypertension, diabetes, asthma, anticoagulation and depression were identified, but only two randomized controlled trials with adequate sample size demonstrating the positive impact of telemonitoring combined with pharmacist care in hypertension were identified. The evidence for the impact of pharmacist-based telemedicine models is sparse and weak, with the studies conducted presenting serious threats to internal and external validity. Therefore, no definitive conclusions about the impact of pharmacist-led telemedicine models can be made at this time. In the Unites States, the increasing shortage of primary care providers and specialists represents an opportunity for pharmacists to assume a more prominent role managing patients with chronic disease in the ambulatory care setting. However, lack of reimbursement may pose a barrier to the provision of care by pharmacists using telemedicine.

  6. Factors associated with physical therapy services received for individuals with cerebral palsy in an outpatient pediatric medical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, Amy F; Succop, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Limited information is available regarding physical therapy use for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level, age, race, sex, and type of insurance with the total physical therapy units received over a 1-year period for individuals with CP in this outpatient pediatric medical setting. This was a cross-sectional study. Four hundred twenty-five individuals with CP (GMFCS level I, 36%; level II, 15%; level III, 13%; level IV, 19%; and level V, 17%) were identified retrospectively through their electronic medical records. A one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) was performed for each explanatory variable followed by a multiway ANOVA that adjusted for other variables to find the best model to explain total physical therapy units received. A significant difference in total therapy units received was found among GMFCS levels (F=6.91; df=4,420; Pphysical therapy received was found for the factors of sex and race. The final multifactorial model indicates a significant main effect of insurance and a GMFCS by age interaction accounting for 19% of the variability (F=4.45; df=21,403; Pphysical therapy services received in a pediatric medical setting in 1 geographic region of the United States. The results of this study provide insight into how therapy received varies for individuals with CP. Future studies should evaluate additional variables that may affect physical therapy services received.

  7. Interactive "Video Doctor" counseling reduces drug and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-positive patients in diverse outpatient settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Gilbert

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide "prevention with positives" in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based assessment and counseling for risky behaviors.We conducted a parallel groups randomized controlled trial (December 2003-September 2006 at 5 San Francisco area outpatient HIV clinics. Eligible patients (HIV-positive English-speaking adults completed an in-depth computerized risk assessment. Participants reporting substance use or sexual risks (n = 476 were randomized in stratified blocks. The intervention group received tailored risk-reduction counseling from a "Video Doctor" via laptop computer and a printed Educational Worksheet; providers received a Cueing Sheet on reported risks. Compared with control, fewer intervention participants reported continuing illicit drug use (RR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.689, 0.957, p = 0.014 at 3 months; and RR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.540, 0.785, p<0.001 at 6 months and unprotected sex (RR 0.88, 95% CI: 0.773, 0.993, p = 0.039 at 3 months; and RR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.686, 0.941, p = 0.007 at 6 months. Intervention participants reported fewer mean days of ongoing illicit drug use (-4.0 days vs. -1.3 days, p = 0.346, at 3 months; and -4.7 days vs. -0.7 days, p = 0.130, at 6 months than did controls, and had fewer casual sex partners at (-2.3 vs. -1.4, p = 0.461, at 3 months; and -2.7 vs. -0.6, p = 0.042, at 6 months.The Positive Choice intervention achieved significant cessation of illicit drug use and unprotected sex at the group-level, and modest individual-level reductions in days of ongoing drug use and number of casual sex partners compared with the

  8. The vexed relationship between Clostridium difficile and inflammatory bowel disease: an assessment of carriage in an outpatient setting among patients in remission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clayton, Evelyn M

    2009-05-01

    Comorbidity with Clostridium difficile may cause diagnostic delay in newly presenting inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, trigger relapse in established disease, confound therapies, and serve as an indicator of an underlying defect in innate immunity. Retrospective analyses have suggested community acquisition; to address this we conducted a prospective analysis of C. difficile carriage in IBD patients using molecular methods specifically in an outpatient setting.

  9. Translation of fetal abdominal circumference-guided therapy of gestational diabetes complicated by maternal obesity to a clinical outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Stephen F; Bovbjerg, Marit L; Kington, Randi L

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of fetal abdominal circumference-guided therapy for gestational diabetes (GDM) in an outpatient population characterized by highly-prevalent maternal obesity. Data for this translational retrospective cohort study come from medical records. Fetal abdominal circumference was assessed by ultrasound in late second trimester, and sex- and gestational age-specific percentiles assigned. Taking fetal abdominal circumference percentile as a marker for adequacy of fetal growth, maternal glucose targets were set accordingly: loose, moderate or tight. Associations between mother's targets and neonatal outcomes (small for gestational age (SGA), large for gestational age (LGA), macrosomia, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission, and neonatal hypoglycemia) were assessed using unconditional logistic regression, controlling for pre-gravid body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain. In 419 consecutive pregnancies complicated by GDM, neonatal outcomes compared favorably with previous randomized trials of intensive GDM management. Importantly, adverse outcomes were observed less often than might be expected in an obese GDM population. BMI did not have an independent effect on neonatal outcomes. Ultrasound-guided therapy of GDM, in general clinic use, can limit excess macrosomia and LGA, even in a population with significant maternal obesity.

  10. Obesity treatment: results after 4 years of a Nutritional and Psycho-Physical Rehabilitation Program in an outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, Lorenzo M; Cuzzolaro, Massimo; Gnessi, Lucio; Lubrano, Carla; Migliaccio, Silvia; Aversa, Antonio; Pinto, Alessandro; Lenzi, Andrea

    2014-06-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease as well as a risk factor for cardiovascular, metabolic and osteoarticular diseases, affecting the psychosocial health and the quality of life. Recent evidence suggests that the adequate treatment of obesity should provide a multidimensional multidisciplinary approach including nutritional therapy, psycho-educational classes and physical reconditioning/motor rehabilitation. The aim of this approach should be to maintain the results over time with a positive impact on the obesity-related cardiovascular and metabolic risk. To evaluate the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary Nutritional and Psycho-Physical Reconditioning Program (NPPRP) in an outpatient setting. The observational prospective cohort study involved subjects, aged from 18 to 65 years, with a BMI >30 kg/m(2), who were followed up over 48 months. After the first nutritional and psychological examination, patients who refused NPPRP were treated according to standard nutrition procedures (SNT). Patients were followed through monthly medical examinations and then by annual telephonic structured interviews for 4 years. Changes in body weight, eating behavior, physical activity performance, and the occurrence of clinical obesity-related complications were considered as outcome measures. Of 464 enrolled patients, 161 (34.7%) took part in the follow-up. From the enrollment to the end of follow-up, weight loss was greater in the NPPRP group than in the SNP group (-8.08 ± 10 kg versus -3.0 ± 6 kg). After 4 years eating behavior improved in both groups. The percentage of patients who continued to perform physical activity was higher in the NPPRP group than in the SNT group (61.0 versus 34.1%). The SNT group reported complications more frequently than the NPPRP group: hypertension (19 versus 5.8%), dyslipidemia (19.4 versus 12.7%), and skeletal problems (26.9 versus 17.5%). The main reasons for drop-out from the rehabilitation program were logistic problems (distance or time) in both

  11. Passing the baton: a grounded practical theory of handoff communication between multidisciplinary providers in two Department of Veterans Affairs outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Christopher J; Maguen, Shira; Daley, Aaron; Cohen, Greg; Seal, Karen H

    2013-01-01

    Handoffs are communication processes that enact the transfer of responsibility between providers across clinical settings. Prior research on handoff communication has focused on inpatient settings between provider teams and has emphasized patient safety. This study examines handoff communication within multidisciplinary provider teams in two outpatient settings. To conduct an exploratory study that describes handoff communication among multidisciplinary providers, to develop a theory-driven descriptive framework for outpatient handoffs, and to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different handoff types. Qualitative, in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 31 primary care, mental health, and social work providers in two Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center outpatient clinics. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using Grounded Practical Theory to develop a theoretical model of and a descriptive framework for handoff communication among multidisciplinary providers. Multidisciplinary providers reported that handoff decisions across settings were made spontaneously and without clear guidelines. Two situated values, clinic efficiency and patient-centeredness, shaped multidisciplinary providers' handoff decisions. Providers reported three handoff techniques along a continuum: the electronic handoff, which was the most clinically efficient; the provider-to-provider handoff, which balanced clinic efficiency and patient-centeredness; and the collaborative handoff, which was the most patient-centered. Providers described handoff choice as a practical response to manage constituent features of clinic efficiency (time, space, medium of communication) and patient-centeredness (information continuity, management continuity, relational continuity, and social interaction). We present a theoretical and descriptive framework to help providers evaluate differential handoff use, reflect on situated values guiding clinic communication, and guide

  12. Comparison of glucometers used in hospitals and in outpatient settings with the laboratory reference method in a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Ullal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glucometers allow self-monitoring of blood glucose in a convenient manner. With the availability of various glucometers, there is a persistent attempt to improve the accuracy and the precision of these glucometer readings, so as to match the laboratory values of blood glucose. Objective: We compared the glucometers used in hospital and out-patient settings with the laboratory reference method. Materials and Methods: We analyzed a total of 105 blood samples collected from in-patient and out-patient from our tertiary care hospital. Venous blood samples were collected and checked on six glucometers and the same blood sample was sent to the laboratory for glucose estimation. The laboratory value was used as a reference for comparison. The accuracy was evaluated by the ISO criteria. The results were evaluated by Bland Altman graphs, correlation coefficients, scatter plots and Clarke′s error grid analysis. Results: We observed good correlation between bed side glucometer and laboratory automated analyzer. Among the in-patient glucometers Breeze 2, Performa and SureStep, the correlation coefficient was 0.97, 0.96 and 0.88 respectively. Among the outpatient glucometers One touch ultra 2, Active and Contour, the correlation coefficient was 0.97, 0.97 and 0.95 respectively. Conclusions: There is a good correlation between different glucometers and laboratory values especially in the out-patient settings. Among all in-patient glucometers, SureStep by Johnson and Johnson had least correlation coefficient, whereas all three out-patient glucometers correlated well with the laboratory values.

  13. Use of patient-reported outcomes in outpatient settings as a means of patient involvement and self-management support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, Caroline; Nielsen, Berit Kjærside; Hjøllund, Niels Henrik Ingvar

    2016-01-01

    of life, symptoms and wellbeing. Patients who visited the outpatient clinic at the Department of Renal Medicine at Aarhus University Hospital in the Central Denmark Region in February and March 2014 and in March and August 2015 were invited to participate. We used a convenience sampling approach...

  14. Extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli in community, specialized outpatient clinic and hospital settings in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Salome N; Hilty, Markus; Kronenberg, Andreas; Droz, Sara; Perreten, Vincent; Endimiani, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) in Escherichia coli can be due to the production of ESBLs, plasmid-mediated AmpCs (pAmpCs) or chromosomal AmpCs (cAmpCs). Information regarding type and prevalence of β-lactamases, clonal relations and plasmids associated with the bla genes for ESC-R E. coli (ESC-R-Ec) detected in Switzerland is lacking. Moreover, data focusing on patients referred to the specialized outpatient clinics (SOCs) are needed. We analysed 611 unique E. coli isolated during September-December 2011. ESC-R-Ec were studied with microarrays, PCR/DNA sequencing for blaESBLs, blapAmpCs, promoter region of blacAmpC, IS elements, plasmid incompatibility group, and also implementing transformation, aIEF, rep-PCR and MLST. The highest resistance rates were observed in the SOCs, whereas those in the hospital and community were lower (e.g. quinolone resistance of 22.6%, 17.2% and 9.0%, respectively; P = 0.003 for SOCs versus community). The prevalence of ESC-R-Ec in the three settings was 5.3% (n = 11), 7.8% (n = 22) and 5.7% (n = 7), respectively. Thirty isolates produced CTX-M ESBLs (14 were CTX-M-15), 5 produced CMY-2 pAmpC and 5 hyper-expressed cAmpCs due to promoter mutations. Fourteen isolates were of sequence type 131 (ST131; 10 with CTX-M-15). blaCTX-M and blaCMY-2 were associated with an intact or truncated ISEcp1 and were mainly carried by IncF, IncFII and IncI1plasmids. ST131 producing CTX-M-15 is the predominant clone. The prevalence of ESC-R-Ec (overall 6.5%) is low, but an unusual relatively high frequency of AmpC producers (25%) was noted. The presence of ESC-R-Ec in the SOCs and their potential ability to be exchanged between hospital and community should be taken into serious consideration.

  15. Integrative medical education: educational strategies and preliminary evaluation of the Integrated Curriculum for Anthroposophic Medicine (ICURAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Christian; Tauschel, Diethard; Neumann, Melanie; Lutz, Gabriele; Cysarz, Dirk; Heusser, Peter; Edelhäuser, Friedrich

    2012-12-01

    the development and preliminary evaluation of a new medical program aimed at educating students in patient-centered integrative care and developing appropriate educational strategies. The Integrated Curriculum for Anthroposophic Medicine (ICURAM) was developed with modules on anthroposophic medicine integrated into the full 6 years of the regular medical curriculum. The educational strategy is the ESPRI(2)T approach, combining Exploratory learning, Supported participation, Patient-based learning, Reflective practice, Integrated learning, an Integrative approach and Team-based learning. The student participation, assessed based on the number of credit points earned per year (ctp/year) through the ICURAM (1 ctp=30 h workload), served as a preliminary indicator of student interest. Of the 412 55%medical students participated in the program: 16% full participation (≥ 4 ctp/year), 18% partial participation (1-3.99 ctp/year) and 22% occasional participation (0.25-0.99 ctp/year). The amount of additional workload taken on by students was between 7.8h/year for occasional participants, 33 h/year for partial participants and 84 h/year for full participants. More than half of medical students were willing to invest a significant amount of additional time in the optional program. An integrative medical curriculum with a student-centered educational strategy seems to be of interest to most medical students. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The meaning of 'place' in families' lived experiences of paediatric outpatient care in different settings: a descriptive phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Gemma; Greenfield, Sheila; Redwood, Sabi

    2015-01-01

    Health service reforms in the United Kingdom have sought to ensure that children and young people who are ill receive timely, high quality and effective care as close to home as possible. Using phenomenological methods, this study examined the experience and impact of introducing new, community-based paediatric outpatient clinics from the perspective of NHS service-users. Findings reveal that paediatric outpatient 'care closer to home' is experienced in ways that go beyond concerns about location and proximity. For families it means care that 'fits into their lives' spatially, temporally and emotionally; facilitating a sense of 'at-homeness' within the self and within the place, through the creation of a warm and welcoming environment, and by providing timely consultations which attend to aspects of the families' lifeworld. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Management and adherence to VTE treatment guidelines in a national prospective cohort study in the Canadian outpatient setting. The Recovery Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Susan R; Springmann, Vicky; Schulman, Sam; Martineau, Josée; Stewart, John A; Komari, Nelly; McLeod, Anne; Strulovitch, Carla; Blostein, Mark; Faucher, Jacques-Philippe; Gamble, Greg; Gordon, Wendy; Kagoma, Peter K; Miron, Marie-José; Laverdière, David; Game, Melaku; Mills, Allan

    2012-09-01

    Documenting patterns and outcomes of venous thromboembolism (VTE) management and degree of adherence by clinicians to treatment guidelines could help identify remediable gaps in patient care. Prospective, clinical practice-based data from Canadian outpatient settings on management of VTE, degree of adherence with treatment guidelines and frequency of recurrent VTE and bleeding during follow-up was obtained in a multicentre, prospective observational study. From 12 Canadian centres, we assessed 868 outpatients with acute symptomatic VTE who received the low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) enoxaparin alone or with vitamin K antagonists (VKA), at baseline and at six months (or at the end of treatment, whichever came first). Index VTE was limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in 583 (67.2%) patients, pulmonary embolism (PE) with or without DVT in 262 (30.2%) patients, and unusual site DVT in 23 (2.6%) patients. VTE was unprovoked in 399 (46.0%) patients, associated with cancer in 74 (8.5%) patients, transient risk factors in 327 (37.7%) patients and hormonal factors in 68 (7.8%) patients.With regard to guideline adherence, 58 (7.3%) patients received 3 months. Only 38.1% of patients with transient VTE risk factors had received thromboprophylaxis. Our study provides useful information on clinical presentation, management and related outcomes in Canadian outpatients with VTE. Our results suggest there may be important gaps in use of thromboprophylaxis to prevent VTE and use of LMWH monotherapy to treat cancer-related VTE.

  18. Psychological recovery and its correlates in adults seeking outpatient psychiatric services: An exploratory study from an Indian tertiary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandotra, Aditi; Mehrotra, Seema; Bharath, Srikala

    2017-10-01

    The study was designed to explore psychological recovery and its correlates in adults receiving outpatient mental health services for psychiatric disorders. It specifically aimed at examining the association of psychological recovery with symptomatic and functional recovery and with selected illness and treatment variables. The relationship of psychological recovery with perceived social support was also the focus of inquiry. The study utilized a cross sectional survey design with a sample of 90 participants diagnosed with severe and common mental illness who had been seeking outpatient psychiatric follow up services. The data was collected with the help of both clinician rated and self-rated measures. The study findings suggested that symptomatic, functional and psychological recovery are significantly correlated but not completely overlapping constructs. Nearly 40% of the sampled participants were at the lower stages of psychological recovery, despite the fact that a majority of them were rated by clinicians as having mild or lower severity of symptoms. With respect to socio-demographic variables, a significant association was found between higher levels of education and psychological recovery. The participants with common mental illness were significantly lower on self-reported improvement and higher on moratorium subscale of psychological recovery (as compared to those with severe mental illness), indicating their struggle in dealing with a sense of loss and despair. Findings also suggested that higher levels of overall perceived social support is likely to facilitate psychological recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ambulatory cardiology network in Greece: Clinical and therapeutic implications in the outpatient setting. The TEVE-SSF study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulos, Konstantinos E; Panagiotopoulou, Eleni E; Katsaros, Konstantinos; Noikokirakis, Georgios; Mpouziou, Maria; Stamelou, Angeliki; Toumanidis, Savvas

    2016-11-15

    Community based registries are particularly valuable tools to Preventive Cardiology as they summarize epidemiological data of ischemic heart disease risk factors, medications and lifestyle characteristics. We enrolled 1191 patients, from an outpatient community based cardiology network, dedicated to cover medically, office based professionals. We recorded demographic and lifestyle characteristics, risk factors for ischemic heart disease, all clinical entities diagnosed and therapies which were prescribed for hypertension and lipid disorders specifically. Our population consisted of 659 males (55%) and 532 females (45%), (mean age 46±14). A sedentary lifestyle was almost universal (92%), followed by smoking (44%) and overweight body composition (38%). Unhealthy lifestyle increased significantly during the third decade of life, while multimorbidity ascended during the fifth. Cardiovascular morbidity was present in 611 patients (51%), while 289 patients (24%) were found negative for cardiovascular disease and positive for a different system diagnosis. Lipid disorders (32%) and hypertension (31%) were the most frequent cardiovascular entities. β-Blockers and statins were the most frequently prescribed medications for hypertension and lipid disorders respectively. Cardiovascular morbidity was frequent in this ambulatory middle aged population, whereas multimorbidity (mainly from gastrointestinal and endocrine system) was a significant coexisting problem, even for a cardiology oriented outpatient population. Unhealthy lifestyle is of major importance because it was present in the majority of our patients early in their life and because it was statistically related to hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Preventive Cardiology must introduce special interventions to deescalate the presence of unhealthy lifestyle in young populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Adherence to Therapy in the Outpatient Setting: the Ability to Identify and Assess the Effectiveness of Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, T F; Smirnova, D M; Deev, D A; Fofanova, V T

    2017-07-01

    To assess adherence of patients to antihypertensive therapy, to determine the role of various factors affecting adherence to treatment by outpatients, and to assess clinical efficacy of a calcium antagonist felodipine. We examined 5 474 women and men aged >18 years who at visit to a local internist had office systolic arterial pressure (AP) 140-179 and diastolic AP up to 100 mm Hg both on and without hypotensive therapy. Examination included registration of risk factors and concomitant therapy. All patients self-assessed their state of heath using visual analog scale (VAS). Adherence to therapy was evaluated by the Morisky-Green test. Obtaining by a patient of antihypertensive drugs in the framework of the Programme for Supplementary Pharmaceutical Provision (SPP) was necessarily registered. Among examined ambulatory patients with arterial hypertension (AH) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) more than 60% had low adherence to prescribed medications. Such factors as complicated AH course when AH was combined with IHD or diabetes (D), use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium antagonists, and angiotensin receptor blockers were associated with high adherence to treatment. Male sex, elderly age, presence of risk factors of cardiovascular complications, and long history of AH were associated with low adherence to therapy. Presence of prescribed drugs in the SSP list was associated with high adherence but multifactorial analysis with inclusion of IHD, D, availability of a tonometer at home made contribution of SSP in high adherence insignificant. The use of felodipine allowed not only to achieve pronounced hypotensive effect in patients with AH but also to improve initially low adherence. During long-term observation of outpatients, it is necessary to regularly assess possibly low adherence to therapy with the aim of its improvement.

  1. Long acting reversible contraception in postpartum adolescents: early initiation of etonogestrel implant is superior to IUDs in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocce, K; Sheeder, J; Python, J; Teal, S B

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the outpatient initiation of postpartum long-acting reversible contraception (LARC). Prospective cohort study of pregnant adolescents' prenatal contraceptive intentions and successful postpartum initiation of LARC. Urban, university hospital-affiliated, adolescent outpatient clinic. Adolescents attending an integrated prenatal and postpartum maternity clinic. Data were collected via the electronic medical record and telephone interview. Contraceptive intentions during the third trimester, contraceptive methods used postpartum, timing of LARC initiation, timing of resumption of intercourse. 116 patients were enrolled; 75% intended LARC use postpartum. Of 38 implant-intenders, 14 received it within 14 days postpartum. All reported abstinence pre-placement. Mean time to insertion was 18±13 days. Of 37 IUD-intenders, only two received one by 8 weeks postpartum. By 14 weeks postpartum, 43% received one. Over half reported intercourse prior to insertion; the only method of contraception used was condoms. Mean time to insertion was 70±11 days. Resumption of intercourse prior to initiation of the intended LARC method was significantly higher in IUD recipients compared to those who intended and received the implant (RR 8.8; CI 1.3-57.5). In postpartum teens attending a clinic that prioritizes contraceptive use, the implant is far more likely to be received prior to resumption of sexual activity than the IUD. This may be due to more and earlier opportunities for placement, or waning commitment with time since delivery. Post-placental IUDs may be needed to equal the success of the implant in this patient population. Short-acting, reliable contraceptive methods should be implemented for postpartum adolescents preferring to wait for IUD insertion. Copyright © 2012 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. AUTOETNOGRAPHIC METHOD AND AUTOBIOGRAPHIC CASES IN CONTEMPORARY ART IN ANTHROPOSOPHIC CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Arzu AYTEKIN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to analyze the autobiographical phenomena through the use of autotypical methodology and contemporary art examples, which are based on the autobiographical data of Joseph Beuys and Christian Boltanski in anthroposophical context.The basic paradigm shifts, sociological and historical accounts, the attitude of the individual and the artist to the external reality reveal itself as the other, society as the other and a new mythical, shamanic figure. This figure appears as a settlement with the past, expression of the past (history artistic expression, and treatment of the experiences and emotions experienced in individual mythology. In this sense, the existence of poetic and minimalist structure as well as mystical influences in the conceptual studies and performances of the artists who make up the sample of the research emerge through the historical and social analysis of their biographical analysis as well as the autoetnographic past and paradigm shifts.

  3. Utilization Management of High-Cost Imaging in an Outpatient Setting in a Large Stable Patient and Provider Cohort over 7 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilburg, Jeffrey B; Sistrom, Christopher L; Rosenthal, Daniel I; Stout, Markus B; Dreyer, Keith J; Rockett, Helaine R; Baron, Jason M; Ferris, Timothy G; Thrall, James H

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To quantify the effect of a comprehensive, long-term, provider-led utilization management (UM) program on high-cost imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging, and positron emission tomography) performed on an outpatient basis. Materials and Methods This retrospective, 7-year cohort study included all patients regularly seen by primary care physicians (PCPs) at an urban academic medical center. The main outcome was the number of outpatient high-cost imaging examinations per patient per year ordered by the patient's PCP or by any specialist. The authors determined the probability of a patient undergoing any high-cost imaging procedure during a study year and the number of examinations per patient per year (intensity) in patients who underwent high-cost imaging. Risk-adjusted hierarchical models were used to directly quantify the physician component of variation in probability and intensity of high-cost imaging use, and clinicians were provided with regular comparative feedback on the basis of the results. Observed trends in high-cost imaging use and provider variation were compared with the same measures for outpatient laboratory studies because laboratory use was not subject to UM during this period. Finally, per-member per-year high-cost imaging use data were compared with statewide high-cost imaging use data from a major private payer on the basis of the same claim set. Results The patient cohort steadily increased in size from 88 959 in 2007 to 109 823 in 2013. Overall high-cost imaging utilization went from 0.43 examinations per year in 2007 to 0.34 examinations per year in 2013, a decrease of 21.33% (P data, outpatient high-cost imaging utilization in this cohort decreased 28%, compared with a 20% decrease in statewide utilization (P = .0023). Conclusion Analysis of high-cost imaging utilization in a stable cohort of patients cared for by PCPs during a 7-year period showed that comprehensive UM can produce a significant

  4. The effect of facility characteristics on patient safety, patient experience, and service availability for procedures in non-hospital-affiliated outpatient settings: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglas, Nancy F; Battistelli, Molly F; Nicholson, Wanda K; Sobota, Mindy; Urman, Richard D; Roberts, Sarah C M

    2018-01-01

    Over recent decades, numerous medical procedures have migrated out of hospitals and into freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) and physician offices, with possible implications for patient outcomes. In response, states have passed regulations for office-based surgeries, private organizations have established standards for facility accreditation, and professional associations have developed clinical guidelines. While abortions have been performed in office setting for decades, states have also enacted laws requiring that facilities that perform abortions meet specific requirements. The extent to which facility requirements have an impact on patient outcomes-for any procedure-is unclear. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effect of outpatient facility type (ASC vs. office) and specific facility characteristics (e.g., facility accreditation, emergency response protocols, clinician qualifications, physical plant characteristics, other policies) on patient safety, patient experience and service availability in non-hospital-affiliated outpatient settings. To identify relevant research, we searched databases of the published academic literature (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science) and websites of governmental and non-governmental organizations. Two investigators reviewed 3049 abstracts and full-text articles against inclusion/exclusion criteria and assessed the quality of 22 identified articles. Most studies were hampered by methodological challenges, with 12 of 22 not meeting minimum quality criteria. Of 10 studies included in the review, most (6) examined the effect of facility type on patient safety. Existing research appears to indicate no difference in patient safety for outpatient procedures performed in ASCs vs. physician offices. Research about specific facility characteristics is insufficient to draw conclusions. More and higher quality research is needed to determine if there is a public health problem to be addressed through facility

  5. Influence of Spirituality on Cool Down Reactions, Work Engagement, and Life Satisfaction in Anthroposophic Health Care Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Büssing, Arndt; Lötzke, Désirée; Glöckler, Michaela; Heusser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse whether spirituality is a resource for health care professionals to deal with increasing stress and work burden, specifically to analyse associations between ?cool down reactions? (which describe an emotional distancing towards patients and/or reduced engagement as a strategy to protect their own functionality), work burden, and life satisfaction. We specifically focussed on anthroposophic health care professionals because of their unique approach to distinct aspec...

  6. Self-administered outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: a report of three years experience in the Irish healthcare setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kieran, J

    2012-02-01

    Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) was first reported in 1972. OPAT programmes are not well established in Ireland, with no reported outcomes in the literature. An OPAT programme was established at St. James Hospital in 2006. Demographics, diagnoses and outcomes of the first 60 courses are reported. A retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data was performed on patients treated from March 2006 to February 2009. The data was analysed using SPSS v.17. Sixty OPAT courses were administered to 56 patients, 57 percent of which were male. The median age was 50 years, the median inpatient stay was 19 days, the median duration of OPAT was 16 days and 1,289 inpatient bed days were saved. The additional cost per day of OPAT was 167.60 euros. Vancomycin was the most prescribed antimicrobial, administered to 35%. Musculoskeletal infection was the indication for treatment in 50%. Confirmatory microbiological diagnosis was identified in 72%, most frequently due to Staphylococcus aureus (68%). Only minor adverse events were recorded. Clinical cure was achieved in 92.8%. A patient satisfaction survey showed high satisfaction. OPAT is a safe and effective way of providing parenteral antibiotic therapy in the Irish healthcare system. Better integration of funding and the appointment of Infectious Diseases specialists will facilitate its expansion.

  7. Quality Oncology Practice Initiative Certification Program: measuring implementation of chemotherapy administration safety standards in the outpatient oncology setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Terry R; Schulmeister, Lisa; Jacobson, Joseph O

    2013-03-01

    The Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Certification Program (QCP) evaluates individual outpatient oncology practice performance in areas that affect patient care and safety and builds on the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) QOPI by assessing the compliance of a practice with certification standards based on the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society standards for safe chemotherapy administration. To become certified, a practice must attain a benchmark quality score on certification measures in QOPI and attest that it complies with 17 QCP standards. Structured on-site reviews, initially performed in randomly selected practices, became mandatory beginning in September 2011. Of 111 practices that have undergone on-site review, only two were fully concordant with all of the standards (median, 11; range, seven to 17). Most practices were subsequently able to modify practice to become QOPI certified. The QCP addresses the call from the Institute of Medicine to close the quality gap by aligning evidence-based guidelines and consensus-driven standards with requirements for oncology practices to develop and maintain structural safety components, such as policies and procedures that ensure practice performance. On-site practice evaluation is a high-impact component of the program.

  8. Evaluation of Preclinical Assays to Investigate an Anthroposophic Pharmaceutical Process Applied to Mistletoe (Viscum album L. Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Baumgartner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts from European mistletoe (Viscum album L. developed in anthroposophic medicine are based on specific pharmaceutical procedures to enhance remedy efficacy. One such anthroposophic pharmaceutical process was evaluated regarding effects on cancer cell toxicity in vitro and on colchicine tumor formation in Lepidium sativum. Anthroposophically processed Viscum album extract (APVAE was produced by mixing winter and summer mistletoe extracts in the edge of a high-speed rotating disk and was compared with manually mixed Viscum album extract (VAE. The antiproliferative effect of VAE/APVAE was determined in five cell lines (NCI-H460, DU-145, HCC1143, MV3, and PA-TU-8902 by WST-1 assay in vitro; no difference was found between VAE and APVAE in any cell line tested (P>0.14. Incidence of colchicine tumor formation was assessed by measurement of the root/shoot-ratio of seedlings of Lepidium sativum treated with colchicine as well as VAE, APVAE, or water. Colchicine tumor formation decreased after application of VAE (−5.4% compared to water, P<0.001 and was even stronger by APVAE (−8.8% compared to water, P<0.001. The high-speed mistletoe extract mixing process investigated thus did not influence toxicity against cancer cells but seemed to sustain morphostasis and to enhance resistance against external noxious influences leading to phenomenological malformations.

  9. Antipsychotic Prescriptions Among Adults With Major Depressive Disorder in Office-Based Outpatient Settings: National Trends From 2006 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Taeho Greg; Mohamed, Somaia; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2018-02-13

    A recent moderately long-term study found an antipsychotic to be more effective than an antidepressant as the next-step treatment of unresponsive major depressive disorder (MDD). It is thus timely to examine recent trends in the pharmacoepidemiology of antipsychotic treatment of MDD. Data from the 2006-2015 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, nationally representative samples of office-based outpatient visits in adults with MDD (ICD-9-CM codes 296.20-296.26 and 296.30-296.36) (n = 4,044 unweighted), were used to estimate rates of antipsychotic prescribing over these 10 years. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified demographic and clinical factors independently associated with antipsychotic use in MDD. Antipsychotic prescribing for MDD increased from 18.5% in 2006-2007 to 24.9% in 2008-2009 and then declined to 18.9% in 2014-2015. Visits with adults 75 years or older showed the greatest decline from 27.0% in 2006-2007 to 10.7% in 2014-2015 (OR for overall trend = 0.73; 95% CI, 0.56-0.95). The most commonly prescribed antipsychotic agents were aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone. Antipsychotic prescription was associated with being black or Hispanic, having Medicare among adults under 65 years or Medicaid as a primary source of payment, and receiving mental health counseling, 3 or more concomitant medications, and diagnosis of cannabis use disorder (P < .01). Antipsychotics, prescribed for about one-fifth of adults with MDD, increased and then declined from 2006 to 2015, reflecting, first, FDA approval and then concern about adverse effects in the elderly. Future research should track evolving trends following the publication of evidence of greater long-term effectiveness of antipsychotic than antidepressant next-step therapy in adults with MDD. © Copyright 2018 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  10. [Problems in integrative postgraduate medical training of physicians at anthroposophic hospitals in Germany and Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Peter; Eberhard, Sabine; Weinzirl, Johannes; Orlow, Pascale; Berger, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Anthroposophic hospitals provide integrative medical care by complementing conventional (CON) with anthroposophic medicine (AM). They teach integrative medicine in postgraduate medical training (PGMT). In a first evaluation of PGMT quality in AM, we analyzed the problems of this training from the perspectives of trainers and trainees. We conducted an anonymous cross-sectional full survey of all trainee and trainer physicians at the 15 AM hospitals in Germany (DE) and Switzerland (CH) with questionnaires of the Swiss Institute of Technology (ETH) Zürich, complemented by a module for AM. We also conducted descriptive statistics for questions with answering scales as well as calculations of group differences (two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test) and a qualitative content analysis (Mayring) of free text answers related to the problem analysis. The response rate in DE embraced 89 out of 215 (41.39%) surveyed trainees and 78 out of 184 (42.39%) trainers; in CH, the response rate comprised 19 out of 25 (76%) trainees and 22 out of 30 (73.33%) trainers. Free text answers related to problem analysis in DE and CH were given by 16 out of 108 (14.8%) trainees and by 20 out of 100 (20%) trainers, overall. Perceived main problems include work overload; shortcomings in work organization; delimitation of competences; interprofessional cooperation; financial resources (trainers); wages (trainees DE); practical relevance of AM (trainees and trainers in DE); professional or didactic competence of trainers; lack of interest in AM (trainees); problems with learning and practicing AM; no curriculum for postgraduate medical training in AM; tensions between AM and CON. Explanations for the differences between DE and CH include larger departments and the DRG system in DE, but also better structural conditions for AM PGMT in CH. Main problems of PGMT in AM include not only non-specific and systemic aspects, but also AM-specific issues. In order to develop a basis for concrete problem solving

  11. Measles transmission from an anthroposophic community to the general population, Germany 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krenn-Lanzl Irene

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Germany, measles vaccination coverage with two doses is not yet sufficient to prevent regional outbreaks. Among the 16 German federal states, vaccination coverage was lowest in Bavaria with 85% in 2008. From March to mid-April 2008, four neighbouring Bavarian counties reported 55 measles-cases mostly linked to an ongoing measles outbreak in an anthroposophic school in Austria. We investigated this outbreak to guide future public health action. Methods We applied the German national case-definition for measles and collected data using the national surveillance system and a questionnaire. Measles cases with disease onset a maximum of 18 days apart and spatial contact (e.g. same household, same school were summed up in clusters. Two different interventions, which were implemented in schools and kindergartens in Bavaria, were compared by their impact on the size and duration of measles clusters. Susceptible persons were excluded from schools or kindergartens either with the first (intervention A or second (intervention B measles case occurring in the respective institution. Results Among the 217 Bavarian measles cases identified from March-July 2008, 28 (13% cases were attendees of the anthroposophic school in Austria. In total, vaccination status was known in 161 (74% cases and 156 (97% of them were not vaccinated. The main factor for non-vaccination was "fear of vaccine-related adverse events" (33%. Twenty-nine (18% of 161 cases suffered complications. Exclusively genotype D5 was detected. Overall, 184 cases could be epidemiologically grouped into 59 clusters. Of those, 41 clusters could be linked to households and 13 to schools or kindergartens. The effect of intervention A and B was analysed in 10 school or kindergarten clusters. Depending on the respective intervention A or B, the median number of cases per cluster was 3 versus 13 (p = 0.05, and the median duration of a cluster was 3 versus 26 days (p = 0.13. Conclusions

  12. Measles transmission from an anthroposophic community to the general population, Germany 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In Germany, measles vaccination coverage with two doses is not yet sufficient to prevent regional outbreaks. Among the 16 German federal states, vaccination coverage was lowest in Bavaria with 85% in 2008. From March to mid-April 2008, four neighbouring Bavarian counties reported 55 measles-cases mostly linked to an ongoing measles outbreak in an anthroposophic school in Austria. We investigated this outbreak to guide future public health action. Methods We applied the German national case-definition for measles and collected data using the national surveillance system and a questionnaire. Measles cases with disease onset a maximum of 18 days apart and spatial contact (e.g. same household, same school) were summed up in clusters. Two different interventions, which were implemented in schools and kindergartens in Bavaria, were compared by their impact on the size and duration of measles clusters. Susceptible persons were excluded from schools or kindergartens either with the first (intervention A) or second (intervention B) measles case occurring in the respective institution. Results Among the 217 Bavarian measles cases identified from March-July 2008, 28 (13%) cases were attendees of the anthroposophic school in Austria. In total, vaccination status was known in 161 (74%) cases and 156 (97%) of them were not vaccinated. The main factor for non-vaccination was "fear of vaccine-related adverse events" (33%). Twenty-nine (18%) of 161 cases suffered complications. Exclusively genotype D5 was detected. Overall, 184 cases could be epidemiologically grouped into 59 clusters. Of those, 41 clusters could be linked to households and 13 to schools or kindergartens. The effect of intervention A and B was analysed in 10 school or kindergarten clusters. Depending on the respective intervention A or B, the median number of cases per cluster was 3 versus 13 (p = 0.05), and the median duration of a cluster was 3 versus 26 days (p = 0.13). Conclusions Introduction of

  13. Interactive "Video doctor" counseling reduces drug and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-positive patients in diverse outpatient settings

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, P; Ciccarone, D; Gansky, SA; Bangsberg, DR; Clanon, K; McPhee, SJ; Calderón, SH; Bogetz, A; Gerbert, B

    2008-01-01

    Background Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide “prevention with positives” in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based...

  14. Transitioning insulin pump therapy from the outpatient to the inpatient setting: a review of 6 years' experience with 253 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Curtiss B; Beer, Karen A; Seifert, Karen M; Boyle, Mary E; Mackey, Patricia A; Castro, Janna C

    2012-09-01

    We reviewed the care of a large cohort of patients with diabetes mellitus on insulin pump therapy who required an inpatient stay. Records were reviewed of patients hospitalized between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. A total of 136 patients using insulin pumps had 253 hospitalizations. Mean (standard deviation) patient age was 55 (16) years, diabetes duration was 29 (15) years, and pump duration was 6 (5) years. Insulin pump therapy was continued in 164 (65%) hospitalizations. Adherence to core process measures improved over time: by 2011, 100% of cases had an endocrinology consultation, 100% had the required insulin pump order set completed, and 94% had documentation of the signed agreement specifying patient responsibilities for continued use of the technology while hospitalized. Documentation of the insulin pump flow sheet also increased but could still be located in only 64% of cases by the end of 2011. Mean glucose was not significantly different among patients who remained on insulin pump therapy compared to those for whom it was discontinued (p > .1), but episodes of severe hyperglycemia (>300 mg/dl) and hypoglycemia (pump users. No pump site infections, mechanical pump failures, or episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis were observed among patients remaining on therapy. With appropriate patient selection and usage guidelines, most patients using insulin pumps can safely have their therapy transitioned to the inpatient setting. Further study is needed to determine whether this approach can be translated to other hospital settings. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  15. Better satisfaction of patients operated on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in outpatient setting. A prospective comparative monocentric study of 60 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunebourg, Alexandre; Ollivier, Matthieu; Delahaye, David; Argenson, Jean-Noël A; Parratte, Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare satisfaction, clinical scores, and complications of patients operated on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in outpatient setting compared to patients operated in the conventional hospitalization. This prospective non-randomized study compared 30 patients (mean age 31 ± 9 years) operated on outpatient setting for an isolated ACLR matched 1:1 according to age, gender, body mass index, delay to surgery, and preoperative clinical score (IKDC) to 30 patients operated for an ACLR in our conventional hospitalization department during the same period. All the patients were operated on by the same surgeon. The same technique of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with using four bundles semitendinosus and cage fixation was used. The same anaesthesiologic protocol and perioperative cares were used in all patients. Patients' satisfaction was assed using five questions about the course of surgery and hospitalization and a four-level satisfaction questionnaire (excellent, good, fair, and poor). Clinical scores (IKDC and KOOS) were compared preoperatively and at 1 year. Readmission within 30 day and complications at 1 year were compared in both groups. Satisfaction was significantly better in the group of day-case surgery and more patients of the group day-case surgery recommended this modality of treatment (29 against 24; p = 0.04). The IKDC score improved in the two groups (day-case group from 64 ± 17 to 86 ± 7; p < 0.001; conventional hospitalization from 60 ± 21 to 85 ± 10; p < 0.001), but no significant difference between two groups was found at 1 year (p = 0.86). No readmission was necessary in the two groups, but two revisions were needed in the group of the conventional hospitalization. Results of our study showed that patients operated on day-case surgery for an isolated ACLR presented a higher rate of satisfaction compared to patients operated in the conventional hospitalization

  16. Time to diagnosis and associated costs of an outpatient vs inpatient setting in the diagnosis of lymphoma: a retrospective study of a large cohort of major lymphoma subtypes in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Xavier; Sanclemente-Ansó, Carmen; Escoda, Ona; Monclús, Esther; Franco-Vanegas, Jonathan; Moreno, Pedro; Guerra-García, Mar; Guasch, Neus; López-Soto, Alfons

    2018-03-12

    Mainly because of the diversity of clinical presentations, diagnostic delays in lymphoma can be excessive. The time spent in primary care before referral to the specialist may be relatively short compared with the interval between hospital appointment and diagnosis. Although studies have examined the diagnostic intervals and referral patterns of patients with lymphoma, the time to diagnosis of outpatient compared to inpatient settings and the costs incurred are unknown. We performed a retrospective study at two academic hospitals to evaluate the time to diagnosis and associated costs of hospital-based outpatient diagnostic clinics or conventional hospitalization in four representative lymphoma subtypes. The frequency, clinical and prognostic features of each lymphoma subtype and the activities of the two settings were analyzed. The costs incurred during the evaluation were compared by microcosting analysis. A total of 1779 patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2016 with classical Hodgkin, large B-cell, follicular, and mature nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas were identified. Clinically aggressive subtypes including large B-cell and peripheral T-cell lymphomas were more commonly diagnosed in inpatients than in outpatients (39.1 vs 31.2% and 18.9 vs 13.5%, respectively). For each lymphoma subtype, inpatients were older and more likely than outpatients to have systemic symptoms, worse performance status, more advanced Ann Arbor stages, and high-risk prognostic scores. The admission time for diagnosis (i.e. from admission to excisional biopsy) of inpatients was significantly shorter than the time to diagnosis of outpatients (12.3 [3.3] vs 16.2 [2.7] days; P cost of €4039.56 (513.02) per inpatient and of €1408.48 (197.32) per outpatient, or a difference of €2631.08 per patient. Although diagnosis of lymphoma was quicker with hospitalization, the outpatient approach seems to be cost-effective and not detrimental. Despite the considerable savings with the latter

  17. Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Lim...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Limited Data Set This file contains select claim level data and is derived from 2010 hospital outpatient PPS...

  18. A Group-Administered social Skills Training for 8- to 12- Year-Old, high-Functioning Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders : An Evaluation of its Effectiveness in a Naturalistic Outpatient Treatment Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckers, A.; Muris, P.; Roelofs, J.; Arntz, A.

    A social skills training (SST) for high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) was evaluated in an outpatient setting using a combined between- and within-subject design in which SST and a waiting list condition were compared. According to parents and teachers, the SST produced

  19. Reflecting on the methodological challenges of recruiting to a United Kingdom-wide, multi-centre, randomised controlled trial in gynaecology outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Sylvia; Logan, Janet; Hagen, Suzanne; Stark, Diane; Glazener, Cathryn; McDonald, Alison M; McPherson, Gladys

    2013-11-15

    Successful recruitment of participants to any trial is central to its success. Trial results are routinely published, and recruitment is often cited to be slower and more difficult than anticipated. This article reflects on the methodological challenges of recruiting women with prolapse attending United Kingdom (UK) gynaecology outpatient clinics to a multi-centre randomised controlled trial (RCT) of physiotherapy, and the systems put in place in an attempt to address them. Gynaecology outpatients with symptomatic prolapse were to be recruited over a 16-month period from 14 UK hospitals and one New Zealand hospital. Eligible women were informed about the trial by their gynaecologist and informed consent was obtained by the central trial office. Recruitment difficulties were encountered early on, and a number of strategies were employed to try to improve recruitment. Some strategies were more successful than others and they differed in the resources required. Actions that facilitated recruitment included increasing recruiting centres to 23 UK and two international hospitals, good centre support, using processes embedded in clinical practice, and good communication between the trial office, collaborators and participants. Collaborator incentives, whereby staff involved received the benefit immediately, were more successful than a nominal monetary payment per woman randomised. Barriers to recruitment included fewer eligible women than anticipated, patient's preference to receive active treatment rather than allocation to the control group, lack of support staff and high staff turnover. Geographical variations in Primary Care Trust Research Management and Governance approval systems and general practitioner (GP) referral procedures also impacted negatively on recruitment. Our article reflects on the methodological challenges of recruiting to a multi-centre RCT in a UK gynaecology setting. Effective interventions included increasing the number of recruiting centres and

  20. The oil-dispersion bath in anthroposophic medicine – an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bornhöft Gudrun

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthroposophic medicine offers a variety of treatments, among others the oil-dispersion bath, developed in the 1930s by Werner Junge. Based on the phenomenon that oil and water do not mix and on recommendations of Rudolf Steiner, Junge developed a vortex mechanism which churns water and essential oils into a fine mist. The oil-covered droplets empty into a tub, where the patient immerses for 15–30 minutes. We review the current literature on oil-dispersion baths. Methods The following databases were searched: Medline, Pubmed, Embase, AMED and CAMbase. The search terms were 'oil-dispersion bath' and 'oil bath', and their translations in German and French. An Internet search was also performed using Google Scholar, adding the search terms 'study' and 'case report' to the search terms above. Finally, we asked several experts for gray literature not listed in the above-mentioned databases. We included only articles which met the criterion of a clinical study or case report, and excluded theoretical contributions. Results Among several articles found in books, journals and other publications, we identified 1 prospective clinical study, 3 experimental studies (enrolling healthy individuals, 5 case reports, and 3 field-reports. In almost all cases, the studies described beneficial effects – although the methodological quality of most studies was weak. Main indications were internal/metabolic diseases and psychiatric/neurological disorders. Conclusion Beyond the obvious beneficial effects of warm bathes on the subjective well-being, it remains to be clarified what the unique contribution of the distinct essential oils dispersed in the water can be. There is a lack of clinical studies exploring the efficacy of oil-dispersion baths. Such studies are recommended for the future.

  1. Influence of spirituality on cool down reactions, work engagement, and life satisfaction in anthroposophic health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büssing, Arndt; Lötzke, Désirée; Glöckler, Michaela; Heusser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse whether spirituality is a resource for health care professionals to deal with increasing stress and work burden, specifically to analyse associations between "cool down reactions" (which describe an emotional distancing towards patients and/or reduced engagement as a strategy to protect their own functionality), work burden, and life satisfaction. We specifically focussed on anthroposophic health care professionals because of their unique approach to distinct aspects of spirituality. In a cross-sectional survey using standardized questionnaires, 489 persons were enrolled (66% women, mean age 53 ± 10 years, 41% physicians, 12% nurses, and 47% other health care professionals). They scored very high on all measures of spirituality and moderate to low with respect to "cool down reactions." Significant predictors of "cool down reactions" were low work vigor, perceived work burden, alcohol consumption, low life satisfaction, and religious orientation (R (2) = 0.20). In contrast, their life satisfaction was explained best (R (2) = 0.35) by vigor, with further positive influences of being a physician, conscious interactions, and living with a partner on one hand and negative influences of "cool down reactions," work burden, and transcendence convictions on the other hand. Thus, specific aspects of spirituality have only a small influence on anthroposophic health care professionals' "cool down reactions," but might buffer against a loss of vigor and dedication in their work.

  2. Influence of Spirituality on Cool Down Reactions, Work Engagement, and Life Satisfaction in Anthroposophic Health Care Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arndt Büssing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyse whether spirituality is a resource for health care professionals to deal with increasing stress and work burden, specifically to analyse associations between “cool down reactions” (which describe an emotional distancing towards patients and/or reduced engagement as a strategy to protect their own functionality, work burden, and life satisfaction. We specifically focussed on anthroposophic health care professionals because of their unique approach to distinct aspects of spirituality. In a cross-sectional survey using standardized questionnaires, 489 persons were enrolled (66% women, mean age 53 ± 10 years, 41% physicians, 12% nurses, and 47% other health care professionals. They scored very high on all measures of spirituality and moderate to low with respect to “cool down reactions.” Significant predictors of “cool down reactions” were low work vigor, perceived work burden, alcohol consumption, low life satisfaction, and religious orientation (R2=0.20. In contrast, their life satisfaction was explained best (R2=0.35 by vigor, with further positive influences of being a physician, conscious interactions, and living with a partner on one hand and negative influences of “cool down reactions,” work burden, and transcendence convictions on the other hand. Thus, specific aspects of spirituality have only a small influence on anthroposophic health care professionals’ “cool down reactions,” but might buffer against a loss of vigor and dedication in their work.

  3. Influence of Spirituality on Cool Down Reactions, Work Engagement, and Life Satisfaction in Anthroposophic Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöckler, Michaela; Heusser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse whether spirituality is a resource for health care professionals to deal with increasing stress and work burden, specifically to analyse associations between “cool down reactions” (which describe an emotional distancing towards patients and/or reduced engagement as a strategy to protect their own functionality), work burden, and life satisfaction. We specifically focussed on anthroposophic health care professionals because of their unique approach to distinct aspects of spirituality. In a cross-sectional survey using standardized questionnaires, 489 persons were enrolled (66% women, mean age 53 ± 10 years, 41% physicians, 12% nurses, and 47% other health care professionals). They scored very high on all measures of spirituality and moderate to low with respect to “cool down reactions.” Significant predictors of “cool down reactions” were low work vigor, perceived work burden, alcohol consumption, low life satisfaction, and religious orientation (R 2 = 0.20). In contrast, their life satisfaction was explained best (R 2 = 0.35) by vigor, with further positive influences of being a physician, conscious interactions, and living with a partner on one hand and negative influences of “cool down reactions,” work burden, and transcendence convictions on the other hand. Thus, specific aspects of spirituality have only a small influence on anthroposophic health care professionals' “cool down reactions,” but might buffer against a loss of vigor and dedication in their work. PMID:25694789

  4. Substantial differences in initiation of oral anticoagulant therapy and clinical outcome among non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients treated in inpatient and outpatient settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Anders Pretzmann; Hansen, Morten Lock; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2016-01-01

    regression analysis, were estimated for outcomes of TE and bleeding. We included 116 051 non-valvular AF patients [mean age 71.9 years (standard deviation 14.1), 51.3% males], of whom 55.2% were inpatients, 41.9% outpatients, and 2.9% ED patients. OAC therapy 180 days after AF diagnosis among patients...

  5. Safety and effectiveness of long-term treatment with diazepam auto-injector administered by caregivers in an outpatient setting for the treatment of acute repetitive seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogin, Joanne; Wheless, James; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Wolter, Kevin D; Pixton, Glenn C; Sherman, Nancy A; Shukla, Rajesh B; Roland, Carl L; Sommerville, Kenneth W

    2014-09-01

    Part 1 of this phase III study was a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, multicenter study of caregiver administered diazepam auto-injector (AI) in subjects with acute repetitive seizures (ARS) and demonstrated that diazepam AI was well-tolerated and significantly more effective than placebo AI in delaying the time to next seizure or rescue. Part 2 of this study, presented herein, was an open-label continuation to assess the long-term safety and effectiveness of diazepam AI for the treatment of ARS. Of the 234 subjects randomized in part 1, 161 continued into part 2 and were provided open-label diazepam AI. Effectiveness measures were time to next seizure or rescue, number of subsequent rescues by type (rescue medication, emergency room visit, or other medical care), and number of subsequent seizures during the 12-h follow-up period. Safety data (adverse events and respirations diazepam AI treatments (median 4.5; range 1-118), of which 1,071 (77.6%) were effective with no subsequent seizure or rescue during the 12-h follow-up period. Median number of subsequent seizures experienced by subjects was one (range 0-20). Of the 1,380 administrations, 79 (5.7%) required use of rescue medication, 18 (1.3%) required a visit to an emergency room, and 6 (0.4%) required other rescue medical care. In most (75%) of subjects with treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), TEAEs were mild or moderate in severity. Commonly reported treatment-related TEAEs were injection-site pain (10.9%), injection-site hemorrhage (7%), and injection-site bruising (6.3%). Although three subjects met the predefined respiratory rate threshold, none were considered clinically significant or reported as AEs. Long-term treatment with diazepam AI administered by trained caregivers in an outpatient setting to treat ARS is a safe and effective option. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here. Wiley Periodicals

  6. Cardiovascular Disease Performance Measures in the Outpatient Setting in India: Insights From the American College of Cardiology's PINNACLE India Quality Improvement Program (PIQIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ankur; Pokharel, Yashashwi; Hira, Ravi S; Risch, Samantha; Vicera, Veronique; Li, Qiong; Kalra, Ram N; Kerkar, Prafulla G; Kumar, Ganesh; Maddox, Thomas M; Oetgen, William J; Glusenkamp, Nathan; Turakhia, Mintu P; Virani, Salim S

    2015-05-20

    India has a growing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet data on the quality of outpatient care for patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation in India are very limited. We collected data on performance measures for 68 196 unique patients from 10 Indian cardiology outpatient departments from January 1, 2011, to February 5, 2014, in the American College of Cardiology's PINNACLE (Practice Innovation and Clinical Excellence) India Quality Improvement Program (PIQIP). PIQIP is India's first national outpatient CVD quality-improvement program. In the PIQIP registry, we estimated the prevalence of CVD risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and current tobacco use) and CVD among outpatients. We examined adherence with performance measures established by the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, and the American Medical Association Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement for coronary artery disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. There were a total of 68 196 patients (155 953 patient encounters), with a mean age of 50.6 years (SD 18.2 years). Hypertension was present in 29.7% of patients, followed by diabetes (14.9%), current tobacco use (7.6%), and dyslipidemia (6.5%). Coronary artery disease was present in 14.8%, heart failure was noted in 4.0%, and atrial fibrillation was present in 0.5% of patients. Among eligible patients, the reported use of medications was as follows: aspirin in 48.6%, clopidogrel in 37.1%, and statin-based lipid-lowering therapy in 50.6% of patients with coronary artery disease; RAAS (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) antagonist in 61.9% and beta-blockers in 58.1% of patients with heart failure; and oral anticoagulants in 37.0% of patients with atrial fibrillation. This pilot study, initiated to improve outpatient CVD care in India, presents our preliminary results and barriers to data collection and demonstrates that such an initiative is

  7. Cardiovascular Disease Performance Measures in the Outpatient Setting in India: Insights From the American College of Cardiology’s PINNACLE India Quality Improvement Program (PIQIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ankur; Pokharel, Yashashwi; Hira, Ravi S; Risch, Samantha; Vicera, Veronique; Li, Qiong; Kalra, Ram N; Kerkar, Prafulla G; Kumar, Ganesh; Maddox, Thomas M; Oetgen, William J; Glusenkamp, Nathan; Turakhia, Mintu P; Virani, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    Background India has a growing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet data on the quality of outpatient care for patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation in India are very limited. We collected data on performance measures for 68 196 unique patients from 10 Indian cardiology outpatient departments from January 1, 2011, to February 5, 2014, in the American College of Cardiology’s PINNACLE (Practice Innovation and Clinical Excellence) India Quality Improvement Program (PIQIP). PIQIP is India’s first national outpatient CVD quality-improvement program. Methods and Results In the PIQIP registry, we estimated the prevalence of CVD risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and current tobacco use) and CVD among outpatients. We examined adherence with performance measures established by the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, and the American Medical Association Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement for coronary artery disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. There were a total of 68 196 patients (155 953 patient encounters), with a mean age of 50.6 years (SD 18.2 years). Hypertension was present in 29.7% of patients, followed by diabetes (14.9%), current tobacco use (7.6%), and dyslipidemia (6.5%). Coronary artery disease was present in 14.8%, heart failure was noted in 4.0%, and atrial fibrillation was present in 0.5% of patients. Among eligible patients, the reported use of medications was as follows: aspirin in 48.6%, clopidogrel in 37.1%, and statin-based lipid-lowering therapy in 50.6% of patients with coronary artery disease; RAAS (renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system) antagonist in 61.9% and beta-blockers in 58.1% of patients with heart failure; and oral anticoagulants in 37.0% of patients with atrial fibrillation. Conclusions This pilot study, initiated to improve outpatient CVD care in India, presents our preliminary results and barriers to data

  8. Tablet splitting: is it worthwhile? Analysis of drug content and weight uniformity for half tablets of 16 commonly used medications in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Sally A

    2015-01-01

    Tablet splitting is a well-established medical practice in clinical settings for multiple reasons, including cost savings and ease of swallowing. However, it does not necessarily result in weight-uniform half tablets. To (a) investigate the effect of tablet characteristics on weight and content uniformity of half tablets, resulting from splitting 16 commonly used medications in the outpatient setting and (b) provide recommendations for safe tablet-splitting prescribing practices. Ten random tablets from each of the selected medications were weighed and split by 5 volunteers (2 men and 3 women aged 25-44 years) using a knife. The selected medications were mirtazapine 30 mg, bromazepam 3 mg, oxcarbazepin 150 mg, sertraline 50 mg, carvedilol 25 mg, bisoprolol fumarate 10 mg, losartan 50 mg, digoxin 0.25 mg, amiodarone HCl 200 mg, metformin HCl 1,000 mg, glimepiride 4 mg, montelukast 10 mg, ibuprofen 600 mg, celecoxib 200 mg, meloxicam 15 mg, and sildenafil citrate 50 mg. The resulting half tablets were evaluated for weight and drug content uniformity in accordance with proxy United States Pharmacopeia (USP) specification (95%-105% for digoxin and 90%-110% for the other 15 drugs). Weight and drug content uniformity were assessed by comparing weight or drug content of the half tablets with one-half of the mean weight or drug content for all whole tablets in the sample. The percentages by which the weight and drug content of each whole tablet or half tablet differed from sample mean values were calculated. Other relevant physical characteristics of the 16 products were measured. A total of 52 of 320 half tablets (16.2%) and 48 of 320 half tablets (15.0%) fell outside of the proxy USP specification for weight and drug content, respectively. Bromazepam, carvedilol, bisoprolol, losartan, digoxin, and meloxicam half tablets failed the weight and content uniformity test; however, the half tablets for the rest of the medications passed the test. Mean percent weight loss after

  9. Reducing the Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases in Non-selected Outpatients With Schizophrenia: A 30-Month Program Conducted in a Real-life Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Peter; Juel, Anette; Hansen, Mette Vinther

    2017-01-01

    Background: The most common cause of premature death in people with schizophrenia is cardiovascular disease, partially explained by an unhealthy lifestyle, smoking, poor diet and sedentary behavior. We aimed to reduce cardiovascular risk factors. Method: Naturalistic follow-up study with 54 long......-term-treated non-selected outpatients with schizophrenia. The 30-month program consisted of individual guidance, group sessions and normal treatment and care offered in our clinic. Results: On average, the participating women reduced their waist circumference by 11.4. cm (P = 0.037), whereas the participating men...

  10. One-year outcome and incidence of anorexia nervosa and restrictive eating disorders among adolescent girls treated as out-patients in a family-based setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosling, Agneta; Salonen Ros, Helena; Swenne, Ingemar

    2016-01-01

    Aims To study the 1-year outcome and to analyse predictors of outcome of a cohort of adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa (AN) or restrictive eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOSr) treated as out-patients in a family-based programme at a specialized eating disorder service. To calculate the incidence of anorexia nervosa among treatment-seeking girls younger than 18 in Uppsala County from 2004 to 2006. Methods A total of 168 female patients were offered treatment, and 141 were followed-up 1 year after starting treatment, 29 with AN and 112 with EDNOSr. Results Of the 29 girls who initially had AN, 6 (20%) had a good outcome and were free of any form of eating disorder at follow-up; only 1 (3%) had AN. Of the patients with EDNOSr, 54 (48%) had a good outcome and were free of eating disorders. Three (3%) had a poor outcome and had developed AN. The incidence of AN was 18/100,000 person-years in girls younger than 12 and 63/100,000 in girls younger than 18. Conclusion Restrictive eating disorders, including AN, in children and adolescents can be successfully treated in a family-based specialized out-patient service without in-patient care.

  11. THE CONTROL OF INTERNATIONAL NORMALISED RATIO IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION TREATED WITH WARFARIN IN OUTPATIENT AND HOSPITAL SETTINGS: DATA FROM RECVASA REGISTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Loukianov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Am. To study in the RECVASA registers the availability of data about the international normalized ratio (INR indicator and achievement of its target values in outpatient and hospital practice in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF receiving anticoagulant therapy with warfarin.Material and methods. Data about the INR control and the frequency of achievement of its target values at the outpatient and hospital stages were analyzed in RECVASA (Ryazan and RECVASA FP – Yaroslavl outpatient registries, as well as in the hospital registers RECVASA FP (Moscow, Kursk, Tula in 817 patients (46.9% of men, age 68.5±9.6 years with AF and the prescribed anticoagulant therapy with warfarin.Results. INR was determined in 689 (84.3% of 817 patients. The values of INR were monitored during therapy with warfarin in RECVASA (Ryazan and RECVASA FP –Yaroslavl outpatient registries in 73.7% and 77.7% of patients, respectively, and in RECVASA FP hospital registers: 95.8% (Moscow; 81.3% (Tula and 93.5% (Kursk. The target level of INR (2.0-3.0 was achieved in a minority of patients with AF during treatment with warfarin: inRyazan – in 26.3% of cases;Yaroslavl – 38.3%;Kursk – 34.8%;Moscow – 39.5%; Tule – 26.3%. Control of INR in hospital registries during warfarin therapy in patients with AF significantly more often (p<0.05 was performed at the hospital stage, compared with prehospital (in Kursk –2.3 times more often in Moscow – 2.6 times, in Tula – in 1,8 times. The target level of INR in the hospital was achieved significantly more often (p<0.05 than before hospitalization (Moscow andKursk, but no significant differences were found in the RECVASA FP –Tula register (p=0.08. The INR was monitored by 94.9% of the patients; however, the target values of this indicator were achieved only in 33% of cases in the sample study in the RECVASA FP –Moscow registry according to a survey of 39 patients with AF who continued to receive warfarin after 2.6±0

  12. The subjectively perceived quality of postgraduate medical training in integrative medicine within the public healthcare systems of Germany and Switzerland: the example of anthroposophic hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrative medicine (IM) integrates evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) with conventional medicine (CON). Medical schools offer basic CAM electives but in postgraduate medical training (PGMT) little has been done for the integration of CAM. An exception to this is anthroposophic medicine (AM), a western form of CAM based on CON, offering an individualized holistic IM approach. AM hospitals are part of the public healthcare systems in Germany and Switzerland and train AM in PGMT. We performed the first quality evaluation of the subjectively perceived quality of this PGMT. Methods An anonymous full survey of all 214 trainers (TR) and 240 trainees (TE) in all 15 AM hospitals in Germany and Switzerland, using the ETHZ questionnaire for annual national PGMT assessments in Switzerland (CH) and Germany (D), complemented by a module for AM. Data analysis included Cronbach’s alpha to assess internal consistency questionnaire scales, 2-tailed Pearson correlation of specific quality dimensions of PGMT and department size, 2-tailed Wilcoxon Matched-Pair test for dependent variables and 2-tailed Mann–Whitney U-test for independent variables to calculate group differences. The level of significance was set at p 0.8 or >0.9, and >0.7 to >0.5 for TR scales. Swiss hospitals surpassed German ones significantly in Global Satisfaction with AM (TR and TE); Clinical Competency training in CON (TE) and AM (TE, TR), Error Management, Culture of Decision Making, Evidence-based Medicine, and Clinical Competency in internal medicine CON and AM (TE). When the comparison was restricted to departments of comparable size, differences remained significant for Clinical Competencies in AM (TE, TR), and Culture of Decision Making (TE). CON received better grades than AM in Global Satisfaction and Clinical Competency. Quality of PGMT depended on department size, working conditions and structural training features. Conclusion The lower quality of PGMT in

  13. The subjectively perceived quality of postgraduate medical training in integrative medicine within the public healthcare systems of Germany and Switzerland: the example of anthroposophic hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Peter; Eberhard, Sabine; Berger, Bettina; Weinzirl, Johannes; Orlow, Pascale

    2014-06-16

    Integrative medicine (IM) integrates evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) with conventional medicine (CON). Medical schools offer basic CAM electives but in postgraduate medical training (PGMT) little has been done for the integration of CAM. An exception to this is anthroposophic medicine (AM), a western form of CAM based on CON, offering an individualized holistic IM approach. AM hospitals are part of the public healthcare systems in Germany and Switzerland and train AM in PGMT. We performed the first quality evaluation of the subjectively perceived quality of this PGMT. An anonymous full survey of all 214 trainers (TR) and 240 trainees (TE) in all 15 AM hospitals in Germany and Switzerland, using the ETHZ questionnaire for annual national PGMT assessments in Switzerland (CH) and Germany (D), complemented by a module for AM. Data analysis included Cronbach's alpha to assess internal consistency questionnaire scales, 2-tailed Pearson correlation of specific quality dimensions of PGMT and department size, 2-tailed Wilcoxon Matched-Pair test for dependent variables and 2-tailed Mann-Whitney U-test for independent variables to calculate group differences. The level of significance was set at p 0.8 or >0.9, and >0.7 to >0.5 for TR scales. Swiss hospitals surpassed German ones significantly in Global Satisfaction with AM (TR and TE); Clinical Competency training in CON (TE) and AM (TE, TR), Error Management, Culture of Decision Making, Evidence-based Medicine, and Clinical Competency in internal medicine CON and AM (TE). When the comparison was restricted to departments of comparable size, differences remained significant for Clinical Competencies in AM (TE, TR), and Culture of Decision Making (TE). CON received better grades than AM in Global Satisfaction and Clinical Competency. Quality of PGMT depended on department size, working conditions and structural training features. The lower quality of PGMT in German hospitals can be attributed to

  14. Screening for renal insufficiency following ESUR (European Society of Urogenital Radiology) guidelines with on-site creatinine measurements in an outpatient setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledermann, H.P.; Mengiardi, B.; Schmid, A. [IMAMED Radiologie Nordwest, Basel (Switzerland); Froehlich, J.M. [Guerbet AG, Medical Affairs, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Bern, Radiology Department, Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-08-15

    To report the results and implications for workflow following introduction of ESUR guidelines to screen for potential renal insufficiency (RI) in private practice with on-site creatinine measurements. A total of 1,766 consecutive outpatients scheduled for contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) completed the ESUR questionnaire enquiring about kidney disease, renal surgery, proteinuria, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, gout or use of nephrotoxic drugs. Patients with positive risk factors underwent on-site creatinine measurement and calculation of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Attending radiologists adapted subsequent imaging depending on renal function and presence of risk factors. One or more ESUR risk factors were present in 796 (45.1%) patients, including hypertension (37.7%), nephrotoxic medication (21.3%), diabetes mellitus (8.0%), proteinuria (3.9%), renal disease (4.1%), gout (3.1%) and renal surgery (2.6%). Pre-procedural creatinine measurements revealed severe RI (eGFR < 30 ml min{sup -1} 1.73 m{sup -2}) in 10 (1.3%) and moderate RI (eGFR 30-59 ml min{sup -1} 1.73 m{sup -2}) in 106 (13.8%). Imaging work-up was adapted in 132 (16.6%) as follows: reduction of contrast material dose (n = 85), CT without contrast (n = 40), changeover to MRI (n = 3) or scintigraphy (n = 4). Screening for RI following ESUR guidelines requires creatinine measurements in nearly half of outpatients scheduled for CECT and reveals moderate to severe renal impairment in 6.6%. (orig.)

  15. Reducing the Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases in Non-selected Outpatients With Schizophrenia: A 30-Month Program Conducted in a Real-life Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Peter; Juel, Anette; Hansen, Mette Vinther; Madsen, Nikolaj Juul; Viuff, Anne Grethe; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2017-12-01

    The most common cause of premature death in people with schizophrenia is cardiovascular disease, partially explained by an unhealthy lifestyle, smoking, poor diet and sedentary behavior. We aimed to reduce cardiovascular risk factors. Naturalistic follow-up study with 54 long-term-treated non-selected outpatients with schizophrenia. The 30-month program consisted of individual guidance, group sessions and normal treatment and care offered in our clinic. On average, the participating women reduced their waist circumference by 11.4cm (P=0.037), whereas the participating men increased their waist circumference by 3.3cm (P=0.590). Patients' consumption of fast food was reduced from 1.2 to 0.8 times/week (P=0.016), just as their consumption of soft drinks was reduced from 0.7 to 0.1l/day (P=0.006). Their consumption of coffee increased from 1.6 to 2.5 cups/day (P=0.086). The time women spent on light physical activity increased from 134 to 469min/week (P=0.055). The number of daily cigarettes smoked was reduced by 25.7% for all smokers. Our program showed that it is possible for women but not for men to reduce their risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease. The program is manageable in most outpatient clinics and can be performed by nursing staff interested in physical health with support from and in cooperation with medical doctors, psychiatrist and leaders/managers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Transdermal fentanyl for pain caused by radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients treated in an outpatient setting. A multicenter trial in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.T.C.; Lin Chienyu; Wang Hungming; Lin Jinching; Lee Moonsing; Chen Yujen

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of transdermal fentanyl in the outpatient treatment of head and neck cancer patients with pain caused by radiotherapy. Patients with a visual analogue scale score ≥4 were invited to participate in the study. The following variables were collected: visual analogue scale, the Brief Pain Inventory, concomitant pain medications and adverse effects. A total of 163 head and neck cancer patients were enrolled (148 males and 15 females; median age, 53 years; age range, 21-72 years). Seventy-two (44%) patients had a visual analogue scale score >6 at enrollment, despite the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or weak opioids. Ninety-four (57.7%) patients received concurrent chemotherapy. A total of 88 patients completed the study, whereas 55 underwent a drop-out by side effects. The most frequently reported adverse events were vomiting (23.9%) and nausea (16.6%). Treatment with transdermal fentanyl resulted in a significant decrease in visual analogue scale and Brief Pain Inventory scores that persisted during treatment. In the overall efficacy evaluation, the pain-alleviating effect, the easiness of application and the overall impression of transdermal fentanyl were rated as good by 54.5%, 65.9% and 59.1% of the completers, respectively. Effects of transdermal fentanyl were rated as good by 64.8% of the investigators. Our data provide evidence that transdermal fentanyl is effective and relatively easy to use for outpatient treatment of pain control in head and neck cancer patients following radiotherapy in selected patients. Reduction of side effects and effective pain management need to be paramount in the management of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. (author)

  17. Post-marketing surveillance of the safety profile of iodixanol in the outpatient CT setting. A prospective, multicenter, observational study of patient risk factors, adverse reactions and preventive measures in 9953 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Frank Hugo Heinz [Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Center, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Non-interventional study in outpatient, contrast-enhanced CT: 1. to determine the extent of preventive measures for risk reduction of adverse drug reactions after contrast-enhanced CT examinations. 2. to prospectively determine the incidence and severity of adverse drug reactions occurring after administration of the iso-osmolar contrast medium iodixanol. 3. to determine a possible influence of preventive measures on the incidence/severity of adverse drug reactions. Evaluable documentation was provided for 9953 patients from 66 radiology centers across Germany. Patient characteristics, aspects of iodixanol administration, and adverse events with an at least 'possible' relationship were documented on a standardized case report form (CRF) and were evaluated up to seven days after contrast medium administration. About 55.5% of patients showed one or more risk factors (e.g. impaired renal function 4.4%, diabetes mellitus 8.5%, hypertension 20.6%). One third of the sites did not implement any preventive measures. Patients with a known risk for an allergy-like reaction were more likely to receive pharmacologic preventive treatment (0.5-50.5%). Oral hydration was the main preventive measure in patients with renal risk factors (<8%) followed by intravenous hydration (1%). Adverse drug reactions, mainly hypersensitivity reactions, occurred in 77 patients (0.74%), but were classified as serious in only 3 patients (0.03%). No statistically significant correlation between risk factors, preventive measures, and adverse reactions could be found. The use of preventive measures for CT examinations in this outpatient setting was generally low with risk patients being pre-medicated more often, depending on their history. In the routine outpatient setting, iso-osmolar iodixanol was very well tolerated in almost 10 000 patients undergoing diagnostic CT. The rate of acute and delayed adverse reactions was low. No correlation could be found between risk factors, preventive

  18. Towards non-reductionistic medical anthropology, medical education and practitioner-patient-interaction: the example of Anthroposophic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Peter; Scheffer, Christian; Neumann, Melanie; Tauschel, Diethart; Edelhäuser, Friedrich

    2012-12-01

    To develop the hypothesis that reductionism in medical anthropology, professional education and health care influences empathy development, communication and patient satisfaction. We identified relevant literature and reviewed the material in a structured essay. We reflected our hypothesis by applying it to Anthroposophic Medicine (AM), an example of holistic theory and practice. Reductionism in medical anthropology such as in conventional medicine seems to lead to a less empathetic and less communicative health care culture than holism such as in CAM disciplines. However, reductionism can be transformed into a systemic, multi-perspective holistic view, when the emergent properties of the physical, living, psychic, spiritual and social levels of human existence and the causal relations between them are more carefully accounted for in epistemology, medical anthropology and professional education. This is shown by the example of AM and its possible benefits for communication with and satisfaction of patients. A non-reductionistic understanding of the human being may improve communication with patients and enhance patient benefit and satisfaction. Interdisciplinary qualitative and quantitative studies are warranted to test this hypothesis and to understand the complex relations between epistemology, medical anthropology, education, health care delivery and benefit for patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Post-marketing surveillance of the safety profile of iodixanol in the outpatient CT setting: a prospective, multicenter, observational study of patient risk factors, adverse reactions and preventive measures in 9953 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, F H H

    2014-11-01

    Non-interventional study in outpatient, contrast-enhanced CT; 1. to determine the extent of preventive measures for risk reduction of adverse drug reactions after contrast-enhanced CT examinations. 2. to prospectively determine the incidence and severity of adverse drug reactions occurring after administration of the iso-osmolar contrast medium iodixanol. 3. to determine a possible influence of preventive measures on the incidence/severity of adverse drug reactions.. Evaluable documentation was provided for 9953 patients from 66 radiology centers across Germany. Patient characteristics, aspects of iodixanol administration, and adverse events with an at least "possible" relationship were documented on a standardized case report form (CRF) and were evaluated up to seven days after contrast medium administration. About 55.5 % of patients showed one or more risk factors (e. g. impaired renal function 4.4 %, diabetes mellitus 8.5 %, hypertension 20.6 %). One third of the sites did not implement any preventive measures. Patients with a known risk for an allergy-like reaction were more likely to receive pharmacologic preventive treatment (0.5 - 50.5 %). Oral hydration was the main preventive measure in patients with renal risk factors (Adverse drug reactions, mainly hypersensitivity reactions, occurred in 77 patients (0.74 %), but were classified as serious in only 3 patients (0.03 %). No statistically significant correlation between risk factors, preventive measures, and adverse reactions could be found. The use of preventive measures for CT examinations in this outpatient setting was generally low with risk patients being pre-medicated more often, depending on their history. In the routine outpatient setting, iso-osmolar iodixanol was very well tolerated in almost 10,000 patients undergoing diagnostic CT. The rate of acute and delayed adverse reactions was low. No correlation could be found between risk factors, preventive measures and the incidence

  20. A cross-sectional study of the knowledge, attitude, and practice of patients aged 50 years or above towards herpes zoster in an out-patient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, A Cy; Chan, M Y; Chou, H Y; Ho, S Y; Li, H L; Lo, C Y; Shek, K F; To, S Y; Yam, K K; Yeung, I

    2017-08-01

    There has been limited research on the knowledge of and attitudes about herpes zoster in the Hong Kong population. This study aimed to investigate the knowledge, attitude, and practice of patients aged 50 years or above towards herpes zoster and its vaccination. This was a cross-sectional study in the format of a structured questionnaire interview carried out in Sai Ying Pun Jockey Club General Outpatient Clinic in Hong Kong. Knowledge of herpes zoster and its vaccination was assessed, and patient attitudes to and concerns about the disease were evaluated. Factors that affected a decision about vaccination against herpes zoster were investigated. A total of 408 Hong Kong citizens aged 50 years or above were interviewed. Multiple regression analysis revealed that number of correct responses regarding knowledge about herpes zoster was positively correlated with educational attainment (B=0.313, P=0.026) and history of herpes zoster (B=0.408, P=0.038), and negatively correlated with age (B= -0.042, Pherpes zoster. Misconceptions about herpes zoster were notable in this study. More health education is needed to improve the understanding and heighten awareness of herpes zoster among the general public. Although the majority of participants indicated that herpes zoster would have a significant impact on their health, a relatively smaller proportion was actually worried about getting the disease. Further studies on this topic should be encouraged to gauge the awareness and knowledge of herpes zoster among broader age-groups.

  1. Outpatient total hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vehmeijer, Stephan B.W.; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    , but efforts to control undesirable pathophysiological responses will be a prerequisite to improve the success rate of an outpatient setting. Also, care must be taken to avoid extra activities or investments solely to enable discharge on the day of surgery. Further cost analyses will have to be performed...... to establish the true financial benefit of outpatient treatment....

  2. Comparison of the bedside head impulse test with the video head impulse test in a clinical practice setting: a prospective study of 500 outpatients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wai eYip

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The primary aim was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV of the bedside head impulse test (bHIT using the video HIT (vHIT as the gold standard for quantifying the function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR. Secondary aims were to determine the bHIT inter-rater reliability, and sensitivity in detecting unilateral and bilateral vestibulopathy.Methods: In this prospective study, 500 consecutive outpatients presenting to a tertiary neuro-otology clinic with vertigo or dizziness of various vestibular etiologies who did not have any of the pre-defined exclusion criteria were recruited. Bedside HITs were done by three experienced neuro-otology clinicians masked to the diagnosis, and the results were compared with the vHIT. The patients were likewise blinded to the bHIT and vHIT findings. Patients with VOR deficits were identified on the vHIT by referencing to the pre-selected pathological gain of 40%, the bHIT sensitivity = 51.7% and 83%, respectively. For bilateral vestibulopathy, overall bHIT sensitivity = 66.3%, reaching 86.84% for severely reduced bidirectional gains.Conclusions: For the primary outcome, the bHIT had moderate sensitivity and low PPV. While the study did not elucidate the best choice for vHIT reference, it demonstrated how the bHIT test properties varied with vHIT thresholds: selecting a lower threshold improved the sensitivity but diminished the PPV, while a higher threshold had the opposite effect. The VOR was most likely normal if the bHIT was negative due to its high NPV. The bHIT was moderately sensitive for detecting unilateral and bilateral vestibulopathy overall, but better for certain subgroups.

  3. [A case report-advanced pancreas cancer with liver and lung metastases well controlled over one year by combination therapy with systemic chemotherapy, radiation and hepatic arterial infusion in an outpatient setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasuike, Yasunori; Tanigawa, Takahiko; Yamada, Masaharu; Minami, Yukiko; Ezumi, Koji; Kashiwazaki, Masaki; Fujimoto, Takayoshi

    2008-11-01

    We report a case of advanced pancreatic cancer with liver and lung metastases that was well controlled over one year by combination therapy with systemic chemotherapy, radiation and hepatic arterial infusion in an outpatient setting. The patient was a 74-year-old woman. Chief complaints were back pain and anorexia. She was diagnosed with pancreas cancer with liver and lung metastases at the time of first visit. We started systemic chemotherapy with gemcitabine 1 g/body and 5-FU 1 g/body alternately every other week on an outpatient basis. At 1.5 months (M) after initiation of chemotherapy, we started radiation therapy to the main tumor at a total dose of 40 Gy. After radiation, chemotherapy was resumed. As a result, the size of the main tumor decreased but metastatic liver tumors got larger. Then we changed to combination therapy with systemic chemotherapy (gemcitabine and 5-FU) and hepatic arterial infusion (5-FU weekly). Liver metastases almost disappeared after 7.5 M. Despite all these treatments, however, the number of metastatic lung tumors increased. The patient was hospitalized for 15 M and died after 17 M. We focused on and succeeded in the prolongation of lifetime and maintenance of QOL by combination therapy with systemic chemotherapy, radiation and hepatic arterial infusion therapy.

  4. Clinical and economic impact of using macrogol 3350 plus electrolytes in an outpatient setting compared to enemas and suppositories and manual evacuation to treat paediatric faecal impaction based on actual clinical practice in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Julian F; Candy, David C A; Clegg, John P; Edwards, Di; Helter, Marianne T; Dale, Anne K; Fell, John; Cosgrove, Michael; Debelle, Geoffrey

    2007-09-01

    To estimate the clinical and economic impact of using macrogol 3350 plus electrolytes (macrogol 3350; Movicol; Movicol Paediatric Plain) in an outpatient setting compared to enemas and suppositories and manual evacuation to treat paediatric faecal impaction. A chart review was undertaken to extract clinical outcomes and resource use from the case notes of a cohort of children aged 2-11 years with faecal impaction who initially received either macrogol 3350 (in an outpatient setting) or enemas and suppositories or manual evacuation for initial disimpaction. Five centres across England and Wales participated in the study. These data were used to inform a decision model which depicted the management of children during the disimpaction phase and for a period of 12 weeks following initial disimpaction. Unit resource costs at 2005/2006 prices were applied to the resource utilisation estimates within the model, enabling the incremental costs and consequences of using macrogol 3350 in an outpatient setting, compared to the other treatments, to be estimated. 112 patients treated with macrogol 3350, 101 who received enemas and suppositories and 11 who underwent a manual evacuation were eligible for analysis. Ninety-seven per cent of children treated with macrogol 3350 were successfully disimpacted within 5 days, compared to 73% of those who received enemas and suppositories and 89% of those who underwent a manual evacuation (p suppositories and manual evacuation respectively; p suppositories or underwent a manual evacuation, respectively. Hence, using macrogol 3350 instead of enemas and suppositories and manual evacuation to disimpact the whole annual cohort of faecally impacted children aged 2-11 years in England could potentially reduce annual NHS expenditure on this condition by 59% (5 million pounds sterling) and reduce the annual number of paediatric hospital admissions for this condition by 92% (4330). Within the limitations of our model, macrogol 3350 affords the NHS

  5. UVB phototherapy in an outpatient setting or at home: a pragmatic randomised single-blind trial designed to settle the discussion. The PLUTO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koek, Mayke B G; Buskens, Erik; Steegmans, Paul H A; van Weelden, Huib; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A F M; Sigurdsson, Vigfús

    2006-08-01

    Home ultraviolet B (UVB) treatment is a much-debated treatment, especially with regard to effectiveness, safety and side effects. However, it is increasingly being prescribed, especially in the Netherlands. Despite ongoing discussions, no randomised research has been performed, and only two studies actually compare two groups of patients. Thus, firm evidence to support or discourage the use of home UVB phototherapy has not yet been obtained. This is the goal of the present study, the PLUTO study (Dutch acronym for "national trial on home UVB phototherapy for psoriasis"). We designed a pragmatic randomised single-blind multi-centre trial. This trial is designed to evaluate the impact of home UVB treatment versus UVB phototherapy in a hospital outpatient clinic as to effectiveness, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. In total 196 patients with psoriasis who were clinically eligible for UVB phototherapy were included. Normally 85% of the patients treated with UVB show a relevant clinical response. With a power of 80% and a 0.05 significance level it will be possible to detect a reduction in effectiveness of 15%. Effectiveness will be determined by calculating differences in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and the Self Administered PASI (SAPASI) scores. Quality of life is measured using several validated generic questionnaires and a disease-specific questionnaire. Other outcome measures include costs, side effects, dosimetry, concomitant use of medication and patient satisfaction. Patients are followed throughout the therapy and for 12 months thereafter. The study is no longer recruiting patients, and is expected to report in 2006. In the field of home UVB phototherapy this trial is the first randomised parallel group study. As such, this trial addresses the weaknesses encountered in previous studies. The pragmatic design ensures that the results can be well generalised to the target population. Because, in addition to effectiveness, aspects such as

  6. UVB phototherapy in an outpatient setting or at home: a pragmatic randomised single-blind trial designed to settle the discussion. The PLUTO study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Weelden Huib

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Home ultraviolet B (UVB treatment is a much-debated treatment, especially with regard to effectiveness, safety and side effects. However, it is increasingly being prescribed, especially in the Netherlands. Despite ongoing discussions, no randomised research has been performed, and only two studies actually compare two groups of patients. Thus, firm evidence to support or discourage the use of home UVB phototherapy has not yet been obtained. This is the goal of the present study, the PLUTO study (Dutch acronym for "national trial on home UVB phototherapy for psoriasis". Methods We designed a pragmatic randomised single-blind multi-centre trial. This trial is designed to evaluate the impact of home UVB treatment versus UVB phototherapy in a hospital outpatient clinic as to effectiveness, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. In total 196 patients with psoriasis who were clinically eligible for UVB phototherapy were included. Normally 85% of the patients treated with UVB show a relevant clinical response. With a power of 80% and a 0.05 significance level it will be possible to detect a reduction in effectiveness of 15%. Effectiveness will be determined by calculating differences in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI and the Self Administered PASI (SAPASI scores. Quality of life is measured using several validated generic questionnaires and a disease-specific questionnaire. Other outcome measures include costs, side effects, dosimetry, concomitant use of medication and patient satisfaction. Patients are followed throughout the therapy and for 12 months thereafter. The study is no longer recruiting patients, and is expected to report in 2006. Discussion In the field of home UVB phototherapy this trial is the first randomised parallel group study. As such, this trial addresses the weaknesses encountered in previous studies. The pragmatic design ensures that the results can be well generalised to the target population

  7. A Group-Administered social Skills Training for 8- to 12- Year-Old, high-Functioning Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Evaluation of its Effectiveness in a Naturalistic Outpatient Treatment Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Anne; Muris, Peter; Roelofs, Jeffrey; Arntz, Arnoud

    2016-11-01

    A social skills training (SST) for high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) was evaluated in an outpatient setting using a combined between- and within-subject design in which SST and a waiting list condition were compared. According to parents and teachers, the SST produced greater improvement of social skills than the waiting list, and these effects were maintained at 3 months follow-up. No between-group effects were found for loneliness, although in general scores on this outcome measure decreased from pre- to follow-up. The effects of SST were unaffected by social anxiety, ADHD symptoms, Theory of Mind, or desire for social interaction. Altogether, SST seems an effective intervention for high-functioning children with ASD that can be applied in daily clinical practice.

  8. Thyroid function and prevalence of anti-thyroperoxidase (TPO) and anti-thyroglobulin (Tg) antibodies in outpatients hospital setting in an area with sufficient iodine intake: influences of age and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legakis, Ioannis; Manousaki, Mina; Detsi, Stela; Nikita, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    In order to examine the prevalence of thyroid disease in a hospital outpatient setting, in an area of sufficient iodine intake, serum levels of TSH, T4, T3, anti-Tg and anti-TPO antibodies were examined in 909 individuals with an age range of 12.4 to 88.5 years, participating in a checkup outpatient setting. The study was conducted in Henry Dynant Hospital located in the metropolitan area of Athens, Greece, during a 2 year period. Hormonal parameters were determined by chemiluminescence immunoassay. Overt thyrotoxicosis was found in 4.95% of the total population and subclinical thyrotoxicosis in 5.5%. Overt hypothyroidism was found in 1.43% and subclinical hypothyroidism in 4.51%. In male population, overt thyrotoxicosis was found in 4.4 % and subclinical thyrotoxicosis was also found in 4.4%. On the other hand, overt hypothyroidism was found in 1.4% and subclinical hypothyroidism was found in 3.7% in males. In female population, overt thyrotoxicosis was found in 5.2% whereas subclinical thyrotoxicosis was found in 6.0%. Overt hypothyroidism was found in 1.5% and subclinical hypothyroidism was found in 4,9% in females. Positive anti-TPO antibodies were detected more often (30.4%) than anti-Tg (15.4%) in the tested population. The positivity in both anti-TPO and anti-Tg antibodies was correlated with abnormally high TSH concentrations after the age of 50 years, especially in female population. In conclusion distinct profile of thyroid hormonal parameters was observed in inhabitants in the metropolitan area of Athens, with overt thyrotoxicosis strikingly overcome overt hypothyroidism while subclinical forms of each dysfunction also exhibit analogous results. © 2013 Tehran University of Medical Sciences. All rights reserved.

  9. Allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation using reduced-intensity conditioning in an outpatient setting in ABO-incompatible patients: are survival and graft-versus-host disease different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Cesar Homero; Gómez-De-León, Andrés; Alatorre-Ricardo, Julio; Cantú-Rodríguez, Olga Graciela; González-Llano, Oscar; Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Mancías-Guerra, Consuelo; Flores-Jiménez, Juan Antonio; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2014-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major cause of morbimortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Minor ABO incompatibility has been associated with an increased risk of GVHD. We analyzed the impact of ABO matching on patient outcome after peripheral blood, reduced-intensity allo-HSCT in an outpatient setting, and its relationship with GVHD. Data of 121 patients were included. All patients received allo-HSCT from HLA-identical siblings as outpatients using a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. Influence of ABO matching as a risk factor for the development of GVHD and survival was analyzed using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression, respectively. Median age was 36 years (range, 1-71 years); 88 patients were ABO identical: 13 presented major mismatch and 20 minor mismatch, with an ABO incompatibility rate of 27.3%. The median follow-up period was 54 months (range, 0.3-120 months). Minor ABO incompatibility patients presented the highest rate of acute GVHD (aGVHD; 25%), in comparison with ABO-identical (20.5%) and major ABO incompatibility patients (15.4%; p = 0.79). The highest incidence of chronic GVHD (cGVHD) occurred in the context of minor ABO incompatibility (35%), in contrast to ABO-identical (30.8%) and major ABO incompatibility (15.4%). Survival was higher for patients in the minor ABO mismatch group; however, there was no significant correlation between ABO matching status and survival (p = 0.45). Using this type of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, minor ABO-mismatched allo-HSCT was associated with a higher incidence of aGVHD and cGVHD and with increased survival, albeit with no significance. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  10. Predictors of readmission after outpatient plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioton, Lauren M; Buck, Donald W; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Ver Halen, Jon; Dumanian, Gregory A; Kim, John Y S

    2014-01-01

    Hospital readmissions have become a topic of focus for quality care measures and cost-reduction efforts. However, no comparative multi-institutional data on plastic surgery outpatient readmission rates currently exist. The authors endeavored to investigate hospital readmission rates and predictors of readmission following outpatient plastic surgery. The 2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was reviewed for all outpatient procedures. Unplanned readmission rates were calculated for all 10 tracked surgical specialties (i.e., general, thoracic, vascular, cardiac, orthopedics, otolaryngology, plastics, gynecology, urology, and neurosurgery). Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine predictors of readmission for plastic surgery. A total of 7005 outpatient plastic surgery procedures were isolated. Outpatient plastic surgery had a low associated readmission rate (1.94 percent) compared with other specialties. Seventy-five patients were readmitted with a complication. Multivariate regression analysis revealed obesity (body mass index ≥ 30), wound infection within 30 days of the index surgery, and American Society of Anesthesiologists class 3 or 4 physical status as significant predictors for unplanned readmission. Unplanned readmission after outpatient plastic surgery is infrequent and compares favorably to rates of readmission among other specialties. Obesity, wound infection within 30 days of the index operation, and American Society of Anesthesiologists class 3 or 4 physical status are independent predictors of readmission. As procedures continue to transition into outpatient settings and the drive to improve patient care persists, these findings will serve to optimize outpatient surgery use.

  11. A 64-week, multicenter, open-label study of aripiprazole effectiveness in the management of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder in a general psychiatric outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Nan-Ying

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the overall long-term effectiveness of aripiprazole in patients with schizophrenia in a general psychiatric practice setting in Taiwan. Methods This was a prospective, open-label, multicenter, post-market surveillance study in Taiwanese patients with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder requiring a switch in antipsychotic medication because current medication was not well tolerated and/or clinical symptoms were not well controlled. Eligible patients were titrated to aripiprazole (5-30 mg/day over a 12-week switching phase, during which their previous medication was discontinued. Patients could then enter a 52-week, long-term treatment phase. Aripiprazole was flexibly dosed (5-30 mg/day at the discretion of the treating physicians. Efficacy was assessed using the Clinical Global Impression scale Improvement (CGI-I score, the Clinical Global Impression scale Severity (CGI-S score, The Brief Psychiatry Rating Scale (BPRS, and the Quality of Life (QOL scale, as well as Preference of Medicine (POM ratings by patients and caregivers. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Results A total of 245 patients were enrolled and switched from their prior antipsychotic medications, and 153 patients entered the 52-week extension phase. In all, 79 patients (32.2% completed the study. At week 64, the mean CGI-I score was 3.10 and 64.6% of patients who showed response. Compared to baseline, scores of CGI-S, QOL, and BPRS after 64 weeks of treatment also showed significant improvements. At week 12, 65.4% of subjects and 58.9% of caregivers rated aripiprazole as better than the prestudy medication on the POM. The most frequently reported adverse events (AEs were headache, auditory hallucinations and insomnia. A total of 13 patients (5.3% discontinued treatment due to AEs. No statistically significant changes were noted with respect to

  12. The STarT Back Screening Tool and Individual Psychological Measures: Evaluation of Prognostic Capabilities for Low Back Pain Clinical Outcomes in Outpatient Physical Therapy Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Mark D.; Fritz, Julie M.; Robinson, Michael E.; Asal, Nabih R.; Nisenzon, Anne N.

    2013-01-01

    disability at 6 months. Limitations Physical therapy treatment was not standardized or accounted for in the analysis. Conclusions Prediction of clinical outcomes by psychology-based measures was dependent upon the clinical outcome domain of interest. Similar to studies from the primary care setting, initial screening with the SBT provided additional prognostic information for 6-month disability and changes in SBT overall scores may provide important clinical decision-making information for treatment monitoring. PMID:23125279

  13. The STarT back screening tool and individual psychological measures: evaluation of prognostic capabilities for low back pain clinical outcomes in outpatient physical therapy settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneciuk, Jason M; Bishop, Mark D; Fritz, Julie M; Robinson, Michael E; Asal, Nabih R; Nisenzon, Anne N; George, Steven Z

    2013-03-01

    not standardized or accounted for in the analysis. Prediction of clinical outcomes by psychology-based measures was dependent upon the clinical outcome domain of interest. Similar to studies from the primary care setting, initial screening with the SBT provided additional prognostic information for 6-month disability and changes in SBT overall scores may provide important clinical decision-making information for treatment monitoring.

  14. Health-related quality of life in patients with depression treated with duloxetine or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in a naturalistic outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jihyung Hong,1 Diego Novick,1 William Montgomery,2 Maria Victoria Moneta,3 Héctor Dueñas,4 Xiaomei Peng,5 Josep Maria Haro3 1Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 2Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 4Eli Lilly de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico; 5Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Purpose: To assess the levels of quality of life (QoL in major depressive disorder (MDD patients treated with either duloxetine or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI as monotherapy for up to 6 months in a naturalistic clinical setting mostly in the Middle East, East Asia, and Mexico.Patients and methods: Data for this post hoc analysis were taken from a 6-month prospective observational study involving 1,549 MDD patients without sexual dysfunction. QoL was measured using the EQ-5D instrument. Depression severity was measured using the Clinical Global Impression of Severity and the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (QIDS-SR16, while pain severity was measured using the pain items of the Somatic Symptom Inventory. Regression analyses were performed to compare the levels of QoL between duloxetine-treated (n=556 and SSRI-treated (n=776 patients, adjusting for baseline patient characteristics.Results: These MDD patients, on average, had moderately impaired QoL at baseline, and the level of QoL impairment was similar between the duloxetine and SSRI groups (EQ-5D score of 0.46 [SD =0.32] in the former and 0.47 [SD =0.33] in the latter, P=0.066. Both descriptive and regression analyses confirmed QoL improvements in both groups during follow-up, but duloxetine-treated patients achieved higher QoL. At 24 weeks, the estimated mean EQ-5D score was 0.90 in the duloxetine cohort, which was statistically significantly higher than that of 0.83 in the SSRI cohort (P<0.001. Notably, pain

  15. Settings for Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Settings Behavioral Health Care Inpatient Mental Health Outpatient Mental Health Substance Abuse Treatment ... Emergency Departments Primary Care Justice System Adult Justice System Juvenile Justice ...

  16. Outpatient Imaging Efficiency - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Use of medical imaging - state data. These measures give you information about hospitals' use of medical imaging tests for outpatients. Examples of medical imaging...

  17. Outpatient Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Jack M; Hooper, Jessica; Moen, Sam

    2017-12-01

    Outpatient total joint arthroplasty (OTJA) allows for a safe, cost effective pathway for appropriately selected patients. With current pressures on arthroplasty surgeons and their associated institutions to reduce costs per episode of care, it is important to define the steps and challenges associated with establishing an outpatient arthroplasty program. Several studies have outlined techniques of selecting patients suitable for this type of postoperative pathway. With emerging concerns about patients who undergo outpatient arthroplasty being at increased risk of medical complications, which may lessen projected cost savings, it is important to identify value-based strategies to optimize patient recovery after OTJA. This article reviews digital techniques for patient selection and data collection, operating room efficiency systems, and provides a summary of methods to build and maintain value in outpatient total joint replacement within the framework of bundled payment reimbursement.

  18. Outpatient Imaging Efficiency - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Use of medical imaging - provider data. These measures give you information about hospitals' use of medical imaging tests for outpatients. Examples of medical...

  19. Outpatient Imaging Efficiency - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Use of medical imaging - national data. These measures give you information about hospitals' use of medical imaging tests for outpatients. Examples of medical...

  20. Medication Errors in Outpatient Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrier, Kyla

    2016-01-01

    Medication errors may occur during parental administration of prescription and over-the-counter medications in the outpatient pediatric setting. Misinterpretation of medication labels and dosing errors are two types of errors in medication administration. Health literacy may play an important role in parents' ability to safely manage their child's medication regimen. There are several proposed strategies for decreasing these medication administration errors, including using standardized dosing instruments, using strictly metric units for medication dosing, and providing parents and caregivers with picture-based dosing instructions. Pediatric healthcare providers should be aware of these strategies and seek to implement many of them into their practices.

  1. Are the CMS Hospital Outpatient Quality Measures Relevant for Rural Hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Michelle M.; Prasad, Shailendra; Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Context: Quality measures focused on outpatient settings are of increasing interest to policy makers, but little research has been conducted on hospital outpatient quality measures, especially in rural settings. Purpose: To evaluate the relevance of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) outpatient quality measures for rural hospitals,…

  2. Billing for outpatient transplant pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Angela Q; Seiger, Todd C; Urann, Christina L; McCleary, Jo Ann; Goroski, Angela L; Ojogho, Okechukwu N

    2012-01-15

    The economic impact of out-patient pharmacy services in a transplant program was evaluated. Full-time kidney transplant pharmacy services were implemented at Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center (PSHMC) in the fall of 2008, with two pharmacists combining hours to provide one full-time-equivalent position. At PSHMC, posttransplantation patients are seen three times per week. The number of patient visits with pharmacists for 2010 was compared with the total number of patient visits. The face-to-face time spent with the patient was translated to a level of billing that was associated with a set reimbursement schedule. For each patient encounter in which a pharmacist was involved, the incremental difference between the nursing and pharmacy levels of billing was examined, as were the levels most often billed by pharmacists. The difference in billing levels between pharmacists and nurses for the same patient encounter was also evaluated. Overall, pharmacist visits accounted for 208 (22%) of the 994 out-patient kidney transplant visits in 2010, with pharmacists billing at a higher level of acuity compared with nursing for the same patient encounter 48% of the time. This translated to an approximate increase of $100 per patient visit. For the one-year study period, pharmacists utilizing facility- fee billing increased out-patient reimbursement by approximately $10,000. By utilizing outpatient facility-fee billing for pharmacy services, the transplant program at PSHMC increased reimbursement in the outpatient setting.

  3. The Profile and Urological Service Needs of Outpatients Attending a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To establish the epidemiology of outpatient urology patients and their service needs as seen in a tertiary centre in the Western region of Kenya. Design: Hospital based observational, descriptive, prospective, cross sectional study. Setting: The Urology Outpatient clinic of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital ...

  4. Outpatient waiting time in Jos University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problem Long waiting time for services has been identified as a reason people avoid presenting to for care in African countries. Design Examination of causes for long outpatient waiting time and the effect of measures to reduce waiting time. Setting Outpatient department of the Jos University Teaching Hospital.

  5. Out-Patient Prescribing Practices at Mbagathi District Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess medicine use practices by using WHO prescribing and patient care indicators in Mbagathi Hospital outpatient department. Design: A hospital based retrospective study. Setting: Mbagathi District Hospital outpatient department between 1st January to 30th June 2012. Main outcome measures: Measures ...

  6. STRUCTURE UROLOGICAL OUTPATIENT RECEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Kulchavenya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the structure of the example receiving outpatient urological Cabinet city polyclinic №26 Novosibirsk. Revealed a clear predominance of inflammatory diseases of the genitourinary system, benign prostatic hyperplasia and urolithiasis. This group of diseases should be given due attention in the medical examination of the population. 

  7. Outpatient management of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassira, Wrood; Namias, Nicholas

    2008-07-01

    The leading etiologies of pediatric burns are scald, thermal, and electrical injuries. The initial management of burns involves assessment of burn depth and total body surface area (TBSA) affected, a history, and physical examination. Calculation of percent of TBSA affected is an important determinant of the necessity for hospitalization versus outpatient management. Only second- and third-degree burns are included in the calculation. The criteria for outpatient management vary based on the center experience and resources. One such set of criteria in an experienced burn center includes burn affecting less than 15% TBSA, therefore not requiring fluid resuscitation; the ability to take in oral fluids, excluding serious perioral burns; no airway involvement or aspiration of hot liquid; no abuse; and dependable family able to transport the patient for clinic appointments. Once the child is ready to reenter school, the physician must discuss with the family and school staff any needs and expectations for the child, including wound care. Social reintegration can be difficult. Educating the teachers and staff of the child's appearance may help prepare the students.

  8. Cost-utility of collaborative care for the treatment of comorbid major depressive disorder in outpatients with chronic physical conditions. A randomized controlled trial in the general hospital setting (CC-DIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goorden M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Maartje Goorden,1 Christina M van der Feltz-Cornelis,2,3 Kirsten M van Steenbergen-Weijenburg,4 Eva K Horn,5 Aartjan TF Beekman,6,7 Leona Hakkaart-van Roijen1 1Institute of Health Policy and Management (iBMG/Institute for Medical Technology Assessment (iMTA, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, 2Tranzo Department, Tilburg University, 3Clinical Centre of Excellence for Body, Mind and Health, GGzBreburg, Tilburg, 4Trimbos Instituut, Utrecht, 5Viersprong Institute for Studies on Personality Disorders, Halsteren, 6Department of Psychiatry, 7EMGO+ Research Institute VUmc, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Purpose: Major depressive disorder (MDD is highly prevalent in patients with a chronic physical condition, and this comorbidity has a negative influence on quality of life, health care costs, self-care, morbidity, and mortality. Research has shown that collaborative care (CC may be a cost-effective treatment. However, its cost-effectiveness in this patient group has not yet been established. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-utility of CC for the treatment of comorbid MDD in chronically ill patients in the outpatient general hospital setting. The study was conducted from a health care and societal perspective.Patients and methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 81 patients with moderate-to-severe MDD were included; 42 were randomly assigned to the CC group and 39 to the care as usual (CAU group. We applied the TiC-P, short-form Health-Related Quality of Life questionnaire, and EuroQol EQ-5D 3 level version, measuring the use of health care, informal care, and household work, respectively, at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months follow-up.Results: The mean annual direct medical costs in the CC group were €6,718 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3,541 to 10,680 compared to €4,582 (95% CI: 2,782 to 6,740 in the CAU group. The average quality-adjusted life years (QALYs gained were 0.07 higher

  9. Simplified antibiotic regimens for treatment of clinical severe infection in the outpatient setting when referral is not possible for young infants in Pakistan (Simplified Antibiotic Therapy Trial [SATT]): a randomised, open-label, equivalence trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Fatima; Nisar, Imran; Tikmani, Shiyam S; Baloch, Benazir; Shakoor, Sadia; Jehan, Fyezah; Ahmed, Imran; Cousens, Simon; Zaidi, Anita K M

    2017-02-01

    Parenteral antibiotic therapy for young infants (aged 0-59 days) with suspected sepsis is sometimes not available or feasible in countries with high neonatal mortality. Outpatient treatment could save lives in such settings. We aimed to assess the equivalence of two simplified antibiotic regimens, comprising fewer injections and oral rather than parenteral administration, compared with a reference treatment for young infants with clinical severe infection. We undertook the Simplified Antibiotic Therapy Trial (SATT), a three-arm, randomised, open-label, equivalence trial in five communities in Karachi, Pakistan. We enrolled young infants (aged 0-59 days) who either presented at a primary health-care clinic or were identified by a community health worker with signs of clinical severe infection. We included infants who were not critically ill and whose family refused admission. We randomly assigned infants to either intramuscular procaine benzylpenicillin and gentamicin once a day for 7 days (reference); oral amoxicillin twice daily and intramuscular gentamicin once a day for 7 days; or intramuscular procaine benzylpenicillin and gentamicin once a day for 2 days followed by oral amoxicillin twice daily for 5 days. The primary outcome was treatment failure within 7 days of enrolment and the primary analysis was per protocol. We judged experimental treatments as efficacious as the reference if the upper bound of the 95% CI for the difference in treatment failure was less than 5·0. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01027429. Between Jan 1, 2010, and Dec 26, 2013, 2780 infants were deemed eligible for the trial, of whom 2453 (88%) were enrolled. Because of inadequate clinical follow-up or treatment adherence, 2251 infants were included in the per-protocol analysis. 820 infants (747 per protocol) were assigned the reference treatment of procaine benzylpenicillin and gentamicin, 816 (751 per protocol) were allocated amoxicillin and gentamicin, and

  10. A comparative analysis of readmission rates after outpatient cosmetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioton, Lauren M; Alghoul, Mohammed S; Kim, John Y S

    2014-02-01

    Despite the increasing scrutiny of surgical procedures, outpatient cosmetic surgery has an established record of safety and efficacy. A key measure in assessing surgical outcomes is the examination of readmission rates. However, there is a paucity of data on unplanned readmission following cosmetic surgery procedures. The authors studied readmission rates for outpatient cosmetic surgery and compared the data with readmission rates for other surgical procedures. The 2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data set was queried for all outpatient procedures. Readmission rates were calculated for the 5 surgical specialties with the greatest number of outpatient procedures and for the overall outpatient cosmetic surgery population. Subgroup analysis was performed on the 5 most common cosmetic surgery procedures. Multivariate regression models were used to determine predictors of readmission for cosmetic surgery patients. The 2879 isolated outpatient cosmetic surgery cases had an associated 0.90% unplanned readmission rate. The 5 specialties with the highest number of outpatient surgical procedures were general, orthopedic, gynecologic, urologic, and otolaryngologic surgery; their unplanned readmission rates ranged from 1.21% to 3.73%. The 5 most common outpatient cosmetic surgery procedures and their associated readmission rates were as follows: reduction mammaplasty, 1.30%; mastopexy, 0.31%; liposuction, 1.13%; abdominoplasty, 1.78%; and breast augmentation, 1.20%. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that operating time (in hours) was an independent predictor of readmission (odds ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.81; P=.010). Rates of unplanned readmission with outpatient cosmetic surgery are low and compare favorably to those of other outpatient surgeries.

  11. Pain experience and functional outcome of inpatient versus outpatient anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, an equivalence randomized controlled trial with 12 months follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkering, K. P.; van Bergen, C. J. A.; Buijze, G. A.; Nagel, P. H. A. F.; Tuinebreijer, W. E.; Breederveld, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has traditionally been performed in an inpatient setting. Outpatient treatment may offer the advantages of cost reduction and higher patient satisfaction. We investigated whether ACL reconstruction in an outpatient setting is

  12. Disparities in internet use among orthopedic outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth P; Rehman, Saqib; Goldhirsh, Jessie

    2014-02-01

    Internet access has lagged behind for patients with lower incomes and from certain ethnic groups. This study investigated the possible improvement of access to health-related information on the Internet for all patients in an urban outpatient setting, regardless of socioeconomic background. A 28-question survey was completed by 100 orthopedic outpatients evaluating associations between their age, ethnicity, income, or education level and their access to the Internet. The survey also examined how patients used the Internet to obtain information about their medical condition, their privacy concerns when conducting online research, and their use of mobile phones as a primary means of Internet access. The Internet was used by 57% of orthopedic outpatients in this urban setting. Internet access decreased with advancing age but increased with increasing income and education, findings consistent with similar studies. Despite the inability to identify an association between ethnicity and Internet access in this patient population, fewer Latinos (33%) than whites (67%) or African Americans (77%) sought information about their medical condition. Among patients who used a mobile phone as the primary method for online access, 74% were African American or Latino and 26% were white. This difference in mobile phone use for online access suggests that mobile phones have provided ethnic minorities with greater Internet access and thus may have narrowed the digital divide among the races. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Blood lipid profiles and factors associated with dyslipidemia assessed by a point-of-care testing device in an outpatient setting: A large-scale cross-sectional study in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei-dong; He, Lin-yun; Guo, Yang; Liu, Peng; Li, Gong-xin; Wang, Li-zi; Liu, Ying-feng

    2015-06-01

    To promote the concept of POCT and to investigate dyslipidemia in Guangzhou, China, we performed a study examining blood lipids assessed by POCT and reported factors associated with dyslipidemia. This multicenter, cross-sectional study enrolled outpatients from 9 Guangzhou hospitals from May through September 2013. After informed consent was obtained, the following information was collected: age; gender; the presence of diabetes mellitus, obesity, and hypertension as well as current use of cigarettes or alcohol. Patients were asked to fast for 8h before the blood examination performed on a POCT device, the CardioChek PA. Of 4012 patients enrolled (1544 males, 2468 females; mean age 60.35±9.41 years), 1993 (49.7%) patients had dyslipidemia, but only 101 (5.1%) took statins. The multivariate tests of associations between demographic variables, comorbidities, and the risk of having dyslipidemia found that the significant predictors of dyslipidemia were male gender, age ≥60 years, being a current smoker or alcohol drinker, and hypertension. Most dyslipidemia patients in Guangzhou remain untreated. POCT in China is feasible, and its widespread use might improve dyslipidemia awareness, treatment and control. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancing outpatient nephrology experience for internal medicine residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Kenar D.; Shah, Hitesh H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Interest in nephrology careers continues to remain low in the USA. Educational innovations that enhance interest in nephrology among medical trainees are being actively studied. While internal medicine (IM) residency programs commonly offer the inpatient nephrology elective to the resident, outpatient nephrology experience is lacking. Understanding the provision of care in outpatient and home dialysis and management of patients with glomerular diseases, chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation are vital components of an outpatient nephrology rotation. In this review article, we share our experiences in incorporating outpatient nephrology to the IM resident’s elective time. We also present the structure of the nephrology rotations at our programs and suggest several learning opportunities in outpatient nephrology that the training community can provide to medical residents. Strategies to effectively set up an outpatient nephrology rotation are also described. While more educational research on the impact of outpatient nephrology on resident learning and career choices are needed, we encourage a collaborative effort between faculty members in nephrology and the medicine residency programs to provide this unique learning opportunity to IM residents. PMID:29479427

  15. Evaluating patients for psychosocial distress and supportive care needs based on health-related quality of life in primary brain tumors: a prospective multicenter analysis of patients with gliomas in an outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmann, Anne-Katrin; Hechtner, Marlene; Nadji-Ohl, Minou; Janko, Mareile; Reuter, Ann Katrin; Kohlmann, Karoline; Haug, Markus; Grüninger, Sonja; Deininger, Monika; Ganslandt, Oliver; König, Jochem; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Coburger, Jan; Renovanz, Mirjam

    2017-01-01

    The association between health-related quality of life (HRQoL), psychosocial distress, and supportive care is in the focus of patient-centered neuro-oncology. We investigated the relationship between the aforementioned in glioma-patients to evaluate the association of these instruments and determine cut-off values for suitable HRQoL scales indicating a potential need for intervention. In an observational multi-center study, outpatients completed the Distress Thermometer (DT), EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30/BN20, HRQoL), and Supportive-Care-Needs-Survey-SF34-G (SCNS). Based on nine EORTC-function and selected -symptom scales items of the questionnaires were matched. Convergent validity of related single items and scores across the instruments was estimated. EORTC cut-off values were calculated. Data of 167 patients were analyzed. The strongest correlation of EORTC-QLQ-C30 and DT was found for cognitive function (cogf), global health status (GHS), emotional (emof), role function (rolef), future uncertainty (FU), fatigue, and between EORTC-QLQ-C30 and SCNS for FU, emof, rolef (r = |0.4-0.7|; p care (AUC 0.78, 0.85; p < 0.01). Worse EORTC-C30 scores correlate with higher DT and SCNS scores. With this exploratory assessment, cut-off values for EORTC-C30 subscores to predict distress and pathological SCNS-scores could be determined, which could influence patients' referral to further treatment. However, further prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm the clinical relevance of these cut-off values.

  16. The impact of outpatient clinical teaching on students' academic performance in obstetrics and gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahaeldin A Hassan

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Clinical teaching at outpatient settings leads to an improvement in students' performance in OSCE. There is evidence of remarkable improvement in the mastery of clinical skills as manifested in the students' scores in physical examination and procedures stations. These results will encourage us to have clinical teaching in other disciplines at outpatient settings.

  17. Length of outpatient treatment affected by extraversion : Still waters run long

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, P; van der Does, A.J W; Sanderman, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has often been shown that in outpatient settings, about half of the treatments are terminated after only a few sessions. The present study sought to investigate the contribution of personality traits to length of treatment in a behaviour therapy-oriented outpatient treatment setting. All patients

  18. Medical Mishap and Negligence: It happens in the Outpatients too

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2011-06-01

    When we consider medical negligence and clinical error we think of busy hospitals late at night and at week-ends. We think of crowded emergency medicine departments, complex surgery and the critically ill ICU patient. We think of prescribing errors in the administration of potent intravenous therapy. We think of high risk specialties such as obstetrics, anaesthesia and surgery. We are less likely to think of outpatients\\/ ambulatory care or a non-interventionist specialty as an important source of litigation. This is remiss on our part. Risks in this setting have gone relatively unnoticed. There 30 times more outpatients than inpatients annually. In the US there are 900 million outpatient visits compared with 30 million inpatients. It is not surprising that this quantum of patient-doctor interaction should also be a source of litigation claims. Furthermore it is likely to continue rising with the increased numbers of procedures now being undertaken at outpatients.

  19. Outpatient Appointment Scheduling with Variable Interappointment Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Foh Chew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare currently consumes 17% of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product and is expected to reach 20% within the coming decade. Confronted with such high costs, sharp demand, and limited capacity, many hospitals now are vying for shorter lengths of stay and are transferring services from inpatient to outpatient facilities. This paper seeks to develop a methodology for constructing effective outpatient appointment scheduling systems. The objective of these appointment systems is to minimize the average total cost function describing total costs incurred by patient waiting and by staff idle time and overtime. In the paper, we will establish that the average total cost function exhibits a unimodal curve. The lowest point of the curve essentially means the lowest average total cost. We will next develop a simulation-based heuristic algorithm for finding an outpatient schedule near the lowest point. In the paper, we present numerical examples using the heuristic based upon a set of predetermined unit costs. Specifically, we find the near optimal interappointment times for schedules, where there are two and three patients in each block, respectively. The current work does not consider possible no shows and walk-ins. Future work will undertake these issues.

  20. Implementation and evaluation of an algorithm-based order set for the outpatient treatment of urinary tract infections in the spinal cord injury population in a VA Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patros, Clayton; Sabol, Mirella; Paniagua, Angela; Lans, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Treatment of urinary tract infections (UTI) in the spinal cord injury (SCI) population is often difficult due to the lack of symptoms, increased resistance, and increased morbidity and mortality associated with UTIs. To develop an algorithm-based order set for the treatment of UTIs for patients with SCI based on SCI-specific antibiogram data in order to assess and improve current antimicrobial prescribing practices at the Clement J. Zablocki Veterans Affairs Medical Center (ZVAMC). This study is a retrospective, pre- and post-implementation analysis of an order set based on SCI antibiogram data. Descriptive statistics were used to compare baseline data and characteristics and chi squared tests were used to evaluate the primary outcome and all secondary outcomes. To achieve a power of 80% with an effect size of 0.3, the goal was to assess 45 antimicrobial treatment courses in the pre-implementation group and 45 antimicrobial treatment courses in the post-implementation group. The percentage of appropriate antimicrobial treatment courses increased from 47.9% in the pre-intervention group (n = 73) to 71.8% in the post-intervention group (n = 39), which was statistically significant (P = 0.015). Patients with SCI treated for UTIs within the ZVAMC had a significantly higher percentage of appropriate treatment courses following the implementation of a unit-specific antibiogram, electronic order set, and educational in-service for providers. An order set and unit-specific antibiogram with related education may be beneficial in improving antimicrobial therapy from a stewardship perspective.

  1. Predictors of outcome in outpatients with anxiety disorders: The Leiden routine outcome monitoring study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schat, A.; van Noorden, M.S.; Noom, M.J.; Giltay, E.J.; van der Wee, N.J.A.; Vermeiren, R.R.J.M.; Zitman, F.G.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the predictors of outcome in anxiety disorders in naturalistic outpatient settings. We analyzed 2-year follow-up data collected through Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) in a naturalistic sample of 917 outpatients in psychiatric specialty care in order to identify factors

  2. Clostridium difficile Infection in Outpatients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-07

    Dr. Jon Mark Hirshon, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses Clostridium difficile infection in outpatients.  Created: 11/7/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/21/2011.

  3. Elderly alcoholics in outpatient treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bent; Nielsen, Anette Søgaard; Lolk, Anette

    2010-01-01

    In Denmark, the treatment of alcoholics is provided by public outpatient alcohol clinics. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether elderly patients differ from younger patients with regards to sociodemographic data, drinking pattern and psychiatric comorbidity which may affect...

  4. Basic Stand Alone Medicare Outpatient Procedures PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Basic Stand Alone (BSA) Outpatient Procedures Public Use Files (PUF) with information from Medicare outpatient claims. The CMS BSA...

  5. Smoking Cessation Counseling Beliefs and Behaviors of Outpatient Oncology Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhauer, Suzanne C.; Tooze, Janet A.; Blackstock, A. William; Spangler, John; Thomas, Leslie; Sutfin, Erin L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Many cancer patients continue to smoke after diagnosis, increasing their risk for treatment complications, reduced treatment efficacy, secondary cancers, and reduced survival. Outpatient oncology providers may not be using the “teachable moment” of cancer diagnosis to provide smoking cessation assistance. Providers and Methods. Physicians and midlevel providers (n = 74) who provide outpatient oncology services completed an online survey regarding smoking cessation counseling behaviors, beliefs, and perceived barriers. Outpatient medical records for 120 breast, lung, head and neck, colon, prostate, and acute leukemia cancer patients were reviewed to assess current smoking cessation assessment and intervention documentation practices. Results. Providers reported commonly assessing smoking in new patients (82.4% frequently or always), but rates declined at subsequent visits for both current smokers and recent quitters. Rates of advising patients to quit smoking were also high (86.5% frequently or always), but oncology setting. PMID:22334454

  6. Elderly outpatient profile and predictors of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Grace Angélica de Oliveira; Cintra, Fernanda Aparecida; Batista, Fernanda Sotelo; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; Guariento, Maria Elena; Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosario de; D'Elboux, Maria José

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES Falls are a serious public health problem and are one of the biggest reasons for hospitalization, morbidity and mortality among elderly people. Moreover, few studies on predictors of falls have been conducted in low and middle income countries. The aim here was to identify elderly outpatient profiles according to sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional variables and correlate them with occurrences of falls among these subjects. DESIGN AND SETTING Cross-sectional descriptive study forming part of the project "Quality of Life of Frail Elderly People", carried out in Campinas, Brazil. METHODS The subjects were 145 elderly individuals (76.3 ± 7.8 years old), of whom 65% were women, who were living in the city of Campinas or nearby and were attended at the geriatric outpatient clinic of a University Hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional data, as well as fall occurrence data, were gathered. Cluster analyses and comparisons between groups were carried out. RESULTS Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups related to the study variables, and the determinants for this distinction were: gender, marital status, physical performance, handgrip strength and functional independence. These groups were compared according to occurrences of falls over the last year, and significant differences between them were found. CONCLUSIONS The results showed that greater occurrences of falls were associated with a profile of elderly people comprising female gender, single status, lower muscle strength and physical performance regarding balance and gait, and lower independence in motor tasks for activities of daily living.

  7. Animal-assisted therapy at an outpatient pain management clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Bernstein, Cheryl D; Constantin, Janet M; Kunkel, Frank A; Breuer, Paula; Hanlon, Raymond B

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of brief therapy dog visits to an outpatient pain management facility compared with time spent in a waiting room. The design of this study is open-label. Setting.  This study was conducted in a university tertiary care adult chronic pain outpatient clinic. The subjects of this study include outpatients, adults accompanying outpatients to their appointments, and clinic staff. Intervention.  Participants were able to spend clinic waiting time with a certified therapy dog instead of waiting in the outpatient waiting area. When the therapy dog was not available, individuals remained in the waiting area. Self-reported pain, fatigue, and emotional distress were recorded using 11-point numeric rating scales before and after the therapy dog visit or waiting room time. Two hundred ninety-five therapy dog visits (235 with patients, 34 family/friends, and 26 staff) and 96 waiting room surveys (83 from patients, 6 family/friends, and 7 staff) were completed over a 2-month study period. Significant improvements were reported for pain, mood, and other measures of distress among patients after the therapy dog visit but not the waiting room control, with clinically meaningful pain relief (decrease ≥2 points) in 23% after the therapy dog visit and 4% in the waiting room control. Significant improvements were likewise seen after therapy dog visits for family/friends and staff. Therapy dog visits in an outpatient setting can provide significant reduction in pain and emotional distress for chronic pain patients. Therapy dog visits can also significantly improve emotional distress and feelings of well-being in family and friends accompanying patients to appointments and clinic staff. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital outpatient services subject to the... FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Categories of Hospitals and Services Subject to and Excluded From the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System § 419.21 Hospital outpatient services...

  9. Movement to outpatient hysterectomy for benign indications in the United States, 2008-2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaby Moawad

    Full Text Available The past decade has witnessed adoption of conservative gynecologic treatments, including minimally invasive surgery (MIS, alongside steady declines in inpatient hysterectomies. It remains unclear what factors have contributed to trends in outpatient benign hysterectomy (BH, as well as whether these trends exacerbate disparities.Retrospective cohort of 527,964 women ≥18 years old who underwent BH from 2008 to 2014. BH surgical approaches included: open/abdominal hysterectomy (AH, vaginal hysterectomy (VH, laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH, and robotic-assisted hysterectomy (RH. Quarterly frequencies were calculated by care setting and surgical approach. We used multilevel logistic regression (MLR using the most recent year of data (2014 to examine the influence of patient-, physician-, and hospital-level preoperative factors and surgical approaches on outpatient migration.From 2008-2014, surgical approaches for LH and RH increased, which coincided with decreases in VH and AH. Overall, a 44.2% shift was observed from inpatient to outpatient settings (P<0.0001. Among all outpatient visits MIS increased, particularly for RH (3.6% to 41.07%. We observed increases in the proportion of non-Hispanic Black and Medicaid patients who obtained MIS in 2014 vs. 2008 (P<0.001. Surgical approach (51.8% and physician outpatient MIS experience (19.9% had the greatest influence on predicting outpatient BH. Compared with LH, RH was associated with statistically significantly higher likelihood of outpatient BH overall (OR 1.23; 95% CI, 1.16-1.31, as well as in sub-analyses of more complex cases and hospitals that performed ≥1 RH (P<0.05.From 2008-2014, rates of LH and RH significantly increased. A significant shift from inpatient to outpatient setting was observed. These findings suggest that RH may facilitate the shift to outpatient BH, particularly for patients with complexities. The adoption of MIS in outpatient settings may improve access to disadvantaged

  10. Outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation – rehabilitation models and shortcomings in outpatient aftercare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietl, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the bronchial asthma are widespread diseases. They need long-lasting and sustainable rehabilitation. Objectives: The goal of this HTA is to describe the present supply and the economic relevance of out-patient pulmonary rehabilitation in conjunction with its social aspects. A further target is to derivate options for actions in the health-care system and possible research necessities. Methods: Relevant publications are identified by means of a structured search in 37 database accessed through the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI. In addition a manual search of identified reference lists has been done. The present report includes German and English literature published from 2004 to 2009. The methodological quality was assessed by two independent researchers according to pre-defined quality criteria of evidence based medicine. Results: Among 860 publications 31 medical studies, four economic studies and 13 ethical studies meet the inclusion criteria. The studies cover rehabilitation programmes in 19 countries. The majority of them has a high level of evidence (1A to 2C. The pulmonary rehabilitation programmes differ by the setting (in-patient, out-patient, in-home, community-based, by the length of intervention (from two weeks to 36 months, by the way and the frequency of intervention and by the duration of the follow-up treatment. Overall out-patient rehabilitation programmes achieve the same positive effects for COPD patients as in-patient programmes do. This is especially true for physical performance and health related quality of life. There are only a few studies dealing with asthma. Therefore, valid statements cannot be given. The results for cost-effectiveness are not distinct enough. Discussion: Goals of pulmonary rehabilitation like prevention and adequate treatment of acute exacerbations, the minimisation of hospitalisation and the reduction

  11. Frailty measurements and dysphagia in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Bridget; Vaezi, Alec; Egloff, Ann Marie; Smith, Libby; Wasserman-Wincko, Tamara; Johnson, Jonas T

    2014-09-01

    Deconditioning and frailty may contribute to dysphagia and aspiration. Early identification of patients at risk of aspiration is important. Aspiration prevention would lead to reduced morbidity and health care costs. We therefore wondered whether objective measurements of frailty could help identify patients at risk for dysphagia and aspiration. Consecutive patients (n = 183) were enrolled. Patient characteristics and objective measures of frailty were recorded prospectively. Variables tested included age, body mass index, grip strength, and 5 meter walk pace. Statistical analysis tested for association between these parameters and dysphagia or aspiration, diagnosed by instrumental swallowing examination. Of variables tested for association with grip strength, only age category (P = .003) and ambulatory status (P dysphagia or aspiration, ambulatory status was significantly associated with dysphagia and aspiration in multivariable model building. Nonambulatory status is a predictor of aspiration and should be included in risk assessments for dysphagia. The relationship between frailty and dysphagia deserves further investigation. Frailty assessments may help identify those at risk for complications of dysphagia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Patients' experiences of NPWT in an outpatient setting in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, B; Pedersen, B D

    2013-01-01

    , and they experienced embarrassment about odour,anxiety and uneasiness in relation to complications, a need for relatives' support and other social relation issues. It was important to include relatives as a resource and make use of the opportunity they presented to assist patients during information sessions about...... on the equipment and a greater confidence as treatment proceeded. There is a link between treatment and tolerance. Duration of treatment influenced the patients' ability to cope with it and the patients gradually developed an acceptance of the technology. The support of relatives was important, particularly after...

  13. Inpatient versus outpatient vincristine, dactinomycin, and cyclophosphamide for pediatric cancers: Quality and cost implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Rachel S; Bernhardt, M Brooke; Berger, Amanda H; Hesselgrave, Joy E; Russell, Heidi V; Okcu, M Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Approximately 18% of the United States' gross domestic product is attributed to healthcare expenditures. Several studies have illustrated that shifting healthcare from the inpatient to the outpatient setting is more cost effective, in addition to improving patient satisfaction. Vincristine, dactinomycin, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) are used together to treat children with solid tumors. Our traditional treatment approach included a two day inpatient admission. The purpose of this project was to establish a process for the administration of VAC in the outpatient setting to improve satisfaction, and reduce costs. We aimed to benchmark practice standards with other institutions, revised our treatment approach to permit outpatient administration, and implemented the new protocol in a stepwise manner. We collected caregiver satisfaction metrics through the use of surveys. Costs of encounters were obtained from administrative data. Total costs and costs by service type were compared using descriptive and mean comparisons. Seven patients received a total of 31 cycles of VAC in the outpatient setting. The time to achieve an appropriate pre-chemotherapy specific gravity was reduced by a median of 120 min. In addition, time spent in the hospital setting was reduced by a mean of 27.2 hr. Adverse effects were minimal and all caregivers reported greater satisfaction with the outpatient regimen. Outpatient administration of VAC was $3,300 less on average compared to the inpatient administration. Outpatient VAC provides a safe alternative for administration that reduces healthcare costs, reduces healthcare utilization, and improves patient satisfaction. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Payment methods for outpatient care facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Beibei; He, Li; Meng, Qingyue; Jia, Liying

    2017-01-01

    Background Outpatient care facilities provide a variety of basic healthcare services to individuals who do not require hospitalisation or institutionalisation, and are usually the patient's first contact. The provision of outpatient care contributes to immediate and large gains in health status, and a large portion of total health expenditure goes to outpatient healthcare services. Payment method is one of the most important incentive methods applied by purchasers to guide the performance of outpatient care providers. Objectives To assess the impact of different payment methods on the performance of outpatient care facilities and to analyse the differences in impact of payment methods in different settings. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), 2016, Issue 3, part of the Cochrane Library (searched 8 March 2016); MEDLINE, OvidSP (searched 8 March 2016); Embase, OvidSP (searched 24 April 2014); PubMed (NCBI) (searched 8 March 2016); Dissertations and Theses Database, ProQuest (searched 8 March 2016); Conference Proceedings Citation Index (ISI Web of Science) (searched 8 March 2016); IDEAS (searched 8 March 2016); EconLit, ProQuest (searched 8 March 2016); POPLINE, K4Health (searched 8 March 2016); China National Knowledge Infrastructure (searched 8 March 2016); Chinese Medicine Premier (searched 8 March 2016); OpenGrey (searched 8 March 2016); ClinicalTrials.gov, US National Institutes of Health (NIH) (searched 8 March 2016); World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (searched 8 March 2016); and the website of the World Bank (searched 8 March 2016). In addition, we searched the reference lists of included studies and carried out a citation search for the included studies via ISI Web of Science to find other potentially relevant studies. We also contacted authors of the main included studies regarding any further published or unpublished work. Selection criteria Randomised

  15. Comparison of student learning in the out-patient clinic and ward round.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M H; Dent, J A

    1994-05-01

    In undergraduate medical education there is a trend away from ward-based teaching towards out-patient and community-based teaching. To study the potential effects of this altered emphasis on student learning, a pilot group of final-year medical students at the University of Dundee was asked to keep individual structured log-books. These contained details of patients seen during their 3-week orthopaedic attachment in both a ward and out-patient setting. A comparison of perceived learning in the two settings showed that students learned more from attending an out-patient clinic than a ward round, but did not make full use of the learning potential of either. The setting did not particularly influence the balance of learning as categorized here but only the ward round supplied experience of surgical complications. The amount of learning taking place in an out-patient clinic was influenced by student ability, measured by examination performance, but not by clinic work-load. The implications of increased use of out-patient clinics and the advantages and disadvantages of the approach employed are discussed. It is concluded that in the situation studied student learning in the outpatient setting is as good as or superior to the ward setting but should not totally replace it.

  16. Fatigue Experiences Among OCD Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Massimo; Piacentino, Daria; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Maraone, Annalisa; Tarsitani, Lorenzo; Biondi, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    Patients with OCD are impaired in multiple domains of functioning and quality of life. While associated psychopathology complaints and neuropsychological deficits were reported, the subjective experience of general fatigue and mental fatigue was scarcely investigated. In this single-center case-control study we compared 50 non-depressed OCD outpatients consecutively recruited and 50 panic disorder (PD) outpatients, to determine whether they experienced fatigue differently. Assessment consisted of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV criteria by using the SCID-I and the SCID-II. Symptom severity was assessed using the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Clinical Global Impressions Scale, severity and the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. Fatigue was assessed by using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI). Regarding MFI physical fatigue, an OR of 0.196 (95 % CI 0.080-0.478) was found, suggesting that its presence is associated with lower odds of OCD compared to PD. The same can be said for MFI mental fatigue, as an OR of 0.138 (95 % CI 0.049-0.326) was found, suggesting that its presence is associated with lower odds of OCD. Notably, OCD patients with OCDP co-morbidity reported higher scores of mental fatigue. In this study fatigue, including mental fatigue, seems not to be a prominent experience among adult non-depressed OCD patients.

  17. Outcomes of Geriatric Burns Treated as Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Shinsuke

    2017-10-01

    Most literature about geriatric burns has focused on inpatient management; therefore, our study investigated the effects of burn characteristics and preexisting medical comorbidities on treatment outcomes for geriatric burn patients treated as outpatients. A retrospective review was conducted for 391 patients over 65 years of age seen in the emergency department of Fukui Prefectural Hospital over a 10-year period. Charts were reviewed for age, sex, burn characteristics, burn mechanisms, preexisting medical comorbidities, and treatment outcomes. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between outcomes of outpatients and comorbidities, which were calculated by the Charlson comorbidity index. Seventy-three patients aged 65 years and older were treated as outpatients at Fukui Prefectural Hospital. The majority (80%) of these patients had burns on less than 5% of their total body surface area. Scald burns accounted for 63% of burn mechanisms, with burns to the lower extremities being the most frequent. The mean percentage of total burn surface area was 4% in the outpatient group and 28% for the inpatient group. The mean time to healing was 24.3 days in outpatients. Of the 73 outpatients, 17 (23%) showed delayed healing. Of these 17 patients, 3 patients experienced wound infection and 2 patients had documented hypertrophic scarring. Four patients ultimately underwent excision and grafting. The common preexisting medical comorbidities in the outpatient group were congestive heart failure and diabetic mellitus. There were no significant differences for medical comorbidities between outpatients and inpatients. The Charlson comorbidity index for outpatients with delayed healing was higher than that for those without delayed healing. The Charlson comorbidity index was associated with delayed healing of outpatients, but age or total burn surface area were not. The characteristics of geriatric burn outpatients were distinct from those of inpatients

  18. Payment methods for outpatient care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Beibei; He, Li; Meng, Qingyue; Jia, Liying

    2017-03-03

    Outpatient care facilities provide a variety of basic healthcare services to individuals who do not require hospitalisation or institutionalisation, and are usually the patient's first contact. The provision of outpatient care contributes to immediate and large gains in health status, and a large portion of total health expenditure goes to outpatient healthcare services. Payment method is one of the most important incentive methods applied by purchasers to guide the performance of outpatient care providers. To assess the impact of different payment methods on the performance of outpatient care facilities and to analyse the differences in impact of payment methods in different settings. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), 2016, Issue 3, part of the Cochrane Library (searched 8 March 2016); MEDLINE, OvidSP (searched 8 March 2016); Embase, OvidSP (searched 24 April 2014); PubMed (NCBI) (searched 8 March 2016); Dissertations and Theses Database, ProQuest (searched 8 March 2016); Conference Proceedings Citation Index (ISI Web of Science) (searched 8 March 2016); IDEAS (searched 8 March 2016); EconLit, ProQuest (searched 8 March 2016); POPLINE, K4Health (searched 8 March 2016); China National Knowledge Infrastructure (searched 8 March 2016); Chinese Medicine Premier (searched 8 March 2016); OpenGrey (searched 8 March 2016); ClinicalTrials.gov, US National Institutes of Health (NIH) (searched 8 March 2016); World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (searched 8 March 2016); and the website of the World Bank (searched 8 March 2016).In addition, we searched the reference lists of included studies and carried out a citation search for the included studies via ISI Web of Science to find other potentially relevant studies. We also contacted authors of the main included studies regarding any further published or unpublished work. Randomised trials, non-randomised trials, controlled before

  19. 42 CFR 419.22 - Hospital outpatient services excluded from payment under the hospital outpatient prospective...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital outpatient services excluded from payment under the hospital outpatient prospective payment system. 419.22 Section 419.22 Public Health CENTERS... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Categories of Hospitals and Services...

  20. Temporal trends in outpatient management of incident pulmonary embolism and associated mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klil-Drori, Adi J; Coulombe, Janie; Suissa, Samy; Hirsch, Andrew; Tagalakis, Vicky

    2018-01-01

    In clinical trial settings, outpatient management of pulmonary embolism (PE) is feasible and safe, but less is known on its use in routine care. We determined trends in outpatient management of PE and associated mortality in a large non-select patient population. All residents of Quebec, Canada with a first-ever work-up for suspected PE in the emergency department (ED) over 10years were included. Patients could transition to outpatient management and from unconfirmed to confirmed PE in a time-varying fashion. Comparing the years 2005-9 with 2000-4, we assessed the odds ratio (OR) for outpatient management, and relative risk (RR) for all-cause mortality, readmissions for PE, and major bleeding in 30days. We adjusted the RR for a mortality risk score. Of 15,217 patients included, 7583 were outpatients (7.5% confirmed PE) and 7634 were inpatients (60.6% confirmed PE). In all, 10.9% of patients with confirmed PE were outpatients, but outpatient management of confirmed PE was more likely in the latter study period (OR 1.73, 95%CI 1.44-2.09). Among outpatients with confirmed PE, mortality (RR 0.84, 95%CI 0.15-4.61) and readmission (RR 1.25, 95%CI 0.45-3.48) rates were stable, and only 3 major bleeding events were noted. Inpatients with confirmed PE had stable mortality rates (RR 0.95, 95%CI 0.72-1.24). Outpatient PE management increased over 10years while remaining fairly uncommon. Nevertheless, stable mortality and readmission rates indicate this practice is safe in routine care, and add to the growing evidence in support of outpatient PE management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Outpatient treatment for acute uncomplicated diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ünlü, Çagdas; Gunadi, Patrick M.; Gerhards, Michael F.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Vrouenraets, Bart C.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, treatment of acute diverticulitis has mostly been based on inpatient care. The question arises whether these patients can be treated on an outpatient basis as the admissions for diverticular disease have been shown to be increasing every year. We studied whether outpatient treatment

  2. Aspiration Curettage and its Outpatient Usage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspiration Curettage and its Outpatient Usage. D. A. G. BARFORD, M, NOTELOVITZ. SUMMARY ... its use on a number of outpatients without anaesthesia is discussed. S. Afr. Med. l., 48, 22 (1974). In order to ... plastic aspiration chamber and suction is applied centrally at the base of the chamber, a cylindrical filter within the.

  3. ERCP as an outpatient treatment : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurnink, Suzanne M.; Poley, Jan Werner; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Siersema, Peter D.

    Background: ERCP on an outpatient basis could be as safe as on an inpatient basis and may also reduce medical costs. Objective: To review the available literature to determine the safety of an ERCP performed on an outpatient basis. Design: A review of the published literature was performed by

  4. [Outpatient treatment for patients with eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of eating disorders, patients in either the acute or chronic stage are generally treated on outpatient basis as much as possible in the living condition of daily life. This paper describes the flow of diagnosis and treatment, first examination and introduction into treatment, way of parents treating their child, parental counseling, criteria for admission (immediate hospitalization or not), and outpatient therapy.

  5. Involuntary Outpatient Commitment of the Mentally Ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Ruta J.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the issue of involuntary outpatient commitment, and its implications for social workers working in the health system. Describes a nationwide movement to establish a new system of involuntary outpatient commitment to address the failure of deinstitutionalization, mandating mental health treatment in the community for persons ineligible for…

  6. The impact of outpatient clinical teaching on students' academic performance in obstetrics and gynecology

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Bahaeldin A.; Elfaki, Omer A.; Khan, Muhammed A.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical teaching at outpatient settings is an essential part of undergraduate medical students' training. The increasing number of students in many medical schools and short hospital stays makes inpatient teaching alone insufficient to provide students with the required clinical skills. To make up this shortfall, outpatient clinical teaching has been implemented by our Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, King Khalid University, KSA, throughout the academic year 2015–2016. ...

  7. Apnea and bradycardia in two premature infants during routine outpatient retinopathy of prematurity screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael G; Kaufman, Lawrence M

    2009-10-01

    Two unrelated premature infants at risk for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) were discharged home from a neonatal intensive care unit. Appropriately timed ROP examinations were performed in an outpatient setting in a free-standing pediatric ophthalmologist's private office remote from any hospital. The infants developed severe apnea and bradycardia at the end of the ROP examinations. As a result, a new protocol for outpatient ROP screening was developed.

  8. Sexual health in Spanish postmenopausal women presenting at outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornellana, M J; Harvey, X; Carballo, A; Khartchenko, E; Llaneza, P; Palacios, S; Mendoza, N

    2017-04-01

    One of the most common complaints among postmenopausal women is a change in sexual drive. The aim of this study was to assess the current state of sexual health in Spanish postmenopausal women who present at outpatient gynecology clinics. In this multicenter, observational, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study, a survey was conducted that included 3026 Spanish postmenopausal women in a routine clinical setting in outpatient gynecology clinics at public and private institutions throughout Spain. We used the Women's Sexual Function questionnaire, which has been validated in Spain. In the multivariate analysis, we found that the best indicators of sexual health in postmenopausal women were a higher education (p education and information about menopause and the complaints associated with this period in a woman's life.

  9. Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care: A Metropolitan Area Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Robin Streit; Parikh, Bijal

    2017-01-01

    Massage offers cancer patients general quality of life benefits as well as alleviation of cancer-related symptoms/cancer-treatment–related symptoms including pain, anxiety, and fatigue. Little is known about whether massage is accessible to cancer patients who receive treatment in the outpatient setting and how massage is incorporated into the overall cancer treatment plan. Outpatient cancer centers (n = 78) in a single metropolitan area were included this mixed-methods project that included a systematic analysis of website information and a telephone survey. Massage was offered at only 40 centers (51.3% of total). A range of massage modalities were represented, with energy-based therapies (Reiki and Therapeutic Touch) most frequently provided. Although massage therapists are licensed health care providers in the states included in this analysis, massage was also provided by nurses, physical therapists, and other health care professionals. PMID:28845677

  10. [Materializing interdisciplinary outpatient management of complex situations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perone, Nicolas; Filliettaz, Séverine Schusselé; Budan, Frédéric; Schaller, Philippe; Balavoine, Jean-François; Waldvogel, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Patient management is becoming increasingly complex, particularly because of the growing prevalence ofchronic diseases and ageing populations. The Swiss health care system is fragmented and struggles to coordinate care provided by professionals from multiple disciplines or working for different institutions. Models to improve health care of complex situations are available that particularly advocate a coordinated team approach. This article presents an action-research designed to empower health professionals to manage complex situations in outpatient settings by means of this type of approach. Health professionals - good practice leaders in the medical and nursing fields in the Geneva Canton (Switzerland) - explored complex management situations, as well as facilitating components and obstacles. A team approach is essential to manage all of the patient's issues, to take the patient's priorities into account, and to work on a joint care plan. The legitimate role of each member of this team is highlighted, together with new roles for existing practices: informing and motivating the patient, highlighting and supporting care givers, coordination by nurses. The creation of such teams, and implementation of these roles involve new processes, which require financing of coordination as well as development of new methods of interdisciplinary management, particularly novel information technology tools.

  11. Outcomes of outpatient management of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew; Coffee, Tammy; Adenuga, Paul; Yowler, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    The literature surrounding pediatric burns has focused on inpatient management. The goal of this study is to characterize the population of burned children treated as outpatients and assess outcomes validating this method of burn care. A retrospective review of 953 patients treated the burn clinic and burn unit of a tertiary care center. Patient age, burn etiology, burn characteristics, burn mechanism, and referral pattern were recorded. The type of wound care and incidence of outcomes including subsequent hospital admission, infection, scarring, and surgery served as the primary outcome data. Eight hundred and thirty children were treated as outpatients with a mean time of 1.8 days for the evaluation of burn injury in our clinic. Scalds accounted for 53% of the burn mechanism, with burns to the hand/wrist being the most frequent area involved. The mean percentage of TBSA was 1.4% for the outpatient cohort and 8% for the inpatient cohort. Burns in the outpatient cohort healed with a mean time of 13.4 days. In the outpatient cohort, nine (1%) patients had subsequent admissions and three (0.4%) patients had concern for infection. Eight patients from the outpatient cohort were treated with excision and grafting. The vast majority of pediatric burns are small, although they may often involve more critical areas such as the face and hand. Outpatient wound care is an effective treatment strategy which results in low rates of complications and should become the standard of care for children with appropriate burn size and home support.

  12. Observational study of outpatients with schizophrenia in the Middle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Observational study of outpatients with schizophrenia in the Middle East and Africa — 3- and 6-month efficacy and safety results. The Intercontinental Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes Study.

  13. An association between air pollution and daily outpatient visits for respiratory disease in a heavy industry area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Ying Wang

    Full Text Available In this work we used daily outpatient data from the Landseed Hospital in a heavily industrial area in northern Taiwan to study the associations between daily outpatient visits and air pollution in the context of a heavily polluted atmospheric environment in Chung-Li area during the period 2007-2011. We test the normality of each data set, control for the confounding factors, and calculate correlation coefficient between the outpatient visits and air pollution and meteorology, and use multiple linear regression analysis to seek significance of these associations. Our results show that temperature and relative humidity tend to be negatively associated with respiratory diseases. NO and [Formula: see text] are two main air pollutants that are positively associated with respiratory diseases, followed by [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], CO, and [Formula: see text]. Young outpatients (age 0-15 years are most sensitive to changing air pollution and meteorology factors, followed by the eldest (age [Formula: see text]66 years and age 16-65 years of outpatients. Outpatients for COPD diseases are most sensitive to air pollution and meteorology factors, followed by allergic rhinitis, asthma, and pneumonia diseases. In the context of sex difference to air pollution and meteorological factors, male outpatients are more sensitive than female outpatients in the 16-65 age groups, while female outpatients are more sensitive than male outpatients in the young 0-15 age groups and in the eldest age groups. In total, female outpatients are more sensitive to air pollution and meteorological factors than male outpatients.

  14. The intercontinental schizophrenia outpatient health outcomes (IC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The intercontinental schizophrenia outpatient health outcomes (IC-SOHO) study: baseline clinical and functional characteristics and antipsychotic use patterns in the North Africa and Middle Eastern (AMEA) region: original article.

  15. Hospital Outpatient PPS Partial Hospitalization Program LDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Partial Hospitalization Program LDS This file contains select claim level data and is derived from 2010 claims...

  16. Breadth versus volume: Neurology outpatient clinic cases in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Blood, Angela D; Park, Yoon Soo; Brorson, James R; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-06-01

    This study examined how volume in certain patient case types and breadth across patient case types in the outpatient clinic setting are related to Neurology Clerkship student performance. Case logs from the outpatient clinic experience of 486 students from The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, USA, participating in the 4week Neurology Clerkship from July 2008 to June 2013 were reviewed. A total of 12,381 patient encounters were logged and then classified into 13 diagnostic categories. How volume of cases within categories and the breadth of cases across categories relate to the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology and a Neurology Clerkship Objective Structured Clinical Examination was analyzed. Volume of cases was significantly correlated with the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology (r=.290, pNeurology (r=.231, p=.017), however was not significantly correlated with any component of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Volume of cases correlated with higher performance on measures of specialty knowledge and clinical skill. Fewer relationships emerged correlating breadth of cases and performance on the same measures. This study provides guidance to educators who must decide how much emphasis to place on volume versus breadth of cases in outpatient clinic learning experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Outpatient management of pediatric acute mastoiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Morin, Francis; Aziz, Haya; Manogaran, Mayuri; Guertin, William; Duval, Melanie

    2017-11-01

    Evaluate the Montreal Children's Hospital experience with outpatient management of uncomplicated acute mastoiditis with parenteral antibiotic therapy alone and determine if it is a safe alternative to inpatient management. A retrospective review of pediatric patients diagnosed with acute mastoiditis at a tertiary care pediatric hospital between 2013 and 2015 was performed. Patients with syndromes, immunodeficiency, cholesteatoma, chronic otitis media, cochlear implant in the affected ear, or incidental mastoid opacity were excluded. 56 children age 6 months to 15 years old were treated for acute mastoiditis, including 29 hospitalizations and 27 outpatients. Patients managed as outpatient with daily intravenous ceftriaxone had a 93% cure rate. Eighteen hospitalized and one outpatient had complications of acute mastoiditis. Children with complications were more likely to be febrile (p = 0.045). Two patients failed outpatient therapy and were admitted; one for myringotomy and piperacillin-tazobactam treatment and one required a mastoidectomy. 4/27 children treated as outpatient underwent myringotomy and tube insertion, 2 underwent myringotomy and tube along with admission and 21 did not require tube insertion. The average total duration of intravenous antibiotic therapy was respectively 4.9 and 18.9 days in the outpatient and hospitalized group. The average duration of admission was 5.9 days. Outpatient medical therapy of uncomplicated pediatric mastoiditis is safe, successful, and efficient. Benefits include efficient use of surgical beds, cost savings and patient and family convenience. Careful patient selection and close monitoring are keys for successful outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Outpatient treatment for acute uncomplicated diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünlü, Çagdas; Gunadi, Patrick M; Gerhards, Michael F; Boermeester, Marja A; Vrouenraets, Bart C

    2013-09-01

    Traditionally, treatment of acute diverticulitis has mostly been based on inpatient care. The question arises whether these patients can be treated on an outpatient basis as the admissions for diverticular disease have been shown to be increasing every year. We studied whether outpatient treatment of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis is feasible and safe, and which patients could benefit from outpatient care. A retrospective cohort study was carried out in two teaching hospitals using hospital registry codes for diverticulitis. All patients diagnosed with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis between January 2004 and January 2012, confirmed by imaging or colonoscopy, were included. Exclusion criteria were patients with recurrent diverticulitis, complicated diverticulitis (Hinchey stages 2, 3, and 4), and right-sided diverticulitis. Inpatient care was compared with outpatient care. Primary outcome was admission for outpatient care and the complication rate in both groups. Multivariate analysis was carried out to identify potential factors for inpatient care. Of 627 patients with diverticulitis, a total of 312 consecutive patients were identified with primary uncomplicated diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon; 194 patients had been treated as inpatients and 118 patients primarily as outpatients. In this last group, 91.5% had been treated successfully without diverticulitis-related complications or the need for hospital admission during a mean follow-up period of 48 months. Despite inherent patient selection in a retrospective cohort, ambulatory treatment of patients presenting with uncomplicated acute diverticulitis seems feasible and safe. In mildly ill and younger patients, hospital admission can be avoided.

  19. Home versus outpatient ultraviolet B phototherapy for mild to severe psoriasis : pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled non-inferiority trial (PLUTO study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, Mayke B. G.; Buskens, Erik; van Weelden, Huib; Steegmans, Paul H. A.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A. F. M.; Sigurdsson, Vigfus

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether ultraviolet B phototherapy at home is equally safe and equally effective as ultraviolet B phototherapy in an outpatient setting for patients with psoriasis. Design Pragmatic multicentre single blind randomised clinical trial (PLUTO study). Setting Dermatology

  20. Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Uptake in a Respiratory Outpatients Clinic

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rossiter, A

    2017-02-01

    Influenza is an acute viral respiratory illness that continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality in Ireland. Despite well-established national and international guidelines1 and increased public awareness campaigns, vaccine uptake rates are well below target worldwide2. We performed an audit of influenza vaccine uptake at a Respiratory outpatient clinic in a tertiary referral centre. 54% (n=41) of patients received the annual vaccine, well below the target of 75% set by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC).

  1. Mediating effects of self-stigma on the relationship between perceived stigma and psychosocial outcomes among psychiatric outpatients: findings from a cross-sectional survey in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Picco, Louisa; Lau, Ying Wen; Pang, Shirlene; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether self-stigma mediates the relationship between perceived stigma and quality of life, self-esteem and general functioning among outpatients with depression, schizophrenia, anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Outpatient clinics at a tertiary psychiatric hospital in Singapore. Participants 280 outpatients with a primary clinical diagnosis of either schizophrenia, depression, anxiety or OCD. Methods Data were collect...

  2. Medically Attended Catheter Complications Are Common in Patients With Outpatient Central Venous Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spires, Steven S; Rebeiro, Peter F; Miller, Mickie; Koss, Katie; Wright, Patty W; Talbot, Thomas R

    2018-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Outpatient central venous catheters (CVCs) are being used more frequently; however, data describing mechanical complications and central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) in the outpatient setting are limited. We performed a retrospective observational cohort study to understand the burden of these complications to elucidate their impact on the healthcare system. METHODS Data were retrospectively collected on patients discharged from Vanderbilt University Medical Center with a CVC in place and admitted into the care of Vanderbilt Home Care Services. Risk factors for medically attended catheter-associated complications (CACs) and outpatient CLABSIs were analyzed. RESULTS A CAC developed in 143 patients (21.9%), for a total of 165 discrete CAC events. Among these, 76 (46%) required at least 1 visit to the emergency department or an inpatient admission, while the remaining 89 (54%) required an outpatient clinic visit. The risk for developing a CAC was significantly increased in female patients, patients with a CVC with >1 lumen, and patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. The absolute number of CLABSIs identified in the study population was small at 16, or 2.4% of the total cohort. CONCLUSIONS Medically attended catheter complications were common among outpatients discharged with a CVC, and reduction of these events should be the focus of outpatient quality improvement programs. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:439-444.

  3. Complications Following Outpatient Total Joint Arthroplasty: An Analysis of a National Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, P Maxwell; Boniello, Anthony J; Berger, Richard A

    2017-05-01

    As outpatient total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasties (TKA) increase in popularity, concerns exist about the safety of discharging patients home the same day. The purpose of this study is to determine the complications associated with outpatient total joint arthroplasty (TJA) and to identify high-risk patients who should be excluded from these protocols. We queried the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for all patients who underwent primary TKA or THA from 2011 to 2014. Demographic variables, medical comorbidities, and 30-day complication, readmission, and reoperation rates were compared between outpatient and traditional inpatient procedures. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was then performed to identify independent risk factors of poor short-term outcomes. Of the total 169,406 patients who underwent TJA, 1220 were outpatient (0.7%). The outpatient and inpatient groups had an overall complication rate of 8% and 16%, respectively. Patients aged more than 70 years, those with malnutrition, cardiac history, smoking history, or diabetes mellitus are at higher risk for readmission and complications after THA and TKA (all P < .05). Surprisingly, outpatient TJA alone did not increase the risk of readmission (OR 0.652, 95% CI 0.243-1.746, P = .395) or reoperation (OR 1.168, 95% CI 0.374-3.651, P = .789), and was a negative independent risk factor for complications (OR 0.459, 95% CI 0.371-0.567, P < .001). With the resources available in a hospital setting, outpatient TJA may be a safe option, but only in select, healthier patients. Care should be taken to extrapolate these results to an outpatient facility, where complications may be more difficult to manage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors affecting the overcrowding in outpatient healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Ravangard, Ramin; Raadabadi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    The expansion of outpatient services and the desire to provide more outpatient care than inpatient care create some problems such as the overcrowding in the outpatient clinics. Given the importance of overcrowding in the outpatient clinics, this qualitative study aimed to determine the factors influencing the overcrowding in the specialty and subspecialty clinic of a teaching hospital. This was a qualitative study conducted in the specialty and subspecialty clinic of a hospital using content analysis method in the period of January to March 2014. The study population was all managers and heads of the outpatient wards. The studied sample consisted of 22 managers of the clinic wards who were selected using the purposive sampling method. The required data was collected using semi-structured interviews. The collected data was analyzed using conventional content analysis and the MAXQDA 10.0 software. Three themes were identified as the main factors affecting the overcrowding including the internal positive factors, internal negative factors, and external factors. Despite the efforts made to eliminate overcrowding, and reduce waiting times and increase access to the services for patients, the problem of overcrowding still has remained unresolved. In addition, the use of some strategies such as clarifying the working processes of the clinic for staff and patients and the relationships between the clinic and other wards especially emergency department, as well as using a simple triage system on the patients' arrival at the clinic are recommended.

  5. Outpatient Palliative Cardiology Service Embedded Within a Heart Failure Clinic: Experiences With an Emerging Model of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandesbery, Benjamin; Dobbie, Krista; Gorodeski, Eiran Z

    2018-04-01

    The role of palliative care consultation in the outpatient treatment of patients with symptomatic heart failure (HF) is poorly studied. In August 2015, we created an outpatient palliative care service embedded within the HF clinic at Cleveland Clinic main campus. To characterize patients cared for by our novel outpatient palliative cardiology service, including their degree of HF, symptoms, comorbidities, topics addressed in clinic, palliative treatments prescribed, advanced directives status, and mortality. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients evaluated by this outpatient service. Eighty patients were seen in 229 outpatient encounters. The most commonly reported symptoms were tiredness (74%), pain (64%), dyspnea (57%), drowsiness (45%), anxiety (45%), and depression (43%). The most frequently addressed issues were pain management (55%) and advanced care planning (54%). The most common palliative medications prescribed in palliative care clinic were opiates (48%), laxatives (22%), antineuropathics (22%), and antidepressants (16%). The 1-year survival rate was 70% (CI 65-75%). Embedding palliative medicine services in an HF outpatient clinic is feasible. Patients seen in this setting had an array of quality-of-life limiting symptoms and were medically managed with several interventions familiar to palliative medicine specialists. Outpatients with chronic HF have a significant symptom burden and may benefit from outpatient specialist palliative care.

  6. [Outpatient surgery: an unstoppable evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnet, P; Ott, V; Schiffer, E; Berney, T; Morel, P

    2010-06-23

    The trend is to definitely shorten hospital stays. It follows in the footsteps of a broader range of surgeries that can be managed in an ambulatory care setting. The expected benefits are: a reduction in costs, a shorter preoperative delay, a shorter absence for the work place and a lessened risk of hospital-borne infections. A multidisciplinary approach is essential for the success of such a program. Surgeons, anaesthetists and nursing staff must be prepared to modify and adapt their skills. The criterion of success for such an endeavour is a low level of readmissions and hospitalisations. If day surgery tends to keep the patient away for the hospital settings, it certainly places him in the centre of his medical management.

  7. Patient selection criteria for outpatient joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort, Nanne P; Bemelmans, Yoeri F L; van der Kuy, P Hugo M; Jansen, Jacqueline; Schotanus, Martijn G M

    2017-09-01

    General consensus of patient selection criteria for outpatient joint arthroplasty is lacking, which is paramount to prevent prolonged hospital stay, adverse events and/or readmissions. This review highlights patient selection criteria for OJA based on the current literature and expert opinion. A search of the English and International electronic healthcare databases including MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, AMED and the Cochrane library was performed in November 2015 to include studies published during the last 10 years. Furthermore, a survey of physicians from different specialties was performed. Fourteen studies described results regarding outpatient joint arthroplasty. Studies on outpatient hip and/or knee arthroplasty resulted in similar outcome in preselected patients. Patients who are able and willing to participate, with a low ASA classification (II), bleeding disorders, poorly controlled and/or severe cardiac (e.g. heart failure, arrhythmia) or pulmonary (e.g. embolism, respiratory failure) comorbidities, uncontrolled DM (type I or II), a high BMI (>30 m 2 /kg), chronic opioid consumption, functional neurological impairments, dependent functional status, chronic/end-stage renal disease and/or reduced preoperative cognitive capacity should be excluded from outpatient joint arthroplasty. The expert opinion-based selection criteria were comparable to literature with a further extension of exclusion for patients with practical issue's, urologic medical history and/or severe mobility disorders. Based on the current literature, the presented patient selection criteria provide a basis for outpatient joint arthroplasty and can be useful when selecting patients. Together with a change in mindset, a multidisciplinary approach and literature-based protocols, outpatient joint arthroplasty can be applied in daily orthopaedic practice while ensuring patients' safety. Clinical review, Level III.

  8. Handoff communication between hospital and outpatient dialysis units at patient discharge: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, James B; Marcotte, Leah M; Berns, Jeffrey S; Shea, Judy A

    2013-02-01

    Hemodialysis patients are vulnerable to adverse events, including those surrounding hospital discharge. Little is known about how dialysis-specific information is shared with outpatient dialysis clinics for discharged patients, and the applicability of existing models of handoff transitions is unknown. Semistructured interviews were performed with 36 dialysis care physicians, nurses, and social workers in hospital and outpatient settings. Interviews were transcribed and qualitatively analyzed by trained coders. Intercoder reliability was measured by Cohen's kappa Quality of communication and the actual process were highly variable. Good communication was described as timely, with standardized content, and coordinated between disciplines. A lack of standards, time/workload imbalance, incompatible electronic records between facilities, and unawareness of pending discharge plans were noted barriers to good communication. Poor or absent communication contributes to adverse events, including omission of antibiotics, mismanagement of congestive heart failure, readmissions, and loss of patient trust. Creating explicit standards for communication, fostering accountability, documenting receipt in the outpatient clinic, and continual feedback from outpatient to inpatient settings are methods to facilitate improvement and reduce preventable adverse events. Standardizing the communication process between inpatient and outpatient dialysis units when patients are discharged from the hospital has potential to reduce adverse events related to poor communication and improve patient care during this transition. Interprofessional collaboration has potential to create robust solutions to this complex problem and foster a culture of multidisciplinary reflexivity.

  9. Intensive Behavioral Treatment of Urinary Incontinence of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Archival Analysis of Procedures and Outcomes from an Outpatient Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanney, Nicole M.; Jostad, Candice M.; LeBlanc, Linda A.; Carr, James E.; Castile, Allison J.

    2013-01-01

    LeBlanc, Crossett, Bennett, Detweiler, and Carr (2005) described an outpatient model for conducting intensive toilet training with young children with autism using a modified Azrin and Foxx, protocol. In this article, we summarize the use of the protocol in an outpatient setting and the outcomes achieved with a large sample of children with autism…

  10. Views on treatment adherence among psychoactive substance-dependent women in the outpatient setting: a qualitative study Significados atribuídos por mulheres dependentes de substâncias psicoativas à adesão ao tratamento no contexto ambulatorial: um estudo qualitativo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dione Viégas Almeida Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the female population, adherence to specialist clinical treatment for psychoactive substance dependence has peculiar characteristics in terms of therapeutic approaches available to addicts in general. A smaller number of women seek specialist treatment in comparison with men. Traditionally, most health care services specializing in chemical dependence provide similar therapies to both men or women, including the use of mixed-sex groups at some facilities. OBJECTIVE: To discuss the views or psychological meanings attributed by women with substance use disorders to phenomena associated with adherence to treatment at a specialist university outpatient clinic. METHODS: The qualitative-clinical method was used, i.e., an approach characterized by the typically qualitative focus of human sciences adapted to health care settings. The semi-structured interview technique with open questions was used for data collection, combined with observation of the women interviewed. Data were processed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: Three categories of treatment outcomes emerged: 1 significant motivations to seek and follow the treatment proposed; 2 symbolic meanings attributed to the drug; 3 psychological representations of lack of motivation to explain difficulties adhering to treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the motivations of addicted women to seek treatment vary, but highlight the fact that the substance used becomes perceived as something that causes significant losses and hinders the proper exercise of women’s role in family and social contexts. A warm welcoming is considered essential for a patient to adhere to treatment, offsetting the strong physical pleasure associated with psychoactive substance use.INTRODUÇÃO: Na população feminina, a adesão a tratamentos clínicos especializados em dependência de substâncias psicoativas tem características peculiares quando se considera as abordagens terap

  11. Gender Differences in Outpatient Utilization : A Pooled Analysis of Data from the Korea Health Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noh, Jin-Won; Kim, Kyoung-Beom; Park, Hyunchun; Kwon, Young Dae

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study aims to set itself apart from prior research by elucidating gender differences in outpatient service utilization among adults aged 20 years or older, using nationally representative survey data. Methods: Data from the Korea Health Panel (KHP) collected between 2010 and 2011

  12. Structure and quality of outpatient care for people living with an HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, Esther A. N.; Smit, Colette; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; Reiss, Peter; Kroon, Frank P.; Brinkman, Kees; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2016-01-01

    Policy-makers and clinicians are faced with a gap of evidence to guide policy on standards for HIV outpatient care. Ongoing debates include which settings of care improve health outcomes, and how many HIV-infected patients a health-care provider should treat to gain and maintain expertise. In this

  13. Trends of reported outpatient malaria cases to assess the Test, Treat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the trends of confirmed outpatient malaria cases and the consumption of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in the government health facilities in Kenya following the roll out of the T3 initiative. Design: A retrospective review study. Setting: All government health facilities in the 47 counties.

  14. Validity of nutritional screening with MUST and SNAQ in hospital outpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leistra, E; Langius, Jacqueline A E; Evers, A.M.; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marian A E; Visser, M; de Vet, Henrica C W; Kruizenga, H M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The majority of hospital outpatients with undernutrition is unrecognized, and therefore untreated. There is a need for an easy and valid screening tool to detect undernutrition in this setting. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the MUST

  15. Muscle Strength Rather Than Muscle Mass Is Associated With Standing Balance in Elderly Outpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, A.Y.; Pasma, J.H.; Lambers, D.; Stijntjes, M.; Blauw, G. J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Maier, A.B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Assessment of the association of muscle characteristics with standing balance is of special interest, as muscles are a target for potential intervention (ie, by strength training). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Geriatric outpatient clinic. Participants: The study included 197

  16. Patient experience with outpatient encounters at public hospitals in Shanghai: Examining different aspects of physician services and implications of overcrowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Fan, Guanrong; Zou, Dongdong; Wang, Tong; Xue, Di

    2017-01-01

    Over 90% of outpatient care in China was delivered at public hospitals, making outpatient experience in this setting an important aspect of quality of care. To assess outpatient experience with different aspects of physician services at China's public hospitals and its association with overcrowding of the hospital outpatient departments. Retrospective analysis of a large survey of outpatient experience in Shanghai, China. We tested the hypotheses that patient experience was poorer with physician-patient communication, education, and shared decision-making and where and when there was greater overcrowding of the hospital outpatient departments. Ordered logistic models were estimated separately for general and specialty hospitals. 7,147 outpatients at 40 public hospitals in Shanghai, China, in 2014. Patient experience with physician services were self-reported based on 12 questions as part of a validated instrument. Indicators of overcrowding included time of visit (morning vs. afternoon, Monday vs. rest of the week) and hospital outpatient volume in the first half of 2014. Overall, patients reported very favorable experience with physician services. Two out of the 12 questions pertaining to both communication and shared decision-making consistently received lower ratings. Hospitals whose outpatient volumes were in the top two quartiles received lower patient ratings, but the relationship achieved statistical significance among specialty hospitals only. Inadequate physician-patient communication and shared decision-making and hospital overcrowding compromise outpatient experience with physician services at Chinese public hospitals. Effective diversion of patients with chronic and less complex conditions to community health centers will be critical to alleviate the extreme workloads at hospitals with high patient volumes and, in turn, improve patient experience.

  17. Compulsory outpatient treatment can prevent involuntary commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene Nørregård; Svensson, Eva Maria Birgitta; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette

    2014-01-01

    Compulsory outpatient treatment (co-pt) has been possible in Denmark since 2010. The aim is to secure necessary treatment, reduce involuntary commitment and improve quality of life for patients with a severe psychiatric illness. Co-pt has been brought into use in 33 cases. This case report...

  18. Tobacco Smoking in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditchburn, K. Marie; Sellman, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Three main aims of this study were to ascertain the prevalence rate of smoking among adolescent psychiatric outpatients; estimate smokers' degree of nicotine dependence; and investigate the relationship between smoking and common mental health disorders. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on 93 patients ages 13-18 presenting to an adolescent…

  19. Assessing Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tims, Frank M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Data about outpatient treatment unit follow-up evaluations drawn from selected evaluation items in the recent National Drug Abuse Treatment Survey are reported. Directors and supervisors of 670 units completed surveys describing the follow-up studies. The majority of programs collecting follow-up data used the information for program change. (SLD)

  20. Prevalence of smear positive tuberculosis among outpatient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is paucity of data on the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) among out-patient attendees from individual Institutions and Health Care Facilities performing sputum smear microscopy in Ghana. This retrospective study analyzed sputum smear microscopy results among pulmonary TB suspected patients ...

  1. An Analysis of the Last Clinical Encounter before Outpatient Mortality among Children with HIV Infection and Exposure in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris A Rees

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV contributes to nearly 20% of all deaths in children under five years of age in Malawi. Expanded coverage of antiretroviral therapy has allowed children to access treatment on an outpatient basis. Little is known about characteristics of the final outpatient encounter prior to mortality in the outpatient setting.This retrospective cohort study assessed clinical factors associated with mortality among HIV-exposed infants and HIV-infected children less than 18 years of age at the Baylor College of Medicine Abbott Fund Children's Center of Excellence in Lilongwe, Malawi. We compared clinical indicators documented from the final outpatient encounter for patients who died in the outpatient setting versus those who were alive after their penultimate clinical encounter.Of the 8,546 patients who were attended to over a 10-year period at the Baylor Center of Excellence, 851 had died (10%. Of children who died, 392 (46% were directly admitted to the hospital after their last clinical encounter and died as inpatients. Of the remaining 459 who died as outpatients after their last visit, 53.5% had a World Health Organization (WHO stage IV condition at their last visit, and 25% had a WHO stage III condition. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that poor nutritional status, female gender, shorter time as a patient, more clinical encounters in the prior month, if last visit was an unscheduled sick visit, and if the patient had lost weight since their prior visit independently predicted increased mortality in the outpatient setting after the final clinical encounter.Clinical indicators may assist in identifying children with HIV who have increased risk of mortality in the outpatient setting. Recognizing these indicators may aid in identifying HIV-infected children who require a higher level of care or closer follow-up.

  2. Mobile information and communication in the hospital outpatient service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Wen-Yuan; Chao, Chia-Chen; Hung, Ming-Chien; Li, Yu-Chuan; Chi, Y P

    2007-08-01

    Most healthcare providers provide mobile service for their medical staff; however, few healthcare providers provide mobile service as part of their outpatient service. The mobile outpatient service system (MOSS) focuses on illness treatment, illness prevention and patient relation management for outpatient service users. Initiated in a local hospital in Taiwan, the MOSS pilot project was developed to improve outpatient service quality and pursue higher patient safety. This study focuses on the development of the MOSS. The workflow, architecture and target users of the MOSS are delineated. In addition, there were two surveys conducted as part of this study. After a focus group of medical staff identified areas in which outpatient services might be improved by the MOSS, the first survey was administered to outpatients to confirm the focus group's intuitions. The second administration of the survey explored outpatient satisfaction after they used the MOSS service. With regard to outpatient attitudes, about 93% of participants agreed that the mobile outpatient service improved outpatient service quality. In the area of outpatient satisfaction, about 89% of participants indicated they were satisfied with the mobile outpatient service. Supported by our study finding, we propose that more diverse mobile outpatient services can be provided in the future.

  3. Outpatient use of antibiotics in children in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Čižman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotics are among the most common drugs prescribed in outpatient settings. It is estimated that up to 50 % are prescribed unnecessarily or inappropriately. To plan the actions for optimizing the use of antibiotics, we conducted a national antibiotic consumption study in children aged 0–18 years in the period between 2003 and 2015.Methods: In this national retrospective research we analyzed outpatient antibiotic consumption using ATC/DDD classification. The use of antibiotics was recorded in relation to the pattern of prescription, age, gender and health region.Results: The total consumption of antibiotics decreased by 35 % from 979 to 636 prescriptions per 1000 children/year (PTY during the whole study period. Te use of all antibiotic classes decreased (except for quinolones and nitrofuran derivatives by 12.5 %–81 %. In all those years we recorded the highest consumption in children aged 1 to 4 years (2184–1160 PTY. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic in children aged 0 to 4 years, penicillin V among 5 to 14 years and co-amoxiclav among adolescents aged 15 to 19 years. In health regions in the northeastern part of Slovenia much more antibiotics were prescribed than in other regions. In 2015, 65 % of prescriptions were prescribed by pediatricians and school medicine specialists, 16 % by physicians without specialization, 14 % by GPs/family doctors and 5 % by other specialists.Conclusions: Despite the decrease in outpatient antibiotic use in children and adolescents in Slovenia, the overall and especially broad-spectrum antibiotic consumption (amoxicillin with clavulanic acid, azithromycin and second/third generation cephalosporins is still too high. It is necessary to strengthen activities to reduce prescribing, particularly for acute (upper respiratory tract infections.

  4. Integration of Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Virginia S; Tafuto, Barbara

    2018-03-01

    Massage therapy can be helpful in alleviating cancer-related symptoms and cancer treatment-related symptoms. While surveys have noted that cancer patients seek out massage as a nonpharmacologic approach during cancer treatment, little is known about the integration of massage in outpatient cancer care. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which massage is being integrated into outpatient cancer care at NCI-designated Cancer Centers. This study used descriptive methods to analyze the integration of massage in NCI-designated Cancer Centers providing clinical services to patients (n = 62). Data were collected from 91.1% of the centers (n = 59) using content analysis and a telephone survey. A dataset was developed and coded for analysis. The integration of massage was assessed by an algorithm that was developed from a set of five variables: 1) acceptance of treatment as therapeutic, 2) institution offers treatment to patients, 3) clinical practice guidelines in place, 4) use of evidence-based resources to inform treatment, and 5) shared knowledge about treatment among health care team. All centers were scored against all five variables using a six-point scale, with all variables rated equally. The integration of massage ranged from not at all (0) to very high (5) with all five levels of integration evident. Only 11 centers (17.7% of total) rated a very high level of integration; nearly one-third of the centers (n = 22) were found to have no integration of massage at all-not even provision of information about massage to patients through the center website. The findings of this analysis suggest that research on massage is not being leveraged to integrate massage into outpatient cancer care.

  5. An economic evaluation of outpatient versus inpatient polyp treatment for abnormal uterine bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, L; Roberts, T E; Cooper, N A M; Middleton, L; Jowett, S; Daniels, J; Smith, P; Clark, T J

    2016-03-01

    To undertake a cost-effectiveness analysis of outpatient uterine polypectomy compared with standard inpatient treatment under general anaesthesia. Economic evaluation carried out alongside the multi-centre, pragmatic, non-inferiority, randomised controlled Outpatient Polyp Treatment (OPT) trial. The UK National Health Service (NHS) perspective was used in the estimation of costs and the interpretation of results. Thirty-one secondary care UK NHS hospitals between April 2008 and July 2011. Five hundred and seven women with abnormal uterine bleeding and hysteroscopically diagnosed endometrial polyps. Outpatient uterine polypectomy versus standard inpatient treatment. Clinicians were free to choose the technique for polypectomy within the allocated setting. Patient-reported effectiveness of the procedure determined by the women's self-assessment of bleeding at 6 months, and QALY gains at 6 and 12 months. Inpatient treatment was slightly more effective but more expensive than outpatient treatment, resulting in relatively high incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Intention-to-treat analysis of the base case at 6 months revealed that it cost an additional £9421 per successfully treated patient in the inpatient group and £ 1,099,167 per additional QALY gained, when compared with outpatient treatment. At 12 months, these costs were £22,293 per additional effectively treated patient and £445,867 per additional QALY gained, respectively. Outpatient treatment of uterine polyps associated with abnormal uterine bleeding appears to be more cost-effective than inpatient treatment at willingness-to-pay thresholds acceptable to the NHS. HTA-funded OPT trial concluded that outpatient uterine polypectomy is cost-effective compared with inpatient polypectomy. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  6. A template for reducing ophthalmology outpatient waiting times: community ophthalmic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, R K; Hughes, F E; Duignan, E S; O'Neill, E C; Connell, P P; Fulcher, T P; Treacy, M P

    2018-02-01

    Through an Irish Health Service Executive (HSE) initiative to tackle excessive hospital outpatient waiting times, 996 patients referred to the Ophthalmology Outpatient Department (OPD) of the Mater Misericordiae University Hospital (MMUH), Eccles Street, Dublin 7, Ireland, were outsourced to a community medical eye clinic (CMEC) for consultation with specialist-registered ophthalmologists. The study aims to determine if patients referred as routine to the OPD department could be managed in a community setting. 996 patients were reviewed in the CMEC, and their data was collected and placed into a spreadsheet for analysis. 61.2% of patients referred to the OPD were fully managed in the community clinic, and 34.9% required ophthalmic surgery in hospital. By facilitating direct listing of some of the surgical patients to the hospital theatre list, 89.8% of the 996 referrals received treatment without needing to attend the hospital outpatients department.

  7. Nursing diagnoses in adult/elderly patients undergoing outpatient antineoplastic chemotherapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomar, Rafael Tavares; Gomes, Rebeca Anselmo Furtado; Leite, Dayana Carvalho; Gomes, Helena Ferraz; Peres, Ellen Marcia; Junior, Eugenio Fuentes Perez

    2017-01-01

    To search in the scientific literature for nursing diagnoses identified in adult/elderly patients undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy in an outpatient setting. Review of studies published in Portuguese, English, or Spanish which were searched in five electronic databases in March 2016, using the descriptors nursing process, nursing diagnosis, neoplasms, drug therapy and hospital outpatient clinic. In the four studies selected for review, 40 nursing diagnoses were identified, namely unbalanced nutrition, less than body requirements, risk of deficient fluid volume, diarrhoea, fatigue, impaired home maintenance, deficient knowledge, disturbed body image, interrupted family processes, ineffective sexuality pattern, anxiety, powerlessness, fear, readiness for enhanced religiosity, risk of infection, impaired dentition, risk of impaired skin integrity, acute pain, and nausea. The nursing diagnoses identified can support the selection of interventions and the creation of nursing guidelines in outpatient oncology services.

  8. Managing and Communicating Operational Workflow: Designing and Implementing an Electronic Outpatient Whiteboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steitz, Bryan D; Weinberg, Stuart T; Danciu, Ioana; Unertl, Kim M

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare team members in emergency department contexts have used electronic whiteboard solutions to help manage operational workflow for many years. Ambulatory clinic settings have highly complex operational workflow, but are still limited in electronic assistance to communicate and coordinate work activities. To describe and discuss the design, implementation, use, and ongoing evolution of a coordination and collaboration tool supporting ambulatory clinic operational workflow at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC). The outpatient whiteboard tool was initially designed to support healthcare work related to an electronic chemotherapy order-entry application. After a highly successful initial implementation in an oncology context, a high demand emerged across the organization for the outpatient whiteboard implementation. Over the past 10 years, developers have followed an iterative user-centered design process to evolve the tool. The electronic outpatient whiteboard system supports 194 separate whiteboards and is accessed by over 2800 distinct users on a typical day. Clinics can configure their whiteboards to support unique workflow elements. Since initial release, features such as immunization clinical decision support have been integrated into the system, based on requests from end users. The success of the electronic outpatient whiteboard demonstrates the usefulness of an operational workflow tool within the ambulatory clinic setting. Operational workflow tools can play a significant role in supporting coordination, collaboration, and teamwork in ambulatory healthcare settings.

  9. Prognosis of CKD Patients Receiving Outpatient Nephrology Care in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, Paolo; Zoccali, Carmine; Borrelli, Silvio; Cianciaruso, Bruno; Di Iorio, Biagio; Santoro, Domenico; Giancaspro, Vincenzo; Abaterusso, Cataldo; Gallo, Ciro; Conte, Giuseppe; Minutolo, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Prognosis in nondialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients under regular nephrology care is rarely investigated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We prospectively followed from 2003 to death or June 2010 a cohort of 1248 patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 and previous nephrology care ≥1 year in 25 Italian outpatient nephrology clinics. Cumulative incidence of ESRD or death before ESRD were estimated using the competing-risk approach. Results Estimated rates (per 100 patient-years) of ESRD and death 8.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.4 to 9.2) and 5.9 (95% CI 5.2 to 6.6), respectively. Risk of ESRD and death increased progressively from stages 3 to 5. ESRD was more frequent than death in stage 4 and 5 CKD, whereas the opposite was true in stage 3 CKD. Younger age, lower body mass index, proteinuria, and high phosphate predicted ESRD, whereas older age, diabetes, previous cardiovascular disease, ESRD, proteinuria, high uric acid, and anemia predicted death (P nephrology clinics, ESRD was a more frequent outcome than death in stage 4 and 5 CKD, but the opposite was true in stage 3. Outcomes were predicted by modifiable risk factors specific to CKD. Proteinuria used in conjunction with estimated GFR refined risk stratification. These findings provide information, specific to CKD patients under regular outpatient nephrology care, for risk stratification that complement recent observations in the general population. PMID:21817127

  10. Utilisation of outpatient services at Red Cross War Memorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The demand for outpatient services continues to grow at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital (RCCH). To determine current utilisation patterns, we conducted a 2-week survey in the outpatient department (OPD). In addition, we reviewed the RCCH Annual Reports for the period 1961 - 1988. Annual outpatient ...

  11. 38 CFR 17.161 - Authorization of outpatient dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... dental condition or disability adjudicated as resulting from combat wounds or service trauma may be... outpatient dental treatment. 17.161 Section 17.161 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.161 Authorization of outpatient dental treatment. Outpatient...

  12. Dental outpatients: health locus of control correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludenia, K; Donham, G W

    1983-11-01

    Examined relationships between the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) Scales, Beck Depression Inventory, Trait subscales of the State-Trait Personality Inventory, and dental ratings of oral hygiene and presence of periodontal disease with dental outpatients (N = 101) at a Veterans Administration Medical Center Dental Clinic. Results indicated that this sample of outpatients scored comparably on MHLC Health Internality and Health Externality to a sample reported by Wallston and Wallston. Older dental patients, in the present sample, scored significantly higher on Powerful Others Externality in contrast to younger Ss, which suggests greater reliance on health professionals for dental health. Confirmatory evidence is presented on the negative correlations of depression, anger, and anxiety with Health Internality. Differential approaches to dental treatment are discussed.

  13. Screening for mental disorders in cardiology outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, M.; Rasmussen, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the frequency of mental disorders in cardiology outpatients to the number of patients with psychological problems identified by cardiologists. In a cardiology outpatient service, 103 consecutive patients were asked to participate in the study. Of these 86...... and mental problems in each patient on visual analogue scales (VAS-som and VAS-men). The current treatments, including psychiatric and psychological treatments, were noted, and the survival was followed for 3 years. Of the 86 patients included, 34 (40%) had a diagnosis of mental disorder. Eleven (12.8%) had...... were included and screened for mental disorder with the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD), Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) psychosis screening, the Clock Drawing Test, and the WHO-5 Well-being Index. The cardiologists were asked to rate the severity of somatic...

  14. Pricing commodity outpatient procedures assessing the impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverley, William O

    2015-10-01

    Hospitals should carefully consider all relevant factors before choosing to lower prices and payments for certain outpatient commodity services in an effort to remain competitive in their market. Key steps to take in the evaluation process include: Determining current profitability. Assessing profitability by payer class. Understanding overall cost positions. Assessing the relative payment terms of current commercial contracts. Determining the net revenue effect of proposed changes.

  15. Pathological gambling among cocaine-dependent outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G W; Carriero, N J; Takushi, R Y; Montoya, I D; Preston, K L; Gorelick, D A

    2000-07-01

    The authors investigated the occurrence of pathological gambling among cocaine-dependent outpatients, its influence on short-term outcome of treatment, and comparative characteristics of patients with and without pathological gambling. The subjects were 313 cocaine-dependent (200 also opiate-dependent) outpatients in clinical trials of medication for cocaine dependence. Pathological gambling (DSM-III-R criteria) was assessed with the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, and sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics were determined with the Addiction Severity Index. Outcome was defined as time in treatment (proportion of maximum scheduled time) and proportion of cocaine-positive urine samples during treatment. Pathological gambling had a lifetime occurrence rate of 8.0% and a current (past month) occurrence of 3.8%. Onset preceded the onset of cocaine dependence in 72.0% of the patients (and preceded onset of opiate dependence in 44.4%). Patients with pathological gambling (lifetime or current) did not differ significantly from other patients in length of treatment or proportion of cocaine-positive urine samples. Those with lifetime pathological gambling were significantly more likely to have tobacco dependence (84.0% versus 61.1%) and antisocial personality disorder (56.0% versus 19.8%), to be unemployed (84.0% versus 49.3%), to have recently engaged in illegal activity for profit (64.0% versus 38.5%), and to have been incarcerated (62.5% versus 33.9%). Pathological gambling is substantially more prevalent among cocaine-dependent outpatients than in the general population. Patients with pathological gambling differ from other cocaine-dependent outpatients in some sociodemographic characteristics but not in short-term outcome of treatment for cocaine dependence.

  16. Supervisory Turnover in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Danica K.; Broome, Kirk M.; Edwards, Jennifer R.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2009-01-01

    Staff turnover is a significant issue within substance abuse treatment, with implications for service delivery and organizational health. This study examined factors associated with turnover among supervisors in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Turnover was conceptualized as being an individual response to organizational-level influences, and predictors represent aggregate program measures. Participants included 532 staff (including 467 counselors and 65 clinical/program directors) from ...

  17. Outpatient surgery for acute uncomplicated appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Martínez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute appendicitis is one of the main indications to abdominal surgery. When the appendicitis is not complicated, is possible to do an outpatient surgery. Objective: To describe postsurgical evolution of the patients who present uncomplicated acute appendicitis. Methods: A prospective study was carried out about the evolution of 100 patients with outpatient surgery for appendectomy by uncomplicated acute appendicitis. The study was performed in the Hospital Susana Lopez de Valencia (HSLV of Popayán, Colombia. A telephone survey was conducted during the 24 hours after surgery, to determinate potential complications like pain, nausea, vomiting and oral intolerance. Clinical histories were reviewed to determinate in case the patient has re-entered because of a possible post operative complication during 30 next days after surgical intervention. Histopathological findings were also reported. Results: During postsurgical follow up, 58% of the patients did not present any kind of pain, 95% tolerated oral route, 97% did not have vomiting and 90% did not have nausea. 3% re-entered because of type 1 infection around the surgical area, 4% because of pain. We found a histopathological concordance with the acute appendicitis diagnostic in 94% of the cases. All patients reported to be satisfied with the given attention in the postsurgery. Conclusions: Patients undergo appendectomy by uncomplicated acute appendicitis treated outpatient, has an appropriate tolerance to oral route and pain control.

  18. Reducing non-attendance at outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, C A; Palmer, J H; Saxby, P J; Devaraj, V S

    1999-03-01

    Outpatient non-attendance is a common source of inefficiency in a health service, wasting time and resources and potentially lengthening waiting lists. A prospective audit of plastic surgery outpatient clinics was conducted during the six months from January to June 1997, to determine the clinical and demographic profile of non-attenders. Of 6095 appointments 16% were not kept. Using the demographic information, we changed our follow-up guidelines to reflect risk factors for multiple non-attendances, and a self-referral clinic was introduced to replace routine follow-up for high risk non-attenders. After these changes, a second audit in the same six months of 1998 revealed a non-attendance rate of 11%--i.e. 30% lower than before. Many follow-up appointments are sent inappropriately to patients who do not want further attention. This study, indicating how risk factor analysis can identify a group of patients who are unlikely to attend again after one missed appointment, may be a useful model for the reduction of outpatient non-attendance in other specialties.

  19. Brachial artery approach for outpatient arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Jai Kyung; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun; Won, Jae Hwan

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of brachial approach arteriography for outpatients, with particular regard to safety and image quality. The angiographic findings and follow-up medical records of 131 brachial approach arteriographies in 121 outpatients were retrospectively analysed. 5 F pigtail catheters were used in 125 cases and 5-F OCU-A catheters were used in three cases of renal arteriography, and three of upper extremity arteriography without catheter. Except for three cases of brachial artery puncture failure, all procedures were performed successfully. One hundred and fifteen of 119 lower extremity arteriographies were visualized down to the level of the tibioperoneal artery. The non-visualized cases were three in which there was multiple obstruction at the distal common iliac artery and one with insufficient contrast amount due to renal failure In four cases there were complications : two involved arterial thrombosis, one was an intramuscular hematoma, and one an A-V fistula. For outpatients, brachial approach arteriography can replace the femoral approach. Its image quality is excellent, there are time-cost benefits, and the rate of complications is relatively low

  20. Optimising neurosurgical outpatient care: a paradigm shift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ameya S; Parker, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    The Wellington Regional Hospital (WRH) neurosurgical service has noted a substantial increase in patient volumes over the last decade, with referrals to the neurosurgical outpatient clinic appearing to have increased even more substantially. To quantify the increase in referrals to the WRH neurosurgical outpatient service and to determine whether this has translated into an increase in the number of neurosurgical procedures performed. All referrals to the WRH neurosurgical department from the lower North and upper South Islands of New Zealand spanning 10 years were collected. Key outcome data were the number of interventions performed. In addition to GP referrals, all specialist referrals to the WRH neurosurgical outpatient service were also analysed as a comparison. In total, 19 201 patients were referred to the WRH neurosurgical service over the 10 years of the study. Within this timeframe, 7105 patients were referred by GPs and 12 096 were referred by specialist teams. Only 348 patients (4.9%) referred by GPs underwent some form of therapeutic intervention, compared to 3489 patients (28.8%) referred by specialist teams. Our data shows that specialist referrals result in a proportionally greater number of therapeutic interventions than GP referrals. This is in part due to the wider array of diagnostic tests available to specialists compared to GPs. The development of relevant guidelines for primary care referral to a neurosurgical service appears warranted and could facilitate initiation of appropriate investigations in primary care.

  1. Ambulatory phlebectomy at radiologic outpatient clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Choi, Sang Il [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University, Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    To evaluate safety, efficacy, and patient's satisfaction of an ambulatory phlebectomy, performed at a radiology outpatient clinic. Between 2003 and 2006, an ambulatory phlebectomy was performed in 12 patients. Endovenous radiofrequency ablation was performed through a venotomy. The venotomy was ligated after RF ablation, and the ambulatory phlebectomy was performed. The patients visited the radiology outpatient clinic one day, one week, and 2 months after the procedure. The improvement in the clinical symptoms, cosmetic change in varicosity, and the procedure related complications were evaluated. The patient's satisfaction was evaluated using a 5-grade scale. RF ablation through a venotomy was performed successfully in all 12 patients. On average, 4.5 incisions were made, and 12.5 cm of varicosity had been removed. The mean procedure time was one hour and forty minutes. The complications of the ambulatory phlebectomy were bruising in one patient, and skin pigmentation in another. The complications associated with RF ablation were a hard palpable vein in 7 patients, numbness in 7 patients, and skin pigmentation along the vein in 2 patients. Follow-up duplex sonography was performed at 2 months after the procedure, showed complete occlusion in all 12 patients. The clinical symptoms had improved in 11 patients, and the varicosity disappeared cosmetically in 11 patients. An ambulatory phlebectomy, combined with RF ablation of the greater saphenous vein, can be performed safely and effectively at a radiology outpatient clinic.

  2. Ambulatory phlebectomy at radiologic outpatient clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Choi, Sang Il; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate safety, efficacy, and patient's satisfaction of an ambulatory phlebectomy, performed at a radiology outpatient clinic. Between 2003 and 2006, an ambulatory phlebectomy was performed in 12 patients. Endovenous radiofrequency ablation was performed through a venotomy. The venotomy was ligated after RF ablation, and the ambulatory phlebectomy was performed. The patients visited the radiology outpatient clinic one day, one week, and 2 months after the procedure. The improvement in the clinical symptoms, cosmetic change in varicosity, and the procedure related complications were evaluated. The patient's satisfaction was evaluated using a 5-grade scale. RF ablation through a venotomy was performed successfully in all 12 patients. On average, 4.5 incisions were made, and 12.5 cm of varicosity had been removed. The mean procedure time was one hour and forty minutes. The complications of the ambulatory phlebectomy were bruising in one patient, and skin pigmentation in another. The complications associated with RF ablation were a hard palpable vein in 7 patients, numbness in 7 patients, and skin pigmentation along the vein in 2 patients. Follow-up duplex sonography was performed at 2 months after the procedure, showed complete occlusion in all 12 patients. The clinical symptoms had improved in 11 patients, and the varicosity disappeared cosmetically in 11 patients. An ambulatory phlebectomy, combined with RF ablation of the greater saphenous vein, can be performed safely and effectively at a radiology outpatient clinic

  3. Increasing the Number of Outpatients Receiving Spiritual Assessment: A Pain and Palliative Care Service Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Castillo, Blanca J; Hirsch, Rosemarie; Groninger, Hunter; Baker, Karen; Cheng, M Jennifer; Phillips, Jayne; Pollack, John; Berger, Ann M

    2015-11-01

    Spirituality is a patient need that requires special attention from the Pain and Palliative Care Service team. This quality improvement project aimed to provide spiritual assessment for all new outpatients with serious life-altering illnesses. Percentage of new outpatients receiving spiritual assessment (Faith, Importance/Influence, Community, Address/Action in care, psychosocial evaluation, chaplain consults) at baseline and postinterventions. Interventions included encouraging clinicians to incorporate adequate spiritual assessment into patient care and implementing chaplain covisits for all initial outpatient visits. The quality improvement interventions increased spiritual assessment (baseline vs. postinterventions): chaplain covisits (25.5% vs. 50%), Faith, Importance/Influence, Community, Address/Action in care completion (49% vs. 72%), and psychosocial evaluation (89% vs. 94%). Improved spiritual assessment in an outpatient palliative care clinic setting can occur with a multidisciplinary approach. This project also identifies data collection and documentation processes that can be targeted for improvement. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Racial disparities in the use of outpatient mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salasky, Vanessa; Yang, Rachel L; Datta, Jashodeep; Graves, Holly L; Cintolo, Jessica A; Meise, Chelsey; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Czerniecki, Brian J; Kelz, Rachel R

    2014-01-01

    Racial disparities exist within many domains of cancer care. This study was designed to identify differences in the use of outpatient mastectomy (OM) based on patient race. We identified patients in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant Use File (during the years 2007-2010) who underwent a mastectomy. The association between mastectomy setting, patient race, patient age, American Society of Anesthesiology physical status classification, functional status, mastectomy type, and hospital teaching status was determined using the chi-square test. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was developed to assess the relative odds of undergoing OM by race, with adjustment for potential confounders. We identified 47,318 patients enrolled in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant Use File who underwent a mastectomy during the study time frame. More than half (62.6%) of mastectomies were performed in the outpatient setting. All racial minorities had lower rates of OM, with 63.8% of white patients; 59.1% of black patients; 57.4% of Asian, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander patients; and 43.9% of American Indian or Alaska Native patients undergoing OM (P black patients, American Indian or Alaska Native patients, and those of unknown race were all less likely to undergo OM (odds ratio [OR], 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80-0.93; OR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.41-0.72; and OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.64-0.76, respectively) compared with white patients. Disparities exist in the use of OM among racial minorities. Further studies are needed to identify the role of cultural preferences, physician attitudes, and insurer encouragements that may influence these patterns of use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Emergency in the clinic: a simulation curriculum to improve outpatient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Eve; Baty, Gillian; Rask, John; Chungtuyco, Michelle; Pereda, Brenda; Leeman, Lawrence

    2017-12-01

    Emergency response skills are essential when events such as seizure, anaphylaxis, or hemorrhage occur in the outpatient setting. As services and procedures increasingly move outside the hospital, training to manage complications may improve outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate a simulation-based curriculum in outpatient emergency management skills with the outcome measures of graded objective performance and learner self-efficacy. This pre- and postcurriculum study enrolled residents and fellows in Obstetrics and Gynecology and Family Medicine in a simulation-based, outpatient emergency management curriculum. Learners completed self-efficacy questionnaires and were videotaped managing 3 medical emergency scenarios (seizure, over-sedation/cardiopulmonary arrest, and hemorrhage) in the simulation laboratory both before and after completion of the curriculum. Evaluators who were blinded to training level scored the simulation performance videotapes using a graded rubric with critical action checklists. Scenario scores were assigned in 5 domains and globally. Paired t-tests were used to determine differences pre- and postcurriculum. Thirty residents completed the curriculum and pre- and postcurriculum testing. Subjects' objective performance scores improved in all 5 domains (Pimprovement. When scores were stratified by previous outpatient simulation experience, subjects with previous experience improved in all but management of excess sedation. Pre- and postcurriculum self-efficacy evaluations demonstrated improvement in all 7 measured areas: confidence, use of appropriate resources, communication skills, complex airway management, bag mask ventilation, resuscitation, and hemorrhage management. Self-efficacy assessment showed improvement in confidence managing outpatient emergencies (P=.001) and ability to communicate well in emergency situations (Pimproved both self-efficacy and objectively rated performance scores in management of outpatient medical

  6. Medical Savings Account balance and outpatient utilization: Evidence from Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Yuen, Peter P

    2016-02-01

    Medical Savings Account (MSA) is a financing instrument designed to reduce consumer-side moral hazards. The Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) scheme in China has an MSA component in addition to a Social Risk-pooling Fund. This study examines the association between MSA balance and outpatient utilization in Guangzhou, China, and determines MSA's impact on utilization under different circumstances. It also seeks to ascertain whether MSA has achieved its intended functions of "Cost-containment", "Saving for the future" and "Enabling utilization". The first group of 114,657 MSA account-holders, including both employees and retirees, who consistently insured with UEBMI from 2002 to 2007, are selected for this study. A two-part model is employed to estimate the effect of the MSA balance on the probability of outpatient services utilization and on the level of outpatient expenditure. Results show that MSA balance is significantly associated with the likelihood of using outpatient services as well as the level of outpatient expenditure. The association is a non-linear U-shaped relationship for working individuals, and an inverted U-shaped relationship for the retirees. The observed U-shaped relationship for working individuals implies that at lower MSA balance levels, a negative balance-expenditure relation exits, while at higher MSA balance levels, the relationship is positive--suggesting possible improper utilization when MSA balance reaches high levels. Setting a maximum MSA balance limit and/or allowing enrollees to use MSA funds to purchase private insurance appears to be desirable. The observed inverted U-shaped relationship for retirees suggests that many retirees have to spend whatever funds they have in their MSA for outpatient care, but the less healthy individuals are able to shift the spending to inpatient care which is mainly financed by the Social Risk-pooling Fund. The results of this study also affirm the usefulness of MSA in performing its

  7. Multisource feedback analysis of pediatric outpatient teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiao, Mao-Meng; Huang, Li-Tung; Huang, Ying-Hsien; Tang, Kuo-Shu; Chen, Chih-Jen

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to evaluate the outpatient communication skills of medical students via multisource feedback, which may be useful to map future directions in improving physician-patient communication. Family respondents of patients, a nurse, a clinical teacher, and a research assistant evaluated video-recorded medical students' interactions with outpatients by using multisource feedback questionnaires; students also assessed their own skills. The questionnaire was answered based on the video-recorded interactions between outpatients and the medical students. A total of 60 family respondents of the 60 patients completed the questionnaires, 58 (96.7%) of them agreed with the video recording. Two reasons for reluctance were "personal privacy" issues and "simply disagree" with the video recording. The average satisfaction score of the 58 students was 85.1 points, indicating students' performance was in the category between satisfied and very satisfied. The family respondents were most satisfied with the "teacher"s attitude," followed by "teaching quality". In contrast, the family respondents were least satisfied with "being open to questions". Among the 6 assessment domains of communication skills, the students scored highest on "explaining" and lowest on "giving recommendations". In the detailed assessment by family respondents, the students scored lowest on "asking about life/school burden". In the multisource analysis, the nurses' mean score was much higher and the students' mean self-assessment score was lower than the average scores on all domains. The willingness and satisfaction of family respondents were high in this study. Students scored the lowest on giving recommendations to patients. Multisource feedback with video recording is useful in providing more accurate evaluation of students' communication competence and in identifying the areas of communication that require enhancement.

  8. Involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Viadel, M; Cañete-Nicolás, C; Bellido-Rodriguez, C; Asensio-Pascual, P; Lera-Calatayud, G; Calabuig-Crespo, R; Leal-Cercós, C

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades there have been significant legislative changes in Spain. Society develops faster than laws, however, and new challenges have emerged. In 2004, the Spanish Association of Relatives of the Mentally Ill (FEAFES) proposed amending the existing legislation to allow for the implementation of involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) for patients with severe mental illness. Currently, and after having made several attempts at change, there is no specific legislation governing the application of this measure. Although IOT may be implemented in local programmes, we consider legal regulation to be needed in this matter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Outpatient care utilization in urban Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Jean-Frédéric; Haddad, Slim; Narayana, Delampady; Fournier, Pierre

    2006-07-01

    Kerala is characterized by a high density of public and private health infrastructure. While less inequality in access has been reported in this Indian state, few studies have looked at problems found within cities. Escalation of costs of private services and reduced public investments could generate some inequalities in access for the poor. To assess factors associated with utilization and source of outpatient care in urban Kerala, and to discuss policy implications with regards to access to care. A multilevel analysis of individual and urban characteristics associated with utilization and source of outpatient care was conducted using data from a 1995-96 survey by the National Sample Survey Organisation on health care in urban Kerala. There is a high level of utilization (83.6%) of allopathic medical services. Controlling for illness severity and age, utilization thereof was lower for the very poor (OR 0.13 [0.03; 0.49]), inhabitants of medium towns (OR 0.20 [0.05; 0.70]), and inhabitants of cities with a lower proportion of permanent material (pucca) houses (0.21 [0.06; 0.72]). Among all users, 77% resorted to a private source of care. Utilization of a private provider was less likely for the very poor (OR 0.13 [0.03; 0.51]) and individuals from casual worker households (OR 0.54 [0.30; 0.97]), while it was more likely for inhabitants of cities from both low public bed density districts (OR 4.08 [1.05; 15.95]) and high private bed density districts (OR 5.83 [2.34; 14.53]). Problems of quality and accessibility of the public sector were invoked to justify utilization of private clinics. A marked heterogeneity in utilization of outpatient care was found between cities of various sizes and characteristics. This study confirms high utilization of private outpatient care in Kerala and suggests problems of access for the poorest. Even in a context of high public availability and considering the health transition factor, relying on the development of the private sector

  10. Attribute correlates of hospital outpatient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueckeberg, H F; Hubbert, A

    1995-01-01

    Customer satisfaction (patient satisfaction) with hospital outpatient or ambulatory services is an important factor in influencing patient patronage and loyalty. Based on an empirical study, this article examines the attributes of the ambulatory care experience which were significantly associated with the level of satisfaction resulting from the most recent hospital ambulatory visit. This study focuses on identifying attributes of ambulatory services. This article brings to the health care marketing literature information on ambulatory satisfaction comparable to that which has been contributed to the literature regarding satisfaction with physician and hospital experiences.

  11. Prevalence and course of pseudothrombocytopenia in outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froom, Paul; Barak, Mira

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and course of pseudothrombocytopenia in outpatients is uncertain. In a cohort study of 687,955 members of a health maintenance organization, we extracted 36,780 consecutive automated complete blood count test results and determined the point prevalence of pseudothrombocytopenia during a one-month period. We also calculated a retrospective cumulative prevalence over the past 5 years. There were 1105 (2.7%) patients with platelet counts of 100-149×10(9)/L and 304 (0.8%) with counts values, or the reference limit value should be lowered to 100×10(9)/L.

  12. How did market competition affect outpatient utilization under the diagnosis-related group-based payment system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Ju; Park, Eun-Cheol; Kim, Sun Jung; Han, Kyu-Tae; Jang, Sung-In

    2017-06-01

    Although competition is known to affect quality of care, less is known about the effects of competition on outpatient health service utilization under the diagnosis-related group payment system. This study aimed to evaluate these effects and assess differences before and after hospitalization in South Korea. Population-based retrospective observational study. We used two data set including outpatient data and hospitalization data from National Health Claim data from 2011 to 2014. Participants who were admitted to the hospital for hemorrhoidectomy were included. A total of 804 884 hospitalizations were included in our analysis. The outcome variables included the costs associated with outpatient examinations and the number of outpatient visits within 30 days before and after hospitalization. High-competition areas were associated with lower pre-surgery examination costs (rate ratio [RR]: 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.88-0.89) and fewer outpatient visits before hospitalization (RR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.98-0.99) as well as after hospitalization compared with moderate-competition areas. Our study reveals that outpatient health service utilization is affected by the degree of market competition. Future evaluations of hospital performance should consider external factors such as market structure and hospital location. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. The effect of employee assistance plan benefits on the use of outpatient behavioral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Hiatt, Deirdre; Horgan, Constance M; McGuire, Thomas G

    2010-12-01

    Nearly half of all US workers have access to an employee assistance plan (EAP). At the same time, most large US employers also purchase health benefits for their employees, and these benefits packages typically include behavioral health services. There is some potential overlap in services covered by the EAP and the health plan, and some employers choose to purchase the two jointly as an 'integrated product'. It is not clear whether EAP services substitute for outpatient behavioral health care services covered by the health plan. To evaluate how the number of EAP visits covered affects the use of regular outpatient behavioral health care (number of visits, and total spending), in an integrated product setting. Analysis of claims, eligibility and benefits data for 26,464 users of behavioral health care for the year 2005. For both EAP and regular behavioral health care, the individuals were enrolled with Managed Health Network (MHN), a large national specialty insurance plan. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to investigate the determinants of the number of regular outpatient visits, and spending for regular outpatient care. To address skewness in the dependent variables, the estimation used generalized linear models with a log link. A limited instrumental variable analysis was used to test for endogeneity of the number of EAP visits covered. Nearly half the enrollees in this sample were in employer plans that allowed 4-5 EAP visits per treatment episode, and 31% were allowed 3 EAP visits per year. Having an EAP visit allowance of 4-5 sessions per episode predicts fewer regular outpatient visits, compared with having an allowance of 3 sessions per year. More generous EAP allowances also reduce payments for outpatient care, with one exception. Greater availability of EAP benefits appears to reduce utilization of regular outpatient care, supporting the idea that the two types of care are to some extent perceived as substitutes. One limitation of this

  14. A randomised controlled trial of Outpatient versus inpatient Polyp Treatment (OPT) for abnormal uterine bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, T Justin; Middleton, Lee J; Cooper, Natalie Am; Diwakar, Lavanya; Denny, Elaine; Smith, Paul; Gennard, Laura; Stobert, Lynda; Roberts, Tracy E; Cheed, Versha; Bingham, Tracey; Jowett, Sue; Brettell, Elizabeth; Connor, Mary; Jones, Sian E; Daniels, Jane P

    2015-07-01

    Uterine polyps cause abnormal bleeding in women and conventional practice is to remove them in hospital under general anaesthetic. Advances in technology make it possible to perform polypectomy in an outpatient setting, yet evidence of effectiveness is limited. To test the hypothesis that in women with abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) associated with benign uterine polyp(s), outpatient polyp treatment achieved as good, or no more than 25% worse, alleviation of bleeding symptoms at 6 months compared with standard inpatient treatment. The hypothesis that response to uterine polyp treatment differed according to the pattern of AUB, menopausal status and longer-term follow-up was tested. The cost-effectiveness and acceptability of outpatient polypectomy was examined. A multicentre, non-inferiority, randomised controlled trial, incorporating a cost-effectiveness analysis and supplemented by a parallel patient preference study. Patient acceptability was evaluated by interview in a qualitative study. Outpatient hysteroscopy clinics and inpatient gynaecology departments within UK NHS hospitals. Women with AUB - defined as heavy menstrual bleeding (formerly known as menorrhagia) (HMB), intermenstrual bleeding or postmenopausal bleeding - and hysteroscopically diagnosed uterine polyps. We randomly assigned 507 women, using a minimisation algorithm, to outpatient polypectomy compared with conventional inpatient polypectomy as a day case in hospital under general anaesthesia. The primary outcome was successful treatment at 6 months, determined by the woman's assessment of her bleeding. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, procedure feasibility, acceptability and cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. At 6 months, 73% (166/228) of women who underwent outpatient polypectomy were successfully treated compared with 80% (168/211) following inpatient polypectomy [relative risk (RR) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82 to 1.02]. The lower end of the CIs showed

  15. A comparison of work-related physical activity levels between inpatient and outpatient physical therapists: an observational cohort trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Wayne; Ogbazi, Raluchukwu; Ohl, Devan; Daniels, Jeffry; Ortiz, Alexis

    2016-06-16

    Physical therapists (PTs) work in a variety of healthcare settings with varied levels of physical activity demands placed on them. The purpose of this study is to compare the physical activity (PA) levels between PTs in inpatient versus outpatient environments for one work week using a cross-sectional design. Sixty-one PTs (30 inpatient, 31 outpatient) wore a tri-axial accelerometer and inclinometer for one work-week. The number steps-per-day, PA intensities, energy expenditures and postural positions adopted during the work day were recorded. Significantly longer amounts of time spent sitting was found for inpatient PTs regardless of the significantly higher number of steps-per-day. Outpatient PTs had a higher number of breaks from sedentary activity with those breaks being longer than the inpatient PTs. The percentage of time spent performing moderate-vigorous PA approached significance implying more time was spent performing these types of activities for outpatient PTs. The energy expenditures between the two groups of PTs were not different. This study compared the differences in physical activity levels between physical therapists who worked at inpatient versus outpatient environment as little is known about their activity levels. Inpatient physical therapists took more steps per day than outpatient physical therapists but the outpatient physical therapists were less sedentary and took more frequent and longer breaks from sedentary activities. The energy expenditures were similar between both types of therapists and this may be reflective of the gender and bodyweight differences between the groups that equalizes the energy expenditures. The findings of this study suggests that there are differences in the physical activity demands between inpatient and outpatient physical therapists. The results of this study may serve dual purposes: (1) employers may be able to more accurately describe the expected physical activity demands to future employees; (2

  16. Elderly outpatient profile and predictors of falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Angélica de Oliveira Gomes

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVESFalls are a serious public health problem and are one of the biggest reasons for hospitalization, morbidity and mortality among elderly people. Moreover, few studies on predictors of falls have been conducted in low and middle income countries. The aim here was to identify elderly outpatient profiles according to sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional variables and correlate them with occurrences of falls among these subjects.DESIGN AND SETTINGCross-sectional descriptive study forming part of the project “Quality of Life of Frail Elderly People”, carried out in Campinas, Brazil.METHODSThe subjects were 145 elderly individuals (76.3 ± 7.8 years old, of whom 65% were women, who were living in the city of Campinas or nearby and were attended at the geriatric outpatient clinic of a University Hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional data, as well as fall occurrence data, were gathered. Cluster analyses and comparisons between groups were carried out.RESULTSCluster analysis identified two distinct groups related to the study variables, and the determinants for this distinction were: gender, marital status, physical performance, handgrip strength and functional independence. These groups were compared according to occurrences of falls over the last year, and significant differences between them were found.CONCLUSIONSThe results showed that greater occurrences of falls were associated with a profile of elderly people comprising female gender, single status, lower muscle strength and physical performance regarding balance and gait, and lower independence in motor tasks for activities of daily living.

  17. Outpatient provider concentration and commercial colonoscopy prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozen, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the magnitude of various contributors to outpatient commercial colonoscopy prices, including market- and provider-level factors, especially market share. We used adjudicated fee-for-service facility claims from a large commercial insurer for colonoscopies occurring in hospital outpatient department or ambulatory surgery center from October 2005 to December 2012. Claims were matched to provider- and market-level data. Linear fixed effects regressions of negotiated colonoscopy price were run on provider, system, and market characteristics. Markets were defined as counties. There were 178,433 claims from 169 providers (104 systems). The mean system market share was 76% (SD = 0.34) and the mean real (deflated) price was US$1363 (SD = 374), ranging from US$169 to US$2748. For every percentage point increase in a system or individual facility's bed share, relative price increased by 2 to 4 percentage points; this result was stable across a number of specifications. Market population and price were also consistently positively related, though this relation was small in magnitude. No other factor explained price as strongly as market share. Price variation for colonoscopy was driven primarily by market share, of particular concern as the number of mergers increases in wake of the recession and the Affordable Care Act. Whether variation is justified by better quality care requires further research to determine whether quality is subsumed in prices. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Complications with Outpatient Angiography and Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Noel; Chi, Ka-Kit; Ajaka, Joe; McKay, Lesa; O'Neill, Diane; Wong, Kai Ping

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively identify the complications, and rates of complication, in outpatient angiography and interventional procedures. Methods: There were 1050 consecutive patients, 646 men and 404 women, aged 17-89 years, with a total of 1239 procedures studied in a 2-year period, 1997 to 1999. Results: There were 560 cases of aorto-femoral angiography,resulting in 124 complications (22%), with pain or hematoma in 110.There were 206 cases of neck and cerebral angiography, resulting in 51 complications (25%), with pain and hematoma in 34, transient ischemic attack in 2 and cerebrovascular accident in 1. There were 197 interfentional procedures, with 177 being balloon dilatations, resulting in 68 complications (35%), with 2 having hematomas and 1 having hematoma/abscess requiring active treatment. There were 276 cases having various 'other' procedures (e.g., renal angiography),resulting in 65 complications (24%), with pain and hematoma in 61. No procedure-related death occurred. Eighteen cases (1.5%) had significant complications, with contrast allergy in eight. Conclusion: Outpatient angiography and intervention are relatively safe, with low significant complication rates

  19. Short-term complications for percutaneous ultrasound-guided biopsy of renal masses in adult outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars René; Loft, Martina; Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard

    2018-01-01

    Background Ultrasound-guided percutaneous kidney tumor biopsy (UGPKB) plays an important role in the diagnosis of renal tumor but there are no consensuses with respect to the length and the extend of the post-biopsy observation period. Purpose To assess the short-term complication rate after UGPKB...... and to evaluate whether the onset of complications allows for the procedure to be performed in an outpatient setting with same-day discharge. Material and Methods Between March 2012 and March 2014, a total of 287 UGPKB were performed in an outpatient setting at a Danish university referral center. All patient...... records were retrospectively reviewed and post-biopsy complications as well as biochemical parameters were registered. Results The overall complication rate was 3.8% (11 patients). Major complications occurred in 1.0% of all cases (three patients); one patient with ongoing bleeding that required...

  20. Feasibility of Outpatient Fully Integrated Closed-Loop Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovatchev, Boris P.; Renard, Eric; Cobelli, Claudio; Zisser, Howard C.; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Anderson, Stacey M.; Brown, Sue A.; Chernavvsky, Daniel R.; Breton, Marc D.; Farret, Anne; Pelletier, Marie-Josée; Place, Jérôme; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Del Favero, Simone; Visentin, Roberto; Filippi, Alessio; Scotton, Rachele; Avogaro, Angelo; Doyle, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the feasibility of a wearable artificial pancreas system, the Diabetes Assistant (DiAs), which uses a smart phone as a closed-loop control platform. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty patients with type 1 diabetes were enrolled at the Universities of Padova, Montpellier, and Virginia and at Sansum Diabetes Research Institute. Each trial continued for 42 h. The United States studies were conducted entirely in outpatient setting (e.g., hotel or guest house); studies in Italy and France were hybrid hospital–hotel admissions. A continuous glucose monitoring/pump system (Dexcom Seven Plus/Omnipod) was placed on the subject and was connected to DiAs. The patient operated the system via the DiAs user interface in open-loop mode (first 14 h of study), switching to closed-loop for the remaining 28 h. Study personnel monitored remotely via 3G or WiFi connection to DiAs and were available on site for assistance. RESULTS The total duration of proper system communication functioning was 807.5 h (274 h in open-loop and 533.5 h in closed-loop), which represented 97.7% of the total possible time from admission to discharge. This exceeded the predetermined primary end point of 80% system functionality. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated that a contemporary smart phone is capable of running outpatient closed-loop control and introduced a prototype system (DiAs) for further investigation. Following this proof of concept, future steps should include equipping insulin pumps and sensors with wireless capabilities, as well as studies focusing on control efficacy and patient-oriented clinical outcomes. PMID:23801798

  1. Outpatient single-session yttrium-90 glass microsphere radioembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Vanessa L; Marshall, Karen G; Salzig, Krystina; Williams, Melissa; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the feasibility of yttrium-90 ((90)Y) glass microsphere radioembolization (including angiography, lung shunt assessment, and treatment) as a single-session, outpatient procedure. Between January 2008 and June 2013, 14 patients underwent outpatient, single-session radioembolization with (90)Y glass microspheres. As part of the routine diagnostic work-up, all patients underwent either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging of the liver with three-dimensional analysis and had laboratory results forwarded to our center for confirmation of candidacy before treatment. On treatment day, all patients underwent planning mesenteric angiography with flat panel cone-beam CT imaging. Patients were administered 33-85 MBq of technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin ((99m)Tc-MAA) via a microcatheter positioned in a hepatic artery supplying the tumor of interest. Planar scintigraphy was initiated within 2 hours after the administration of (99m)Tc-MAA and lung shunt fraction was determined. Final dosimetry calculations were performed while the patient was being transferred back from nuclear medicine to interventional radiology. All patients successfully underwent planning angiography with administration of (99m)Tc-MAA and (90)Y radioembolization as a single-session treatment. There were no reportable or recordable medical events; treatment was carried out to the desired dose in all cases. The mean total procedure time was 2.70 hours ± 0.72 (range, 1.63-3.97 h). This study reports a novel proof of concept for performing radioembolization in a single-session setting. By using the described method, time between initial clinical assessments and radioembolization treatment is decreased, and costs are minimized. © 2014 Published by SIR on behalf of SIR.

  2. Patients’ Perspectives on the Design of Hospital Outpatient Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yisong Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest among healthcare managers and designers in moving towards a ‘patient-centred’ design of health and care facilities by integrating patient perceptions and expectations of the physical environment where care takes place. Increased interests in physical environments can mostly be attributed to our improved understanding of their role in patients’ health outcomes and staff productivity. There is a gap in the literature on users’ perspectives on physical settings in the context of healthcare. Moreover, the connection of care services with the design of the facility is often overlooked partly due to the lack of evidence. This research was aimed at filling the gap by exploring outpatients’ perspectives on design factors related to the areas frequented by them, e.g., hospital waiting areas. A 16-item questionnaire was conducted among randomly selected outpatients in two hospitals in Qingdao, China, with a response rate of 84.3%. Five principal factors were identified: sensory; lighting and thermal; facilities; spatial; and seating design, which agreed with the literature. Non-parametric tests were applied to assess variances in constructed principal dimensions concerning demographic variables. Female outpatients were found to be more perceptive of the ‘sensory design’ factors than males. The number of previous visits to the hospital was found to be associated with ‘spatial’ and ‘seating design’ factors, while respondents’ age had an association with ‘sensory’ and ‘seating design’ factors. Respondents ranked ‘noise’ and ‘air freshness’ and ‘cleanliness’ as highly important.

  3. [Patient satisfaction in the outpatient department--a pilot study for customer satisfaction in ENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K; Meyer, J; Jahnke, I; Wollenberg, B; Schmidt, C

    2009-03-01

    Customer satisfaction in German hospitals is becoming more important because of increasing competition in the healthcare market. Because the majority of patients with ear-nose-throat (ENT) problems are treated in an outpatient setting, this competition is not only taking place among hospitals but also among specialists in private practices. To assess patient preferences, reliable and valid questionnaires are necessary, which so far exist only for inpatients. The aim of the study was to develop an instrument with which to discover areas for potential improvement of the outpatient department. The questionnaire was developed according to the guidelines of the EORTC and tested in a prestudy. During the time of observation, 98 patients were available, of whom 79 could be included in the study. The return rate was 71%. Of these patients, 18 were female and 38 male; the median age was 56 years. There were no differences between the study group and the yearly clinic average in terms of age, gender, or ratio of tumor patients. Patients mainly complained about waiting times in the outpatient department and diagnostic units as well as high patient turnover. Concerning positive aspects, patients mentioned the medical competence of the treating physicians; concerning negative aspects, the building infrastructure was noted. The questionnaire showed sufficient psychometric properties and helped find areas for improvement in the outpatient department. However, a complete picture of the department will be feasible only with repeated measures, especially when taking steps to improve the department's processes.

  4. Process Improvement in Outpatient Installation RSUD dr. Soediran Mangun Sumarso Using Lean Hospital Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyida, Ghany; Fahma, Fakhrina; Iftadi, Irwan

    2018-03-01

    RSUD dr. Soediran Mangun Sumarso is a public hospital in Wonogiri district which has an outpatient installation service. However, the waiting time of some services in outpatient installations exceeds the standard time set by the health minister of the Republic of Indonesia. It is known from the data waiting time in the outpatient installation. The purpose of this study is to provide improvements using lean hospital approach. Proposed improvement is done by eliminating waste that occurs in outpatient installation service. The methodology used in this study consists of four stages. The first stage is describing the service system using a cross-functional flowchart. The second stage is identifying waste using value stream mapping, observation and interview. The third stage is to determine critical waste by borda method and pareto diagram. The last stage is to provide recommendation improvement using fishbone diagram and FMEA. The result of this research is proposed improvements. The proposed improvements are adding special register counters, implementing an online reservation system, doctors schedule synchronization, adding doctors in polyclinics, fixing queue numbers, applying visual management concepts, making connecting glass in pharmacies and adding multifunction shelves in polyclinics.

  5. Frailty profile for geriatric patients in outpatient clinic of RSUP H. Adam Malik Medan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permatasari, T. D.; Sihombing, B.; Arianto, P.

    2018-03-01

    Frailty is a circumstance of increased vulnerability to bad resolution of homeostasis after a stressor occasion, which increases the risk of adverse outcomes. Early detection of frailty in elderly patients is a must but is rarely in the Geriatric Outpatient settings. We conducted a study to see the frailty profile for geriatric patients in the outpatient clinic of RSUP H. Adam Malik Medan. A cross-sectional research with a descriptive method was in the Geriatric Outpatient Clinic of Adam Malik Hospital from July-September 2016. The population of this study was patients from the Geriatric Outpatient Clinic, and sampling was by using consecutive methods. Samples were by questionnaires assessing (FRAIL Scale).This study was140 patients. Based on age, the age group of 81-90 years was dominantly frail (53.8%). Most of the subjects worked as government employees (109 subjects), and most of them were robust (42.2%). Based on income, both groups were dominated by robust (38.3% and 41.3%, respectively). Based on BMI, most were robust with underweight 33.5%, normoweight 37.8%, and obese 44.7%. Among the 140 patients, frailty was in the 27.1% of the subjects and the contributing factors were Age, Gender, and Obesity.

  6. A comparative analysis of coverage decisions for outpatient pharmaceuticals: evidence from Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grepstad, Mari; Kanavos, Panos

    2015-02-01

    This study analyses the reasons for differences and similarities in coverage recommendations for outpatient pharmaceuticals in Denmark, Norway and Sweden, following HTA appraisals. A comparative analysis of all outpatient drug appraisals carried out between January 2009 and December 2012, including an analysis of divergent coverage recommendations made by all three countries was performed. Agreement levels between HTA agencies were measured using kappa scores. Consultations with stakeholders in the three countries were carried out to complement the discussion on HTA processes and reimbursement outcomes. Nineteen outpatient drug-indication pairs appraised in each of the three countries were identified, of which 6 pairs (32%) had divergent coverage recommendations. An uneven distribution of coverage recommendations was observed, with the highest overlap in appraisals between Norway and Sweden (free-marginal kappa 0.89). Similarities were found in priority setting principles, mode of appraisal and reasoning for coverage recommendations. The study shows that health economic evaluation is less prominent or explicit in outpatient drug appraisals in Denmark than in Norway and Sweden, that all three countries could benefit from improved communication between appraisers and manufacturers, and that final coverage recommendations rely on factors other than safety, comparative efficacy or cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing adherence to guidelines with administrative data in psychiatric outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Fenema, Esther; Giltay, Erik; van Noorden, Martijn; van Hemert, Albert; Zitman, Frans

    2017-02-01

    To assess (feasibility) of adherence to treatment guidelines among outpatients with common mental disorders in a routine Dutch clinical outpatient setting for common mental disorders using administrative data. In a retrospective cohort study, we analysed routinely collected administrative data of 5346 patients, treated for mood, anxiety or somatoform disorders with pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy or a combination of both. Available administrative data allowed assessment of guideline adherence with a disorder-independent set of five quality indicators, assessing psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, a combination of both and routine outcome measurements (ROM) during diagnostic and therapeutic phases. Associations between the socio-demographic variables age, gender, clinical diagnosis and treatment type on the one hand and non-adherence to guidelines were tested using logistic regression analysis. Patients were aged 39.5 years (SD 13.0) on average. The majority of patients were treated with a combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (50.1%), followed by psychotherapy (44.2%) and pharmacotherapy (5.6%). The majority of patients were suffering from a mood disorder (50.0%), followed by anxiety (43.9%) and somatoform disorders (6.1%). A diagnosis of anxiety or somatoform disorder was associated with higher odds of suboptimal duration [odds ratio (OR): 1.55 and 1.82[ and suboptimal frequency of psychotherapeutic treatment (OR of 0.89 and 0.63), and absence of ROM in the diagnostic phase (ORs 1.31 and 1.36, respectively) compared with depressive disorders. No ROM in the diagnostic phase was also predicted for by increasing age (ORs for the age categories of 56 and older of 1.48). In this proof of principal study, we were able to assess some key indicators assessing adherence to clinical guidelines by using administrative data. Also, we could identify predictors of adherence with simple parameters available in every administrative data. Administrative data could help to

  8. Cost and morbidity analysis of chest port insertion in adults: Outpatient clinic versus operating room placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, Claudio F; Ginesu, Giorgio C; Bellini, Alessandro; Cherchi, Giuseppe; Scanu, Antonio M; Cossu, Maria Laura; Fancellu, Alessandro; Porcu, Alberto

    2017-09-01

    Totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs) represent a convenient way for the administration of medications or nutrients. Traditionally, chest ports have been positioned by surgeons in the operating room, however there has been a transition over the years to port insertion by interventional radiologists in the radiology suite. The optimal method for chest port placement is still under debate. Data on all adult patients undergoing isolated chest port placement at our institution in a 12-year period were retrospectively reviewed. The aim of this cohort study was to compare cost and morbidity for chest port insertion in two different settings: outpatient clinic and operating room. Between 2003 and 2015 a total of 527 chest ports were placed in adult patients. Of them, 262 procedures were performed in the operating room and 265 procedures were undertaken in the outpatient clinic. Patient characteristics were similar and there was no significant difference in early (port was 1270 Euros in the operating room versus 620 Euros in the outpatient clinic. Our results suggest that chest ports can be safely placed in most patients under local anesthesia in the office setting without fluoroscopy or ultrasound guidance. Future randomized controlled studies may evaluate if surgeons or interventional radiologists should routinely perform these procedures in a dedicated office setting and reserve more sophisticated facilities only for patients at high risk of technical failure.

  9. Setting up of ambulatory hysteroscopy service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhe, Shilpa

    2015-10-01

    There is an obvious trend towards developing ambulatory procedures in gynaecology with ambulatory hysteroscopy as its mainstay. In the recent years, the fast pace of modern technological advances in gynaecologic endoscopy, and particularly in the field of hysteroscopy, have been both thrilling and spectacular. Despite this, the uptake of operative hysteroscopy in ambulatory settings has been relatively slow. There is some apprehension amongst gynaecologists to embark on therapeutic outpatient hysteroscopy, and an organisational change is required to alter the mindset. Although there are best practice guidelines for outpatient hysteroscopy, there are unresolved issues around adequate training and accreditation of future hysteroscopists. Virtual-reality simulation training for operative hysteroscopy has shown promising preliminary results, and it is being aggressively evaluated and validated. This review article is an attempt to provide a useful practical guide to all those who wish to implement ambulatory hysteroscopy services in their outpatient departments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dermatology referrals in a neurological set up

    OpenAIRE

    Deeptara Pathak Thapa; Amit Thapa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Dermatology is a specialty, which not only deals with dermatological problems with outpatient but also inpatients referrals. The importances of Dermatologist in hospital setting are rising due to changing condition of medical care. Since no peer-reviewed articles are available for dermatological problems in a neurological set up, we conducted this study to know about pattern of skin disorders in neurological patients. Material and Methods: The present study was a prospectiv...

  11. The clinical effectiveness of cognitive therapy for depression in an outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Carly J; Fournier, Jay C; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; DeRubeis, Robert J; Crits-Christoph, Paul; Beck, Aaron T

    2010-09-01

    Cognitive therapy (CT) has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of depression in numerous randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However, little evidence is available that speaks to the effectiveness of this treatment under routine clinical conditions. This paper examines outcomes of depressed individuals seeking cognitive therapy at an outpatient clinic (N=217, Center for Cognitive Therapy; CCT). Outcomes were then compared to those of participants in a large NIMH-funded RCT of cognitive therapy and medications as treatments for depression. The CCT is shown to be a clinically representative setting, and 61% of participants experienced reliable change in symptoms over the course of treatment; of those, 45% (36% of the total sample) met criteria for recovery by the end of treatment. Participants at CCT had similar outcomes to participants treated in the RCT, but there was some evidence that those with more severe symptoms at intake demonstrated greater improvement in the RCT than their counterparts at CCT. The CCT may not be representative of all outpatient settings, and the structure of treatment there was considerably different from that in the RCT. Treatment fidelity was not assessed at CCT. Depressed individuals treated with cognitive therapy in a routine clinical care setting showed a significant improvement in symptoms. When compared with outcomes evidenced in RCTs, there was little evidence of superior outcomes in either setting. However, for more severe participants, outcomes were found to be superior when treatment was delivered within an RCT than in an outpatient setting. Clinicians treating such patients in non-research settings may thus benefit from making modifications to treatment protocols to more closely resemble research settings. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Potential medication dosing errors in outpatient pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Stille, Christopher J; Smith, David; Hecht, Julia; Pearson, John; Stull, John; Debellis, Kristin; Andrade, Susan; Miller, Marlene; Kaushal, Rainu; Gurwitz, Jerry; Davis, Robert L

    2005-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of potential dosing errors of medication dispensed to children for 22 common medications. Using automated pharmacy data from 3 health maintenance organizations (HMOs), we randomly selected up to 120 children with a new dispensing prescription for each drug of interest, giving 1933 study subjects. Errors were defined as potential overdoses or potential underdoses. Error rate in 2 HMOs that use paper prescriptions was compared with 1 HMO that uses an electronic prescription writer. Approximately 15% of children were dispensed a medication with a potential dosing error: 8% were potential overdoses and 7% were potential underdoses. Among children weighing error rates were not lower at the site with an electronic prescription writer. Potential medication dosing errors occur frequently in outpatient pediatrics. Studies on the clinical impact of these potential errors and effective error prevention strategies are needed.

  13. Supervisory turnover in outpatient substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Danica K; Broome, Kirk M; Edwards, Jennifer R; Flynn, Patrick M

    2011-01-01

    Staff turnover is a significant issue within substance abuse treatment, with implications for service delivery and organizational health. This study examined factors associated with turnover among supervisors in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Turnover was conceptualized as being an individual response to organizational-level influences, and predictors represent aggregate program measures. Participants included 532 staff (including 467 counselors and 65 clinical/program directors) from 90 programs in four regions of the USA. Using logistic regression, analyses of structural factors indicated that programs affiliated with a parent organization and those providing more counseling hours to clients had higher turnover rates. When measures of job attitudes were included, only parent affiliation and collective appraisal of satisfaction were related to turnover. Subsequent analyses identified a trend toward increased supervisory turnover when satisfaction was low following the departure of a previous supervisor. These findings suggest that organizational-level factors can be influential in supervisory turnover.

  14. Pure analgesics in a rheumatological outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pure analgesics are only rarely used by Italian clinicians and this holds true also for rheumatologists. This work is concerned with an evaluation of the use of analgesics in a rheumatological outpatient clinic during the period 1989-1999. Methods: The records of 1705 patients consecutively seen at the clinic were downloaded on a specifically built website. Results: 4469 visits were considered. In 260 of them (5.8%, analgesics were prescribed to 234 (13.7% patients. The number of patients with a prescription of analgesics steadily increased during the years 1989-1999. The diagnoses in patients assuming analgesics were: osteoarthritis (47.1%, inflammatory arthritis (24.2%, soft tissue rheumatisms (13.7%, nonspecific arthralgia/myalgia (7.5%, and connective tissue diseases (2.6%. Peripheral analgesics were used in 188 (82.5% patients and central analgesics were used in the remaining 40 patients (17.5%. Analgesic drugs were used mainly in degenerative joint conditions. The indications for analgesics in the 55 patients with inflammatory arthrits were: (a partial or total remission of arthritis; for this reason non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were no longer required in 18 patients; (b to increase the analgesic effect of NSAIDs in 23 patients; (c contraindications to NSAIDs in 14 patients (renal failure in 2 patients, gastritis in 10, allergy and bleeding in the remaining two. Conclusions: About 14% of our outpatients were treated with analgesics with an increasing trend in the examined period. The main indications for analgesics are degenerative conditions but they can be used also in selected patients with arthritis.

  15. Trends and Seasonal Variation in Outpatient Antibiotic Prescription Rates in the United States, 2006 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Lauri A.; Roberts, Rebecca M.; Hunkler, Robert J.; Taylor, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasing threat to the effectiveness of antibiotics. The majority of antibiotics are prescribed in primary care settings for upper respiratory tract infections. The purpose of this study was to describe seasonal trends in outpatient antibiotic prescriptions (Rx) in the United States over a 5-year period. This study was a retrospective, cross-sectional observation of systemic antibiotic prescriptions in the outpatient setting from 2006 to 2010. Winter months were defined as the first and fourth quarters of the calendar year. Antibiotic prescribing rates were calculated (prescriptions/1,000 population) using annual U.S. Census Bureau population data. Over 1.34 billion antibiotic prescriptions were dispensed over the 5-year period. The antibiotic prescription (Rx) rate decreased from 892 Rx/1,000 population in 2006 to 867 Rx/1,000 population in 2010. Penicillins and macrolides were the primary antibiotic classes prescribed, but penicillin prescribing decreased while macrolide prescribing increased over the study period. Overall, antibiotic prescriptions were 24.5% higher in winter months than in the summer, with the largest difference (28.8%) in 2008 and the smallest (20.4%) in 2010. This seasonality was consistently drug class dependent, driven by 75% and 100% increases in penicillin and macrolide prescriptions, respectively, in the winter months. The mean outpatient antibiotic prescription rate decreased in the United States from 2006 to 2010. More antibiotic prescribing, predominately driven by the macrolide and penicillin classes, in the outpatient setting was observed in the winter months. Understanding annual variability in antibiotic use can assist with designing interventions to improve the judicious use of antibiotics. PMID:24590486

  16. Outpatient Foley catheter versus inpatient prostaglandin E2 gel for induction of labour: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induction of labour (IOL is one of the commonest obstetric interventions, with significant impact on both the individual woman and health service delivery. Outpatient IOL is an attractive option to reduce these impacts. To date there is little data comparing outpatient and inpatient IOL methods, and potential safety concerns (hyperstimulation if prostaglandins, the standard inpatient IOL medications, are used in the outpatient setting. The purpose of this study was to assess feasibility, clinical effectiveness and patient acceptability of outpatient Foley catheter (OPC vs. inpatient vaginal PGE2 (IP for induction of labour (IOL at term. Methods Women with an unfavourable cervix requiring IOL at term (N = 101 were randomised to outpatient care using Foley catheter (OPC, n = 50 or inpatient care using vaginal PGE2 (IP, n = 51. OPC group had Foley catheter inserted and were discharged overnight following a reassuring cardiotocograph. IP group received 2 mg/1 mg vaginal PGE2 if nulliparous or 1 mg/1 mg if multiparous. Main outcome measures were inpatient stay (prior to birth, in Birthing Unit, total, mode of birth, induction to delivery interval, adverse reactions and patient satisfaction. Results OPC group had shorter hospital stay prior to birth (21.3 vs. 32.4 hrs, p  Conclusions OPC was feasible and acceptable for IOL of women with an unfavourable cervix at term compared to IP, however did not show a statistically significant reduction in total inpatient stay and was associated with increased oxytocin IOL. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN:12609000420246.

  17. Prospective controlled assessment of impact of feedback on gastroenterology trainees in outpatient practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous studies have demonstrated the value of systematic feedback in enhancing endoscopic procedure performance. It remains unknown whether feedback may play a role in modifying physician performance in outpatient practice. This study aimed to assess the impact of systematic feedback on duration of office visits of gastroenterology (GI) trainees in outpatient practice. METHODS: Patients attending a GI outpatient department in an academic medical center were prospectively followed over 4 months. The duration of office visits for consecutive patients seen by five GI fellows of similar experience level were recorded for 2 months (pre-feedback); confidential feedback was then provided to each fellow on a weekly basis for 2 months detailing their individual consultation times and the comparative, anonymous times of the other fellows (post-feedback). RESULTS: Over the course of the study, 1,647 outpatients were seen by five GI fellows. Pre-feedback consultation durations differed significantly with one fellow taking 2.5 times longer than their colleague. Following feedback, times shortened significantly for all fellows, with the greatest impact observed in those trainees taking longer at baseline. There were no significant differences in satisfaction levels among patients seen by each trainee. CONCLUSIONS: There was a wide disparity in the consultation times among GI fellows. Systematic feedback shortened times among all trainees and enhanced uniformity by having the greatest impact among those fellows taking longer at baseline. Routine provision of feedback may be valuable in enhancing uniformity of outpatient practice although clinicians should ensure that shortening consultation visits does not compromise quality of patient care. Future larger studies of feedback in this setting will be enhanced by incorporating objective measures of quality of care and patient satisfaction.

  18. Prospective Controlled Assessment of Impact of Feedback on Gastroenterology Trainees in Outpatient Practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2011-03-29

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous studies have demonstrated the value of systematic feedback in enhancing endoscopic procedure performance. It remains unknown whether feedback may play a role in modifying physician performance in outpatient practice. This study aimed to assess the impact of systematic feedback on duration of office visits of gastroenterology (GI) trainees in outpatient practice. METHODS: Patients attending a GI outpatient department in an academic medical center were prospectively followed over 4 months. The duration of office visits for consecutive patients seen by five GI fellows of similar experience level were recorded for 2 months (pre-feedback); confidential feedback was then provided to each fellow on a weekly basis for 2 months detailing their individual consultation times and the comparative, anonymous times of the other fellows (post-feedback). RESULTS: Over the course of the study, 1,647 outpatients were seen by five GI fellows. Pre-feedback consultation durations differed significantly with one fellow taking 2.5 times longer than their colleague. Following feedback, times shortened significantly for all fellows, with the greatest impact observed in those trainees taking longer at baseline. There were no significant differences in satisfaction levels among patients seen by each trainee. CONCLUSIONS: There was a wide disparity in the consultation times among GI fellows. Systematic feedback shortened times among all trainees and enhanced uniformity by having the greatest impact among those fellows taking longer at baseline. Routine provision of feedback may be valuable in enhancing uniformity of outpatient practice although clinicians should ensure that shortening consultation visits does not compromise quality of patient care. Future larger studies of feedback in this setting will be enhanced by incorporating objective measures of quality of care and patient satisfaction.

  19. Quality of outpatient clinical notes: a stakeholder definition derived through qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Janice L; Stephens, Mark B; Pangaro, Louis N; Gimbel, Ronald W

    2012-11-19

    groups provide a comprehensive description of quality in outpatient clinical documentation. The resulting description of characteristics and content necessary for quality notes provides a research-based foundation for assessing the quality of clinical documentation in outpatient health care settings.

  20. 42 CFR 410.59 - Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient occupational therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.59 Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule... occupational therapy services only if they are furnished by an individual meeting the qualifications in part...

  1. Drug prescribing patterns for outpatients in three hospitals in north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Information about drug utilization at the out patient departments of the Hospitals in Ethiopia is scanty although a large segment of the patients are being served at the outpatient departments. Objective: To evaluate and compare patterns of drug prescribing practiced in the outpatient departments of three ...

  2. Prevalence and determinants for malnutrition in geriatric outpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.; Lonterman-Monasch, S.; de Vries, O.J.; Danner, S.A.; Kramer, M.H.H.; Muller, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background & aims: Few data is available on the nutritional status of geriatric outpatients. The aim of this study is to describe the nutritional status and its clinical correlates of independently living geriatric older individuals visiting a geriatric outpatient department. Methods: From 2005 to

  3. Continuity of care of outpatients with schizophrenia in Pretoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To study the needs of outpatients suffering from schizophrenia and their primary caregivers. Methods. A qualitative descriptive design was selected to study the needs of a non-probability purposive sample of 50 outpatients with schizophrenia and their primary caregivers. Data were collected on their ...

  4. Creative Art Therapy Groups: A Treatment Modality for Psychiatric Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapeau, Marie-Celine; Kronish, Neomi

    2007-01-01

    This brief report examines the benefits of a creative art therapy group program for outpatients suffering from psychiatric disorders. Included is a review of relevant treatment outcomes literature on the effectiveness of group art therapy. The authors describe the Creative Art Therapy Group Program offered to adult psychiatric outpatients that is…

  5. 42 CFR 410.60 - Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... services furnished under § 410.62; (iii) Outpatient physical therapy and speech-language pathology services... physical therapy and speech-language pathology services furnished by a nurse practitioner, clinical nurse... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions...

  6. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  7. Outpatient antibiotic prescriptions from 1992 to 2001 in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuyvenhoven, MM; van Balen, FAM; Verheij, TJM

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Although Dutch outpatient antibiotic prescription rates are low compared with other European countries, continuing to scrutinize trends in outpatient antibiotic use is important in order to identify possible increases in antibiotic use or inappropriate increases in the use of particular

  8. Effectiveness of bilateral tubotubal anastomosis in a large outpatient population

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Gary S.; Thorp, John M.; Weaver, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is bilateral tubotubal anastomosis a successful treatment in an outpatient patient population? SUMMARY ANSWER For women wanting children after tubal sterilization, bilateral tubotubal anastomosis is an effective outpatient treatment. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY With the current emphasis in reproductive medicine on high technology procedures, the effectiveness of female surgical sterilization reversal is often overlooked. Previous clinical studies of tubal sterilization reversal have ...

  9. CASE REPORT Acalculous cholecystitis presenting in an out-patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    out-patient with no risk factors. M Goodier, MB ChB. S Mulira, MB ChB. S Andronikou ... developing in outpatients with none of the traditional risk factors appears to be increasing.1 To date, there have ... artery with no significant source of collateral supply to the gallbladder. Ischaemia of the gallbladder in critically ill patients ...

  10. Detecting delirium in elderly outpatients with cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroomer-van Wijk, Anne J. M.; Jonker, Barbara W.; Kok, Rob M.; van der Mast, Roos C.; Luijendijk, Hendrika J.

    Background: Delirium may be more prevalent in elderly outpatients than has long been assumed. However, it may be easily missed due to overlap with dementia. Our aim was to study delirium symptoms and underlying somatic disorders in psycho-geriatric outpatients. Methods: We performed a case-control

  11. Utilization of community-based outpatient addiction treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines a number of outpatient addictions treatment programmes developed in various regions of Kenya. The uptake of outpatient services at four sites between 2007 and 2010 has been examined. A field-based follow-up survey was administered to determine abstinence rates among clients who participated ...

  12. Factors associated with anxiety and depression among type 2 diabetes outpatients in Malaysia: a descriptive cross-sectional single-centre study

    OpenAIRE

    Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Renganathan, Pukunan; Manaf, Rizal Abdul; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence and factors associated with anxiety and depression among type 2 diabetes outpatients in Malaysia. Design Descriptive, cross-sectional single-centre study with universal sampling of all patients with type 2 diabetes. Setting Endocrinology clinic of medical outpatient department in a Malaysian public hospital. Participants All 169 patients with type 2 diabetes (men, n=99; women, n=70) aged between 18 and 90 years who acquired follow-up treatment from the en...

  13. Automatic sets and Delone sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbe, A; Haeseler, F von

    2004-01-01

    Automatic sets D part of Z m are characterized by having a finite number of decimations. They are equivalently generated by fixed points of certain substitution systems, or by certain finite automata. As examples, two-dimensional versions of the Thue-Morse, Baum-Sweet, Rudin-Shapiro and paperfolding sequences are presented. We give a necessary and sufficient condition for an automatic set D part of Z m to be a Delone set in R m . The result is then extended to automatic sets that are defined as fixed points of certain substitutions. The morphology of automatic sets is discussed by means of examples

  14. [Differences between adolescents with pathological Internet use in inpatient and outpatient treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartberg, Lutz; Moll, Bettina; Baldus, Christiane; Thomsen, Monika; Thomasius, Rainer

    2017-07-01

    In epidemiological studies high prevalence estimates for pathological Internet use in adolescence were reported. There are only few studies published, reporting data of adolescents seeking treatment concerning their pathological Internet use. Currently, a comparison of patients in inpatient versus outpatient treatment is not available. We investigated 74 adolescents reporting pathological Internet use with standardized questionnaires concerning problematic Internet use, psychopathological symptoms and life satisfaction. Overall, 35 adolescents were treated in an outpatient and another 39 adolescents in an inpatient setting. A substantial portion in both groups showed comorbid mental health problems. There were no differences in the degree of problematic Internet use between the two groups. However, compared to adolescents in an outpatient setting, adolescents in inpatient treatment reported longer average Internet usage times, a lower life satisfaction as well as more anxiety/depressiveness and self-esteem problems. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis Internet usage time and life satisfaction were identified as statistically significant factors for the affiliation to one of the two treatment groups. The results of the present study could be useful as a further description of this group of patients and more general to develop interventions for adolescents reporting pathological Internet use.

  15. Benzodiazepine use in medical out-patient clinics: a study from a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, M.J.; Ahmer, S.; Khan, F.; Qureshi, A.W.A.; Shehzad, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of Benzodiazepine use in the outpatient setting of general medicine clinics at a single tertiary care centre. Methods: The prospective prevalence study was conducted in the outpatient setting of Internal Medicine Clinics at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from November to December 2009. All subjects were interviewed after informed consent and variables were recorded on a specially-designed proforma. Apart from basic demographics and comorbid conditions, duration, frequency and route of benzodiazepine use, as well as the reason and who initiated it was noted. Chi-square test and t test was applied to see the association of socio demographic or clinical factors with the use of benzodiazepine. Results: Of the 355 patients, 129 (36.33%) reported using the drug. The majority (n=86; 24.2%) were taking it on a daily basis. The highest numbers of patients using the drug were suffering from cardiovascular problems, 32 (25%) followed by 22 (17%) from endocrinology. Diazepam equivalent dose was around 7.04+-4, with a inter-quartile range of 3-96 weeks. Alprazolam (9%) was the most frequently prescribed Benzodiazepine. Conclusion: Benzodiazepine use is alarmingly high in the outpatient clinics of General Internal Medicine Department. There is no implementation of law to prevent its hazardous sale. In this regard all concerned should work collectively for awareness and irrational drug sale and use. (author)

  16. Outpatient presentations to burn centers: data from the Burns Registry of Australia and New Zealand outpatient pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbe, Belinda J; Watterson, Dina M; Singer, Yvonne; Darton, Anne

    2015-05-01

    Most studies about burn injury focus on admitted cases. To compare outpatient and inpatient presentations at burn centers in Australia to inform the establishment of a repository for outpatient burn injury. Data for sequential outpatient presentations were collected at seven burn centers in Australia between December 2010 and May 2011 and compared with inpatient admissions from these centers recorded by the Burns Registry of Australia and New Zealand for the corresponding period. There were 788 outpatient and 360 inpatient presentations. Pediatric outpatients included more children burns (39% vs 24%). Adult outpatients included fewer males (58% vs 73%) and intentional injuries (3.3% vs 10%), and more scald (46% vs 30%) and contact burns (24% vs 13%). All pediatric, and 98% of adult, outpatient presentations involved a %TBSAburns presenting to burn centers differed to inpatient admission data, particularly with respect to etiology and burn severity, highlighting the importance of the need for outpatient data to enhance burn injury surveillance and inform prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Crianças em situação de violência de um ambulatório do Rio de Janeiro: conhecendo seu perfil Niños en situación de violencia de un ambulatorio en Rio de Janeiro: conociendo su perfil Children under violence situation followed-up in the outpatient setting at Rio de Janeiro: knowing their profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Martins de Magalhães Pierantoni

    2009-12-01

    relatives as an aggressor and protectors in the circle of violence. A quantitative descriptive study was developed in the outpatient setting at Rio de Janeiro during 2006-2007. Data from 44 children charts showed that there was a strong relation among poverty, low background and gender to the social matrix of the violence. Boys were the main victims (64% of violence. Physical aggression (33% was more reported. Paradoxically, mothers were the main relatives who caused the aggression (39.1%, and assumed the social role as children protector (57.1%. It concluded that children, aggressor/protector need to be assisted, followed-up and supported by healthcare facility. Consequently, the double social role aggressor/protector implies family center care approach in order to break the circle of violence.

  18. Personality correlates of outpatient mental health service utilization: findings from the U.S. national comorbidity survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Lachlan A; Cox, Brian J; Enns, Murray W; Clara, Ian P

    2006-05-01

    The present paper investigated the relationships between several personality constructs and the use of outpatient mental health services. Respondents were from the National Comorbidity Survey (NCS) Part II data set and included those with a past-year mood, anxiety, alcohol/substance use disorder (n=1750). Bivariate logistic regressions were used to examine associations between participants' self-reports of personality traits and outpatient mental health service utilization. Similar multivariate analyses were used to investigate these associations after adjusting for sociodemographic variables and the presence of psychiatric disorders and their comorbidity. The bivariate and multivariate analyses revealed significant positive associations between outpatient mental health service utilization and both Powerful Others Locus of Control and Self-criticism. These findings suggest that personality traits may play a role in treatment seeking behaviors for mental health problems over and above the presence of psychiatric disorders alone. The assessment of relevant personality constructs has the potential to inform and improve treatment outreach efforts.

  19. Modafinil and sleep architecture in an inpatient-outpatient treatment study of cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Peter T; Angarita, Gustavo A; Canavan, Sofija; Pittman, Brian; Oberleitner, Lindsay; Malison, Robert T; Mohsenin, Vahid; Hodges, Sarah; Easton, Caroline; McKee, Sherry; Bessette, Andrew; Forselius, Erica

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether the increase in slow-wave sleep associated with modafinil treatment in chronic cocaine users mediates improved clinical outcomes. 57 cocaine dependent participants were randomized to receive modafinil 400mg or placebo daily during a period of inpatient treatment followed by six weeks of outpatient treatment. Participants underwent polysomnographic sleep recording during inpatient treatment prior to and after starting modafinil. Outpatient treatment consisted of weekly cognitive behavioral therapy. Contingency management was used to promote participation in treatment and research demands, including thrice weekly visits during the outpatient phase for urine toxicology screens and other assessments. The primary clinical outcome was the percent of urine toxicology screens that were negative for cocaine. Modafinil treatment was associated with a higher mean percentage (52% vs. 26%) of cocaine-free urine screens (p=0.02) and an increase in N3 sleep time (p=0.002). The change in N3 sleep time mediated the higher rate of cocaine-free urine screens. Modafinil treatment was also associated with more consecutive days abstinent during outpatient treatment, greater survival of abstinence, higher daily rates of abstinence, and less sleep degradation typically associated with abstinence from chronic cocaine use. Morning-dosed modafinil improves slow-wave sleep in abstinent cocaine users in the inpatient setting, and this effect is a statistical mediator of improved clinical outcomes associated with continued modafinil treatment. The high rates of abstinence achieved in this trial suggest that promoting healthy sleep physiology in an inpatient setting may be important in the effective treatment of cocaine dependence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative Effectiveness of Oral Versus Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy for Empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, Chris; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Byington, Carrie L; Sheng, Xiaoming; Greene, Tom H; Korgenski, Ernest K; Hersh, Adam L

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of pediatric parapneumonic empyema (PPE) requires several weeks of antibiotic therapy that is typically completed in the outpatient setting. The route of outpatient therapy can be oral or intravenous (outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy [OPAT]). No studies have compared outcomes between oral therapy and OPAT for PPE. We identified children <18 years hospitalized from 2005 to 2014 at Primary Children's Hospital with PPE and discharged with oral therapy or OPAT. The primary outcome was the percentage of children who experienced all-cause complications after discharge. Complications included those that were related to pneumonia (including treatment failure, defined as readmission with reaccumulation of pleural fluid or abscess requiring drainage) or antibiotic therapy (eg, allergy, line clot) resulting in either a hospital readmission or emergency department/urgent care visit. All-cause complications were compared between oral therapy and OPAT by using propensity score-weighted logistic regression. A total of 391 children were hospitalized with PPE; 337 (86%) were discharged with OPAT; 35 (9%) children experienced an all-cause complication, including 5 with oral (9.3%) and 30 (8.9%) with OPAT. Pneumonia and treatment-related complications were comparable (P = .25 and .78, respectively). Two patients treated with OPAT (1%) experienced treatment failure. After adjustment using propensity score weighting, the frequency of complications was similar between groups (adjusted odds ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.23-4.65). The frequency of complications was similar with oral therapy and OPAT for children with PPE. Oral antibiotics may be considered safe and effective for children with PPE who will be discharged to complete therapy in the outpatient setting. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Patient safety culture and nurse-reported adverse events in outpatient hemodialysis units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Flynn, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety culture is an important quality indicator in health care facilities and has been associated with key patient outcomes in hospitals. The purpose of this analysis was to examine relationships between patient safety culture and nurse-reported adverse patient events in outpatient hemodialysis facilities. A cross-sectional correlational, mailed survey design was used. The analytic sample consisted of 422 registered nurses who worked in outpatient dialysis facilities in the United States. The Handoff and Transitions and the Overall Patient Safety Grade scales of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ) Hospital Patient on Safety Survey were modified and used to measure patient safety culture in outpatient dialysis facilities. Nurse-reported adverse patient events was measured as a series of questions designed to capture the frequency with which nurses report that 13 adverse events occur in the outpatient dialysis facility setting. Handoff and transitions safety during patient shift change in dialysis centers was perceived negatively by a majority of nurses. On the other hand, a majority of nurses rated the overall patient safety culture in their dialysis facility as good to excellent. All relationships between patient safety culture items and adverse patient events were in the expected direction. Negative ratings of handoffs and transitions safety were independently associated with increased odds of frequent occurrences of vascular access thrombosis and patient complaints. Negative ratings of overall patient safety culture in dialysis units were independently associated with increased odds of frequent occurrences of medication errors by nurses, patient hospitalization, vascular access infection, and patient complaints. Findings from this analysis indicate that a positive patient safety culture is an important antecedent for optimal patient outcomes in ambulatory care settings.

  2. Eating disorders: a hidden phenomenon in outpatient mental health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursland, Anthea; Watson, Hunna J

    2014-05-01

    Eating disorders are common but underdiagnosed illnesses. Help-seeking for co-occurring issues, such as anxiety and depression, are common. To identify the prevalence of eating problems, using the SCOFF, and eating disorders when screening positive on the SCOFF (i.e., ≥2), among patients seeking help for anxiety and depression at a community-based mental health service. Patients (N = 260) consecutively referred and assessed for anxiety and depression treatment were administered the SCOFF screening questionnaire and a semi-structured standardized diagnostic interview during routine intake. 18.5% (48/260) scored ≥2 on the SCOFF, indicating eating problems. Of these, 41% (19/48) met criteria for an eating disorder. Thus, overall, 7.3% (19/260) of the sample met criteria for a DSM-IV eating disorder. Those scoring ≥2 on the SCOFF were more likely to: be female (p = 0.001), younger (p = 0.003), and have a history of self-harm (p eating disorders are a hidden phenomenon in general outpatient mental health. By using a standardized diagnostic interview to establish diagnosis rather than self- or staff-report, the study builds on limited previous findings. The naturalistic study setting shows that screening for eating disorders can be easily built into routine intake practice, and successfully identifies treatment need. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. [Economic aspects of ultrasound diagnostics in gastroenterological outpatient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhiller, S

    2003-04-01

    Due to new examination techniques, the quality of gastroenterological ultrasound diagnostics has improved considerably in the last few years. In the long term these techniques are an indispensable requirement for competent examinations. However, the price of such high-quality apparatus has increased considerably. To ascertain the financial prerequisites for highly specialised ultrasound services in a gastroenterological out-patient department. Systematic determination of costs and income from ultrasound diagnostics within the public health system for the second quarter of 2001 (KV Bayern) and precise definition of the cost of individual services. We apply the results obtained to other settings e.g. in-patient departments. The use of a grade 3 ultrasound appliance (DEGUM criteria) is cost-effective on the basis of 1940 examinations per year within taking a fictitious physician's fee into account. Based on a fee of 50.00 Euros per hour, an examination frequency of 5,834 per year would be required, whereas a fee of 100.00 Euros per hour could not be recovered even by an extremely large number of examinations. The present fee paid by the public health sector does not cover the expenses of a grade 3 ultrasound appliance. We discuss feasible solutions for offering a highly specialized, customer-friendly and cost-effective method for ultrasound examinations within the gastroenterological practice.

  4. Caregivers' reactions to preoperative procedures in outpatient pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velhote, André Bohomol; Bohomol, Elena; Velhote, Manoel Carlos Prieto

    2016-01-01

    To identify pediatric caregivers' reactions in outpatient surgery settings. A quantitative descriptive/exploratory survey-based study involving application of a semi-structured questionnaire to 62 caregivers in two hospitals. Most caregivers (88.7%) were mothers who submitted to preoperative fasting with their children. Nervousness, anxiety and concern were the most common feelings reported by caregivers on the day of the surgery. Medical instructions regarding preoperative procedures had significant positive impacts on patient care, and on patient and caregiver stress levels. Identificar as reações dos acompanhantes de crianças submetidas à cirurgia ambulatorial. Estudo survey descritivo/ exploratório, de caráter quantitativo, realizado em dois hospitais com 62 acompanhantes que responderam um questionário semiestruturado. Constatou-se que a maioria dos acompanhantes era formada por mães (88,7%) e permaneceu em jejum junto das crianças. Todos os acompanhantes referiram sentimentos identificados como nervosismo, ansiedade e preocupação. A orientação médica aos procedimentos pré-operatórios foi de grande importância, não somente para o cuidado da criança, mas também do acompanhante, visando diminuir ao máximo o estresse vivenciado por eles.

  5. Improving outpatient primary medication adherence with physician guided, automated dispensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moroshek JG

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Jacob G Moroshek1,2 1Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, 2Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Background: Physician dispensing, different from pharmacist dispensing, is a way for practitioners to supply their patients with medications, at the point of care. The InstyMeds dispenser and logistics system can automate much of the dispensing, insurance adjudication, inventory management, and regulatory reporting that is required of physician dispensing. Objective: To understand the percentage of patients that exhibit primary adherence to medication in the outpatient setting when choosing InstyMeds. Method: The InstyMeds dispensing database was de-identified and analyzed for primary adherence. This is the ratio of patients who dispensed their medication to those who received an eligible prescription. Results: The average InstyMeds emergency department installation has a primary adherence rate of 91.7%. The maximum rate for an installed device was 98.5%. Conclusion: Although national rates of primary adherence have been found to be in the range of 70%, automated physician dispensing vastly improves the rate of adherence. Improved adherence should lead to better patient outcomes, fewer return visits, and lower healthcare costs. Keywords: automated dispensing, adherence, compliance, medication, physician dispensing, InstyMeds

  6. [Outpatient treatment of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis: Impact on healthcare costs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Leyre; Cots, Francesc; Alonso, Sandra; Pascual, Marta; Salvans, Silvia; Courtier, Ricard; Gil, M José; Grande, Luis; Pera, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    Outpatient treatment of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis is safe and effective. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of outpatient treatment on the reduction of healthcare costs. A retrospective cohort study comparing 2 groups was performed. In the outpatient treatment group, patients diagnosed with uncomplicated acute diverticulitis were treated with oral antibiotics at home. In the hospital treatment group, patients met the criteria for outpatient treatment but were admitted to hospital and received intravenous antibiotic therapy. Cost estimates have been made using the hospital cost accounting system based on total costs, the sum of all variable costs (direct costs) plus overhead expenses divided by activity (indirect costs). A total of 136 patients were included, 90 in the outpatient treatment group and 46 in the hospital group. There were no differences in the characteristics of the patients in both groups. There were also no differences in the treatment failure rate in both groups (5.5% vs. 4.3%; P=.7). The total cost per episode was significantly lower in the outpatient treatment group (882 ± 462 vs. 2.376 ± 830 euros; P=.0001). Outpatient treatment of acute diverticulitis is not only safe and effective but also reduces healthcare costs by more than 60%. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Atrial fibrillation: an observational study with outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albina, Gastón; De Luca, Julián; Conde, Diego; Giniger, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia with serious clinical consequences in the absence of treatment. However, there are limited data on the treatment of these patients in Argentina. The objective was to describe the therapeutic management of patients with nonacute AF by Argentinean cardiologists and to determine the incidence of clinical events after 12 months follow-up. The Atrial Fibrillation study in Argentina (FARAON) was an observational, descriptive, prospective, national, and multicentric study that included outpatients with AF, followed for 12 months. The study included 38 sites in Argentina. Each researcher included the first 10 patients who met the inclusion criteria of being over 21 and also being an AF carrier documented by electrocardiogram or Holter within 12 months prior to or at the time of enrollment. A total of 373 patients were included, mean age 70 ± 11.5 years, 40% women; 65% had AF rhythm at the time of inclusion, 57% had permanent AF, and 56% were asymptomatic. At the time of enrollment, 40% of physicians opted for rhythm control strategy. β-blockers and amiodarone were the most used drugs. Patients with rhythm control drugs had higher success rate than those with frequency control drug therapy (80% vs 57%). Cardiologists in Argentina receive patients with AF that are mostly permanent AF. More than half of the patients are asymptomatic. They opt primarily by controlling the pace. When choosing antiarrhythmic drugs, nearly half of them indicated amiodarone. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Dexamethasone for pain after outpatient shoulder surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholdt, K. T.; Mønsted, P. N.; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    -blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted at Horsens Regional Hospital, Denmark. Patients scheduled for arthroscopic subacromial decompression and/or acromioclavicular joint resection as an outpatient procedure (n = 101) were randomised to receive intravenous dexamethasone 40 mg (D40), 8 mg (D8......) or placebo (D0) before surgery. The primary outcome was pain intensity 8 h after surgery rated on a numeric rating scale of 0 to 10. Secondary outcomes were pain intensity, analgesic consumption and side effects during the first 3 days after surgery. Results Data from 73 patients were available for analysis......: (D40: 25, D8: 26, D0: 22 patients). Eight hours after surgery, pain intensity were: [median (interquartile range)] group D40: 2 (1–4), group D8: 2.5 (1–5), group D0: 4 (2–7). There was no significant difference in pain intensity between group D40 and D8 after 8 h (P = 0.46) or at any other time. When...

  9. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and determinants of support for complete smoking bans in psychiatric settings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, M.C.; Gorts, C.A.; Soelen, P. van; Jonkers, R.E.; Hilberink, S.R.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure in psychiatric settings and to assess determinants of support for complete smoking bans. DESIGN: Cross sectional study SETTING: Dutch psychiatric hospitals, outpatient care institutions, and sheltered home facilities. SUBJECTS: A

  10. Implementation issues relevant to outpatient neurology palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Benzi M; Persenaire, Michael J; Holden, Samantha K; Palmer, Laura T; Redwine, Hannah; Berk, Julie; Anderson, C Alan; Filley, Christopher M; Kutner, Jean; Miyasaki, Janis; Carter, Julie

    2017-11-29

    homes, and hospices. Specialized outpatient palliative care for neurologic disorders fills several important gaps in care for this patient population, provides important educational opportunities for trainees, and creates opportunities for patient and caregiver-centered research. Educational initiatives are needed to train general neurologists in primary palliative care, to train neurologists in specialist palliative care, and to train palliative medicine specialists in neurology. Research is needed to build an evidence base to identify patient and caregiver needs, support specific interventions, and to build more efficient models of care in both academic and community settings.

  11. Research setting versus clinic setting: Which produces better outcomes in cognitive therapy for depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Carly R; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Derubeis, Robert J; Newman, Cory F; Beck, Aaron T

    2013-06-01

    To compare the outcomes of cognitive therapy for depression under controlled and clinically representative conditions, while holding several therapist and clinical assessment factors constant. Treatment outcomes for a sample of 23 adults with a primary diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder who received cognitive therapy in an outpatient clinic were compared with outcomes of 18 clients who were treated in the cognitive therapy condition of a large, multi-site randomized clinical trial of treatments for depression. All participants had been treated by one of two therapists who served as clinicians in both settings. Individuals in the two samples were diagnostically and demographically similar (approximately 50% Female, 83% White). A variety of client characteristics, assessed prior to treatment, as well as the outcomes of treatment, were examined. Significantly superior treatment outcomes were observed in the individuals treated in the research study, relative to clients in the outpatient clinic, and the difference was not accounted for by intake characteristics. Individuals treated by the therapists in the RCT experienced almost three times as much improvement in depressive symptoms as clients seen in the outpatient setting. If replicated, the findings suggest that differences exist between treatment outcomes in research and outpatient settings and that these differences may not simply be due to therapist experience and training, or differences in patient populations. Future research should further examine the impact of fidelity monitoring, treatment expectation and motivation, and the duration and timing of treatment protocols on clinical outcomes.

  12. [Impact of primary care oriented outpatient benefit package design in new rural cooperative medical system on hypertension outpatient services utilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shu-nv; Jian, Wei-yan; Yip, Winnie C-M; Guo, Yan

    2014-06-18

    To study the impact of primary care oriented outpatient benefits package design of outpatient services coverage and ladder reimbursement of county, town and village levels in the new rural cooperative medical system (NRCMs) on hypertension outpatient services utilization. The panel data of treatment and control groups in 2009 and 2011 before and after the policy reform were drawn from the household survey data of the innovative payment system project. The difference in difference (DID) method was used for data analysis. The outcome indicators included the utilization of outpatient services of patients with self-reported hypertension and their main treatment locations. The primary care oriented outpatient benefit package design in the NRCMs reduced the probability of no treatment in the latest three months of hypertension by 10.2 percent points. Meanwhile, it increased the probability of choosing village clinic as the preferred location by 15.7 percent points. Primary care oriented outpatient benefits package design lead patients with hypertension to use the nearest outpatient services at low risk of disease.

  13. Beyond malaria--causes of fever in outpatient Tanzanian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Acremont, Valérie; Kilowoko, Mary; Kyungu, Esther; Philipina, Sister; Sangu, Willy; Kahama-Maro, Judith; Lengeler, Christian; Cherpillod, Pascal; Kaiser, Laurent; Genton, Blaise

    2014-02-27

    As the incidence of malaria diminishes, a better understanding of nonmalarial fever is important for effective management of illness in children. In this study, we explored the spectrum of causes of fever in African children. We recruited children younger than 10 years of age with a temperature of 38°C or higher at two outpatient clinics--one rural and one urban--in Tanzania. Medical histories were obtained and clinical examinations conducted by means of systematic procedures. Blood and nasopharyngeal specimens were collected to perform rapid diagnostic tests, serologic tests, culture, and molecular tests for potential pathogens causing acute fever. Final diagnoses were determined with the use of algorithms and a set of prespecified criteria. Analyses of data derived from clinical presentation and from 25,743 laboratory investigations yielded 1232 diagnoses. Of 1005 children (22.6% of whom had multiple diagnoses), 62.2% had an acute respiratory infection; 5.0% of these infections were radiologically confirmed pneumonia. A systemic bacterial, viral, or parasitic infection other than malaria or typhoid fever was found in 13.3% of children, nasopharyngeal viral infection (without respiratory symptoms or signs) in 11.9%, malaria in 10.5%, gastroenteritis in 10.3%, urinary tract infection in 5.9%, typhoid fever in 3.7%, skin or mucosal infection in 1.5%, and meningitis in 0.2%. The cause of fever was undetermined in 3.2% of the children. A total of 70.5% of the children had viral disease, 22.0% had bacterial disease, and 10.9% had parasitic disease. These results provide a description of the numerous causes of fever in African children in two representative settings. Evidence of a viral process was found more commonly than evidence of a bacterial or parasitic process. (Funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation and others.).

  14. Clinical Features of Refractory Ascites in Outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Regina Caly

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To present the clinical features and outcomes of outpatients who suffer from refractory ascites. METHODS: This prospective observational study consecutively enrolled patients with cirrhotic ascites who submitted to a clinical evaluation, a sodium restriction diet, biochemical blood tests, 24 hour urine tests and an ascitic fluid analysis. All patients received a multidisciplinary evaluation and diuretic treatment. Patients who did not respond to the diuretic treatment were controlled by therapeutic serial paracentesis, and a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was indicated for patients who required therapeutic serial paracentesis up to twice a month. RESULTS: The most common etiology of cirrhosis in both groups was alcoholism [49 refractory (R and 11 non-refractory ascites (NR]. The majority of patients in the refractory group had Child-Pugh class B cirrhosis (p=0.034. The nutritional assessment showed protein-energy malnutrition in 81.6% of the patients in the R group and 35.5% of the patients in the NR group, while hepatic encephalopathy, hernia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, upper digestive hemorrhage and type 2 hepatorenal syndrome were present in 51%, 44.9%, 38.8%, 38.8% and 26.5% of the patients in the R group and 9.1%, 18.2%, 0%, 0% and 0% of the patients in the NR group, respectively (p=0.016, p=0.173, p=0.012, p=0.012, and p=0.100, respectively. Mortality occurred in 28.6% of the patients in the R group and in 9.1% of the patients in the NR group (p=0.262. CONCLUSION: Patients with refractory ascites were malnourished, suffered from hernias, had a high prevalence of complications and had a high postoperative death frequency, which was mostly due to infectious processes.

  15. Decreasing post-succinylcholine myalgia in outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, B; Chalasani, J; Uy, N T; Phitayakorn, P; Mallett, S V; Rudy, T E

    1987-05-01

    The effectiveness of four pretreatment regimens in decreasing succinylcholine-induced myalgias was studied in healthy outpatients undergoing general anaesthesia for ambulatory surgery. Four hundred and forty adult females were randomly assigned to one of four pretreatment groups. Three hundred and ninety-five patients completed the study. One of the following pretreatments was given prior to injection of 1.5 mg X kg-1 of succinylcholine: normal saline IV three minutes and again immediately prior to succinylcholine; 0.06 mg X kg-1 d-tubo-curarine (dTc) IV three minutes prior and normal saline IV immediately prior; normal saline IV three minutes prior and 1.5 mg X kg-1 lidocaine IV immediately prior; 0.06 mg X kg-1 dTc IV three minutes prior and 1.5 mg X kg-1 lidocaine IV immediately prior. Fasciculations after injection of succinylcholine were observed and recorded. Patients were contacted by telephone 40-48 hours postoperatively and questioned about the presence of muscle pains. These pains, if present, were graded either mild or moderate to severe. The patients in the two dTc-containing groups exhibited less fasciculations than patients in the other two experimental groups. The dTc-lidocaine group had a lower incidence of moderate to severe fasciculations than in any of the other three groups. Patients in the dTc, lidocaine, and dTc-lidocaine experimental groups reported a higher incidence of absence of muscle pain and a lower incidence of moderate-severe pain than did patients in the saline group. The dTc-lidocaine group had more patients without myalgia and less patients with moderate to severe myalgias than any of the other groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. VA Outpatient Visits by Administrative Parent, FY2010-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Outpatient visits by Administrative Parent. A visit is counted as a visit to one or more clinics or units within 1 calendar day at the site of care level. A patient...

  17. Transportation and retention in outpatient drug abuse treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, P D; Lemon, S C; Stein, M D

    2001-09-01

    To determine whether certain types of transportation assistance improve outpatient treatment retention beyond thresholds shown to have therapeutic benefits, we analyzed data from 1,144 clients in 22 outpatient methadone maintenance (OMM) programs and 2,031 clients in 22 outpatient drug-free (ODF) programs in the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcomes Study (DATOS), a national, 12-month, longitudinal study of drug abuse treatment programs. Directors' surveys provided information about provision of car, van, or contracted transportation services or individual vouchers/payment for public transportation. Chart-abstracted treatment retention was dichotomized at 365 days for OMM and 90 days for ODF. Separate multivariate hierarchical linear models revealed that provision of car, van, or contracted transportation services improved treatment retention beyond these thresholds for both OMM and ODF, but individual vouchers or payment for public transportation did not. Future research should validate whether car, van, or contracted transportation services improve retention and other treatment outcomes in outpatient drug abuse treatment.

  18. Veterinary Teaching Hospital to launch small animal outpatient imaging service

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Christy

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in June 2009, the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech's Veterinary Teaching Hospital will introduce a new outpatient advanced imaging service for surrounding small animal veterinarian practices.

  19. Child health service provision in Ethiopia: Outpatient, growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Child health service provision in Ethiopia: Outpatient, growth monitoring and immunization. Theodros Getachew, Ibrahim Kedir, Abebe Bekele, Atkure Defar, Mekonnen Tadesse, Habtamu Teklie, Kassahun Amenu, Terefe Gelibo, Yibeltal Assefa, Amha Kebede, Agazi Ameha ...

  20. Cardiovascular risk factors in outpatients with bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumpers, U.M.H.; Boom, K.; Janssen, F.M.G.; Tulen, J.H.M.; Loonen, Anton J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: The mortality due to cardiovascular diseases in bipolar patients is much higher than in the general population. It is unclear whether lithium treatment contributes to this cardiovascular morbidity. Methods: The cardiovascular risk factors in outpatients with bipolar disorder on

  1. Feasibility and safety of outpatient breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duriaud, Helle Molter; Kroman, Niels; Kehlet, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    included patients with mastectomy > 70 years, post-operative observation and observation after mobilisation. RESULTS: Of the 382 patients who were planned for outpatient surgery (79%), 90% received surgery in an outpatient setup. Among the 101 patients (21%) who were planned for inpatient......INTRODUCTION: Improvement in perioperative care programmes has facilitated post-operative recovery and use of short-term or outpatient procedures. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of an outpatient breast cancer programme in patients referred to a large breast cancer...... unit. METHODS: After an introduction period involving 554 consecutive patients, all patients operated from 1 November 2015 to 30 June 2016 (a total 483 patients) were treated with multimodal oral analgesia, preoperative high-dose glucocorticoids and no routine use of drains. Planned inpatient surgery...

  2. Comparing Short-term Complications of Inpatient Versus Outpatient Single-level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: An Analysis of 6940 Patients Using the ACS-NSQIP Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Ryan; Kim, Robert B; Lam, Sandi K; Cybulski, George R; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2018-02-01

    Multicenter propensity score-adjusted retrospective cohort study. To determine baseline 30-day complication rates for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and compare clinical complications for patients undergoing single-level ACDFs between inpatient and outpatient settings. ACDF remains the most common procedure in the treatment of a variety of cervical disc pathologies, making it a focus of quality improvement initiatives. Outpatient single-level ACDFs are becoming more common and offer advantages including reducing nosocomial infections and costs, as well as improved patient satisfaction. The 2011-2013 NSQIP datasets were queried to identify all patients who underwent single-level ACDF procedures using current procedural terminology codes. Outpatient and inpatient cohorts were matched 1:1 using propensity score analysis to assess short-term outcomes. The outcomes assessed included 30-day medical and surgical complications, reoperation, readmission, and mortality. In total, 6940 patients underwent a single-level ACDF with an overall complication rate of 4.2%. A total of 5162 patients (74.4%) had an inpatient hospital stay after surgery, whereas 1778 patients (25.6%) had outpatient surgery. After matching based on preoperative and operative characteristics to account for potential confounders, the overall complication rate was higher in the inpatient arm compared with the outpatient arm (2.5% vs. 1.2%; P=0.003). The 30-day readmission rate was also higher but not significant in the inpatient group than the outpatient group (2.2% vs. 1.8%; P=0.355). Mortality was the same with 0.1% in both groups (P=0.564). Patients undergoing outpatient single-level ACDF had a lower 30-day complication rates than those undergoing it in the inpatient setting. Outpatient surgery for single-level ACDF is safe and a favorable option for suitable patients. Level 3.

  3. Management of posterior ankyloglossia and upper lip ties in a tertiary otolaryngology outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoiton, Lara; Morgan, Maggie; Baguley, Katherine

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown an association between ankyloglossia (tongue tie) and upper-lip ties to breastfeeding difficulties. Treatment is commonly multidisciplinary involving lactation consultants and surgical management with tongue tie and upper lip tie release. There is currently limited data looking at posterior ankyloglossia and upper lip ties. Consecutive patients seen at an ENT outpatient clinic for ankyloglossia and upper-lip ties from May 2014-August 2015 were assessed for an outpatient frenotomy. Breastfeeding outcomes were assessed following the procedure. 43 babies were seen and 34 patients had a procedure carried out. Babies ranged from 2 to 20 weeks old with the median age being 6.6 weeks. The most common presenting complaint was latching issues (85%) with mothers' painful nipples being the second (65%). 21 patients (62%) had a tongue tie release, 10 (29%) had both a tongue tie and upper lip tie divided, whereas 3 (9%) had an upper-lip tie alone divided. 29 (85%) of the patients who had a procedure carried out had an immediate improvement in breastfeeding, while 28 (82%) had a continued improvement at 2 weeks follow up. Frenotomy for posterior ankyloglossia and upper lip ties is a simple procedure that can be carried out in an outpatient setting with apparent immediate benefit. Otolaryngologists are likely to have an increasing role to play in the evaluation and management of ankyloglossia and upper lip ties in babies with breastfeeding difficulties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Epidemiology of burns in Taiwan: a nationwide report including inpatients and outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Han; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Ma, Hsu

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study is to understand the incidence of burns among outpatients and inpatients of Taiwan in 2010. Characteristics of the burned patients were also studied in terms of gender, age, burn sites, burn degree, reconstructive surgical treatment, as well as which specialty and medical facility they are treated in. Burned patients were identified from the 1,000,000-person cohort dataset sampled from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database. Ones who had been hospitalized with discharge diagnoses related to burns were categorized as inpatients and others who had only ambulatory visits and emergency room visits were classified as outpatients. 7630 burn-injury patients were found, presenting an annual incidence of burns as 670.8/10(5) in males (n=3303) and 852.5/10(5) in females (n=4327). Only 3.4% (156 males and 107 females) of them were hospitalized. Higher incidence of burns were found in females and young children, while males and the elderly tended to have more severe burns, based on high-degree burns, admission rate, and incidence of hospitalizations for burns. This is a population-based study demonstrating the epidemiology of burns among outpatients and inpatients in Taiwan, leading us closer to the reality of burns treated in different settings of medical facilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Outpatient management following intensive induction or salvage chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Roland B; Taylor, Lenise R; Gardner, Kelda M; Dorcy, Kathleen Shannon; Vaughn, Jennifer E; Estey, Elihu H

    2013-01-01

    Adults with newly diagnosed or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) commonly receive intensive chemotherapy to achieve disease remission. In the United States and many other countries, it is standard practice that these patients remain hospitalized "preemptively" until blood count recovery, owing to the risk for overwhelming infections and bleeding during pancytopenia. This care policy requires hospitalization for an average of 3 to 4 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. However, highly effective oral prophylactic antimicrobials are now available, and transfusion support of outpatients has become routine in recent years. As a result, the care of patients with hematologic malignancies treated with intensive modalities is increasingly shifting from inpatient to outpatient settings. Benefits of this shift could include the reduced need for medical resources (eg, transfusions or intravenous antimicrobial therapy), improved quality of life (QOL), decreased rates of nosocomial infections, and lower costs. Increasing evidence indicates that select AML patients undergoing intensive remission induction or salvage chemotherapy can be discharged early after completion of chemotherapy and followed closely in a well-equipped outpatient facility in a safe and costeffective manner. Further demonstration that the current approach of preemptive hospitalization is medically unjustified, economically more burdensome, and adversely affects health-related QOL would very likely change the management of these patients throughout this country and elsewhere, resulting in the establishment of a new standard practice that improves cancer care.

  6. Patient involvement in rheumatology outpatient service design and delivery: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Savia; Galloway, James; Simpson, Carol; Chura, Radka; Dobson, Joanne; Gullick, Nicola J; Steer, Sophia; Lempp, Heidi

    2017-06-01

    Patient involvement is increasingly recognized as important within the UK National Health Service to ensure that services delivered are relevant to users' needs. Organizations are encouraged to work with service users to achieve excellence in care. Patient education can improve health outcomes and reduce health-care costs. Mobile technologies could play a vital role in this. Patient-centred development of innovative strategies to improve the experience of rheumatology outpatients. The Group Rheumatology Initiative Involving Patients (GRIIP) project was set up in 2013 as a joint venture between patients, clinicians, academics and management at a London hospital. The project saw (i) the formation of an independent patient group which provided suggestions for service improvement - outcomes included clearer signs in the outpatient waiting area, extended phlebotomy opening hours and better access to podiatry; (ii) a rolling patient educational evening programme initiated in 2014 with topics chosen by patient experts - feedback has been positive and attendance continues to grow; and (iii) a mobile application (app) co-designed with patients launched in 2015 which provides relevant information for outpatient clinic attendees and data capture for clinicians - downloads have steadily increased as users adopt this new technology. Patients can effectively contribute to service improvement provided they are supported, respected as equals, and the organization is willing to undergo a cultural change. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Westberg, Pharm.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic.Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, including registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified medical assistants. The impact of this training was measured through pre-initiation and post-implementation surveys, competency assessments and an audit. Results: The educational initiative was successfully designed and delivered to clinic nursing staff. Assessment of the initiative found that all nursing staff completing competency assessments successfully passed. Pre-initiation- and post-implementation- survey responses on the self-assessed ability to gather and document accurate medication lists did not show significant changes. Informal observations in the clinic indicated that this initiative changed the culture of the clinic, creating increased awareness of the importance of accurate medications and increased emphasis on medication reconciliation.Conclusions: The expertise of pharmacists can be utilized to educate nursing staff on the skills and abilities necessary to gather and document accurate medication lists. This study did not find measurable changes in the accuracy of medication lists in this clinic. Future research is needed to determine the best methods to train health professionals in medication reconciliation to ensure accurate medication lists in the outpatient setting.

  8. Impact of relational coordination on staff and patient outcomes in outpatient surgical clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittell, Jody Hoffer; Logan, Caroline; Cronenwett, Jack; Foster, Tina C; Freeman, Richard; Godfrey, Marjorie; Vidal, Dale Collins

    2018-01-05

    Pressures are increasing for clinicians to provide high-quality, efficient care, leading to increased concerns about staff burnout. This study asks whether staff well-being can be achieved in ways that are also beneficial for the patient's experience of care. It explores whether relational coordination can contribute to both staff well-being and patient satisfaction in outpatient surgical clinics where time constraints paired with high needs for information transfer increase both the need for and the challenge of achieving timely and accurate communication. We studied relational coordination among surgeons, nurses, residents, administrators, technicians, and secretaries in 11 outpatient surgical clinics. Data were combined from a staff and a patient survey to conduct a cross-sectional study. Data were analyzed using ordinary least squares and random effects regression models. Relational coordination among all workgroups was significantly associated with staff outcomes, including job satisfaction, work engagement, and burnout. Relational coordination was also significantly associated with patients' satisfaction with staff and their overall visit, though the association between relational coordination and patients' satisfaction with their providers did not reach statistical significance. Even when patient-staff interactions are relatively brief, as in outpatient settings, high levels of relational coordination among interdependent workgroups contribute to positive outcomes for both staff and patients, and low levels tend to have the opposite effect. Clinical leaders can increase the expectation of positive outcomes for both staff and their patients by implementing interventions to strengthen relational coordination.

  9. Economic impact of prescreening on gastroenterology outpatient clinic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Fergal; Harewood, Gavin C; Cagney, Daniel; Basri, Fadzwani; Patchett, Stephen E; Murray, Frank E

    2010-04-01

    Outpatient clinic activity represents a major workload for clinicians. Unnecessary outpatient visits place a strain on service provision, resulting in unnecessary delays for more urgent cases. We sought to determine both the impact and economic benefit of employing phone follow-up and physician assistant (PA) triage systems on attendances at a gastroenterology outpatient department. We performed a retrospective chart review of all patients attending a gastroenterology outpatient clinic over a 2-week period. Patients were categorized into new or follow-up attendees and the follow-up patients were further subcategorized into 1 of 4 groups: (1) those attending to receive results of investigations requiring no further treatment (group A); (2) those attending to receive results of investigations requiring further treatment (group B); (3) those attending with a chronic gastrointestinal disease requiring no active change in management (group C); (4) those attending with a chronic gastrointestinal disease requiring active change in management (group D). It was assumed that patients in group A could be managed by phone follow-up in place of clinic attendance and patients in group C could be triaged to see a PA. Out of a total of 329 outpatient attendees, 40 (12%) required no active intervention (group A) and would have been suitable for phone follow-up. A further 58 (18%) had stable disease, requiring no change in management and hence, could have been triaged to see a PA. Implementation of phone follow-up and patient review by PA could reduce salary expenses of outpatient practice by 17%. Our findings support routine prescreening of outpatient attendees to enhance the efficiency of gastroenterology outpatient practice.

  10. Outpatient diagnostic of bladder tumours in flexible cystoscopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Gregers G; Mogensen, Karin; Toft, Birgitte Grønkær

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) in flexible cystoscopes and the diagnostic quality of biopsies for diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the outpatients department (OPD).......The aim of this study was to evaluate photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) in flexible cystoscopes and the diagnostic quality of biopsies for diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the outpatients department (OPD)....

  11. Econometric estimation of WHO-CHOICE country-specific costs for inpatient and outpatient health service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Karin; Lauer, Jeremy A; Gkountouras, Georgios; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Stanciole, Anderson

    2018-01-01

    Policy makers require information on costs related to inpatient and outpatient health services to inform resource allocation decisions. Country data sets were gathered in 2008-2010 through literature reviews, website searches and a public call for cost data. Multivariate regression analysis was used to explore the determinants of variability in unit costs using data from 30 countries. Two models were designed, with the inpatient and outpatient models drawing upon 3407 and 9028 observations respectively. Cost estimates are produced at country and regional level, with 95% confidence intervals. Inpatient costs across 30 countries are significantly associated with the type of hospital, ownership, as well as bed occupancy rate, average length of stay, and total number of inpatient admissions. Changes in outpatient costs are significantly associated with location, facility ownership and the level of care, as well as to the number of outpatient visits and visits per provider per day. These updated WHO-CHOICE service delivery unit costs are statistically robust and may be used by analysts as inputs for economic analysis. The models can predict country-specific unit costs at different capacity levels and in different settings.

  12. Outpatient anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for cervical disk disease: a prospective consecutive series of 96 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lied, B; Rønning, P A; Halvorsen, C M; Ekseth, K; Helseth, E

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate surgical complications and clinical outcome in a consecutive series of 96 patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for cervical disk degeneration (CDD) in an outpatient setting. Pre-, per-, and postoperative data on patients undergoing single- or two-level outpatient ACDF at the private Oslofjord Clinic were prospectively collected. This study includes 96 consecutive patients with a mean age of 49.1 years. 36/96 had a two-level ACDF. Mean postoperative observation time before discharge was 350 min, and 95/96 were successfully discharged either to their home or to a hotel on the day of surgery. The surgical mortality was 0%, while the surgical morbidity rate was 5.2%. Two (2.1%) patients developed postoperative hematoma, 2 (2.1%) patients experienced postoperative dysphagia, and 1 (1%) experienced deterioration of neurological function. Radicular pain, neck pain, and headache decreased significantly after surgery. 91% of patients were satisfied with the surgery, according to the NASSQ. ACDF in carefully selected patients with CDD appears to be safe in the outpatient setting, provided a sufficient postoperative observation period. The clinical outcome and patient satisfaction of outpatients are comparable to that of inpatients. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Structured outpatient treatment of alcohol vs. drug dependencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washton, A M

    1990-01-01

    This chapter describes the rationale, indications, design, and use of a structured outpatient treatment approach as an effective alternative to residential treatment for alcohol and drug dependencies. An increasing demand for outpatient treatment services is being created by a combination of clinical and economic factors, including the influx of employed drug abusers who do not need or desire residential care and mounting financial pressures to contain health care costs. To be effective as a primary treatment modality, outpatient programs must be highly structured and intensive and able to deal with the full spectrum of alcohol and drug addictions. Perpetuating the historical separation between alcoholism and drug abuse treatment programs is unnecessary and counterproductive, although certain modifications in treatment approaches are needed to accommodate the distinctive characteristics of particular classes of drugs and the people who use them. The "outpatient rehab," a treatment model that approximates the intensity of inpatient treatment on an outpatient basis, may help to maximize the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of outpatient treatment as a viable alternative to residential care. Initial treatment results with this model are encouraging.

  14. Local anaesthesia for pain control during outpatient hysteroscopy: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Natalie A M; Khan, Khalid S

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of different types of local anaesthetic for pain control during outpatient hysteroscopy. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Setting Outpatient hysteroscopy clinics. Participants Women undergoing diagnostic or operative hysteroscopy as outpatients—that is, without general anaesthesia. Study selection criteria Medline, Embase, CINAHL, the Cochrane library, and reference lists of relevant studies. Two reviewers independently selected trials. Data were abstracted on quality, characteristics, and results. Results There were 20 trials (2851 participants). Data from 15 of these were meta-analysed in subgroups defined by type of intervention and study quality. Intracervical (standardised mean difference −0.36, 95% confidence interval −0.61 to −0.10, I2=0%) and paracervical (−1.28, −2.22 to −0.35, I2=97%) injections of local anaesthetic significantly reduced the pain in women undergoing hysteroscopy as outpatients, whereas transcervical (−0.11, −0.31 to 0.10, I2=27%) and topical application (−0.32, −0.97 to 0.33, I2= 90%) did not. Meta-regression showed that paracervical injection was superior to the other anaesthetic methods (P=0.04), a finding that was supported by the high quality subgroup of studies. Use of local anaesthetic did not have a significant effect on the incidence of vasovagal episodes (P=0.09). Conclusions Paracervical local anaesthetic injection is the best method of pain control for women undergoing hysteroscopy as outpatients. PMID:20332307

  15. Profile and analysis of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri J.E. Tarigan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic complications of diabetes mellitus have a significant role in increasing morbidity, mortality, disability, and health cost. In the outpatient setting, the availability of data regarding to the chronic complications of type 2 diabetes is useful for evaluation of prevention, education, and patient’s treatment. This study aimed to describe the characteristic of type 2 diabetes chronic complications in outpatient diabetes clinic.Methods: A cross-sectional study was done using 155 patients in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (RSCM, Jakarta in 2010. Secondary data were used from medical record based on history taking, physical examination, diabetic foot assessment, laboratory, neurologic, cardiology, opthalmology, ankle brachial index, and electrography of the patients. Characteristic profiles of the subjects, prevalence of the chronic complications, and its association with diabetes risk factors, such as glycemic control using HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes, and LDL cholesterol were analyzed using chi square test.Results: Among 155 subjects participated in the study, most of them were women (59% and elderly (46%. The prevalence of diabetes chronic complications was 69% from all subjects. These chronic complications included microangiopathy, macroangiopathy and mixed complications, with prevalence of 56%, 7% and 27% respectively. Microangiopathy included nephropathy (2%, retinopathy (7%, neuropathy (38% and mixed complications (53%. Macroangiopathy included coronary heart disease (46%, peripheral arterial disease (19%, stroke (18%, and mixed complication (17%. From the analysis, we found significant association between duration of diabetes and diabetic neuropathy (p = 0.003.Conclusion: Prevalence of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, mainly dominated by microvascular-related complications including nephropathy, retinopathy

  16. The use of spirometry in a primary care setting

    OpenAIRE

    Blain, Elizabeth A; Craig, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Elizabeth A Blain, Timothy J CraigPenn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USAObjective: To determine the use of spirometry in family practice, internal medicine, and pediatric outpatient settings.Methods: Data were collected from 45 outpatient offices in the central Pennsylvania area via phone survey that asked a set of four questions: 1) Do you have spirometry in your office? 2) Do you use spirometry for asthma patients? 3) In what situation do you use spirometry for? 4) Do you use s...

  17. Crohn's disease-associated silent aspiration in the outpatient setting: Anesthesiologists beware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Christopher; Coleman, Scott; Van Hal, Michele; Rashidian, Farshad; Okum, Gary; Green, Michael Stuart

    2018-01-01

    Every anesthesia provider fears aspiration of gastric contents during an anesthetic, and it may occur even in the absence of overt signs such as coughing or choking. Whether the aspiration is frank or silent, catastrophic and deleterious consequences may ensue. Therefore, familiarity with risk factors for silent aspiration is essential. Crohn's disease reportedly delays gastric emptying making these patients more susceptible to silent aspiration during surgery. Anesthesia providers must be cognizant of this risk and vigilant in the recognition to formulate a specific treatment plan preoperatively. We present a case of an ambulatory surgical patient with suspected silent aspiration undiagnosed by the anesthesia care team before induction of anesthesia.

  18. Drug Utilization Patterns and Costs of Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents in an Outpatient Setting in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristos, Apostolos; Kani, Chara; Litsa, Panagiota; Valsami, Georgia; Souliotis, Kyriakos; Saridi, Maria; Markantonis, Sophia

    2016-05-01

    Anemia in the elderly is often related to a higher prevalence of chronic diseases such as chronic kidney failure, arthritis, and malignancy. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) have been used for years to effectively treat anemia and when used appropriately can substantially improve the health status and quality of life of older adults. Following the 2008 recession in Greece, the government introduced ESA price control restrictions, but no prescribing restrictions, in an effort to reduce drug expenditure. ESA prescribing patterns and treatment costs were analyzed to determine inappropriate or appropriate use of these agents and related health care resources in Greece. A retrospective register-based drug utilization study was carried out using data from prescriptions dispensed at the public pharmacy of the largest social insurance fund (IKA-ETAM), for patients receiving ESAs over a six-month period. For each patient, demographic data, ESA dosage regimen, treatment indication and cost, prescriber specialty, and prescription origin were recorded. A total of 14,387 prescriptions from 6,074 patients (median age 74 years) were reviewed. A substantial number of patients (13.5%) were treated for off-label indications, for which the average cost per patient per indication was higher. ESA dosage/frequency of administration varied but was in accordance with recommendations. The percentage of patients who received innovator and biosimilar erythropoietin (EPO) was 88% and 12%, respectively. For the optimization of ESA utilization and the reduction of treatment costs, strict ESA prescription monitoring, development of registries, and criteria for off-label indications and biosimilar use in naive patients under the umbrella of risk-sharing agreements should be proposed.

  19. Follow-up of patients with rheumatic heart diseases in the outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Belov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The major tasks of a follow-up of patients with rheumatic cardiac defects (RCD are formulated on the basis of the recommendations of international and national scientific associations. At the same time, a clinicianXs experience and judgments play an important role in supervising patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease and RCD.

  20. A comparison of pain assessment by physicians, parents and children in an outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudvik, Christina; Moutte, Svein-Denis; Baste, Valborg; Morken, Tone

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to compare pain assessments by patients, parents and physicians in children with different medical conditions, and analyse how this affected the physicians' administration of pain relief. This cross-sectional study involved 243 children aged 3-15 years treated at Bergen Accident and Emergency Department (ED) in 2011. The child patient's pain intensity was measured using age-adapted scales while parents and physicians did independent numeric rating scale (NRS) assessments. Physicians assessed the child's mean pain to be NRS=3.2 (SD 2.0), parents: NRS=4.8 (SD 2.2) and children: NRS=5.5 (SD 2.4). The overall child-parent agreement was moderate (Cohen's weighted κ=0.55), but low between child-physician (κ=0.12) and parent-physician (κ=0.17). Physicians significantly underestimated pain in all paediatric patients ≥3 years old and in all categories of medical conditions. However, the difference in pain assessment between child and physician was significantly lower for fractures (NRS=1.2; 95% CI 0.5 to 2.0) compared to wounds (NRS=3.4; CI 2.2 to 4.5; p=0.001), infections (NRS=3.1; CI 2.2 to 4.0; p=0.002) and soft tissue injuries (NRS=2.4; CI 1.9 to 2.9; p=0.007). The physicians' pain assessment improved with increasing levels of pain, but only 42.1% of children with severe pain (NRS≥7) received pain relief. Paediatric pain was significantly underestimated by ED physicians. In the absence of a self-report from the child, parents' evaluation should be listened to. Despite improved pain assessments in children with fractures and when pain was perceived to be severe, it is worrying that barely half of the children with severe pain received analgesics in the ED. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Building youths' resilience within a psychiatric outpatient setting: results from a pilot clinical intervention project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waaktaar, Trine; Christie, Helen J; Borge, Anne Inger Helmen; Torgersen, Svenn

    2004-02-01

    The relevance of resilience research for clinical practice has not yet been established. In this intervention pilot study, the aim was to explore how group work based on enhancing the participants' creativity, self-efficacy, active coping, and sense of continuity could be utilized within a clinical context for adolescents with stressful background experiences. 31 participants and 24 parents completed pre-, post-, and 1-yr. follow-up assessments of the youths' behavior difficulties, as well as depression, positive life attitude, coping, and prosocial behavior. Apart from a drop in self-rated prosocial behavior, no significant treatment effects were found. Implications for clinical practice and research are indicated.

  2. Understanding the management of electronic test result notifications in the outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Hardeep

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Notifying clinicians about abnormal test results through electronic health record (EHR -based "alert" notifications may not always lead to timely follow-up of patients. We sought to understand barriers, facilitators, and potential interventions for safe and effective management of abnormal test result delivery via electronic alerts. Methods We conducted a qualitative study consisting of six 6-8 member focus groups (N = 44 at two large, geographically dispersed Veterans Affairs facilities. Participants included full-time primary care providers, and personnel representing diagnostic services (radiology, laboratory and information technology. We asked participants to discuss barriers, facilitators, and suggestions for improving timely management and follow-up of abnormal test result notifications and encouraged them to consider technological issues, as well as broader, human-factor-related aspects of EHR use such as organizational, personnel, and workflow. Results Providers reported receiving a large number of alerts containing information unrelated to abnormal test results, many of which were believed to be unnecessary. Some providers also reported lacking proficiency in use of certain EHR features that would enable them to manage alerts more efficiently. Suggestions for improvement included improving display and tracking processes for critical alerts in the EHR, redesigning clinical workflow, and streamlining policies and procedures related to test result notification. Conclusion Providers perceive several challenges for fail-safe electronic communication and tracking of abnormal test results. A multi-dimensional approach that addresses technology as well as the many non-technological factors we elicited is essential to design interventions to reduce missed test results in EHRs.

  3. Partial epilepsies: Choice of antiepileptic drugs in adults in the outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Vlasov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper depicts the author's view on how a neurologist/epileptologist chooses an antiepileptic drug in his practice under present-day conditions. It considers possible clinical situations and therapeutic tactics in relation to the efficiency of performed therapy, as well as methods for switching to other antiepileptic drugs if the previous/first monotherapy is ineffective. The author gives main international and Russian guidelines in terms of the type of epileptic seizure/form of epilepsy/epilepsy syndrome. Despite its almost semicentennial history of effective clinical application, valproate is shown to be now a first-line choice drug for the therapy of undifferentiated, cryptogenic, and symptomatic partial epilepsies in patients of different age groups. The properties of valproate, such as efficacy against different types of seizures and forms of epilepsy, good tolerability, minimal aggravation risk, high monotherapy retention rates, various dosage forms, including the brand-name extendedrelease drug Depakine chrono or Depakine chronosphere and its intravenous formulation, favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles, make it indispensable at the present developmental stage of epileptology.

  4. Holter monitoring of central and peripheral temperature: possible uses and feasibility study in outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Manuel; Cuesta, David; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Churruca, Juan; Miro, Pau; Ruiz, Raul; Martinez, Carlos

    2009-08-01

    Conventional clinical thermometry has important limitations. A continuous monitoring of temperature may offer significant advantages, including the use of chronobiological and complexity analysis of temperature profile and eventually the identification of a "pre-febrile" pattern. We present a clinical model designed to measure, store and/or transmit in real time a central and a peripheral temperature reading. The results of its use in a healthy, free-living population is reported. Thirty subjects (15 women, 15 men, 20-70 years old), were monitored for 24 h while following their normal life. Temperatures were recorded every minute at the external auditory channel (EAC) and on the skin, at the intersection of the 5th intercostal space and the anterior axillary line. A Cosinor analysis and Approximate Entropy (ApEn) (m = 2, r = 0.15*SD, N = 180) were calculated for both temperatures. Median temperature was 35.55 degrees C [interquartile range (IR) 0.77 degrees C] in the external auditory channel (EAC) and 34.62 degrees C (IR 1.61) in the specified skin location. Median gradient between AEC and skin was 0.93 (IR 1.57). A circadian rhythm was present both in EAC and skin temperature, with a mean amplitude of 0.44 degrees C and an acrophase at 21:02 for the EAC and 0.70 degrees C and 00:42 for the skin. During the night there was a sizable increase in peripheral temperature, with a decrease in gradient and a loss of complexity in the temperature profile, most significantly in the peripheral temperature. Continuous monitoring of central and peripheral temperature may be a helpful tool in both ambulatory and admitted patients and may offer new approaches in clinical thermometry.

  5. Management of Newly Diagnosed Atrial Fibrillation in an Outpatient Clinic Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrysoee, Lars; Strömberg, Anna; Brandes, Axel

    2018-01-01

    fibrillation is not a fatal disease in itself was very important for patients. At the same time, visiting the clinic was overwhelming, information was difficult to understand, and patients found it difficult to be involved in decision-making. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that patients were uncertain...... with anticoagulation, and that anticoagulating was a lifelong treatment. RELEVANCE FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: This study demonstrates some lack of patient-centred care and an absence of tailored patient AF-related education. Furthermore, the study highlights the need for and importance of active patient involvement...

  6. Observational study identifies non-attendance characteristics in two hospital outpatient clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blæhr, Emely; Søgaard, Rikke; Kristensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Non-attended hospital appointments are receiving increasing attention in times when rapid access and efficient service delivery at public hospitals are on the agenda. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of non-attendance in a Danish outpatient setting and its...... notice were collected from administrative systems along with appointment characteristics. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Of the 54,987 and 31,538 appointments scheduled at the two departments, 4,524 (8%) and 5,479 (17%) were cancelled and 2,905 (5%) and 1,249 (4%) were...

  7. Best Practices for Outpatient Anterior Cervical Surgery: Results From a Delphi Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohandas, Anita; Summa, Chris; Worthington, W Bradley; Lerner, Jason; Foley, Kevin T; Bohinski, Robert J; Lanford, Gregory B; Holden, Carol; Wohns, Richard N W

    2017-06-01

    Delphi Panel expert panel consensus and narrative literature review. To obtain expert consensus on best practices for patient selection and perioperative decision making for outpatient anterior cervical surgery (anterior cervical disc fusion (ACDF) and cervical total disc replacement (CTDR)). Spine surgery in ambulatory settings is becoming a preferred option for both patients and providers. The transition from traditional inpatient environments has been enabled by innovation in anesthesia protocols and surgical technique, as well as favorable economics. Studies have demonstrated that anterior cervical surgery (ACDF and CTDR) can be performed safely on an outpatient basis. However, practice guidelines and evidence-based protocols to inform best practices for the safe and efficient performance of these procedures in same-day, ambulatory settings are lacking. A panel of five neurosurgeons, three anesthesiologists, one orthopedic spine surgeon, and a registered nurse was convened to comprise a multidisciplinary expert panel. A three-round modified-Delphi method was used to generate best-practice statements. Predetermined consensus was set at 70% for each best-practice statement. A total of 94 consensus statements were reviewed by the panel. After three rounds of review, there was consensus for 83 best-practice statements, while 11 statements failed to achieve consensus. All statements within several perioperative categories (and subcategories) achieved consensus, including preoperative assessment (n = 8), home-care/follow-up (n = 2), second-stage recovery (n = 18), provider economics (n = 8), patient education (n = 14), discharge criteria (n = 4), and hypothermia prevention (n = 6). This study obtained expert-panel consensus on best practices for patient selection and perioperative decision making for outpatient anterior cervical surgery (ACDF/CTDR). Given a paucity of guidelines and a lack of established care pathways for ACDF/CTDR in same

  8. A randomised controlled trial of Minnesota versus outpatient treatment of alcoholics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbaek, Morten; Nielsen, Bent

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the Minnesota day clinic treatment with the traditional public psychosocial treatment. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Public out-patient alcohol clinic and privately funded Minnesota day clinic in Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 148 individuals with alcohol...... dependence were included in a 1-year clinical trial. MEASUREMENTS: Self-reported drinking pattern and the seven composite scores from the addiction severity index (ASI). FINDINGS: A total of 42 (57%) and 45 (61%) patients (P > 0.05) completed the Minnesota treatment and public treatment, respectively...

  9. Outpatient diagnosis and clinical presentation of bipolar youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Kirti; Nakonezny, Paul A; Simmons, Alex; Mayes, Taryn; Walley, Annie; Emslie, Graham

    2009-08-01

    Many children and adolescents in the community do not fit the classic Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) criteria for Bipolar Disorder, Type I., and bipolar disorder, not otherwise specified (BPNOS) is often the "catch all" diagnosis. Significant research has been conducted to better understand the phenomenology of the spectrum of bipolar disorder; however, there are presently different operational definitions for bipolar disorder, in both clinical and research settings. A recent study, The Course and Outcome of Bipolar Youth (COBY) provided preliminary validation for diagnosing BPNOS. Using these COBY research definitions for BPNOS, we examined the clinical presentation and the prior history of psychotropic medication usage of youth with BPI vs. BPNOS presenting to an outpatient clinic. The initial evaluation consisted of a direct clinical interview with the parent(s) and the patient. Standardized rating scales such as the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms were used to assess current mood states. The Clinical Global Impressions Scale-Severity was used to assess the overall functioning of bipolar youth. Age, comorbidities, and family histories of 68 bipolar youth in the clinic are similar to what other studies have reported. BPNOS youth have significant functional impairment which is comparable to the BPI youth. Both bipolar groups are equally likely to have similar prior exposure to psychotropic medications. BPNOS is a serious illness the diagnostic guidelines for which are still debatable. Until further clarification of this diagnosis, the COBY definitions for BPNOS can be used in a clinic. The use of stringent criteria for diagnosing the bipolar spectrum disorders allows for careful differential diagnoses of psychiatric illnesses.

  10. Quality of life among dually diagnosed and non-substance-using male schizophrenia outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Imer Aras

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the quality of life (QoL in an outpatient setting among male patients dually diagnosed with schizophrenia and substance use disorder (SUD, and non-substance-using male schizophrenia patients. Methods. The study was conducted in an outpatient setting with 52 male schizophrenia patients and 49 male schizophrenia patients with SUD comorbidity, who were admitted to Bakirköy Research and Training Hospital between 1 May 2010 and 30 September 2010. The patients had been in remission for a minimum of 6 months. The subjects were re-evaluated for the persistence of the diagnosis by using the Structural Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID I socio-demographic data form, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF and positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS were administered to detect the factors affecting diagnostic stability and clinical course. Results. Schizophrenia patients with no SUD comorbidity had a significantly earlier age of disease onset than the comorbid group. SUD comorbidity in schizophrenia patients leads to increased rates of unemployment and homicidality. WHOQOL-Bref psychological health scores were significantly lower among patients in the comorbidity group. No statistically significant difference was identified between the groups with regard to the PANSS scores. Conclusions. It is necessary to focus on the treatment challenges for schizophrenia patients with SUD comorbidity, such as the provision of treatment in criminal justice settings, in which a high proportion of such patients are found.

  11. Antibiotic overuse for acute respiratory tract infections in Sri Lanka: a qualitative study of outpatients and their physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillekeratne, L Gayani; Bodinayake, Champica K; Dabrera, Thushani; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Arachchi, Wasantha Kodikara; Sooriyaarachchi, Anoji; Stewart, Kearsley; Watt, Melissa; Østbye, Truls; Woods, Christopher W

    2017-03-16

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are a common reason for antibiotic overuse worldwide. We previously showed that over 80% of outpatients presenting to a tertiary care hospital in Sri Lanka with influenza-like illness received antibiotic prescriptions, although almost half were later confirmed to have influenza. The purpose of this qualitative study was to assess Sri Lankan patients' and physicians' attitudes towards ARTI diagnosis and treatment. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 50 outpatients with ARTIs and five physicians in the Outpatient Department (OPD) at a large, public tertiary care hospital in southern Sri Lanka. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for themes related to ARTI diagnosis and treatment. Patients frequently sought ARTI care in the public sector due to the receipt of free care and the perception that government hospitals carried a sense of responsibility for patients' health. Patients reported multiple medical visits for their illnesses of short duration and many indicated that they were seeking care in the OPD while at the hospital for another reason. While patients generally expected to receive medication prescriptions at their visit, most patients were not specifically seeking an antibiotic prescription. However, more than 70% of patients received antibiotic prescriptions at their OPD visit. Physicians incorrectly perceived that patients desired antibiotics or "capsules," a common formulation of antibiotics dispensed in this outpatient setting, and cited patient demand as an important cause of antibiotic overuse. Physicians also indicated that high patient volume and fear of bacterial superinfection drove antibiotic overuse. Patients in this study were seeking medication prescriptions for their ARTIs, but physicians incorrectly perceived that antibiotic prescriptions were desired. High patient volume and fear of bacterial superinfection were also important factors in antibiotic overuse. Training of

  12. Do "Virtual" and "Outpatient" Public Health Tuberculosis Clinics Perform Equally Well? A Program-Wide Evaluation in Alberta, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Long

    Full Text Available Meeting the challenge of tuberculosis (TB elimination will require adopting new models of delivering patient-centered care customized to diverse settings and contexts. In areas of low incidence with cases spread out across jurisdictions and large geographic areas, a "virtual" model is attractive. However, whether "virtual" clinics and telemedicine deliver the same outcomes as face-to-face encounters in general and within the sphere of public health in particular, is unknown. This evidence is generated here by analyzing outcomes between the "virtual" and "outpatient" public health TB clinics in Alberta, a province of Western Canada with a large geographic area and relatively small population.In response to the challenge of delivering equitable TB services over long distances and to hard to reach communities, Alberta established three public health clinics for the delivery of its program: two outpatient serving major metropolitan areas, and one virtual serving mainly rural areas. The virtual clinic receives paper-based or electronic referrals and generates directives which are acted upon by local providers. Clinics are staffed by dedicated public health nurses and university-based TB physicians. Performance of the two types of clinics is compared between the years 2008 and 2012 using 16 case management and treatment outcome indicators and 12 contact management indicators.In the outpatient and virtual clinics, respectively, 691 and 150 cases and their contacts were managed. Individually and together both types of clinics met most performance targets. Compared to outpatient clinics, virtual clinic performance was comparable, superior and inferior in 22, 3, and 3 indicators, respectively.Outpatient and virtual public health TB clinics perform equally well. In low incidence settings a combination of the two clinic types has the potential to address issues around equitable service delivery and declining expertise.

  13. Relocation consequences on an ophthalmology consultation service from an inpatient to outpatient facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh JS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jorawer S Singh,1 Vincent M Imbrogno,2 Mary K Howard,3 Amandip S Cheema,3 Ausra D Selvadurai,4 Surbhi Bansal5 1Department of Ophthalmology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, 2Contemporary Ophthalmology of Erie, Erie, PA, 3Department of Ophthalmology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 4OcuSight Eye Care Center, Rochester, NY, 5Department of Ophthalmology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Importance: This study shows that relocation of an academic ophthalmology residency program from an inpatient to an outpatient setting in western New York does not affect the consult volume but affects management patterns and follow-up rates.Objective: To investigate the effects on the ophthalmology consultation service of an academic program with relocation from a Regional Level-1 Trauma center to an outpatient facility.Design: Consultation notes from 3 years before and 3 years after the University at Buffalo’s (UB Department of Ophthalmology relocation from a Regional Level-1 Trauma center (Erie County Medical Center to an outpatient facility (Ross Eye Institute were obtained from hospital electronic medical records and analyzed.Setting: Hospitalized care and institutional practice.Participants: All inpatient or Emergency Room Ophthalmology consultation patients from the Department of Ophthalmology at UB from 2004 to 2010 (1,379 patients.Exposures: None, this was a retrospective chart review.Main outcome measures: Patient demographics, reason for consult, diagnoses, and ophthalmic procedures performed by the UB Department of Ophthalmology before and after its relocation.Results: Relocation to the outpatient facility did not affect consult volume (P=0.15. The number of consults focusing on ophthalmic conditions, as a percentage of the yearly total, rose 460% (P=0.0001, while systemic condition consults with ocular manifestations fell 83% (P=0.0001. Consults for ocular trauma decreased 65% (P=0.0034. Consults ending with a

  14. Outpatient treatment costs and their potential impact on cancer care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isshiki, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Cancer creates a tremendous financial burden. Cancer-related costs are categorized into direct, indirect, and psychosocial costs. Although there have been many reports on medical care costs, which are direct, those on other costs are extremely scarce. We estimated travel time and costs required for cancer patients to receive outpatient treatment. We studied 521 cancer patients receiving anti-cancer treatment between February 2009 and December 2012 at the Outpatient Chemotherapy Center of Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center. Address data were extracted from Data Warehouse electronic medical records, and travel distance and time required for outpatient treatment were calculated via MapInfo and ACT Distance Calculator Package. Transportation costs were estimated on the basis of ¥274 (=$3.00) per kilometer. The study design was approved by an ethics review board of Teikyo University (12-851). Average round-trip travel distance, time, and cost for all patients were 26.7 km, 72.5 min, and ¥7,303 ($79.99), respectively. Cancer patients incurred a travel cost of ¥4000–¥9000 ($40.00 to $100.00) for each outpatient treatment. With population aging, seniors living alone and senior households are increasing, and outpatient visits are becoming a common burden

  15. Cost-effectiveness assessment in outpatient sinonasal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuaire, G; Theis, D; Fackeure, R; Chevalier, D; Gengler, I

    2018-02-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of outpatient sinonasal surgery in terms of clinical efficacy and control of expenses. A retrospective study was conducted from January 2014 to January 2016. Patients scheduled for outpatient sinonasal surgery were systematically included. Clinical data were extracted from surgical and anesthesiology computer files. The cost accounting methods applied in our institution were used to evaluate logistic and technical costs. The standardized hospital fees rating system based on hospital stay and severity in diagnosis-related groups (Groupes homogènes de séjours: GHS) was used to estimate institutional revenue. Over 2years, 927 outpatient surgical procedures were performed. The crossover rate to conventional hospital admission was 2.9%. In a day-1 telephone interview, 85% of patients were very satisfied with the procedure. All outpatient cases showed significantly lower costs than estimated for conventional management with overnight admission, while hospital revenue did not differ between the two. This study confirmed the efficacy of outpatient surgery in this indication. Lower costs could allow savings for the health system by readjusting the rating for the procedure. More precise assessment of cost-effectiveness will require more fine-grained studies based on micro costing at hospital level and assessment of impact on conventional surgical activity and post-discharge community care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Patterns of Psychiatric Outpatient Practice in Taiwan: A Nationwide Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Xiu Dai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Limited studies have utilized nationwide data to assess the patterns of psychiatric practice in other countries. In this study, data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan (NHIRD-TW for 2012 was analyzed to determine the patterns of psychiatric outpatient practice in Taiwan; (2 Methods: To determine the patterns of psychiatric outpatient practice in Taiwan, the data were drawn from the datasets of Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database for 2012, with 619,760 records of outpatient visits representing 1/500 of all the claims in Taiwan for that year. The analysis of psychiatric outpatient visits included patient demographics, diagnoses, and prescribed medications; (3 Results: Neurotic disorders were the most prevalent diagnoses (43.1%, n = 5714. Hypnotics-sedatives and anxiolytics were prescribed in 51.7% (n = 6850 and 39.1% (n = 5181 of psychiatric visits, respectively, with zolpidem being the most commonly prescribed drug (22.6%, n = 2998; and (4 Conclusion: Hypnotics and sedatives were widely prescribed for the outpatient population, and zolpidem had the highest annual prevalence of use. These findings deserve the attention of clinicians and policy makers for monitoring the abuse and dependence of these agents and subsequent adverse events.

  17. The cost of outpatient pneumonia in children Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Beth; Griffiths, Ulla Kou; Mulholland, Edward Kim; Ratu, Felisita Tupou; Tikoduadua, Lisi; Russell, Fiona Mary

    2012-02-01

    Pneumonia is the most common reason for visiting an outpatient facility among children Fiji. The objective of this study is to describe for the first time the costs associated with an episode of outpatient pneumonia in Fiji, in terms of cost both to the government health sector and to the household. Costs were estimated for 400 clinically diagnosed pneumonia cases from two outpatient facilities, one in the capital, Suva, and one in a peri-urban and rural area, Nausori. Household expenses relating to transport costs, treatment costs and indirect costs were determined primarily through structured interview with the caregiver. Unit costs were collected from a variety of sources. Patient-specific costs were summarised as average costs per facility. The overall average societal cost associated with an episode of outpatient pneumonia was $18.98, ranging from $14.33 in Nausori to $23.67 in Suva. Household expenses represent a significant proportion of the societal cost (29% in Nausori and 45% in Suva), with transport costs the most important household cost item. Health sector expenses were dominated by personnel costs at both sites. Both the average total household expenses and the average total health sector expenses were significantly greater in Suva than Nausori. A single episode of outpatient pneumonia represents a significant cost both to the government health sector and to affected households. Given the high incidence of this disease in Fiji, this places a considerable burden on society. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Intensive Outpatient Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe a novel model of intensive outpatient cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT indicated for eating disorder patients who are having difficulty modifying their eating habits in response to conventional outpatient CBT. Intensive outpatient CBT is a manual based treatment derived by the CBT-Enhanced (CBT-E for eating disorders. The treatment has four features that distinguish it from the conventional outpatient CBT-E: (1 it is designed to be suitable for both adult and adolescent patients, (2 it is delivered by a multidisciplinary non-eclectic team trained in CBT, (3 there is assistance with eating, (4 there is a family therapy module for patients under the age of 18 years. Preliminary outcome of intensive outpatient CBT-E are encouraging. The treatment has been applied to 20 consecutive underweight eating disorder patients (age 18.2 ± 6.5 years; BMI 14.6 ± 1.5 kg/m2. Thirteen patients (65% concluded the treatment, five (25% were admitted at an eating disorder inpatient unit, and two (10% prematurely interrupted the treatment. Completers obtained significant weight regain and improvement of eating disorder and general psychopathology. Most of the improvements were maintained at six-month follow-up.

  19. Characteristics of the first 1000 headaches in an outpatient headache clinic registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Ángel L; Rojo, Esther; Herrero, Sonia; Neri, María J; Bautista, Lourdes; Peñas, María L; Cortijo, Elisa; Mulero, Patricia; Fernández, Rosa

    2011-02-01

    To analyze the incidence and characteristics of the first 1000 headaches in an outpatient clinic. Headache is a common cause of medical consultation, both in primary care and in specialist neurology outpatient clinics. The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition (ICHD-II), enables headaches to be classified in a precise and reproducible manner. In January 2008, an outpatient headache clinic was set up in Hospital Clínico Universitario, a tertiary hospital in Valladolid, Spain. Headaches were classified prospectively in accordance with ICHD-II criteria. In each case we recorded age and sex, duration of headache, ancillary tests required, and previous symptomatic or prophylactic therapies. In January 2010, the registry included 1000 headaches in 682 patients. The women/men ratio was 2.46/1 and the mean age of the patients was 43.19 ± 17.1 years (range: 14-94 years). Patients were referred from primary care (53.4%), general neurology clinics (36.6%), and other specialist clinics (9%). The headaches were grouped (ICHD-II classification) as follows: group 1 (Migraine), 51.4%; group 2 (Tension-type headache), 16%; group 3 (Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias), 2.6%; group 4 (Other primary headaches) and group 13 (Cranial neuralgias), 3.4%. The diagnostic criteria of chronic migraine were satisfied in 8.5% of migraines. Regarding secondary headaches, 1.1% of all cases were included in group 5 (Headaches attributed to trauma) and 8.3% in group 8 (Headaches attributed to a substance or its withdrawal). Only 3.4% of headaches were classified in group 14 (Unspecified or not elsewhere classified), and 5.2% were included in the groups listed in the ICHD-II research appendix. This registry outlines the characteristics of patients seen in an outpatient headache clinic in a tertiary hospital; our results are similar to those previously reported for this type of outpatient clinic. Migraine was the most common diagnosis. Most headaches can be classified using

  20. Pain medication management processes used by oncology outpatients and family caregivers part I: health systems contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Karen L; Plano Clark, Vicki L; West, Claudia M; Dodd, Marylin J; Rabow, Michael W; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Oncology patients with persistent pain treated in outpatient settings and their family caregivers have significant responsibility for managing pain medications. However, little is known about their practical day-to-day experiences with pain medication management. The aim was to describe day-to-day pain medication management from the perspectives of oncology outpatients and their family caregivers who participated in a randomized clinical trial of a psychoeducational intervention called the Pro-Self(©) Plus Pain Control Program. In this article, we focus on pain medication management by patients and family caregivers in the context of multiple complex health systems. We qualitatively analyzed audio-recorded intervention sessions that included extensive dialogue between patients, family caregivers, and nurses about pain medication management during the 10-week intervention. The health systems context for pain medication management included multiple complex systems for clinical care, reimbursement, and regulation of analgesic prescriptions. Pain medication management processes particularly relevant to this context were getting prescriptions and obtaining medications. Responsibilities that fell primarily to patients and family caregivers included facilitating communication and coordination among multiple clinicians, overcoming barriers to access, and serving as a final safety checkpoint. Significant effort was required of patients and family caregivers to insure safe and effective pain medication management. Health systems issues related to access to needed analgesics, medication safety in outpatient settings, and the effort expended by oncology patients and their family caregivers require more attention in future research and health-care reform initiatives. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A prospective, multicentre study on the use of epidermal grafts to optimise outpatient wound management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachach-Haram, Nadine; Bystrzonowski, Nicola; Kanapathy, Muholan; Smith, Oliver; Harding, Keith; Mosahebi, Ash; Richards, Toby

    2017-02-01

    Current wound management through the use of a split-thickness skin graft often requires hospital admission, a period of immobility, attentive donor site wound care and pain management. This study evaluates the feasibility of using a novel epidermal graft-harvesting device (CelluTome) that allows pain-free epidermal skin grafting in the outpatient clinic setting. A prospective series of 35 patients was performed in 2 centres, involving 10 acute and 25 chronic wounds. All patients were subjected to epidermal grafting in the outpatient specialist clinic, without the use of anaesthesia, and allowed to return home after the procedure. Completely healed wounds were noted in 22 patients (62·9%). The overall mean time for 50% and 100% reduction in wound size was 3·31 ± 2·33 and 5·91 ± 3·48 weeks, respectively. There was no significant difference in healing times between the acute and chronic wounds (50% reduction in wound size; acute 2·20 ± 0·91 weeks versus chronic 3·73 ± 2·63 weeks, P = 0·171. Hundred percent reduction in wound size; acute 4·80 ± 1·61 weeks versus chronic 6·83 ± 4·47 weeks, P = 0·183). The mean time for donor site healing was 5·49 ± 1·48 days. The mean pain score during graft harvest was 1·42 ± 0·95, and the donor site Vancouver Scar Scale was 0 for all cases at 6 weeks. This automated device offers autologous skin harvesting in the outpatient setting with minimal or no pain and a scar free donor site, equally benefiting both the acute and chronic wounds. It has the potential to save NHS resources by eliminating the need for theatre space and a hospital bed while at the same time benefiting patient care. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Pain in patients attending outpatient rehabilitation: results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, Francesca; Paperini, Anita; Molino Lova, Raffaello; Pasquini, Guido; Boni, Roberta; Castagnoli, Chiara; Vannetti, Federica; Padua, Luca; Macchi, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate pain occurrence, characteristics and correlations in an outpatient rehabilitation setting. This was an observational pilot study. The setting was an outpatient rehabilitation facility. The subjects included all patients attending physiotherapy in the week 25th to 29th September 2010 and the interventions were made using self-administered questionnaire. Ongoing pain was assessed by a yes-no question, pain intensity by a numeric rating scale (NRS) ranging 0-10. Pain-related medication was investigated, along with pain characteristics, patient treatment expectations, life satisfaction, and catastrophism. Of the 201 patients, 12 were excluded and 189 enrolled (age 63.6 ± 15.6; 70.4% women). Pain (mean NRS = 5.6 ± 2.4) was reported by 60.9% patients (66% orthopedic and 40% neurological). In 87.8% cases, pain was chronic (>6 months). According to patients reporting pain, the main objectives of treatment were both pain relief and functional recovery for 51%; pain relief for 24.9%; functional recovery for 22.8%. Low treatment expectations were reported by 15.3% patients; catastrophism by 40.7%; 28.6% patients were on pain medication: use of drugs was related to age (p = 0.005), pain intensity (p = 0.009) and catastrophism (p = 0.0003). In a multivariate analysis, pain was independently correlated with an orthopedic versus neurological diagnosis (p = 0.000), and with reduced treatment expectations (p = 0.020), while independent of age (p = 0.74) gender (p = 0.22), and catastrophism (0.17). A high prevalence of pain was observed in outpatients undergoing rehabilitation. Pain was chronic in most cases. Pain relief was the most desired treatment outcome by patients reporting pain. Pain complaint was independently correlated to orthopedic vs neurological diagnosis and to reduced treatment expectations.

  3. Medication safety in the ambulatory chemotherapy setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Tejal K; Bartel, Sylvia B; Shulman, Lawrence N; Verrier, Deborah; Burdick, Elisabeth; Cleary, Angela; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Leape, Lucian L; Bates, David W

    2005-12-01

    Little is known concerning the safety of the outpatient chemotherapy process. In the current study, the authors sought to identify medication error and potential adverse drug event (ADE) rates in the outpatient chemotherapy setting. A prospective cohort study of two adult and one pediatric outpatient chemotherapy infusion units at one cancer institute was performed, involving the review of orders for patients receiving medication and/or chemotherapy and chart reviews. The adult infusion units used a computerized order entry writing system, whereas the pediatric infusion unit used handwritten orders. Data were collected between March and December 2000. The authors reviewed 10,112 medication orders (8008 adult unit orders and 2104 pediatric unit orders) from 1606 patients (1380 adults and 226 pediatric patients). The medication error rate was 3% (306 of 10,112 orders). Of these errors, 82% occurring in adults (203 of 249 orders) had the potential for harm and were potential ADEs, compared with 60% of orders occurring in pediatric patients (34 of 57 orders). Among these, approximately one-third were potentially serious. Pharmacists and nurses intercepted 45% of potential ADEs before they reached the patient. Several changes were implemented in the adult and pediatric settings as a result of these findings. In the current study, the authors found an ambulatory medication error rate of 3%, including 2% of orders with the potential to cause harm. Although these rates are relatively low, there is clearly the potential for serious patient harm. The current study identified strategies for prevention.

  4. Efficacy, safety, and applicability of outpatient treatment for diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tursi A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Antonio TursiGastroenterology Service, ASL BAT, Andria BT, ItalyAbstract: Acute diverticulitis of the colon represents a significant burden for national health systems, in terms of direct and indirect costs. Although current guidelines recommend use of antibiotics for the outpatient treatment of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis, evidence for this is still lacking. Hence, significant effort is now being made to identify the appropriate therapeutic approach to treat and prevent relapses of diverticulitis. Outpatient treatment has been identified as a safe and effective therapeutic approach in up to 90% of patients with uncomplicated diverticulitis. It allows important costs saving to health systems without a negative influence on quality of life for patients with uncomplicated diverticulitis, and reduces health care costs by more than 60%.Keywords: diverticulitis, 5-aminosalycilic acid, antibiotics, probiotics, outpatient treatment

  5. Measurement of nurses' workload in an oncology outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Alves de Souza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand and the degree of patient care in oncological outpatient services, as well as the complexity of treatment have had an impact on the workload of nurses. This study aimed at measuring the workload and productivity of nurses in an oncological outpatient service. An observational study using a work sampling technique was conducted and included seven nurses working in an oncological outpatient service in the south-eastern region of Brazil. A total of 1,487 intervention or activity samples were obtained. Nurses used 43.2% of their time on indirect care, 33.2% on direct care, 11.6% on associated activities, and 12% on personal activities. Their mean productivity was 88.0%. The findings showed that nurses in this service spend most of their time in indirect care activities. Moreover, the productivity index in this study was above that recommended in the literature.

  6. Service quality of hospital outpatient departments: patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of patient perceptions of health service quality as an important element in quality assessments has attracted much attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to assess the service quality of hospital outpatient departments affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from the patients' perspective. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in Tehran, Iran. The study samples included 500 patients who were selected by multi-stage random sampling from four hospitals. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire consisting of 50 items, and the validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed. For data analysis, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Friedman test, and descriptive statistics were used through LISREL 8.54 and SPSS 18 applications. Eight significant factors were extracted for outpatient service quality, which explained about 67 per cent of the total variance. Physician consultation, information provided to the patient, and the physical environment of the clinic were the three determining factors of the quality of outpatient services. The highest and lowest perceptions were related to physician consultation and perceived waiting time dimension, respectively. The mean score of patients' perception of outpatient service quality was 3.89 (±0.60). About 59.5 per cent of patients assessed the quality of outpatient services as good, 38.2 per cent as moderate, and 2.3 per cent as poor. Practical implications - The instrument developed for this study is valid and reliable, and it can help hospital managers to identify the areas needing improvement and correction. According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience with outpatient departments of teaching hospitals, and the services provided in these centres were of adequate quality, based on patient assessments.

  7. Outpatient Management of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Kim T; Nguyen, Jacqueline; Miladinovic, Branko; Lilly, Carol M; Ashmeade, Terri L; Balakrishnan, Maya

    2016-11-01

    An increasing number of infants are diagnosed with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). The study's primary objectives were to describe an academic medical center's level IV neonatal ICU's (NICU's) comprehensive outpatient NAS management effort, measure guideline compliance, and assess its safety. Secondary objectives were to describe the duration and cumulative methadone exposure, and to improve parent and provider knowledge of NAS. The study included 22 infants having a gestational age of 35-41 weeks, diagnosed with NAS, and discharged for outpatient methadone management. Discharges spanned 10 months and included 3 improvement periods. The outpatient program includes comprehensive discharge planning, a focused electronic health record (EHR) template, management guidelines, and parent and provider education. Providers complied with using the outpatient management guideline and EHR template, and assessed weight, NAS symptoms, and methadone dose during appointments. Two infants required NAS-related hospital readmission in the study period. From improvement period 1 to period 3 there was no difference in total outpatient days on methadone (58, 53, 74 days, respectively) or cumulative methadone dose (2.7, 2.6, 3.1mg/kg, respectively). A downward trend pattern in cumulative methadone exposure was noted in improvement period 2. Pre- and postimplementation surveys revealed that after implementation, parents had better understanding of NAS before delivery (71% vs. 100%, p = 0.009), while providers had increased comfort with outpatient management (24% vs. 67%, p management can be safe when a comprehensive management program is implemented and can result in provider compliance with the program. Copyright 2016 The Joint Commission.

  8. Voting preferences of outpatients with chronic mental illness in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullenkamp, Jens; Voges, Burkhard

    2004-12-01

    Outpatients with chronic mental illness living in therapeutic residential facilities in Mannheim, Germany (N=110) responded to an opinion poll to determine their voting preferences for the 2002 federal election to the Bundestag. The poll found that the outpatients were significantly more likely than the general population in Mannheim to prefer left-wing parties (78 percent compared with 56 percent). This finding is in contrast to earlier reports; however, it seems to better reflect common beliefs about the political preferences of this population. In conclusion, persons with chronic mental illness seem to prefer political parties that they believe will best serve their perceived specific interests.

  9. Empirical analysis of scaling and fractal characteristics of outpatients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li-Jiang; Liu, Zi-Xian; Guo, Jin-Li

    2014-01-01

    The paper uses power-law frequency distribution, power spectrum analysis, detrended fluctuation analysis, and surrogate data testing to evaluate outpatient registration data of two hospitals in China and to investigate the human dynamics of systems that use the “first come, first served” protocols. The research results reveal that outpatient behavior follow scaling laws. The results also suggest that the time series of inter-arrival time exhibit 1/f noise and have positive long-range correlation. Our research may contribute to operational optimization and resource allocation in hospital based on FCFS admission protocols.

  10. Continuity across inpatient and outpatient mental health care or specialisation of teams? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, S; Priebe, S; Giacco, D

    2015-02-01

    A central question for the organisation of mental health care is whether the same clinicians should be responsible for a patient's care across inpatient and outpatient settings (continuity of care) or if there should be separate teams (specialisation). Current reforms in Europe are inconsistent on which to favour, and are based on little research evidence. This review is the first systematic appraisal of the existing evidence comparing continuity of care and specialisation across inpatient and outpatient mental health care. A systematic search for studies of any design comparing mental health care systems based on continuity or specialisation of care was performed. Differences in clinical, social and cost-effective outcomes, and the views and experiences of patients and staff were assessed using narrative synthesis. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria. All studies had methodological shortcomings, but findings point towards reduced length and number of hospitalisations, and faster or more flexible transitions between services in continuity systems. Survey and qualitative findings suggest advantages of both systems, whilst patients and staff appear to prefer a continuity system. The evidence base suggests better outcomes and stakeholder preferences for continuity of care systems, but the quality of existing studies is insufficient to draw definitive conclusions. Higher quality comparative studies across various settings and population groups are urgently needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Day hospital versus out-patient care for psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, M; Crowther, R; Almaraz-Serrano, A M; Tyrer, P

    2001-01-01

    This review considers the use of day hospitals as an alternative to out-patient care. Three types of day hospital are covered by the review: 'day treatment programmes', 'day care centres' and 'transitional' day hospitals. Day treatment programmes offer more intense treatment for patients who have failed to respond to out-patient care (usually patients with affective or personality disorders). Day care centres offer structured support to patients with long-term severe mental disorders (mainly schizophrenia), who would otherwise be treated in the out-patient clinic. Transitional day hospitals offer time-limited care to patients who have just been discharged from in-patient care. The review had three objectives. First, to assess the effectiveness of day treatment programmes versus out-patient care for people with treatment-refractory disorders. Second, to assess the effectiveness of day care centres versus out-patient care for people with severe long term disorders. Third, to assess the effectiveness of transitional day hospital care for people who had just been discharged from hospital. We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Cochrane Library, issue 4, 2000), MEDLINE (January 1966 to December 2000), EMBASE (1980 to December 2000), CINAHL (1982 to December 2000), Psyc LIT (1966 to December 2000), and the reference lists of articles. Researchers were approached to identify unpublished studies. Randomised controlled trials comparing day hospital care (including day treatment programme, day care centre, and transitional day hospital) against out-patient care. Studies were ineligible if a majority of participants were under 18 or over 65, or who had a primary diagnosis of substance abuse or organic brain disorder. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers and cross-checked. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for dichotomous data. Weighted or standardised means were calculated for continuous data. There was evidence from

  12. Key ingredients for implementing intensive outpatient programs within patient-centered medical homes: A literature review and qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breland, Jessica Y; Asch, Steven M; Slightam, Cindie; Wong, Ava; Zulman, Donna M

    2016-03-01

    Intensive outpatient programs aim to transform care while conserving resources for high-need, high-cost patients, but little is known about factors that influence their implementation within patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs). In this mixed-methods study, we reviewed the literature to identify factors affecting intensive outpatient program implementation, then used semi-structured interviews to determine how these factors influenced the implementation of an intensive outpatient program within the Veterans Affairs' (VA) PCMH. Interviewees included facility leadership and clinical staff who were involved in a pilot Intensive Management Patient Aligned Care Team (ImPACT) intervention for high-need, high-cost VA PCMH patents. We classified implementation factors in the literature review and qualitative analysis using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). The literature review (n=9 studies) and analyses of interviews (n=15) revealed key implementation factors in three CFIR domains. First, the Inner Setting (i.e., the organizational and PCMH environment), mostly enabled implementation through a culture of innovation, good networks and communication, and positive tension for change. Second, Characteristics of Individuals, including creativity, flexibility, and interpersonal skills, allowed program staff to augment existing PCMH services. Finally, certain Intervention Characteristics (e.g., adaptability) enabled implementation, while others (e.g., complexity) generated implementation barriers. Resources and structural features common to PCMHs can facilitate implementation of intensive outpatient programs, but program success is also dependent on staff creativity and flexibility, and intervention adaptations to meet patient and organizational needs. Established PCMHs likely provide resources and environments that permit accelerated implementation of intensive outpatient programs. V. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Outpatient chemotherapy, family-centered care, electronic information, and education in adolescents and young adults with osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pete Anderson, Patricia Wells, Theresa Lazarte, Laura Gore, Laura Salvador, Maritza Salazar-AbshireMD Anderson Cancer Center, Pediatrics, Houston TX, USAAbstract: Current osteosarcoma chemotherapy is “standard” (doxorubicin, cisplatin, high-dose methotrexate ± ifosfamide-mesna, and etoposide ± mifamurtide, but current regimens have many short-term, medium-term, and long-term side effects. Generally 12–15 cycles of chemotherapy are given in the hospital over 7–10 months. Even in the absence of new research protocols, improvement in quality of life is now possible, with all osteosarcoma chemotherapy agents now being able to be administered in the outpatient setting. Outpatient chemotherapy is not only less expensive, but in the adolescent and young adult population can result in better quality of life for some. In this paper, we share information to help reduce the frequency of hospitalization and review some tools and strategies to facilitate communication when providing outpatient chemotherapy, family-centered care, and information/education. These include antiemetics with both longer-acting 5HT antagonists and aprepitant, outpatient chemotherapy guidelines, and a 5-week editable calendar that is part of our electronic medical record. Sharing information on absolute lymphocyte count recovery is another means of maintaining hope and increasing understanding of the prognosis of osteosarcoma. Finally, this paper shares an advanced directive/palliative care “checklist” of issues for patients and caregivers to consider at end of life, ie, when “cure of cancer is not the answer”. In summary, better communication at all stages of osteosarcoma care can help reduce hospitalization, improve quality of life, and maintain hope in the adolescent and young adult population with osteosarcoma.Keywords: family-centered care, adolescent and young adult, flash drives, chemotherapy calendars, outpatient, osteosarcoma, chemotherapy

  14. A national comparison of burnout and work-life balance among internal medicine hospitalists and outpatient general internists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Daniel L; Shanafelt, Tait D; Dyrbye, Liselotte N; West, Colin P

    2014-03-01

    General internists suffer higher rates of burnout and lower satisfaction with work-life balance than most specialties, but the impact of inpatient vs outpatient practice location is unclear. Physicians in the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile were previously surveyed about burnout, depression, suicidal ideation, quality of life, fatigue, work-life balance, career plans, and health behaviors. We extracted and compared data for these variables for the 130 internal medicine hospitalists and 448 outpatient general internists who participated. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, hours worked, and practice setting. There were 52.3% of the hospitalists and 54.5% of the outpatient internists affected by burnout (P = 0.86). High scores on the emotional exhaustion subscale (43.8% vs 48.1%, P = 0.71) and on the depersonalization subscale (42.3% vs 32.7%, P = 0.17) were common but similar in frequency in the 2 groups. Hospitalists were more likely to score low on the personal accomplishment subscale (20.3% vs 9.6%, P = 0.04). There were no differences in symptoms of depression (40.3% for hospitalists vs 40.0% for outpatient internists, P = 0.73) or recent suicidality (9.2% vs 5.8%, P = 0.15). Rates of reported recent work-home conflict were similar (48.4% vs 41.3%, P = 0.64), but hospitalists were more likely to agree that their work schedule leaves enough time for their personal life and family (50.0% vs 42.0%, P = 0.007). Burnout was common among both hospitalists and outpatient general internists, although hospitalists were more satisfied with work-life balance. A better understanding of the causes of distress and identification of solutions for all internists is needed. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  15. [The low consumption of outpatient medical care in the department of Ardennes (France) (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, T; Sailly, J C

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the research explained in this article was to build up a methodology which allows to set up a map of low consumption of outpatient medical care and to find out to which extent the low recorded demand is attributable tho the medical aids supply. French National Health Service files were the basic data for this research which was led into the department of Ardennes. First and foremost the investigation was to identify on a district level with low consumer families after having eliminated demands' factors. Thus one could set up maps of low consumption in comparison with maps of low prescription. The investigation showed that low consumer families live generally in the cantons of low medical care consumption concerned mainly with low medical aids suppliers.

  16. A cross-sectional study to assess the feasibility of a short message service to improve adherence of outpatients undergoing sedation gastrointestinal endoscopy in the People’s Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng XQ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoqian Deng, Ling Ye, Yuting Wang, Tao Zhu Department of Anesthesiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Adherence to the prescribed preparation regimen for patients scheduled for sedation gastrointestinal endoscopy (SGIE often fails to meet health care providers’ expectations. Therefore, the feasibility of using mobile phones to improve the adherence of outpatients was assessed among outpatients scheduled for SGIE.Methods: The study was designed as a cross-sectional study using survey questionnaires. Outpatients who would be undergoing SGIE were enrolled. The main outcomes included proportions of outpatients who have access to mobile phones, and the use of text-messaging among outpatients. Willingness to receive text messages and personal opinions about short message service (SMS were also investigated. Characteristics of outpatients, including socio-demographic factors, with a mobile phone (or those who could receive and read messages compared with those without a mobile phone (or those who could not receive and read messages were compared using the chi-square test. Logistic regression was used to analyze significant contributing factors associated with mobile phone ownership and the use of text messages.Results: A large majority of outpatients owned personal mobile phones (94.9% and could receive and read the messages (78.9%. Most of the outpatients were willing to receive a pre-procedure education via text message (81.9%. Outpatients aged 16–39 years old and those with a college education or higher were more likely to use mobile phones and read SMS than outpatients aged 60–80 years old and those with only a primary education level (P<0.0001. Outpatients who lived in an urban setting were more likely to own a mobile phone than outpatients who lived in a rural setting (P=0.002.Conclusion: The accessibility of mobile phones and the frequent use of message functions

  17. Utilisation of outpatient services at Red Cross War Memorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-10-06

    Oct 6, 1990 ... Cape Town and Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospi- tal, Cape Town. J. IRELAND, M.D., F.C.P. (S.A.). Accepted 13 Mar 1990. 1957 to their highest level ever; nearly 350000 in 1988. This steady rise in outpatient attendance was stemmed during the. 1970s by the expansion of health services in the ...

  18. Trends in outpatient malaria cases, following Mass Long Lasting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There were over 6 million case of malaria reported in Kenya in 2015 and it remains a major public health priority despite significant investments in interventions to control and prevent infections in high risk areas. Objectives: To analyse trends from 2011-2015, and report i) outpatient department (OPD) malaria ...

  19. Self-Esteem and Suicide Ideation in Psychiatric Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhar, Sunil; Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Brown, Gregory; Beck, Aaron T.

    2008-01-01

    Depression, hopelessness, and low self-esteem are implicated as vulnerability factors for suicide ideation. The association of self-esteem with suicide ideation after controlling for depressed mood and hopelessness was examined. Adult psychiatric outpatients (N = 338) completed measures of self-esteem, suicide ideation, hopelessness, and…

  20. Efficacy of promethazine suppositories dispensed to outpatient surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. D.; Jilka, J.; Gentry, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting frequently complicate outpatient anesthesia and surgery. The duration of treatment for this complication must occasionally extend beyond discharge from the hospital. In this study, we evaluated the commonly used anti-emetic promethazine for its efficacy in the post-discharge period. Adult outpatient surgical patients who had excessive postoperative nausea and vomiting in the recovery room, or who were at risk for postoperative nausea and vomiting following discharge were given two promethazine suppositories (25 mg) for home use. All patients were contacted by our recovery room nurses on the first business day after their surgery and questioned as to their use of the suppositories and, if used, their efficacy. We found that 55 percent of patients given promethazine suppositories for home use had nausea and vomiting in the post-discharge period. Of the patients given promethazine, 89 percent used the suppositories. All of these patients reported improvement in their symptoms following use of the suppositories. None reported adverse effects from the promethazine suppositories. In conclusion, we found promethazine suppositories to be an inexpensive and efficacious treatment for nausea and vomiting in adult outpatient surgical patients following discharge from the hospital. Side-effects were minimal, and our patients voiced no complaints about this mode of therapy. We recommend this therapy for treatment of nausea and vomiting after hospital discharge following adult outpatient surgery. PMID:10527366

  1. Outpatient treatment of uncomplicated diverticulitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Velázquez, Patricia; Grande, Luis; Pera, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    Acute diverticulitis occurs in up to 25% of patients with diverticulosis. The majority of cases are mild or uncomplicated and it has become a frequent reason for consultation in the emergency department. On the basis of the National Inpatient Sample database from the USA, 86% of patients admitted with diverticulitis were treated with medical therapy. However, several recent studies have shown that outpatient treatment with antibiotics is safe and effective. The aim of this systematic review is to update the evidence published in the outpatient treatment of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis. We performed a systematic review according to the PRISMA guidelines and searched in MEDLINE and Cochrane databases all English-language articles on the management of acute diverticulitis using the following search terms: 'diverticulitis', 'outpatient', and 'uncomplicated'. Data were extracted independently by two investigators. A total of 11 articles for full review were yielded: one randomized controlled trial, eight prospective cohort studies, and two retrospective cohort studies. Treatment successful rate on an outpatient basis, which means that no further complications were reported, ranged from 91.5 to 100%. Fewer than 8% of patients were readmitted in the hospital. Intolerance to oral intake and lack of family or social support are common exclusion criteria used for this approach, whereas severe comorbidities are not definitive exclusion criteria in all the studies. Ambulatory treatment of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis is safe, effective, and economically efficient when applying an appropriate selection in most reviewed studies.

  2. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with

  3. Psychoactive Substance Use Among Psychiatric Outpatients In a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Psychiatric and substance-use disorders are serious problems for the individuals who have them as well as the society as a whole. There is dearth of studies enumerating the estimates of psychoactive drug use among psychiatric outpatients in Nigeria. Aim: This study aimed at determining lifetime and current ...

  4. An Overview of Outpatient Treatment of Adolescent Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanter, Marc; Glickman, Linda; Singer, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on ambulatory substance abuse treatment for adolescents, including brief intervention, Twelve-Step-based outpatient treatment, family-based treatment, cognitive behavioral therapy, and pharmacologic treatment. An overview of socially and culturally specific strategies is also included. The diversity of settings…

  5. Control of Risk Factors For Nephropathy Among Nigerian Outpatients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zamzar

    control of risk factors for nephropathy in a Nigerian teaching hospital. Methods: Between April and July 2005, 160 type 2 diabetic outpatients were assessed for control of average fasting blood glucose and blood pressure over 3 visits, and current use of ACE inhibitors. All patients were over 30 years of age and had been ...

  6. [The clinical relevance of defense mechanisms in inpatients and outpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitmansgruber, Horst; Beck, Thomas; Mulser, Hubert; Dahlbender, Reiner W; Schüssler, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    How clearcut is the clinical significance of mature and immature defense mechanisms in psychological symptoms? Defense mechanisms, symptoms and well-being were assessed in 293 inpatients, 316 outpatients and 157 students. The factors "mature defense" and "immature defense" predict well-being/symptoms to a substantial degree. The assessment of defense mechanism via self-report is clinically useful.

  7. Perceived Mental Illness Stigma among Youth in Psychiatric Outpatient Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkington, Katherine S.; Hackler, Dusty; McKinnon, Karen; Borges, Cristiane; Wright, Eric R.; Wainberg, Milton L.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the experiences of mental illness stigma in 24 youth (58.3% male, 13-24 years, 75% Latino) in psychiatric outpatient treatment. Using Link and Phelan's (2001) model of stigmatization, we conducted thematic analysis of the interview texts, examining experiences of stigma at individual and structural levels, in addition to the…

  8. 76 FR 49458 - TRICARE; Hospital Outpatient Radiology Discretionary Appeal Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE; Hospital Outpatient Radiology Discretionary Appeal Adjustments AGENCY... hospitals of an opportunity for net adjusted payments for radiology services for which TRICARE payments were... radiology services specified in the regulation as being reimbursed under the allowable charge methodology...

  9. A prospective analysis of gastroenterology out-patient consultations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The pattern and relative occurrence of gastrointestinal and liver disorders in Nigeria is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of gastroenterology referral and consultations as seen in the outpatient department of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. Methods: This was a ...

  10. Thoracoscopic Surgery for Pneumothorax Following Outpatient Drainage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Atsushi; Yotsumoto, Takuma

    2017-10-20

    We investigated the outcomes of surgery for pneumothorax following outpatient drainage therapy. We reviewed the records of 34 patients who underwent operations following outpatient drainage therapy with the Thoracic Vent at our hospital between December 2012 and September 2016. Indications for outpatient drainage therapy were pneumothorax without circulatory or respiratory failure and pleural effusion. Indications for surgical treatment were persistent air leakage and patient preference for surgery to prevent or reduce the incidence of recurrent pneumothorax. Intraoperatively, 9 of 34 cases showed loose adhesions around the Thoracic Vent, all of which were dissected bluntly. The preoperative drainage duration ranged from 5 to 13 days in patients with adhesions and from 3 to 19 days in those without adhesions, indicating no significant difference. The duration of preoperative drainage did not affect the incidence of adhesions. The operative duration ranged from 30 to 96 minutes in patients with adhesions and from 31 to 139 minutes in those without adhesions, also indicating no significant difference. Outpatient drainage therapy with the Thoracic Vent was useful for spontaneous pneumothorax patients who underwent surgery, and drainage for less than 3 weeks did not affect intraoperative or postoperative outcomes.

  11. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection as a Cause of Outpatient Clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... BACKGROUND: Failure to timely diagnose and treat urinary tract infections is associated with grave long term consequences. The objectives of this study included assessing the proportion and predictors of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) as a cause of pediatric outpatient department (OPD) visits and ...

  12. Identifying Outpatients with Entrenched Suicidal Ideation Following Hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Stephen S.; Jobes, David A.; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Atkins, David C.; Janis, Karin; Chessen, Chloe E.; Landes, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify outpatients who experience entrenched suicidal ideation following inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Our findings suggest that the use of a suicidal ambivalence index score was helpful at discriminating those who reported significantly greater ratings of suicidal ideation across a 1-year period of…

  13. Analytical models to determine room requirements in outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, P.J.H.; Vanberkel, P.T.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; van Houdenhoven, M.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.

    2012-01-01

    Outpatient clinics traditionally organize processes such that the doctor remains in a consultation room while patients visit for consultation, we call this the Patient-to-Doctor policy (PtD-policy). A different approach is the Doctor-to-Patient policy (DtP-policy), whereby the doctor travels between

  14. Satisfaction with outpatient health services at Jimma Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Satisfaction with outpatient health services at. Jimma Hospital, South West Ethiopia. Lemessa Oljira, Solomon Gebre-Selassie. Abstract. Background: The opinions of users about the health care services and the degree of their satisfaction may indicate the efficiency of the services. Objective: To assess consumer satisfaction ...

  15. Personality disorders among Danish alcoholics attending outpatient treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm, Dorte; Nielsen, Bent

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was firstly to describe the characteristics of alcoholic outpatients (A) suffering from co-morbid personality disorder (PD) of either the cluster B (A+PDB) or cluster C (A+PDC) type. Secondly, to investigate the effect of various kinds of treatment to be able to single...

  16. Child health service provision in Ethiopia: Outpatient, growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EPHA USER33

    health services: out-patient curative care for sick children, routine childhood vaccination services (EPI), and routine growth monitoring services. Figure 1: Percentage of facilities offering all three basic child vaccination services by facility type, Ethiopia. Figure 2: Percentage of facilities providing basic child health services, ...

  17. the profile and urological service needs of outpatients attending a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A peek into the outpatient services would, therefore, give an insight into the common medical problems in a given discipline. (1). This study has similar demographic features to one done on inpatients in the same institution two years earlier and confirms the generally accepted knowledge that urology is a specialty dealing.

  18. A South African outpatient drug treatm.ent centre

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract The Cape Town Drug Counselling Centre is an outpatient drug treatment service which has been operational since 1985. Statistics obtained frOID. 1990 are detailed, describing patient characteris- tics in respect of referral sources, age, sex, occu- pational status, educational level and drugs abused. The typical ...

  19. Household costs of seeking outpatient care in Egyptian children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Addressing difficulties of seeking and getting health care would lower the burden of diarrhea among ill children from developing countries as Egypt. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the economic burden of diarrhea associated with outpatient visits of children in Egypt by identifying the different types of ...

  20. Utilisation of outpatient services at Red Cross War Memorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-10-06

    Oct 6, 1990 ... May 1988, indicating the 13 suburbs with the highest attendance figures. of the annual OPD attendance. Overall, 79% of outpatient attendances were on the medical side, the single busiest area being the general medical OPD (48%). The proportion of specialist to total medical OPD attendances was 77% ...

  1. Nasotracheal Intubation in Children for Outpatient Dental Surgery: Is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... in Children for Outpatient Dental Surgery: Is Fiberoptic Bronchoscopy. Useful?. Niger J Clin Pract 2018;21:183-8. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons. Attribution‑NonCommercial‑ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the ...

  2. Gynecologic Oncologist Views Influencing Referral to Outpatient Specialty Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Casey M; Lefkowits, Carolyn; Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Bakitas, Marie A; Clark, Leslie H; Duska, Linda R; Urban, Renata R; Chen, Lee-May; Creasy, Stephanie L; Schenker, Yael

    2017-03-01

    Early specialty palliative care is underused for patients with advanced gynecologic malignancies. We sought to understand how gynecologic oncologists' views influence outpatient specialty palliative care referral to help inform strategies for improvement. We conducted a qualitative interview study at 6 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers with well-established outpatient palliative care services. Between September 2015 and March 2016, 34 gynecologic oncologists participated in semistructured telephone interviews focused on attitudes, experiences, and preferences related to outpatient specialty palliative care. A multidisciplinary team analyzed transcripts using constant comparative methods to inductively develop a coding framework. Through an iterative, analytic process, codes were classified, grouped, and refined into themes. Mean (SD) participant age was 47 (10) years. Mean (SD) interview length was 25 (7) minutes. Three main themes emerged regarding how gynecologic oncologists view outpatient specialty palliative care: (1) long-term relationships with patients is a unique and defining aspect of gynecologic oncology that influences referral, (2) gynecologic oncologists value palliative care clinicians' communication skills and third-party perspective to increase prognostic awareness and help negotiate differences between patient preferences and physician recommendation, and (3) gynecologic oncologists prefer specialty palliative care services embedded within gynecologic oncology clinics. Gynecologic oncologists value longitudinal relationships with patients and use specialty palliative care to negotiate conflict surrounding prognostic awareness or the treatment plan. Embedding specialty palliative care within gynecologic oncology clinics may promote communication between clinicians and facilitate gynecologic oncologist involvement throughout the illness course.

  3. Observational study of outpatients with schizophrenia in the Middle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To examine the comparative outcomes associated with the antipsychotic treatment of outpatients with schizophrenia and to describe changes in clinical status over the first 6 months of treatment in participating patients from the Middle East and Africa (MEA). Methods. The Intercontinental Schizophrenia ...

  4. Patient satisfaction in outpatient healthcare services at secondary level vs. tertiary level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velikj-Stefanovska Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients satisfaction is a very important part of any clinical practice both for evaluation and improvement of healthcare services. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine patient satisfaction with public outpatient healthcare services at secondary and tertiary level and to assess possible differences between the two levels. Methods. In a quantitative cross-sectional study, a convenient sample of 646 patients who experienced public outpatient healthcare services at the secondary and tertiary level during the last two months were interviewed. Patient satisfaction questionnaires, with statements regarding various aspects of satisfaction, were completed during face-to-face interviews (response rate 84.6%. The research instrument was tested for internal consistency using the Cronbach’s coefficient alpha estimate. Results. The patients were significantly more satisfied in tertiary than in secondary outpatient healthcare facilities in almost all aspects of assessment related to general settings, nurse/administrative staff performance and physician performance (p<0.001. The patients in the secondary healthcare services (SHCS were more satisfied than in the tertiary healthcare services (THCS but only regarding the information on location (83.9% vs.78.3% and possibilities to enter and move inside the department (88.8% vs. 83.3%. Analysis of data for SHCS and THCS showed that there was no significant difference between the mean overall satisfaction scores with regard to patients’ gender, age, marital status, educational level, employment and number of visits. Conclusion. There is a need to improve the current level of patient-provider relationship and communication, as well as that of hospital environment, while special efforts should be made to address the problem of patient waiting time and hospital bureaucracy.

  5. Estimating increases in outpatient dialysis costs resulting from scientific and technological advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozminkowski, R J; Hassol, A; Firkusny, I; Noether, M; Miles, M A; Newmann, J; Sharda, C; Guterman, S; Schmitz, R

    1995-04-01

    The Medicare program's base payment rate for outpatient dialysis services has never been adjusted for the effects of inflation, productivity changes, or scientific and technological advancement on the costs of treating patients with end-stage renal disease. In recognition of this, Congress asked the Prospective Payment Assessment Commission to annually recommend an adjustment to Medicare's base payment rate to dialysis facilities. One component of this adjustment addresses the cost-increasing effects of technological change--the scientific and technological advances (S&TA) component. The S&TA component is intended to encourage dialysis facilities to adopt technologies that, when applied appropriately, enhance the quality of patient care, even though they may also increase costs. We found the appropriate increase to the composite payment rate for Medicare outpatient dialysis services in fiscal year 1995 to vary from 0.18% to 2.18%. These estimates depend on whether one accounts for the lack of previous adjustments to the composite rate. Mathematically, the S&TA adjustment also depends on whether one considers the likelihood of missing some dialysis sessions because of illness or hospitalization. The S&TA estimates also allow for differences in the incremental costs of technological change that are based on the varying advice of experts in the dialysis industry. The major contributors to the cost of technological change in dialysis services are the use of twin-bag disconnect peritoneal dialysis systems, automated peritoneal dialysis cyclers, and the new generation of hemodialysis machines currently on the market. Factors beyond the control of dialysis facility personnel that influence the cost of patient care should be considered when payment rates are set, and those rates should be updated as market conditions change. The S&TA adjustment is one example of how the composite rate payment system for outpatient dialysis services can be modified to provide appropriate

  6. Outpatient Dermatological Diagnoses in Spain: Results From the National DIADERM Random Sampling Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buendía-Eisman, A; Arias-Santiago, S; Molina-Leyva, A; Gilaberte, Y; Fernández-Crehuet, P; Husein-ElAhmed, H; Viera-Ramírez, A; Fernández-Peñas, P; Taberner, R; Descalzo, M Á; García-Doval, I

    2018-03-20

    Dermatologists perform most of their work in outpatient or private clinics. Data on the diagnoses made by dermatologists in these settings are lacking, however, as outpatient activity, unlike hospital activity, is difficult to code. The aim of this study was to analyze the diagnoses made by members of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV) at dermatology clinics in Spain. We selected a random sample of AEDV dermatologists drawn from the AEDV list and stratified by geographic area. The selected dermatologists received instructions on how to collect the data required. Each participant recorded the diagnosis reached and other data for patients seen during 2 specified periods: 3 days in January and 3 days in May. The diagnoses were subsequently coded by a dermatologist expert in applying the International Classification of Diseases (10th revision). In view of the complex nature of the sample, data were analyzed with standard error and finite population corrections. The sample consisted of 124 dermatologists. Of these, 65% participated in the first phase of the study and 59% in the second. An estimated 621,562 patients (95% CI, 368.130-874.995) visit the dermatologist every month in Spain. This is the equivalent of 28 (25-31) patients per day per clinic. The most common diagnosis recorded was actinic keratosis, followed by basal cell carcinoma and melanocytic nevus. The vast majority of visits took place at the clinic, but 1% of patients (0.3%-3%) were assessed using teledermatology. This is the first study in Spain to analyze diagnoses made by AEDV members at outpatient dermatology clinics. Our findings show a high volume of activity and will be useful for guiding health care planning, resource use, and future studies. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  7. Bloodstream infection among children presenting to a general hospital outpatient clinic in urban Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Pradhan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are limited data on the etiology and characteristics of bloodstream infections in children presenting in hospital outpatient settings in South Asia. Previous studies in Nepal have highlighted the importance of murine typhus as a cause of febrile illness in adults and enteric fever as a leading bacterial cause of fever among children admitted to hospital. METHODS: We prospectively studied a total of 1084 febrile children aged between 2 months and 14 years presenting to a general hospital outpatient department in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, over two study periods (summer and winter. Blood from all patients was tested by conventional culture and by real-time PCR for Rickettsia typhi. RESULTS: Putative etiological agents for fever were identified in 164 (15% patients. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi was identified in 107 (10%, S. enterica serovar Paratyphi A (S. Paratyphi in 30 (3%, Streptococcus pneumoniae in 6 (0.6%, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in 2 (0.2%, Haemophilus influenzae type b in 1 (0.1%, and Escherichia coli in 1 (0.1% patient. S. Typhi was the most common organism isolated from blood during both summer and winter. Twenty-two (2% patients were PCR positive for R. typhi. No significant demographic, clinical and laboratory features distinguished culture positive enteric fever and murine typhus. CONCLUSIONS: Salmonella infections are the leading cause of bloodstream infection among pediatric outpatients with fever in Kathmandu Valley. Extension of immunization programs against invasive bacterial disease to include the agents of enteric fever and pneumococcus could improve the health of children in Nepal.

  8. Outpatient use of ceftaroline fosamil versus vancomycin for osteoarticular infection: a matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athans, Vasilios; Kenney, Rachel M; Wong, Jacob; Davis, Susan L

    2016-12-01

    There are few convenient intravenous options for long-term outpatient treatment of osteoarticular infection (OAI) and limited effectiveness and safety data exist for this off-label use of ceftaroline. The objective of this study was to describe the long-term effectiveness and safety of ceftaroline for the treatment of OAI. This was a matched retrospective cohort study of patients receiving ceftaroline- or vancomycin-based therapy for OAI in the outpatient setting. Patients were matched according to infection subtype, anatomical site and microbiology. The primary endpoint was 180 day infection-related readmission (IRR). Secondary endpoints included all-cause readmission, time-to-IRR and adverse event incidence. The final matched cohort consisted of 50 ceftaroline-treated patients and 50 vancomycin-treated patients. The IRR incidence was 22% for ceftaroline patients and 30% for vancomycin patients; OR = 0.66 (95% CI = 0.27-1.62; P = 0.362). There was no significant difference between groups in all-cause readmission or time-to-IRR. Attributable adverse event incidences were 24% and 18% for ceftaroline and vancomycin, respectively. Rash (10%) and nausea (6%) were the most common ceftaroline adverse events, while acute kidney injury (6%) and rash (4%) were the most common vancomycin adverse events. Attributable readmission and adverse events were common among patients treated with outpatient intravenous antimicrobials for OAI. This study found no appreciable difference in effectiveness or tolerability between ceftaroline- or vancomycin-treated patients. Although further research will be important to delineate the role of ceftaroline in the management of OAI, data derived from this study may aid clinicians in determining therapy when limited options exist. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Factors related to self-efficacy among men and women undergoing outpatient chemotherapy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Miho; Sumi, Naomi

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to examine factors that influence self-efficacy in Japanese patients with cancer receiving outpatient chemotherapy and to identify whether there are gender-specific similarities or differences that determine self-efficacy in this setting. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 156 patients with cancer (86 men and 70 women) undergoing chemotherapy as outpatients across five hospitals in Japan. The patients completed the European Organization for Research and Cancer Core Quality of Life questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30), the Self-Efficacy for Advanced Cancer questionnaire (SEAC) which consists of three subscales (affect regulation efficacy, symptom-coping efficacy and activities of daily living efficacy), and a patient information form. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with self-efficacy in men and women. In both men and women, insomnia was related to affect regulation efficacy, while fatigue and nausea/vomiting correlated with activities of daily living efficacy. For male patients, fatigue and nausea/vomiting also correlated with affect regulation efficacy and symptom-coping efficacy. Emotional functioning influenced self-efficacy for both genders, while physical functioning affected self-efficacy in female patients only. These results suggest that to enhance self-efficacy in Japanese patients with cancer undergoing outpatient chemotherapy, effective intervention is required with regard to the management of both emotional and physical functioning, specifically symptoms such as fatigue, nausea/vomiting and insomnia in both genders. Furthermore, women with a reduced level of physical function may require particular attention, as they may be at risk of lower levels of self-efficacy. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Westberg

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic. Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, including registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified medical assistants. The impact of this training was measured through pre-initiation and post-implementation surveys, competency assessments and an audit. Results: The educational initiative was successfully designed and delivered to clinic nursing staff. Assessment of the initiative found that all nursing staff completing competency assessments successfully passed. Pre-initiation- and post-implementation- survey responses on the self-assessed ability to gather and document accurate medication lists did not show significant changes. Informal observations in the clinic indicated that this initiative changed the culture of the clinic, creating increased awareness of the importance of accurate medications and increased emphasis on medication reconciliation. Conclusions: The expertise of pharmacists can be utilized to educate nursing staff on the skills and abilities necessary to gather and document accurate medication lists. This study did not find measurable changes in the accuracy of medication lists in this clinic. Future research is needed to determine the best methods to train health professionals in medication reconciliation to ensure accurate medication lists in the outpatient setting. Type: Original Research

  11. Improving the Quality of Outpatient Diabetes Care Using an Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissmann, Joerg; Mueller, Angelika; Messinger, Diethelm; Parkin, Christopher G.; Amann-Zalan, Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of information management system (IMS) use with individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who were treated in outpatient settings. Methods: In this 7-month, prospective, observational study, 965 adults with diabetes, mean (SD) baseline HbA1c 8.61(1.2)% (70.6[13.1] mmol/mol), were recruited from 132 outpatient care centers in Germany and Denmark. HbA1c was measured at baseline, month 4, and month 7. IMS reports were generated from uploaded self-monitored blood glucose data and therapy adjustments were documented at months 1 and 4. Hypoglycemic events were documented. Results: Mean (SD) HbA1c decreased from baseline in type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients at month 4 (–0.61[1.03]% (–6.7[11.3] mmol/mol), n = 213; –0.88[1.22]% (–9.6[13.3] mmol/mol), n = 589, respectively) and month 7 (–0.64[1.02]% (–7.0[11.1] mmol/mol), n = 219; –0.93[1.27]% (–10.2[13.9] mmol/mol), n = 594, respectively), all P < .0001, with no increase in hypoglycemic events. Therapy was adjusted in 106(42.7)% type 1 and 349(52.4)% type 2 diabetes patients at months 1 and 105(42.3)% type 1 and 282(42.3)% type 2 diabetes patients at month 4. Physicians used IMS reports to make therapy adjustments in 90% of patients at month 1 and 86% of patients at month 4. Conclusions: Integration of the IMS into outpatient care facilitates significant improvements in glycemic control. PMID:26224760

  12. Factors influencing the purchasing behavior of TCM outpatients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hui-Ling; Ma, Tso-Chiang; Chiu, Yen-Lin; Chen, Jin-Tang; Chang, Yuan-Shiun

    2008-07-01

    To test the factors that influence Chinese medicine outpatients' behavior patterns in purchasing Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) under the National Health Insurance (NHI) system in Taiwan. A structural questionnaire was developed and administered to randomly selected outpatients waiting for Chinese Medicine at pharmacies in two academic hospitals that offered Chinese Medicine services in central Taiwan. A total of 641 effective questionnaires were collected. SPSS 10.0 (Statistical Package for Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) was used to run descriptive analysis and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). In addition, LISREL 8.30 (Analytical Package, Scientific Software International, Inc., Chicago, IL) was used to modify and analyze the relationship between the variables of the hypothetical pathway model. Path analysis showed that "behavioral intention" and "suffering from disease" had positive and direct influences on the outpatients' patterns of purchasing TCM. Furthermore, "usable resources" was an important factor with direct influence on behavioral intention. When there were more usable resources, the behavioral intention became stronger and indirectly influenced the purchasing behavior of TCM outpatients. In addition, one-way ANOVA showed that the purchasing behavior was significantly influenced by the number of diseases that an individual suffered. The results of the pathway model showed that "behavioral intention" and "suffering from disease" had positive and direct influence on the TCM purchasing behavior of Chinese Medicine outpatients. However, "usable resources" was an important factor with direct influence on behavioral intention. When there were more usable resources, the behavioral intention became stronger and indirectly had influence on the TCM purchasing behavior. Furthermore, the analysis result of one-way ANOVA showed that the more chronic diseases the surveyed subject suffered, the more significant the influence on purchasing behavior

  13. Hypnosis closed loop TCI systems in outpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Luengo, A; Asensio-Merino, F

    Determine the influence of general anaesthesia with closed-loop systems in the results of outpatient varicose vein surgery. Retrospective observational study including data from 270 outpatients between 2014 and 2015. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the type of general anaesthesia used. The CL Group included patients who received propofol in closed-loop guided by BIS and remifentanil using TCI, and the C Group received non-closed-loop anaesthesia. Age, sex, surgical time, discharge time and failure of outpatient surgery were recorded. Quantitative data were checked for normal distribution by the method of Kolmogorov-Smirnov-Lilliefors. Differences between groups were analysed by a Student-t-test or Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test, depending on their distribution. Categorical data were analysed by a Chi-squared test. We used Kaplan-Meier estimator and the effect size (calculated by Cohen's d) to study the discharge time. Statistical analysis was performed using R 3.2.3 binary for Mac OS X 10.9. There were no significant differences in age, sex and surgical time and failure of outpatient surgery. Discharge time was different in both groups: 200 (100) vs. 180 (82.5) minutes, C Group and CL Group, respectively (data are median and interquartile rank); P=.005. The use of closed-loop devices for the hypnotic component of anaesthesia hastens discharge time. However, for this effect to be clinically significant, some improvements still need to be made in our outpatient surgery units. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of Diabetes E-Consults on Outpatient Clinic Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoll, Brian; Parikh, Pratik J; Gallimore, Jennie; Harrell, Stephen; Burke, Brian

    2015-08-01

    An e-consult is an electronic communication system between clinicians, usually a primary care physician (PCP) and a medical or surgical specialist, regarding general or patient-specific, low complexity questions that would not need an in-person consultation. The objectives of this study were to understand and quantify the impact of the e-consult initiative on outpatient clinic workflow and outcomes. We collected data from 5 different Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient clinics and interviewed several physicians and staff members. We then developed a simulation model for a primary care team at an outpatient clinic. A detailed experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of factors, such as e-consult demand, view-alert notification arrivals, walk-in patient arrivals, and PCP unavailability, on e-consult cycle time. Statistical tests indicated that 4 factors related to outpatient clinic workflow were significant, and levels within each of the 4 significant factors resulted in statistically different e-consult cycle times. The arrival rate of electronic notifications, along with patient walk-ins, had a considerable effect on cycle time. Splitting the workload of an unavailable PCP among the other PCPs, instead of the current practice of allocating it to a single PCP, increases the system's ability to handle a much larger e-consult demand. The full potential of e-consults can only be realized if the workflow at the outpatient clinics is designed or modified to support this initiative. This study furthers our understanding of how e-consult systems can be analyzed and alternative workflows tested using statistical and simulation modeling to improve care delivery and outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Enhancing outpatient clinics management software by reducing patients' waiting time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almomani, Iman; AlSarheed, Ahlam

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) gives great attention to improving the quality of services provided by health care sectors including outpatient clinics. One of the main drawbacks in outpatient clinics is long waiting time for patients-which affects the level of patient satisfaction and the quality of services. This article addresses this problem by studying the Outpatient Management Software (OMS) and proposing solutions to reduce waiting times. Many hospitals around the world apply solutions to overcome the problem of long waiting times in outpatient clinics such as hospitals in the USA, China, Sri Lanka, and Taiwan. These clinics have succeeded in reducing wait times by 15%, 78%, 60% and 50%, respectively. Such solutions depend mainly on adding more human resources or changing some business or management policies. The solutions presented in this article reduce waiting times by enhancing the software used to manage outpatient clinics services. Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been used to understand current OMS and examine level of patient's satisfaction. Five main problems that may cause high or unmeasured waiting time have been identified: appointment type, ticket numbering, doctor late arrival, early arriving patient and patients' distribution list. These problems have been mapped to the corresponding OMS components. Solutions to the above problems have been introduced and evaluated analytically or by simulation experiments. Evaluation of the results shows a reduction in patient waiting time. When late doctor arrival issues are solved, this can reduce the clinic service time by up to 20%. However, solutions for early arriving patients reduces 53.3% of vital time, 20% of the clinic time and overall 30.3% of the total waiting time. Finally, well patient-distribution lists make improvements by 54.2%. Improvements introduced to the patients' waiting time will consequently affect patients' satisfaction and improve the quality of health care services

  16. Telemedicine is cost effective compared with standard care. A randomized controlled project in Type 2 diabetes mellitus in an outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ole Winther; Lauszus, Finn Friis; Lokke, Mette

    2017-01-01

    the total cost at a reasonable level. Objectives: We evaluated the economic and short-time health effect of two different ways of outpatient treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). A health economist calculated the total cost of replacing the standard care with telemedicine. Methods: Forty...... consumption per home-based video telephone, consultations at out-patient clinic, telemedicine set-up equipment, and hospital operating cost. Sample size calculation concluded that 11 patients were needed in each group. Results: The reductions in the two treatments resulted in differences between telemedicine...

  17. Relevant patient perceptions and experiences for evaluating quality of interaction with physiotherapists during outpatient rehabilitation: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Baño-Aledo, M Elena; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; Montilla-Herrador, Joaquina; Collins, Sean M

    2014-03-01

    To identify elements of the physiotherapist-patient interaction considered by patients when they evaluate the quality of care in outpatient rehabilitation settings. A qualitative study with nine focus groups, Two researchers conducted the focus groups, and a topic guide with predetermined questions was used. Each group discussion was audiotaped,, transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically according to a modified grounded theory approach. Three postacute ambulatory centers in Barcelona, Madrid and Seville (Spain). Fifty-seven adults undergoing outpatient rehabilitation for musculoskeletal conditions/injuries. Patients based their evaluations of quality of care on their assessment of physiotherapists' willingness to provide information and education, technical expertise and interpersonal manners (eg. respect, emotional support and sensitivity changes in the patient's status). Both positive and negative aspects of the physiotherapist-patient interaction emerged under all these themes, except for friendly and respectful communication. This study identified which elements of the physiotherapist-patient interaction are considered by patients when evaluating the quality of care in rehabilitation outpatient settings. Further research should work to develop self-report questionnaires about patients' experiences of the physiotherapist-patient interaction in rehabilitation services to provide empirical and quantitative evidence. Copyright © 2013 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Cooperation, Job Satisfaction and Burn Out - Sustainability in Outpatient Mental Health Care among Medical Specialists in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardt, Johanna; Moock, Jörn; Rössler, Wulf; Kawohl, Wolfram

    2017-04-01

    Objective Cooperation, job satisfaction, and burn out risk are indicators of sustainability in mental health services. Thus they were assessed among registered medical specialists in outpatient mental health care in Germany. Method A postal survey consisting of three questionnaires about cooperation, job satisfaction, and burnout was carried out among all registered medical specialists in outpatient mental health care in Germany (n = 4,430). Results 14.1 % (n = 626) of the specialists responded to the survey. Quality and quantity of cooperation regarding mental health care services were rated diverse, job satisfaction was assessed medium to high, and burnout risk was low to medium. Higher job satisfaction correlated with good quality of cooperation, fewer years of practice, fewer patients' chronically ill, more patients who as well seek psychotherapy, and less time spent on cooperation. Low burn out risk correlated with good quality of cooperation, higher age, single practice setting and a higher amount of patients who as well seek psychotherapy. Conclusion Quality and quantity of cooperation in outpatient mental health care - especially regarding community mental health care institutions - should be fostered. Aspects to be considered to reinforce job satisfaction and minimize burn out risk are age, years of practice, quality and quantity of cooperation, practice setting, and the mixture of patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Financial impact of surgical training on hospital economics: an income analysis of 1184 out-patient clinic consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J E F; Ravindra, P; Lepore, M; Armstrong, A; Bhangu, A; Maxwell-Armstrong, C A

    2013-01-01

    In many countries healthcare commissioning bodies (state or insurance-based) reimburse hospitals for their activity. The costs associated with post-graduate clinical training as part of this are poorly understood. This study quantified the financial revenue generated by surgical trainees in the out-patient clinic setting. A retrospective analysis of surgical out-patient ambulatory care appointments under 6 full-time equivalent Consultants (Attendings) in one hospital over 2 months. Clinic attendance lists were generated from the Patient Access System. Appointments were categorised as: 'new', 'review' or 'procedure' as per the Department of Health Payment by Results (PbR) Outpatient Tariff (Outpatient Treatment Function Code 104; Outpatient Procedure Code OPRSI1). During the study period 78 clinics offered 1184 appointments; 133 of these were not attended (11.2%). Of those attended 1029 had sufficient detail for analysis (98%). 261 (25.4%) patients were seen by a trainee. Applying PbR reimbursement criteria to these gave a projected annual income of £GBP 218,712 (€EU 266,527; $USD 353,657) generated by 6 surgical trainees (Residents). This is equivalent to approximately £GBP 36,452 (€EU 44,415; $USD 58,943) per trainee annually compared to £GBP 48,732 (€EU 59,378; $USD 78,800) per Consultant. This projected yearly income off-set 95% of the trainee's basic salary. Surgical trainees generated a quarter of the out-patient clinic activity related income in this study, with each trainee producing three-quarters of that generated by a Consultant. This offers considerable commercial value to hospitals. Although this must offset productivity differences and overall running costs, training bodies should ensure hospitals offer an appropriate return. In a competitive market hospitals could be invited to compete for trainees, with preference given to those providing excellence in training. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  20. 76 FR 74121 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    ... Business Administration SCH Sole Community Hospital SDP Single Drug Pricer SI Status Indicator TEP... Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment; Hospital Value-Based... Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment; Hospital Value-Based...

  1. Patients' ratings of the quality of their outpatient visit to clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COs) compromises the current efforts on health reforms in Kenya. The objective of this study was to assess patients' satisfaction with their outpatient visit to Clinical Officers. METHODS: This was an exit survey of adult outpatients who visited ...

  2. Patient-provider interaction during medication encounters : A study in outpatient pharmacies in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Ellen S.; van Meeteren, Marijke M.; Van Dijk, M; van de Bemt, Bart J F; Ensing, Hendrikus T.; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Blom, Lyda; van Dijk, Liset

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe communication between pharmacy staff and patients at the counter in outpatient pharmacies. Both content and communication style were investigated. Methods: Pharmaceutical encounters in three outpatient pharmacies in the Netherlands were video-recorded. Videos were analyzed

  3. Patient-provider interaction during medication encounters: A study in outpatient pharmacies in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, E.S.; Meeteren, M.M. van; Dijk, M.; Bemt, B.J.F van den; Ensing, H.T.; Bouvy, M.L.; Blom, L.; Dijk, L. van

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe communication between pharmacy staff and patients at the counter in outpatient pharmacies. Both content and communication style were investigated. METHODS: Pharmaceutical encounters in three outpatient pharmacies in the Netherlands were video-recorded. Videos were analyzed

  4. Patient–provider interaction during medication encounters: a study in outpatient pharmacies in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, E.S.; Meeteren, M.M. van; Dijk, M. van; Bemt, B.J.F. van de; Ensing, H.T.; Bouvy, M.; Blom, L.; Dijk, L. van

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe communication between pharmacy staff and patients at the counter in outpatient pharmacies. Both content and communication style were investigated. Methods: Pharmaceutical encounters in three outpatient pharmacies in the Netherlands were video-recorded. Videos were analyzed

  5. Groups as a part of integrated treatment plans : Inpatient psychotherapy for outpatients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staats, H

    2005-01-01

    Group psychotherapy in Germany is well established as part of an integrative treatment plan in inpatient treatment. Outpatient group psychotherapy, however, is conceptualized as a separate treatment option in competition with individual therapy. German guidelines for outpatient psychotherapy exclude

  6. An audit of hospital based outpatient infusions and a pilot program of community-based monoclonal antibody infusions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doran, J-P

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody to tumour necrosis factor alpha, is administered as an intravenous infusion requiring a costly hospital day case or inpatient admission. METHODS: An audit of all current therapies given by intravenous infusions in an outpatient setting in St Vincent\\'s University Hospital (SVUH) was undertaken. Furthermore, in conjunction with TCP homecare, we established in a general practise health clinic, the first Irish community infusion centre for the administration of infliximab in August 2006. RESULTS: All outpatient departments indicated that they would favour a centralized hospital infusion unit. There were no adverse events and the mean global satisfaction improved in the community infliximab infusion pilot programme of seven patients. CONCLUSION: This study suggests efficiencies in providing centralized infusion facilities, while the community based infusion of infliximab is feasible and safe in this small cohort and identifies the community infusion unit as a viable and cost efficient alternative for administration of infliximab.

  7. Complications with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs used in hospitalized patients and outpatients: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Grau

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (PICCs are widely used for hospitalized patients and among outpatients. Despite many advantages, PICC-related complications can occur such as infection, thrombosis or mechanical complications. We aimed to evaluate rates and nature of PICC-related complications from insertion to removal and analyze risk factors of complications at baseline and during healthcare. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study looking at PICC-related complication rates in the inpatient and outpatient settings of 163 patients over a 7-month period. Pertinent patient demographics as well as catheter-related factors were collected. The data were analyzed to identify catheter-related complications using univariate and multivariate analysis. Results One hundred ninety-two PICCs were monitored for a total of 5218 PICC-days (3337 PICC-days for inpatients, 1881 PICC-days for outpatients. The overall complication rate was 30.2% (11.1 per 1000 PICC-days with a mean time to onset of 16.1 days. Complications included occlusion (8.9%, accidental withdrawal (8.9%, infections (6.3% including 9 local infections (4.7% and 3 bloodstream infections (1.6%, venous thrombosis (1.6% and hematoma (1%. Complication rate was higher in the hospitalization setting (36.1%; 14.38 per 1000 PICC-days than in the outpatient setting (19.4%; 3.19 per 1000 PICC-days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the occurrence of occlusion was significantly associated with an age > 65 years (OR = 4.19; 95% CI [1.1–15.81] and the presence of a pre-occlusive event the week before PICC removal (OR = 76.35; 95% CI [9.36–622.97]. Conclusions PICCs appear safe in the inpatient and outpatient settings with low rates of infectious or thrombotic complications. Occlusion and accidental withdrawal were the most common complications, with age > 65 and catheter pre-occlusive event associated with an increased likelihood of

  8. Inappropriate prescribing in outpatient healthcare: an evaluation of respiratory infection visits among veterans in teaching versus non-teaching primary care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Parente

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent study led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC revealed at least 30% of antibiotic prescriptions in the outpatient setting were inappropriate. In this study of all ages, among adult patients, results were similar to the overall population, with the majority of inappropriate prescribing relating to respiratory infections. We applied the same methodology to investigate rates of antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in outpatient primary care clinics at the Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The results of our evaluation reflected comparable rates of inappropriate prescribing, but when stratified by teaching versus non-teaching primary care clinics, inappropriate prescribing was significantly higher in non-teaching clinics (17.6% vs 44.0%, p < .0001. Respiratory infection visits in non-teaching outpatient clinics may be a pragmatic target for antimicrobial stewardship programs.

  9. Frequency, types and severity of medication use-related problems among medical outpatients in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuff, Kazeem B; Tayo, Fola

    2011-06-01

    To determine the frequency, types and severity of medications use-related problems among medical outpatients in a tertiary care setting in southwestern Nigeria. Medical outpatient clinics of a 900-bed Teaching Hospital located in Ibadan, Southwestern Nigeria. A prospective cross-sectional medication use review was conducted by ten pharmacists for 400 randomly selected medical outpatients over a 4 week period at a 900-bed premier teaching hospital located in Ibadan, Nigeria. Severity assessment of medication use-related problems was done by 3 independent assessors with a modified severity index. Frequency, types and severity of medication use-related problems identified through pharmacist-initiated medication use review. Of the 400 randomly selected patients, 324 (81.0%) consented and were interviewed. One hundred and sixty-three (50.3%) of the cohort were males and 161 (49.7%) were females; with mean ages 51.5 ± 17.6 and 52.1 ± 17.4 years respectively. Median no. of drugs prescribed per patient per day was 4 (Minimum-Maximum, 1-7). About 27.5% were self medicating with orthodox (prescription-only and over-the-counter) and/or herbal medicines; and only 14.6% claimed disclosure to their physicians. The proportion of patients self medicating with orthodox medicines was significantly higher (P medication use-related problems were identified from 58.6% of patients, but the highest number (5) was identified among 2.6% of patients. The frequency of medication use-related problems appear strongly related to the number of medicines prescribed (r = 0.71, P = 0.006). The majority of medication use-related problems were ranked as potentially harmful [Inter-rater reliability coefficient: Gwet AC1: 0.7214 (P ≤ 0.001)]. Non-adherence (43.8%), problems associated with self medication (39.3%) and adverse drug reactions (15.6%) were the most frequent. Unauthorized drug holidays (46.5%) and stoppage of prescribed prescription-only medications for local herbs (29.3%) were the

  10. Estimating average inpatient and outpatient costs and childhood pneumonia and diarrhoea treatment costs in an urban health centre in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chola Lumbwe

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Millions of children die every year in developing countries, from preventable diseases such as pneumonia and diarrhoea, owing to low levels of investment in child health. Investment efforts are hampered by a general lack of adequate information that is necessary for priority setting in this sector. This paper measures the health system costs of providing inpatient and outpatient services, and also the costs associated with treating pneumonia and diarrhoea in under-five children at a health centre in Zambia. Methods Annual economic and financial cost data were collected in 2005-2006. Data were summarized in a Microsoft excel spreadsheet to obtain total department costs and average disease treatment costs. Results The total annual cost of operating the health centre was US$1,731,661 of which US$1 284 306 and US$447,355 were patient care and overhead departments costs, respectively. The average cost of providing out-patient services was US$3 per visit, while the cost of in-patient treatment was US$18 per bed day. The cost of providing dental services was highest at US$20 per visit, and the cost of VCT services was lowest, with US$1 per visit. The cost per out-patient visit for under-five pneumonia was US$48, while the cost per bed day was US$215. The cost per outpatient visit attributed to under-five diarrhoea was US$26, and the cost per bed day was US$78. Conclusion In the face of insufficient data, a cost analysis exercise is a difficult but feasible undertaking. The study findings are useful and applicable in similar settings, and can be used in cost effectiveness analyses of health interventions.

  11. Pain intensity, quality of life, quality of palliative care, and satisfaction in outpatients with metastatic or recurrent cancer: a Japanese, nationwide, region-based, multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Akemi; Morita, Tatsuya; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Igarashi, Ayumi; Akiyama, Miki; Akizuki, Nobuya; Shirahige, Yutaka; Eguchi, Kenji

    2012-03-01

    Increasing numbers of patients with advanced cancer are receiving anticancer and/or palliative treatment in outpatient settings, and palliative care for outpatients with advanced cancer is being recognized as one of the most important areas for comprehensive cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate pain intensity, quality of life, quality of palliative care, and satisfaction reported by outpatients with advanced cancer. Questionnaires were sent to 1493 consecutive outpatients with metastatic or recurrent cancer from four regions in Japan; 859 responses were analyzed (58%). Questionnaires included the Brief Pain Inventory, Good Death Inventory, Care Evaluation Scale, and a six-point satisfaction scale. Approximately 20% of the patients reported moderate to severe pain. Whereas more than 70% agreed or strongly agreed with "good relationship with medical staff" and "being respected as an individual," less than 60% agreed or strongly agreed with "free from physical distress," "free from emotional distress," "maintaining hope," and "fulfillment at life's completion"; 54% reported some agreement with "feel a burden to others." About 20% reported that improvement is necessary in physical care by physicians, physical care by nurses, psycho-existential care, help with decision making, and coordination/consistency of care; 13% reported some levels of dissatisfaction. A considerable number of outpatients with metastatic or recurrent cancer experienced pain, physical symptoms, emotional distress, and existential suffering, and advocated improvements in palliative care across multiple areas. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: tobacco intervention practices in outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Thomas J; Chen, Chieh-I; Baker, Christine L; Shah, Sonali N; Pashos, Chris L; Boulanger, Luke

    2012-09-01

    Tobacco use remains the leading cause of preventable death. The outpatient medical clinic represents an important venue for delivering evidence-based interventions to large numbers of tobacco users. Extensive evidence supports the effectiveness of brief interventions. In a retrospective database analysis of 11,827 adult patients captured in the 2005 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (of which 2,420 were tobacco users), we examined the degree to which a variety of patient demographic, clinical and physician-related variables predict the delivery of tobacco counseling during a routine outpatient visit in primary care settings. In 2005, 21.7% of identified tobacco users received a tobacco intervention during their visit. The probability of receiving an intervention differed by gender, geographic region and source of payment. Individuals presenting with tobacco-related health conditions were more likely to receive an intervention. Most physicians classified as specialists were less likely to intervene. The provision of tobacco intervention services appears to be increasing at a modest rate, but remains well below desirable levels. It is a priority that brief interventions be routinely implemented to reduce the societal burden of tobacco use. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Comparing Self-Concept Among Youth Currently Receiving Inpatient Versus Outpatient Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chris; Ferro, Mark A

    2018-01-01

    This study compared levels of self-concept among youth who were currently receiving inpatient versus outpatient mental health services. Forty-seven youth were recruited from the Child & Youth Mental Health Program at McMaster Children's Hospital. Self-concept was measured using the Self-Perception Profile for Children and Adolescents. The mean age was 14.5 years and most participants were female (70.2%). ANOVAs comparing self-concept with population norms showed large significant effects (d = 0.77 to 1.93) indicating compromised self-concept among youth receiving mental health services. Regression analyses controlling for patient age, sex, family income, and diagnoses of major depressive disorder, generalized social phobia, and generalized anxiety showed that the inpatient setting was a significant predictor of lower global self-worth (β=-.26; p=.035). Compared to outpatients, inpatients generally reported lower self-concept, but differences were significant only for global self-worth. Future research replicating this finding and assessing its clinical significance is encouraged.

  14. Factors that influence the QOL of cancer patients who have undergone radiotherapy as outpatients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senuma, Maiko; Shinoda, Shizuyo; Kitada, Yoko; Takei, Akemi; Kanda, Kiyoko; Seyama, Ruka; Igarashi, Reiko

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the factors that influence the QOL of cancer patients who have undergone radiotherapy in the outpatient setting. The patient's quality of life (QOL) was investigated by using the QOL evaluation standard functional assessment of cancer therapy-general (FACT-G) in 73 cancer patients (mean age 64.2±12.2 yrs standard deviation (SD)) who had undergone radiotherapy as outpatients. The mean QOL score was 74.8±17.1 pointy, and a significant difference was seen in about 25 items as a result of examining the factors that influenced the patient's QOL. In addition, a stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that the factors which influenced the QOL were the operation due to the original disease, social support (excluding the family), tiredness, relapse and the metastasis, performance status (PS), uneasiness of presence in descending order of influence. The results revealed the strong influence of psychological, mental and social factors on the QOL score. From the patient of view of nursing support for cancer patients, screening for these factors may allow earlier detection of any decrease in the QOL, or identify when the QOL has already decreased. Furthermore, support should be initiated at as early a stage as possible. (author)

  15. Variables influencing presenting symptoms of patients with eating disorders at psychiatric outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Chin-Hao; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Hsi-Chung

    2016-04-30

    Eating disorders (EDs) have been underdiagnosed in many clinical settings. This study investigates the influence of clinical characteristics on presenting symptoms of patients with EDs. Psychiatric outpatients, aged 18-45, were enrolled sequentially and received a two-phase survey for EDs in August 2010-January 2013. Their primary reasons for seeking psychiatric help were obtained at their first encounter with outpatient psychiatrists. Patients' clinical and demographic characteristics were compared according to presenting symptoms with or without eating/weight problems. Of 2140 patients, 348 (16.3%) were diagnosed with an ED (22.6% of women and 6.3% of men). The three most common reasons for seeking psychiatric help were eating/weight problems (46.0%), emotional problems (41.3%), and sleep disturbances (19.3%). The multivariate analyses suggest that when patients with EDs presented symptoms that were less related to eating/weight problems, they were significantly more likely to be those having diagnoses other than anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa and less severe degree of binge-eating. Further, patients with EDs who demonstrated more impulsive behaviors and poorer functioning were less likely to report their eating problems when visiting psychiatric clinics. Thus, ED should be assessed routinely in patients with complex psychopathology to facilitate comprehensive treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Methods for estimating and comparing VA outpatient drug benefits with the private sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Render, Marta L; Nowak, John; Hammond, Emmett K; Roselle, Gary

    2003-06-01

    To estimate and compare Veterans Health Administration (VA) expenditures for outpatient pharmaceuticals for veterans at six VA facilities with hypothetical private sector costs. Using the VA Pharmacy Benefits Management Strategic Health Care Group (PBM) database, we extracted data for all dispensed outpatient prescriptions from the six study sites over federal fiscal year 1999. After extensive data validation, we converted prescriptions to the same units and merged relevant VA pricing information by National Drug Code to Redbook listed average wholesale price and the Medicaid maximal allowable charge, where available. We added total VA drug expenditures to personnel cost from the pharmacy portion of that medical center's cost distribution report. Hypothetical private sector payments were $200.8 million compared with an aggregate VA budget of $118.8 million. Using National Drug Code numbers, 97% of all items dispensed from the six facilities were matched to private sector price data. Nonmatched pharmaceuticals were largely generic over-the-counter pain relievers and commodities like alcohol swabs. The most commonly prescribed medications reflect the diseases and complaints of an older male population: pain, cardiovascular problems, diabetes, and depression or other psychiatric disorders. Use of the VA PBM database permits researchers to merge expenditure and prescription data to patient diagnoses and sentinel events. A critical element in its use is creating similar units among the systems. Such data sets permit a deeper view of the variability in drug expenditures, an important sector of health care whose inflation has been disproportionate to that of the economy and even health care.

  17. Topical lotions utilized in outpatient rehabilitation clinics as a potential source of bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Henry G; Levine, David; Bage, Julie; Giles, David K; Collier, A Grace

    2018-02-26

    Soft tissue mobilization and massage requiring lotions or creams are commonly used interventions in outpatient rehabilitation clinics. For at least 50 years hand creams used in healthcare settings have been found to be contaminated by bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the current state of bacterial contamination of lotions used in clinics and to determine the efficacy of lotion preservatives to kill bacteria. Unopened containers of lotions were studied, along with 81 lotion containers used in 22 outpatient clinics in southeast Tennessee and northwest Georgia. Three sites on each container were sampled using sterile swabs. At a microbiology lab, bacterial growth media was inoculated and incubated. Of the 81 containers sampled, 16 supported bacterial growth (19.8%). Container threads displayed the highest contamination compared with other container locations (p < 0.01). No bacteria were found in unopened lotion containers, although when challenged with live bacterial cultures lotion preservatives did not kill bacteria tested. Enrichment cultures using lotions studied here supported the growth of several bacterial species. These findings suggest the need for standardized protocols to help reduce potential healthcare-associated infections due to use of lotions. Improved efficacy of preservatives added to lotions should be a priority.

  18. Physician Assistants Improve Efficiency and Decrease Costs in Outpatient Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Cory M; Daniels, Kimberly M; Flath-Sporn, Susan J; Doyle, Michael; Heald, Ronald; Padwa, Bonnie L

    2016-11-01

    To determine the effects on time, cost, and complication rates of integrating physician assistants (PAs) into the procedural components of an outpatient oral and maxillofacial surgery practice. This is a prospective cohort study of patients from the Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery at Boston Children's Hospital who underwent removal of 4 impacted third molars with intravenous sedation in our outpatient facility. Patients were separated into the "no PA group" and PA group. Process maps were created to capture all activities from room preparation to patient discharge, and all activities were timed for each case. A time-driven activity-based costing method was used to calculate the average times and costs from the provider's perspective for each group. Complication rates were calculated during the periods for both groups. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and significance was set at P oral and maxillofacial surgeon was directly involved in the procedure decreased by an average of 19.2 minutes after the introduction of PAs (P oral and maxillofacial surgery practice resulted in decreased costs whereas complication rates remained constant. The increased availability of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon after the incorporation of PAs allows for more patients to be seen during a clinic session, which has the potential to further increase efficiency and revenue. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Prevalence of sarcopenia in geriatric outpatients and nursing homes. The ELLI study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna-Pozo, Carmen María; Serra-Rexach, José Antonio; Viña, José; Gómez-Cabrera, María del Carmen; Salvá, Antoni; Ruiz, Domingo; Masanes, Ferrán; Lopez-Soto, Alfonso; Formiga, Francesc; Cuesta, Federico; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    There are few systematic studies on the prevalence of sarcopenia using the new diagnostic criteria in different geriatric care settings. To estimate the prevalence of sarcopenia, using the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) criteria in older subjects living in nursing homes and in those who attend geriatric outpatient clinics. A single country multicentre study in two samples of older subjects: patients cared for in outpatient geriatric clinics, and individuals living in nursing homes. Data collected will include demographic variables, medical history, medication, geriatric syndromes, functional status (assessment of basic and instrumental activities of daily living), mobility, cognitive status, comorbidity, quality of life, nutritional status, and laboratory parameters. For the diagnosis of sarcopenia, 4m walking speed, handgrip strength, and body composition measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis will be assessed. Using the EWGSOP algorithm, the prevalence of sarcopenia in an elderly Spanish population will be estimated. In addition, concordance and correlation between the three parameters included in the definition (muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance) will be analysed, using the different existing cut-off points, and examining the diagnostic accuracy of each. Finally, demographic, anthropometric and functional data that define subjects with sarcopenia will be investigated. The ELLI study should improve knowledge on the prevalence and characteristics of sarcopenia in older people in our population. Copyright © 2012 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Outpatient myeloablative allo-SCT: a comprehensive approach yields decreased hospital utilization and low TRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S R; Matthews, R H; Barreras, A M; Bashey, A; Manion, K L; McNatt, K; Speckhart, D; Connaghan, D G; Morris, L E; Holland, H K

    2010-03-01

    Historically, myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) has required prolonged in-patient hospitalization due to the effects of mucosal toxicity and prolonged cytopenias. We explored the safety and feasibility of outpatient management of these patients. A total of 100 consecutive patients underwent a matched-related donor myeloablative allogeneic HSCT for a hematologic malignancy at a single institution. Patients were hospitalized briefly for stem-cell infusion and thereafter only for complications more safely managed in the in-patient setting. The median hospital length of stay from the start of the preparative regimen to day +30 and day +100 post-transplant was 12 and 15 days, respectively. Planned hospital discharge occurred in 79 patients after stem cell infusion. Patients were readmitted to hospital at median of day +7 post transplant, with neutropenic fever being the primary cause for readmission. In total, 18 patients required no in-patient care in the first 100 days. Non-relapse mortality at day 100 and 6 months was 10 and 15%, respectively, for all patients, and 0 and 5%, respectively, for standard risk patients. In summary, outpatient myeloablative allogeneic HSCT with expectant in-patient management can be accomplished safely with low treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Clinical outcomes seem comparable to those reported for traditional in-patient management.

  1. Mixed Methods Approach for Measuring the Impact of Video Telehealth on Outpatient Clinic Triage Nurse Workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Rhonda G.; Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Nurse-delivered telephone triage is a common component of outpatient clinic settings. Adding new communication technology to clinic triage has the potential to not only transform the triage process, but also alter triage workflow. Evaluating the impact of new technology on an existing workflow is paramount to maximizing efficiency of the delivery system. This study investigated triage nurse workflow before and after the implementation of video telehealth using a sequential mixed methods protocol that combined ethnography and time-motion study to provide a robust analysis of the implementation environment. Outpatient clinic triage using video telehealth required significantly more time than telephone triage, indicating a reduction in nurse efficiency. Despite the increased time needed to conduct video telehealth, nurses consistently rated it useful in providing triage. Interpretive analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data suggests the increased depth and breadth of data available during video triage alters the assessment triage nurses provide physicians. This in turn could impact the time physicians spend formulating a diagnosis and treatment plan. While the immediate impact of video telehealth is a reduction in triage nurse efficiency, what is unknown is the impact of video telehealth on physician and overall clinic efficiency. Future studies should address this area. PMID:24080753

  2. Fuzzy logic-based approach to detecting a passive RFID tag in an outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Daiki; Yih, Yuehwern

    2011-06-01

    This study is motivated by the observations on the data collected by radio frequency identification (RFID) readers in a pilot study, which was used to investigate the feasibility of implementing an RFID-based monitoring system in an outpatient eye clinic. The raw RFID data collected from RFID readers contain noise and missing reads, which prevent us from determining the tag location. In this paper, fuzzy logic-based algorithms are proposed to interpret the raw RFID data to extract accurate information. The proposed algorithms determine the location of an RFID tag by evaluating its possibility of presence and absence. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithms, numerical experiments are conducted using the data observed in the outpatient eye clinic. Experiments results showed that the proposed algorithms outperform existing static smoothing method in terms of minimizing both false positives and false negatives. Furthermore, the proposed algorithms are applied to a set of simulated data to show the robustness of the proposed algorithms at various levels of RFID reader reliability.

  3. Comparison of Volume Status in Asymptomatic Haemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Papakrivopoulou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of haemodialysis (HD patients gain weight between dialysis sessions and thereby become volume overloaded, whereas peritoneal dialysis (PD is a more continuous technique. Cardiovascular mortality and hypertension is increased with both treatment modalities. We therefore wished to compare volume status in PD and HD to determine whether PD patients are chronically volume overloaded, as a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality. Study Design, Setting and Participants:We retrospectively audited 72 healthy HD patients and 115 healthy PD patients attending a university hospital dialysis centre for routine outpatient treatment, who had multi-frequency bioimpedance measurements of extracellular water to total body water (ECW/TBW. Results: The groups were well matched for age, sex, weight and ethnicity, PD patients had greater urine output [1,075 (485–1,613 vs. 42.5 (0–1,020 ml/day, p Conclusions: Overhydration is common in healthy stable PD outpatients, and ECW volumes in PD patients are not dissimilar to those of pre-dialysis HD patients. The role of chronic volume overload as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease needs further investigation.

  4. [Use of lung ultrasound as a prognostic tool in outpatients with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo Villanueva, María Del Carmen; Fernández López, María; Canora Lebrato, Jesús; Satué Bartolomé, José Ángel; San Martín Prado, Alberto; Zapatero Gaviria, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    To assess the prognostic value of lung ultrasound for patients with chronic heart failure. Prospective observational cohort study, in which a lung ultrasound was performed on 54 patients at a heart failure outpatient consultation. Ultrasonography was classified as positive or negative for ultrasound interstitial syndrome depending on the number of B lines observed. Patients were followed up for six months; considering emergency visits, readmissions and deaths due to heart failure as markers of poor prognosis. 53.7% (29) of the patients had ultrasound interstitial syndrome. Among them, 48.3% (14) were readmitted, compared to 16% (4) of those without the syndrome (P=.012). Considering any of the events previously described as end points (readmissions, emergencies and deaths), we found that in the group of patients with ultrasound interstitial syndrome, 55.2% (16) had at least one of these complications, compared to 20% (5) of participants without the syndrome (P=.008). Lung ultrasound in the outpatient setting is useful in predicting which patients are at increased risk of heart failure decompensation in the mid-term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence and correlates of criminal victimization among new admissions to outpatient mental health services in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisanti, Annette S; Frueh, B Christopher; Archambeau, Olga; Steffen, John J; Wolff, Nancy

    2014-04-01

    Adults with serious mental illness (SMI) experience criminal victimization at rates higher than the general population whether they reside in the community or correctional settings. This study examines the past-six month prevalence and correlates of criminal victimization among a large community sample (N = 2,209) of consumers with SMI newly admitted to outpatient mental health services during 2005 through 2008. A cross-sectional design was used with self-report and clinical data collected from administrative records. Victimization was determined by responses to direct questions about experiences in the previous 6 months with respect to victimization of a non-violent and/or violent crime. Socio-demographic, clinical and criminal correlates of victimization were abstracted from a quality of life survey and clinical assessment interview conducted at admission. Overall, 25.4 % of consumers reported being a victim of any crime (violent or non-violent) in the past 6 months, with 20.3 % reporting non-violent and 12.3 % violent victimization. The risk of victimization was elevated for those who were female, White, not taking atypical psychotropic medication, not feeling safe in their living arrangement, and were arrested or homeless in the six-months prior to engaging in mental health outpatient treatment. Policy and practice implications of these findings are discussed.

  6. Using Lean Thinking at an otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic to improve quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leijen-Zeelenberg, Janneke E; Brunings, Jan Wouter; Houkes, Inge; van Raak, Arno J A; Ruwaard, Dirk; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Kremer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Although Lean Thinking has led to considerable improvement in a variety of healthcare settings, its effects on otorhinolaryngology remain underexposed. This study reports on how the implementation of Lean Thinking at an otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic has affected patient and provider satisfaction, waste reduction, and organizational culture. Prospective before-and-after design. The 18-month prospective before-and-after design used mixed methods for data collection and analysis. A survey was conducted to measure satisfaction among patients and providers. Semistructured interviews were conducted to evaluate the effect of Lean Thinking on waste and organizational culture. During the project, 69 issues were posted on the Lean board. Improvements were made on 36 inefficiency issues, not all concerning a specific type of waste. Employees reported considerable improvement in transportation, motion, and waiting. Patient satisfaction was high both at baseline and follow-up and did not change significantly. The effects on provider satisfaction were slight; satisfaction with autonomy and participation decreased significantly, but satisfaction with communication increased significantly. The implementation of Lean Thinking at an otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic reduced waste and increased provider satisfaction with communication. Although patient satisfaction did not change significantly, it cannot be concluded that the intervention had no effect on perceived quality of care. Other approaches to measure patients' perceptions should be considered. NA. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. The Hidden Burden of Outpatient Repeat PSA Testing in a Prospective Cohort

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, E

    2017-05-01

    PSA testing is widespread throughout Europe for diagnostic purposes and follow up. We performed a prospective outpatient cohort study of 250 men (2013-2015) in two hospital sites. Included were those men being followed up by urology with PSA blood testing. First appointments and those men in whom non-PSA tests were ordered by urology were excluded. The median age was 67.2yrs (46-88). Eighty-one point two percent of samples had a combination of 21 different serology tests at an added cost of >€18,000. Abnormal serology resulted in 53 referrals. Twenty-six-six percentof correspondence referenced abnormal serology other than PSA. Follow up of non-PSA test results poses a challenge in an outpatient setting with failure to appropriately follow-up on abnormal results, increased costs, and medico-legal implications. There is currently no Irish legislature in place to safeguard hospital physicians. This study quantifies the levels of expenditure, resources and risk associated with ambulant PSA testing.

  8. Combination of interval set and soft set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyun Qin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Soft set theory and interval set theory are all mathematical tools for dealing with uncertainties. This paper is devoted to the discussion of soft interval set and its application. The notion of soft interval sets is introduced by combining soft set and interval set. Several operations on soft interval sets are presented in a manner parallel to that used in defining operations on soft sets and the lattice structures of soft interval sets are established. In addition, a soft interval set based decision making problem is analyzed.

  9. Factors Associated with Deliberate Self-Harm Behaviour among Depressed Adolescent Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuisku, Virpi; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Kiviruusu, Olli; Karlsson, Linnea; Ruuttu, Titta; Marttunen, Mauri

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether depressed adolescent outpatients with deliberate self-harm behaviour (DSH) differed from non-suicidal depressed adolescent outpatients in depressive and anxiety symptoms, alcohol use, perceived social support and number of negative life-events. Depressed adolescent outpatients (n = 155) aged 13-19 years were interviewed…

  10. Unmet needs for comprehensive services in outpatient addiction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Janice L; Emptage, Nicholas P; Hubbard, Robert L

    2006-04-01

    Many addiction treatment patients suffer from health and psychosocial problems in addition to substance misuse at the time of their treatment entry. Outpatient treatment programs have attempted to address these problems by providing or facilitating access to comprehensive health and social services. Nevertheless, previous research have suggested high levels of unmet needs for these services in the addiction treatment population. Using data from a large study on community-based outpatient addiction treatment, this article provides additional information on levels of unmet service needs and the relationship between need and receipt of services during treatment. Our results suggest extremely high levels of unmet needs for a wide variety of health and psychosocial services. Specifically, the data suggest that unmet service needs may be far more prevalent than previous estimates and that addiction treatment populations in rural areas may be particularly disadvantaged.

  11. Childhood maltreatment in adult female psychiatric outpatients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosse, Gunilla Klensmeden; Holen, Are

    2006-11-01

    To explore possible relations between maltreatment in childhood and subsequent eating disorders in adult life, 107 consecutive adult psychiatric female outpatients were screened for eating disorders. They also completed questionnaires about harassment by adults and bullying by peers in childhood. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire measured childhood abuse by parents or other adults, and the Parental Bonding Instrument captured parental coldness and overprotection. Bullying by peers was measured by an inventory used in schools. Outpatients who met the criteria for bulimia nervosa reported far more bullying by peers, more coldness and overprotection from fathers, and more childhood emotional, physical and sexual abuse. The findings suggest associations between childhood maltreatment, especially bullying by peers, and bulimia nervosa.

  12. RADIATION-HYGIENIC JUSTIFICATION OF OUTPATIENT RADIONUCLIDE THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ja. Narkevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of the use of the different therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals labeled with one of the 19 β-γ-emitting radionuclides or 6 α-β-γ-emitting radionuclides in the outpatient regime was identified in the estimateinvestigations. A criterion for admissibility of outpatient regime is effective dose of individuals from the population who occasionally or permanently contact the patients after the radiopharmaceutical introduction. Basing on the dose limits established by the Radiation Safety Standard-99/2009, maximal allowable activities of the mentioned radionuclides were calculated for various geometries and exposure scenarios. It is shown that only patients taking radionuclide therapy courses with 111In and 131I have to be hospitalized even in the case of the most conservative exposure conditions.

  13. Efficacy, safety, and applicability of outpatient treatment for diverticulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Acute diverticulitis of the colon represents a significant burden for national health systems, in terms of direct and indirect costs. Although current guidelines recommend use of antibiotics for the outpatient treatment of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis, evidence for this is still lacking. Hence, significant effort is now being made to identify the appropriate therapeutic approach to treat and prevent relapses of diverticulitis. Outpatient treatment has been identified as a safe and effective therapeutic approach in up to 90% of patients with uncomplicated diverticulitis. It allows important costs saving to health systems without a negative influence on quality of life for patients with uncomplicated diverticulitis, and reduces health care costs by more than 60%. PMID:24729730

  14. Monitoring of psychological well-being in outpatients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Snoek, Frank J; Van Der Ploeg, Henk M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether monitoring and discussing psychological well-being in outpatients with diabetes improves mood, glycemic control, and the patient's evaluation of the quality of diabetes care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This study was a randomized controlled trial of 461...... outpatients with diabetes who were randomly assigned to standard care or to the monitoring condition. In the latter group, the diabetes nurse specialist assessed and discussed psychological well-being with the patient (with an interval of 6 months) in addition to standard care. The computerized Well......-being Questionnaire was used for this purpose. Primary outcomes were mood, HbA(1c), and the patient's evaluation of the quality of diabetes care at 1-year follow-up. The number of referrals to the psychologist was analyzed as a secondary outcome. Intention-to-treat analysis was used. RESULTS: The monitoring group...

  15. Analysis of a factor that influences cancer outpatient fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogure, Mayumi; Hosokawa, Mai; Takagai, Junko; Ishida, Kazuko; Kano, Taro; Kanda, Kiyoko

    2008-01-01

    The fatigue seen in many cancer cases is considered to be decrease quality of life. We clarified factors related to such fatigue and used out result to relieve fatigue. We conducted a questionnaire using the Cancer Fatigue Scale (CFS) on 204 cancer outpatients at the A hospital. We studied 16 factors influencing fatigue and analyzed the relationships among these factors and CFS scores. The mean of total fatigue scores was 23.0 points (standard deviation: 10.0). The fatigue is strong by higher than 19 points of the CFS scores. That frequency was 64.7%. The logistic regression analysis was conducted the influence factors of fatigue. Logistic regression analysis was conducted for items showing a significant difference Performance States (PS), loneliness, hormonal therapy, and radiation therapy. The conclusion of this study was to reduce fatigue in outpatient cancer treatment, it was suggested to that importance to assess a related factor of fatigue. (author)