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Sample records for anthropomorphic plastinated lung

  1. Dissection and preparation of viscera for plastination

    OpenAIRE

    Creus Tacies, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Póster 1- Get a better understanding of the sistem coronary dissection, one of the most important from the point of anatomical and functional aspects. 2- Learn the plastination technique applying on a previously dissected equine heart.

  2. plastination: a novel approach to cadavar scarcity in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... 1977 by preserving several human and animal bodies by plastination (Von Hagens et al., 1987;. Von Hagens ... Apart from large space, ventilation, vigilance and technical know-how, Plastination requires deep freezers ... The whole organ or body of an animal can be totally plastinated using silicone (S10).

  3. E12 sheet plastination: Techniques and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottone, Nicolas Ernesto; Baptista, Carlos A C; Latorre, Rafael; Bianchi, Homero Felipe; Del Sol, Mariano; Fuentes, Ramon

    2017-10-30

    Plastination is an anatomical technique that consists of replacing the liquids and fat of specimens by reactive polymers through forced impregnation in a vacuum. These are then polymerized to achieve the final result. E12 sheet plastination involves epoxy resin impregnation of thin (2-4 mm) and ultra-thin (<2 mm) tissue sheets, producing dry, transparent, odorless, non-toxic and long-lasting sheets. E12 sheet plastination techniques were reviewed using MEDLINE, EMBASE and SciELO databases, and manual searches. After searching, 616 records were found using the online and manual searches (MEDLINE, n: 207; EMBASE, n: 346; SciELO, n: 44; Manual search: 23). Finally, 96 records were included in this review (after duplicates and articles unrelated to the subject were excluded). The aim of this work was to review the E12 sheet plastination technique, searching for articles concerning views of it, identifying the different variants implemented by researchers since its creation by Gunther von Hagens, and to identify its applications from teaching and research in anatomy to morphological sciences. Clin. Anat., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Plastination technology for anatomical studies in Nigeria: Opinion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Gunther von Hagens developed plastination as a technique of tissue preservation in 1977. He used a delicate method of forced impregnation with curable polymers like silicone, epoxy or polyester resins for preservation of anatomical specimens. With plastination, every part of a biological tissue is treated, preserving it ...

  5. Plastination: ethical and medico-legal considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Paola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The international plastination phenomenon has proved to be immensely popular with audiences world-wide. Never before has the human body been exposed to public gaze in such an accessible manner. The exhibitions have perplexed many, included anatomists, some of whom find the display of human bodies unethical. The objective of this study is to review the attention on the use of plastination and exhibition of entire human bodies for non-educational or commercial purposes. The nature of these exhibitions and the uneasy balance between entertainment and education has caused heated debate. The possible legitimacy of the expression of one’s will as far as exhibition purposes isn’t considered sufficient for the indiscriminate use of a corpse despite the ethical necessity of respecting the wishes of individuals based on respect for the deceased. The informed consent of an individual represents only the most basic and minimal prerequisite for the use of the deceased’s body for exhibition purposes, and is absolutely not enough on its own to justify its use in entertainment exhibitions or for the commercialization of the death

  6. The Crossroads of Plastination and Pilgrimage

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    Chadwick Co SY SU

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available At the Singapore Science Centre in 2010, I went to Body Worlds, an exhibit set up by the Institute for Plastination, founded by Gunther von Hagens. As I later learned, he pioneered plastination—the art, science, and technique of preserving entire bodies and body parts for use in medical and anatomical research, exhibition, or both. A few months after, I made the decision to donate my body after death to the Institute under arrangements similar to that of a Living Will. In my visits to two other Body World exhibits in Germany and the Netherlands, I have seen organs perfectly preserved and had thoughts occur to me that one day, I may well be an exhibit specimen instead of an exhibit attendee. By establishing a connection with existing pilgrimage literature; and using a combination of thick description and pragmatic analyses; this paper puts forward the proposition that visits to these; and other similar; exhibits constitute a pilgrimage of and to the self. The paper also discusses the ethics and practical consequences of body donation; and evaluates the arguments for and against the body donation decision from the lenses of the person making the donation; the person’s significant others; and societal influencers. The paper concludes by suggesting take-off points in discussing the connection between plastination and pilgrimage; particularly in the contexts of intercultural communication and religious studies.

  7. Application of Monte Carlo calculations to calibration of anthropomorphic phantoms used for activity assessment of actinides in lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, D; Borissov, N; de Carlan, L; Pierrat, N; Genicot, J L; Etherington, G

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on a new utility for development of computational phantoms for Monte Carlo calculations and data analysis for in vivo measurements of radionuclides deposited in tissues. The individual parameters of each worker can be acquired for an exact geometric representation of his or her anatomy, which is particularly important for low-energy gamma ray emitting sources such as thorium, uranium, plutonium and other actinides. The software discussed here enables automatic creation of an MCNP input data file based on computed tomography (CT) scanning data. The utility was first tested for low- and medium-energy actinide emitters on Livermore phantoms, the mannequins generally used for lung counting, in order to compare the results of simulation and measurement. From these results, the utility's ability to study uncertainties in in vivo calibration were investigated. Calculations and comparison with the experimental data are presented and discussed in this paper.

  8. Anthropomorphism in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, David

    This article presents an address on anthropomorphism in psychology. Anthropomorphism assures that human beings are given human characteristics when participating in psychological research. This is significant because the research community does not often report results of studies in the language of feelings, thoughts, or desires, which has led to…

  9. Plastination of decalcified bone by a new resin technique

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    Abbas Ali Rabiei

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Our synthesized resin found to be much more economical than conventional plastination method. In more details, properties of these new products were the same as, S 10 method, from points of strength, flexibility and weight, but, since the money cost for producing them was about one fifth that of S 10 method.

  10. Plastination technology for anatomical studies in Nigeria: Opinion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-09

    Apr 9, 2013 ... Plastination technology for anatomical studies in. Nigeria: Opinion of ... Today, modern techniques used to preserve the human body for didactic purposes are built on methods that began in ... of new techniques and computer science, alternative methods of teaching anatomy have come. Dr. Gunther von ...

  11. The Interspinous Spacer: A Clinicoanatomical Investigation Using Plastination

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    Thomas Kaulhausen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The relatively new and less-invasive therapeutic alternative “interspinous process decompression device (IPD” is expected to result in improved symptoms of neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC caused by lumbar spinal stenosis. The aim of the study was to analyze IPD position particularly regarding damage originating from surgical implantation. Methods. Anatomic assessments were performed on a fresh human cadaver. For the anatomic examination, the lumbar spine was plastinated after implantation of the IPDs. After radiographic control, serial 4 mm thick sections of the block plastinate were cut in the sagittal (L1–L3 and horizontal (L3–L5 planes. The macroanatomical positioning of the implants was then analyzed. The insertion procedure caused only little injury to osteoligamentous or muscular structures. The supraspinous ligament was completely intact, and the interspinous ligaments were not torn as was initially presupposed. No osseous changes at the spinal processes were apparent. Contact of the IPD with the spinous processes was visible, so that sufficient biomechanical limitation of the spinal extension seems likely. Conclusions. Minimally invasive IPD implantation with accurate positioning in the anterior portion of the interspinous place is possible without severe surgical trauma.

  12. The actin-bundling protein L-plastin: a novel local inflammatory marker associated with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, V Ö; Emingil, G; Osterwalder, V; Bostanci, N

    2015-06-01

    L-plastin, an actin-bundling protein, is exclusively expressed in leukocytes and plays a crucial role in immune-mediated events. Periodontitis is a common infectious inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. Recent findings using proteomic technologies have demonstrated that L-plastin is one of the few molecules consistently present in the inflammatory exudate of the gingiva in periodontal disease, but not in health. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate in detail the local and systemic role of this molecule in different forms of periodontitis. A total of 61 subjects who met the inclusion/exclusion criteria were recruited, including 21 with chronic periodontitis, 20 generalized aggressive periodontitis and 20 nonperiodontitis control subjects. Gingival tissue biopsies, gingival crevicular fluid, as well as serum and saliva, were obtained. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR were employed to evaluate the localization and mRNA expression, respectively, of L-plastin. L-plastin levels in gingival crevicular fluid, saliva and serum were measured using ELISA. Statistical analysis was performed using nonparametric methods. Subjects with chronic periodontitis and generalized aggressive periodontitis exhibited significantly higher tissue L-plastin gene expression and gingival crevicular fluid levels than did subjects in the control group but there was no significant difference between the two forms of periodontitis. Within gingival tissue, L-plastin was confined to the inflammatory infiltrate. There was no statistically significant difference between serum and salivary L-plastin levels among the three study groups. The elevated gingival tissue expression and gingival crevicular fluid levels of L-plastin in both forms of periodontitis may denote the localized involvement of this novel molecule in the pathogenesis of the disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. L-plastin nanobodies perturb matrix degradation, podosome formation, stability and lifetime in THP-1 macrophages.

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    Sarah De Clercq

    Full Text Available Podosomes are cellular structures acting as degradation 'hot-spots' in monocytic cells. They appear as dot-like structures at the ventral cell surface, enriched in F-actin and actin regulators, including gelsolin and L-plastin. Gelsolin is an ubiquitous severing and capping protein, whereas L-plastin is a leukocyte-specific actin bundling protein. The presence of the capping protein CapG in podosomes has not yet been investigated. We used an innovative approach to investigate the role of these proteins in macrophage podosomes by means of nanobodies or Camelid single domain antibodies. Nanobodies directed against distinct domains of gelsolin, L-plastin or CapG were stably expressed in macrophage-like THP-1 cells. CapG was not enriched in podosomes. Gelsolin nanobodies had no effect on podosome formation or function but proved very effective in tracing distinct gelsolin populations. One gelsolin nanobody specifically targets actin-bound gelsolin and was effectively enriched in podosomes. A gelsolin nanobody that blocks gelsolin-G-actin interaction was not enriched in podosomes demonstrating that the calcium-activated and actin-bound conformation of gelsolin is a constituent of podosomes. THP-1 cells expressing inhibitory L-plastin nanobodies were hampered in their ability to form stable podosomes. Nanobodies did not perturb Ser5 phosphorylation of L-plastin although phosphorylated L-plastin was highly enriched in podosomes. Furthermore, nanobody-induced inhibition of L-plastin function gave rise to an irregular and unstable actin turnover of podosomes, resulting in diminished degradation of the underlying matrix. Altogether these results indicate that L-plastin is indispensable for podosome formation and function in macrophages.

  14. Plastins regulate ectoplasmic specialization via its actin bundling activity on microfilaments in the rat testis

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    Nan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastins are a family of actin binding proteins (ABPs known to cross-link actin microfilaments in mammalian cells, creating actin microfilament bundles necessary to confer cell polarity and cell shape. Plastins also support cell movement in response to changes in environment, involved in cell/tissue growth and development. They also confer plasticity to cells and tissues in response to infection or other pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation. In the testis, the cell-cell anchoring junction unique to the testis that is found at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB and at the Sertoli-spermatid (e.g., 8-19 spermatids in the rat testis is the basal and the apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES, respectively. The ES is an F-actin-rich anchoring junction constituted most notably by actin microfilament bundles. A recent report using RNAi that specifically knocks down plastin 3 has yielded some insightful information regarding the mechanism by which plastin 3 regulates the status of actin microfilament bundles at the ES via its intrinsic actin filament bundling activity. Herein, we provide a brief review on the role of plastins in the testis in light of this report, which together with recent findings in the field, we propose a likely model by which plastins regulate ES function during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis via their intrinsic activity on actin microfilament organization in the rat testis.

  15. Plastination technology for anatomical studies in Nigeria: Opinion of teachers at medical institutions

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    Onyemaechi O. Azu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Gunther von Hagens developed plastination as a technique of tissue preservation in 1977. He used a delicate method of forced impregnation with curable polymers like silicone, epoxy or polyester resins for preservation of anatomical specimens. With plastination, every part of a biological tissue is treated, preserving it for educational purposes. Hence, there are vast applications in the medical field. We set out to survey the knowledge and opinion of lecturers of anatomy about plastinated specimen use in medical schools through the administration of questionnaires to respondents who participated at the Society of Experimental and Clinical Anatomists of Nigeria (SECAN conference in 2011. It was found that 50.0% and 23.75% of respondents respectively, had their masters and doctorate degrees in Anatomy. Less than 8.0% utilised plastination as a tool for teaching as against 40% (plastic models, 36.25% (cadavers and 15.0% (pathology pots. Conventional methods such as fixation by immersion (15.0% and embalming (52.5% with formaldehyde were commonly used for long term preservation of tissues in their various institutions. These methods were found to be less costly (25.0%, easy to use (56.25% and the only method (12.25% available, even though they posed some health hazards (96.0%. Whilst only 6.25% of the respondents did not know anything about plastination, 93.75% were aware of it. The advocacy for preservation of tissues by plastination has been gradual in developed countries. We recommend the use of plastinates in medical schools in Nigeria.

  16. Plastination technology for anatomical studies in Nigeria: Opinion of teachers at medical institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyemaechi O. Azu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Gunther von Hagens developed plastination as a technique of tissue preservation in 1977. He used a delicate method of forced impregnation with curable polymers like silicone, epoxy or polyester resins for preservation of anatomical specimens. With plastination, every part of a biological tissue is treated, preserving it for educational purposes. Hence, there are vast applications in the medical field. We set out to survey the knowledge and opinion of lecturers of anatomy about plastinated specimen use in medical schools through the administration of questionnaires to respondents who participated at the Society of Experimental and Clinical Anatomists of Nigeria (SECAN conference in 2011. It was found that 50.0%and 23.75%of respondents respectively, had their masters and doctorate degrees in Anatomy. Less than 8.0% utilised plastination as a tool for teaching as against 40%(plastic models, 36.25%(cadavers and 15.0%(pathology pots. Conventional methods such as fixation by immersion (15.0% and embalming (52.5% with formaldehyde were commonly used for long term preservation of tissues in their various institutions. These methods were found to be less costly (25.0%, easy to use (56.25% and the only method (12.25% available, even though they posed some health hazards (96.0%. Whilst only 6.25%of the respondents did not know anything about plastination, 93.75%were aware of it. The advocacy for preservation of tissues by plastination has been gradual in developed countries. We recommend the use of plastinates in medical schools in Nigeria.

  17. Comparing two methods of plastination and glycerin preservation to study skeletal system after Alizarin red-Alcian blue double staining

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    Mohsen M Setayesh

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that plastination technique was an appropriate method in comparison with glycerin preservation, which conserved skeletal tissue of fetus and young rats colored by Alizarin red- Alcian blue double staining. And the final result was that plastination technique can generate dry, odorless, indecomposable and tangible samples.

  18. T-plastin expression downstream to the calcineurin/NFAT pathway is involved in keratinocyte migration.

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    Cécilia Brun

    Full Text Available Cutaneous wound healing requires keratinocyte proliferation, migration and differentiation to restore the barrier function of the skin. The calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated-T-cell (NFAT signaling pathway has been recently shown to be involved in keratinocyte growth, differentiation and migration. It is induced by an increased intracellular calcium rate and its inhibition results in decreased capacities of keratinocytes to migrate. Nevertheless, the link between calcineurin activation and keratinocyte migration remains unknown. Recently, Orai1, a pore subunit of a store-operated calcium channel that favors calcium influx, was shown to play a critical role to control proliferation and migration of basal keratinocytes. Of interest, the actin-bundling T-plastin is crucial in cell motility through cross-linking to actin filament and its synthesis was shown to be induced by calcium influx and regulated by the calcineurin/NFAT pathway in tumor Sezary cells. We investigated herein the role of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway-dependent T-plastin in keratinocyte migration, by quantifying T-plastin expression in keratinocytes and by analyzing their migration under calcineurin inhibition or knockdown of NFAT2 or T-plastin. We did confirm the role of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway in keratinocyte migration as shown by their decreased capacities to migrate after FK506 treatment or siNFAT2 transfection in both scratching and Boyden assays. The expression of NFAT2 and T-plastin in keratinocytes was decreased under FK506 treatment, suggesting that T-plastin plays a role in keratinocyte migration downstream to the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Accordingly, siRNA knockdown of T-plastin expression also decreased their migration capacities. Actin lamellipodia formation as well as FAK and β6-integrin expression were also significantly decreased after treatment with FK506 or siRNA, reinforcing that NFAT2-dependent T-plastin expression plays a role in keratinocyte

  19. MR-plastination-arthrography: a new technique used to study the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermans, John J.; Wentink, Noortje [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Neurosciences, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Beumer, Annechien [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedics, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique called MR plastination arthrography to study both intra- and extra-articular anatomy. In six human cadaveric lower legs MR arthrography was performed in either a one-step or two-step procedure. In the former a mixture of diluted Gadolinium and dyed polymer was injected. In the latter the dyed polymer was injected after arthrography wih diluted Gadolinium. Three-millimeter slices of these legs, obtained in a plane identical to that of the MR images, were plastinated according to the E12 technique of von Hagens. The plastination slices were subsequently compared with the MR images. The one-step procedure resulted in an inhomogeneous arthrogram. The two-step procedure resulted in a good correlation between the high-resolution MR images and plastination slices, as expressed by a good comparison of anatomic detail of the small syndesmotic recess. Images of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis obtained with plastination arthrography correlated well with images acquired by MR arthrography when performed in a two-step procedure. (orig.)

  20. Plastination of macroparasites: An eco-friendly method of long-term preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niranjan; Das, Bhupamani; Solanki, Jayesh B; Jadav, Mehul M; Menaka, Ramasamy

    2017-11-01

    Preservation of macroparasites by infiltrating the polymer in the tissues can defy the inherited shortcoming of classical wet preservation method. Preservation was done by infiltrating the melamine alone or with xylene (MX)/chloroform (MC)/turpentine oil (MT) in 1:1 and hardener (MH) in 9:1 ratio in the tissues of the gross specimen of the animal parasites. The plastinated models withstand the process of microbial decomposition, and remain intact in the environmental conditions. The polymer mixture resists the entry of the water molecule, and model dried just after taking out it from the water tank. Overall, the plastinated parasites were dry, non-sticky, glossy, odorless, chemical free, and harmless, to some extent flexible, with detectable morphological structure, and retain their natural form but lost their natural color. Full marks were assigned to the degree of dryness, non-stickiness, and odorlessness to the model plastinated in different solutions on a five-point scale. For flexibility, the score was 1.2, 2.2, and 2.4 for the plastinated model in melamine/MH, MX/MC, and MT solutions, respectively. The average score of glossiness was 4.6 and 5 for the specimen plastinated in melamine/MH and MX/MC/MT solutions, respectively. The degree of dryness, glossiness, stickiness, and flexibility varies non-significantly, with the polymer mixtures used. The prepared model can be used to educate the students/general mass population.

  1. Plastination of macroparasites: An eco-friendly method of long-term preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Kumar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Preservation of macroparasites by infiltrating the polymer in the tissues can defy the inherited shortcoming of classical wet preservation method. Materials and Methods: Preservation was done by infiltrating the melamine alone or with xylene (MX/chloroform (MC/turpentine oil (MT in 1:1 and hardener (MH in 9:1 ratio in the tissues of the gross specimen of the animal parasites. Results: The plastinated models withstand the process of microbial decomposition, and remain intact in the environmental conditions. The polymer mixture resists the entry of the water molecule, and model dried just after taking out it from the water tank. Overall, the plastinated parasites were dry, non-sticky, glossy, odorless, chemical free, and harmless, to some extent flexible, with detectable morphological structure, and retain their natural form but lost their natural color. Full marks were assigned to the degree of dryness, non-stickiness, and odorlessness to the model plastinated in different solutions on a five-point scale. For flexibility, the score was 1.2, 2.2, and 2.4 for the plastinated model in melamine/MH, MX/MC, and MT solutions, respectively. The average score of glossiness was 4.6 and 5 for the specimen plastinated in melamine/MH and MX/MC/MT solutions, respectively. The degree of dryness, glossiness, stickiness, and flexibility varies non-significantly, with the polymer mixtures used. Conclusion: The prepared model can be used to educate the students/general mass population.

  2. Plastination of tissues and organs: interdisciplinary approach to replace laboratory animals that are in use for education and research

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    Ilieski Vlatko

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to apply the plastination as an alternative method for protection on animals that are used in education, experiments and research according the European Directive 86/609/EEC. A two years old female guinea pig is used as material. The dissection of muscles as well subcutaneous structures and organs from abdominal cavity is preformed immediately after the death of animal. The guinea pig is plastinated using the protocol for S10 plastination. The plastinated guinea pig has firm consistention, it is dry on hand touch, oddorless and free of any chemical substances. The dissected skeletal muscle enable to learn their topography and easy to understand their function. Because of permanent preservation, the organs from abdominal cavity retain their topographical position enabling complete view of anatomical relationship of organs like stomach, spleen, pancreas and left kidney are, the mesenteries with apart of thin and large intestines, the relationship between the ovary and the horns of the uterus. According the results, the S10 plastination technique can be use for developing an anatomical model from one laboratory animal witch can be used for education process in anatomy. The method of plastination is an important tool allowing 3.R concept to be aplied and widely accepted since plastinated models can reduce using the laboratory animals for education and research purposes.

  3. Effectiveness of Plastinated Anatomical Specimens Depicting Common Sports Injuries to Enhance Musculoskeletal Injury Evaluation Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Kaori; Stickley, Christopher D.; Labrash, Steven J.; Lozanoff, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Context: Plastination techniques have emerged as effective methods for preserving human tissue and enabling human specimens to be utilized in a fashion similar to anatomical models with much greater accuracy. Opportunities to observe and experience human specimens in classroom settings should be beneficial to undergraduate and graduate students in…

  4. MR-plastination-arthrography: A new technique used to study the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Hermans (John); N. Wentink; G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); A. Beumer (Annechien)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique called MR plastination arthrography to study both intra- and extra-articular anatomy. Materials and methods: In six human cadaveric lower legs MR arthrography was performed in either a one-step or two-step procedure. In

  5. Defining the Morphology and Distribution of the Alar Fascia: A Sheet Plastination Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scali, Frank; Nash, Lance G; Pontell, Matthew E

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to delineate the morphology, integrity, and distribution of the alar fascia using dissection and E12 sheet plastination. This is the first study that employs E12 sheet plastination to investigate the alar fascia and its adjacent potential spaces. Twenty-nine manual dissections and 3 sets of E12 sheet plastinations were used to examine the posterior pharyngeal region for the architecture and distribution of the alar fascia. Specimens were examined from the inferior nuchal line to C6. The alar fascia originated as a well-defined midline structure at the level of C1 and could be identified down to C6. There was no evidence of the alar fascia between the inferior nuchal line and the base of the skull. Notably, the alar fascia permitted resistance to manual traction. E12 sheet plastination allowed for visualization of the alar fascia's superior attachments within the deep cervical region. Resistance to traction suggests that the alar fascia may be more than just a loose fibroareolar matrix. The findings in this study suggest an alternative point of entry into the danger space. Understanding the continuity of this fascial layer is critically important with regard to the pathophysiology of deep neck space infections. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. The Artificial World of Plastination: A Challenge to Religious Perspectives on the Dead Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David Gareth

    2016-11-01

    The public exhibitions of plastinated (preserved) and dissected human cadavers have proved exceedingly popular and also very contentious. However, there has been little in the way of sustained analysis of these exhibitions from a Christian angle. The technique of plastination enables whole bodies to be displayed as though standing and playing a variety of sports, and with 'life-like' facial expressions. In analyzing this phenomenon, the plastination procedure is outlined, and the degree of naturalness of the whole body plastinates assessed. In searching for theological directives the debate over burial and cremation is used as a means of exploring the respect we give the dead body, and the significance of the resurrection of the body for our views of the dead body. In particular, attention is paid to devaluation of the dead body in situations ranging from dissection of the body through to commercial public exhibitions. The centrality of notions of altruism and 'gift' is discussed. It is concluded that there are many disquieting features to these exhibitions, necessitating caution in approaching them. Nevertheless, in reminding visitors of their mortality and the wonders of the human body, they are not to be dismissed entirely.

  7. The Diverse Utility of Wet Prosections and Plastinated Specimens in Teaching Gross Anatomy in New Zealand

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    Cornwall, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Anatomical education has traditionally used cadaveric material to study the human body, with both wet prosections and plastinated (PP) material commonly utilized. However, the frequency of use of these different preparation modes in a tertiary institution has not been previously examined. An audit of PP use in the Department of Anatomy and…

  8. Design of non-anthropomorphic robotic hands for anthropomorphic tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Simó Serra, Edgar; Moreno-Noguer, Francesc; Pérez Gracia, Alba

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the idea of designing non- anthropomorphic multi-fingered robotic hands for tasks tha t replicate the motion of the human hand. Taking as input data a finite set of rigid-body positions for the five fingertips, we de- velop a method to perform dimensional synthesis for a kinema tic chain with a tree structure, with five branches that share thr ee common joints. We state the forward kinematics equations of relative dis- placements for each serial chain expressed as du...

  9. Anthropomorphism and Intentionality Improve Memory for Events

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    Baker, Lewis J.; Hymel, Alicia M.; Levin, Daniel T.

    2018-01-01

    Several studies have explored the determinants of anthropomorphism: the tendency to endow nonhuman agents with human features, goals, and intentions. Less is known of the cognitive benefits that may arise from anthropomorphism. Following research in narrative comprehension, we explored how the attribution of human-like features and intentional…

  10. Quantitative kinetic study of the actin-bundling protein L-plastin and of its impact on actin turn-over.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad Al Tanoury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Initially detected in leukocytes and cancer cells derived from solid tissues, L-plastin/fimbrin belongs to a large family of actin crosslinkers and is considered as a marker for many cancers. Phosphorylation of L-plastin on residue Ser5 increases its F-actin binding activity and is required for L-plastin-mediated cell invasion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study the kinetics of L-plastin and the impact of L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation on L-plastin dynamics and actin turn-over in live cells, simian Vero cells were transfected with GFP-coupled WT-L-plastin, Ser5 substitution variants (S5/A, S5/E or actin and analyzed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP. FRAP data were explored by mathematical modeling to estimate steady-state reaction parameters. We demonstrate that in Vero cell focal adhesions L-plastin undergoes rapid cycles of association/dissociation following a two-binding-state model. Phosphorylation of L-plastin increased its association rates by two-fold, whereas dissociation rates were unaffected. Importantly, L-plastin affected actin turn-over by decreasing the actin dissociation rate by four-fold, increasing thereby the amount of F-actin in the focal adhesions, all these effects being promoted by Ser5 phosphorylation. In MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA treatment induced L-plastin translocation to de novo actin polymerization sites in ruffling membranes and spike-like structures and highly increased its Ser5 phosphorylation. Both inhibition studies and siRNA knock-down of PKC isozymes pointed to the involvement of the novel PKC-delta isozyme in the PMA-elicited signaling pathway leading to L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the L-plastin contribution to actin dynamics regulation was substantiated by its association with a protein complex comprising cortactin, which is known to be involved in this process. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether these findings

  11. Quantitative Kinetic Study of the Actin-Bundling Protein L-Plastin and of Its Impact on Actin Turn-Over

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Tanoury, Ziad; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth; Halavatyi, Aliaksandr; Hoffmann, Céline; Moes, Michèle; Hadzic, Ermin; Catillon, Marie; Yatskou, Mikalai; Friederich, Evelyne

    2010-01-01

    Background Initially detected in leukocytes and cancer cells derived from solid tissues, L-plastin/fimbrin belongs to a large family of actin crosslinkers and is considered as a marker for many cancers. Phosphorylation of L-plastin on residue Ser5 increases its F-actin binding activity and is required for L-plastin-mediated cell invasion. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the kinetics of L-plastin and the impact of L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation on L-plastin dynamics and actin turn-over in live cells, simian Vero cells were transfected with GFP-coupled WT-L-plastin, Ser5 substitution variants (S5/A, S5/E) or actin and analyzed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). FRAP data were explored by mathematical modeling to estimate steady-state reaction parameters. We demonstrate that in Vero cell focal adhesions L-plastin undergoes rapid cycles of association/dissociation following a two-binding-state model. Phosphorylation of L-plastin increased its association rates by two-fold, whereas dissociation rates were unaffected. Importantly, L-plastin affected actin turn-over by decreasing the actin dissociation rate by four-fold, increasing thereby the amount of F-actin in the focal adhesions, all these effects being promoted by Ser5 phosphorylation. In MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment induced L-plastin translocation to de novo actin polymerization sites in ruffling membranes and spike-like structures and highly increased its Ser5 phosphorylation. Both inhibition studies and siRNA knock-down of PKC isozymes pointed to the involvement of the novel PKC-δ isozyme in the PMA-elicited signaling pathway leading to L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the L-plastin contribution to actin dynamics regulation was substantiated by its association with a protein complex comprising cortactin, which is known to be involved in this process. Conclusions/Significance Altogether these findings quantitatively

  12. Morphological peculiarity of the renal parenchyma on S10 thin plastinated pig kidneys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pendovski Lazo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the morphological structures on the renal parenchyma on the pig kidneys, prepared in thin slices by S10 sheet plastination method. A total number of 60 kidneys taken form two adult breeds are plastinated in 2mm sagital thin sections. The morphological structure on thin kidney slices is analyzed and their anatomic-topographical relationship is investigated. The prepared thin kidney slices are permanent, flexible, dry, and odorless with smooth surfaces anatomical models with clear distinction between renal medulla and renal cortex. In cross-bread landras/yorkshire, the number of renal pyramids is ranged between 8-14 (average 10.63 while in breed dalland the number is ranged between 8- 13(average 9.94(p>0.05. Three morphological forms are found in pig kidneys based of the variation of adhesion of renal pyramids and derange of their renal papilla into renal pelvis. According the results can be concluded that the S10 sheet plastination method could be used for preparing of thin anatomical models that are suitable for education and research purposes enabling three-dimensional plan view of anatomical structures inside of kidneys.

  13. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veit, R.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi, N.; Mannweiler, E.; Drexler, G.; Williams, G.

    1989-01-01

    The first generation of heterogenoeous anthropomorphic mathematical models to be used in dose calculations was the MIRD-5 adult phantom, followed by the pediatric MIRD-type phantoms and by the GSF sex-specific phantoms ADAM and EVA. A new generation of realistic anthropomorphic models is now introduced. The organs and tissues of these models consist of a well defined number of volume elements (voxels), derived from computer tomographic (CT) data; consequently, these models were named voxel or tomographic models. So far two voxel models of real patients are available: one of an 8 week old baby and of a 7 year old child. For simplicity, the model of the baby will be referred to as BABY and that of the child as CHILD. In chapter 1 a brief literature review is given on the existing mathematical models and their applications. The reasons that lead to the construction of the new CT models is discussed. In chapter 2 the technique is described which allows to convert any physical object into computer files to be used for dose calculations. The technique which produces three dimensional reconstructions of high resolution is discussed. In chapter 3 the main characteristics of the models of the baby and child are given. Tables of organ masses and volumes are presented together with three dimensional images of some organs and tissues. A special mention is given to the assessment of bone marrow distribution. Chapter 4 gives a short description of the Monte Carlo code used in conjunction with the models to calculate organ and tissue doses resulting from photon exposures. Some technical details concerning the computer files which describe the models are also given. (orig./HP)

  14. Reminders of Social Connection Can Attenuate Anthropomorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Jennifer A; Tchalova, Kristina; Fenerci, Can

    2016-12-01

    It is a fundamental human need to secure and sustain a sense of social belonging. Previous research has shown that individuals who are lonely are more likely than people who are not lonely to attribute humanlike traits (e.g., free will) to nonhuman agents (e.g., an alarm clock that makes people get up by moving away from the sleeper), presumably in an attempt to fulfill unmet needs for belongingness. We directly replicated the association between loneliness and anthropomorphism in a larger sample ( N = 178); furthermore, we showed that reminding people of a close, supportive relationship reduces their tendency to anthropomorphize. This finding provides support for the idea that the need for belonging has causal effects on anthropomorphism. Last, we showed that attachment anxiety-characterized by intense desire for and preoccupation with closeness, fear of abandonment, and hypervigilance to social cues-was a stronger predictor of anthropomorphism than loneliness was. This finding helps clarify the mechanisms underlying anthropomorphism and supports the idea that anthropomorphism is a motivated process reflecting the active search for potential sources of connection.

  15. Improved determination of macroscopic parasite preparations using S10 modified plastination procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Atanaskova

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Macroscopic preparations of parasites fixed in formaldehyde or alcohol don’t fulfill in complete the requests for education, as well as their determination, mainly because of the toxic fumes and not enough visible structure of fixed parasite. Using the modified С10 plastination method, parasites from three different phylum were prepared: Plathelminthes: Class Cestoda (Dipilidum caninum, Moniezia spp and larvae from T.Echinococcus granulosus - Echinococcus unilocularis, larvae from T. pisiformis - Cysticercus pisiformis, , larvae from T. hidatigena - Cysticercus tenuicollis, Phylum Nemathelminthes, Class Nematoda, (Ascaris suum, Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus, Diro filaria immitis, Phylum Arthropoda, Class Arachnida (tick from the Ixodidae family and Class Insecta (Gasterophilus intestinalis, Hypoderma bovis. The aim of this study was conserving the parasites in native condition with plastination method and improved determination according to their visible morphologic structure. Parasites were previously kept in 10% formaldehyde. Prepared parasites were dry, chemical free, not toxic and safe for the environment, flexible and with detained form and structure. There was a variation in the natural colors in some of the parasites, as a result from long-time formalin fixation. Preparations made with this method are permanent educative material which enables improved study of parasite’s structure.

  16. 21 CFR 892.1370 - Nuclear anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear anthropomorphic phantom. 892.1370 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1370 Nuclear anthropomorphic phantom. (a) Identification. A nuclear anthropomorphic phantom is a human tissue facsimile that contains a...

  17. Bioinspired Fingertip for Anthropomorphic Robotic Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Controzzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An artificial fingertip with mechanical features and appearance similar to the human fingertip could represent a significant step forward towards the development of the next generation artificial hands. However, so far, a fingertip showing a good trade-off among mechanical features, appearance and anthropomorphism, along with its 3D computational model, is still missing.

  18. The public display of plastinates as a challenge to the integrity of anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy has been thrust into the public domain by the highly successful public displays of dissected and plastinated human bodies. This is anatomy in modern guise, anatomy as perceived by the general public. If this is the case, the message it is giving the public about the nature of anatomy is that it is an impersonal analysis of the human body of value within a medical and health care environment. While this is in part true, and while it reflects important aspects of anatomy's history, it fails to reflect the humanistic strands within an increasing swathe of contemporary anatomy. These are manifested in growing recognition of the centrality of informed consent in the practice of anatomy, awareness of the personal dimensions and relationships of those whose bodies are being dissected, and manifested in thanksgiving ceremonies involving staff and students. The notion that the bodies undergoing dissection can be students' first teachers and/or patients is gaining ground, another indication of the human dimensions of the anatomical enterprise. Exhibitions such as Body Worlds ignore these dimensions within anatomy by dislocating it from its clinical and relational base. The significance of this is that loss of these dimensions leads to a loss of the human face of anatomy by isolating it from the people whose body bequests made this knowledge possible. What is required is greater transparency and openness in the practices of all who deal with the dead human body, trends that owe much to the writings of scholars from within a range of humanities disciplines as they have responded to the public displays of dissected plastinated bodies. Anatomists have much to learn from these debates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Revisiting the Effect of Anthropomorphizing a Social Cause Campaign.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Williams

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests that anthropomorphism can be harnessed as a tool to boost intentions to comply with social cause campaigns. Drawing on the human tendency to extend moral concern to entities portrayed as humanlike, it has been argued that adding personified features to a social campaign elevates anticipated guilt at failing to comply, and this subsequently boosts intentions to comply with that campaign. The present research aimed to extend extant research by disentangling the effects of emotional and non-emotional anthropomorphism, and differentiating amongst other emotional mechanisms of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect (namely, anticipated pride and anticipated regret. Experiment 1 (N = 294 compared the effectiveness of positive, negative, and emotionally-neutral anthropomorphized campaign posters for boosting campaign compliance intentions against non-anthropomorphized posters. We also measured potential mechanisms including anticipated guilt, regret, and pride. Results failed to support the anthropomorphism-compliance effect, and no changes in anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. Experiments 2 (N = 150 and 3 (N = 196 represented further tests of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect. Despite high statistical power and efforts to closely replicate the conditions under which the anthropomorphism-compliance effect had been previously observed, no differences in compliance intention or anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. A meta-analysis of the effects of anthropomorphism on compliance and anticipated emotion across the three experiments revealed effect size estimates that did not differ significantly from zero. The results of these three experiments suggest that the anthropomorphism-compliance effect is fragile and perhaps subject to contextual and idiographic influences. Thus, this research provides important insight and impetus for future research on the applied and theoretical

  20. The actin filament cross-linker L-plastin confers resistance to TNF-α in MCF-7 breast cancer cells in a phosphorylation-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janji, Bassam; Vallar, Laurent; Tanoury, Ziad Al; Bernardin, François; Vetter, Guillaume; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth; Berchem, Guy; Friederich, Evelyne; Chouaib, Salem

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We used a tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α resistant breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cell line to investigate the involvement of the actin cytoskeleton in the mechanism of cell resistance to this cytokine. We found that TNF resistance correlates with the loss of cell epithelial properties and the gain of a mesenchymal phenotype, reminiscent of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Morphological changes were associated with a profound reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and with a change in the repertoire of expressed actin cytoskeleton genes and EMT markers, as revealed by DNA microarray-based expression profiling. L-plastin, an F-actin cross-linking and stabilizing protein, was identified as one of the most significantly up-regulated genes in TNF-resistant cells. Knockdown of L-plastin in these cells revealed its crucial role in conferring TNF resistance. Importantly, overexpression of wild-type L-plastin in TNF-sensitive MCF-7 cells was sufficient to protect them against TNF-mediated cell death. Furthermore, we found that this effect is dependent on serine-5 phosphorylation of L-plastin and that non-conventional protein kinase C isoforms and the ceramide pathway may regulate its phosphorylation state. The protective role of L-plastin was not restricted to TNF-α resistant MCF-7 cells because a correlation between the expression of L-plastin and the resistance to TNF-α was observed in other breast cancer cell lines. Together, our study discloses a novel unexpected role of the actin bundling protein L-plastin as a cell protective protein against TNF-cytotoxicity. PMID:19799649

  1. The "Cutopia" paradox: anthropomorphism as entertainment

    OpenAIRE

    McRae, Donna Leanna; Vale, Michael Charles

    2016-01-01

    An infant chimpanzee, dressed in riotous checks, bowtie and braces, cradled in human arms while it regards a camera, is perhaps further from us than a tiger lurking in the deepest jungle. Anthropomorphic sentiment negates empathy, blinding us to the real animal behind the “character.” The engaging creature we imagine we’d like to hold and protect is the product, most likely, of violent separation and trauma, stolen in order to bring us this enjoyment. We read the comical face, celebrating wha...

  2. Status and Trends of the Anthropomorphic Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Hurs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a number of current developments in the field of anthropomorphic robotics, namely robotic exoskeletons, android platform with copying control systems, android platform with autonomous control systems, avatars, and androids. Highlights the key subsystems of the robotic platform such as sensitization tools, tools of self-diagnostics, security and prioritization, a power subsystem, and computer system. Identifies the most important subsystem of a “future soldier” to represent an equipage as a multifunctional active exoskeleton, completed with the necessary equipment.The paper shows the main problems the developers of anthropomorphic robotics face. For example, many degrees of the human body freedom curb a creation of the actuating mechanisms of robots, which fit the human anatomy as much as possible. For the human sizes the specific characteristics of traditional types of actuators, such as electromechanical, electro-hydraulic and electro-pneumatic are worse than those of the human muscles. Clearly, the greatest prospects in this area are associated with artificial muscles. There is also no so far a solution for the problem of creating the feedbacks in all kinds of senses to ensure that an operator has a feeling that he is in the place of the robot. There is much tension around the issue of creating a perfect remote control system that allows the operator to obtain unambiguous signals to control the robot. There is currently no completely autonomous control system with elements of artificial intelligence. Particular attention is paid to the problems of creating power sources that can provide affordable autonomy for mobile robotic systems. The most, presently, promising power sources are mentioned.The paper considers some development aspects of the control system, which is capable to run in a copier, supervisory, combined and offline modes. Presents the most important functions of the robot sensory system. Shows some aspects

  3. Anthropomorphic master/slave manipulator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vykukal, H. C.; King, R. F.; Vallotton, W. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An anthropomorphic master/slave manipulator system including master arm apparatus with a plurality of master tubular articulated portions is outlined. Objectives of this investion were to provide a system that accurately and smoothly simulates human limb movement at a remote location. The system has a high frequency response, a high structural stiffness and a design that protects the components of the slave mechanism. Simulation of human movements is possible in outer space, underwater, and in a hazardous environment such as in a high radiation area. The equivalent ability, dexterity, and strength of a human arm are simulated.

  4. Anthropomorphic Networks as Representatives of Global Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergii Yahodzinskyi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There has been analyzed a phenomenon of global consciousness, and its cultural and historical, civilizational dimensions have been substantiated. There has been demonstrated that the concept of planetary consciousness, global thinking, noosphere was described for the first time in the philosophy of cosmism. However, in modern conditions ideas of representatives of the naturalistic philosophical direction of cosmism have not lost their heuristic potential. They can be reconsidered in a new fashion within the context of emerging anthropomorphic (human dimension networks. There has been proved that global consciousness is a component of the social and cultural potential of global information networks defining vectors to prospects of humanity progress in the 21st century. Relying on methodology of the structural and functional analysis, the author arrives at a conclusion about global networks obtaining the status of representatives of global consciousness. This is the area of networks where all relevant information is concentrated – from statistical data to scientific and technical information. Access to these data is limited by human abilities and is realized in the form of discrete requests with using heuristic algorithms of information procession. A suggestion is introduced considering the fact that modern society being a self-organized system seeks to gain stable condition. Anthropomorphic networks are means of decreasing social entropy, which is growing as a result of any kind of human intervention into social processes. Thus, for the first time a human is challenged by their intellect, ability to create, discover and control.

  5. 21 CFR 892.1950 - Radiographic anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic anthropomorphic phantom. 892.1950 Section 892.1950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... phantom. (a) Identification. A radiographic anthropomorphic phantom is a device intended for medical...

  6. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Andrea S.D. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de

    2009-01-01

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  7. Plastin 3 is upregulated in iPSC-derived motoneurons from asymptomatic SMN1-deleted individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heesen, Ludwig; Peitz, Michael; Torres-Benito, Laura; Hölker, Irmgard; Hupperich, Kristina; Dobrindt, Kristina; Jungverdorben, Johannes; Ritzenhofen, Swetlana; Weykopf, Beatrice; Eckert, Daniela; Hosseini-Barkooie, Seyyed Mohsen; Storbeck, Markus; Fusaki, Noemi; Lonigro, Renata; Heller, Raoul; Kye, Min Jeong; Brüstle, Oliver; Wirth, Brunhilde

    2016-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a devastating motoneuron (MN) disorder caused by homozygous loss of SMN1. Rarely, SMN1-deleted individuals are fully asymptomatic despite carrying identical SMN2 copies as their SMA III-affected siblings suggesting protection by genetic modifiers other than SMN2. High plastin 3 (PLS3) expression has previously been found in lymphoblastoid cells but not in fibroblasts of asymptomatic compared to symptomatic siblings. To find out whether PLS3 is also upregulated in MNs of asymptomatic individuals and thus a convincing SMA protective modifier, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of three asymptomatic and three SMA III-affected siblings from two families and compared these to iPSCs from a SMA I patient and control individuals. MNs were differentiated from iPSC-derived small molecule neural precursor cells (smNPCs). All four genotype classes showed similar capacity to differentiate into MNs at day 8. However, SMA I-derived MN survival was significantly decreased while SMA III- and asymptomatic-derived MN survival was moderately reduced compared to controls at day 27. SMN expression levels and concomitant gem numbers broadly matched SMN2 copy number distribution; SMA I presented the lowest levels, whereas SMA III and asymptomatic showed similar levels. In contrast, PLS3 was significantly upregulated in mixed MN cultures from asymptomatic individuals pinpointing a tissue-specific regulation. Evidence for strong PLS3 accumulation in shaft and rim of growth cones in MN cultures from asymptomatic individuals implies an important role in neuromuscular synapse formation and maintenance. These findings provide strong evidence that PLS3 is a genuine SMA protective modifier.

  8. Sectional depiction of the pelvic floor by CT, MR imaging and sheet plastination: computer-aided correlation and 3D model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersdorff, D.; Taupitz, M.; Hamm, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany); Schiemann, T. [Inst. for Mathematics and Computer Science in Medicine, University of Hamburg (Germany); Kooijman, H. [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany); Nicolas, V. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany)

    2001-04-01

    The structures of the pelvic floor are clinically important but difficult to assess. To facilitate the understanding of the complicated pelvic floor anatomy on sectional images obtained by CT and MR imaging, and to make the representation more vivid, a computer-aided 3D model was created from a male and a female torso to develop a teaching tool. A male and a female cadaver torso were investigated by means of CT, MR imaging, and serial-section sheet plastination. A 3D reconstruction of the pelvic floor and adjacent structures was performed by fusion of CT and MR imaging data sets with sheet plastination sections. Corresponding sections from all three methods could be compared and visualized in their 3D context. Sheet plastination allows distinction of connective tissue, muscles, and pelvic organs down to a microscopic level. In combination with CT, MR imaging, and sheet plastination a 3D model of the pelvic floor offers a better understanding of the complex pelvic anatomy. This knowledge may be applied in the diagnostic imaging of urinary incontinence or prolapse and prior to prostate surgery. (orig.)

  9. Anthropomorphic thorax phantom for cardio-respiratory motion simulation in tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolwin, Konstantin; Czekalla, Björn; Frohwein, Lynn J.; Büther, Florian; Schäfers, Klaus P.

    2018-02-01

    Patient motion during medical imaging using techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), or single emission computed tomography (SPECT) is well known to degrade images, leading to blurring effects or severe artifacts. Motion correction methods try to overcome these degrading effects. However, they need to be validated under realistic conditions. In this work, a sophisticated anthropomorphic thorax phantom is presented that combines several aspects of a simulator for cardio-respiratory motion. The phantom allows us to simulate various types of cardio-respiratory motions inside a human-like thorax, including features such as inflatable lungs, beating left ventricular myocardium, respiration-induced motion of the left ventricle, moving lung lesions, and moving coronary artery plaques. The phantom is constructed to be MR-compatible. This means that we can not only perform studies in PET, SPECT and CT, but also inside an MRI system. The technical features of the anthropomorphic thorax phantom Wilhelm are presented with regard to simulating motion effects in hybrid emission tomography and radiotherapy. This is supplemented by a study on the detectability of small coronary plaque lesions in PET/CT under the influence of cardio-respiratory motion, and a study on the accuracy of left ventricular blood volumes.

  10. Anthropomorphic Robot Design and User Interaction Associated with Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Though in its original concept a robot was conceived to have some human-like shape, most robots now in use have specific industrial purposes and do not closely resemble humans. Nevertheless, robots that resemble human form in some way have continued to be introduced. They are called anthropomorphic robots. The fact that the user interface to all robots is now highly mediated means that the form of the user interface is not necessarily connected to the robots form, human or otherwise. Consequently, the unique way the design of anthropomorphic robots affects their user interaction is through their general appearance and the way they move. These robots human-like appearance acts as a kind of generalized predictor that gives its operators, and those with whom they may directly work, the expectation that they will behave to some extent like a human. This expectation is especially prominent for interactions with social robots, which are built to enhance it. Often interaction with them may be mainly cognitive because they are not necessarily kinematically intricate enough for complex physical interaction. Their body movement, for example, may be limited to simple wheeled locomotion. An anthropomorphic robot with human form, however, can be kinematically complex and designed, for example, to reproduce the details of human limb, torso, and head movement. Because of the mediated nature of robot control, there remains in general no necessary connection between the specific form of user interface and the anthropomorphic form of the robot. But their anthropomorphic kinematics and dynamics imply that the impact of their design shows up in the way the robot moves. The central finding of this report is that the control of this motion is a basic design element through which the anthropomorphic form can affect user interaction. In particular, designers of anthropomorphic robots can take advantage of the inherent human-like movement to 1) improve the users direct manual control over

  11. Embodied neurofeedback with an anthropomorphic robotic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Niclas; Emkes, Reiner; Thorne, Jeremy D; Debener, Stefan

    2016-11-21

    Neurofeedback-guided motor imagery training (NF-MIT) has been suggested as a promising therapy for stroke-induced motor impairment. Whereas much NF-MIT research has aimed at signal processing optimization, the type of sensory feedback given to the participant has received less attention. Often the feedback signal is highly abstract and not inherently coupled to the mental act performed. In this study, we asked whether an embodied feedback signal is more efficient for neurofeedback operation than a non-embodiable feedback signal. Inspired by the rubber hand illusion, demonstrating that an artificial hand can be incorporated into one's own body scheme, we used an anthropomorphic robotic hand to visually guide the participants' motor imagery act and to deliver neurofeedback. Using two experimental manipulations, we investigated how a participant's neurofeedback performance and subjective experience were influenced by the embodiability of the robotic hand, and by the neurofeedback signal's validity. As pertains to embodiment, we found a promoting effect of robotic-hand embodiment in subjective, behavioral, electrophysiological and electrodermal measures. Regarding neurofeedback signal validity, we found some differences between real and sham neurofeedback in terms of subjective and electrodermal measures, but not in terms of behavioral and electrophysiological measures. This study motivates the further development of embodied feedback signals for NF-MIT.

  12. Development of thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms for use in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira, R.A.D.; Maia, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms to be used in control tests of medical images in scintillation cameras. The main difference among the phantoms was the neck shape: in the first, called OSCT, it was geometrically shaped, while in the second, called OSAP, it was anthropomorphically shaped. In both phantoms, thyroid gland prototypes, which were made of acrylic and anthropomorphically shaped, were constructed to allow the simulation of a healthy thyroid and of thyroids with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Images of these thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms were obtained using iodine 131 with an activity of 8.695 MBq. The iodine 131 was chosen because it is widely used in studies of thyroid scintigraphy. The images obtained proved the effectiveness of the phantoms to simulate normal or abnormal thyroids function. These phantoms can be used in medical imaging quality control programs and, also in the training of professionals involved in the analysis of images in nuclear medicine centers. - Highlights: ► Two thyroid phantoms were developed (OSCT and OSAP) with different types of acrylics. ► Thyroid glands were represented anthropomorphically in the both phantoms. ► Different prototypes of thyroid were built of simulate healthy or unhealthy glands. ► Images indicate that anthropomorphic phantoms correctly simulate the thyroid gland

  13. Seeing More Than Human: Autism and Anthropomorphic Theory of Mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Atherton

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Theory of mind (ToM is defined as the process of taking another’s perspective. Anthropomorphism can be seen as the extension of ToM to non-human entities. This review examines the literature concerning ToM and anthropomorphism in relation to individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD, specifically addressing the questions of how and why those on the spectrum both show an increased interest for anthropomorphism and may even show improved ToM abilities when judging the mental states of anthropomorphic characters. This review highlights that while individuals with ASD traditionally show deficits on a wide range of ToM tests, such as recognizing facial emotions, such ToM deficits may be ameliorated if the stimuli presented is cartoon or animal-like rather than in human form. Individuals with ASD show a greater interest in anthropomorphic characters and process the features of these characters using methods typically reserved for human stimuli. Personal accounts of individuals with ASD also suggest they may identify more closely with animals than other humans. It is shown how the social motivations hypothesized to underlie the anthropomorphizing of non-human targets may lead those on the spectrum to seek social connections and therefore gain ToM experience and expertise amongst unlikely sources.

  14. Social Cognition Unbound: Insights Into Anthropomorphism and Dehumanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waytz, Adam; Epley, Nicholas; Cacioppo, John T

    2010-02-01

    People conceive of wrathful gods, fickle computers, and selfish genes, attributing human characteristics to a variety of supernatural, technological, and biological agents. This tendency to anthropomorphize nonhuman agents figures prominently in domains ranging from religion to marketing to computer science. Perceiving an agent to be humanlike has important implications for whether the agent is capable of social influence, accountable for its actions, and worthy of moral care and consideration. Three primary factors-elicited agent knowledge, sociality motivation, and effectance motivation-appear to account for a significant amount of variability in anthropomorphism. Identifying these factors that lead people to see nonhuman agents as humanlike also sheds light on the inverse process of dehumanization, whereby people treat human agents as animals or objects. Understanding anthropomorphism can contribute to a more expansive view of social cognition that applies social psychological theory to a wide variety of both human and nonhuman agents.

  15. Using 3D printing techniques to create an anthropomorphic thorax phantom for medical imaging purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelaar, Colien; van Eijnatten, Maureen; Dahele, Max; Wolff, Jan; Forouzanfar, Tymour; Slotman, Ben; Verbakel, Wilko F A R

    2018-01-01

    Imaging phantoms are widely used for testing and optimization of imaging devices without the need to expose humans to irradiation. However, commercially available phantoms are commonly manufactured in simple, generic forms and sizes and therefore do not resemble the clinical situation for many patients. Using 3D printing techniques, we created a life-size phantom based on a clinical CT scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer. It was assembled from bony structures printed in gypsum, lung structures consisting of airways, blood vessels >1 mm, and outer lung surface, three lung tumors printed in nylon, and soft tissues represented by silicone (poured into a 3D-printed mold). Kilovoltage x-ray and CT images of the phantom closely resemble those of the real patient in terms of size, shapes, and structures. Surface comparison using 3D models obtained from the phantom and the 3D models used for printing showed mean differences phantom show that the phantom is able to endure radiation doses over 24,000 Gy. It is feasible to create an anthropomorphic thorax phantom using 3D printing and molding techniques. The phantom closely resembles a real patient in terms of spatial accuracy and is currently being used to evaluate x-ray-based imaging quality and positional verification techniques for radiotherapy. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Anthropomorphism in Human-Robot Co-evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Luisa; Dumouchel, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Social robotics entertains a particular relationship with anthropomorphism, which it neither sees as a cognitive error, nor as a sign of immaturity. Rather it considers that this common human tendency, which is hypothesized to have evolved because it favored cooperation among early humans, can be used today to facilitate social interactions between humans and a new type of cooperative and interactive agents - social robots. This approach leads social robotics to focus research on the engineering of robots that activate anthropomorphic projections in users. The objective is to give robots "social presence" and "social behaviors" that are sufficiently credible for human users to engage in comfortable and potentially long-lasting relations with these machines. This choice of 'applied anthropomorphism' as a research methodology exposes the artifacts produced by social robotics to ethical condemnation: social robots are judged to be a "cheating" technology, as they generate in users the illusion of reciprocal social and affective relations. This article takes position in this debate, not only developing a series of arguments relevant to philosophy of mind, cognitive sciences, and robotic AI, but also asking what social robotics can teach us about anthropomorphism. On this basis, we propose a theoretical perspective that characterizes anthropomorphism as a basic mechanism of interaction, and rebuts the ethical reflections that a priori condemns "anthropomorphism-based" social robots. To address the relevant ethical issues, we promote a critical experimentally based ethical approach to social robotics, "synthetic ethics," which aims at allowing humans to use social robots for two main goals: self-knowledge and moral growth.

  17. Effective dose measurement at workplaces within an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagrasa, C.; Darreon, J.; Martin-Burtat, N.; Clairand, I.; Colin, J.; Fontbonne, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry of the IRSN (France) is developing an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom in order to measure the effective dose for photon fields at workplaces. This anthropomorphic phantom will be equipped with small active detectors located inside at chosen positions. The aim of this paper is to present the development of these new detectors showing the results of the characterisation of the prototype under metrological conditions. New evaluations of the effective dose for standard and non-homogenous irradiation configurations taking into account the real constraints of the project have been done validating the feasibility and utility of the instrument. (authors)

  18. Bases for calibration of whole body counters using anthropomorphic physical simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Bernardo Maranhao

    1998-01-01

    The quantification of radionuclides in the human body can be carried out through in vivo measurements performed in facilities generically called whole body counters. The calibration of such units is usually done by using physical anthropomorphic phantoms, which can be defined as artificial structures with geometrical characteristics and attenuation properties similar to the living tissues. This work presents the development of the phantoms necessary to the monitoring of the internal contamination by the radionuclides manipulated in Brazil. It also presents the procedures for the calibration of the detectors used for the in vivo measurements. The developed phantoms are applied in the determination of radionuclides deposited in specific organs, such as Th-232 and Am-241 in the lungs and skull, isotopes of iodine in the thyroid and photon emitters in the energy range from 100 to 3000 keV in the whole body. (author)

  19. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Santos, William S.; Gorski, Ronan; Perini, Ana P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Orengo, Gilberto

    2014-11-01

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus.

  20. SU-E-T-124: Anthropomorphic Phantoms for Confirmation of Linear Accelerator Based Small Animal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perks, J; Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lucero, S [UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To document the support of radiobiological small animal research by a modern radiation oncology facility. This study confirms that a standard, human use linear accelerator can cover the range of experiments called for by researchers performing animal irradiation. A number of representative, anthropomorphic murine phantoms were made. The phantoms confirmed the small field photon and electron beams dosimetry validated the use of the linear accelerator for rodents. Methods: Laser scanning a model, CAD design and 3D printing produced the phantoms. The phantoms were weighed and CT scanned to judge their compatibility to real animals. Phantoms were produced to specifically mimic lung, gut, brain, and othotopic lesion irradiations. Each phantom was irradiated with the same protocol as prescribed to the live animals. Delivered dose was measured with small field ion chambers, MOS/FETs or TLDs. Results: The density of the phantom material compared to density range across the real mice showed that the printed material would yield sufficiently accurate measurements when irradiated. The whole body, lung and gut irradiations were measured within 2% of prescribed doses with A1SL ion chamber. MOSFET measurements of electron irradiations for the orthotopic lesions allowed refinement of the measured small field output factor to better than 2% and validated the immunology experiment of irradiating one lesion and sparing another. Conclusion: Linacs are still useful tools in small animal bio-radiation research. This work demonstrated a strong role for the clinical accelerator in small animal research, facilitating standard whole body dosing as well as conformal treatments down to 1cm field. The accuracy of measured dose, was always within 5%. The electron irradiations of the phantom brain and flank tumors needed adjustment; the anthropomorphic phantoms allowed refinement of the initial output factor measurements for these fields which were made in a large block of solid water.

  1. Computer Control Of Coordinate Movement With Anthropomorphic Two-Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao-tsu, Chang; Bai-yan, Shi

    1985-01-01

    The paper explores the mutual collision problem for two moving anthropomorphic arms with complicatedly shaped objects grasped each in the case constant acceleration in three dimensional space. A discriminant criterion has been proposed for intersection detection, which is based on topology theory. This method is more expressive and straightforward.

  2. Anthropomorphic Patterns And Smoking In A Nigerian Population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... codes for tallness in men also encode male craving for tobacco. For tobacco smoking, which is implicated in many health hazards, male tallness may probably be the only health benefit. Key words: Tobacco smoking, males, females, anthropomorphic measurements. Journal of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy Vol.

  3. Anthropomorphism in Human–Robot Co-evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Damiano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Social robotics entertains a particular relationship with anthropomorphism, which it neither sees as a cognitive error, nor as a sign of immaturity. Rather it considers that this common human tendency, which is hypothesized to have evolved because it favored cooperation among early humans, can be used today to facilitate social interactions between humans and a new type of cooperative and interactive agents – social robots. This approach leads social robotics to focus research on the engineering of robots that activate anthropomorphic projections in users. The objective is to give robots “social presence” and “social behaviors” that are sufficiently credible for human users to engage in comfortable and potentially long-lasting relations with these machines. This choice of ‘applied anthropomorphism’ as a research methodology exposes the artifacts produced by social robotics to ethical condemnation: social robots are judged to be a “cheating” technology, as they generate in users the illusion of reciprocal social and affective relations. This article takes position in this debate, not only developing a series of arguments relevant to philosophy of mind, cognitive sciences, and robotic AI, but also asking what social robotics can teach us about anthropomorphism. On this basis, we propose a theoretical perspective that characterizes anthropomorphism as a basic mechanism of interaction, and rebuts the ethical reflections that a priori condemns “anthropomorphism-based” social robots. To address the relevant ethical issues, we promote a critical experimentally based ethical approach to social robotics, “synthetic ethics,” which aims at allowing humans to use social robots for two main goals: self-knowledge and moral growth.

  4. Anthropomorphism in Human–Robot Co-evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Luisa; Dumouchel, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Social robotics entertains a particular relationship with anthropomorphism, which it neither sees as a cognitive error, nor as a sign of immaturity. Rather it considers that this common human tendency, which is hypothesized to have evolved because it favored cooperation among early humans, can be used today to facilitate social interactions between humans and a new type of cooperative and interactive agents – social robots. This approach leads social robotics to focus research on the engineering of robots that activate anthropomorphic projections in users. The objective is to give robots “social presence” and “social behaviors” that are sufficiently credible for human users to engage in comfortable and potentially long-lasting relations with these machines. This choice of ‘applied anthropomorphism’ as a research methodology exposes the artifacts produced by social robotics to ethical condemnation: social robots are judged to be a “cheating” technology, as they generate in users the illusion of reciprocal social and affective relations. This article takes position in this debate, not only developing a series of arguments relevant to philosophy of mind, cognitive sciences, and robotic AI, but also asking what social robotics can teach us about anthropomorphism. On this basis, we propose a theoretical perspective that characterizes anthropomorphism as a basic mechanism of interaction, and rebuts the ethical reflections that a priori condemns “anthropomorphism-based” social robots. To address the relevant ethical issues, we promote a critical experimentally based ethical approach to social robotics, “synthetic ethics,” which aims at allowing humans to use social robots for two main goals: self-knowledge and moral growth. PMID:29632507

  5. Evolution of prehension ability in an anthropomorphic neurorobotic arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Massera

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show how a simulated anthropomorphic robotic arm controlled by an artificial neural network can develop effective reaching and grasping behaviour through a trial and error process in which the free parameters encode the control rules which regulate the fine-grained interaction between the robot and the environment and variations of the free parameters are retained or discarded on the basis of their effects at the level of the global behaviour exhibited by the robot situated in the environment. The obtained results demonstrate how the proposed methodology allows the robot to produce effective behaviours thanks to its ability to exploit the morphological properties of the robot's body (i.e. its anthropomorphic shape, the elastic properties of its muscle-like actuators and the compliance of its actuated joints and the properties which arise from the physical interaction between the robot and the environment mediated by appropriate control rules.

  6. Modeling and control of an anthropomorphic robotic hand

    OpenAIRE

    Bensalah, Choukri

    2016-01-01

    Mención Europea en el título de doctor This thesis presents methods and tools for enabling the successful use of robotic hands. For highly dexterous and/or anthropomorphic robotic hands, these methods have to share some common goals, such as overcoming the potential complexity of the mechanical design and the ability of performing accurate tasks with low and efficient computational cost. A prerequisite for dexterity is to increase the workspace of the robotic hand. For th...

  7. Patayan Anthropomorphic Figurines from an Orange County Site

    OpenAIRE

    Koerper, Henry C; Hedges, Ken

    1996-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to describe these specimens and discuss their cultural associations, temporal placement, and the possible agents and routes of trade for the exotic effigies. Set against the near absence of Late Prehistoric anthropomorphic figurines from elsewhere in Orange County, these dozen artifacts, as well as figurines of the Northern Tradition found at CA-ORA-58, have important implications for the political and economic role of the Banning-Norris site, as well as i...

  8. Design of a multimodal ({sup 1}H/{sup 23}Na MR/CT) anthropomorphic thorax phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Wiebke; Lietzmann, Florian; Schad, Lothar R.; Zoellner, Frank G. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine

    2017-08-01

    This work proposes a modular, anthropomorphic MR and CT thorax phantom that enables the comparison of experimental studies for quantitative evaluation of deformable, multimodal image registration algorithms and realistic multi-nuclear MR imaging techniques. A human thorax phantom was developed with insertable modules representing lung, liver, ribs and additional tracking spheres. The quality of human tissue mimicking characteristics was evaluated for {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MR as well as CT imaging. The position of landmarks in the lung lobes was tracked during CT image acquisition at several positions during breathing cycles. {sup 1}H MR measurements of the liver were repeated after seven months to determine long term stability. The modules possess HU, T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} values comparable to human tissues (lung module: -756 ± 148 HU, artificial ribs: 218 ± 56 HU (low CaCO{sub 3} concentration) and 339 ± 121 (high CaCO{sub 3} concentration), liver module: T{sub 1} = 790 ± 28 ms, T{sub 2} = 65 ± 1 ms). Motion analysis showed that the landmarks in the lung lobes follow a 3D trajectory similar to human breathing motion. The tracking spheres are well detectable in both CT and MRI. The parameters of the tracking spheres can be adjusted in the following ranges to result in a distinct signal: HU values from 150 to 900 HU, T{sub 1} relaxation time from 550 ms to 2000 ms, T{sub 2} relaxation time from 40 ms to 200 ms. The presented anthropomorphic multimodal thorax phantom fulfills the demands of a simple, inexpensive system with interchangeable components. In future, the modular design allows for complementing the present set up with additional modules focusing on specific research targets such as perfusion studies, {sup 23}Na MR quantification experiments and an increasing level of complexity for motion studies.

  9. Plastinación, una técnica moderna al servicio de la anatomía Plastination: a modern anatomical technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Isaza Castro

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La preservación y el mantenimiento de los cadáveres y especímenes anatómicos han llevado a la búsqueda de técnicas diferentes y a la utilización de sustancias distintas al formaldehído con el fin de minimizar los riesgos de exposición a vapores químicos y a agentes biológicos y de disponer de preparados anatómicos con mayor durabilidad, conservando las características anatómicas y facilitando la docencia y la investigación en la disciplina. Una de estas técnicas es la plastinación. Presentamos los resultados obtenidos con ella en la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Antioquia. The preservation and maintenance of anatomical specimens and corpses have created the need for new techniques and for the use of substances different from formaldehyde, in order to lessen the risks of exposure to this substance and to biological agents, and to increase the availability and durability of anatomical pieces preserving their characteristics in order to facilitate teaching and research. In the eighth decade of the XX century the German anatomist von Hagens patented the plastination technique that consists of replacing the water of tissues by silicones, polymers or resins. The plastination process includes four steps: fixation, dehydration, impregnating and curing. There are some difficulties in Colombia regarding the availability of acetone, polymers and silicones as well as a lack of adequate infrastructure for the plastination process; because of this we have modified the technique using other substances at different pressure and temperature conditions; we report the modifications with which we have obtained very good results.

  10. Are anthropomorphic persuasive appeals effective? The role of the recipient's motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Kim-Pong

    2015-03-01

    Anthropomorphic persuasive appeals are prevalent. However, their effectiveness has not been well studied. The present research addresses this issue with two experiments in the context of environmental persuasion. It shows that anthropomorphic messages, relative to non-anthropomorphic ones, appear to motivate more conservation behaviour and elicit more favourable message responses only among recipients who have a strong need for effectance or social connection. Among recipients whose such need is weak, anthropomorphic appeals seem to backfire. These findings extend the research on motivation and persuasion and add evidence to the motivational bases of anthropomorphism. In addition, joining some recent studies, the present research highlights the implications of anthropomorphism of nature for environmental conservation efforts, and offers some practical suggestions for environmental persuasion. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Transfer Relation between the Compression Test Rig and the Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) Lower Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Transfer Relation between the Compression Test Rig and the Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) Lower Leg by Masayuki Sakamoto ARL-SR-0330...1138 ARL-SR-0330 August 2015 Transfer Relation between the Compression Test Rig and the Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) Lower Leg ...Relation between the Compression Test Rig and the Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) Lower Leg 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  12. Influence of the Pulse Duration in the Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) Lower-Leg Loading Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Influence of the Pulse Duration in the Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) Lower- Leg Loading Mechanics by Masayuki Sakamoto ARL-SR-0331...ARL-SR-0331 August 2015 Influence of the Pulse Duration in the Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) Lower- Leg Loading Mechanics Masayuki...Pulse Duration in the Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) Lower- Leg Loading Mechanics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  13. How gestures affect students: A comparative experiment using class presentations conducted by an anthropomorphic agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Tomohiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Imao, Tomoya

    2017-07-01

    Recently, a variety of user interfaces have been developed based on human-robot and human-agent interaction, and anthropomorphic agents are used as one type of interface. However, the use of anthropomorphic agents is applied mainly to the medical and cognitive sciences, and there are few studies of their application to other fields. Therefore, we used an anthropomorphic agent of MMD in a virtual lecture to analyze the effect of gestures on students and search for ways to apply anthropomorphic agents to the field of educational technology.

  14. Development of a physical 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carton, Ann-Katherine; Bakic, Predrag; Ullberg, Christer; Derand, Helen; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Develop a technique to fabricate a 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom with known ground truth for image quality assessment of 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems. Methods: The phantom design is based on an existing computer model that can generate breast voxel phantoms of varying composition, size, and shape. The physical phantom is produced in two steps. First, the portion of the voxel phantom consisting of the glandular tissue, skin, and Cooper's ligaments is separated into sections. These sections are then fabricated by high-resolution rapid prototyping using a single material with 50% glandular equivalence. The remaining adipose compartments are then filled using an epoxy-based resin (EBR) with 100% adipose equivalence. The phantom sections are stacked to form the physical anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The authors fabricated a prototype phantom corresponding to a 450 ml breast with 45% dense tissue, deformed to a 5 cm compressed thickness. Both the rapid prototype (RP) and EBR phantom materials are radiographically uniform. The coefficient of variation (CoV) of the relative attenuation between RP and EBR phantom samples was <1% and the CoV of the signal intensity within RP and EBR phantom samples was <1.5% on average. Digital mammography and reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis images of the authors' phantom were reviewed by two radiologists; they reported that the images are similar in appearance to clinical images, noting there are still artifacts from air bubbles in the EBR. Conclusions: The authors have developed a technique to produce 3D anthropomorphic breast phantoms with known ground truth, yielding highly realistic x-ray images. Such phantoms may serve both qualitative and quantitative performance assessments for 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems.

  15. Human-Like Movement of an Anthropomorphic Robot: Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    e Silva, E. Costa; Costa, M. F.; Bicho, E.; Erlhagen, W.

    2011-09-01

    Human-like movement is fundamental for natural human-robot interaction and collaboration. We have developed in a model for generating arm and hand movements an anthropomorphic robot. This model was inspired by the Posture-Based Motion-Planning Model of human reaching and grasping movements. In this paper we present some changes to the model we have proposed in [4] and test and compare different nonlinear constrained optimization techniques for solving the large-scale nonlinear constrained optimization problem that rises from the discretization of our time-continuous model. Furthermore, we test different time discretization steps.

  16. SU-F-T-292: Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Phantom Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrens, H; Lewis, B; Lujano, C; Nguyen, T; Hernandez, N; Alvarez, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of IROC Houston’s international and domestic end-to-end QA phantom irradiations. Methods: IROC Houston has anthropomorphic lung, liver, head and neck, prostate, SRS and spine phantoms that are used for credentialing and quality assurance purposes. The phantoms include structures that closely mimic targets and organs at risk and are made from tissue equivalent materials: high impact polystyrene, solid water, cork and acrylic. Motion tables are used to mimic breathing motion for some lung and liver phantoms. Dose is measured with TLD and radiochromic film in various planes within the target of the phantoms. Results: The most common phantom requested is the head and neck followed by the lung phantom. The head and neck phantom was sent to 800 domestic and 148 international sites between 2011 and 2015, with average pass rates of 89% and 92%, respectively. During the past five years, a general upward trend exists regarding demand for the lung phantom for both international and domestic sites with international sites more than tripling from 5 (2011) to 16 (2015) and domestic sites doubling from 66 (2011) to 152 (2015). The pass rate for lung phantoms has been consistent from year to year despite this large increase in the number of phantoms irradiated with an average pass rate of 85% (domestic) and 95% (international) sites. The percentage of lung phantoms used in combination with motions tables increased from 38% to 79% over the 5 year time span. Conclusion: The number of domestic and international sites irradiating the head and neck and lung phantoms continues to increase and the pass rates remained constant. These end-to-end QA tests continue to be a crucial part of clinical trial credentialing and institution quality assurance. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.

  17. Analysis of Inverse Kinamtics of an Anthropomorphic Robotic hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Parida

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method for solving the inverse kinematics of the fingers of an anthropomorphic hand is proposed. Solution of inverse kinematic equations is a complex problem, the complexity comes from the nonlinearity of joint space and Cartesian space mapping and having multiple solutions.This is a typical problem in robotics that needs to be solved to control the fingers of an anthropomorphic robotic hand to perform tasks it is designated to do. With more complex structures operating in a 3-dimensional space deducing a mathematical soluation for the inverse kinematics may prove challenging. In this paper, using the ability of ANFIS (Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System to learn from training data, it is possible to create ANFIS network, an implementation of a representative fuzzy inference system using ANFIS structure, with limited mathematical representation of the system. The main advantages of this method with respect to the other methods are implementation is easy, very fast and shorter computation time and better response with acceptable error.

  18. OSL Based Anthropomorphic Phantom and Real-Time Organ Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintenlang, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The overall objective of this project was the development of a dosimetry system that provides the direct measurement of organ doses in real-time with a sensitivity that makes it an effective tool for applications in a wide variety of health physics applications. The system included the development of a real-time readout system for fiber optic coupled (FOC) dosimeters that is integrated with a state-of-art anthropomorphic phantom to provide instantaneous measures of organ doses throughout the phantom. The small size of the FOC detectors and optical fibers allow the sensitive volume of the detector to be located at organ centroids (or multiple locations distributed through the organ) within a tissue equivalent, anthropomorphic phantom without perturbing the tissue equivalent features of the phantom. The developed phantom/dosimetry system can be used in any environment where personnel may be exposed to gamma or x-ray radiations to provide the most accurate determinations of organ and effective doses possible to date

  19. Almost human: Anthropomorphism increases trust resilience in cognitive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Ewart J; Monfort, Samuel S; McKendrick, Ryan; Smith, Melissa A B; McKnight, Patrick E; Krueger, Frank; Parasuraman, Raja

    2016-09-01

    We interact daily with computers that appear and behave like humans. Some researchers propose that people apply the same social norms to computers as they do to humans, suggesting that social psychological knowledge can be applied to our interactions with computers. In contrast, theories of human–automation interaction postulate that humans respond to machines in unique and specific ways. We believe that anthropomorphism—the degree to which an agent exhibits human characteristics—is the critical variable that may resolve this apparent contradiction across the formation, violation, and repair stages of trust. Three experiments were designed to examine these opposing viewpoints by varying the appearance and behavior of automated agents. Participants received advice that deteriorated gradually in reliability from a computer, avatar, or human agent. Our results showed (a) that anthropomorphic agents were associated with greater trust resilience , a higher resistance to breakdowns in trust; (b) that these effects were magnified by greater uncertainty; and c) that incorporating human-like trust repair behavior largely erased differences between the agents. Automation anthropomorphism is therefore a critical variable that should be carefully incorporated into any general theory of human–agent trust as well as novel automation design. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved

  20. Leap Motion Device Used to Control a Real Anthropomorphic Gripper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Staretu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents for the first time the use of the Leap Motion device to control an anthropomorphic gripper with five fingers. First, a description of the Leap Motion device is presented, highlighting its main functional characteristics, followed by testing of its use for capturing the movements of a human hand's fingers in different configurations. Next, the HandCommander soft module and the Interface Controller application are described. The HandCommander is a software module created to facilitate interaction between a human hand and the GraspIT virtual environment, and the Interface Controller application is required to send motion data to the virtual environment and to test the communication protocol. For the test, a prototype of an anthropomorphic gripper with five fingers was made, including a proper hardware system of command and control, which is briefly presented in this paper. Following the creation of the prototype, the command system performance test was conducted under real conditions, evaluating the recognition efficiency of the objects to be gripped and the efficiency of the command and control strategies for the gripping process. The gripping test is exemplified by the gripping of an object, such as a screw spanner. It was found that the command system, both in terms of capturing human hand gestures with the Leap Motion device and effective object gripping, is operational. Suggestive figures are presented as examples.

  1. Optimized generation of high resolution breast anthropomorphic software phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrajac, David D.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present an efficient method for generating anthropomorphic software breast phantoms with high spatial resolution. Employing the same region growing principles as in their previous algorithm for breast anatomy simulation, the present method has been optimized for computational complexity to allow for fast generation of the large number of phantoms required in virtual clinical trials of breast imaging. Methods: The new breast anatomy simulation method performs a direct calculation of the Cooper’s ligaments (i.e., the borders between simulated adipose compartments). The calculation corresponds to quadratic decision boundaries of a maximum a posteriori classifier. The method is multiscale due to the use of octree-based recursive partitioning of the phantom volume. The method also provides user-control of the thickness of the simulated Cooper’s ligaments and skin. Results: Using the proposed method, the authors have generated phantoms with voxel size in the range of (25–1000 μm)3/voxel. The power regression of the simulation time as a function of the reciprocal voxel size yielded a log-log slope of 1.95 (compared to a slope of 4.53 of our previous region growing algorithm). Conclusions: A new algorithm for computer simulation of breast anatomy has been proposed that allows for fast generation of high resolution anthropomorphic software phantoms. PMID:22482649

  2. OSL Based Anthropomorphic Phantom and Real-Time Organ Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Hintenlang, Ph.D

    2009-02-10

    The overall objective of this project was the development of a dosimetry system that provides the direct measurement of organ does in real-time with a sensitivity that makes it an effective tool for applications in a wide variety of health physics applications. The system included the development of a real-time readout system for fiber optic coupled (FOC) dosimeters that is integrated with a state-of-art anthropomorphic phantom to provide instantaneous measures of organ doses throughout the phantom. The small size of the FOC detectors and optical fibers allow the sensitive volume of the detector to be located at organ centroids (or multiple locations distributed through the organ) within a tissue equivalent, anthropomorphic phantom without perturbing the tissue equivalent features of the phantom. The developed phantom/dosimetry system can be used in any environment where personnel may be exposed to gamma or x-ray radiations to provide the most accurate determinations of organ and effective doses possible to date.

  3. Anthropomorphically Speaking: On Communication between Teachers and Children in Early Childhood Biology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulin, Susanne; Pramling, Niklas

    2009-01-01

    In this study a particular kind of figurative language, so-called anthropomorphic speech, is analysed in the context of science activities in a preschool setting. Anthropomorphism means speaking about something non-human in human terms. Can any systematic pattern be seen with regard to when such speech is used? Do children and/or teachers…

  4. Do storybooks with anthropomorphized animal characters promote prosocial behaviors in young children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nicole E; Lee, Kang; Ganea, Patricia A

    2018-05-01

    For millennia, adults have told children stories not only to entertain but also to impart important moral lessons to promote prosocial behaviors. Many such stories contain anthropomorphized animals because it is believed that children learn from anthropomorphic stories as effectively, if not better than, from stories with human characters, and thus are more inclined to act according to the moral lessons of the stories. Here we experimentally tested this belief by reading preschoolers a sharing story with either human characters or anthropomorphized animal characters. Reading the human story significantly increased preschoolers' altruistic giving but reading the anthropomorphic story or a control story decreased it. Thus, contrary to the common belief, realistic stories, not anthropomorphic ones, are better for promoting young children's prosocial behavior. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: IROC Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Proton Phantom Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lujano, C; Hernandez, N; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Taylor, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the proton phantoms that IROC Houston uses to approve and credential proton institutions to participate in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: Photon phantoms cannot necessarily be used for proton measurements because protons react differently than photons in some plastics. As such plastics that are tissue equivalent for protons were identified. Another required alteration is to ensure that the film dosimeters are housed in the phantom with no air gap to avoid proton streaming. Proton-equivalent plastics/materials used include RMI Solid Water, Techron HPV, blue water, RANDO soft tissue material, balsa wood, compressed cork and polyethylene. Institutions wishing to be approved or credentialed request a phantom and are prioritized for delivery. At the institution, the phantom is imaged, a treatment plan is developed, positioned on the treatment couch and the treatment is delivered. The phantom is returned and the measured dose distributions are compared to the institution’s electronically submitted treatment plan dosimetry data. Results: IROC Houston has developed an extensive proton phantom approval/credentialing program consisting of five different phantoms designs: head, prostate, lung, liver and spine. The phantoms are made with proton equivalent plastics that have HU and relative stopping powers similar (within 5%) of human tissues. They also have imageable targets, avoidance structures, and heterogeneities. TLD and radiochromic film are contained in the target structures. There have been 13 head, 33 prostate, 18 lung, 2 liver and 16 spine irradiations with either passive scatter, or scanned proton beams. The pass rates have been: 100%, 69.7%, 72.2%, 50%, and 81.3%, respectively. Conclusion: IROC Houston has responded to the recent surge in proton facilities by developing a family of anthropomorphic phantoms that are able to be used for remote audits of proton beams. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA081647.

  6. Mistaking minds and machines: How speech affects dehumanization and anthropomorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Juliana; Epley, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    Treating a human mind like a machine is an essential component of dehumanization, whereas attributing a humanlike mind to a machine is an essential component of anthropomorphism. Here we tested how a cue closely connected to a person's actual mental experience-a humanlike voice-affects the likelihood of mistaking a person for a machine, or a machine for a person. We predicted that paralinguistic cues in speech are particularly likely to convey the presence of a humanlike mind, such that removing voice from communication (leaving only text) would increase the likelihood of mistaking the text's creator for a machine. Conversely, adding voice to a computer-generated script (resulting in speech) would increase the likelihood of mistaking the text's creator for a human. Four experiments confirmed these hypotheses, demonstrating that people are more likely to infer a human (vs. computer) creator when they hear a voice expressing thoughts than when they read the same thoughts in text. Adding human visual cues to text (i.e., seeing a person perform a script in a subtitled video clip), did not increase the likelihood of inferring a human creator compared with only reading text, suggesting that defining features of personhood may be conveyed more clearly in speech (Experiments 1 and 2). Removing the naturalistic paralinguistic cues that convey humanlike capacity for thinking and feeling, such as varied pace and intonation, eliminates the humanizing effect of speech (Experiment 4). We discuss implications for dehumanizing others through text-based media, and for anthropomorphizing machines through speech-based media. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Design and fabrication of a realistic anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom for MR purposes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sossena Wood

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to design an anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom that can be used for MRI and other electromagnetic applications.An eight compartment, physical anthropomorphic head phantom was developed from a 3T MRI dataset of a healthy male. The designed phantom was successfully built and preliminarily evaluated through an application that involves electromagnetic-tissue interactions: MRI (due to it being an available resource. The developed phantom was filled with media possessing electromagnetic constitutive parameters that correspond to biological tissues at ~297 MHz. A preliminary comparison between an in-vivo human volunteer (based on whom the anthropomorphic head phantom was created and various phantoms types, one being the anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom, were performed using a 7 Tesla human MRI scanner.Echo planar imaging was performed and minimal ghosting and fluctuations were observed using the proposed anthropomorphic phantom. The magnetic field distributions (during MRI experiments at 7 Tesla and the scattering parameter (measured using a network analyzer were most comparable between the anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom and an in-vivo human volunteer.The developed anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom can be used as a resource to various researchers in applications that involve electromagnetic-biological tissue interactions such as MRI.

  8. Design and fabrication of a realistic anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom for MR purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Sossena; Krishnamurthy, Narayanan; Santini, Tales; Raval, Shailesh B; Farhat, Nadim; Holmes, John Andy; Ibrahim, Tamer S

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design an anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom that can be used for MRI and other electromagnetic applications. An eight compartment, physical anthropomorphic head phantom was developed from a 3T MRI dataset of a healthy male. The designed phantom was successfully built and preliminarily evaluated through an application that involves electromagnetic-tissue interactions: MRI (due to it being an available resource). The developed phantom was filled with media possessing electromagnetic constitutive parameters that correspond to biological tissues at ~297 MHz. A preliminary comparison between an in-vivo human volunteer (based on whom the anthropomorphic head phantom was created) and various phantoms types, one being the anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom, were performed using a 7 Tesla human MRI scanner. Echo planar imaging was performed and minimal ghosting and fluctuations were observed using the proposed anthropomorphic phantom. The magnetic field distributions (during MRI experiments at 7 Tesla) and the scattering parameter (measured using a network analyzer) were most comparable between the anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom and an in-vivo human volunteer. The developed anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom can be used as a resource to various researchers in applications that involve electromagnetic-biological tissue interactions such as MRI.

  9. Design and fabrication of a realistic anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom for MR purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Sossena; Krishnamurthy, Narayanan; Santini, Tales; Raval, Shailesh; Farhat, Nadim; Holmes, John Andy; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to design an anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom that can be used for MRI and other electromagnetic applications. Materials and methods An eight compartment, physical anthropomorphic head phantom was developed from a 3T MRI dataset of a healthy male. The designed phantom was successfully built and preliminarily evaluated through an application that involves electromagnetic-tissue interactions: MRI (due to it being an available resource). The developed phantom was filled with media possessing electromagnetic constitutive parameters that correspond to biological tissues at ~297 MHz. A preliminary comparison between an in-vivo human volunteer (based on whom the anthropomorphic head phantom was created) and various phantoms types, one being the anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom, were performed using a 7 Tesla human MRI scanner. Results Echo planar imaging was performed and minimal ghosting and fluctuations were observed using the proposed anthropomorphic phantom. The magnetic field distributions (during MRI experiments at 7 Tesla) and the scattering parameter (measured using a network analyzer) were most comparable between the anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom and an in-vivo human volunteer. Conclusion The developed anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom can be used as a resource to various researchers in applications that involve electromagnetic-biological tissue interactions such as MRI. PMID:28806768

  10. Do Young Chinese Children Gain Anthropomorphism after Exposure to Personified Touch-Screen and Board Games?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Hsueh, Yeh; Wang, Fuxing; Bai, Xuejun; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Li

    2017-01-01

    Research shows that preschoolers are likely to anthropomorphize not only animals, but also inanimate toy after being exposed to books that personify these objects. Can such an effect also arise through young children's use of touch-screen games? The present study is the first to examine whether playing a touch-screen personified train game affects young children's anthropomorphism of real trains. Seventy-nine 4- and 6-year-old children were randomly assigned to play either a touch-screen game or a board game of Thomas the Tank Engine for 10 min. They completed the Individual Differences in Anthropomorphism Questionnaire-Child Form (IDAQ-CF) (two subscales: Technology/Inanimate Nature, Animate Nature) and an additional four items about the anthropomorphism of real trains, before (T1) and after (T2) the game. Overall results showed that children manifested a small but statistically significant increase in anthropomorphizing of real trains after their exposure to both games, claiming that real trains were like humans. Interestingly, 4-year-old children in the board game group tended to anthropomorphize real trains more than those in the touch-screen group, whereas the reverse was true for the 6-year-old children. The results suggest that touch-screen games may delay the decline of children's anthropomorphism during the cognitive and socio-emotional transition that occurs in children aged 5-7. These findings have implications for future research on how touch-screen games increase children's anthropomorphism of the real world, and more generally, for evaluation of the influence of the growing use of touch-screen games on young children's learning.

  11. Scintillation method possibilities for uranium detection in the lungs of a man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgirev, E.I.; Kajdanovskij, G.N.; Lossner, V.

    1978-01-01

    Detecting systems using various types of scintillation crystals were studied to find out whether it was possible to estimate the content of natural uranium in the lungs during lifetime. Data on the graduation of these systems obtained by use of an anthropomorphic phantom of the human trunk are given, as are values of minimal detectable levels of uranium in the lungs. A technique for a planned periodic monitoring of uranium in the lungs of every radiation worker is presented

  12. SU-E-I-94: Automated Image Quality Assessment of Radiographic Systems Using An Anthropomorphic Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J; Wilson, J; Zhang, Y; Samei, E; Ravin, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In a large, academic medical center, consistent radiographic imaging performance is difficult to routinely monitor and maintain, especially for a fleet consisting of multiple vendors, models, software versions, and numerous imaging protocols. Thus, an automated image quality control methodology has been implemented using routine image quality assessment with a physical, stylized anthropomorphic chest phantom. Methods: The “Duke” Phantom (Digital Phantom 07-646, Supertech, Elkhart, IN) was imaged twice on each of 13 radiographic units from a variety of vendors at 13 primary care clinics. The first acquisition used the clinical PA chest protocol to acquire the post-processed “FOR PRESENTATION” image. The second image was acquired without an antiscatter grid followed by collection of the “FOR PROCESSING” image. Manual CNR measurements were made from the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions of the phantom in each image. An automated image registration algorithm was used to estimate the CNR of the same insert using similar ROIs. Automated measurements were then compared to the manual measurements. Results: Automatic and manual CNR measurements obtained from “FOR PRESENTATION” images had average percent differences of 0.42%±5.18%, −3.44%±4.85%, and 1.04%±3.15% in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions, respectively; measurements obtained from “FOR PROCESSING” images had average percent differences of -0.63%±6.66%, −0.97%±3.92%, and −0.53%±4.18%, respectively. The maximum absolute difference in CNR was 15.78%, 10.89%, and 8.73% in the respective regions. In addition to CNR assessment of the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts, the automated method also provided CNR estimates for all 75 contrast-detail inserts in each phantom image. Conclusion: Automated analysis of a radiographic phantom has been shown to be a fast, robust, and objective means for assessing radiographic

  13. Monte Carlo Simulations for Homeland Security Using Anthropomorphic Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    A radiological dispersion device (RDD) is a device which deliberately releases radioactive material for the purpose of causing terror or harm. In the event that a dirty bomb is detonated, there may be airborne radioactive material that can be inhaled as well as settle on an individuals leading to external contamination. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to simulate healthcare workers in the operating room or trauma room at a hospital. The Monte Carlo Neutral Particle transport code MCNP5 was used for the modeling. The human body was modeled using Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD-V) anthropomorphic phantoms originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the specifications of International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) Publication 23 and later altered at Georgia Tech (17). This study considered two possible contamination scenarios: uniform external contamination with no internal contamination and inhaled radioactive material without any external contamination. For both scenarios, the patients isotopes considered were 60 Co, 137 Cs, 131 I, 192 Ir, and 241 Am. For the externally contaminated patient, a uniform volume source two millimeters thick was placed around the skin of each anthropomorphic phantom to simulate a uniform source on the surface of the body. For the internally contaminated patients, the Dose and Risk Calculation software, DCAL, was used to determine the distribution of the isotopes in the internal organs. For both of the scenarios, the healthcare provider was placed 20-cm from the middle of the torso of the contaminated patient. The amount of energy deposited to the tissues and organs of the healthcare provider due to the internally and externally contaminated patients and in the patient in the case of external contamination was determined. The effective dose rate was calculated using the masses of the tissues and organ and tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 60. The effective dose rate for the

  14. Do cavies talk? The effect of anthropomorphic picture books on children's knowledge about animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganea, Patricia A.; Canfield, Caitlin F.; Simons-Ghafari, Kadria; Chou, Tommy

    2013-01-01

    Many books for young children present animals in fantastical and unrealistic ways, such as wearing clothes, talking and engaging in human-like activities. This research examined whether anthropomorphism in children's books affects children's learning and conceptions of animals, by specifically assessing the impact of depictions (a bird wearing clothes and reading a book) and language (bird described as talking and as having human intentions). In Study 1, 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children saw picture books featuring realistic drawings of a novel animal. Half of the children also heard factual, realistic language, while the other half heard anthropomorphized language. In Study 2, we replicated the first study using anthropomorphic illustrations of real animals. The results show that the language used to describe animals in books has an effect on children's tendency to attribute human-like traits to animals, and that anthropomorphic storybooks affect younger children's learning of novel facts about animals. These results indicate that anthropomorphized animals in books may not only lead to less learning but also influence children's conceptual knowledge of animals. PMID:24782793

  15. Do cavies talk? The effect of anthropomorphic picture books on children's knowledge about animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganea, Patricia A; Canfield, Caitlin F; Simons-Ghafari, Kadria; Chou, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    Many books for young children present animals in fantastical and unrealistic ways, such as wearing clothes, talking and engaging in human-like activities. This research examined whether anthropomorphism in children's books affects children's learning and conceptions of animals, by specifically assessing the impact of depictions (a bird wearing clothes and reading a book) and language (bird described as talking and as having human intentions). In Study 1, 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children saw picture books featuring realistic drawings of a novel animal. Half of the children also heard factual, realistic language, while the other half heard anthropomorphized language. In Study 2, we replicated the first study using anthropomorphic illustrations of real animals. The results show that the language used to describe animals in books has an effect on children's tendency to attribute human-like traits to animals, and that anthropomorphic storybooks affect younger children's learning of novel facts about animals. These results indicate that anthropomorphized animals in books may not only lead to less learning but also influence children's conceptual knowledge of animals.

  16. Anxious attachment and excessive acquisition: The mediating roles of anthropomorphism and distress intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Melissa M; Crone, Cassandra; Kwok, Cathy; Grisham, Jessica R

    2018-03-01

    Background and aims Most individuals with hoarding disorder (HD) are prone to excessively acquiring new possessions. Understanding the factors that contribute to this collecting behavior will allow us to develop better treatment approaches for HD. The aim of this study was to test our assumption that an anxious attachment style is associated with a tendency to anthropomorphize comforting objects and an inability to tolerate distress, which in turn leads to excessive acquisition. Methods A total of 361 participants with subclinical to clinical acquisition problems (77.8% female) completed a series of self-report measures. Results As expected, greater anxious attachment was related to greater distress intolerance and stronger tendencies to anthropomorphize inanimate objects. In turn, greater distress intolerance and anthropomorphism were related to more excessive buying and greater acquisition of free items. Examination of the pathways and indirect effects showed support for double mediation rather than serial mediation, as distress intolerance did not predict anthropomorphism. Discussion and conclusion These novel findings, if replicated, suggest that adding treatment modules that target improving distress tolerance and reducing anthropomorphism to standard treatment for HD may lead to further reductions in excessive acquiring.

  17. Digital preservation of anatomical variation: 3D-modeling of embalmed and plastinated cadaveric specimens using uCT and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Colin W; Wilson, Timothy D; Rice, Charles L

    2017-01-01

    Anatomy educators have an opportunity to teach anatomical variations as a part of medical and allied health curricula using both cadaveric and three-dimensional (3D) digital models of these specimens. Beyond published cadaveric case reports, anatomical variations identified during routine gross anatomy dissection can be powerful teaching tools and a medium to discuss several anatomical sub-disciplines from embryology to medical imaging. The purpose of this study is to document how cadaveric anatomical variation identified during routine dissection can be scanned using medical imaging techniques to create two-dimensional axial images and interactive 3D models for teaching and learning of anatomical variations. Three cadaveric specimens (2 formalin embalmed, 1 plastinated) depicting anatomical variations and an embryological malformation were scanned using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computed tomography (μCT) for visualization in cross-section and for creation of 3D volumetric models. Results provide educational options to enable visualization and facilitate learning of anatomical variations from cross-sectional scans. Furthermore, the variations can be highlighted, digitized, modeled and manipulated using 3D imaging software and viewed in the anatomy laboratory in conjunction with traditional anatomical dissection. This study provides an example for anatomy educators to teach and describe anatomical variations in the undergraduate medical curriculum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of anthropomorphic images and narration styles in promotional messages for generic prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzumdar, Jagannath M; Schommer, Jon C; Hadsall, Ronald S; Huh, Jisu

    2013-01-01

    Anthropomorphism is attribution of human characteristics to nonhuman objects or events. Marketers have used anthropomorphized characters to promote products and services. To promote use of generic drugs to save on prescription drug costs, health systems are in the process of developing informational materials to influence consumer's perceptions about generic prescription drugs. To evaluate the effects of anthropomorphic images (control vs caring vs authoritative) and information narration styles (first person vs third person) on (1) social presence, (2) attitude toward the overall promotional message, (3) perceived informativeness of the message content, (4) attitude toward specific message, (5) intent to seek information, and (6) intention to switch to a generic prescription drug. A 3×2 between-subject factorial design was used. Student participants were administered a mock promotional message regarding generic prescription drugs. Following the promotional message, they were asked to respond to items developed to measure the effects of the promotional message. Manipulation checks were conducted to test the desired effects of the independent variables. Pilot testing, exploratory factor analysis, and reliability testing of the item measures were conducted before their use in the study. Analysis of variance was used to analyze the data and test the proposed effects of the independent variables. Anthropomorphic images showed a positive effect on social presence and attitude toward the specific message. Narration styles had a positive effect on attitude toward the overall promotional message. Neither anthropomorphic images nor narration styles had a significant effect on perceived informativeness, intent to seek information, and intention to switch to a generic prescription drug. This research reveals that anthropomorphism of medications and narration styles could play a significant role in promotional messages for generic prescription drugs. These findings provide a

  19. Organ shielding and doses in Low-Earth orbit calculated for spherical and anthropomorphic phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiä, Daniel; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther

    2013-08-01

    Humans in space are exposed to elevated levels of radiation compared to ground. Different sources contribute to the total exposure with galactic cosmic rays being the most important component. The application of numerical and anthropomorphic phantoms in simulations allows the estimation of dose rates from galactic cosmic rays in individual organs and whole body quantities such as the effective dose. The male and female reference phantoms defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the hermaphrodite numerical RANDO phantom are voxel implementations of anthropomorphic phantoms and contain all organs relevant for radiation risk assessment. These anthropomorphic phantoms together with a spherical water phantom were used in this work to translate the mean shielding of organs in the different anthropomorphic voxel phantoms into positions in the spherical phantom. This relation allows using a water sphere as surrogate for the anthropomorphic phantoms in both simulations and measurements. Moreover, using spherical phantoms in the calculation of radiation exposure offers great advantages over anthropomorphic phantoms in terms of computational time. In this work, the mean shielding of organs in the different voxel phantoms exposed to isotropic irradiation is presented as well as the corresponding depth in a water sphere. Dose rates for Low-Earth orbit from galactic cosmic rays during solar minimum conditions were calculated using the different phantoms and are compared to the results for a spherical water phantom in combination with the mean organ shielding. For the spherical water phantom the impact of different aluminium shielding between 1 g/cm2 and 100 g/cm2 was calculated. The dose equivalent rates were used to estimate the effective dose rate.

  20. Generating human-like movements on an anthropomorphic robot using an interior point method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa e Silva, E.; Araújo, J. P.; Machado, D.; Costa, M. F.; Erlhagen, W.; Bicho, E.

    2013-10-01

    In previous work we have presented a model for generating human-like arm and hand movements on an anthropomorphic robot involved in human-robot collaboration tasks. This model was inspired by the Posture-Based Motion-Planning Model of human movements. Numerical results and simulations for reach-to-grasp movements with two different grip types have been presented previously. In this paper we extend our model in order to address the generation of more complex movement sequences which are challenged by scenarios cluttered with obstacles. The numerical results were obtained using the IPOPT solver, which was integrated in our MATLAB simulator of an anthropomorphic robot.

  1. Concept development of a tendon arm manipulator and anthropomorphic robotic hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolman, C. T.

    1987-01-01

    AMETEK/ORED inhouse research and development efforts leading toward a next-generation robotic manipulator arm and end-effector technology is summarized. Manipulator arm development has been directed toward a multiple-degree-of-freedom, flexible, tendon-driven concept referred to here as a Tendon Arm Manipulator (TAM). End-effector development has been directed toward a three-fingered, dextrous, tendon-driven, anthropomorphic configuration which is referred to as an Anthropomorphic Robotic Hand (ARH). Key technology issues are identified for both concepts.

  2. Study of AAA Algorithm on the pelvic region with the VMAT technical using a dummy anthropomorphic; Estudio del algoritmo AAA en la region pelvica con la tecnica VMAT usando un maniqui antropomorfico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puchades Puchades, V.; Serna Berna, A.; Mata Colodro, F.; Ramos Amores, D.; Casal Zamorano, E.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of real dosimetry in patients in new techniques of irradiation is very important to know the degree of accuracy of the dose calculations provided by the planners and however it is sometimes difficult to achieve. One way to evaluate this dosimetry without resorting to a patient, is the use of anthropomorphic Dummies. One of the algorithms employed is called AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm), which is an analytical algorithm of overlap-convolution, which improves the calculation of doses in the heterogeneities that the patient presents in your body (FAT, muscle, bone, lung) in comparison with other ancestor algorithms. (Author)

  3. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A. W.; Saripan, M. I.; Bradley, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, 8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose.

  4. Positioning of the detectors inside an anthropomorphic phantom in order to measure the effective dose at workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furstoss, C.; Menard, S.

    2006-01-01

    Passive and active dosimeters worn on the trunk by the workers exposed to radiation fields at their workplaces measure the personal dose equivalent Hp(10), which was introduced by ICRP 60 to provide an appropriate estimate of the protection quantity: the effective dose E. However, the angular and energy distributions of the radiation fields encountered at workplaces can generate an over or an under-estimation of E because of the response of the dosimeters or/and because of the definition of H p(10) itself. That is why the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (I.R.S.N.) is evaluating the possibility of the measurement of the effective dose E using an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom. The determination of the effective dose E in mixed neutron/photon fields requires to identify the nature and the energy distribution of the incident fields in order to apply the right radiation weighting factor to the mean absorbed doses. So electronic detectors will have to be placed on the surface and inside the phantom in order to identify the nature of the radiation field and to measure the mean absorbed dose within the organs. The positions and the technical characteristics of the detectors are determined by simulating the spatial distributions of the energy losses within organs and tissues of the phantom. The simulations are carried out with the Monte Carlo code M.C.N.P.X. using mesh tallies (virtual grid superimposed to the phantom geometry) and a mathematical model of an anthropomorphic phantom based on the specifications of Cristy and Eckerman. The processing of the first numerical results corresponding to photon irradiations in standard configurations (A.P., P.A. and L.A.T.) shows that for the following organs: the lungs, the liver, the small intestine and the brain, just one detector is enough and that this detector is not necessarily located at the center of the organ. On the other hand, the determination of the energy deposited in the red bone marrow

  5. Is this car looking at you? How anthropomorphism predicts fusiform face area activation when seeing cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Simone; Brick, Timothy R; Müller, Barbara C N; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Anthropomorphism encompasses the attribution of human characteristics to non-living objects. In particular the human tendency to see faces in cars has long been noticed, yet its neural correlates are unknown. We set out to investigate whether the fusiform face area (FFA) is associated with seeing human features in car fronts, or whether, the higher-level theory of mind network (ToM), namely temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) show a link to anthropomorphism. Twenty participants underwent fMRI scanning during a passive car-front viewing task. We extracted brain activity from FFA, TPJ and MPFC. After the fMRI session participants were asked to spontaneously list adjectives that characterize each car front. Five raters judged the degree to which each adjective can be applied as a characteristic of human beings. By means of linear mixed models we found that the implicit tendency to anthropomorphize individual car fronts predicts FFA, but not TPJ or MPFC activity. The results point to an important role of FFA in the phenomenon of ascribing human attributes to non-living objects. Interestingly, brain regions that have been associated with thinking about beliefs and mental states of others (TPJ, MPFC) do not seem to be related to anthropomorphism of car fronts.

  6. Construction of a anthropomorphic phantom for dose measurement in hands in brachytherapy procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, Cinthia M.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to show the differences between the dose value measured by dosimeter endpoint and the values measured in different points inside the hand during brachytherapy procedures. For this, the procedures involved in the handling of sources were analyzed and the simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom hand

  7. Who Sees Human? The Stability and Importance of Individual Differences in Anthropomorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waytz, Adam; Cacioppo, John; Epley, Nicholas

    2010-05-01

    Anthropomorphism is a far-reaching phenomenon that incorporates ideas from social psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, and the neurosciences. Although commonly considered to be a relatively universal phenomenon with only limited importance in modern industrialized societies-more cute than critical-our research suggests precisely the opposite. In particular, we provide a measure of stable individual differences in anthropomorphism that predicts three important consequences for everyday life. This research demonstrates that individual differences in anthropomorphism predict the degree of moral care and concern afforded to an agent, the amount of responsibility and trust placed on an agent, and the extent to which an agent serves as a source of social influence on the self. These consequences have implications for disciplines outside of psychology including human-computer interaction, business (marketing and finance), and law. Concluding discussion addresses how understanding anthropomorphism not only informs the burgeoning study of nonpersons, but how it informs classic issues underlying person perception as well. © The Author(s) 2010.

  8. Characterisation of an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dose measurements in radiology beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, L.M.S.; Cerqueira, R.A.D.; Santos, W.S.; Pereira, A.J.S.; Rodrigues, T.M.A.; Carvalho Júnior, A.B.; Maia, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterise an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dosimetric measurements of conventional radiology beams. This phantom was developed by a previous research project at the Federal University of Sergipe for image quality control tests. As the phantom consists of tissue-equivalent material, it is possible to characterise it for dosimetric studies. For comparison, a geometric chest phantom, consisting of PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) with dimensions of 30×30×15 cm³ was used. Measurements of incident air kerma (K i ) and entrance surface dose (ESD) were performed using ionisation chambers. From the results, backscatter factors (BSFs) of the two phantoms were determined and compared with values estimated by CALDose X software, based on a Monte Carlo simulation. For the technical parameters evaluated in this study, the ESD and BSF values obtained experimentally showed a good similarity between the two phantoms, with minimum and maximum difference of 0.2% and 7.0%, respectively, and showed good agreement with the results published in the literature. Organ doses and effective doses for the anthropomorphic phantom were also estimated by the determination of conversion coefficients (CCs) using the visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code. Therefore, the results of this study prove that the anthropomorphic thorax phantom proposed is a good tool to use in dosimetry and can be used for risk evaluation of X-ray diagnostic procedures. - Highlights: ► An anthropomorphic chest phantom was to characterise for dosimetric measurements. ► Anthropomorphic phantom developed for image quality can also be used for dosimetry. ► BSFs were compared and showed tendencies found in the literature. ► CCs equivalent and effective doses obtained for the phantom are within the expected

  9. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M.K.A.; Bakar, K.A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A.W; Saripan, M.I.; Bradley, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose. - Highlights: • Using TLD-100 dosimeters and a RANDO phantom 5 CT thorax protocol organ doses were assessed. • The specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation of protocols differed with approach. • Organ dose was observed to decrease in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. • E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, lower by ~8% compared to the universal k factor.

  10. Mechanical design and performance specifications of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belter, Joseph T; Segil, Jacob L; Dollar, Aaron M; Weir, Richard F

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we set forth a detailed analysis of the mechanical characteristics of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands. We report on an empirical study concerning the performance of several commercially available myoelectric prosthetic hands, including the Vincent, iLimb, iLimb Pulse, Bebionic, Bebionic v2, and Michelangelo hands. We investigated the finger design and kinematics, mechanical joint coupling, and actuation methods of these commercial prosthetic hands. The empirical findings are supplemented with a compilation of published data on both commercial and prototype research prosthetic hands. We discuss numerous mechanical design parameters by referencing examples in the literature. Crucial design trade-offs are highlighted, including number of actuators and hand complexity, hand weight, and grasp force. Finally, we offer a set of rules of thumb regarding the mechanical design of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands.

  11. Development of pathological anthropomorphic models using 3D modelling techniques for numerical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Kleber Souza Silva; Barbosa, Antonio Konrado de Santana; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2011-01-01

    Computational exposure models can be used to estimate human body absorbed dose in a series of situations such as X-Ray exams for diagnosis, accidents and medical treatments. These models are fundamentally composed of an anthropomorphic simulator (phantom), an algorithm that simulates a radioactive source and a Monte Carlo Code. The accuracy of data obtained in the simulation is strongly connected to the adequacy of such simulation to the real situation. The phantoms are one of the key factors for the researcher manipulation. They are generally developed in supine position and its anatomy is patronized by compiled data from international institutions such as ICRP or ICRU. Several pathologies modify the structure of organs and body tissues. In order to measure how significant these alterations are, an anthropomorphic model was developed for this study: patient mastectomies. This model was developed using voxel phantom FASH and then coupled with EGSnrc Monte Carlo code

  12. A method to acquire CT organ dose map using OSL dosimeters and ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George; Liu, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present the design and procedure of an experimental method for acquiring densely sampled organ dose map for CT applications, based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters “nanoDots” and standard ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms; and to provide the results of applying the method—a dose data set with good statistics for the comparison with Monte Carlo simulation result in the future.

  13. Anthropomorphic Interfaces on Automation Trust, Dependence, and Performance inYounger and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    and Human Interactive Communication, Vol., IXX, 55-60 Greenwald, A. G., & Banaji, M. R. (1995). Implicit social cognition: Attitudes, self - esteem , and...1995. “Implicit Social Cognition: Attitudes, Self - esteem , and Stereotypes.” Psychological Review 102 (1): 4–27. Hayes, C. C., and C. A. Miller. 2011...level Analysis of the Effects of Age and Gender Stereotypes on Trust in Anthropomorphic Technology by Younger and Older Adults. Ergonomics. • Rovira

  14. Characterisation of an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dose measurements in radiology beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, L. M. S.; Cerqueira, R. A. D.; Santos, W. S.; Pereira, A. J. S.; Rodrigues, T. M. A.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterise an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dosimetric measurements of conventional radiology beams. This phantom was developed by a previous research project at the Federal University of Sergipe for image quality control tests. As the phantom consists of tissue-equivalent material, it is possible to characterise it for dosimetric studies. For comparison, a geometric chest phantom, consisting of PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) with dimensions of 30×30×15 cm³ was used. Measurements of incident air kerma (Ki) and entrance surface dose (ESD) were performed using ionisation chambers. From the results, backscatter factors (BSFs) of the two phantoms were determined and compared with values estimated by CALDose_X software, based on a Monte Carlo simulation. For the technical parameters evaluated in this study, the ESD and BSF values obtained experimentally showed a good similarity between the two phantoms, with minimum and maximum difference of 0.2% and 7.0%, respectively, and showed good agreement with the results published in the literature. Organ doses and effective doses for the anthropomorphic phantom were also estimated by the determination of conversion coefficients (CCs) using the visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code. Therefore, the results of this study prove that the anthropomorphic thorax phantom proposed is a good tool to use in dosimetry and can be used for risk evaluation of X-ray diagnostic procedures.

  15. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  16. Performance of an automatic dose control system for CT: anthropomorphic phantom studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosch, D; Stumpp, P; Kahn, T; Nagel, H D

    2011-02-01

    To assess the performance and to provide more detailed insight into characteristics and limitations of devices for automatic dose control (ADC) in CT. A comprehensive study on DoseRight 2.0, the ADC system provided by Philips for its Brilliance CT scanners, was conducted with assorted tests using an anthropomorphic phantom that allowed simulation of the operation of the system under almost realistic conditions. The scan protocol settings for the neck, chest and abdomen with pelvis were identical to those applied in the clinical routine. Using the appropriate ADC functionalities, dose reductions equal 40% for the neck, 20% for the chest and 10% for the abdomen with pelvis. Larger dose reductions can be expected for average patients, since their attenuating properties differ significantly from the anthropomorphic phantom. Adverse effects due to increased image noise were only moderate as a consequence of the "adequate noise system" design and the complementary use of adaptive filtration. The results of specific tests also provided deeper insight into the operation of the ADC system that helps to identify the causes of suspected malfunctions and to prevent potential pitfalls. Tests with anthropomorphic phantoms allow verification of the characteristics of devices for ADC in CT under almost realistic conditions. However, differences in phantom shape and material composition require supplementary patient studies on representative patient groups. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. SU-E-I-80: Quantification of Respiratory and Cardiac Motion Effect in SPECT Acquisitions Using Anthropomorphic Models: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadimitroulas, P; Kostou, T; Kagadis, G [University of Patras, Rion, Ahaia (Greece); Loudos, G [Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Attika (Greece)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to quantify, evaluate the impact of cardiac and respiratory motion on clinical nuclear imaging protocols. Common SPECT and scintigraphic scans are studied using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, comparing the resulted images with and without motion. Methods: Realistic simulations were executed using the GATE toolkit and the XCAT anthropomorphic phantom as a reference model for human anatomy. Three different radiopharmaceuticals based on 99mTc were studied, namely 99mTc-MDP, 99mTc—N—DBODC and 99mTc—DTPA-aerosol for bone, myocardium and lung scanning respectively. The resolution of the phantom was set to 3.5 mm{sup 3}. The impact of the motion on spatial resolution was quantified using a sphere with 3.5 mm diameter and 10 separate time frames, in the ECAM modeled SPECT scanner. Finally, respiratory motion impact on resolution and imaging of lung lesions was investigated. The MLEM algorithm was used for data reconstruction, while the literature derived biodistributions of the pharmaceuticals were used as activity maps in the simulations. Results: FWHM was extracted for a static and a moving sphere which was ∼23 cm away from the entrance of the SPECT head. The difference in the FWHM was 20% between the two simulations. Profiles in thorax were compared in the case of bone scintigraphy, showing displacement and blurring of the bones when respiratory motion was inserted in the simulation. Large discrepancies were noticed in the case of myocardium imaging when cardiac motion was incorporated during the SPECT acquisition. Finally the borders of the lungs are blurred when respiratory motion is included resulting to a dislocation of ∼2.5 cm. Conclusion: As we move to individualized imaging and therapy procedures, quantitative and qualitative imaging is of high importance in nuclear diagnosis. MC simulations combined with anthropomorphic digital phantoms can provide an accurate tool for applications like motion correction

  18. Radiotherapy dose compensation for lung patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piyaratna, N.; Arnold, A.; Metcalfe, P.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to provide a more homogeneous dose distribution in the target volume from compensated anterior and posterior fields while the healthy lung is spared by de-weighting the lateral fields. A compensation computation which used linear iterations to compute the most homogeneous dose distribution across the target volume was applied to produce optimum compensator designs. The equivalent tissue-air ratio (E-TAR) inhomogeneity correction was applied for the computations using a GE target series 11 planning computer. The compensators designed were tested for accuracy in a modified water/lung phantom using a scanning diode and an anthropomorphic phantom using thermoluminescent dosimeters. A comparison has been made between the compensated and uncompensated plans for the first nine patients who we have treated with this technique. The dose profiles produced by the computation agreed with the prediction of the computed isodose plans to within ± 2% at the target depth. The thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-measured results in the anthropomorphic phantom agreed with the planning computer within ± 3%. A comparison of nine compensated plans of radiotherapy patients for large-volume targets in the lung region showed a maximum variation in the target to be 19% uncompensated versus 10% compensated. By providing compensated treatment fields from anterior and posterior treatment portals, a homogeneous dose that conforms well to the target volume is provided. As an added bonus, this enables the lateral lung fields to be significantly de-weighted and the healthy lung is spared considerable dose. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  19. Lung Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at increased risk of sudden lung ...

  20. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of in-vivo measurement of lung contamination; Simulacion Monte Carlo de medida in-vivo de contaminacion en pulmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraleda, M.; Gomez-Ros, J. M.; Lopez, M. A.; Navarro, J. F.; Broggio, D.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the technique used to simulate in-vivo measurement of lung contaminated with enriched uranium using an anthropomorphic phantom of thorax. This work was carried out as part of an international intercomparison between different institutions within collaborative actions EURADOS promoted.

  2. Experience of development and testing of a new model of an anthropomorphic radiodosimetric phantom of the human body ARDF-10 'Roman'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhov, R.E.; Finkel, F.V.

    2013-01-01

    In 2006-2010 by the commission of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Finland applied scientific research and development of a new model of an anthropomorphic radio dosimetric phantom of the human body (the Phantom) were performed, after the development of the production technology and initial testing in 2010-2012 the first serial copy of the Phantom under the name ARDF-10 ROMAN was produced. The main application of the new model of the Phantom ARDF-10 ROMAN: - increase of the precision of calibration and implementation of the periodic monitoring of Whole body counters (WBC) equipment, standardization of measurement procedure for inter-laboratory comparisons of the incorporated activity. - metrological support of the development and implementation of new methods for human radiation spectrometry: identification of radionuclide content of incorporated activity in the human body; measurements of the activity of incorporated technogenic and natural radionuclides in the whole body and in the lungs; measurements of 90 Sr content in the bone tissue. Study of the mechanisms of the intake, distribution, accumulation and excretion of the radionuclides in the human body, such as: daughter products of 222 Rn decay in the respiratory tract, 241 Am, other transuranic elements; isotopes of iodine in the thyroid gland; radiopharmaceuticals administered to patients for diagnostic and medicinal purposes. Obtaining estimates of spatial-temporal distribution of individual internal exposure dose of a human. The result of the work of recent years has been the creation of hygienic safe standard sample of an anthropomorphic radio dosimetric phantom of the human body ARDF-10 ROMAN, consisting of 4 anthropometric models of body parts, which are independent assembly units (head phantom, neck phantom, torso phantom, knee phantom). Phantom models are made from simulators of bone, soft (muscle) and lungs biological tissue. The Phantom contains 28 separate elements. To the first

  3. Development and characterization of an anthropomorphic breast software phantom based upon region-growing algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakic, Predrag R.; Zhang, Cuiping; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We present a novel algorithm for computer simulation of breast anatomy for generation of anthropomorphic software breast phantoms. A realistic breast simulation is necessary for preclinical validation of volumetric imaging modalities.Methods: The anthropomorphic software breast phantom simulates the skin, regions of adipose and fibroglandular tissue, and the matrix of Cooper’s ligaments and adipose compartments. The adipose compartments are simulated using a seeded region-growing algorithm; compartments are grown from a set of seed points with specific orientation and growing speed. The resulting adipose compartments vary in shape and size similar to real breasts; the adipose region has a compact coverage by adipose compartments of various sizes, while the fibroglandular region has fewer, more widely separated adipose compartments. Simulation parameters can be selected to cover the breadth of variations in breast anatomy observed clinically.Results: When simulating breasts of the same glandularity with different numbers of adipose compartments, the average compartment volume was proportional to the phantom size and inversely proportional to the number of simulated compartments. The use of the software phantom in clinical image simulation is illustrated by synthetic digital breast tomosynthesis images of the phantom. The proposed phantom design was capable of simulating breasts of different size, glandularity, and adipose compartment distribution. The region-growing approach allowed us to simulate adipose compartments with various size and shape. Qualitatively, simulated x-ray projections of the phantoms, generated using the proposed algorithm, have a more realistic appearance compared to previous versions of the phantom.Conclusions: A new algorithm for computer simulation of breast anatomy has been proposed that improved the realism of the anthropomorphic software breast phantom. PMID:21815391

  4. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 4. Organ doses for adults due to idealized external photon exposures

    CERN Document Server

    Zankl, M; Petoussi-Henss, N; Regulla, D

    2002-01-01

    The present report contains extensive tables and figures of conversion coefficients of organ and tissue equivalent dose, normalised to air kerma free in air for voxel anthropomorphic phantoms and for standard geometries of external photon radiation, estimated with Monte Carlo techniques. Four realistic adult voxel phantoms were used for the calculations, based on computed tomographic data of real people: three male phantoms, two of them being of average size, one representing a big man, and one female phantom of a tall and somewhat over weighted woman.

  5. Simulating effects of brain atrophy in longitudinal PET imaging with an anthropomorphic brain phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, L S; Axelsson, J; Riklund, K

    2017-01-01

    cameras and reconstruction algorithms. Here, a 3D-printed anthropomorphic brain phantom with attachable striata in three sizes was designed to enable controlled volumetric changes. Using a method to eliminate the non-radioactive plastic wall, and manipulating BP levels by adding different number of events......, as the amplitude of the PVE on the BP differs depending on where in the striatum the change occurred. Therefore, to correctly interpret age-related longitudinal changes in the BP, we must account for volumetric changes also within a structure, rather than across the whole volume. The present 3D-printing technology...

  6. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeters for low-dose measurements in maxillofacial anthropomorphic phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Juha H; Wolff, Jan E; Kiljunen, Timo; Schulze, Dirk; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2015-07-08

    The aims of this study were to characterize reinforced metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to assess the measurement uncertainty, single exposure low-dose limit with acceptable accuracy, and the number of exposures required to attain the corresponding limit of the thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The second aim was to characterize MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities for two dental photon energy ranges, dose dependency, dose rate dependency, and accumulated dose dependency. A further aim was to compare the performance of MOSFETs with those of TLDs in an anthropomorphic phantom head using a dentomaxillofacial CBCT device. The uncertainty was assessed by exposing 20 MOSFETs and a Barracuda MPD reference dosimeter. The MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities were evaluated for two photon energy ranges (50-90 kVp) using a constant dose and polymethylmethacrylate backscatter material. MOSFET and TLD comparative point-dose measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic phantom that was exposed with a clinical CBCT protocol. The MOSFET single exposure low dose limit (25% uncertainty, k = 2) was 1.69 mGy. An averaging of eight MOSFET exposures was required to attain the corresponding TLD (0.3 mGy) low-dose limit. The sensitivity was 3.09 ± 0.13 mV/mGy independently of the photon energy used. The MOSFET dosimeters did not present dose or dose rate sensitivity but, however, presented a 1% decrease of sensitivity per 1000 mV for accumulated threshold voltages between 8300 mV and 17500 mV. The point doses in an anthropomorphic phantom ranged for MOSFETs between 0.24 mGy and 2.29 mGy and for TLDs between 0.25 and 2.09 mGy, respectively. The mean difference was -8%. The MOSFET dosimeters presented statistically insignificant energy dependency. By averaging multiple exposures, the MOSFET dosimeters can achieve a TLD-comparable low-dose limit and constitute a feasible method for diagnostic dosimetry using anthropomorphic phantoms. However, for single in

  7. FlexyDos3D: a deformable anthropomorphic 3D radiation dosimeter: radiation properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Deene, Yves; Skyt, Peter Sandegaard; Hill, Robin

    2015-01-01

    during the actual treatment. FlexyDos3D offers the additional advantage that it is easy to fabricate, is non-toxic and can be molded in an arbitrary shape with high geometrical precision.The dosimeter formulation has been optimized in terms of dose sensitivity. The influence of the casting material...... registration software.A new three dimensional anthropomorphically shaped flexible dosimeter, further called 'FlexyDos3D', has been constructed and a new fast optical scanning method has been implemented that enables scanning of irregular shaped dosimeters. The FlexyDos3D phantom can be actuated and deformed...

  8. Tessier 3 Cleft in a Pre-Hispanic Anthropomorphic Figurine in El Salvador, Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Ramon Manuel; Martinez, Maria Guadalupe

    2017-03-01

    In 1976, Paul Tessier provided a numerical classification system for rare facial clefts, numbered from 0 to 14. The Tessier 3 cleft is a rare facial cleft extending from the philtrum of the upper lip through the wing of the nostril, and reaches the medial canthus of the eye. The aim of this document was to describe a pre-Hispanic anthropomorphic figurine dating from the classic period (200 A.D.-900 A.D.), which has a Tessier 3 cleft. We also discuss the documented pre-Hispanic beliefs about facial clefts.

  9. Anthropomorphic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.

    1998-01-01

    Based on decisions taken during the Research Coordination Meetings in Mito City 1988 and Bombay 1991, the participants were requested to provide data on physical measurement parameters of body height, body weight, sitting height, head circumference, neck circumference, chest circumference, chest width and chest depth which represented the age groups as newborn, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years, 15 years and adult 20-50 years. Accordingly, physical measurement data was obtained by participants from 9 countries

  10. Development and liver of phantom anthropomorphic application for use in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, M.G.; Silva, L.F.; Ferreira, F. C.L.; Cunha, C.J.; Paschoal, C.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of artificial ionizing radiation has also been employed in several areas, namely: medicine, agriculture, industry, ink curing etc. However, the use of radiation for medical purposes of diagnosis or therapy is being treated with more attention due to its increased use and the use of simulators object for quality control and training of professionals. The phantoms and are used to aid radiographic procedures, they may simulate a part of the body, both in its form as mass, density, and attenuation. The objective of this work was the development and application of liver anthropomorphic phantom for use in diagnostic radiology and training professionals. The construction of the liver anthropomorphic phantom was through literature and it was noticed that the use of phantoms are relatively low. For the construction of the mold of the phantom was used an adult human liver with early cirrhosis that was preserved in formalin for teaching demonstrations in Prof. Human Anatomy Museum collection Osvaldo Cruz of milk from the Federal University of Sergipe. With this work, we emphasize the need for the control program and quality assurance in radiology doctor to ensure image quality and low exposure of patients and professionals, since the radiological examinations are extremely important, because its contribution decisively in medical diagnosis. (authors)

  11. Design Of A Low Cost Anthropomorphic Robot Hand For Industrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, P.; Raleigh, B.

    2009-11-01

    Autonomous grasping systems using anthropomorphic robotic end effectors have many applications, and the potential of such devices has inspired researchers to develop many types of grasping systems over the past 30 years. Their research has yielded significant advances in end effector dexterity and functionality. However, due to the cost and complexity associated with such devices, their role has been largely confined to that of being research tools in laboratories. Industry, by contrast, has largely opted for simple, single task, devices. This paper presents a novel low cost anthropomorphic robotic end effector, and in particular the design characteristics that make it more applicable to industrial application. The design brief was (i) to be broadly similar to the human hand in terms of size and performance (ii) be low cost (less than €5000 for the system) and (iii) to provide sufficient performance to allow use in industrial applications. Consisting of three fingers and an opposing thumb, the robotic hand developed has a total of 12 automated degrees of freedom. Another 4 degrees of freedom can be set manually. The specific design of the fingers and thumb, together with the drive arrangement utilizing synchronous belts, yields a simplified kinematics solution for the control of movement. The modular nature of the design is extended also to the palm, which can be easily modified to produce different overall work envelopes for the hand. The drive system and grasping strategies are also detailed.

  12. Analysis of translational errors in frame-based and frameless cranial radiosurgery using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Taynna Vernalha Rocha [Faculdades Pequeno Principe (FPP), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Cordova Junior, Arno Lotar; Almeida, Cristiane Maria; Piedade, Pedro Argolo; Silva, Cintia Mara da, E-mail: taynnavra@gmail.com [Centro de Radioterapia Sao Sebastiao, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Brincas, Gabriela R. Baseggio [Centro de Diagnostico Medico Imagem, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Marins, Priscila; Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate three-dimensional translational setup errors and residual errors in image-guided radiosurgery, comparing frameless and frame-based techniques, using an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods: We initially used specific phantoms for the calibration and quality control of the image-guided system. For the hidden target test, we used an Alderson Radiation Therapy (ART)-210 anthropomorphic head phantom, into which we inserted four 5- mm metal balls to simulate target treatment volumes. Computed tomography images were the taken with the head phantom properly positioned for frameless and frame-based radiosurgery. Results: For the frameless technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.22 ± 0.04 mm for setup errors and 0.14 ± 0.02 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 0.28 mm and 0.16 mm, respectively. For the frame-based technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.73 ± 0.14 mm for setup errors and 0.31 ± 0.04 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 1.15 mm and 0.63 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The mean values, standard deviations, and combined uncertainties showed no evidence of a significant differences between the two techniques when the head phantom ART-210 was used. (author)

  13. Analysis of translational errors in frame-based and frameless cranial radiosurgery using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taynná Vernalha Rocha Almeida

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate three-dimensional translational setup errors and residual errors in image-guided radiosurgery, comparing frameless and frame-based techniques, using an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods: We initially used specific phantoms for the calibration and quality control of the image-guided system. For the hidden target test, we used an Alderson Radiation Therapy (ART-210 anthropomorphic head phantom, into which we inserted four 5mm metal balls to simulate target treatment volumes. Computed tomography images were the taken with the head phantom properly positioned for frameless and frame-based radiosurgery. Results: For the frameless technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.22 ± 0.04 mm for setup errors and 0.14 ± 0.02 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 0.28 mm and 0.16 mm, respectively. For the frame-based technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.73 ± 0.14 mm for setup errors and 0.31 ± 0.04 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 1.15 mm and 0.63 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The mean values, standard deviations, and combined uncertainties showed no evidence of a significant differences between the two techniques when the head phantom ART-210 was used.

  14. In good company? Perception of movement synchrony of a non-anthropomorphic robot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Lehmann

    Full Text Available Recent technological developments like cheap sensors and the decreasing costs of computational power have brought the possibility of robotic home companions within reach. In order to be accepted it is vital for these robots to be able to participate meaningfully in social interactions with their users and to make them feel comfortable during these interactions. In this study we investigated how people respond to a situation where a companion robot is watching its user. Specifically, we tested the effect of robotic behaviours that are synchronised with the actions of a human. We evaluated the effects of these behaviours on the robot's likeability and perceived intelligence using an online video survey. The robot used was Care-O-bot3, a non-anthropomorphic robot with a limited range of expressive motions. We found that even minimal, positively synchronised movements during an object-oriented task were interpreted by participants as engagement and created a positive disposition towards the robot. However, even negatively synchronised movements of the robot led to more positive perceptions of the robot, as compared to a robot that does not move at all. The results emphasise a the powerful role that robot movements in general can have on participants' perception of the robot, and b that synchronisation of body movements can be a powerful means to enhance the positive attitude towards a non-anthropomorphic robot.

  15. In good company? Perception of movement synchrony of a non-anthropomorphic robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Hagen; Saez-Pons, Joan; Syrdal, Dag Sverre; Dautenhahn, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological developments like cheap sensors and the decreasing costs of computational power have brought the possibility of robotic home companions within reach. In order to be accepted it is vital for these robots to be able to participate meaningfully in social interactions with their users and to make them feel comfortable during these interactions. In this study we investigated how people respond to a situation where a companion robot is watching its user. Specifically, we tested the effect of robotic behaviours that are synchronised with the actions of a human. We evaluated the effects of these behaviours on the robot's likeability and perceived intelligence using an online video survey. The robot used was Care-O-bot3, a non-anthropomorphic robot with a limited range of expressive motions. We found that even minimal, positively synchronised movements during an object-oriented task were interpreted by participants as engagement and created a positive disposition towards the robot. However, even negatively synchronised movements of the robot led to more positive perceptions of the robot, as compared to a robot that does not move at all. The results emphasise a) the powerful role that robot movements in general can have on participants' perception of the robot, and b) that synchronisation of body movements can be a powerful means to enhance the positive attitude towards a non-anthropomorphic robot.

  16. Effectiveness of thyroid gland shielding in dental CBCT using a paediatric anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, A; Davies, J; Horner, K; Theodorakou, C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of thyroid shielding in dental CBCT examinations using a paediatric anthropomorphic phantom. An ATOM(®) 706-C anthropomorphic phantom (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems Inc., Norfolk, VA) representing a 10-year-old child was loaded with six thermoluminescent dosemeters positioned at the level of the thyroid gland. Absorbed doses to the thyroid were measured for five commercially available thyroid shields using a large field of view (FOV). A statistically significant thyroid gland dose reduction was found using thyroid shielding for paediatric CBCT examinations for a large FOV. In addition, a statistically significant difference in thyroid gland doses was found depending on the position of the thyroid gland. There was little difference in the effectiveness of thyroid shielding when using a lead vs a lead-equivalent thyroid shield. Similar dose reduction was found using 0.25- and 0.50-mm lead-equivalent thyroid shields. Thyroid shields are to be recommended when undertaking large FOV CBCT examinations on young patients.

  17. Design, development, and implementation of the Radiological Physics Center's pelvis and thorax anthropomorphic quality assurance phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Followill, David S.; Radford Evans, DeeAnn; Cherry, Christopher; Molineu, Andrea; Fisher, Gary; Hanson, William F.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) developed two heterogeneous anthropomorphic quality assurance phantoms for use in verifying the accuracy of radiation delivery: one for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the pelvis and the other for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the thorax. The purpose of this study was to describe the design and development of these two phantoms and to demonstrate the reproducibility of measurements generated with them. The phantoms were built to simulate actual patient anatomy. They are lightweight and water-fillable, and they contain imageable targets and organs at risk of radiation exposure that are of similar densities to their human counterparts. Dosimetry inserts accommodate radiochromic film for relative dosimetry and thermoluminesent dosimetry capsules for absolute dosimetry. As a part of the commissioning process, each phantom was imaged, treatment plans were developed, and radiation was delivered at least three times. Under these controlled irradiation conditions, the reproducibility of dose delivery to the target TLD in the pelvis and thorax phantoms was 3% and 0.5%, respectively. The reproducibility of radiation-field localization was less than 2.5 mm for both phantoms. Using these anthropomorphic phantoms, pelvic IMRT and thoracic SBRT radiation treatments can be verified with a high level of precision. These phantoms can be used to effectively credential institutions for participation in specific NCI-sponsored clinical trials

  18. Social categorization of social robots: anthropomorphism as a function of robot group membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyssel, Friederike; Kuchenbrandt, Dieta

    2012-12-01

    Previous work on social categorization has shown that people often use cues such as a person's gender, age, or ethnicity to categorize and form impressions of others. The present research investigated effects of social category membership on the evaluation of humanoid robots. More specifically, participants rated a humanoid robot that either belonged to their in-group or to a national out-group with regard to anthropomorphism (e.g., mind attribution, warmth), psychological closeness, contact intentions, and design. We predicted that participants would show an in-group bias towards the robot that ostensibly belonged to their in-group--as indicated by its name and location of production. In line with our hypotheses, participants not only rated the in-group robot more favourably--importantly, they also anthropomorphized it more strongly than the out-group robot. Our findings thus document that people even apply social categorization processes and subsequent differential social evaluations to robots. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  19. Location of radiosensitive organs, measurement of absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs and use of bismuth shields in paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkoom, S.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate: firstly, (i) location of radiosensitive organs in the interior of four (4) paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms, and, secondly, (ii) effectiveness of single and double bismuth thyroid shields, distance between shield and phantom surface, during paediatric multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) using fixed tube current (FTC) and automatic exposure control (AEC) on dose reduction and image quality. Four (4) paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms representing the equivalent of a newborn, 1-, 5-, and 10-y-old child underwent head, thorax and abdomen computed tomography (CT) scans. CT and magnetic resonance imaging scans of all children aged 0-16 y-old performed during a 5-y-period at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece were reviewed, and five hundred and three (503) were found to be eligible for normal anatomy. Anterior-posterior and lateral dimensions of twelve (12) of the above children closely matched that of the phantoms' thoracic and abdominal region in each four (4) phantoms. The mid-sagittal plane (MSP) and mid-coronal plane (MCP) were drawn on selected matching axial images of patients and phantoms. Multiple points outlining large radiosensitive organs and centres of small organs in patient images were identified at each slice level and their orthogonal distances from the MSP and MCP were measured. The outlines and centres of all radiosensitive organs were reproduced using the coordinates of each organ on the corresponding phantom's transverse images. The four (4) phantoms were also subjected to routine head and neck, neck and thorax CT scans on a 16-slice CT system. Each phantom was first scanned with both FTC and AEC for with and without bismuth shields. Each scan was repeated ten (10) times to increase thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) signal and reduce measurement statistical error. For neck CT, the effect of using single and double thickness of bismuth shields and 1-3 cm cotton spacers

  20. Lung scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalenz, Roberto.

    1994-01-01

    A review of lung scintigraphy, perfusion scintigraphy with SPECT, lung ventilation SPECT, blood pool SPECT. The procedure of lung perfusion studies, radiopharmaceutical, administration and clinical applications, imaging processing .Results encountered and evaluation criteria after Biello and Pioped. Recommendations and general considerations have been studied about relation of this radiopharmaceutical with other pathologies

  1. Lung transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transplant surgery include: You are placed on the heart-lung machine. One or both of your lungs are removed. For people who are having a double lung transplant, most or all of the steps from the first side are completed before the second side is ...

  2. Dosimetric reproduction of a left-breast 3DCRT field-in-field radiation therapy planning in an anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Aquino, Jean Carlos; Campos, Tarcísio P. Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    The proposal of this study was to reproduce the dosimetry established in a treatment planning system (TPS) following a 3D conformational radiation therapy (3DCRT) protocol of two parallel-opposite fields applied to the left-breast in a thorax phantom, with the use of the field-in-field technique. Computed tomography (CT) images of the anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom of the thorax with mobile breasts were generated. This phantom was developed by the NRI / UFMG research group. The generated images were transferred to the planning system XiO version-5 for the elaboration of the breast tele therapeutic planning with 2 Gy per fraction, in 25 fractions, with prescribed dose of 50 Gy. A set of ten EBT2 radiochromic films were irradiated at different doses. The values of RGB (Red, Green, Blue) of the radiochromic films were obtained by scanning and data transformed in optical density (OD), whose values were used to construct the calibration curve. EBT2 radiochromic films were positioned outside and inside of the thorax phantom: internally in the right and left lungs, on the face of the heart, in the glandular breast tissue-equivalent (TE) and in the left breast skin. After phantom radiation at the linear accelerator 6 MV Elekta Precise reproducing the 3DCRT, the radiochromic films were digitized after 24 h of exposure. The measurements of the intensities of the films in RGB were measured in the software ImageJ, transformed in optical density and converted in bidimensional dose distributions, applying the calibration curve. The experimental dosimetric data were analyzed and compared with values generated in the TPS. In addition, graphics and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were developed. The dose measurements in the glandular-TE in breast did not present statistically significant differences in relation to values at equivalent positions generated in the TPS. The organs at risk received doses below the reference values, according to TPS. It was verified the

  3. Dosimetric reproduction of a left-breast 3DCRT field-in-field radiation therapy planning in an anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Luciana B., E-mail: lucibn19@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: jonymarques@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem; Barsanelli, Cristiane; Geraldo, Jony M., E-mail: cbarsanelli@yahoo.com.br [Hospital Luxemburgo, Instituto Mário Penna, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Aquino, Jean Carlos; Campos, Tarcísio P. Ribeiro, E-mail: jeancarlosaquino@outlook.com, E-mail: tprcampos@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UGMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The proposal of this study was to reproduce the dosimetry established in a treatment planning system (TPS) following a 3D conformational radiation therapy (3DCRT) protocol of two parallel-opposite fields applied to the left-breast in a thorax phantom, with the use of the field-in-field technique. Computed tomography (CT) images of the anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom of the thorax with mobile breasts were generated. This phantom was developed by the NRI / UFMG research group. The generated images were transferred to the planning system XiO version-5 for the elaboration of the breast tele therapeutic planning with 2 Gy per fraction, in 25 fractions, with prescribed dose of 50 Gy. A set of ten EBT2 radiochromic films were irradiated at different doses. The values of RGB (Red, Green, Blue) of the radiochromic films were obtained by scanning and data transformed in optical density (OD), whose values were used to construct the calibration curve. EBT2 radiochromic films were positioned outside and inside of the thorax phantom: internally in the right and left lungs, on the face of the heart, in the glandular breast tissue-equivalent (TE) and in the left breast skin. After phantom radiation at the linear accelerator 6 MV Elekta Precise reproducing the 3DCRT, the radiochromic films were digitized after 24 h of exposure. The measurements of the intensities of the films in RGB were measured in the software ImageJ, transformed in optical density and converted in bidimensional dose distributions, applying the calibration curve. The experimental dosimetric data were analyzed and compared with values generated in the TPS. In addition, graphics and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were developed. The dose measurements in the glandular-TE in breast did not present statistically significant differences in relation to values at equivalent positions generated in the TPS. The organs at risk received doses below the reference values, according to TPS. It was verified the

  4. 75 FR 5931 - Anthropomorphic Test Devices; Hybrid III Test Dummy, ES-2re Side Impact Crash Test Dummy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... [Docket No. NHTSA-2009-0194] RIN 2127-AK64 Anthropomorphic Test Devices; Hybrid III Test Dummy, ES-2re Side Impact Crash Test Dummy AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department... adopted specifications and qualification requirements for a new crash test dummy called the ``ES- 2re...

  5. 76 FR 31860 - Anthropomorphic Test Devices; Hybrid III Test Dummy, ES-2re Side Impact Crash Test Dummy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... [Docket No. NHTSA-2010-0146] RIN 2127-AK64 Anthropomorphic Test Devices; Hybrid III Test Dummy, ES-2re Side Impact Crash Test Dummy AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department..., 2008, concerning a 50th percentile adult male side crash test dummy called the ``ES-2re'' test dummy...

  6. Creating an anthropomorphic digital MR phantom—an extensible tool for comparing and evaluating quantitative imaging algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosca, Ryan J.; Jackson, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    Assessing and mitigating the various sources of bias and variance associated with image quantification algorithms is essential to the use of such algorithms in clinical research and practice. Assessment is usually accomplished with grid-based digital reference objects (DRO) or, more recently, digital anthropomorphic phantoms based on normal human anatomy. Publicly available digital anthropomorphic phantoms can provide a basis for generating realistic model-based DROs that incorporate the heterogeneity commonly found in pathology. Using a publicly available vascular input function (VIF) and digital anthropomorphic phantom of a normal human brain, a methodology was developed to generate a DRO based on the general kinetic model (GKM) that represented realistic and heterogeneously enhancing pathology. GKM parameters were estimated from a deidentified clinical dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI exam. This clinical imaging volume was co-registered with a discrete tissue model, and model parameters estimated from clinical images were used to synthesize a DCE-MRI exam that consisted of normal brain tissues and a heterogeneously enhancing brain tumor. An example application of spatial smoothing was used to illustrate potential applications in assessing quantitative imaging algorithms. A voxel-wise Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated negligible differences between the parameters estimated with and without spatial smoothing (using a small radius Gaussian kernel). In this work, we reported an extensible methodology for generating model-based anthropomorphic DROs containing normal and pathological tissue that can be used to assess quantitative imaging algorithms.

  7. Low-cost design and fabrication of an anthropomorphic robotic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaid, Ali Bin; Tahir, Sanan; Rasheed, Tahir; Ahmed, Sharjeel; Sohail, Mehreen; Afzal, Muhammad Raheel; Ali, Muzaffar; Kim, Yoonsoo

    2014-10-01

    Human hand signifies a magnificent and challenging example for scientists and engineers trying to replicate its complex structure and functionality. This paper proposes a bio-mechatronic approach for the design of an anthropomorphic artificial hand capable of performing basic human hand motions with fundamental gripping functionality. The dexterity of the artificial hand is exhibited by imitating the natural motion of the human fingers. Imitation is produced according to the data acquired from the flex sensors attached to the human fingers. In order to have proper gripping, closed-loop control is implemented using the tactile sensors. Feedback for the closed-loop control is provided by force sensing resistors (FSRs), attached on the fingertips of the robotic hand. These sensors also enable handling of fragile objects. The mathematical model is derived using forward kinematics and also simulated on MATLAB to ascertain the position of robotic fingers in 3D space.

  8. Kinematic design of a finger abduction mechanism for an anthropomorphic robotic hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-A. A. Demers

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the kinematic design of an abduction mechanism for the fingers of an underactuated anthropomorphic robotic hand. This mechanism will enhance the range of feasible grasps of the underactuated hand without significantly increasing its complexity. The analysis of the link between the index finger and the third finger is first assessed, where the parameters are studied in order to follow the amplitude constraint and to minimize the coordination error. Then, the study of the mechanism joining the third finger and the little finger is summarized. Finally, a prototype of the finger's abduction system is presented.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  9. Fatal Attractions: Attachment to Smartphones Predicts Anthropomorphic Beliefs and Dangerous Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodford, Jessica E; Kwan, Virginia S Y; Sobota, David S

    2017-05-01

    As technology's presence grows increasingly concrete in global societies, so too do our relationships with the devices we keep close at hand from day to day. Whereas research has, in the past, framed smartphone addiction in terms of possessional attachment, the present research hypothesizes that anxious smartphone attachment stems from human attachment, in which Anxiously attached individuals may be more likely to generalize their anxious attachment style to communication devices. In the present study, we found support for this hypothesis and showed that anxious smartphone attachment predicts (1) anthropomorphic beliefs, (2) reliance on-or "clinginess" toward-smartphones, and (3) a seemingly compulsive urge to answer one's phone, even in dangerous situations (e.g., while driving). Taken together, we seek to provide a theoretical framework and methodological tools to identify the sources of technology attachment and those most at risk of engaging in dangerous or inappropriate behaviors as a result of attachment to ever-present mobile devices.

  10. Shybo. An open-source low-anthropomorphic robot for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luce Lupetti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents Shybo: a novel low-anthropomorphic robot for children. The robot, resulted from the combination of open-source hardware and software, is able to perceive sounds and to react through two non-verbal behaviors: hat’s movement and lighting. By taking advantage of an open-source machine-learning software, the robot can be easily trained by children. This robot can be employed in research to support human-robot interaction studies with children, for investigating perceptual aspects of robot’s features or for investigating children’ cognitive abilities. It can also be used for applications in educational context to support playful learning experiences.

  11. Contextual analysis of fragmentation of the anthropomorphic figurines from the Late Neolithic site of Selevac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Porčić

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The biographical approach to material culture and the hypothesis of deliberate fragmentation of anthropomorphic figurines are used in this paper to deduce a hypothesis that there should be an association between particular fragmentation categories and context types in the archaeological record of the Late Neolithic settlements in Central Balkans. This hypothesis is tested using published data from the site of Selevac by performing correspondence analysis and chi-square test on a contingency table in which categories of fragmentation are cross-tabulated with context types. The results are statistically significant, suggesting that complete figurines are associated with houses while transversely broken figurines are associated with pits. There is also evidence that figurines were broken differentially in respect to their original size.

  12. The application of shape memory actuators in anthropomorphic upper limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Christian Mariani Lucas; da Cunha, Fransergio Leite; Dynnikov, Vladimir Ivanovitch

    2003-05-01

    In recent years, single crystal Cu-Al-Ni alloys with shape memory behavior (SMB) became generally commercialized. They achieved the level of extended application, including upper limb human prosthesis with anthropomorphic characteristics. An actuator based in single crystal Cu-Al-Ni alloy was tested as a prototype for prosthetic actuators. Their thermal cycle times remarkably define the actuator dynamics and the idea of preheating to reduce its response time was tested. To elaborate the heating conditions, the chemical composition of martensitic and austenitic single crystals, Cu-Al-Ni alloy samples were examined. The dynamic response of a martensitic actuator made with SMB and the power consumed with preheating was analyzed. It demonstrates that the presence of more elements in alloys may be fundamental to displace the heating diagram and to reduce the power consumed.

  13. Identification of anthropomorphic, teleological and vitalist conceptions amongst participants of an annual meeting of SBBq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Leites Larentis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to identify epistemological obstacles amongst participants of XXXIX Annual Meeting of Brazilian Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. A questionnaire with selected excerpts of scientific papers from high impact factor journals was answered by 97 participants of this annual meeting (39 under-graduates, 42 graduate students, and 16 professors and researchers. From Bachelard’s notion of teleological obstacle, it was possible to identify vitalist conceptions (animism, teleological approaches of the evolution processes, expressed in apologies of immanent purposes in organisms’ adaptation, and an anthropomorphic vision of the biological processes under evaluation in the answers and also in the acceptance or not recognition of these obstacles in the excerpts. The presence of figures of speech, metaphors and analogies (verbal obstacle were verified in explaining the evolution and the immune system, also present in the excerpts.

  14. Rapid genetic algorithm optimization of a mouse computational model: Benefits for anthropomorphization of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Teodora Bot

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available While the mouse presents an invaluable experimental model organism in biology, its usefulness in cardiac arrhythmia research is limited in some aspects due to major electrophysiological differences between murine and human action potentials (APs. As previously described, these species-specific traits can be partly overcome by application of a cell-type transforming clamp (CTC to anthropomorphize the murine cardiac AP. CTC is a hybrid experimental-computational dynamic clamp technique, in which a computationally calculated time-dependent current is inserted into a cell in real time, to compensate for the differences between sarcolemmal currents of that cell (e.g., murine and the desired species (e.g., human. For effective CTC performance, mismatch between the measured cell and a mathematical model used to mimic the measured AP must be minimal. We have developed a genetic algorithm (GA approach that rapidly tunes a mathematical model to reproduce the AP of the murine cardiac myocyte under study. Compared to a prior implementation that used a template-based model selection approach, we show that GA optimization to a cell-specific model results in a much better recapitulation of the desired AP morphology with CTC. This improvement was more pronounced when anthropomorphizing neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes to human-like APs than to guinea pig APs. CTC may be useful for a wide range of applications, from screening effects of pharmaceutical compounds on ion channel activity, to exploring variations in the mouse or human genome. Rapid GA optimization of a cell-specific mathematical model improves CTC performance and may therefore expand the applicability and usage of the CTC technique.

  15. Anthropomorphism in the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence - The limits of cognition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlmann, Ulrike M.; Bürger, Moritz J. F.

    2018-02-01

    The question "Are we alone?" lingers in the human mind since ancient times. Early human civilisations populated the heavens above with a multitude of Gods endowed with some all too human characteristics - from their outer appearance to their innermost motivations. En passant they created thereby their own cultural founding myths on which they built their understanding of the world and its phenomena and deduced as well rules for the functioning of their own society. Advancing technology has enabled us to conduct this human quest for knowledge with more scientific means: optical and radio-wavelengths are being monitored for messages by an extra-terrestrial intelligence and active messaging attempts have also been undertaken. Scenarios have been developed for a possible detection of extra-terrestrial intelligence and post-detection guidelines and protocols have been elaborated. The human responses to the whole array of questions concerning the potential existence, discovery of and communication/interaction with an extra-terrestrial intelligence share as one clear thread a profound anthropomorphism, which ascribes classical human behavioural patterns also to an extra-terrestrial intelligence in much the same way as our ancestors attributed comparable conducts to mythological figures. This paper aims at pinpointing this thread in a number of classical reactions to basic questions related to the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence. Many of these reactions are based on human motives such as curiosity and fear, rationalised by experience and historical analogy and modelled in the Science Fiction Culture by literature and movies. Scrutinising the classical hypothetical explanations of the Fermi paradox under the angle of a potentially undue anthropomorphism, this paper intends to assist in understanding our human epistemological limitations in the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence. This attempt is structured into a series of questions: I. Can we be alone? II

  16. Design, manufacture, and evaluation of an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom purpose-built for radiotherapy dosimetric intercomparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, K. M.; Ebert, M. A.; Kron, T.; Howlett, S. J.; Cornes, D.; Hamilton, C. S.; Denham, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was designed and constructed to meet specific criteria for multicenter radiotherapy dosimetric intercomparison. Methods: Three dimensional external and organ outlines were generated from a computed tomography image set of a male pelvis, forming the basis of design for an anatomically realistic phantom. Clinically relevant points of interest were selected throughout the dataset where point-dose values could be measured with thermoluminescence dosimeters and a small-volume ionization chamber. Following testing, three materials were selected and the phantom was manufactured using modern prototyping techniques into five separate coronal slices. Time lines and resource requirements for the phantom design and manufacture were recorded. The ability of the phantom to mimic the entire treatment chain was tested. Results: The phantom CT images indicated that organ densities and geometries were comparable to those of the original patient. The phantom proved simple to load for dosimetry and rapid to assemble. Due to heat release during manufacture, small air gaps and density heterogeneities were present throughout the phantom. The overall cost for production of the prototype phantom was comparable to other commercial anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantom was shown to be suitable for use as a ''patient'' to mimic the entire treatment chain for typical external beam radiotherapy for prostate and rectal cancer. Conclusions: The phantom constructed for the present study incorporates all characteristics necessary for accurate Level III intercomparison studies. Following use in an extensive Level III dosimetric comparison over a large time scale and geographic area, the phantom retained mechanical stability and did not show signs of radiation-induced degradation.

  17. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  18. An anthropomorphic abdominal phantom for deformable image registration accuracy validation in adaptive radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuliang; Wang, Linjing; Xu, Xiangdong; Chen, Haibin; Chen, Jiawei; Zhang, Guoqian; Lei, Huaiyu; Wang, Ruihao; Zhang, Shuxu; Gu, Xuejun; Zhen, Xin; Zhou, Linghong

    2017-06-01

    To design and construct a three-dimensional (3D) anthropomorphic abdominal phantom for geometric accuracy and dose summation accuracy evaluations of deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Organ molds, including liver, kidney, spleen, stomach, vertebra, and two metastasis tumors, were 3D printed using contours from an ovarian cancer patient. The organ molds were molded with deformable gels made of different mixtures of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and the softener dioctyl terephthalate. Gels with different densities were obtained by a polynomial fitting curve that described the relation between the Hounsfield unit (HU) and PVC-softener blending ratio. The rigid vertebras were constructed by molding of white cement and cellulose pulp. The final abdominal phantom was assembled by arranging all the fabricated organs inside a hollow dummy according to their anatomies, and sealed by deformable gel with averaged HU of muscle and fat. Fiducial landmarks were embedded inside the phantom for spatial accuracy and dose accumulation accuracy studies. Two channels were excavated to facilitate ionization chamber insertion for dosimetric measurements. Phantom properties such as deformable gel elasticity and HU stability were studied. The dosimetric measurement accuracy in the phantom was performed, and the DIR accuracies of three DIR algorithms available in the open source DIR toolkit-DIRART were also validated. The constructed deformable gel showed elastic behavior and was stable in HU values over times, proving to be a practical material for the deformable phantom. The constructed abdominal phantom consisted of realistic anatomies in terms of both anatomical shapes and densities when compared with its reference patient. The dosimetric measurements showed a good agreement with the calculated doses from the treatment planning system. Fiducial-based accuracy analysis conducted on the constructed phantom demonstrated the feasibility of

  19. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  20. Design and manufacturing of anthropomorphic thyroid-neck phantom for use in nuclear medicine centres in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermosilla, A.; Diaz Londono, G.; Garcia, M.; Ruiz, F.; Andrade, P.; Perez, A.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropomorphic phantoms are used in nuclear medicine for imaging quality control, calibration of gamma spectrometry system for the study of internal contamination with radionuclides and for internal dosimetric studies. These are constructed of materials that have radiation attenuation coefficients similar to those of the different organs and tissues of the human body. The material usually used for the manufacture of phantoms is polymethyl methacrylate. Other materials used for this purpose are polyethylene, polystyrene and epoxy resin. This project presents the design and manufacture of an anthropomorphic thyroid-neck phantom that includes the cervical spine, trachea and oesophagus, using a polyester resin (ρ 1.1 g cm -3 ). Its linear and mass attenuation coefficients were experimentally determined and simulated by means of XCOM software, finding that this material reproduces the soft tissue ICRU-44 in a range of energies between 80 keV and 11 MeV, with less than a 5 % difference. (authors)

  1. Too humanlike to increase my appetite: Disposition to anthropomorphize animals relates to decreased meat consumption through empathic concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemyjska, Aleksandra; Cantarero, Katarzyna; Byrka, Katarzyna; Bilewicz, Michał

    2018-04-12

    People who exclude meat from their diets are not only devoid of situational pressures to disengage morally and deny humanlike mental states to animals but also they may be dispositionally more inclined to ascribe human-like qualities to non-human animals than omnivores. The aim of this research was to test whether individual differences in anthropomorphism are related to empathic connection with non-human animals and hence decreased meat consumption. In two studies (N = 588) we confirmed that decreased meat consumption was associated with both increased recognition of human features of animals and increased empathy to animals. Most importantly, our data support a model in which animals' anthropomorphism predicts empathy. Empathy, in turn, increases the importance that potential animal harm plays in dietary choices regarding meat, leading to reduced meat consumption. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Procedures of hepatic scintigraphy and improvement of professionals by using anthropomorphic simulator object of liver in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Fernanda C.L.; Cunha, Cledison J.; Dullius, Marcos A.; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates hepatic scintigraphy procedures and the possibility of professional improvement in nuclear medicine by using three-dimension anthropomorphic simulators representative of adult human liver. For the conformation of anthropomorphic simulator, it was used gypsum and acrylic. Three simulator objects representing cirrhosis livers. The simulator were filled with 99m Tc diluted in water for the obtention of scintigraphic images. Tomographic images were analysed posterior and anterior of simulator representing an organ with more cirrhosis grade. It was observed that the simulators make possible the acquisition of images similar to the real images of liver with hepatic cirrhosis. The simulations of hemangiomas can contribute for continuous education of nuclear medicine professionals, as far the question of image formation is concerned, make possible the parameter study as, for example, the , matrix size energy window, zoom and counting statistic

  3. Measurement of Entrance Surface Dose on an Anthropomorphic Thorax Phantom Using a Miniature Fiber-Optic Dosimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Dayeong; Hong, Seunghan; Sim, Hyeok In; Kim, Seon Geun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Youn, Won Sik; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-01-01

    A miniature fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD) system was fabricated using a plastic scintillating fiber, a plastic optical fiber, and a multi-pixel photon counter to measure real-time entrance surface dose (ESD) during radiation diagnosis. Under varying exposure parameters of a digital radiography (DR) system, we measured the scintillating light related to the ESD using the sensing probe of the FOD, which was placed at the center of the beam field on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Also, we obt...

  4. Optimization of a protocol for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy by using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Susie Medeiros Oliveira; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de, E-mail: susie@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Glavam, Adriana Pereira; Kubo, Tadeu Takao Almodovar [Clinica de Diagnostico Por Imagem (CDPI/DASA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: to develop a study aiming at optimizing myocardial perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods: imaging of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a GE SPECT Ventri gamma camera, with varied activities and acquisition times, in order to evaluate the influence of these parameters on the quality of the reconstructed medical images. The {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi radiotracer was utilized, and then the images were clinically evaluated on the basis of data such as summed stress score, and on the technical image quality and perfusion. The software ImageJ was utilized in the data quantification. Results: the results demonstrated that for the standard acquisition time utilized in the procedure (15 seconds per angle), the injected activity could be reduced by 33.34%. Additionally, even if the standard scan time is reduced by 53.34% (7 seconds per angle), the standard injected activity could still be reduced by 16.67%, without impairing the image quality and the diagnostic reliability. Conclusion: the described method and respective results provide a basis for the development of a clinical trial of patients in an optimized protocol. (author)

  5. Optimization of a protocol for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy by using an anthropomorphic phantom*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Susie Medeiros Oliveira; Glavam, Adriana Pereira; Kubo, Tadeu Takao Almodovar; de Sá, Lidia Vasconcellos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a study aiming at optimizing myocardial perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods Imaging of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a GE SPECT Ventri gamma camera, with varied activities and acquisition times, in order to evaluate the influence of these parameters on the quality of the reconstructed medical images. The 99mTc-sestamibi radiotracer was utilized, and then the images were clinically evaluated on the basis of data such as summed stress score, and on the technical image quality and perfusion. The software ImageJ was utilized in the data quantification. Results The results demonstrated that for the standard acquisition time utilized in the procedure (15 seconds per angle), the injected activity could be reduced by 33.34%. Additionally, even if the standard scan time is reduced by 53.34% (7 seconds per angle), the standard injected activity could still be reduced by 16.67%, without impairing the image quality and the diagnostic reliability. Conclusion The described method and respective results provide a basis for the development of a clinical trial of patients in an optimized protocol. PMID:25741088

  6. Optimising radiographic bitewing examination to adult and juvenile patients through the use of anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauer, L. T.; Branets, I.; Stabulas-Savage, J.; Quinn, B.; Miodownik, D.; Dauer, Z. L.; Colosi, D.; Hershkowitz, D.; Goren, A.

    2014-01-01

    Four anthropomorphic phantoms (an adult male, an adult female, a 10-y-old child and a 5-y-old child) were exposed to bitewing radiographs at film and digital settings using both rectangular and round collimation. Optically stimulated dosemeters were used. For children, average organ doses were <40 μGy and the organs with the highest doses were the salivary glands, parotid, oral mucosa, skin and extrathoracic airway. For adults, average organ doses were <200 μGy. Highest adult doses were to the salivary glands, oral mucosa and skin. Effective doses ranged from 1.5 to 1.8 μSv for children and from 2.6 to 3.6 μSv for adults when optimised technique factors were employed, including digital receptors, rectangular collimation, size-appropriate exposure times and proper clinical judgment. Optimised doses were a fraction of the natural daily background exposure. Therefore, predictions of hypothetical cancer incidence or detriment in patient populations exposed to such low doses are highly speculative and should be discouraged. (authors)

  7. Dose evaluation in occupationally exposed workers through dosimeters ring and wrist type with an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, R.; Gastelo, E.; Paucar, R.; Tolentino, D.; Herrera, J.; Armas, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the Nuclear Medicine service of the Clinica San Pablo (Peru), the occupationally exposed workers carried out the preparation and administration of radiopharmaceuticals to patients, so it is vital to measure the equivalent dose to the hands during the procedures in order to optimize the exposure to the ionizing radiation and execute the Radiological Safety Regulation (D.S. No. 009-97-Em) and the standard IR 002.2012 of radiation protection and safety in nuclear medicine. In this paper was designed and built a hand anthropomorphic phantom made of paraffin following the description given for the standard man, later were placed dosimeters ring and wrist type UD-807 model, Panasonic brand. Then we proceeded to irradiate using vial containers of Tc-99 and I-131. The obtained results showed the difference between the equivalent dose obtained among the ring and wrist dosimeter also getting a dose of 153 mSv /year when working with 99m Tc and of 61 mSv /year when working with iodine-131. Was also demonstrated that the ring dosimeter shows the average dose received in the hand with less dispersion. It was found that under the national regulation on Requirements of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety in Medicine article 63, indicates that higher doses of 150 mSv /year the occupationally exposed workers should have hand dosimetry. Finally the individual dose limit of 500 mSv /year in extremities can be overcome if adequate radiation protection standards do not apply. (author)

  8. Towards Rehabilitation Robotics: Off-the-Shelf BCI Control of Anthropomorphic Robotic Arms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkinoos Athanasiou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in neural interfaces have demonstrated remarkable results in the direction of replacing and restoring lost sensorimotor function in human patients. Noninvasive brain-computer interfaces (BCIs are popular due to considerable advantages including simplicity, safety, and low cost, while recent advances aim at improving past technological and neurophysiological limitations. Taking into account the neurophysiological alterations of disabled individuals, investigating brain connectivity features for implementation of BCI control holds special importance. Off-the-shelf BCI systems are based on fast, reproducible detection of mental activity and can be implemented in neurorobotic applications. Moreover, social Human-Robot Interaction (HRI is increasingly important in rehabilitation robotics development. In this paper, we present our progress and goals towards developing off-the-shelf BCI-controlled anthropomorphic robotic arms for assistive technologies and rehabilitation applications. We account for robotics development, BCI implementation, and qualitative assessment of HRI characteristics of the system. Furthermore, we present two illustrative experimental applications of the BCI-controlled arms, a study of motor imagery modalities on healthy individuals’ BCI performance, and a pilot investigation on spinal cord injured patients’ BCI control and brain connectivity. We discuss strengths and limitations of our design and propose further steps on development and neurophysiological study, including implementation of connectivity features as BCI modality.

  9. Towards Rehabilitation Robotics: Off-the-Shelf BCI Control of Anthropomorphic Robotic Arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Alkinoos; Xygonakis, Ioannis; Pandria, Niki; Kartsidis, Panagiotis; Arfaras, George; Kavazidi, Kyriaki Rafailia; Foroglou, Nicolas; Astaras, Alexander; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2017-01-01

    Advances in neural interfaces have demonstrated remarkable results in the direction of replacing and restoring lost sensorimotor function in human patients. Noninvasive brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are popular due to considerable advantages including simplicity, safety, and low cost, while recent advances aim at improving past technological and neurophysiological limitations. Taking into account the neurophysiological alterations of disabled individuals, investigating brain connectivity features for implementation of BCI control holds special importance. Off-the-shelf BCI systems are based on fast, reproducible detection of mental activity and can be implemented in neurorobotic applications. Moreover, social Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) is increasingly important in rehabilitation robotics development. In this paper, we present our progress and goals towards developing off-the-shelf BCI-controlled anthropomorphic robotic arms for assistive technologies and rehabilitation applications. We account for robotics development, BCI implementation, and qualitative assessment of HRI characteristics of the system. Furthermore, we present two illustrative experimental applications of the BCI-controlled arms, a study of motor imagery modalities on healthy individuals' BCI performance, and a pilot investigation on spinal cord injured patients' BCI control and brain connectivity. We discuss strengths and limitations of our design and propose further steps on development and neurophysiological study, including implementation of connectivity features as BCI modality.

  10. Comparison of various anthropomorphic phantom types for in vivo measurements by means of Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schläger, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Three widely used anthropomorphic phantoms are analysed with regard to their suitability for the efficiency calibration of whole-body counters (WBCs): a Bottle Manikin Absorber (BOMAB) phantom consisting of water-filled plastic containers, a St Petersburg block phantom (Research Institute of Sea Transport Hygiene, St Petersburg) made of polyethylene bricks and a mathematical Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) phantom, each of them representing a person weighing 70 kg. The analysis was performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations with the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code using detailed mathematical models of the phantoms and the WBC at Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ). The simulated peak efficiencies for the BOMAB phantom and the MIRD phantom agree very well, but the results for the St Petersburg phantom are considerably higher. Therefore, WBCs similar to that at FZJ will probably underestimate the activity of incorporated radionuclides if they are calibrated by means of a St Petersburg phantom. Finally, the results from this work are compared with the conclusions from other studies dealing with block and BOMAB phantoms.

  11. Dose profile study in head CT scans using a male anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Alvaro M.L.; Santana, Priscila do C.; Mourao, Arnaldo P., E-mail: amlgphys@gmail.com, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com, E-mail: apratabhz@gmail.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) test is an efficient and non-invasive method to obtain data about internal structures of the human body. CT scans contribute with the highest absorbed doses in population due X-ray beam attenuation and it has raised concern in radiosensitive tissues. Techniques for the optimization of CT scanning protocols in diagnostic services have been developing with the objective of decreasing the absorbed dose in the patient, aiming image quality within acceptable parameters for diagnosis by noise control. Routine head scans were performed using GE CT scan of 64 channels programmed with automatic exposure control and voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV attaching the noise index in approximately 0.5%, using the tool of smart mA. An anthropomorphic adult male phantom was used and radiochromic film strips were placed to measure the absorbed dose deposited in areas such as the lens, thyroid and pituitary for study of dose deposited in these important areas containing high radiosensitive tissues. Different head scans were performed using optimized values of mA.s for the different voltages. The absorbed dose measured by the film strips were in the range of the 0.58 and 44.36 mGy. The analysis of noise in the images is within the acceptable levels for diagnosis, and the optimized protocol happens with the voltage of 100 kV. The use of other voltage values can allow obtain better protocols for head scans. (author)

  12. Comparison Between THOR Anthropomorphic Test Device and THOR Finite Element Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Extended time spent in reduced gravity can cause physiologic deconditioning of astronauts, reducing their ability to sustain excessive forces during dynamic phases of spaceflight such as landing. To make certain that the crew is safe during these phases, NASA must take caution when determining what types of landings are acceptable based on the accelerations applied to the astronaut. In order to test acceptable landings, various trials have been run accelerating humans, cadavers, and Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs), or crash test dummies, at different acceleration and velocity rates on a sled testing platform. Using these tests, risks of injury will be created and metrics will be developed for the likelihood of injuries due to the acceleration. A finite element model (FEM) of the Test Device for Human Occupant Restraint (THOR) ATD has been developed that can simulate these test trials and others (Putnam, 2014), reducing the need for human and ATD testing. Additionally, this will give researchers a more effective way to test the accelerations and orientations encountered during spaceflight landings during design of new space vehicles for crewed missions. However, the FEM has not been proven and must be validated by comparing the forces, accelerations, and other measurements of all parts of the body between the physical tests already completed and computer simulated trials. The purpose of my research was to validate the FEM for the ATD using previously run trials with the physical THOR ATD.

  13. Measurement of Head Impact Due to Standing Fall in Adults Using Anthropomorphic Test Dummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiaghamemar, Marzieh; Seidi, Morteza; Ferguson, James R; Caccese, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    The kinematics and kinetics of head impact due to a standing fall onto a hard surface are summarized. Head injury due to impact from falls represents a significant problem, especially for older individuals. When the head is left unprotected during a fall, the impact severity can be high enough to cause significant injury or even death. To ascertain the range of head impact parameters, the dynamic response was captured for the pedestrian version of the 5th percentile female and 50th percentile male Hybrid III anthropomorphic test dummies as they were dropped from a standing position with different initial postures. Five scenarios of falls were considered including backward falls with/without hip flexion, forward falls with/without knee flexion and lateral falls. The results show that the head impact parameters are dependent on the fall scenario. A wide range of impact parameters was observed in 107 trials. The 95% prediction interval for the peak translational acceleration, peak angular acceleration, peak force, impact translational velocity and peak angular velocity are 146-502 g, 8.8-43.3 krad/s(2), 3.9-24.5 kN, 2.02-7.41 m/s, and 12.9-70.3 rad/s, respectively.

  14. Small anthropomorphic figurines in clay at Ģipka Neolithic settlements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilze Biruta Loze

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Miniature Neolithic figurines in clay are a special topic of research. This especially concerns areas where their representation has so far been poor. While carrying out archaeological excavations in Northern Kurzeme, the north-west coastal dune zone of Rīga Bay, a ritual-like complex was recovered at Ģipka A site belonging to the local Culture of Pit Ceramics. It consists of several large and smaller fireplaces and pits, with the finds of fragmentary clay figurines recovered under the palisade that surrounded the settlement. The head and body of the miniature anthropomorphic figurines in clay have original modelling. It is possible to single out two types of figurine: with rather broad cheekbones, and oval modelling of face. The large amount of ochre found in the settlement and the purposeful breaking of figurines are evidence of their role during a rite. Clay figurines have a symbolic meaning, and the signs depicted on them, incised walking stick-shape and other motifs, are the symbols of early farmers.

  15. Variation in the anthropomorphization of supernatural beings and its implications for cognitive theories of religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtulman, Andrew

    2008-09-01

    The cognitive study of religion has been highly influenced by P. Boyer's (2001, 2003) claim that supernatural beings are conceptualized as persons with counterintuitive properties. The present study tests the generality of this claim by exploring how different supernatural beings are conceptualized by the same individual and how different individuals conceptualize the same supernatural beings. In Experiment 1, college undergraduates decided whether three types of human properties (psychological, biological, physical) could or could not be attributed to two types of supernatural beings (religious, fictional). On average, participants attributed more human properties to fictional beings, like fairies and vampires, than to religious beings, like God and Satan, and they attributed more psychological properties than nonpsychological properties to both. In Experiment 2, 5-year-old children and their parents made both open-ended and closed-ended property attributions. Although both groups of participants attributed a majority of human properties to the fictional beings, children attributed a majority of human properties to the religious beings as well. Taken together, these findings suggest that anthropomorphic theories of supernatural-being concepts, though fully predictive of children's concepts, are only partially predictive of adults' concepts. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Beyond intuitive anthropomorphic control: recent achievements using brain computer interface technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A.; Fifer, Matthew; Rich, Matthew; Pino, Johnathan; Wester, Brock; Johannes, Matthew; Dohopolski, Chris; Helder, John; D'Angelo, Denise; Beaty, James; Bensmaia, Sliman; McLoughlin, Michael; Tenore, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) research has progressed rapidly, with BCIs shifting from animal tests to human demonstrations of controlling computer cursors and even advanced prosthetic limbs, the latter having been the goal of the Revolutionizing Prosthetics (RP) program. These achievements now include direct electrical intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the brain to provide human BCI users feedback information from the sensors of prosthetic limbs. These successes raise the question of how well people would be able to use BCIs to interact with systems that are not based directly on the body (e.g., prosthetic arms), and how well BCI users could interpret ICMS information from such devices. If paralyzed individuals could use BCIs to effectively interact with such non-anthropomorphic systems, it would offer them numerous new opportunities to control novel assistive devices. Here we explore how well a participant with tetraplegia can detect infrared (IR) sources in the environment using a prosthetic arm mounted camera that encodes IR information via ICMS. We also investigate how well a BCI user could transition from controlling a BCI based on prosthetic arm movements to controlling a flight simulator, a system with different physical dynamics than the arm. In that test, the BCI participant used environmental information encoded via ICMS to identify which of several upcoming flight routes was the best option. For both tasks, the BCI user was able to quickly learn how to interpret the ICMSprovided information to achieve the task goals.

  17. Towards Rehabilitation Robotics: Off-the-Shelf BCI Control of Anthropomorphic Robotic Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xygonakis, Ioannis; Pandria, Niki; Kartsidis, Panagiotis; Arfaras, George; Kavazidi, Kyriaki Rafailia; Foroglou, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Advances in neural interfaces have demonstrated remarkable results in the direction of replacing and restoring lost sensorimotor function in human patients. Noninvasive brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are popular due to considerable advantages including simplicity, safety, and low cost, while recent advances aim at improving past technological and neurophysiological limitations. Taking into account the neurophysiological alterations of disabled individuals, investigating brain connectivity features for implementation of BCI control holds special importance. Off-the-shelf BCI systems are based on fast, reproducible detection of mental activity and can be implemented in neurorobotic applications. Moreover, social Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) is increasingly important in rehabilitation robotics development. In this paper, we present our progress and goals towards developing off-the-shelf BCI-controlled anthropomorphic robotic arms for assistive technologies and rehabilitation applications. We account for robotics development, BCI implementation, and qualitative assessment of HRI characteristics of the system. Furthermore, we present two illustrative experimental applications of the BCI-controlled arms, a study of motor imagery modalities on healthy individuals' BCI performance, and a pilot investigation on spinal cord injured patients' BCI control and brain connectivity. We discuss strengths and limitations of our design and propose further steps on development and neurophysiological study, including implementation of connectivity features as BCI modality. PMID:28948168

  18. A multi-level analysis of the effects of age and gender stereotypes on trust in anthropomorphic technology by younger and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Richard; McLaughlin, Anne Collins; Bass, Brock

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that gender stereotypes, elicited by the appearance of the anthropomorphic technology, can alter perceptions of system reliability. The current study examined whether stereotypes about the perceived age and gender of anthropomorphic technology interacted with reliability to affect trust in such technology. Participants included a cross-section of younger and older adults. Through a factorial survey, participants responded to health-related vignettes containing anthropomorphic technology with a specific age, gender, and level of past reliability by rating their trust in the system. Trust in the technology was affected by the age and gender of the user as well as its appearance and reliability. Perceptions of anthropomorphic technology can be affected by pre-existing stereotypes about the capability of a specific age or gender. The perceived age and gender of automation can alter perceptions of the anthropomorphic technology such as trust. Thus, designers of automation should design anthropomorphic interfaces with an awareness that the perceived age and gender will interact with the user’s age and gender

  19. Lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causing chemicals such as uranium, beryllium, vinyl chloride, nickel chromates, coal products, mustard gas, chloromethyl ethers, gasoline, and diesel exhaust Exposure to radon gas Family history of lung cancer ...

  20. Simulating effects of brain atrophy in longitudinal PET imaging with an anthropomorphic brain phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, L. S.; Axelsson, J.; Riklund, K.; Boraxbekk, C. J.

    2017-07-01

    In longitudinal positron emission tomography (PET), the presence of volumetric changes over time can lead to an overestimation or underestimation of the true changes in the quantified PET signal due to the partial volume effect (PVE) introduced by the limited spatial resolution of existing PET cameras and reconstruction algorithms. Here, a 3D-printed anthropomorphic brain phantom with attachable striata in three sizes was designed to enable controlled volumetric changes. Using a method to eliminate the non-radioactive plastic wall, and manipulating BP levels by adding different number of events from list-mode acquisitions, we investigated the artificial volume dependence of BP due to PVE, and potential bias arising from varying BP. Comparing multiple reconstruction algorithms we found that a high-resolution ordered-subsets maximization algorithm with spatially variant point-spread function resolution modeling provided the most accurate data. For striatum, the BP changed by 0.08% for every 1% volume change, but for smaller volumes such as the posterior caudate the artificial change in BP was as high as 0.7% per 1% volume change. A simple gross correction for striatal volume is unsatisfactory, as the amplitude of the PVE on the BP differs depending on where in the striatum the change occurred. Therefore, to correctly interpret age-related longitudinal changes in the BP, we must account for volumetric changes also within a structure, rather than across the whole volume. The present 3D-printing technology, combined with the wall removal method, can be implemented to gain knowledge about the predictable bias introduced by the PVE differences in uptake regions of varying shape.

  1. Anthropomorphic chest phantom imaging – The potential for dose creep in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, W.K.; Hogg, P.; Tootell, A.; Manning, D.; Thomas, N.; Kane, T.; Kelly, J.; McKenzie, M.; Kitching, J.

    2013-01-01

    For film-based radiography the operator had to be exact in the selection of acquisition parameters or the image could easily become under- or over-exposed. By contrast, digital technology allows for a much greater tolerance of acquisition factor selection which would still give an image of acceptable diagnostic quality. In turn this greater tolerance allows for the operator to increase effective dose for little or no penalty in image quality. The purpose of this article is to determine how image quality and lesion visibility vary with effective dose (E) in order to identify how much overexposure could be tolerated within the radiograph. Using an anthropomorphic chest phantom with ground glass lesions we determined how perceptual image quality and E varied over a wide range of acquisition conditions. Perceptual image quality comprised of image quality and lesion visibility. E was calculated using Monte Carlo method; image quality was determined using a two alternative forced choice (2AFC) method and the quality criteria were partly informed from European guidelines. Five clinicians with significant experience in image reading scored the images for quality (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.869). Image quality and lesion visibility had a close correlation (R 2 > 0.8). The tolerance for over-exposure, whilst still acquiring an image of acceptable quality, increases with decreasing kV and increasing source to image distance (SID). The maximum over-exposure factor (ratio of maximum E to minimum E that produce images of acceptable quality) possible was 139 (at 125 cm and 60 kV). Given the phantom had characteristics similar to the human thorax we propose that that potential for overexposure in a human whilst still obtaining an image of acceptable perceptual image quality is very high. Further research into overexposure tolerance and dose creep should be undertaken

  2. Lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorichter, S.

    2009-01-01

    The term lung function is often restricted to the assessment of volume time curves measured at the mouth. Spirometry includes the assessment of lung volumes which can be mobilised with the corresponding flow-volume curves. In addition, lung volumes that can not be mobilised, such as the residual volume, or only partially as FRC and TLC can be measured by body plethysmography combined with the determination of the airway resistance. Body plethysmography allows the correct positioning of forced breathing manoeuvres on the volume-axis, e.g. before and after pharmacotherapy. Adding the CO single breath transfer factor (T LCO ), which includes the measurement of the ventilated lung volume using He, enables a clear diagnosis of different obstructive, restrictive or mixed ventilatory defects with and without trapped air. Tests of reversibility and provocation, as well as the assessment of inspiratory mouth pressures (PI max , P 0.1 ) help to classify the underlying disorder and to clarify treatment strategies. For further information and to complete the diagnostic of disturbances of the ventilation, diffusion and/or perfusion (capillar-)arterial bloodgases at rest and under physical strain sometimes amended by ergospirometry are recommended. Ideally, lung function measurements are amended by radiological and nuclear medicine techniques. (orig.) [de

  3. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  4. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and ... is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among coal ...

  5. Lung radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    Indication or main clinical use of Lung radiopharmaceuticals is presented and clasification of radiopharmaceuticals as ventilation and perfusion studies. Perfusion radiopharmaceuticals, main controls for administration quality acceptance. Clearence after blood administration and main clinical applications. Ventilation radiopharmaceuticals, gases and aerosols, characteristics of a ideal radioaerosol, techniques of good inhalation procedure, clinical applications. Comparison of several radiopharmaceuticals reflering to retention time as 50% administered dose, percent administered dose at 6 hours post inhalation, blood activity at 30 and 60 minutes post inhalation, initial lung absorbed dose, cumulated activity.Kinetic description of two radiopharmaceuticals, 99mTcDTPA and 99mTc-PYP

  6. Experimental validation of a kV source model and dose computation method for CBCT imaging in an anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2016-07-08

    We present an experimental validation of a kilovoltage (kV) X-ray source characterization model in an anthropomorphic phantom to estimate patient-specific absorbed dose from kV cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging procedures and compare these doses to nominal weighted CT-dose index (CTDIw) dose estimates. We simulated the default Varian on-board imager 1.4 (OBI) default CBCT imaging protocols (i.e., standard-dose head, low-dose thorax, pelvis, and pelvis spotlight) using our previously developed and easy to implement X-ray point-source model and source characterization approach. We used this characterized source model to compute absorbed dose in homogeneous and anthropomorphic phantoms using our previously validated in-house kV dose computation software (kVDoseCalc). We compared these computed absorbed doses to doses derived from ionization chamber measurements acquired at several points in a homogeneous cylindrical phantom and from thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) placed in the anthropomorphic phantom. In the homogeneous cylindrical phantom, computed values of absorbed dose relative to the center of the phantom agreed with measured values within ≤2% of local dose, except in regions of high-dose gradient where the distance to agreement (DTA) was 2 mm. The computed absorbed dose in the anthropomorphic phantom generally agreed with TLD measurements, with an average percent dose difference ranging from 2.4% ± 6.0% to 5.7% ± 10.3%, depending on the characterized CBCT imaging protocol. The low-dose thorax and the standard dose scans showed the best and worst agreement, respectively. Our results also broadly agree with published values, which are approximately twice as high as the nominal CTDIw would suggest. The results demonstrate that our previously developed method for modeling and characterizing a kV X-ray source could be used to accurately assess patient-specific absorbed dose from kV CBCT procedures within reasonable accuracy, and serve as further

  7. Welders’ lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izidor Kern

    2010-02-01

    Conclusions: h is study coni rms that longterm welders may have symptoms with no functional disorders, but with prominent morphological changes. h e key to correct diagnosis is an occupational history of the patient. Diagnostic work-up includes funda-mental procedures in suspected interstitial lung disease. h e best therapy is cessation of exposure.

  8. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  9. A method to acquire CT organ dose map using OSL dosimeters and ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To present the design and procedure of an experimental method for acquiring densely sampled organ dose map for CT applications, based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters “nanoDots” and standard ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms; and to provide the results of applying the method—a dose data set with good statistics for the comparison with Monte Carlo simulation result in the future.Methods: A standard ATOM phantom has densely located holes (in 3 × 3 cm or 1.5 × 1.5 cm grids), which are too small (5 mm in diameter) to host many types of dosimeters, including the nanoDots. The authors modified the conventional way in which nanoDots are used, by removing the OSL disks from the holders before inserting them inside a standard ATOM phantom for dose measurements. The authors solved three technical difficulties introduced by this modification: (1) energy dependent dose calibration for raw OSL readings; (2) influence of the brief background exposure of OSL disks to dimmed room light; (3) correct pairing between the dose readings and measurement locations. The authors acquired 100 dose measurements at various positions in the phantom, which was scanned using a clinical chest protocol with both angular and z-axis tube current modulations.Results: Dose calibration was performed according to the beam qualities inside the phantom as determined from an established Monte Carlo model of the scanner. The influence of the brief exposure to dimmed room light was evaluated and deemed negligible. Pairing between the OSL readings and measurement locations was ensured by the experimental design. The organ doses measured for a routine adult chest scan protocol ranged from 9.4 to 18.8 mGy, depending on the composition, location, and surrounding anatomy of the organs. The dose distribution across different slices of the phantom strongly depended on the z-axis mA modulation. In the same slice, doses to the soft tissues other than the spinal cord demonstrated

  10. X-ray properties of an anthropomorphic breast phantom for MRI and x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, Melanie; Badal, Andreu; Jennings, Robert J; Myers, Kyle J; Badano, Aldo [Division of Imaging and Applied Mathematics, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, US Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002 (United States); Heras, Hugo de las, E-mail: melanie.freed@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Radiological Devices, Office of In Vitro Device Evaluation and Safety, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, US Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002 (United States)

    2011-06-21

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the x-ray properties of a dual-modality, anthropomorphic breast phantom whose MRI properties have been previously evaluated. The goal of this phantom is to provide a platform for optimization and standardization of two- and three-dimensional x-ray and MRI breast imaging modalities for the purpose of lesion detection and discrimination. The phantom is constructed using a mixture of lard and egg whites, resulting in a variable, tissue-mimicking structure with separate adipose- and glandular-mimicking components. The phantom can be produced with either a compressed or uncompressed shape. Mass attenuation coefficients of the phantom materials were estimated using elemental compositions from the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference and the atomic interaction models from the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE and compared with human values from the literature. The image structure was examined quantitatively by calculating and comparing spatial covariance matrices of the phantom and patient mammography images. Finally, a computerized version of the phantom was created by segmenting a computed tomography scan and used to simulate x-ray scatter of the phantom in a mammography geometry. Mass attenuation coefficients of the phantom materials were within 20% and 15% of the values for adipose and glandular tissues, respectively, which is within the estimation error of these values. Matching was improved at higher energies (>20 keV). Tissue structures in the phantom have a size similar to those in the patient data, but are slightly larger on average. Correlations in the patient data appear to be longer than those in the phantom data in the anterior-posterior direction; however, they are within the error bars of the measurement. Simulated scatter-to-primary ratio values of the phantom images were as high as 85% in some areas and were strongly affected by the heterogeneous nature of the phantom. Key physical x-ray properties of

  11. MO-FG-209-05: Towards a Feature-Based Anthropomorphic Model Observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avanaki, A.

    2016-06-15

    This symposium will review recent advances in the simulation methods for evaluation of novel breast imaging systems – the subject of AAPM Task Group TG234. Our focus will be on the various approaches to development and validation of software anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in the statistical assessment of novel imaging systems using such phantoms along with computational models for the x-ray image formation process. Due to the dynamic development and complex design of modern medical imaging systems, the simulation of anatomical structures, image acquisition modalities, and the image perception and analysis offers substantial benefits of reduced cost, duration, and radiation exposure, as well as the known ground-truth and wide variability in simulated anatomies. For these reasons, Virtual Clinical Trials (VCTs) have been increasingly accepted as a viable tool for preclinical assessment of x-ray and other breast imaging methods. Activities of TG234 have encompassed the optimization of protocols for simulation studies, including phantom specifications, the simulated data representation, models of the imaging process, and statistical assessment of simulated images. The symposium will discuss the state-of-the-science of VCTs for novel breast imaging systems, emphasizing recent developments and future directions. Presentations will discuss virtual phantoms for intermodality breast imaging performance comparisons, extension of the breast anatomy simulation to the cellular level, optimized integration of the simulated imaging chain, and the novel directions in the observer models design. Learning Objectives: Review novel results in developing and applying virtual phantoms for inter-modality breast imaging performance comparisons; Discuss the efforts to extend the computer simulation of breast anatomy and pathology to the cellular level; Summarize the state of the science in optimized integration of modules in the simulated imaging chain; Compare novel directions

  12. Skin Dosimetry in Breast Teletherapy on a Phantom Anthropomorphic and Anthropometric Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista Nogueira, Luciana; Lemos Silva, Hugo Leonardo; Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the breast teletherapy dosimetry. The goal is to evaluate and compare absorbed doses in equivalent skin tissue, TE-skin, of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric breast phantom submitted to breast radiotherapy. The methodology involved the reproduction of a set of tomographic images of the phantom; the elaboration of conformational radiotherapy planning in the SOMAVISION and CadPlan (TPS) software; and the synthetic breast irradiation by parallel opposed fields in 3D conformal teletherapy at 6 MV linear accelerator Clinac-2100 C from VARIAN with prescribed dose (PD) of 180 cGy to the target volume (PTV), referent to the glandular tissue. Radiochromic films EBT2 were selected as dosimeters. Two independent calibration processes of films with solid water Gammex 457 plates and water filled box were produced. Curves of optical density (OD) versus absorbed dose were produced. Dosimeters were positioned in the external region of the breast phantom in contact with TE-skin, area of 4.0 cm 2 each. The irradiation process was prepared in duplicate to check the reproducibility of the technique. The radiochromic films were scanned and their response in RGB (Red, Green, Blue) analyzed by the ImageJ software. The optical density was obtained and converted to dose based on the calibration curves. Thus, the spatial dose distribution in the skin was reproduced. The absorbed doses measured on the radiochromic films in TE-skin showed values between upper and lower quadrants at 9 o'clock in the range of 54% of PD, between the upper and lower quadrants 3 o'clock in the range of 72% and 6 o'clock at the lower quadrant in the range of 68 % of PD. The values are ±64% (p <0.05) according to the TPS. It is concluded that the depth dose measured in solid water plates or water box reproduce equivalent dose values for both calibration processes of the radiochromic films. It was observed that the skin received doses ranging from 50% to 78% of the prescribed

  13. Kinematics and shoulder belt position of child anthropomorphic test devices during steering maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, Isabelle; Bohman, Katarina; Jakobsson, Lotta

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify and compare the kinematics and shoulder belt position of child anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) during emergency steering maneuvers. Furthermore, the ATDs were compared to the results from child volunteers aged 4 to 12 in the same test setup (Bohman, Stockman, et al. 2011). A driving study was conducted on a test track comprising 4 ATDs: the Q6, Q10, and Hybrid III (HIII) 6- and 10-year-old ATDs restrained in the rear seat of a passenger vehicle. The ATDs were exposed to 2 repeated steering maneuvers in each restraint system. The Q6 and HIII 6-year-old were restrained on booster cushions as well as high-back booster seats. The Q10 and HIII 10-year-old were restrained on booster cushions or restrained by 3-point seat belts directly on the seat. Lateral motion of the forehead and upper sternum was determined, as well as shoulder belt movement on shoulder and torso tilting angle. All ATDs began to move approximately at the same point in time corresponding to a vehicle lateral acceleration of just below 0.2 g. In the later phase of the maneuver, Q10 had moved 26 percent less than the children when restrained by seat belt only and 35 percent less when on a booster cushion. Corresponding numbers for the HIII 10-year-old were 43 and 44 percent higher than for children. Compared to children, the Q6 had moved 34 percent less when restrained on a high-back booster seat and 31 percent less when on a booster cushion. Corresponding numbers for HIII 6-year-old were 7 and 28 percent higher than for children. Due to extensive variety of lateral displacements observed in the children, child performance range covers both ATD families for the evaluated sizes of 6- and 10-year-old ATDs. Compared to children, the HIII ATDs were closer with regards to mean values in the initial phase of the maneuver and the Q ATDs were closer in the end of the ramping phase of the lateral acceleration. The question regarding which ATD replicates better the

  14. Skin Dosimetry in Breast Teletherapy on a Phantom Anthropomorphic and Anthropometric Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista Nogueira, Luciana [Anatomy and Imaging Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Lemos Silva, Hugo Leonardo [Santa Casa Hospital, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio [Nuclear Engineering Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper addresses the breast teletherapy dosimetry. The goal is to evaluate and compare absorbed doses in equivalent skin tissue, TE-skin, of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric breast phantom submitted to breast radiotherapy. The methodology involved the reproduction of a set of tomographic images of the phantom; the elaboration of conformational radiotherapy planning in the SOMAVISION and CadPlan (TPS) software; and the synthetic breast irradiation by parallel opposed fields in 3D conformal teletherapy at 6 MV linear accelerator Clinac-2100 C from VARIAN with prescribed dose (PD) of 180 cGy to the target volume (PTV), referent to the glandular tissue. Radiochromic films EBT2 were selected as dosimeters. Two independent calibration processes of films with solid water Gammex 457 plates and water filled box were produced. Curves of optical density (OD) versus absorbed dose were produced. Dosimeters were positioned in the external region of the breast phantom in contact with TE-skin, area of 4.0 cm{sup 2} each. The irradiation process was prepared in duplicate to check the reproducibility of the technique. The radiochromic films were scanned and their response in RGB (Red, Green, Blue) analyzed by the ImageJ software. The optical density was obtained and converted to dose based on the calibration curves. Thus, the spatial dose distribution in the skin was reproduced. The absorbed doses measured on the radiochromic films in TE-skin showed values between upper and lower quadrants at 9 o'clock in the range of 54% of PD, between the upper and lower quadrants 3 o'clock in the range of 72% and 6 o'clock at the lower quadrant in the range of 68 % of PD. The values are ±64% (p <0.05) according to the TPS. It is concluded that the depth dose measured in solid water plates or water box reproduce equivalent dose values for both calibration processes of the radiochromic films. It was observed that the skin received doses ranging from 50% to 78% of the

  15. An anthropomorphic transhumeral prosthesis socket developed based on an oscillometric pump and controlled by force-sensitive resistor pressure signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, N A Abd; Gholizadeh, H; Hasnan, N; Osman, N A Abu; Fadzil, S S Mohd; Hashim, N A

    2017-02-01

    While considering the importance of the interface between amputees and prosthesis sockets, we study an anthropomorphic prosthesis socket whose size can be dynamically changed according to the requirements of the residual limb. First, we introduce the structure and function of the anthropomorphic prosthesis socket. Second, we study the dynamic model of the prosthesis system and analyze the dynamic characteristics of the prosthesis socket system, the inputs of an oscillometric pump, and the control mechanism of force-sensitive resistor (FSR) pressure signals. Experiments on 10 healthy subjects using the designed system yield an average detection result between 102 and 112 kPa for the FSR pressure sensor and 39 and 41 kPa for the oscillometric pump. Results show the function of the FSR pressure signal in maintaining the contact pressure between the sockets and the residual limb. The potential development of an auto-adjusted socket that uses an oscillometric pump system will provide prosthetic sockets with controllable contact pressure at the residual limb. Moreover, this development is an attractive research area for researchers involved in rehabilitation engineering, prosthetics, and orthotics.

  16. Third generation anthropomorphic physical phantom for mammography and DBT: incorporating voxelized 3D printing and uniform chest wall QC region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Christine; Solomon, Justin; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Gehm, Michael E.; Catenacci, Matthew; Wiley, Benjamin J.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2017-03-01

    Physical breast phantoms provide a standard method to test, optimize, and develop clinical mammography systems, including new digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems. In previous work, we produced an anthropomorphic phantom based on 500x500x500 μm breast CT data using commercial 3D printing. We now introduce an improved phantom based on a new cohort of virtual models with 155x155x155 μm voxels and fabricated through voxelized 3D printing and dithering, which confer higher resolution and greater control over contrast. This new generation includes a uniform chest wall extension for evaluating conventional QC metrics. The uniform region contains a grayscale step wedge, chest wall coverage markers, fiducial markers, spheres, and metal ink stickers of line pairs and edges to assess contrast, resolution, artifact spread function, MTF, and other criteria. We also experimented with doping photopolymer material with calcium, iodine, and zinc to increase our current contrast. In particular, zinc was discovered to significantly increase attenuation beyond 100% breast density with a linear relationship between zinc concentration and attenuation or breast density. This linear relationship was retained when the zinc-doped material was applied in conjunction with 3D printing. As we move towards our long term goal of phantoms that are indistinguishable from patients, this new generation of anthropomorphic physical breast phantom validates our voxelized printing process, demonstrates the utility of a uniform QC region with features from 3D printing and metal ink stickers, and shows potential for improved contrast via doping.

  17. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxi...... II trials, but results from large phase III trials are necessary in order to measure the impact of these new agents in the management of NSCLC. Major improvements of therapy for mesothelioma have not occurred within the last year....

  18. Hyperlucent lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Gutierrez, Florana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel E.

    2007-01-01

    Unilateral hyperlucent lung is also known as Swyer-James Syndrome, Macleod Syndrome or lobular or unilateral emphysema. It is an uncommon disease characterized by lung or unilateral lobe hiperlucency associated to an air trapping upon expiration. As regards to etiology, this syndrome is considered to be an acquired disease that appears secondary to respiratory infections during the early years of life, probably bronchiolitis and/ or viral pneumonia. The clinical presentation varies among patients. Some of them are asymptomatic, others present a history of recurrent episodes of pulmonary infections from early years of life or present effort dyspnea. The diagnosis is usually made accidentally by a chest radiograph in a child with history of respiratory infections or in an adult during a routine chest x- ray in an asymptomatic person. It is important to differentiate this syndrome from other causes of unilateral pulmonary hiperlucency on conventional chest x-rays. Few cases of Swyer-James Syndrome in children have been reported, it is presented the clinical case of a patient who had a parainfluenza 3 bronchopneumonia when he was a month and eighteen days of age. The differential diagnosis of this syndrome should be done with other thoracic entities that diminish the radiological pulmonary unilateral density. A case of a child who is the bearer of hyperlucent lung is described. (author) [es

  19. Use of Anthropomorphic Brand Mascots for Student Motivation and Engagement: A Promotional Case Study with Pablo the Penguin at the University of Portsmouth Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, David E.; Thompson, Paula

    2016-01-01

    A case study demonstrating how an online narrative featuring the adventures of a cuddly toy penguin, Pablo Penguin (@uoppenguin on Twitter) has been introduced at the University of Portsmouth Library to build trust and engagement between university students and library services and facilities. Evidence for the benefits of anthropomorphic brand…

  20. Construction of a anthropomorphic phantom for dose measurement in hands in brachytherapy procedures; Construccion de un fantoma antropomorfico para mediciones de dosis en manos en procedimientos de braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, Cinthia M., E-mail: cinthia_papp@yahoo.com.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (IH/UNCUYO/CNEA), Mendoza (Argentina). Universidad Nacional de Cuyo. Instituto Balseiro; Ortiz, Arnulfo; Alvarez, Guillermo, E-mail: arnot@gmail.com, E-mail: galvarez@fuesmen.edu.ar [Fundacion Escuela de Medicina Nuclear (FUESMEN), Mendoza (Argentina)

    2013-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to show the differences between the dose value measured by dosimeter endpoint and the values measured in different points inside the hand during brachytherapy procedures. For this, the procedures involved in the handling of sources were analyzed and the simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom hand.

  1. How Lungs Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health and Diseases > How Lungs Work How Lungs Work The Respiratory System Your lungs are part of ... Parts of the Respiratory System and How They Work Airways SINUSES are hollow spaces in the bones ...

  2. Lung diffusion testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003854.htm Lung diffusion testing To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lung diffusion testing measures how well the lungs exchange gases. This ...

  3. An Optimal Design of Driving Mechanism in a 1 Degree of Freedom (d.o.f. Anthropomorphic Finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ceccarelli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms can be used in finger design to obtain suitable actuation systems and to give stiff robust behavior in grasping tasks. The design of driving mechanisms for fingers has been attached at LARM in Cassino with the aim to obtain one degree of freedom actuation for an anthropomorphic finger. The dimensional design of a finger-driving mechanism has been formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem by using evaluation criteria for fundamental characteristics regarding with finger motion, grasping equilibrium and force transmission. The feasibility of the herein proposed optimum design procedure for a finger-driving mechanism has been tested by numerical examples that have been also used to enhance a prototype previously built at LARM in Cassino.

  4. Computational voxel phantom, associated to anthropometric and anthropomorphic real phantom for dosimetry in human male pelvis radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Cleuza Helena Teixeira; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses a computational model of voxels through MCNP5 Code and the experimental development of an anthropometric and anthropomorphic phantom for dosimetry in human male pelvis brachytherapy focusing prostatic tumors. For elaboration of the computational model of the human male pelvis, anatomical section images from the Visible Man Project were applied. Such selected and digital images were associated to a numeric representation, one for each section. Such computational representation of the anatomical sections was transformed into a bi-dimensional mesh of equivalent tissue. The group of bidimensional meshes was concatenated forming the three-dimensional model of voxels to be used by the MCNP5 code. In association to the anatomical information, data from the density and chemical composition of the basic elements, representatives of the organs and involved tissues, were setup in a material database for the MCNP-5. The model will be applied for dosimetric evaluations in situations of irradiation of the human masculine pelvis. Such 3D model of voxel is associated to the code of transport of particles MCNP5, allowing future simulations. It was also developed the construction of human masculine pelvis phantom, based on anthropometric and anthropomorphic dates and in the use of representative equivalent tissues of the skin, fatty, muscular and glandular tissue, as well as the bony structure.This part of work was developed in stages, being built the bony cast first, later the muscular structures and internal organs. They were then jointly mounted and inserted in the skin cast. The representative component of the fatty tissue was incorporate and accomplished the final retouchings in the skin. The final result represents the development of two important essential tools for elaboration of computational and experimental dosimetry. Thus, it is possible its use in calibrations of pre-existent protocols in radiotherapy, as well as for tests of new protocols, besides

  5. Effect of titanium dental implants on proton therapy delivered for head tumors: experimental validation using an anthropomorphic head phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oancea, C.; Shipulin, K.; Mytsin, G.; Molokanov, A.; Niculae, D.; Ambrožová, I.; Davídková, M.

    2017-01-01

    A dosimetric experiment was performed at the Medico-Technical Complex in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, to investigate the effects of metallic dental implants in the treatment of head and neck tumours with proton therapy. The goal of the study was to evaluate the 2D dose distributions of different clinical treatment plans measured in an anthropomorphic phantom, and compare them to predictions from a treatment planning system. The anthropomorphic phantom was sliced into horizontal segments. Two grade 4 Titanium implants were inserted between 2 slices, corresponding to a maxillary area. GafChromic EBT2 films were placed between the segments containing the implants to measure the 2D delivered dose. Two different targets were designed: the first target includes the dental implants in the isocentre, and in the second target, the proton beam is delivered through the implants, which are located at the entrance region of the Bragg curve. The experimental results were compared to the treatment plans made using our custom 3D Treatment Planning System, named RayTreat. To quantitatively determine differences in the isodose distributions (measured and calculated), the gamma index (3 mm, 3%) was calculated for each target for the matrix value in the region of high isodose (> 90%): for the experimental setup, which includes the implants in the SOBP region, the result obtained was 84.3%. When the implants were localised in the entrance region of the Bragg curve, the result obtained was 86.4%. In conclusion, the uncertainties introduced by the clinically planned dose distribution are beyond reasonable limits. The linear energy transfer spectra in close proximity to the implants were investigated using solid state nuclear track detectors (TED). Scattered particles outside the target were detected.

  6. Effect of titanium dental implants on proton therapy delivered for head tumors: experimental validation using an anthropomorphic head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oancea, C.; Shipulin, K.; Mytsin, G.; Molokanov, A.; Niculae, D.; Ambrožová, I.; Davídková, M.

    2017-03-01

    A dosimetric experiment was performed at the Medico-Technical Complex in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, to investigate the effects of metallic dental implants in the treatment of head and neck tumours with proton therapy. The goal of the study was to evaluate the 2D dose distributions of different clinical treatment plans measured in an anthropomorphic phantom, and compare them to predictions from a treatment planning system. The anthropomorphic phantom was sliced into horizontal segments. Two grade 4 Titanium implants were inserted between 2 slices, corresponding to a maxillary area. GafChromic EBT2 films were placed between the segments containing the implants to measure the 2D delivered dose. Two different targets were designed: the first target includes the dental implants in the isocentre, and in the second target, the proton beam is delivered through the implants, which are located at the entrance region of the Bragg curve. The experimental results were compared to the treatment plans made using our custom 3D Treatment Planning System, named RayTreat. To quantitatively determine differences in the isodose distributions (measured and calculated), the gamma index (3 mm, 3%) was calculated for each target for the matrix value in the region of high isodose (> 90%): for the experimental setup, which includes the implants in the SOBP region, the result obtained was 84.3%. When the implants were localised in the entrance region of the Bragg curve, the result obtained was 86.4%. In conclusion, the uncertainties introduced by the clinically planned dose distribution are beyond reasonable limits. The linear energy transfer spectra in close proximity to the implants were investigated using solid state nuclear track detectors (TED). Scattered particles outside the target were detected.

  7. Extravascular Lung Water and Acute Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Maharaj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury carries a high burden of morbidity and mortality and is characterised by nonhydrostatic pulmonary oedema. The aim of this paper is to highlight the role of accurate quantification of extravascular lung water in diagnosis, management, and prognosis in “acute lung injury” and “acute respiratory distress syndrome”. Several studies have verified the accuracy of both the single and the double transpulmonary thermal indicator techniques. Both experimental and clinical studies were searched in PUBMED using the term “extravascular lung water” and “acute lung injury”. Extravascular lung water measurement offers information not otherwise available by other methods such as chest radiography, arterial blood gas, and chest auscultation at the bedside. Recent data have highlighted the role of extravascular lung water in response to treatment to guide fluid therapy and ventilator strategies. The quantification of extravascular lung water may predict mortality and multiorgan dysfunction. The limitations of the dilution method are also discussed.

  8. Intersections of lung progenitor cells, lung disease and lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla F. Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cell biology approaches to study adult lung progenitor cells and lung cancer has brought a variety of new techniques to the field of lung biology and has elucidated new pathways that may be therapeutic targets in lung cancer. Recent results have begun to identify the ways in which different cell populations interact to regulate progenitor activity, and this has implications for the interventions that are possible in cancer and in a variety of lung diseases. Today's better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate lung progenitor cell self-renewal and differentiation, including understanding how multiple epigenetic factors affect lung injury repair, holds the promise for future better treatments for lung cancer and for optimising the response to therapy in lung cancer. Working between platforms in sophisticated organoid culture techniques, genetically engineered mouse models of injury and cancer, and human cell lines and specimens, lung progenitor cell studies can begin with basic biology, progress to translational research and finally lead to the beginnings of clinical trials.

  9. Lung needle biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you have certain lung diseases such as emphysema. Usually, a collapsed lung after a biopsy does not need treatment. But ... any type Bullae (enlarged alveoli that occur with emphysema) Cor pulmonale (condition ... of the lung High blood pressure in the lung arteries Severe ...

  10. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experience complications from follow-up tests. For this reason, lung cancer screening is offered to people who are in ... is more likely to be cancerous. For that reason, you might be referred to a lung ... problems. Your lung cancer screening test may detect other lung and heart ...

  11. ADAM: A breathing phantom for lung SBRT quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallotta, Stefania; Calusi, Silvia; Foggi, Leonardo; Lisci, Riccardo; Masi, Laura; Marrazzo, Livia; Talamonti, Cinzia; Livi, Lorenzo; Simontacchi, Gabriele

    2017-07-20

    Radiotherapy treatment of moving lesions is a challenging task in which different strategies can be used to adequately treat the tumor while sparing the surrounding tissue. The complexity of these strategies requires accurate and appropriate quality assurance tests. For this purpose, ADAM (Anthropomorphic Dynamic breAthing Model), a new phantom which simulates realistic patient breathing, was developed aiming to test the image quality and dose delivery in lung cancer treatments. ADAM reproduces a male torso complete with a moving anterior chest wall and internal parts. The phantom's external body is printed with a 3D printer using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene. Internal lungs, ribs, spinal cord, and lung tumor (LT) are made of materials that simulate human tissues. Driven by an Arduino programmable board, the lungs can move along linear or elliptical paths while the anterior chest wall moves up and down. Phantom features and usability, reproducibility of LT position in the phantom chest, internal and external motion repeatability and tumor-to-surface motion correlation were investigated. Hounsfield Units of the employed materials demonstrates the phantom adequately simulates human tissues. Tests performed with the Synchrony system confirm ADAM's suitability for respiratory internal tracking. Reproducibility of the internal structure position is within 1mm as are internal and external motion repeatability. A strong positive correlation is found between the lung and chest wall positions (R 2 =0.999). ADAM demonstrates to be suitable to be employed with gating and tracking devices used in the treatment of moving lesions. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Accuracy of fully automated, quantitative, volumetric measurement of the amount of fibroglandular breast tissue using MRI: correlation with anthropomorphic breast phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengert, Georg J; Pinker, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H; Vogl, Wolf-Dieter; Spijker, Sylvia M; Bickel, Hubert; Polanec, Stephan H; Baltzer, Pascal A

    2017-06-01

    To demonstrate the accuracy of fully automated, quantitative, volumetric measurement of the amount of fibroglandular breast tissue (FGT), using MRI, and to investigate the impact of different MRI sequences using anthropomorphic breast phantoms as the ground truth. In this study, 10 anthropomorphic breast phantoms that consisted of different known fractions of adipose and protein tissue, which closely resembled normal breast parenchyma, were developed. Anthropomorphic breast phantoms were imaged with a 1.5 T unit (Siemens, Avantofit) using an 18-channel breast coil. The sequence protocol consisted of an isotropic Dixon sequence (Di), an anisotropic Dixon sequence (Da), and T 1 3D FLASH sequences with and without fat saturation (T1). Fully automated, quantitative, volumetric measurement of FGT for all anthropomorphic phantoms and sequences was performed and correlated with the amounts of fatty and protein components in the phantoms as the ground truth. Fully automated, quantitative, volumetric measurements of FGT with MRI for all sequences ranged from 5.86 to 61.05% (mean 33.36%). The isotropic Dixon sequence yielded the highest accuracy (median 0.51%-0.78%) and precision (median range 0.19%) compared with anisotropic Dixon (median 1.92%-2.09%; median range 0.55%) and T 1 -weighted sequences (median 2.54%-2.46%; median range 0.82%). All sequences yielded good correlation with the FGT content of the anthropomorphic phantoms. The best correlation of FGT measurements was identified for Dixon sequences (Di, R 2  = 0.999; Da, R 2  = 0.998) compared with conventional T 1 -weighted sequences (R 2  = 0.971). MRI yields accurate, fully automated, quantitative, volumetric measurements of FGT, an increasingly important and sensitive imaging biomarker for breast cancer risk. Compared with conventional T 1 sequences, Dixon-type sequences show the highest correlation and reproducibility for automated, quantitative, volumetric FGT measurements using anthropomorphic breast

  13. Development of pathological anthropomorphic models using 3D modelling techniques for numerical dosimetry; Desenvolvimento de modelos antropomorficos patologicos usando tecnicas de modelagem 3D para dosimetria numerica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Kleber Souza Silva [Faculdade Integrada de Pernambuco (FACIPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Barbosa, Antonio Konrado de Santana; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    Computational exposure models can be used to estimate human body absorbed dose in a series of situations such as X-Ray exams for diagnosis, accidents and medical treatments. These models are fundamentally composed of an anthropomorphic simulator (phantom), an algorithm that simulates a radioactive source and a Monte Carlo Code. The accuracy of data obtained in the simulation is strongly connected to the adequacy of such simulation to the real situation. The phantoms are one of the key factors for the researcher manipulation. They are generally developed in supine position and its anatomy is patronized by compiled data from international institutions such as ICRP or ICRU. Several pathologies modify the structure of organs and body tissues. In order to measure how significant these alterations are, an anthropomorphic model was developed for this study: patient mastectomies. This model was developed using voxel phantom FASH and then coupled with EGSnrc Monte Carlo code

  14. Lung growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Suchita; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2007-12-01

    Human lung growth starts as a primitive lung bud in early embryonic life and undergoes several morphological stages which continue into postnatal life. Each stage of lung growth is a result of complex and tightly regulated events governed by physical, environmental, hormonal and genetic factors. Fetal lung liquid and fetal breathing movements are by far the most important determinants of lung growth. Although timing of the stages of lung growth in animals do not mimic that of human, numerous animal studies, mainly on sheep and rat, have given us a better understanding of the regulators of lung growth. Insight into the genetic basis of lung growth has helped us understand and improve management of complex life threatening congenital abnormalities such as congenital diaphragmatic hernia and pulmonary hypoplasia. Although advances in perinatal medicine have improved survival of preterm infants, premature birth is perhaps still the most important factor for adverse lung growth.

  15. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  16. Initial implementation of the conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density in tissue inhomogeneity corrections: An anthropomorphic phantom study of radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi [Division of Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan); Noto, Yoshiyuki [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital, Niigata 951-8520 (Japan); Sasamoto, Ryuta; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi, E-mail: masaito@clg.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To achieve accurate tissue inhomogeneity corrections in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide range of ρ{sub e}. The purpose of this study is to present an initial implementation of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method for a treatment planning system (TPS). In this paper, two example radiotherapy plans are used to evaluate the reliability of dose calculations in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method. Methods: CT images were acquired using a clinical dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with two tube potential pairs and an additional tin (Sn) filter for the high-kV tube (80–140 kV/Sn and 100–140 kV/Sn). Single-energy CT using the same DSCT scanner was also performed at 120 kV to compare the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method with a conventional conversion from a CT number to ρ{sub e} (Hounsfield units, HU–ρ{sub e} conversion). Lookup tables for ρ{sub e} calibration were obtained from the CT image acquisitions for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom (EDP). To investigate the beam-hardening effect on dosimetric uncertainties, two EDPs with different sizes (a body EDP and a head EDP) were used for the ρ{sub e} calibration. Each acquired lookup table was applied to two radiotherapy plans designed using the XiO TPS with the superposition algorithm for an anthropomorphic phantom. The first radiotherapy plan was for an oral cavity tumor and the second was for a lung tumor. Results: In both treatment plans, the performance of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion was superior to that of the conventional HU–ρ{sub e} conversion in terms of the reliability of dose calculations. Especially, for the oral tumor plan, which dealt with dentition and bony structures, treatment

  17. Investigation of the THOR Anthropomorphic Test Device for Predicting Occupant Injuries during Spacecraft Launch Abort and Landing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey T. Somers

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate new methods for predicting injury from expected spaceflight dynamic loads by leveraging a broader range of available information in injury biomechanics. Although all spacecraft designs were considered, the primary focus was the NASA Orion capsule, as the authors have the most knowledge and experience related to this design. The team defined a list of critical injuries and selected the Test Device for Human Occupant Restraint (THOR anthropomorphic test device (ATD as the basis for new standards and requirements. In addition, the team down selected the list of available injury metrics to the following: head injury criteria (HIC 15, kinematic rotational brain injury criteria (BRIC, neck axial tension and compression force, maximum chest deflection, lateral shoulder force and displacement, acetabular lateral force, thoracic spine axial compression force, ankle moments, and average distal forearm speed limits. The team felt that these metrics capture all of the injuries that might be expected by a seated crewmember during vehicle aborts and landings. Using previously determined injury risk levels for nominal and off-nominal landings, appropriate injury assessment reference values (IARVs were defined for each metric. Musculoskeletal deconditioning due to exposure to reduced gravity over time can affect injury risk during landing; therefore a deconditioning factor was applied to all IARVs. Although there are appropriate injury data for each anatomical region of interest, additional research is needed for several metrics to improve the confidence score.

  18. Radiation Pattern Measurement of a Low-Profile Wearable Antenna Using an Optical Fibre and a Solid Anthropomorphic Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Hong Loh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study into radiation pattern measurements of an electrically small dielectric resonator antenna (DRA operating between 2.4 and 2.5 GHz in the industrial, scientific and medical (ISM radio band for body-centric wireless communication applications. To eliminate the distortion of the radiation pattern associated with the unwanted radiation from a metallic coaxial cable feeding the antenna we have replaced it with a fibre optic feed and an electro-optical (EO transducer. The optical signal is then converted back to RF using an Opto-Electric Field Sensor (OEFS system. To ensure traceable measurements of the radiation pattern performance of the wearable antenna a generic head and torso solid anthropomorphic phantom model has been employed. Furthermore, to illustrate the benefits of the method, numerical simulations of the co-polar and cross-polar H-plane radiation patterns at 2.4, 2.45, and 2.5 GHz are compared with the measured results obtained using: (i an optical fibre; and (ii a metallic coaxial cable.

  19. Mind-Reading and Behavior-Reading against Agents with and without Anthropomorphic Features in a Competitive Situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Terada

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Humans use two distinct cognitive strategies separately to understand and predict other humans' behavior. One is mind-reading, in which an internal state such as an intention or an emotional state is assumed to be a source of a variety of behaviors. The other is behavior-reading, in which an actor's behavior is modeled based on stimulus-response associations without assuming internal states behind the behavior. We hypothesize that anthropomorphic features are key for an observer switching between these two cognitive strategies in a competitive situation. We provide support for this hypothesis through two studies using four agents with different appearances. We show that only a human agent was thought to possess both the ability to generate a variety of behaviors and internal mental states, such as minds and emotions (Study 1. We also show that humans used mixed (opposing strategies against a human agent and exploitative strategies against the agents with mechanical appearances when they played a repeated zero-sum game (Study 2. Our findings show that humans understand that human behavior is varied; that humans have internal states, such as minds and emotions; that the behavior of machines is governed by a limited number of fixed rules; and that machines do not possess internal mental states. Our findings also suggest that the function of mind-reading is to trigger a strategy for use against agents with variable behavior and that humans exploit others who lack behavioral variability based on behavior-reading in a competitive situation.

  20. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Jaekel, Oliver [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  1. Measurement of entrance surface dose on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a miniature fiber-optic dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Dayeong; Hong, Seunghan; Sim, Hyeok In; Kim, Seon Geun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Youn, Won Sik; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-04-01

    A miniature fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD) system was fabricated using a plastic scintillating fiber, a plastic optical fiber, and a multi-pixel photon counter to measure real-time entrance surface dose (ESD) during radiation diagnosis. Under varying exposure parameters of a digital radiography (DR) system, we measured the scintillating light related to the ESD using the sensing probe of the FOD, which was placed at the center of the beam field on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Also, we obtained DR images using a flat panel detector of the DR system to evaluate the effects of the dosimeter on image artifacts during posteroanterior (PA) chest radiography. From the experimental results, the scintillation output signals of the FOD were similar to the ESDs including backscatter simultaneously obtained using a semiconductor dosimeter. We demonstrated that the proposed miniature FOD can be used to measure real-time ESDs with minimization of DR image artifacts in the X-ray energy range of diagnostic radiology.

  2. Measurement of Entrance Surface Dose on an Anthropomorphic Thorax Phantom Using a Miniature Fiber-Optic Dosimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook Jae Yoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A miniature fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD system was fabricated using a plastic scintillating fiber, a plastic optical fiber, and a multi-pixel photon counter to measure real-time entrance surface dose (ESD during radiation diagnosis. Under varying exposure parameters of a digital radiography (DR system, we measured the scintillating light related to the ESD using the sensing probe of the FOD, which was placed at the center of the beam field on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Also, we obtained DR images using a flat panel detector of the DR system to evaluate the effects of the dosimeter on image artifacts during posteroanterior (PA chest radiography. From the experimental results, the scintillation output signals of the FOD were similar to the ESDs including backscatter simultaneously obtained using a semiconductor dosimeter. We demonstrated that the proposed miniature FOD can be used to measure real-time ESDs with minimization of DR image artifacts in the X-ray energy range of diagnostic radiology.

  3. Constructive anthropomorphism: a functional evolutionary approach to the study of human-like cognitive mechanisms in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbilly, Michal; Lotem, Arnon

    2017-10-25

    Anthropomorphism, the attribution of human cognitive processes and emotional states to animals, is commonly viewed as non-scientific and potentially misleading. This is mainly because apparent similarity to humans can usually be explained by alternative, simpler mechanisms in animals, and because there is no explanatory power in analogies to human phenomena when these phenomena are not well understood. Yet, because it is also difficult to preclude real similarity and continuity in the evolution of humans' and animals' cognitive abilities, it may not be productive to completely ignore our understanding of human behaviour when thinking about animals. Here we propose that in applying a functional approach to the evolution of cognitive mechanisms, human cognition may be used to broaden our theoretical thinking and to generate testable hypotheses. Our goal is not to 'elevate' animals, but rather to find the minimal set of mechanistic principles that may explain 'advanced' cognitive abilities in humans, and consider under what conditions these mechanisms were likely to enhance fitness and to evolve in animals. We illustrate this approach, from relatively simple emotional states, to more advanced mechanisms, involved in planning and decision-making, episodic memory, metacognition, theory of mind, and consciousness. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. Investigation of the THOR Anthropomorphic Test Device for Predicting Occupant Injuries during Spacecraft Launch Aborts and Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Jeffrey T.; Newby, Nathaniel; Lawrence, Charles; DeWeese, Richard; Moorcroft, David; Phelps, Shean

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate new methods for predicting injury from expected spaceflight dynamic loads by leveraging a broader range of available information in injury biomechanics. Although all spacecraft designs were considered, the primary focus was the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Orion capsule, as the authors have the most knowledge and experience related to this design. The team defined a list of critical injuries and selected the THOR anthropomorphic test device as the basis for new standards and requirements. In addition, the team down-selected the list of available injury metrics to the following: head injury criteria 15, kinematic brain rotational injury criteria, neck axial tension and compression force, maximum chest deflection, lateral shoulder force and displacement, acetabular lateral force, thoracic spine axial compression force, ankle moments, and average distal forearm speed limits. The team felt that these metrics capture all of the injuries that might be expected by a seated crewmember during vehicle aborts and landings. Using previously determined injury risk levels for nominal and off-nominal landings, appropriate injury assessment reference values (IARVs) were defined for each metric. Musculoskeletal deconditioning due to exposure to reduced gravity over time can affect injury risk during landing; therefore a deconditioning factor was applied to all IARVs. Although there are appropriate injury data for each anatomical region of interest, additional research is needed for several metrics to improve the confidence score. PMID:25152879

  5. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas, Raya R; Hünemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Radiation dose evaluation in head and neck MDCT examinations with a 6-year-old child anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo; Fujii, Keisuke; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Yamauchi, Masato

    2010-07-01

    CT examinations of the head and neck are the most commonly performed CT studies in children, raising concern about radiation dose and their risks to children. The purpose of this study was to clarify radiation dose levels for children of 6 years of age undergoing head and neck multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations. Radiation doses were measured with small-sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters that were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within a standard 6-year-old anthropomorphic phantom. Organ and effective doses of brain CT were evaluated for 19 protocols in nine hospitals on various (2-320 detector rows) MDCT scanners. The maximum value of mean organ dose in brain CT was 34.3 mGy for brain. Maximum values of mean doses for the radiosensitive lens and thyroid were 32.7 mGy for lens in brain CT and 17.2 mGy for thyroid in neck CT. seventy-fifth percentile of effective dose distribution in brain CT was approximately the same as the diagnostic reference level (DRL) in the 2003 UK survey. The results of this study would encourage revision of MDCT protocols in pediatric head and neck CT examinations for dose reduction and protocol standardization.

  7. Radiation dose evaluation in head and neck MDCT examinations with a 6-year-old child anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji [Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, School of Health Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Fujii, Keisuke [Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, School of Health Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiological Protection, Chiba (Japan); Yamauchi, Masato [Aichi Medical University Hospital, Division of Radiology, Nagakute-cho, Aichi-gun, Aichi (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    CT examinations of the head and neck are the most commonly performed CT studies in children, raising concern about radiation dose and their risks to children. The purpose of this study was to clarify radiation dose levels for children of 6 years of age undergoing head and neck multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations. Radiation doses were measured with small-sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters that were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within a standard 6-year-old anthropomorphic phantom. Organ and effective doses of brain CT were evaluated for 19 protocols in nine hospitals on various (2-320 detector rows) MDCT scanners. The maximum value of mean organ dose in brain CT was 34.3 mGy for brain. Maximum values of mean doses for the radiosensitive lens and thyroid were 32.7 mGy for lens in brain CT and 17.2 mGy for thyroid in neck CT. seventy-fifth percentile of effective dose distribution in brain CT was approximately the same as the diagnostic reference level (DRL) in the 2003 UK survey. The results of this study would encourage revision of MDCT protocols in pediatric head and neck CT examinations for dose reduction and protocol standardization. (orig.)

  8. Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... even smaller tubes called bronchioles. Bronchioles end in tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide actually takes place. Each lung houses about 300-400 million alveoli. The lungs also ...

  9. Nutrition for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to help prepare meals or do the grocery shopping for you. Most people you know want to ... Better Breathers Clubs Asthma Basics LUNG FORCE Expos Online Support Communities FUNDRAISERS Fight For Air Climb LUNG ...

  10. Lung Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cervical Colorectal (Colon) Ovarian Prostate Skin Cancer Home Lung Cancer Trends Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... in the United States, the incidence rate of lung cancer— Men Decreased significantly by 2.5% per year ...

  11. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    with vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects......Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...

  12. Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD) response to head impacts and potential implications for athletic headgear testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Adam; Benzel, Edward; Miele, Vincent; Morr, Douglas; Prakash, Vikas

    2012-09-01

    The Hybrid III 50th percentile male anthropomorphic test device (ATD) is the most widely used human impact testing surrogate and has historically been used in automotive or military testing. More recently, this ATD is finding use in applications evaluating athletic helmet protectivity, quantifying head impact dosage and estimating injury risk. But ATD head-neck response has not been quantified in omnidirectional athletic-type head impacts absent axial preload. It is probable that headgear injury reduction that can be quantified in a laboratory, including in American football, boxing, hockey, lacrosse and soccer, is related to a number of interrelated kinetic and kinematic factors, such as head center of gravity linear acceleration, head angular acceleration, head angular velocity, occipito-cervical mechanics and neck stiffness. Therefore, we characterized ATD head-neck dynamic response to direct head impacts in a series of front, oblique front and lateral head impacts. Key findings were: (1) impacts producing highest ATD resultant center of gravity linear acceleration resulted in the lowest resultant occipito-cervical spine bending moment/force. (2) Resultant ATD head angular velocity and angular acceleration did not appear coupled to impact direction at lower impact energy levels; these parameters were coupled at higher energy levels. (3) The ATD had progressively increasing occipito-cervical stiffness in extension, torsion and lateral bending, respectively. Because the ATD neck influenced head and neck impact dosage parameters, testing agencies, manufacturers and researchers should consider using the Hybrid III head form attached to a neck as a means to quantify head and neck injury risks as opposed to systems that do not utilize a neck. This heightened understanding of Hybrid III ATD head-neck response, and consideration of order of stiffest axes in the lateral, oblique and extension directions, respectively, should aid in the development of head and neck injury

  13. A Simulation Study on Patient Setup Errors in External Beam Radiotherapy Using an Anthropomorphic 4D Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Samadi Miandoab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Patient set-up optimization is required in radiotherapy to fill the accuracy gap between personalized treatment planning and uncertainties in the irradiation set-up. In this study, we aimed to develop a new method based on neural network to estimate patient geometrical setup using 4-dimensional (4D XCAT anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods To access 4D modeling of motion of dynamic organs, a phantom employs non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso method with spline-based model to generate 4D computed tomography (CT images. First, to generate all the possible roto-translation positions, the 4D CT images were imported to Medical Image Data Examiner (AMIDE. Then, for automatic, real time verification of geometrical setup, an artificial neural network (ANN was proposed to estimate patient displacement, using training sets. Moreover, three external motion markers were synchronized with a patient couch position as reference points. In addition, the technique was validated through simulated activities by using reference 4D CT data acquired from five patients. Results The results indicated that patient geometrical set-up is highly depended on the comprehensiveness of training set. By using ANN model, the average patient setup error in XCAT phantom was reduced from 17.26 mm to 0.50 mm. In addition, in the five real patients, these average errors were decreased from 18.26 mm to 1.48 mm various breathing phases ranging from inhalation to exhalation were taken into account for patient setup. Uncertainty error assessment and different setup errors were obtained from each respiration phase. Conclusion This study proposed a new method for alignment of patient setup error using ANN model. Additionally, our correlation model (ANN could estimate true patient position with less error.

  14. Pilot Investigation into the Use of an Anthropomorphic Breast Sonography Phantom as a Training and Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Jacinta E; Cannon, Louise M; McDermott, Ronan; Ryan, Max; Fagan, Andrew J

    2017-11-01

    A device for the training and quantitative assessment of the competency of trainee radiologists in the technically challenging area of breast sonography was developed and evaluated. Currently, suitable commercially available devices are lacking, and there is a growing realization that the reliance on direct exposure to patients for learning may not represent best practice from either the trainees' or patients' perspective. Three devices (PI, PII and PIII) were designed to produce very realistic sonographic images of breast morphology with a range of embedded pathologies. The pilot evaluation used a case study research design to evaluate the role of the anthropomorphic breast sonography training device in training and assessment in a clinical environment. Through the case study, it was possible to evaluate the process and relationships when using this type of training intervention for a small group of radiology resident trainees. The investigation involved a baseline assessment of trainees' (n = 4) ability to detect and characterize all lesions in PI, followed by a 4-wk training period on PII and a post-training assessment using PIII. The evaluation revealed an improvement of 30% ± 8% in the trainee's performance from pre- to post-training. It was expected that the performance of the trainees would improve as the training phantom described in this study aligns with the learning theory of constructivism and fits the ideal specifications of a medical training device in terms of its realism and facilitation of self-directed learning and deliberate practice of the trainees. The device provides a useful platform upon which training and assessment can be facilitated. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of the 5th and 95th Percentile Hybrid III Anthropomorphic Test Device Finite Element Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C.; Somers, J. T.; Baldwin, M. A.; Wells, J. A.; Newby, N.; Currie, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA spacecraft design requirements for occupant protection are a combination of the Brinkley criteria and injury metrics extracted from anthropomorphic test devices (ATD's). For the ATD injury metrics, the requirements specify the use of the 5th percentile female Hybrid III and the 95th percentile male Hybrid III. Furthermore, each of these ATD's is required to be fitted with an articulating pelvis and a straight spine. The articulating pelvis is necessary for the ATD to fit into spacecraft seats, while the straight spine is required as injury metrics for vertical accelerations are better defined for this configuration. The requirements require that physical testing be performed with both ATD's to demonstrate compliance. Before compliance testing can be conducted, extensive modeling and simulation are required to determine appropriate test conditions, simulate conditions not feasible for testing, and assess design features to better ensure compliance testing is successful. While finite element (FE) models are currently available for many of the physical ATD's, currently there are no complete models for either the 5th percentile female or the 95th percentile male Hybrid III with a straight spine and articulating pelvis. The purpose of this work is to assess the accuracy of the existing Livermore Software Technology Corporation's FE models of the 5th and 95th percentile ATD's. To perform this assessment, a series of tests will be performed at Wright Patterson Air Force Research Lab using their horizontal impact accelerator sled test facility. The ATD's will be placed in the Orion seat with a modified-advanced-crew-escape-system (MACES) pressure suit and helmet, and driven with loadings similar to what is expected for the actual Orion vehicle during landing, launch abort, and chute deployment. Test data will be compared to analytical predictions and modelling uncertainty factors will be determined for each injury metric. Additionally, the test data will be used to

  16. Image quality for five modern chest radiography techniques: a modified FROC study with an anthropomorphic chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maansson, L.G.; Lanhede, B.; Kheddache, S.; Tylen, U.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the image quality for one conventional and four digital chest radiography techniques. Three storage phosphor systems, one selenium drum system, and one film-screen system were compared using a modified receiver-operating-characteristics method. Simulated pathology was randomly positioned over the parenchymal regions and the mediastinum of an anthropomorphic phantom. Eight observers (four chest radiologists, one specialist in general radiology, one hospital physicist, and two radiographers) evaluated 60 images for each technique. The selenium drum system (Philips, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) rated best for the detection of parenchymal nodules. Together with the storage phosphor system of generation IIIN (Philips/Fuji), the selenium drum system also rated best for detection of thin linear structures. The storage phosphor system of generation V (Fuji) rated best for the detection of mediastinal nodules. The first generation of the storage phosphor system from Agfa (Mortsel, Belgium) rated worst for the detection of parenchymal nodules and thin linear structures. These differences were significant (p < 0.0001). Averaging the results for all test objects, the selenium drum system and the storage phosphor system of generation V were significantly better than the other systems tested. The film/screen system performed significantly better than the first-generation storage phosphor system from Agfa, equal to the generation IIIN storage phosphor system (Philips/Fuji) and significantly worse than the selenium drum system (Philips) and the generation-V storage phosphor system (Fuji). The conclusion is therefore that the image quality of selenium-based digital technique and of the more recent generations of storage phosphor systems is superior to both conventional technique and storage phosphor systems using image plates of older types. (orig.)

  17. Effects of Lumbar Spine Assemblies and Body-Borne Equipment Mass on Anthropomorphic Test Device Responses During Drop Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggromito, Daniel; Jaffrey, Mark; Chhor, Allen; Chen, Bernard; Yan, Wenyi

    2017-10-01

    When simulating or conducting land mine blast tests on armored vehicles to assess potential occupant injury, the preference is to use the Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD). In land blast events, neither the effect of body-borne equipment (BBE) on the ATD response nor the dynamic response index (DRI) is well understood. An experimental study was carried out using a drop tower test rig, with a rigid seat mounted on a carriage table undergoing average accelerations of 161 g and 232 g over 3 ms. A key aspect of the work looked at the various lumbar spine assemblies available for a Hybrid III ATD. These can result in different load cell orientations for the ATD which in turn can affect the load measurement in the vertical and horizontal planes. Thirty-two tests were carried out using two BBE mass conditions and three variations of ATDs. The latter were the Hybrid III with the curved (conventional) spine, the Hybrid III with the pedestrian (straight) spine, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Hybrid III which also has a straight spine. The results showed that the straight lumbar spine assemblies produced similar ATD responses in drop tower tests using a rigid seat. In contrast, the curved lumbar spine assembly generated a lower pelvis acceleration and a higher lumbar load than the straight lumbar spine assemblies. The maximum relative displacement of the lumbar spine occurred after the peak loading event, suggesting that the DRI is not suitable for assessing injury when the impact duration is short and an ATD is seated on a rigid seat on a drop tower. The peak vertical lumbar loads did not change with increasing BBE mass because the equipment mass effects did not become a factor during the peak loading event.

  18. Numerical absorbed dose distributions inside principal organs of a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom irradiated by monoenergetic photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furstoss, C.; Menard, S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Personnel can be exposed to photon or mixed (neutrons and photons) radiations at workplaces for various activities (nuclear fuel cycle, medical sector, research... ). The passive and active personal dosimeters worn on the trunk evaluate the personal dose equivalent Hp(10), defined by ICRP 601 to be an estimator of the effective dose E. However, the angular and energy distributions of the radiations encountered could generate an over or under-estimation of the protection quantity E because of the response of the dosimeters or/and because of the definition of Hp(10) itself. The Institute of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) is evaluating the possibility of the measurement of the effective dose E using an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom at workplaces. Such an instrument would allow the control of the suitability of the radiological protection instrumentation used at workplaces for radiation fields which can appreciably differ from the reference ISO radiation fields used to calibrate dosimeters. The objectives of this study are to determine key positions for the future detectors inside and on the phantom, as well as their needed technical characteristics. The simulations of the organ absorbed dose distributions performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX2 and the MIRD phantom3 model will allow the determination of the detector locations. This paper will present the first numerical results obtained for monoenergetic parallel photon fields. The effective doses E calculated in an energy range from 15 keV to 10 MeV will be presented and compared with the results of M. Zankl et al., published in the GSF report Bericht 8/974. (author)

  19. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation...... with vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects...

  20. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Könik, Arda; Johnson, Karen L; Dasari, Paul; Pretorius, P H; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A; Connolly, Caitlin M; Segars, Paul W; Lindsay, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  1. Kinematics of child volunteers and child anthropomorphic test devices during emergency braking events in real car environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, Isabelle; Bohman, Katarina; Jakobsson, Lotta; Brolin, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to present, compare, and discuss the kinematic response of children and child anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) during emergency braking events in different restraint configurations in a passenger vehicle. A driving study was conducted on a closed-circuit test track comprising 16 children aged 4 to 12 years old and the Q3, Hybrid III (HIII) 3-year-old, 6-year-old, and 10-year-old ATDs restrained on the right rear seat of a modern passenger vehicle. The children were exposed to one braking event in each of the 2 restraint systems and the ATDs were exposed to 2 braking events in each restraint system. All events had a deceleration of 1.0 g. Short children (stature 107-123 cm) and the Q3, HIII 3-year-old, and 6-year-old were restrained on booster cushions as well as high-back booster seats. Tall children (stature 135-150 cm) and HIII 10-year-old were restrained on booster cushions or restrained by 3-point belts directly on the car seat. Vehicle data were collected and synchronized with video data. Forward trajectories for the forehead and external auditory canal (ear) were determined as well as head rotation and shoulder belt force. A total of 40 trials were analyzed. Child volunteers had greater maximum forward displacement of the head and greater head rotation compared to the ATDs. The average maximum displacement for children ranged from 165 to 210 mm and 155 to 195 mm for the forehead and ear target, respectively. Corresponding values for the ATDs were 55 to 165 mm and 50 to 160 mm. The change in head angle was greater for short children than for tall children. Shoulder belt force was within the same range for short children when restrained on booster cushions or high-back booster seats. For tall children, the shoulder belt force was greater when restrained on booster cushions compared to being restrained by seat belts directly on the car seat. The forward displacement was within the same range for all children regardless of

  2. Calibration and Validation of a Finite ELement Model of THor-K Anthropomorphic Test Device for Aerospace Safety Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, J. B.; Unataroiu, C. D.; Somers, J. T.

    2014-01-01

    The THOR anthropomorphic test device (ATD) has been developed and continuously improved by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to provide automotive manufacturers an advanced tool that can be used to assess the injury risk of vehicle occupants in crash tests. Recently, a series of modifications were completed to improve the biofidelity of THOR ATD [1]. The updated THOR Modification Kit (THOR-K) ATD was employed at Wright-Patterson Air Base in 22 impact tests in three configurations: vertical, lateral, and spinal [2]. Although a computational finite element (FE) model of the THOR had been previously developed [3], updates to the model were needed to incorporate the recent changes in the modification kit. The main goal of this study was to develop and validate a FE model of the THOR-K ATD. The CAD drawings of the THOR-K ATD were reviewed and FE models were developed for the updated parts. For example, the head-skin geometry was found to change significantly, so its model was re-meshed (Fig. 1a). A protocol was developed to calibrate each component identified as key to the kinematic and kinetic response of the THOR-K head/neck ATD FE model (Fig. 1b). The available ATD tests were divided in two groups: a) calibration tests where the unknown material parameters of deformable parts (e.g., head skin, pelvis foam) were optimized to match the data and b) validation tests where the model response was only compared with test data by calculating their score using CORrelation and Analysis (CORA) rating system. Finally, the whole ATD model was validated under horizontal-, vertical-, and lateral-loading conditions against data recorded in the Wright Patterson tests [2]. Overall, the final THOR-K ATD model developed in this study is shown to respond similarly to the ATD in all validation tests. This good performance indicates that the optimization performed during calibration by using the CORA score as objective function is not test specific. Therefore confidence is

  3. Effects of body habitus on internal radiation dose calculations using the 5-year-old anthropomorphic male models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianwu; Kuster, Niels; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-08-01

    Computational phantoms are commonly used in internal radiation dosimetry to assess the amount and distribution pattern of energy deposited in various parts of the human body from different internal radiation sources. Radiation dose assessments are commonly performed on predetermined reference computational phantoms while the argument for individualized patient-specific radiation dosimetry exists. This study aims to evaluate the influence of body habitus on internal dosimetry and to quantify the uncertainties in dose estimation correlated with the use of fixed reference models. The 5-year-old IT’IS male phantom was modified to match target anthropometric parameters, including body weight, body height and sitting height/stature ratio (SSR), determined from reference databases, thus enabling the creation of 125 5-year-old habitus-dependent male phantoms with 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentile body morphometries. We evaluated the absorbed fractions and the mean absorbed dose to the target region per unit cumulative activity in the source region (S-values) of F-18 in 46 source regions for the generated 125 anthropomorphic 5-year-old hybrid male phantoms using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended general purpose Monte Carlo transport code and calculated the absorbed dose and effective dose of five 18F-labelled radiotracers for children of various habitus. For most organs, the S-value of F-18 presents stronger statistical correlations with body weight, standing height and sitting height than BMI and SSR. The self-absorbed fraction and self-absorbed S-values of F-18 and the absorbed dose and effective dose of 18F-labelled radiotracers present with the strongest statistical correlations with body weight. For 18F-Amino acids, 18F-Brain receptor substances, 18F-FDG, 18F-L-DOPA and 18F-FBPA, the mean absolute effective dose differences between phantoms of different habitus and fixed reference models are 11.4%, 11.3%, 10.8%, 13.3% and 11.4%, respectively. Total body

  4. Radiation dose evaluation in tomosynthesis and C-arm cone-beam CT examinations with an anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shuji; Aoyama, Takahiko; Oda, Nobuhiro; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate organ dose and the effective dose to patients undergoing tomosynthesis (TS) and C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) examinations and to compare the doses to those in multidetector CT (MDCT) scans. Patient doses were measured with small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, 48 in number, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed. The doses in head, chest, abdomen, and hip-joint TS, and in head and abdomen C-arm CBCT were evaluated for routine protocols on Shimadzu TS and C-arm CBCT systems, and the doses in MDCT with the same scan regions as in TS and CBCT were on Toshiba 64-detector-row CT scanners. In TS examination of the head, chest, abdomen, and hip-joint, organ doses for organs within scan ranges were 1-4 mGy, and effective doses were 0.07 mSv for the head scan and around 1 mSv for other scans. In C-arm CBCT examinations of the head and abdomen, organ doses within scan range were 2-37 mGy, and effective doses were 1.2 mSv for the head scan and 4-5 mSv for abdominal scans. Effective doses in TS examinations were approximately a factor of 10 lower, while the doses in CBCT examinations were nearly the same level, compared to the doses in the corresponding MDCT examinations. TS examinations with low doses and excellent resolutions in coronal images compared to recent MDCT would widely be used in tomographic examinations of the chest, abdomen, pelvis, skeletal-joints, and knee instead of MDCT examinations with significantly high doses. Since patient dose in C-arm CBCT was nearly the same level as that in recent MDCT, the same consideration for high radiation dose would be required for the use of CBCT.

  5. The Effect of Contrast Material on Radiation Dose at CT: Part I. Incorporation of Contrast Material Dynamics in Anthropomorphic Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Segars, W Paul; Marin, Daniele; Nelson, Rendon C; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-06-01

    Purpose To develop a method to incorporate the propagation of contrast material into computational anthropomorphic phantoms for estimation of organ dose at computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods A patient-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of the human cardiovascular system was incorporated into 58 extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) patient phantoms. The PBPK model comprised compartmental models of vessels and organs unique to each XCAT model. For typical injection protocols, the dynamics of the contrast material in the body were described according to a series of patient-specific iodine mass-balance differential equations, the solutions to which provided the contrast material concentration time curves for each compartment. Each organ was assigned to a corresponding time-varying iodinated contrast agent to create the contrast material-enhanced five-dimensional XCAT models, in which the fifth dimension represents the dynamics of contrast material. To validate the accuracy of the models, simulated aortic and hepatic contrast-enhancement results throughout the models were compared with previously published clinical data by using the percentage of discrepancy in the mean, time to 90% peak, peak value, and slope of enhancement in a paired t test at the 95% significance level. Results The PBPK model allowed effective prediction of the time-varying concentration curves of various contrast material administrations in each organ for different patient models. The contrast-enhancement results were in agreement with results of previously published clinical data, with mean percentage, time to 90% peak, peak value, and slope of less than 10% (P > .74), 4%, 7%, and 14% for uniphasic and 12% (P > .56), 4%, 12%, and 14% for biphasic injection protocols, respectively. The exception was hepatic enhancement results calculated for a uniphasic injection protocol for which the discrepancy was less than 25%. Conclusion A technique to model the propagation of

  6. Nonrespiratory lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isawa, Toyoharu

    1994-01-01

    The function of the lungs is primarily the function as a gas exchanger: the venous blood returning to the lungs is arterialized with oxygen in the lungs and the arterialized blood is sent back again to the peripheral tissues of the whole body to be utilized for metabolic oxygenation. Besides the gas exchanging function which we call ''respiratory lung function'' the lungs have functions that have little to do with gas exchange itself. We categorically call the latter function of the lungs as ''nonrespiratory lung function''. The lungs consist of the conductive airways, the gas exchanging units like the alveoli, and the interstitial space that surrounds the former two compartments. The interstitial space contains the blood and lymphatic capillaries, collagen and elastic fibers and cement substances. The conductive airways and the gas exchanging units are directly exposed to the atmosphere that contains various toxic and nontoxic gases, fume and biological or nonbiological particles. Because the conductive airways are equipped with defense mechanisms like mucociliary clearance or coughs to get rid of these toxic gases, particles or locally produced biological debris, we are usually free from being succumbed to ill effects of inhaled materials. By use of nuclear medicine techniques, we can now evaluate mucociliary clearance function, and other nonrespiratory lung functions as well in vivo

  7. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation...... are only ameliorated to a minor degree by a healthy diet....

  8. Lung disease - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pulmonary Disease): COPD Foundation -- www.copdfoundation.org National Emphysema Foundation -- www.emphysemafoundation.org National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/ ...

  9. Parasitic diseases of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Roentgenologic semiotics of the main parasitic diseases of lungs is described: echinococcosis, paragonimiasis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiosis and some rarely met parasitic diseases

  10. Anthropomorphism in god concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Peter

    2011-01-01

    There is an emerging consensus among current, cognitive theories of religion that the detection and representation of intentional agents and their actions are fundamental to religion. By no means a monolithic theory, this is an argument with several separate lines of reasoning, and several...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and a history of lung disease such as tuberculosis, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis. A history of lung ... Cancer Society: Cancer Facts & Figures 2017 (PDF) Byers LA, Rudin CM. Small cell lung cancer: where do ...

  12. MRI of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich (ed.) [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2009-07-01

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  13. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  14. Screening for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Infante, Maurizio V; Pedersen, Jesper H

    2010-01-01

    In lung cancer screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography (LDCT), the proportion of stage I disease is 50-85%, and the survival rate for resected stage I disease can exceed 90%, but proof of real benefit in terms of lung cancer mortality reduction must come from the several randomized...

  15. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation Your Lung Operation DVD After Your Operation Back to Your Lung Operation Your Lung Operation DVD Welcome Your Lung ...

  16. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  17. Immunosuppression in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffert, Jenna L; Raza, Kashif

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation can be a life-saving procedure for those with end-stage lung diseases. Unfortunately, long term graft and patient survival are limited by both acute and chronic allograft rejection, with a median survival of just over 6 years. Immunosuppressive regimens are employed to reduce the rate of rejection, and while protocols vary from center to center, conventional maintenance therapy consists of triple drug therapy with a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus), antiproliferative agents [azathioprine (AZA), mycophenolate, sirolimus (srl), everolimus (evl)], and corticosteroids (CS). Roughly 50% of lung transplant centers also utilize induction therapy, with polyclonal antibody preparations [equine or rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)], interleukin 2 receptor antagonists (IL2RAs) (daclizumab or basiliximab), or alemtuzumab. This review summarizes these agents and the data surrounding their use in lung transplantation, as well as additional common and novel therapies in lung transplantation. Despite the progression of the management of lung transplant recipients, they continue to be at high risk of treatment-related complications, and poor graft and patient survival. Randomized clinical trials are needed to allow for the development of better agents, regimens and techniques to address above mentioned issues and reduce morbidity and mortality among lung transplant recipients.

  18. The lung communication network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Davide; Chanson, Marc

    2015-08-01

    The different types of cells in the lung, from the conducting airway epithelium to the alveolar epithelium and the pulmonary vasculature, are interconnected by gap junctions. The specific profile of gap junction proteins, the connexins, expressed in these different cell types forms compartments of intercellular communication that can be further shaped by the release of extracellular nucleotides via pannexin1 channels. In this review, we focus on the physiology of connexins and pannexins and describe how this lung communication network modulates lung function and host defenses in conductive and respiratory airways.

  19. Insulin and the Lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Suchita; Prakash, Y S; Linneberg, Allan

    2013-01-01

    , molecular understanding is necessary. Insulin resistance is a strong, independent risk factor for asthma development, but it is unknown whether a direct effect of insulin on the lung is involved. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the effect of insulin on cellular components of the lung...... and highlights the molecular consequences of insulin-related metabolic signaling cascades that could adversely affect lung structure and function. Examples include airway smooth muscle proliferation and contractility and regulatory signaling networks that are associated with asthma. These aspects of insulin...

  20. A prospective study of breast anthropomorphic measurements, volume and ptosis in 605 Asian patients with breast cancer or benign breast disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Si Huang

    Full Text Available The current study aims to summarize breast anthropomorphic measurement features in Chinese patients with breast diseases and to investigate their potential correlations with demographic factors.Fifteen breast anthropomorphic parameters of 605 Chinese female patients were collected prospectively. Breast ptosis status was scaled by two methods and breast volume was calculated according to a modified formula of BREAST-V.Among 1210 breasts, the average breast volume was 340.0±109.1 ml (91.8-919.2 ml. The distance from the nipple to the inframammary fold was 7.5±1.6 cm in the standing position. The width of the breast base was 14.3±1.4 cm (8.5-23.5 cm. The incidence of breast ptosis was 22.8% (274/1204, of which 37 (23.5% and 79 (31.7% women had severe ptosis assessed by different criteria. Increased height (OR[odds ratio] = 1.500, P<0.001, post-menopausal status (OR = 1.463, P = 0.02, increased BMI, breastfeeding for 7-12 months (OR = 1.882, P = 0.008 and more than one year (OR = 2.367, P = 0.001 were risk factors for an increased breast volume. Post-menopausal status (OR = 2.390, P<0.001 and OR = 2.621, P<0.001 for different scales, BMI≥24.7 kg/m2 (OR = 3.149, P<0.001 and OR = 2.495, P = 0.002, breastfeeding for 7-12 months (OR = 4.136, P = 0.004 and OR = 4.010, P = 0.002, and breastfeeding for more than one year (OR = 6.934, P<0.001 and OR = 6.707, P<0.001 were independent risk factors for breast ptosis.The current study provides anthropomorphic measurements data of Chinese women with breast diseases, which are useful for cosmetic and reconstructive breast surgery decisions. Post-menopausal status, increased BMI, and breastfeeding for more than six months were independent risk factors for both increased breast volume and breast ptosis.

  1. Lung cysts in chronic paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, André Nathan; Marchiori, Edson; Benard, Gil; Araújo, Mariana Sponholz; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    On HRCT scans, lung cysts are characterized by rounded areas of low attenuation in the lung parenchyma and a well-defined interface with the normal adjacent lung. The most common cystic lung diseases are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. In a retrospective analysis of the HRCT findings in 50 patients diagnosed with chronic paracoccidioidomycosis, we found lung cysts in 5 cases (10%), indicating that patients with paracoccidioidomycosis can present with lung cysts on HRCT scans. Therefore, paracoccidioidomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic lung diseases.

  2. Lung cysts in chronic paracoccidioidomycosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, André Nathan; Marchiori, Edson; Benard, Gil; Araújo, Mariana Sponholz; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    On HRCT scans, lung cysts are characterized by rounded areas of low attenuation in the lung parenchyma and a well-defined interface with the normal adjacent lung. The most common cystic lung diseases are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. In a retrospective analysis of the HRCT findings in 50 patients diagnosed with chronic paracoccidioidomycosis, we found lung cysts in 5 cases (10%), indicating that patients with paracoccidioidomycosis can present with lung cysts on HRCT scans. Therefore, paracoccidioidomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic lung diseases. PMID:23857700

  3. The Danish Lung Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Rasmussen, Torben Riis

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Lung Cancer Registry (DLCR) was established by the Danish Lung Cancer Group. The primary and first goal of the DLCR was to improve survival and the overall clinical management of Danish lung cancer patients. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish primary lung cancer patients since...... 2000 are included into the registry and the database today contains information on more than 50,000 cases of lung cancer. MAIN VARIABLES: The database contains information on patient characteristics such as age, sex, diagnostic procedures, histology, tumor stage, lung function, performance...... as a source for research regarding lung cancer in Denmark and in comparisons with other countries....

  4. Lung cysts in chronic paracoccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Nathan Costa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available On HRCT scans, lung cysts are characterized by rounded areas of low attenuation in the lung parenchyma and a well-defined interface with the normal adjacent lung. The most common cystic lung diseases are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. In a retrospective analysis of the HRCT findings in 50 patients diagnosed with chronic paracoccidioidomycosis, we found lung cysts in 5 cases (10%, indicating that patients with paracoccidioidomycosis can present with lung cysts on HRCT scans. Therefore, paracoccidioidomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic lung diseases.

  5. Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... process. Overview Researchers have only begun to study, define, and understand chILD in the last decade. Currently, ... This term refers to inhaling substances—such as food, liquid, or vomit—into the lungs. Inhaling these ...

  6. Eosinophilic Lung Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in eosinophil number in the lung tissue. Treatment Treatment of acute eosinophilic pneumonia may require hospitalization. It may be necessary to support the person with assistance from a breathing machine. Treatment with intravenous (IV) steroids or other medications which ...

  7. Open lung biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancerous) tumors Cancer Certain infections (bacterial, viral, or fungal) Lung diseases (fibrosis) The procedure may help diagnose a number ... 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 57. Review Date 11/11/2016 Updated by: Mary C. ...

  8. Lung surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - discharge ... milk) for 2 weeks after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and 6 to 8 weeks after open surgery. ...

  9. Diffuse cavitary lung lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunzke, Mindy; Garrington, Timothy; Hayes, Kari; Bourland, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    An 11-year-old girl presented with a 2-month history of progressively worsening cough, daily fevers, and weight loss. A chest radiograph revealed multiple cystic cavitary lung lesions. An extensive infectious work-up was negative. Chest CT verified multiple cavitary lung lesions bilaterally, and [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography with CT (PET/CT) showed increased uptake in the lung lesions as well as regional lymph nodes. Subsequent biopsy of an involved lymph node confirmed classical Hodgkin lymphoma, nodular sclerosis type. This case represents an unusual presentation for a child with Hodgkin lymphoma and demonstrates a role for 18 F-FDG PET/CT in evaluating a child with cavitary lung lesions. (orig.)

  10. Lung cancer imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Ravenel, James G

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a guide to the diagnosis, staging and overview of the management of lung cancer relevant to practicing radiologists so that they can better understand the decision making issues and provide more useful communication to treating physicians.

  11. [Interstitial lung diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, K; Brasch, F

    2008-11-01

    Interstitial lung diseases comprise a heterogeneous group of about 200 entities. In the classification of these diseases, diffuse parenchymal lung diseases with known cause, granulomatous diseases, and other specific interstitial lung diseases are separated from the important group of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, which are classified according to the 2002 ATS/ERS consensus classification. Concerning the histological pattern, this classification differentiates between "usual interstitial pneumonia" (UIP), "nonspecific interstitial pneumonia" (NSIP), "organising pneumonia" (COP), "diffuse alveolar damage" (DAD), "respiratory bronchiolitis" (RB), "desquamative interstitial pneumonia" (DIP), "lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia" (LIP) and "unclassifiable interstitial pneumonias". A key message of this classification is that the pathologist will give the diagnosis of a histological pattern, whereas the final clinicopathologic diagnosis can be made only by the clinical pulmonologist after careful correlation with the clinical and radiologic features, which is essential in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases.

  12. Lungs in TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the arteries that supply the lungs). There have been only ... www.thoracic.org The LAM Foundation 4520 Cooper Road, Suite 300, Cincinnati, OH 45242 Phone: 513-777- ...

  13. Lung cysts in chronic paracoccidioidomycosis*

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, André Nathan; Marchiori, Edson; Benard, Gil; Araújo, Mariana Sponholz; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    On HRCT scans, lung cysts are characterized by rounded areas of low attenuation in the lung parenchyma and a well-defined interface with the normal adjacent lung. The most common cystic lung diseases are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. In a retrospective analysis of the HRCT findings in 50 patients diagnosed with chronic paracoccidioidomycosis, we found lung cysts in 5 cases (10%), indicating that patients with paracoccidioidomy...

  14. A Low-Cost Open Source 3D-Printable Dexterous Anthropomorphic Robotic Hand with a Parallel Spherical Joint Wrist for Sign Languages Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bulgarelli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel open-source 3D-printable dexterous anthropomorphic robotic hand specifically designed to reproduce Sign Languages’ hand poses for deaf and deaf-blind users. We improved the InMoov hand, enhancing dexterity by adding abduction/adduction degrees of freedom of three fingers (thumb, index and middle fingers and a three-degrees-of-freedom parallel spherical joint wrist. A systematic kinematic analysis is provided. The proposed robotic hand is validated in the framework of the PARLOMA project. PARLOMA aims at developing a telecommunication system for deaf-blind people, enabling remote transmission of signs from tactile Sign Languages. Both hardware and software are provided online to promote further improvements from the community.

  15. Fabrication of an anthropomorphous phantom equipped with sensors to assess the efficient dose at workstations submitted to photonic fields: experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darreon, J.

    2009-12-01

    The efficient dose is a reference value in radioprotection. It allows the harmfulness of ionizing radiations received by organs and tissues to be assessed. It is used on a legal basis but is not directly measurable. This research thesis reports a practical feasibility study of an anthropomorphous dummy or phantom equipped with sensors to assess the efficient dose from selective measurements. A first part deals with the dose measurement system, i.e. the sensors which will be embedded in the phantom. The second part, based on a simulation performed with a Monte Carlo code, reports the study of the efficient dose assessment accuracies for different irradiation configurations which could be obtained with this measurement instrument. The author shows that the estimation accuracy can be improved by modifying the sensor locations with respect to doses deposited in future reference phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

  16. ROC evaluation of SPECT myocardial lesion detectability with and without single iteration non-uniform Chang attenuation compensation using an anthropomorphic female phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC; Gilland, D.R.; Turkington, T.G.; Coleman, R.E.; Tsui, B.M.W.; Metz, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate lesion detectability with and without nonuniform attenuation compensation (AC) in myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in women using an anthropomorphic phantom and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) methodology. Breast attenuation causes artifacts in reconstructed images and may increase the difficulty of diagnosis of myocardial perfusion imaging in women. The null hypothesis tested using the ROC study was that nonuniform AC does not change the lesion detectability in myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in women. The authors used a filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm and Chang's single iteration method for AC. In conclusion, with the proposed myocardial defect model nuclear medicine physicians demonstrated no significant difference for the detection of the anterior wall defect; however, a greater accuracy for the detection of the inferior wall defect was observed without nonuniform AC than with it. Medical physicists did not demonstrate any statistically significant difference in defect detection accuracy with or without nonuniform AC in the female phantom

  17. Evaluation of neutron doses received at different organs in radiotherapy treatments using the UAB PADC based dosemeters in an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, C., E-mail: carles.domingo@uab.ca [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Fuste, M.J.; Morales, E.; Amgarou, K.; Castelo, J. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Servicio de Radiofisica, Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    The NEUTOR project was set up to study radiotherapy patient exposures to the neutrons produced around the LINAC accelerator head by photon radiation above approx8 MeV. These neutrons may reach the patient directly, or they may interact with the surrounding materials until they become thermalised, scattering all over the treatment room and affecting the patient as well. A miniaturised version of the UAB PADC based neutron dosemeter is used, together with thermoluminescence Li-6/Li-7 pairs, in several positions inside an anthropomorphic female phantom to determine doses received by the patient at several organs or tissues. Irradiations were made at a 15 MV LINAC (Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Macarena, Sevilla, Spain), an 18 MV LINAC (Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, Spain) and a 23 MV LINAC (Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Germany). Preliminary patient dose maps obtained from the UAB PADC dosemeter measurements (considering an average calibration factor for all neutron energies) are reported in this work.

  18. Dosimetric lung models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.C.; Roy, M.

    1986-01-01

    The anatomical and physiological factors that vary with age and influence the deposition of airborne radionuclides in the lung are reviewed. The efficiency with which aerosols deposit in the lung for a given exposure at various ages from birth to adulthood is evaluated. Deposition within the lung is considered in relation to the clearance mechanisms acting in different regions or compartments. The procedure for evaluating dose to sensitive tissues in lung and transfer to other organs that is being considered by the Task Group established by ICRP to review the Lung Model is outlined. Examples of the application of this modelling procedure to evaluate lung dose as a function of age are given, for exposure to radon daughters in dwellings, and for exposure to an insoluble 239 Pu aerosol. The former represents exposure to short-lived radionuclides that deliver relatively high doses to bronchial tissue. In this case, dose rates are marginally higher in children than in adults. Plutonium exposure represents the case where dose is predominantly delivered to respiratory tissue and lymph nodes. In this case, the life-time doses tend to be lower for exposure in childhood. Some of the uncertainties in this modelling procedure are noted

  19. Multiple cystic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Angélica Ferreira Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders that can present a diagnostic challenge due to the increasing number of diseases associated with this presentation. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest helps to define the morphological aspects and distribution of lung cysts, as well as associated findings. The combination of appearance upon imaging and clinical features, together with extrapulmonary manifestations, when present, permits confident and accurate diagnosis of the majority of these diseases without recourse to open-lung biopsy. The main diseases in this group that are discussed in this review are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and folliculin gene-associated syndrome (Birt–Hogg–Dubé; other rare causes of cystic lung disease, including cystic metastasis of sarcoma, are also discussed. Disease progression is unpredictable, and understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and their appearance during evolution of the disease are essential for management. Correlation of disease evolution and clinical context with chest imaging findings provides important clues for defining the underlying nature of cystic lung disease, and guides diagnostic evaluation and management.

  20. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-03: Development and Implementation of An Anthropomorphic Pediatric Spine Phantom for the Assessment of Craniospinal Irradiation Procedures in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D; Summers, P; Followill, D; Sahoo, N; Mahajan, A; Stingo, F; Kry, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design an anthropomorphic pediatric spine phantom for use in the evaluation of proton therapy facilities for clinical trial participation by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center (formerly RPC). Methods: This phantom was designed to perform an end-to-end audit of the proton spine treatment process, including simulation, dose calculation by the treatment planning system (TPS), and proton treatment delivery. The design incorporated materials simulating the thoracic spinal column of a pediatric patient, along with two thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-100 capsules and radiochromic film embedded in the phantom for dose evaluation. Fourteen potential materials were tested to determine relative proton stopping power (RSP) and Hounsfield unit (HU) values. Each material was CT scanned at 120kVp, and the RSP was obtained from depth ionization scans using the Zebra multilayer ion chamber (MLIC) at two energies: 160 MeV and 250 MeV. To determine tissue equivalency, the measured RSP for each material was compared to the RSP calculated by the Eclipse TPS for a given HU. Results: The materials selected as bone, tissue, and cartilage substitutes were Techron HPV Bearing Grade (Boedeker Plastics, Inc.), solid water, and blue water, respectively. The RSP values did not differ by more than 1.8% between the two energies. The measured RSP for each selected material agreed with the RSP calculated by the Eclipse TPS within 1.2%. Conclusion: An anthropomorphic pediatric proton spine phantom was designed to evaluate proton therapy delivery. The inclusion of multiple tissue substitutes increases heterogeneity and the level of difficulty for institutions to successfully treat the phantom. The following attributes will be evaluated: absolute dose agreement, distal range, field width, junction match and right/left dose profile alignment. The phantom will be tested at several institutions using a 5% dose agreement criterion, and a 5%/3mm gamma analysis

  1. A fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of the Metabolic Tumor Volume from PET images: validation on 3D printed anthropomorphic oncological lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallivanone, F.; Interlenghi, M.; Castiglioni, I.; Canervari, C.

    2016-01-01

    18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a standard functional diagnostic technique to in vivo image cancer. Different quantitative paramters can be extracted from PET images and used as in vivo cancer biomarkers. Between PET biomarkers Metabolic Tumor Volume (MTV) has gained an important role in particular considering the development of patient-personalized radiotherapy treatment for non-homogeneous dose delivery. Different imaging processing methods have been developed to define MTV. The different proposed PET segmentation strategies were validated in ideal condition (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration), while the majority of cancer lesions doesn't fulfill these requirements. In this context, this work has a twofold objective: 1) to implement and optimize a fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of MTV, feasible in clinical practice 2) to develop a strategy to obtain anthropomorphic phantoms, including non-spherical and non-uniform objects, miming realistic oncological patient conditions. The developed PET segmentation algorithm combines an automatic threshold-based algorithm for the definition of MTV and a k-means clustering algorithm for the estimation of the background. The method is based on parameters always available in clinical studies and was calibrated using NEMA IQ Phantom. Validation of the method was performed both in ideal (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration) and non-ideal (e.g. in non-spherical objects with a non-uniform radioactivity concentration) conditions. The strategy to obtain a phantom with synthetic realistic lesions (e.g. with irregular shape and a non-homogeneous uptake) consisted into the combined use of standard anthropomorphic phantoms commercially and irregular molds generated using 3D printer technology and filled with a radioactive chromatic alginate. The proposed segmentation algorithm was feasible in

  2. SU-F-T-168: Development and Implementation of An Anthropomorphic Head & Neck Phantom for the Assessment of Proton Therapy Treatment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branco, D; Taylor, P; Frank, S; Li, H; Zhang, X; Mehrens, H; Guindani, M; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To design a Head and Neck (H&N) anthropomorphic QA phantom that the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC-H) can use to verify the quality of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) H&N treatments for institutions participating in NCI clinical trials. Methods: The phantom was created to serve as a remote auditing tool for IROC-H to evaluate an institution’s IMPT planning and delivery abilities. The design was based on the composition, size, and geometry of a generalized oropharyngeal tumor and contains critical structures (parotids and spinal cord). Radiochromic film in the axial and sagittal planes and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD)-100 capsules were embedded in the phantom and used to perform the dose delivery evaluation. A CT simulation was used to create a passive scatter and a spot scanning treatment plan with typical clinical constraints for H&N cancer. The IMPT plan was approved by a radiation oncologist and the phantom was irradiated multiple times. The measured dose distribution using a 7%/4mm gamma analysis (85% of pixels passing) and point doses were compared with the treatment planning system calculations. Results: The designed phantom could not achieve the target dose prescription and organ at risk dose constraints with the passive scatter treatment plan. The target prescription dose could be met but not the parotid dose constraint. The average TLD point dose ratio in the target was 0.975, well within the 5% acceptance criterion. The dose distribution analysis using various acceptance criteria, 5%/4mm, 5%/3mm, 7%/4mm and 7%/5mm, had average pixel passing rates of 85.9%, 81.8%, 89.6% and 91.6%, and respectively. Conclusion: An anthropomorphic IMPT H&N phantom was designed that can assess the dose delivery of proton sites wishing to participate in clinical trials using a 5% TLD dose and 7%/4mm gamma analysis acceptance criteria.

  3. Construction of anthropomorphic hybrid, dual-lattice voxel models for optimizing image quality and dose in radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Becker, Janine; Greiter, Matthias; Schlattl, Helmut; Zankl, Maria; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    In radiography there is generally a conflict between the best image quality and the lowest possible patient dose. A proven method of dosimetry is the simulation of radiation transport in virtual human models (i.e. phantoms). However, while the resolution of these voxel models is adequate for most dosimetric purposes, they cannot provide the required organ fine structures necessary for the assessment of the imaging quality. The aim of this work is to develop hybrid/dual-lattice voxel models (called also phantoms) as well as simulation methods by which patient dose and image quality for typical radiographic procedures can be determined. The results will provide a basis to investigate by means of simulations the relationships between patient dose and image quality for various imaging parameters and develop methods for their optimization. A hybrid model, based on NURBS (Non Linear Uniform Rational B-Spline) and PM (Polygon Mesh) surfaces, was constructed from an existing voxel model of a female patient. The organs of the hybrid model can be then scaled and deformed in a non-uniform way i.e. organ by organ; they can be, thus, adapted to patient characteristics without losing their anatomical realism. Furthermore, the left lobe of the lung was substituted by a high resolution lung voxel model, resulting in a dual-lattice geometry model. "Dual lattice" means in this context the combination of voxel models with different resolution. Monte Carlo simulations of radiographic imaging were performed with the code EGS4nrc, modified such as to perform dual lattice transport. Results are presented for a thorax examination.

  4. The aging lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowery EM

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Erin M Lowery,1 Aleah L Brubaker,2 Erica Kuhlmann,1 Elizabeth J Kovacs31Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine at Loyola University Medical Center, 2Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL, USAAbstract: There are many age-associated changes in the respiratory and pulmonary immune system. These changes include decreases in the volume of the thoracic cavity, reduced lung volumes, and alterations in the muscles that aid respiration. Muscle function on a cellular level in the aging population is less efficient. The elderly population has less pulmonary reserve, and cough strength is decreased in the elderly population due to anatomic changes and muscle atrophy. Clearance of particles from the lung through the mucociliary elevator is decreased and associated with ciliary dysfunction. Many complex changes in immunity with aging contribute to increased susceptibility to infections including a less robust immune response from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Considering all of these age-related changes to the lungs, pulmonary disease has significant consequences for the aging population. Chronic lower respiratory tract disease is the third leading cause of death in people aged 65 years and older. With a large and growing aging population, it is critical to understand how the body changes with age and how this impacts the entire respiratory system. Understanding the aging process in the lung is necessary in order to provide optimal care to our aging population. This review focuses on the nonpathologic aging process in the lung, including structural changes, changes in muscle function, and pulmonary immunologic function, with special consideration of obstructive lung disease in the elderly.Keywords: aging, lung, pulmonary immunology, COPD

  5. Quantitative assessment of radiation-induced lung changes by computerized optical densitometry of routine chest x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, Soeren M.; Skoczylas, Jerzy Z.; Overgaard, Marie; Overgaard, Jens; Nielsen, Ole G.; Madsen, Erik Hjoellund

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a quantitative assay of radiological lung changes after postmastectomy radiotherapy applicable for analysis of routine chest x-rays. Methods and Materials: The assay relies on measurement of the optical density of chest x-rays by means of a standard personal computer-controlled film densitometer used for scanning dosimetry films. Density profiles were recorded at 1 mm steps along two reference lines in each lung. The crossing between the clavicula and the first rib in the x-ray projection was used as an easily identifiable anatomical landmark and was used to establish two parallel cranio-caudal reference lines separated by 20 mm. The starting point for recording optical densities was 5 mm below a line perpendicular to the reference lines and tangent to the top of the lung. Data were stored in a computer file for subsequent processing. The optical film densities in the apex of the lungs were converted into equivalent absorber thickness (EAT). To minimize the dependency on technical factors, the unirradiated lung was used as a control. Lung density changes were quantified by the relative change in EAT (REAT), which was evaluated as the difference between the summed EATs along the reference lines in the two lungs, corrected for any pretreatment difference in lung density, and taken as a percentage of the pretreatment EAT value of the lung. Results: Four different tests were carried out to investigate the reproducibility and validity of the proposed assay. (a) An anthropomorphic phantom was used to test the relationship between REAT and the layer of plastic absorber placed in front of one lung. A linear relationship was found with a correlation coefficient of 0.9993. (b) A series of 10 repeat measurements of the same arbitrarily chosen x-ray showed a mean REAT value of 9.8%, with a standard deviation of 0.21%. (c) Forty-three chest x-rays exposed on the same day were available from the clinical series. These were treated as double determinations of

  6. Recent lung imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taplin, G.V.; Chopra, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclide lung imaging procedures have been available for 11 years but only the perfusion examination has been used extensively and mainly for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (P.E.). Its ability to reveal localized ischemia makes it a valuable test of regional lung function as well as a useful diagnostic aid in P.E. Although it had been recognized for several years that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can cause lung perfusion defects which may simulate pulmonary embolism, relatively little use has been made of either the radioxenon or the radioaerosol inhalation lung imaging procedures until the last few years as a means of distinguishing P.E. from COPD. In this review emphasis is placed on our recent experience with both of these inhalation procedures in comparison with pulmonary function tests and roentgenography for the early detection of COPD in population studies. Equal emphasis is given to simultaneous aerosol ventilation-perfusion (V/P) imaging for a functional diagnosis of P.E. Two new developments in regional lung diffusion imaging, performed after the inhalation of radioactive gases and/or rapidly absorbed radioaerosols are described. The experimental basis for their potential clinical application in pulmonary embolism detection is presented

  7. Lung Development and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    The onset of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can arise either from failure to attain the normal spirometric plateau or from an accelerated decline in lung function. Despite reports from numerous big cohorts, no single adult life factor, including smoking, accounts for this accelerated decline. By contrast, five childhood risk factors (maternal and paternal asthma, maternal smoking, childhood asthma and respiratory infections) are strongly associated with an accelerated rate of lung function decline and COPD. Among adverse effects on lung development are transgenerational (grandmaternal smoking), antenatal (exposure to tobacco and pollution), and early childhood (exposure to tobacco and pollution including pesticides) factors. Antenatal adverse events can operate by causing structural changes in the developing lung, causing low birth weight and prematurity and altered immunological responses. Also important are mode of delivery, early microbiological exposures, and multiple early atopic sensitizations. Early bronchial hyperresponsiveness, before any evidence of airway inflammation, is associated with adverse respiratory outcomes. Overlapping cohort studies established that spirometry tracks from the preschool years to late middle age, and those with COPD in the sixth decade already had the worst spirometry at age 10 years. Alveolar development is now believed to continue throughout somatic growth and is adversely impacted by early tobacco smoke exposure. Genetic factors are also important, with genes important in lung development and early wheezing also being implicated in COPD. The inescapable conclusion is that the roots of COPD are in early life, and COPD is a disease of childhood adverse factors interacting with genetic factors.

  8. Lung cancer screening: Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyea Young

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide as well as in Korea. A recent National Lung Screening Trial in U.S. revealed that low-dose CT (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer specific mortality by 20% in high risk individuals as compared to chest radiograph screening. Based on this evidence, several expert societies in U.S. and Korean multisociety collaborative committee developed guidelines for recommendation of lung cancer screening using annual LDCT in high risk populations. In most of the societies high risk groups are defined as persons aged 55 to 74 years, who are current smokers with history of smoking of more than 30 packs per year or ex-smokers, who quit smoking up to 15 or more years ago. The benefits of LDCT screening are modestly higher than the harms in high risk individuals. The harms included a high rate of false-positive findings, over-diagnosis and radiation-related deaths. Invasive diagnostic procedure due to false positive findings may lead to complications. LDCT should be performed in qualified hospitals and interpreted by expert radiologists. Recently, the American College of Radiology released the current version of Lung cancer CT screening Reporting and Data Systems. Education and actions to stop smoking must be offered to current smokers

  9. Mechanisms of lung aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenberger, Christina; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Lung aging is associated with structural remodeling, a decline of respiratory function and a higher susceptibility to acute and chronic lung diseases. Individual factors that modulate pulmonary aging include basic genetic configuration, environmental exposure, life-style and biography of systemic diseases. However, the actual aging of the lung takes place in pulmonary resident cells and is closely linked to aging of the immune system (immunosenescence). Therefore, this article reviews the current knowledge about the impact of aging on pulmonary cells and the immune system, without analyzing those factors that may accelerate the aging process in depth. Hallmarks of aging include alterations at molecular, cellular and cell-cell interaction levels. Because of the great variety of cell types in the lung, the consequences of aging display a broad spectrum of phenotypes. For example, aging is associated with more collagen and less elastin production by fibroblasts, thus increasing pulmonary stiffness and lowering compliance. Decreased sympathetic airway innervation may increase the constriction status of airway smooth muscle cells. Aging of resident and systemic immune cells leads to a pro-inflammatory milieu and reduced capacity of fighting infectious diseases. The current review provides an overview of cellular changes occurring with advancing age in general and in several cell types of the lung as well as of the immune system. Thereby, this survey not only aims at providing a better understanding of the mechanisms of pulmonary aging but also to identify gaps in knowledge that warrant further investigations.

  10. Unexpandable lung from pleural disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, John T; Maldonado, Fabien; Chopra, Amit; Rahman, Najib; Light, Richard

    2018-02-01

    Unexpandable lung is a common complication of malignant pleural effusions and inflammatory pleural diseases, such as pleural infection (e.g. empyema and complicated parapneumonic effusion) and noninfectious fibrinous pleuritis. Unexpandable lung due to pleural disease may be because of an active pleural process, and is referred to as malignant or inflammatory lung entrapment. An unexpandable lung may also be encountered in the setting of remote pleural inflammation resulting in a mature fibrous membrane overlying the visceral pleura preventing full expansion of the lung. This condition is termed trapped lung and may be understood as a form of defective healing of the pleural space. Trapped lung typically presents as a chronic, stable pleural effusion without evidence of active pleural disease. An unexpandable lung most often manifests itself as an inability of fully expanding the lung with pleural space drainage. Patients will either develop chest pain preventing complete drainage of the pleural space or develop a post-procedure pneumothorax. Pleural manometry and radiological imaging are useful in the assessment of an unexpandable lung. Pleural manometry can demonstrate abnormal lung expansion during drainage and imaging will demonstrate abnormal visceral pleural thickening found in trapped lung or malignant and inflammatory lung entrapment. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  11. Lung pair phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Peter C.; Gordon, N. Ross; Simmons, Kevin L.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an "authentic lung tissue" or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  12. Advances in lung ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco Neto, Miguel Jose; Rahal Junior, Antonio; Vieira, Fabio Augusto Cardillo; Silva, Paulo Savoia Dias da; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound examination of the chest has advanced in recent decades. This imaging modality is currently used to diagnose several pathological conditions and provides qualitative and quantitative information. Acoustic barriers represented by the aerated lungs and the bony framework of the chest generate well-described sonographic artifacts that can be used as diagnostic aids. The normal pleural line and A, B, C, E and Z lines (also known as false B lines) are artifacts with specific characteristics. Lung consolidation and pneumothorax sonographic patterns are also well established. Some scanning protocols have been used in patient management. The Blue, FALLS and C.A.U.S.E. protocols are examples of algorithms using artifact combinations to achieve accurate diagnoses. Combined chest ultrasonography and radiography are often sufficient to diagnose and manage lung and chest wall conditions. Chest ultrasonography is a highly valuable diagnostic tool for radiologists, emergency and intensive care physicians. (author)

  13. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This picture is a chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and ... visible in the middle of the chest. The x-ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, ...

  14. Staging of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Patricia M; Carter, Brett W; Betancourt Cuellar, Sonia L; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2015-06-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. Thorough clinical staging of patients with lung cancer is important, because therapeutic options and management are to a considerable degree dependent on stage at presentation. Radiologic imaging is an essential component of clinical staging, including chest radiography in some cases, computed tomography, MRI, and PET. Multiplanar imaging modalities allow assessment of features that are important for surgical, oncologic, and radiation therapy planning, including size of the primary tumor, location and relationship to normal anatomic structures in the thorax, and existence of nodal and/or metastatic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lung Cancer Precision Medicine Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with lung cancer are benefiting from the boom in targeted and immune-based therapies. With a series of precision medicine trials, NCI is keeping pace with the rapidly changing treatment landscape for lung cancer.

  16. LungMAP: The Molecular Atlas of Lung Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardini-Poleske, Maryanne E; Clark, Robert F; Ansong, Charles; Carson, James P; Corley, Richard A; Deutsch, Gail H; Hagood, James S; Kaminski, Naftali; Mariani, Thomas J; Potter, Steven S; Pryhuber, Gloria S; Warburton, David; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Palmer, Scott M; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2017-11-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute is funding an effort to create a molecular atlas of the developing lung (LungMAP) to serve as a research resource and public education tool. The lung is a complex organ with lengthy development time driven by interactive gene networks and dynamic cross talk among multiple cell types to control and coordinate lineage specification, cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, morphogenesis, and injury repair. A better understanding of the processes that regulate lung development, particularly alveologenesis, will have a significant impact on survival rates for premature infants born with incomplete lung development and will facilitate lung injury repair and regeneration in adults. A consortium of four research centers, a data coordinating center, and a human tissue repository provides high-quality molecular data of developing human and mouse lungs. LungMAP includes mouse and human data for cross correlation of developmental processes across species. LungMAP is generating foundational data and analysis, creating a web portal for presentation of results and public sharing of data sets, establishing a repository of young human lung tissues obtained through organ donor organizations, and developing a comprehensive lung ontology that incorporates the latest findings of the consortium. The LungMAP website (www.lungmap.net) currently contains more than 6,000 high-resolution lung images and transcriptomic, proteomic, and lipidomic human and mouse data and provides scientific information to stimulate interest in research careers for young audiences. This paper presents a brief description of research conducted by the consortium, database, and portal development and upcoming features that will enhance the LungMAP experience for a community of users. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Effects of exposure equalization on image signal-to-noise ratios in digital mammography: A simulation study with an anthropomorphic breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinming; Lai Chaojen; Whitman, Gary J.; Geiser, William R.; Shen Youtao; Yi Ying; Shaw, Chris C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The scan equalization digital mammography (SEDM) technique combines slot scanning and exposure equalization to improve low-contrast performance of digital mammography in dense tissue areas. In this study, full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired with an anti-scatter grid at various exposure levels were superimposed to simulate SEDM images and investigate the improvement of low-contrast performance as quantified by primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs). Methods: We imaged an anthropomorphic breast phantom (Gammex 169 ''Rachel,'' Gammex RMI, Middleton, WI) at various exposure levels using a FFDM system (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). The exposure equalization factors were computed based on a standard FFDM image acquired in the automatic exposure control (AEC) mode. The equalized image was simulated and constructed by superimposing a selected set of FFDM images acquired at 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 times of exposure levels to the standard AEC timed technique (125 mAs) using the equalization factors computed for each region. Finally, the equalized image was renormalized regionally with the exposure equalization factors to result in an appearance similar to that with standard digital mammography. Two sets of FFDM images were acquired to allow for two identically, but independently, formed equalized images to be subtracted from each other to estimate the noise levels. Similarly, two identically but independently acquired standard FFDM images were subtracted to estimate the noise levels. Corrections were applied to remove the excess system noise accumulated during image superimposition in forming the equalized image. PSNRs over the compressed area of breast phantom were computed and used to quantitatively study the effects of exposure equalization on low-contrast performance in digital mammography. Results: We found that the highest achievable PSNR improvement factor was 1.89 for

  18. AUTOTRANSPLANTATION OF THE LUNG: EXPERIMENTAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    undertaken to investigate the technique of lung trans- plantation in subhuman primates, and to determine lung ..... Perfect intimal approximation seems to be an important aspect of this problem. The value of ... systemic heparinization supplemented by temporary local heparinization of the lung, feeling it offered a measure.

  19. Radiodiagnosis of lung picture changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenetskij, M.S.; Lezova, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    The roentgenological picture of changes of the lung picture in the case of different pathological states in the lungs and the heart, is described. A developed diagnostic algorithm for the syndrome of lung picture change and the rules of its application are given. 5 refs.; 9 figs

  20. Your Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your vocal cords when you're not ready. Love Your Lungs Your lungs are amazing. They allow you to breathe, talk to your friend, shout at a game, sing, laugh, cry, and more! And speaking of a game, your lungs even work with your brain to help you inhale and exhale a larger ...

  1. X-Ray Computed Tomography: Semiautomated Volumetric Analysis of Late-Stage Lung Tumors as a Basis for Response Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendtsen, C.; Kietzmann, M.; Korn, R.; Mozley, P. D.; Schmidt, G.; Binnig, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background. This study presents a semiautomated approach for volumetric analysis of lung tumors and evaluates the feasibility of using volumes as an alternative to line lengths as a basis for response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST). The overall goal for the implementation was to accurately, precisely, and efficiently enable the analyses of lesions in the lung under the guidance of an operator. Methods. An anthropomorphic phantom with embedded model masses and 71 time points in 10 clinical cases with advanced lung cancer was analyzed using a semi-automated workflow. The implementation was done using the Cognition Network Technology. Results. Analysis of the phantom showed an average accuracy of 97%. The analyses of the clinical cases showed both intra- and interreader variabilities of approximately 5% on average with an upper 95% confidence interval of 14% and 19%, respectively. Compared to line lengths, the use of volumes clearly shows enhanced sensitivity with respect to determining response to therapy. Conclusions. It is feasible to perform volumetric analysis efficiently with high accuracy and low variability, even in patients with late-stage cancer who have complex lesions. PMID:21747819

  2. X-Ray Computed Tomography: Semiautomated Volumetric Analysis of Late-Stage Lung Tumors as a Basis for Response Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bendtsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study presents a semiautomated approach for volumetric analysis of lung tumors and evaluates the feasibility of using volumes as an alternative to line lengths as a basis for response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST. The overall goal for the implementation was to accurately, precisely, and efficiently enable the analyses of lesions in the lung under the guidance of an operator. Methods. An anthropomorphic phantom with embedded model masses and 71 time points in 10 clinical cases with advanced lung cancer was analyzed using a semi-automated workflow. The implementation was done using the Cognition Network Technology. Results. Analysis of the phantom showed an average accuracy of 97%. The analyses of the clinical cases showed both intra- and interreader variabilities of approximately 5% on average with an upper 95% confidence interval of 14% and 19%, respectively. Compared to line lengths, the use of volumes clearly shows enhanced sensitivity with respect to determining response to therapy. Conclusions. It is feasible to perform volumetric analysis efficiently with high accuracy and low variability, even in patients with late-stage cancer who have complex lesions.

  3. Effect of reconstruction methods and x-ray tube current–time product on nodule detection in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom: A crossed-modality JAFROC observer study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J. D., E-mail: j.d.thompson@salford.ac.uk [Directorate of Radiography, University of Salford, Frederick Road Campus, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU, United Kingdom and Department of Radiology, Furness General Hospital, University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, Dalton Lane, Barrow-in-Furness LA14 4LF (United Kingdom); Chakraborty, D. P. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, FARP Building, Room 212, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Szczepura, K.; Tootell, A. K. [Directorate of Radiography, University of Salford, Frederick Road Campus, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU (United Kingdom); Vamvakas, I. [Department of Radiology, Christie Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 550 Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Manning, D. J. [Faculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster Medical School, Furness College, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YG (United Kingdom); Hogg, P. [Directorate of Radiography, University of Salford, Frederick Road Campus, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU, United Kingdom and Department of Radiography, Karolinksa Institute, Solnavägen 1, Solna 171 77 (Sweden)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate nodule detection in an anthropomorphic chest phantom in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR{sup 3D}) and filtered back projection (FBP) over a range of tube current–time product (mAs). Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study: (i) an anthropomorphic chest phantom was loaded with spherical simulated nodules of 5, 8, 10, and 12 mm in diameter and +100, −630, and −800 Hounsfield units electron density; this would generate CT images for the observer study; (ii) a whole-body dosimetry verification phantom was used to ultimately estimate effective dose and risk according to the model of the BEIR VII committee. Both phantoms were scanned over a mAs range (10, 20, 30, and 40), while all other acquisition parameters remained constant. Images were reconstructed with both AIDR{sup 3D} and FBP. For the observer study, 34 normal cases (no nodules) and 34 abnormal cases (containing 1–3 nodules, mean 1.35 ± 0.54) were chosen. Eleven observers evaluated images from all mAs and reconstruction methods under the free-response paradigm. A crossed-modality jackknife alternative free-response operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis method was developed for data analysis, averaging data over the two factors influencing nodule detection in this study: mAs and image reconstruction (AIDR{sup 3D} or FBP). A Bonferroni correction was applied and the threshold for declaring significance was set at 0.025 to maintain the overall probability of Type I error at α = 0.05. Contrast-to-noise (CNR) was also measured for all nodules and evaluated by a linear least squares analysis. Results: For random-reader fixed-case crossed-modality JAFROC analysis, there was no significant difference in nodule detection between AIDR{sup 3D} and FBP when data were averaged over mAs [F(1, 10) = 0.08, p = 0.789]. However, when data were averaged over reconstruction methods, a significant difference was seen between

  4. small Cell Lung Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hospital of Qiqihar Medical University Hospital. Inclusion criteria for the current study was histologically and cytologically confirmed NSCLC patients, patients with either lung cancer stage. IIIA, IIIB or IV, chemotherapy naïve, patients having evaluable and measureable disease,. WHO performance status (PS): 0 – 2, no active.

  5. Pediatric acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlem, P.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Bos, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Among ventilated children, the incidence of acute lung injury (ALI) was 9%; of that latter group 80% developed the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The population-based prevalence of pediatric ARDS was 5.5 cases/100.000 inhabitants. Underlying diseases in children were septic shock (34%),

  6. Tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hammen

    2015-01-01

    Our case report presents two patients, who were referred to the Thorax diagnostic centre at the Department of Respiratory Medicine, Odense University Hospital, with presumptive diagnosis of neoplasm and had proved lung TB with no evidence of malignancy instead. In the first case diagnosis was confirmed after thoracotomy, in the second case after bronchoscopy.

  7. Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Eva; Mao, Jenny T.; Lam, Stephen; Reid, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor. Former smokers are at a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer compared with lifetime never smokers. Chemoprevention refers to the use of specific agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent the process of carcinogenesis. This article reviews the major agents that have been studied for chemoprevention. Methods: Articles of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention trials were reviewed and summarized to obtain recommendations. Results: None of the phase 3 trials with the agents β-carotene, retinol, 13-cis-retinoic acid, α-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, acetylsalicylic acid, or selenium has demonstrated beneficial and reproducible results. To facilitate the evaluation of promising agents and to lessen the need for a large sample size, extensive time commitment, and expense, surrogate end point biomarker trials are being conducted to assist in identifying the most promising agents for later-stage chemoprevention trials. With the understanding of important cellular signaling pathways and the expansion of potentially important targets, agents (many of which target inflammation and the arachidonic acid pathway) are being developed and tested which may prevent or reverse lung carcinogenesis. Conclusions: By integrating biologic knowledge, additional early-phase trials can be performed in a reasonable time frame. The future of lung cancer chemoprevention should entail the evaluation of single agents or combinations that target various pathways while working toward identification and validation of intermediate end points. PMID:23649449

  8. Lung Cancer Survivorship

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-20

    A lung cancer survivor shares her story about diagnosis, treatment, and community support. She also gives advice for other cancer survivors.  Created: 10/20/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/20/2016.

  9. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a radioactive gas that comes from the breakdown of uranium in rocks and soil. It seeps up through the ground, and leaks ... show that living in areas with higher levels of air pollution increases the risk of lung cancer. Beta carotene ...

  10. Lung Cancer: Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Timothy F

    2018-01-01

    Lung cancer management that is individualized for age, comorbidities, cancer type, cancer stage, and patient preference has long been a cornerstone of management. New to this realm of individualized management are the emerging biologic therapies, immunotherapies, and targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer provided by advances in genetics and molecular medicine. These techniques have led to a new field of precision medicine based on the unique molecular characteristics of a specific patient and the specific cancer. However, standard management including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy remains the most common management options for stage I through III lung cancers. Advancements in precision medicine are most relevant to patients with stage IV (ie, metastatic) lung cancers. Functional patient assessment and pulmonary function testing are keys to preoperative assessment. Early palliative care and a minimally invasive approach to surgery should be considered in patients who can tolerate surgery. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  11. Predicting occupational lung diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suarthana, E.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis aims at demonstrating the development, validation, and application of prediction models for occupational lung diseases. Prediction models are developed to estimate an individual’s probability of the presence or future likelihood of occurrence of an outcome (i.e. disease of interest or

  12. Procedures of hepatic scintigraphy and improvement of professionals by using anthropomorphic simulator object of liver in nuclear medicine; Procedimentos de cintilografia hepatica e aperfeicoamento de profissionais utilizando objeto simulador antropomorfico de figado em medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Fernanda C.L.; Cunha, Cledison J.; Dullius, Marcos A.; Souza, Divanizia N., E-mail: divanizi@ufs.b [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper evaluates hepatic scintigraphy procedures and the possibility of professional improvement in nuclear medicine by using three-dimension anthropomorphic simulators representative of adult human liver. For the conformation of anthropomorphic simulator, it was used gypsum and acrylic. Three simulator objects representing cirrhosis livers. The simulator were filled with {sup 99m}Tc diluted in water for the obtention of scintigraphic images. Tomographic images were analysed posterior and anterior of simulator representing an organ with more cirrhosis grade. It was observed that the simulators make possible the acquisition of images similar to the real images of liver with hepatic cirrhosis. The simulations of hemangiomas can contribute for continuous education of nuclear medicine professionals, as far the question of image formation is concerned, make possible the parameter study as, for example, the , matrix size energy window, zoom and counting statistic

  13. Calculation of dose in anthropomorphic dummies ICRP 110 simulation of protocols overall for a team of 320 sections TC; Calculo de dosis en maniquies antropomorficos ICRP 110 mediante simulacion de protocolos generales para un equipo de TC de 320 secciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cros Torrents, M.; Geleijns, J.; Salvador Artells, M.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to carry out, using a program of simulation Monte Carlo, an estimate of the dose received in anthropomorphic mannequins voxelized in tests of four protocols established for the Aquilion ONE General acquiring in conical beam of 320 X 0, 5 mm. Finally, will be obtained factors of conversion between values of product dose (DLP) length and effective doses for each protocol. (Author)

  14. Statistical lung model for microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.; Hadley, R.T.

    1984-03-01

    To calculate the microdosimetry of plutonium in the lung, a mathematical description is needed of lung tissue microstructure that defines source-site parameters. Beagle lungs were expanded using a glutaraldehyde fixative at 30 cm water pressure. Tissue specimens, five microns thick, were stained with hematoxylin and eosin then studied using an image analyzer. Measurements were made along horizontal lines through the magnified tissue image. The distribution of air space and tissue chord lengths and locations of epithelial cell nuclei were recorded from about 10,000 line scans. The distribution parameters constituted a model of lung microstructure for predicting the paths of random alpha particle tracks in the lung and the probability of traversing biologically sensitive sites. This lung model may be used in conjunction with established deposition and retention models for determining the microdosimetry in the pulmonary lung for a wide variety of inhaled radioactive materials

  15. Effects of tube potential and scatter rejection on image quality and effective dose in digital chest X-ray examination: An anthropomorphic phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, D.J.; Crawshaw, I.; Rimmer, S.D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of tube potential and scatter rejection techniques on image quality of digital posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was imaged using a range of tube potentials (81–125 kV p ) without scatter rejection, with an anti-scatter grid, and using a 10 cm air gap. Images were anonymised and randomised before being evaluated using a visual graded analysis (VGA) method. Results: The effects of tube potential on image quality were found to be negligible (p > 0.63) for the flat panel detector (FPD). Decreased image quality (p = 0.031) was noted for 125 kV p relative to 109 kV p , though no difference was noted for any of the other potentials (p > 0.398) for computed radiography (CR). Both scatter rejection techniques improved image quality (p p . Scatter rejection improved image quality, but with no difference found between techniques. The air-gap resulted in a smaller increase in effective dose than the anti-scatter grid and would be the preferred scatter rejection technique

  16. Dosimetric comparison of the specific anthropomorphic mannequin (SAM) to 14 anatomical head models using a novel definition for the mobile phone positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, Wolfgang; Christ, Andreas; Kellom, Tocher; Seidman, Seth; Nikoloski, Neviana; Beard, Brian; Kuster, Niels

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents new definitions for obtaining reproducible results in numerical phone dosimetry. Numerous numerical dosimetric studies have been published about the exposure of mobile phone users which concluded with conflicting results. However, many of these studies lack reproducibility due to shortcomings in the description of the phone positioning. The new approach was tested by two groups applying two different numerical program packages to compare the specific anthropomorphic mannequin (SAM) to 14 anatomically correct head models. A novel definition for the positioning of mobile phones next to anatomically correct head models is given along with other essential parameters to be reported. The definition is solely based on anatomical characteristics of the head. A simple up-to-date phone model was used to determine the peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) of mobile phones in SAM and in the anatomically correct head models. The results were validated by measurements. The study clearly shows that SAM gives a conservative estimate of the exposure in anatomically correct head models for head only tissue. Depending on frequency, phone position and head size the numerically calculated 10 g averaged SAR in the pinna can be up to 2.1 times greater than the peak spatial SAR in SAM. Measurements in small structures, such as the pinna, will significantly increase the uncertainty; therefore SAM was designed for SAR assessment in the head only. Whether SAM will provide a conservative value for the pinna depends on the pinna SAR limit of the safety standard considered

  17. Design and development of an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furstoss, Ch.

    2006-11-01

    My PhD study aims to determine the feasibility to design and develop, for photon fields, an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces. First of all, the energy losses within the organs are calculated using the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code, in order to determine the detection positions within the different organs. Then, to decrease the number of detection positions, the organ contribution to the effective dose is studied. Finally, the characteristics of the detectors to insert and the characteristics of the phantom to use are deduced. The results show that 24 or 23 detection positions, according to the wT values (publication 60 or new recommendations of the ICRP), give a E estimation with an uncertainty of ±15 % from 50 keV to 4 MeV. Moreover, the interest of such an instrument is underlined while comparing the E estimation by the personal dose equivalent Hp to the E estimation by the instrumented phantom when the phantom is irradiated by point sources (worker in front of a glove box for example). Last, after the detector and phantom characteristic determination, two types of detectors and one type of phantom are selected. However, for the detectors mainly, developments are necessary. Follow up this study, the characterization and the adaptation of the detectors to the project would be interesting. Furthermore, the study to mixed photon-neutrons would be required the needs of the radiological protection community. (author)

  18. Comparison of airway diameter measurements from an anthropomorphic airway tree phantom using hyperpolarized 3He MRI and high-resolution computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yang-Sheng; Hoffman, Eric; Cook-Granroth, Janice; Maurer, Rie; Shah, Niral; Mansour, Joey; Tschirren, Juerg; Albert, Mitchell

    2007-09-01

    An anthropomorphic airway tree phantom was imaged with both hyperpolarized (HP) 3He MRI using a dynamic projection scan and computed tomography (CT). Airway diameter measurements from the HP 3He MR images obtained using a newly developed model-based algorithm were compared against their corresponding CT values quantified with a well-established method. Of the 45 airway segments that could be evaluated with CT, only 14 airway segments (31%) could be evaluated using HP 3He MRI. No airway segments smaller than approximately 4 mm in diameter and distal to the fourth generation were adequate for analysis in MRI. For the 14 airway segments measured, only two airway segments yielded a non-equivalent comparison between the two imaging modalities, while eight more had inconclusive comparison results, leaving only four airway segments (29%) that satisfied the designed equivalence criteria. Some of the potential problems in airway diameter quantification described in the formulation of the model-based algorithm were observed in this study. These results suggest that dynamic projection HP 3He MRI may have limited utility for measuring airway segment diameters, particularly those of the central airways. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Use of an anthropomorphic hand phantom to verify the radiation intensity that is needed to modify the analog and digital radiographic quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandeira, Caroline K.; Vieira, Michele P.M.M.; Felix, Jose E.R.

    2014-01-01

    The radiology is a field of medicine that is in constantly expansion and advancing. This can be noticed with the transition from analog to digital radiology systems, it is important that professionals understand image formation in both systems in order to produce radiographies with diagnostic quality. Therefore, the objective of this work is to present the importance of radiological protection by changing values of technical parameters while the quality of radiographic imaging is sustained. An anthropomorphic hand phantom was built in order to obtain radiographies, as it is necessary to respect the Brazilian regulations (Portaria 453/98) which forbids the use of radiation in patients for testing. Three analog and eight digital radiographies were obtained using fixed kVp and varying mAs. Each image was compared to the others acquired in the same location. Digital radiographies have shown that approximately 28% of change in mAs is necessary to change noise, whereas approximately 33,3% is necessary in the analog system to change density. The conclusion is that computerized systems need less x-ray intensity to modify image features and can reduce the patient radiation doses. However, more testing must be conducted in different radiologic environments to confirm the results obtained in the present study. (author)

  20. Optimization of energy window and evaluation of scatter compensation methods in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer with and without model mismatch and an anthropomorphic model observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We used the ideal observer (IO) and IO with model mismatch (IO-MM) applied in the projection domain and an anthropomorphic channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) applied to reconstructed images to optimize the acquisition energy window width and to evaluate various scatter compensation methods in the context of a myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) defect detection task. The IO has perfect knowledge of the image formation process and thus reflects the performance with perfect compensation for image-degrading factors. Thus, using the IO to optimize imaging systems could lead to suboptimal parameters compared with those optimized for humans interpreting SPECT images reconstructed with imperfect or no compensation. The IO-MM allows incorporating imperfect system models into the IO optimization process. We found that with near-perfect scatter compensation, the optimal energy window for the IO and CHO was similar; in its absence, the IO-MM gave a better prediction of the optimal energy window for the CHO using different scatter compensation methods. These data suggest that the IO-MM may be useful for projection-domain optimization when MM is significant and that the IO is useful when followed by reconstruction with good models of the image formation process. PMID:26029730

  1. Investigation of the characteristics of Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) of a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner by utilising cylindrical and anthropomorphic phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulaidi, W. E. P.; Huri, M. S. N.; Ng, K. H.

    2017-05-01

    One method to optimise the use of x-rays in CT and hence a reduction in patient dose is the application of automatic exposure control (AEC). This study measured the effective mAs, image noise and volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) as the result of changing the AEC index on a Siemens Somatom Definition 64 slices dual source CT scanner. The scans were performed on four phantoms of different geometries, namely the 16 and 32 cm cylindrical CTDI phantoms and two anthropomorphic phantoms, RANDO (20 cm effective diameter) and ATOM (19.8 cm effective diameter). Results showed that the effective mAs increased with increasing tube potential (kVp) and Quality Reference mAs (QRM), therefore increasing CTDIvol while reducing image noise. Meanwhile, no changes of radiation dose and image noise were observed when the pitch was increased. However, for the largest phantom (32 cm effective diameter), a constant effective mAs was found between 120 and 140 kVp. The same trend was also found with increasing QRM from 300 mAs to 400 mAs suggesting a certain limitation of the AEC has been reached. In conclusion, this study showed that AEC is affected by kVp and QRM but not by pitch selection. Further work is required to quantify the characteristics of the AEC system in relation to the mentioned parameters for better optimisation.

  2. Quantifying the effects of iodine contrast media on standardised uptake values of FDG PET/CT images: an anthropomorphic phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Nordin, Abdul Jalil; Ackerly, Trevor; Van Every, Bruce; Martin, Ruth; Geso, Moshi

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to quantify the amount of change in Standardised Uptake Values (SUVs) of PET/CT images by simulating the set-up as closely as possible to the actual patient scanning. The experiments were conducted using an anthropomorphic phantom, which contained an amount of radioactivity in the form of Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in a primary plastic test tube and one litre saline bags, including the insertion of bony structures and another two test tubes containing different concentrations of iodine contrast media. Standard scanning protocols were employed for the PET/CT image acquisition. The highest absolute differences in the SUVmax and SUVmean values of the saline bags were found to be about 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The primary test tube showed the largest change of 1.5 in both SUVs; SUV max and SUVmean. However, none of these changes were found to be statistically significant. The clinical literature also contains no evidence to suggest that the changes of this magnitude would change the final diagnosis. Based on these preliminary data, we propose that iodine contrast media can be used during the CT scan of PET/CT imaging, without significantly affecting the diagnostic quality of this integrated imaging modality.

  3. Increased mean lung density: Another independent predictor of lung cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverzellati, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.sverzellati@unipr.it [Department of Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Parma, Padiglione Barbieri, University Hospital of Parma, V. Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Randi, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgia.randi@marionegri.it [Department of Epidemiology, Mario Negri Institute, Via La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Spagnolo, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.spagnolo@unimore.it [Respiratory Disease Unit, Center for Rare Lung Disease, Department of Oncology, Hematology and Respiratory Disease, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via del Pozzo 71, 44124 Modena (Italy); Marchianò, Alfonso, E-mail: alfonso.marchiano@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Radiology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Silva, Mario, E-mail: mac.mario@hotmail.it [Department of Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Parma, Padiglione Barbieri, University Hospital of Parma, V. Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin, E-mail: Jan-Martin.Kuhnigk@mevis.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Universitaetsallee 29, 28359 Bremen (Germany); La Vecchia, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.lavecchia@marionegri.it [Department of Occupational Health, University of Milan, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.zompatori@unibo.it [Department of Radiology, Cardio-Thoracic Section, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Albertoni 15, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Pastorino, Ugo, E-mail: ugo.pastorino@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Surgery, Section of Thoracic Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between emphysema phenotype, mean lung density (MLD), lung function and lung cancer by using an automated multiple feature analysis tool on thin-section computed tomography (CT) data. Methods: Both emphysema phenotype and MLD evaluated by automated quantitative CT analysis were compared between outpatients and screening participants with lung cancer (n = 119) and controls (n = 989). Emphysema phenotype was defined by assessing features such as extent, distribution on core/peel of the lung and hole size. Adjusted multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate independent associations of CT densitometric measurements and pulmonary function test (PFT) with lung cancer risk. Results: No emphysema feature was associated with lung cancer. Lung cancer risk increased with decreasing values of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) independently of MLD (OR 5.37, 95% CI: 2.63–10.97 for FEV{sub 1} < 60% vs. FEV{sub 1} ≥ 90%), and with increasing MLD independently of FEV{sub 1} (OR 3.00, 95% CI: 1.60–5.63 for MLD > −823 vs. MLD < −857 Hounsfield units). Conclusion: Emphysema per se was not associated with lung cancer whereas decreased FEV{sub 1} was confirmed as being a strong and independent risk factor. The cross-sectional association between increased MLD and lung cancer requires future validations.

  4. Diffuse parenchymal lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Tomassetti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Between September 2015 and August 2016 there were >1500 publications in the field of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs. For the Clinical Year in Review session at the European Respiratory Society Congress that was held in London, UK, in September 2016, we selected only five articles. This selection, made from the enormous number of published papers, does not include all the relevant studies that will significantly impact our knowledge in the field of DPLDs in the near future. This review article provides our personal view on the following topics: early diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, current knowledge on the multidisciplinary team diagnosis of DPLDs and the diagnostic role of transbronchial cryobiopsy in this diagnostic setting, insights on the new entity of interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features, and new therapeutic approaches for scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease.

  5. Angiosarcoma of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafino, Monica; Alves, Paula; Almeida, Margarida Mendes de; Garrido, Patricia; Hasmucrai, Direndra; Teixeira, Encarnacao; Sotto-Mayor, Renato, E-mail: mgrafino@gmail.com [Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte, EPE, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-06-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare malignant vascular tumor. Pulmonary involvement is usually attributable to metastasis from other primary sites, primary pulmonary angiosarcoma therefore being quite uncommon. We report a case of angiosarcoma with pulmonary involvement, probably primary to the lung, which had gone untreated for more than two years. We describe this rare neoplasm and its growth, as well as the extensive local invasion and hematogenous metastasis at presentation. We also discuss its poor prognosis. (author)

  6. Lung function; Lungenfunktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorichter, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg, Abteilung Pneumologie, Freiburg (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The term lung function is often restricted to the assessment of volume time curves measured at the mouth. Spirometry includes the assessment of lung volumes which can be mobilised with the corresponding flow-volume curves. In addition, lung volumes that can not be mobilised, such as the residual volume, or only partially as FRC and TLC can be measured by body plethysmography combined with the determination of the airway resistance. Body plethysmography allows the correct positioning of forced breathing manoeuvres on the volume-axis, e.g. before and after pharmacotherapy. Adding the CO single breath transfer factor (T{sub LCO}), which includes the measurement of the ventilated lung volume using He, enables a clear diagnosis of different obstructive, restrictive or mixed ventilatory defects with and without trapped air. Tests of reversibility and provocation, as well as the assessment of inspiratory mouth pressures (PI{sub max}, P{sub 0.1}) help to classify the underlying disorder and to clarify treatment strategies. For further information and to complete the diagnostic of disturbances of the ventilation, diffusion and/or perfusion (capillar-)arterial bloodgases at rest and under physical strain sometimes amended by ergospirometry are recommended. Ideally, lung function measurements are amended by radiological and nuclear medicine techniques. (orig.) [German] Unter dem Begriff Lungenfunktion wird die Bestimmung der Lungenvolumina am Mund verstanden. Dabei werden die mobilisierbaren Lungenvolumina mit den zugehoerigen Fluss-Volumen-Kurven mittels Spirometrie und Ganzkoerperplethysmographie (GKP) und die nicht (RV) und teilweise mobilisierbaren Lungenvolumina (FRC, TLC) einschliesslich der Atemwegswiderstaende bestimmt. Die GKP ermoeglicht zusaetzlich die korrekte (Volumenachsen-)Positionierung der forcierten Atemmanoever. Dieses erlaubt eine uebersichtlichere graphische Darstellung z. B. vor und nach der Applikation pharmakologisch wirksamer Substanzen. Wird die GKP

  7. Translating bed total body irradiation lung shielding and dose optimization using asymmetric MLC apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shahbaz; Brown, Derek; Ahmed, Saad B. S.; Kakakhel, Muhammad B.; Muhammad, Wazir

    2016-01-01

    A revised translating bed total body irradiation (TBI) technique is developed for shielding organs at risk (lungs) to tolerance dose limits, and optimizing dose distribution in three dimensions (3D) using an asymmetrically‐adjusted, dynamic multileaf collimator. We present a dosimetric comparison of this technique with a previously developed symmetric MLC‐based TBI technique. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom is CT scanned with 3 mm slice thickness. Radiological depths (RD) are calculated on individual CT slices along the divergent ray lines. Asymmetric MLC apertures are defined every 9 mm over the phantom length in the craniocaudal direction. Individual asymmetric MLC leaf positions are optimized based on RD values of all slices for uniform dose distributions. Dose calculations are performed in the Eclipse treatment planning system over these optimized MLC apertures. Dose uniformity along midline of the RANDO phantom is within the confidence limit (CL) of 2.1% (with a confidence probability p=0.065). The issue of over‐ and underdose at the interfaces that is observed when symmetric MLC apertures are used is reduced from more than ±4% to less than ±1.5% with asymmetric MLC apertures. Lungs are shielded by 20%, 30%, and 40% of the prescribed dose by adjusting the MLC apertures. Dose‐volume histogram analysis confirms that the revised technique provides effective lung shielding, as well as a homogeneous dose coverage to the whole body. The asymmetric technique also reduces hot and cold spots at lung‐tissue interfaces compared to previous symmetric MLC‐based TBI technique. MLC‐based shielding of OARs eliminates the need to fabricate and setup cumbersome patient‐specific physical blocks. PACS number(s): 87.55.‐x, 87.55.de, 87.55.D‐ PMID:27074477

  8. Diagnostic Imaging of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Kara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related death in men and women. It is frequently seen among men than in women and male-female ratio is 1.5:1. Common epidemiological factors that increase risk of lung cancer is smoking. Early age to start smoking, high number of smoking cigarettes per a day and depth of inhalation increase risk of lung cancer. 25% of patients with lung cancer are nonsmokers that passively exposed to cigarette smoke. Occupational exposure to substances such as asbestos, arsenic, nickel, beryllium, mustard gas increases the risk of lung cancer. The well defined risk factor is exposure to asbestos. In addition advanced age, diffuse pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and genetic predisposition are the risk factors that increases lung cancer. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(6.000: 749-756

  9. PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS OF LUNG INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Marushchak

    2016-05-01

    Results and conclusions. The topical issue of lung pathogenetic injury is to understand the signs and mechanisms responsible for regulation of free radical oxidation and antioxidant defense system, the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules, the influence of active metabolites on the process of restoration and survival of the respiratory tract cells in cases of acute lung injury. The studies of this processes will help to obtain more knowledge on lung pathology.

  10. Lung ventilation imaging with TECHNEGAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunko, Hisashi; Seto, Mikito; Kuji, Ichiei; Miyauchi, Tsutomu; Hisada, Kinichi

    1991-01-01

    In order to optimize inhalation method for lung ventilation imaging with Tc-99m-gas (TECHNEGAS), relation between lung deposition of TECHNEGAS and inhalation method was evaluated. Submaximal inhalation with breath-holding (BH), continuous submaximal inhalation (C) and tidal inhalation (TV) were compared in 35 patients (36 studies) with various lung diseases. Mean lung deposition of TECHNEGAS was 6.6-7.4%/LD in BH group and was significantly higher than other groups of inhalation method (p<0.05-0.001). Lung deposition increased according to the times of inhalation in C group. TV group resulted in the lowest lung deposition which was the same as 5 times of inhalation in C group. Lung/filter ratio (L/F) was highest in BH group. Image quality of TECHNEGAS was significantly better in BH group. Hot spot in central airway was seen in 15% of patients. All of them was in TV or C groups. In order to improve lung deposition and image quality of the TECHNEGAS, sufficient breath-holding was important. L/F seemed to be the index of effective inhalation of the TECHNEGAS. TV was suitable for poorly cooperative or dyspneic patients. TECHNEGAS was useful for evaluation of lung ventilation to provide good quality image with safety and simplicity. (author)

  11. Lung cancer: principles and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pass, Harvey I

    2005-01-01

    "A comprehensive review of lung cancer, from screening, early detection, and prevention, to management strategies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and multimodality therapy, as well...

  12. Interstitial lung diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with interstitial lung diseases in children. It gives an update and the results of the authors’ observations of different forms of interstitial lung diseases. Particular emphasis is placed on hypersensitive pneumonitis as the most common nosological entity among childhood interstitial lung diseases. The authors followed up 186 children with hypersensitive pneumonitis. They present the most important clinical, functional, radiological, and immunological diagnostic signs of this disease and consider its prognosis. In addition, there is evidence for other rare forms of interstitial lung diseases (idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis, etc. in children. 

  13. The dysmorphic lung: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, J.M.; Caceres, J.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital lung malformations are not infrequent and can be discovered in adults. It is, therefore, necessary to know their radiological manifestations in order to avoid diagnostic errors. We classify the congenital lung malformations in two main groups: dysmorphic lung and focal pulmonary malformations. We review the radiological spectrum of dysmorphic lung, based on a classification that emphasises the pulmonary abnormality, adding variants when diaphragmatic or venous abnormalities are present. In our opinion this approach allows for a rational use of advanced imaging techniques (CT, MRI). (orig.). With 13 figs

  14. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. La trampa del antropomorfismo. Hacia una interfaz (más compleja de lo social The trap of anthropomorphism. Towards a (more complex social interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iñaki Martínez de Albeniz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available La enseñanza de la sociología supone, hoy día, una cura de humildad. Por más que acudamos a sofisticados modelos teóricos (la sociedad líquida, la teoría de sistemas, la fluidez social, la teoría del actor-red, que cuestionan las bases fundacionales de la sociología clásica, la práctica docente evidencia que entre los estudiantes sigue imperando una imagen simple o esquemática de lo social. La sorpresa es mayor si asumimos que se trata de una generación que se ha socializado en el uso de herramientas digitales que facilitan, en principio, la elaboración de mapas más acordes con la complejidad que lo social reviste. El antropomorfismo, la idea de que la sociedad es ante todo un agrupamiento más o menos estable de individuos, es el límite infranqueable que sigue imponiéndose a la hora de entender lo social. Para minar esta visión hegemónica es preciso acudir a disciplinas como el arte (digital, las nuevas tecnología y, en general, las innovaciones estéticas, no tanto para destruir esa representación antropomórfica de lo social sino para desfigurándola prefigurar otras más acordes con una complejidad que ya no sólo intuimos y cuyo aliento sentimos muy cerca. The teaching of sociology is today a humbling experience. Although we use complex theoretical models (the liquid society, system theory, social fluidity or Actor-Network Theory that question the foundational bases of classical sociology, teaching practice shows that a simple or schematic picture of the social continues to prevail among students. The surprise is even greater when we consider that this is a generation that has been socialized in the use of digital tools, a resource that, in principle, should facilitate a mapping of social reality more appropriate to its complexity. Anthropomorphism, the idea that society is primarily a more or less stable grouping of individuals, is the impassable limit that continues to be imposed when it comes to understanding

  16. Effect of imaging parameters of spiral CT scanning on image quality for the dental implants. Visual evaluation using a semi-anthropomorphic mandible phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Yasuhiko; Indou, Hiroko; Honda Eiichi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of parameters of spiral CT scanning on the image quality required for the planning of dental implants operations. A semi-anthropomorphic mandible phantom which has artificial mandibular canals and teeth roots was used as a standard object for imaging. Spiral CT scans for the phantom settled in water phantom with diameters of 20 and 16 cm were performed. Visibility of the artificial mandibular canal made of a Teflon tube and gaps between tooth apex and canal in the mandibular phantom was evaluated for various combinations of the slice thickness, tables speeds, angles to the canal, and x-ray tube currents. Teeth roots were made of PVC (poly vinyl chloride). The artificial mandibular canal was clearly observed on the images of 1 mm slice thickness. At the same table speed of 2 mm /rotation, the images of thin slice (1 mm) were superior to that of thick slice (2 mm). The gap between teeth apex and canal was erroneously diagnosed on the images with table speeds of 3 mm/rotation. Horizontal scanning in parallel to the canal result in poor image quality for observation of mandibular canals because of the partial volume effect. A relatively high x-ray tube current (125 mA) at thin slice (1 mm) scanning was required for scanning the mandibular phantom in 20 cm water vessel. Spiral scanning with slice thickness of 1 mm and table speeds of 1 of 2 mm/rotation seemed to be suitable for dental implants. The result of this study suggested that diagnosis from two independent spiral scans with a different angle to the object was more accurate and more efficient than single spiral scanning. (author)

  17. Assessment of head injury risk associated with feet-first free falls in 12-month-old children using an anthropomorphic test device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Angela K; Bertocci, Gina; Pierce, Mary Clyde

    2009-04-01

    Short distance falls are a common false history provided in cases of child abuse. Falls are also a common occurrence in ambulating young children. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of head injury in short distance feet-first free falls for a 12-month-old child. Feet-first free falls were simulated using an anthropomorphic test device. Three fall heights and five surfaces were tested to determine whether changing fall environment characteristics leads to differences in head injury risk outcomes. Linear head accelerations were measured and angular head accelerations in the anterior-posterior direction were determined. Head injury criteria values and impact durations were also determined for each fall. The mean peak linear head acceleration across all trials was 52.2g. HIC15 values were all below the injury assessment reference value. The mean peak angular head acceleration across all trials was 4,246 rad/s2. Impact durations ranged from 12.1 milliseconds to 27.8 milliseconds. In general, head accelerations were greater and impact durations were lower for surfaces with lower coefficients of restitution (a measure of resiliency). In falls onto wood and linoleum over concrete, the ground-based fall was associated with greater accelerations than the two higher fall heights. Results show that fall dynamics play an important role in head injury outcome measures. Different fall heights and impact surfaces led to differences in head injury risk, but the risk of severe head injury across all tested scenarios was low for a 12-month-old child in feet-first free falls.

  18. Study on motion artifacts in coronary arteries with an anthropomorphic moving heart phantom on an ECG-gated multidetector computed tomography unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Dorgelo, Joost; Tukker, Wim G.J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2005-01-01

    Acquisition time plays a key role in the quality of cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and is directly related to the rotation time of the scanner. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of heart rate and a multisector reconstruction algorithm on the image quality of coronary arteries of an anthropomorphic adjustable moving heart phantom on an ECG-gated MDCT unit. The heart phantom and a coronary artery phantom were used on a MDCT unit with a rotation time of 500 ms. The movement of the heart was determined by analysis of the images taken at different phases. The results indicate that the movement of the coronary arteries on the heart phantom is comparable to that in a clinical setting. The influence of the heart rate on image quality and artifacts was determined by analysis of several heart rates between 40 and 80 bpm where the movement of the heart was synchronized using a retrospective ECG-gated acquisition protocol. The resulting reformatted volume rendering images of the moving heart and the coronary arteries were qualitatively compared as a result of the heart rate. The evaluation was performed on three independent series by two independent radiologists for the image quality of the coronary arteries and the presence of artifacts. The evaluation shows that at heart rates above 50 bpm the influence of motion artifacts in the coronary arteries becomes apparent. In addition the influence of a dedicated multisector reconstruction technique on image quality was determined. The results show that the image quality of the coronary arteries is not only related to the heart rate and that the influence of the multisector reconstruction technique becomes significant above 70 bpm. Therefore, this study proves that from the actual acquisition time per heart cycle one cannot determine an actual acquisition time, but only a mathematical acquisition time. (orig.)

  19. Size matching in lung transplantation using predicted total lung capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwens, JP; van der Mark, TW; van der Bij, W; Koeter, GH

    2002-01-01

    Height is used in allocation of donor lungs as an indirect estimate of thoracic size. Total lung capacity (TLC), determined by both height and sex, could be a more accurate functional estimation of thoracic size. Size-matching criteria based on height versus predicted TLC was retrospectively

  20. Immunologic lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The term immunologic lung disease comprises a broad spectrum of disease. The authors have covered a few entities in which recent studies have been particularly helpful in elucidating pathophysiology though not in uncovering the inciting cause. Common to all of these entities is the problem of finding appropriate methods of defining disease activity and response to treatment. As exemplified by the improved outlook for Goodpasture's syndrome with elucidation of its underlying immunopathology, it is likely that better understanding of the immunologic basis of sarcoid and interstitial disease may be helpful in planning more effective treatment strategies. 44 references

  1. Epithelioid lung haenangioendiothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finozzi, V.; Andrade, E.; Campos, N.; Pizarrosa, C.

    2000-01-01

    The first national case of epithelioid lung haenangioendiothelioma concerned a 60 years old woman. Clinical picture and TC diagnosis showed a vascularized tumor producing persistent haenoptoic expectoration.It is necessary to be acquainted with it for the purpose of a differentiated diagnosis. It is a tumor with specific immunohistochemical markers against factor V III.Treatment consisted of surgical resection. Concerning its classification it is situated at the limit between benign and malignant, prognosis is usually good, but evolution is slow, extending for over 20 years

  2. Black lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramani, R.V.; Frantz, R.L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Coal workers` pneumoconiosis (CWP), often called Black Lung Disease is a occupational disease which results from inhalation of coal mine dust which usually contains small amounts of free crystalline silica. This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the epidemiology and clinical aspects of CWP and how it has been controlled in the USA through the 1969 Coal Mine Act and dust level standards. It describes the sampling methods used. Medical control methods and engineering control of the disease is discussed. Work of the Generic Mineral Technology Center for Respirable Dust is described. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Although rheumatoid arthritis primarily affects joints, it sometimes causes lung disease ...

  4. Single-Lung Ventilation with Contralateral Lung Deflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallan, Luís Alberto O.; Lisboa, Luiz Augusto F.; Platania, Fernando; Oliveira, Sérgio A.; Stolf, Noedir A.

    2007-01-01

    There are many new alternative methods of minimally invasive myocardial revascularization that can be applied in selected patients who have multivessel coronary artery disease. However, these techniques often require new and expensive equipment. Most multivessel myocardial revascularization is performed via median sternotomy and involves the use of a conventional endotracheal tube. Both lungs are ventilated, and frequently the left pleural cavity is opened. In contrast, single-lung deflation naturally moves the mediastinum within the thorax toward the collapsed lung, without the need to open the pleural cavities. Herein, we describe a simple alternative procedure that facilitates off-pump multivessel coronary artery bypass grafting via complete median sternotomy: single-lung ventilation with contralateral lung deflation. This technique better exposes the more distal right and circumflex coronary artery branches with or without the opening of the pleural cavities. PMID:17622364

  5. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menten, Martin J.; Fast, Martin F.; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left–right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the influence of

  6. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menten, Martin J; Fast, Martin F; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left-right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. This study has highlighted the influence of patient anatomy on the success rate of real

  7. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menten, Martin J., E-mail: martin.menten@icr.ac.uk; Fast, Martin F.; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.oelfke@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left–right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the influence of

  8. Polonium and Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Zagà

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210 is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226 and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210 and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties.

  9. Lung and oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherrah-Davies, E.

    1985-01-01

    The author discusses cancer of the lung and oesophagus. The author says lung cancer is increasing and there is no real improvement in the cure rates. It is natural to think of instituting some method of screening the population mostly at risk, in order to detect changes at an earlier stage of development. It seems to be tacitly agreed that screening methods so far known (mass radiography, sputum cytology, and possibly fibre-optic bronchoscopy) are likely to give a poor return, and would certainly be inordinately expensive. The recognition of air pollution as a major problem, and the attempts being made to deal with it, may help. Antismoking propaganda seems to have had little or no value, and it is unlikely that human nature will change and the public will stop smoking en masse. It also seems unlikely that any government will ever attempt to ban cigarettes when the tobacco tax is so lucrative. In short, the outlook at the moment is indeed pessimistic and one can only hope that some unexpected avenue of advance will appear soon

  10. Microbiome overview in swine lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Pérez-Wohlfeil, Esteban; Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; Trelles, Oswaldo; Schrank, Irene Silveira; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiologic agent of swine enzootic pneumonia. However other mycoplasma species and secondary bacteria are found as inhabitants of the swine respiratory tract, which can be also related to disease. In the present study we have performed a total DNA metagenomic analysis from the lungs of pigs kept in a field condition, with suggestive signals of enzootic pneumonia and without any infection signals to evaluate the bacteria variability of the lungs microbiota. Libraries from metagenomic DNA were prepared and sequenced using total DNA shotgun metagenomic pyrosequencing. The metagenomic distribution showed a great abundance of bacteria. The most common microbial families identified from pneumonic swine's lungs were Mycoplasmataceae, Flavobacteriaceae and Pasteurellaceae, whereas in the carrier swine's lungs the most common families were Mycoplasmataceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Flavobacteriaceae. Analysis of community composition in both samples confirmed the high prevalence of M. hyopneumoniae. Moreover, the carrier lungs had more diverse family population, which should be related to the lungs normal flora. In summary, we provide a wide view of the bacterial population from lungs with signals of enzootic pneumonia and lungs without signals of enzootic pneumonia in a field situation. These bacteria patterns provide information that may be important for the establishment of disease control measures and to give insights for further studies.

  11. Ventilator-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, J D; Dreyfuss, D; Saumon, G

    2003-08-01

    During mechanical ventilation, high end-inspiratory lung volume (whether it be because of large tidal volume (VT) and/or high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure) results in a permeability type pulmonary oedema, called ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Previous injury sensitises lung to mechanical ventilation. This experimental concept has recently received a resounding clinical illustration after a 22% reduction of mortality was observed in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients whose VT had been reduced. In addition, it has been suggested that repetitive opening and closing of distal units at low lung volume could induce lung injury but this notion has been challenged both conceptually and clinically after the negative results of the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome clinical Network Assessment of Low tidal Volume and Elevated end-expiratory volume to Obviate Lung Injury (ARDSNet ALVEOLI) study. Experimentally and clinically, involvement of inflammatory cytokines in VILI has not been unequivocally demonstrated. Cellular response to mechanical stretch has been increasingly investigated, both on the epithelial and the endothelial side. Lipid membrane trafficking has been thought to be a means by which cells respond to stress failure. Alterations in the respiratory system pressure/volume curve during ventilator-induced lung injury that include decrease in compliance and position of the upper inflection point are due to distal obstruction of airways that reduce aerated lung volume. Information from this curve could help avoid potentially harmful excessive tidal volume reduction.

  12. Bricklayers and lung cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The article ‘Lung cancer risk among bricklayers in a pooled analysis of case–control studies’ in the International Journal of Cancer publishes findings of an epidemiological study (in the frame of a SYNERGY-project) dedicated to the lung cancer risk among bricklayers. The authors conclude that a

  13. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    Full Text Available HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection.

  14. Microbiome overview in swine lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele Maboni Siqueira

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiologic agent of swine enzootic pneumonia. However other mycoplasma species and secondary bacteria are found as inhabitants of the swine respiratory tract, which can be also related to disease. In the present study we have performed a total DNA metagenomic analysis from the lungs of pigs kept in a field condition, with suggestive signals of enzootic pneumonia and without any infection signals to evaluate the bacteria variability of the lungs microbiota. Libraries from metagenomic DNA were prepared and sequenced using total DNA shotgun metagenomic pyrosequencing. The metagenomic distribution showed a great abundance of bacteria. The most common microbial families identified from pneumonic swine's lungs were Mycoplasmataceae, Flavobacteriaceae and Pasteurellaceae, whereas in the carrier swine's lungs the most common families were Mycoplasmataceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Flavobacteriaceae. Analysis of community composition in both samples confirmed the high prevalence of M. hyopneumoniae. Moreover, the carrier lungs had more diverse family population, which should be related to the lungs normal flora. In summary, we provide a wide view of the bacterial population from lungs with signals of enzootic pneumonia and lungs without signals of enzootic pneumonia in a field situation. These bacteria patterns provide information that may be important for the establishment of disease control measures and to give insights for further studies.

  15. A lung function information system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F.M. Verbraak (Anton); E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); J. de Vries (Julius); J.M. Bogaard (Jan); A. Versprille (Adrian)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract A lung function information system (LFIS) was developed for the data analysis of pulmonary function tests at different locations. This system was connected to the hospital information system (HIS) for the retrieval of patient data and the storage of the lung function

  16. Lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adler, Frederick R; Aurora, Paul; Barker, David H; Barr, Mark L; Blackwell, Laura S; Bosma, Otto H; Brown, Samuel; Cox, D R; Jensen, Judy L; Kurland, Geoffrey; Nossent, George D; Quittner, Alexandra L; Robinson, Walter M; Romero, Sandy L; Spencer, Helen; Sweet, Stuart C; van der Bij, Wim; Vermeulen, J; Verschuuren, Erik A M; Vrijlandt, Elianne J L E; Walsh, William; Woo, Marlyn S; Liou, Theodore G

    2009-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a complex, high-risk, potentially life-saving therapy for the end-stage lung disease of cystic fibrosis (CF). The decision to pursue transplantation involves comparing the likelihood of survival with and without transplantation as well as assessing the effect of wait-listing

  17. Lung cancer in younger patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death. The incidence increases with age and the occurrence in young patients is relatively low. The clinicopathological features of lung cancer in younger patients have not been fully explored previously. METHODS: To assess the age...... differences in the clinical characteristics of lung cancer, we conducted a retrospective analysis comparing young patients ≤ 65 years of age with an elderly group > 65 years of age. Among 1,232 patients evaluated due to suspicion of lung cancer in our fast-track setting from January-December 2013, 312 newly...... diagnosed lung cancer patients were included. RESULTS: Patients ≤ 65 years had a significantly higher representation of females (p = 0.0021), more frequent familial cancer aggregation (p = 0.028) and a lower incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0133). When excluding pure carcinoid tumours...

  18. Advances in lung ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Miguel José; Rahal, Antonio; Vieira, Fabio Augusto Cardillo; Silva, Paulo Savoia Dias da; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmão

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound examination of the chest has advanced in recent decades. This imaging modality is currently used to diagnose several pathological conditions and provides qualitative and quantitative information. Acoustic barriers represented by the aerated lungs and the bony framework of the chest generate well-described sonographic artifacts that can be used as diagnostic aids. The normal pleural line and A, B, C, E and Z lines (also known as false B lines) are artifacts with specific characteristics. Lung consolidation and pneumothorax sonographic patterns are also well established. Some scanning protocols have been used in patient management. The Blue, FALLS and C.A.U.S.E. protocols are examples of algorithms using artifact combinations to achieve accurate diagnoses. Combined chest ultrasonography and radiography are often sufficient to diagnose and manage lung and chest wall conditions. Chest ultrasonography is a highly valuable diagnostic tool for radiologists, emergency and intensive care physicians. RESUMO O exame ultrassonográfico do tórax avançou nas últimas décadas, sendo utilizado para o diagnóstico de inúmeras condições patológicas, e fornecendo informações qualitativas e quantitativas. Os pulmões aerados e o arcabouço ósseo do tórax representam barreira sonora para o estudo ultrassonográfico, gerando artefatos que, bem conhecidos, são utilizados como ferramentas diagnósticas. Eco pleural normal, linhas A, linhas B, linhas C, linhas E e Z (conhecidas como falsas linhas B) são artefatos com características peculiares. Os padrões de consolidação e de pneumotórax também são bem estabelecidos. Alguns protocolos têm sido utilizados no manuseio dos pacientes: Blue Protocol, Protocolo FALLS e Protocolo C.A.U.S.E são exemplos de três propostas que, por meio da associação entre os artefatos, permitem sugerir diagnósticos precisos. A ultrassonografia de tórax, aliada à radiografia de tórax, muitas vezes é suficiente para o diagn

  19. Development of virtual anthropomorphism of head mathematical model for using in dosimetry computerized simulation; Desenvolvimento de modelo matematico antropomorfico virtual de cabeca para utilizacao em simulacao computacional de dosimetria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassola, V.F.; Hoff, G.; Streck, E.E. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Fisica. Grupo de Experimentacao e Simulacao Computacional em Fisica (GESiC)]. E-mail: ghoff@pucrs.br

    2004-07-01

    This paper shows the development of a virtual anthropomorphous model of head, considering different tissue composition, based in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) images. The head original images were acquired in an equipment of NMR GE Sigma Horizon LX 1.5 T Echo Speed, available in the clinic of diagnosis for image SIDI. These images were segmented using routines developed in C++ language. The generated model is a group of 124 matrices of sequential data in format ASCII, where 26 indices evidence different structures. (author)

  20. Soluble ICAM-1 activates lung macrophages and enhances lung injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B

    1998-01-01

    of the proteosome inhibitor and by genistein. Alveolar macrophages showed adherence to immobilized sICAM-1 in a CD18-dependent manner. Finally, airway instillation of sICAM-1 intensified lung injury produced by intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes in a manner associated with enhanced lung production...... of TNF-alpha and MIP-2 and increased neutrophil recruitment. Therefore, through engagement of beta2 integrins, sICAM-1 enhances alveolar macrophage production of MIP-2 and TNF-alpha, the result of which is intensified lung injury after intrapulmonary disposition of immune complexes....

  1. Lung (agricultural/rural).

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Pico, G A

    1996-02-01

    Industrialization of farming, animal raising, and forestry has added chemical and mechanical hazards that need to be recognized and prevented. Lung disease among farmworkers can result from a wide variety of hazardous exposures, which include organic dusts, allergens, chemicals, toxic gases, and infectious agents. In addition to nonspecific symptoms of mucous membrane irritation, farmworkers can experience occupational asthma or bronchitis, organic dust toxic syndrome, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, silo filler's disease (toxic hemorrhagic pulmonary edema), and neuromuscular respiratory failure. At risk are farmworkers and those involved in the processing, stocking, transportation, handling, and inspection of unprocessed agricultural, animal, and forestry products; veterinarians; gardeners; game, river, and forest keepers; persons involved in building, supplying, or servicing farm operations; and residents of rural communities. Worker education on the risks of environmental exposures, adherence to safety regulations, and increased knowledge of the cause and prevention of environmental diseases will reduce their prevalence and their adverse human and animal health and socioeconomic effects.

  2. Cryotherapy in Treating Patients With Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Other Lung or Parts of the Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  3. Design and development of an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces: feasibility study; Conception et developpement d'un fantome anthropomorphe equipe de detecteurs dans le but d'evaluer la dose efficace a un poste de travail: etude de faisabilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furstoss, Ch

    2006-11-15

    My PhD study aims to determine the feasibility to design and develop, for photon fields, an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces. First of all, the energy losses within the organs are calculated using the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code, in order to determine the detection positions within the different organs. Then, to decrease the number of detection positions, the organ contribution to the effective dose is studied. Finally, the characteristics of the detectors to insert and the characteristics of the phantom to use are deduced. The results show that 24 or 23 detection positions, according to the wT values (publication 60 or new recommendations of the ICRP), give a E estimation with an uncertainty of {+-}15 % from 50 keV to 4 MeV. Moreover, the interest of such an instrument is underlined while comparing the E estimation by the personal dose equivalent Hp to the E estimation by the instrumented phantom when the phantom is irradiated by point sources (worker in front of a glove box for example). Last, after the detector and phantom characteristic determination, two types of detectors and one type of phantom are selected. However, for the detectors mainly, developments are necessary. Follow up this study, the characterization and the adaptation of the detectors to the project would be interesting. Furthermore, the study to mixed photon-neutrons would be required the needs of the radiological protection community. (author)

  4. SU-E-I-74: Image-Matching Technique of Computed Tomography Images for Personal Identification: A Preliminary Study Using Anthropomorphic Chest Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunobu, Y; Shiotsuki, K; Morishita, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA are used to identify unidentified bodies in forensic medicine. Cranial Computed tomography (CT) images and/or dental radiographs are also used for identification. Radiological identification is important, particularly in the absence of comparative fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA samples. The development of an automated radiological identification system for unidentified bodies is desirable. We investigated the potential usefulness of bone structure for matching chest CT images. Methods: CT images of three anthropomorphic chest phantoms were obtained on different days in various settings. One of the phantoms was assumed to be an unidentified body. The bone image and the bone image with soft tissue (BST image) were extracted from the CT images. To examine the usefulness of the bone image and/or the BST image, the similarities between the two-dimensional (2D) or threedimensional (3D) images of the same and different phantoms were evaluated in terms of the normalized cross-correlation value (NCC). Results: For the 2D and 3D BST images, the NCCs obtained from the same phantom assumed to be an unidentified body (2D, 0.99; 3D, 0.93) were higher than those for the different phantoms (2D, 0.95 and 0.91; 3D, 0.89 and 0.80). The NCCs for the same phantom (2D, 0.95; 3D, 0.88) were greater compared to those of the different phantoms (2D, 0.61 and 0.25; 3D, 0.23 and 0.10) for the bone image. The difference in the NCCs between the same and different phantoms tended to be larger for the bone images than for the BST images. These findings suggest that the image-matching technique is more useful when utilizing the bone image than when utilizing the BST image to identify different people. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicated that evaluating the similarity of bone structure in 2D and 3D images is potentially useful for identifying of an unidentified body

  5. SU-E-I-74: Image-Matching Technique of Computed Tomography Images for Personal Identification: A Preliminary Study Using Anthropomorphic Chest Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunobu, Y; Shiotsuki, K [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Morishita, J [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, JP (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA are used to identify unidentified bodies in forensic medicine. Cranial Computed tomography (CT) images and/or dental radiographs are also used for identification. Radiological identification is important, particularly in the absence of comparative fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA samples. The development of an automated radiological identification system for unidentified bodies is desirable. We investigated the potential usefulness of bone structure for matching chest CT images. Methods: CT images of three anthropomorphic chest phantoms were obtained on different days in various settings. One of the phantoms was assumed to be an unidentified body. The bone image and the bone image with soft tissue (BST image) were extracted from the CT images. To examine the usefulness of the bone image and/or the BST image, the similarities between the two-dimensional (2D) or threedimensional (3D) images of the same and different phantoms were evaluated in terms of the normalized cross-correlation value (NCC). Results: For the 2D and 3D BST images, the NCCs obtained from the same phantom assumed to be an unidentified body (2D, 0.99; 3D, 0.93) were higher than those for the different phantoms (2D, 0.95 and 0.91; 3D, 0.89 and 0.80). The NCCs for the same phantom (2D, 0.95; 3D, 0.88) were greater compared to those of the different phantoms (2D, 0.61 and 0.25; 3D, 0.23 and 0.10) for the bone image. The difference in the NCCs between the same and different phantoms tended to be larger for the bone images than for the BST images. These findings suggest that the image-matching technique is more useful when utilizing the bone image than when utilizing the BST image to identify different people. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicated that evaluating the similarity of bone structure in 2D and 3D images is potentially useful for identifying of an unidentified body.

  6. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessa, C La; Berger, T; Kaderka, R; Schardt, D; Burmeister, S; Labrenz, J; Reitz, G; Durante, M

    2014-04-21

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient's body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm³ cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence ⁶LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and ⁷LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ≤ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 neutrons is observed for photons and, among ions, for passively modulated beams. For the treatment with high-energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same order of magnitude as the primary radiation. In carbon therapy delivered with raster

  7. SU-E-I-89: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Pediatric Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, 80 mA, 0.7s rotation time. Image quality was assessed by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: For the baseline protocol, CNR was found to decrease from 0.460 ± 0.182 to 0.420 ± 0.057 when kVa was activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.620 ± 0.040. The liver dose decreased by 30% with kVa activation. Conclusion: Application of kVa reduces the liver dose up to 30%. However, reduction in image quality for abdominal scans occurs when using the automated tube voltage selection feature at the baseline protocol. As demonstrated by the CNR and NPS analysis, the texture and magnitude of the noise in reconstructed images at ASiR 40% was found to be the same as our baseline images. We have demonstrated that 30% dose reduction is possible when using 40% ASiR with kVa in pediatric patients.

  8. SU-E-I-81: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Adult Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics (GE) automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of an adult anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, Auto mA (180 to 380 mA), noise index (NI) = 14, adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) of 20%, 0.8s rotation time. Image quality was evaluated by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: The CNR for the adult male was found to decrease from CNR = 0.912 ± 0.045 for the baseline protocol without kVa to a CNR = 0.756 ± 0.049 with kVa activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.903 ± 0.023. The difference in the central liver dose with and without kVa was found to be 0.07%. Conclusion: Dose reduction was insignificant in the adult phantom. As determined by NPS analysis, ASiR of 40% produced images with similar noise texture to the baseline protocol. However, the CNR at ASiR of 40% with kVa fails to meet the current ACR CNR passing requirement of 1.0.

  9. Effective dose estimation for pediatric upper gastrointestinal examinations using an anthropomorphic phantom set and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emigh, Brent; Gordon, Christopher L.; Falkiner, Michelle; Thomas, Karen E.; Connolly, Bairbre L.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for updated radiation dose estimates in pediatric fluoroscopy given the routine use of new dose-saving technologies and increased radiation safety awareness in pediatric imaging. To estimate effective doses for standardized pediatric upper gastrointestinal (UGI) examinations at our institute using direct dose measurement, as well as provide dose-area product (DAP) to effective dose conversion factors to be used for the estimation of UGI effective doses for boys and girls up to 10 years of age at other centers. Metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters were placed within four anthropomorphic phantoms representing children ≤10 years of age and exposed to mock UGI examinations using exposures much greater than used clinically to minimize measurement error. Measured effective dose was calculated using ICRP 103 weights and scaled to our institution's standardized clinical UGI (3.6-min fluoroscopy, four spot exposures and four examination beam projections) as determined from patient logs. Results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations and related to fluoroscope-displayed DAP. Measured effective doses for standardized pediatric UGI examinations in our institute ranged from 0.35 to 0.79 mSv in girls and were 3-8% lower for boys. Simulation-derived and measured effective doses were in agreement (percentage differences 0.18). DAP-to-effective dose conversion factors ranged from 6.5 x 10 -4 mSv per Gy-cm 2 to 4.3 x 10 -3 mSv per Gy-cm 2 for girls and were similarly lower for boys. Using modern fluoroscopy equipment, the effective dose associated with the UGI examination in children ≤10 years at our institute is < 1 mSv. Estimations of effective dose associated with pediatric UGI examinations can be made for children up to the age of 10 using the DAP-normalized conversion factors provided in this study. These estimates can be further refined to reflect individual hospital examination protocols through the use of direct organ

  10. Radionuclide injury to the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Sanders, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequently observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. 88 references

  11. Cancer Genes in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Telbany, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is now known as a disease of genomic alterations. Mutational analysis and genomics profiling in recent years have advanced the field of lung cancer genetics/genomics significantly. It is becoming more accepted now that the identification of genomic alterations in lung cancer can impact therapeutics, especially when the alterations represent “oncogenic drivers” in the processes of tumorigenesis and progression. In this review, we will highlight the key driver oncogenic gene mutations and fusions identified in lung cancer. The review will summarize and report the available demographic and clinicopathological data as well as molecular details behind various lung cancer gene alterations in the context of race. We hope to shed some light into the disparities in the incidence of various genetic mutations among lung cancer patients of different racial backgrounds. As molecularly targeted therapy continues to advance in lung cancer, racial differences in specific genetic/genomic alterations can have an important impact in the choices of therapeutics and in our understanding of the drug sensitivity/resistance profile. The most relevant genes in lung cancer described in this review include the following: EGFR, KRAS, MET, LKB1, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK, RET, and ROS1. Commonly identified genetic/genomic alterations such as missense or nonsense mutations, small insertions or deletions, alternative splicing, and chromosomal fusion rearrangements were discussed. Relevance in current targeted therapeutic drugs was mentioned when appropriate. We also highlighted various targeted therapeutics that are currently under clinical development, such as the MET inhibitors and antibodies. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the landscape of genomic alterations in lung cancer is expected to be much transformed and detailed in upcoming years. These genomic landscape differences in the context of racial disparities should be emphasized both in tumorigenesis and in drug

  12. Adaptive Neurocontrol of Anthropomorphic Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řízek, Stanislav; Frolov, A.; Dufossé, M.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2000), s. 463-471 ISSN 1210-0552. [Neural Network World 2000. Prague, 09.07.2000-12.07.2000] Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : neurocontrol * arm reaching movement * human arm biomechanics * arm neuromuscular apparatus Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  13. Percutaneous drainage of lung abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Sonnenberg, E.; D'Agostino, H.; Casola, G.; Vatney, R.R.; Wittich, G.R.; Harker, C.

    1989-01-01

    The authors performed percutaneous drainage of lung abscesses in 12 patients. Indications for drainage were septicemia and persistence or worsening of radiographic findings. These lung abscesses were refractory to intravenous antibiotics and to bronchial toilet. Etiology of the abscesses included pneumonia (most frequently), trauma, postoperative development, infected necrotic neoplasm, and infected sequestration. Guidelines for drainage included passage of the catheter through contiguously abnormal lung and pleura, inability of the patient to cough, and/or bronchial obstruction precluding bronchial drainage. Cure was achieved in 11 of 12 patients. Catheters were removed on an average of 16 days after insertion. Antibiotics were administered an average of 18 days before drainage. No major complications occurred

  14. Targeting apoptosis pathways in lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pore, Milind M.; Hiltermann, T. Jeroen N.; Kruyt, Frank A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a devastating disease with a poor prognosis. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) represent different forms of lung cancer that are associated with distinct genetic causes and display different responses to therapy in the clinic. Whereas SCLC is often

  15. SU-E-J-31: Monitor Interfractional Variation of Tumor Respiratory Motion Using 4D KV Conebeam Computed Tomography for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, A; Prior, P; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4DCT has been widely used to generate internal tumor volume (ITV) for a lung tumor for treatment planning. However, lung tumors may show different respiratory motion on the treatment day. The purpose of this study is to evaluate 4D KV conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) for monitoring tumor interfractional motion variation between simulation and each fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods: 4D KV CBCT was acquired with the Elekta XVI system. The accuracy of 4D KV CBCT for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was tested with a dynamic thorax motion phantom (CIRS, Virginia) with a linear amplitude of 2 cm. In addition, an adult anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson, Rando) with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters embedded at the center and periphery of a slab of solid water was used to measure the dose of 4D KV CBCT and to compare it with the dose with 3D KV CBCT. The image registration was performed by aligning\\ each phase images of 4D KV CBCT to the planning images and the final couch shifts were calculated as a mean of all these individual shifts along each direction.A workflow was established based on these quality assurance tests for lung cancer patients. Results: 4D KV CBCT does not increase imaging dose in comparison to 3D KV CBCT. Acquisition of 4D KV CBCT is 4 minutes as compared to 2 minutes for 3D KV CBCT. Most of patients showed a small daily variation of tumor respiratory motion about 2 mm. However, some patients may have more than 5 mm variations of tumor respiratory motion. Conclusion: The radiation dose does not increase with 4D KV CBCT. 4D KV CBCT is a useful tool for monitoring interfractional variations of tumor respiratory motion before SBRT of lung cancer patients.

  16. Dose exposure in the ITALUNG trial of lung cancer screening with low-dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascalchi, M; Mazzoni, L N; Falchini, M; Belli, G; Picozzi, G; Merlini, V; Vella, A; Diciotti, S; Falaschi, F; Lopes Pegna, A; Paci, E

    2012-08-01

    Few data are available on the effective dose received by participants in lung cancer screening programmes with low-dose CT (LDCT). We report the collective effective dose delivered to 1406 current or former smokers enrolled in the ITALUNG trial who completed 4 annual LDCT examinations and related further investigations including follow-up LDCT, 2-[(18)F]flu-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) or CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). Using the air CT dose index and Monte Carlo simulations on an anthropomorphic phantom, the whole-body effective dose associated with LDCT was determined for the eight CT scanners used in the trial. A value of 7 mSv was assigned to FDG-PET while the measured mean effective dose of CT-guided FNAB was 1.5 mSv. The mean collective effective dose in the 1406 subjects ranged between 8.75 and 9.36 Sv and the mean effective dose to the single subject over 4 years was between 6.2 and 6.8 mSv (range 1.7-21.5 mSv) according to the cranial-caudal length of the LDCT volume. 77.4% of the dose was owing to annual LDCT and 22.6% to further investigations. Considering the nominal risk coefficients for stochastic effects after exposure to low-dose radiation according to the National Radiological Protection Board, International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 60, ICRP103 and Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII, the mean number of radiation-induced cancers ranged between 0.12 and 0.33 per 1000 subjects. The individual effective dose to participants in a 4-year lung cancer screening programme with annual LDCT is very low and about one-third of the effective dose that is associated with natural background radiation and diagnostic radiology in the same time period.

  17. Numerical efficiency calibration of in vivo measurement systems. Monte Carlo simulations of in vivo measurement scenarios for the detection of incorporated radionuclides, including validation, analysis of efficiency-sensitive parameters and customized anthropomorphic voxel models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegenbart, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Detector efficiency calibration of in vivo bioassay measurements is based on physical anthropomorphic phantoms that can be loaded with radionuclides of the suspected incorporation. Systematic errors of traditional calibration methods can cause considerable over- or underestimation of the incorporated activity and hence the absorbed dose in the human body. In this work Monte Carlo methods for radiation transport problem are used. Virtual models of the in vivo measurement equipment used at the Institute of Radiation Research, including detectors and anthropomorphic phantoms have been developed. Software tools have been coded to handle memory intensive human models for the visualization, preparation and evaluation of simulations of in vivo measurement scenarios. The used tools, methods, and models have been validated. Various parameters have been investigated for their sensitivity on the detector efficiency to identify and quantify possible systematic errors. Measures have been implemented to improve the determination of the detector efficiency in regard to apply them in the routine of the in vivo measurement laboratory of the institute. A positioning system has been designed and installed in the Partial Body Counter measurement chamber to measure the relative position of the detector to the test person, which has been identified to be a sensitive parameter. A computer cluster has been set up to facilitate the Monte Carlo simulations and reduce computing time. Methods based on image registration techniques have been developed to transform existing human models to match with an individual test person. The measures and methods developed have improved the classic detector efficiency methods successfully. (orig.)

  18. Aging changes in the lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Aging changes in the lungs URL of this page: // ...

  19. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M bovis , M africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  20. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Both Men and Women” Stay Informed Rates by State for Other Kinds of Cancer All Cancers Combined ... Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  1. Early laparotomy after lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Pia; Zemtsovski, Mikhail; Perch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal complications after lung transplantation have been reported with incidence rates ranging from 3% to 51%, but the reasons are poorly understood. We aimed to investigate the correlations between pulmonary diseases leading to lung transplantation and early gastrointestinal...... complications requiring laparotomy after transplantation with outcomes for patients at increased risk. METHODS: In this study we performed a retrospective analysis of data of patients who underwent lung transplantation at our institution from 2004 to 2012. The study period was limited to the first 90 days after...... transplantation. RESULTS: Lung transplantation was performed in 258 patients, including 51 patients with α1-anti-trypsin deficiency (A1AD). Seventy-eight patients (30%) had an X-ray of the abdomen, and 23 patients (9%) required laparotomy during the first 90 days after transplantation. Patients with A1AD...

  2. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  3. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the lung cancer and your overall health. Radiation Therapy Radiation is a high-energy X-ray that ... surgery, chemotherapy or both depending upon the circumstances. Radiation therapy works within cancer cells by damaging their ability ...

  4. Antibody induction therapy for lung transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Møller, Christian H; Penninga, Ida Elisabeth Irene

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation has become a valuable and well-accepted treatment option for most end-stage lung diseases. Lung transplant recipients are at risk of transplanted organ rejection, and life-long immunosuppression is necessary. Clear evidence is essential to identify an optimal, safe...... and effective immunosuppressive treatment strategy for lung transplant recipients. Consensus has not yet been achieved concerning use of immunosuppressive antibodies against T-cells for induction following lung transplantation....

  5. Spine Metastases in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Yu. Stolyarova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose and the objectives of the study were to determine the incidence of metastatic lesions to various parts of the spine, the assessment of the association with other clinical signs of lung cancer (localization, form, histology, degree of differentiation, staging, nature of extraosseous metastasis, to investigate the effect of these parameters on the survi­val of the patients. Material and methods. The study included 1071 patients with lung cancer aged 24 to 86 years. None of the examined patients has been operated previously for lung cancer, and after arriving at a diagnosis, all patients received radiation therapy, 73 % of them — combined radiochemothe­rapy. Results. Metastasis in the vertebral bodies and vertebral joints occurs in 13 % of patients with lung cancer and in 61 % of patients with bone form of the disease, the ratio of the defeat of thoracic, sacral, lumbar and cervical spine was 6 : 4 : 2 : 1. The development of metastases in the spine is mostly associa­ted with the localization of the tumor in the upper lobe of the lung, the peripheral form of the disease, with non-small cell histologic variants (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The number of metastases in the spinal column directly correlates with the degree of metastatic involvement of the inguinal lymph nodes, abdominal wall and the liver, has an impact on the invasion of lung tumor into the esophagus and the trachea. The life expectancy of the deceased persons with spine metastases is less than that of other patients with the lung cancer, but the overall survival rate in these groups of patients is not very different. Conclusions. Clinical features of lung cancer with metastases in the spine necessitate the development of medical technology of rational radiochemotherapy in such patients.

  6. Pathogenic mechanism in lung fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witschi, H.; Haschek, W.M.; Meyer, K.R.; Ullrich, R.L.; Dalbey, W.E.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine whether an interaction between two agents causing alveolar epithelial damage would produce lung fibrosis. In mouse lung, intraperitoneal injection of the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene causes diffuse alveolar type I cell necrosis, followed by proliferation of type II alveolar cells. In animals exposed to 70% O 2 or 100-200 rad x rays during the phase of type II cell proliferation following BHT, diffuse interstitial lung fibrosis developed within 2 weeks. Quantitative analysis of the lungs for hydroxyproline showed that the interaction between BHT and O 2 or x rays was synergistic. If exposure to O 2 or x rays was delayed until epithelial recovery was complete, no fibrosis was seen. Abnormally high levels of lung collagen persisted up to 6 months after one single treatment with BHT and 100 rad x rays. A commonly seen form of chronic lung damage may thus be caused by an acute interaction between a bloodborne agent which damages the alveolar cell and a toxic inhalant or x rays, provided a critically ordered sequence of exposure is observed

  7. Glycocalyx of lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria de Fátima; Bairos, Vasco A

    2002-01-01

    Due to their diversity and external location on cell membranes, glycans, as glycocalyx components, are key elements in eukaryotic cell, tissue, and organ homeostasis. Although information on the lung glycocalyx is scarce, this article aims to review, discuss, and summarize what is known about bronchoalveolar glycocalyx composition, mainly the sialic acids. It was deemed relevant, however, to make a brief introductory overview of the cell glycocalyx and its particular development in epithelial cells. After that, follows a summary of the evolution of the knowledge regarding the bronchoalveolar glycocalyx composition throughout the years, particularly its morphological features. Since sialic acids are located terminally on the bronchoalveolar lining cells' glycocalyx and play crucial roles, we focused mainly on the existing lung histochemical and biochemical data of these sugar residues, as well as their evolution throughout lung development. The functions of the lung glycocalyx sialic acids are discussed and interpretations of their roles analyzed, including those related to the negative overall superficial shield provided by these molecules. The increasing presence of these sugar residues throughout postnatal lung development should be regarded as pivotal in the development and maintenance of a dynamic bronchoalveolar architecture, supporting the normal histophysiology of the respiratory system. The case for a profound knowledge of lung glycocalyx--given its potential to provide answers to serious clinical problems--is made with particular reference to cystic fibrosis. Finally, concluding remarks and perspectives for future research in this field are put forth.

  8. Systemic vasculitis and the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarico, Rosaria; Barsotti, Simone; Elefante, Elena; Baldini, Chiara; Tani, Chiara; Mosca, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a critical analysis of the recent literature on this topic, with particular focus on the most relevant studies published over the last year. Many studies are published every year on the diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment of pulmonary involvement in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). The main subjects covered by this article are the pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical aspects of lung involvement in ANCA-associated vasculitis and non-ANCA-associated vasculitis. Lung involvement is a common feature in systemic vasculitis. The lungs are one of the most frequently involved organs in systemic vasculitis. In order to provide an update on the recent advances in the pathogenesis, clinical features and novel treatments of lung involvement in systemic vasculitis, a systematic MedLine search has been performed.Most of the data analyzed have confirmed that lung involvement seems to develop more frequently in patients with myeloperoxidase-ANCA-positive AAV, mainly in those with a diagnosis of microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), compared with patients with proteinase 3 ANCA-positive AAV. Moreover, among non-ANCA-associated vasculitis lung involvement may represent a worrying complication of the disease, mainly when associated with vascular involvement.

  9. Carcinosarcoma of lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Neupane

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary carcinosarcoma of the lung is exceedingly rare. It is described as malignancy composed of a mixture of carcinoma and sarcoma elements. The sarcomatous element is usually spindle cell but may contain cartilage, bone or skeletal muscle. We report a case of pulmonary carcinosarcoma in a 66 years male who presented with cough, chest pain on exertion, anorexia and weight loss. Brush cytology revealed poorly differentiated non-small cell carcinoma. Histopathological examination showed proliferation of malignant spindle cells containing bone and malignant cartilage admixed with areas of keratinized squamous cells with few foci of ill-defined glandular structure. On immunohistochemistry, carcinomatous component of tumor showed positivity for cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and spindle cell component were positive for vimentin. These findings led to diagnosis of carcinosarcoma. Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2013 Vol. 3, No.1, Issue 5, 419-421 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v3i5.7873

  10. Effect of radiation dose and iterative reconstruction on lung lesion conspicuity at MDCT: Does one size fit all?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Marcos Paulo Ferreira; Agrawal, Rishi, E-mail: rishi.agrawal@northwestern.edu; Gonzalez-Guindalini, Fernanda Dias; Hart, Eric M.; Patel, Suresh K.; Töre, Hüseyin Gürkan; Yaghmai, Vahid

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of different acquisition parameters and reconstruction algorithms in lung lesions conspicuity in chest MDCT. Methods: An anthropomorphic chest phantom containing 6 models of lung disease (ground glass opacity, bronchial polyp, solid nodule, ground glass nodule, emphysema and tree-in-bud) was scanned using 80, 100 and 120 kVp, with fixed mAs ranging from 10 to 110. The scans were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms. Three blinded thoracic radiologists reviewed the images and scored lesions conspicuity and overall image quality. Image noise and radiation dose parameters were recorded. Results: All acquisitions with 120 kVp received a score of 3 (acceptable) or higher for overall image quality. There was no significant difference between IR and FBP within each setting for overall image quality (p > 0.05), even though image noise was significantly lower using IR (p < 0.0001). When comparing specific lower radiation acquisition parameters 100 kVp/10 mAs [Effective Dose (ED): 0.238 mSv] vs 120 kVp/10 mAs (ED: 0.406 mSv) vs 80 kVp/40 mAs (ED: 0.434 mSv), we observed significant difference in lesions conspicuity (p < 0.02), as well as significant difference in overall image quality, independent of the reconstruction algorithm (p < 0.02), with higher scores on the 120 kV/10 mAs setting. Tree-in-bud pattern, ground glass nodule and ground glass opacity required lower radiation doses to get a diagnostic score using IR when compared to FBP. Conclusion: Designing protocols for specific lung pathologies using lower dose acquisition parameters is feasible, and by applying iterative reconstruction, radiologists may have better diagnostic confidence to evaluate some lesions in very low dose settings, preserving acceptable image quality.

  11. La sculpture celtique anthropomorphe à Châteaumeillant (Cher : découverte récente d’une main en grès The anthropomorphic Celtic sculpture at Châteaumeillant (Cher: the recent discovery of a sandstone hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Krausz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Au cours des fouilles de l’été 2007, trois fragments appartenant à une statue anthropomorphe en grès ont été mis au jour sur l’oppidum de Châteaumeillant. L’élément le plus remarquable est une main à l’échelle un demi. Le dépôt de ces fragments est probablement détritique au milieu d’un ensemble homogène de céramiques attribuables au début de La Tène D1a. La main sculptée en ronde-bosse exclut l’appartenance à un buste, modèle de sculpture qui est le plus caractéristique en Berry. Il s’agit probablement d’une statue assise comme on en connaît plusieurs exemplaires dans le centre de la France ; ces statues sont nettement de tradition gauloise même si elles sont presque toujours découvertes en contexte gallo-romain. La fragmentation des éléments sculptés retrouvés dans une fosse au comblement détritique conduit à s’interroger sur les événements qui ont précédé leur dépôt. Étant donné le contexte d’enfouissement, il s’agit plutôt d’une cassure accidentelle, mais cet article tente de faire le point sur le sectionnement des mains qui, comme celui des têtes, renvoie à la sphère guerrière chez les Celtes.During the 2007 excavation, three fragments of an anthropomorphic sandstone statue were found at the oppidum at Châteaumeillant. The most noteworthy element is a half-scale hand. This material seems to have been discarded as rubbish in a pit otherwise containing a homogeneous assemblage of sherds attributable to the beginning of La Tène D1a. The hand is sculpted in the round and therefore cannot have come from an example of the usual series of sculptures found in Berry, in which the lower arms are placed in front of the chest. It is probably from a figure sitting cross-legged, of which several examples are known in central France. Although usually recovered from Gallo-Roman contexts, such statues are clearly in a Gallic tradition. The recovery of these fragments mixed with rubbish

  12. Development of an anthropomorphic model and a Monte Carlo code dedicated to physical reconstruction of radiological accident; Developpement d'un modele anthropomorphe et d'un code de calcul Monte Carlo dedies a la reconstitution physique d'accident radiologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, A

    2000-09-01

    The diversity of radiological accidents is such that medical prognoses and decisions regarding the choice of treatment are hard to make on the basis of clinical observations alone. To supplement this information, it is important to know the overall dose received by the organism and the dose distributions. The dose can be estimated by physically reconstructing the accident using experimental techniques or calculations. It must be possible to adapt them to various accident situations, which means that a large quantity of parameters, both geometrical (morphology and posture of the victim, environment etc.) and physical (energy spectrum, source geometry etc.) have to be available. The software used to construct the geometry, MGED, used in conjunction with MORSE, a Monte Carlo transport code, meets these requirements. The first has led to the development of an anthropomorphic model known as MANDRAC, which can be adapted to the size and position of the victim. The second, generates and transports source particles, and also reproduces physical interaction phenomena. This work describes the development and characterisation of these two tools, in order to obtain a definition of the methodologies which have been adapted and optimised depending on the type of accident (overall or localised irradiation). To begin with (Section III), the computer code is validated and the uncertainties associated with its use assessed. The study which follows focuses on the model and the uncertainties arising from geometry (Section IV). It also makes it possible to assess the influence of morphological parameters on dose calculation. One important result of the study is that it determines the parameters which have to be known depending on the type of accident and the degree of accuracy. All the tools are then compared to those used in the field of medical dosimetry (Section V). Several applications to accidents are used to assess this technique in actual situations (Section VI). (author)

  13. Relationships of clinical protocols and reconstruction kernels with image quality and radiation dose in a 128-slice CT scanner: Study with an anthropomorphic and water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Krauss, B.; Banckwitz, R.; Maentele, W.; Bauer, R.W.; Vogl, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Research highlights: ► Clinical protocol, reconstruction kernel, reconstructed slice thickness, phantom diameter or the density of material it contains directly affects the image quality of DSCT. ► Dual energy protocol shows the lowest DLP compared to all other protocols examined. ► Dual-energy fused images show excellent image quality and the noise is same as that of single- or high-pitch mode protocol images. ► Advanced CT technology improves image quality and considerably reduce radiation dose. ► An important finding is the comparatively higher DLP of the dual-source high-pitch protocol compared to other single- or dual-energy protocols. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of scanning parameters (clinical protocols), reconstruction kernels and slice thickness with image quality and radiation dose in a DSCT. Materials and methods: The chest of an anthropomorphic phantom was scanned on a DSCT scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition flash) using different clinical protocols, including single- and dual-energy modes. Four scan protocols were investigated: 1) single-source 120 kV, 110 mA s, 2) single-source 100 kV, 180 mA s, 3) high-pitch 120 kV, 130 mA s and 4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140 kV, eff.mA s 89, 76. The automatic exposure control was switched off for all the scans and the CTDIvol selected was in between 7.12 and 7.37 mGy. The raw data were reconstructed using the reconstruction kernels B31f, B80f and B70f, and slice thicknesses were 1.0 mm and 5.0 mm. Finally, the same parameters and procedures were used for the scanning of water phantom. Friedman test and Wilcoxon-Matched-Pair test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The DLP based on the given CTDIvol values showed significantly lower exposure for protocol 4, when compared to protocol 1 (percent difference 5.18%), protocol 2 (percent diff. 4.51%), and protocol 3 (percent diff. 8.81%). The highest change in Hounsfield Units was observed with dual

  14. Lung procurement for transplantation: new criteria for lung donor selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, M P; Betto, C; Gambacorta, M; Vesconi, S; Scalamogna, M; Benazzi, E; Ravini, M

    2010-05-01

    In Italy, like everywhere in the world, the organ shortage for transplantation is a real problem. It is well known that lung donors (LD) are particularly difficult to procure and that management of the organ do not care during the diagnosis of cerebral death represents a difficult challenge. In this context, the salvage of the so-called "marginal donors" may increase the pool of donors, favoring organ retrieval. To increase lung procurement, the intensivist must recognize "marginal donors," optimizing organ selection and function. The aim of our study was to review LD procured in 2008, as identified by the unrestricted criteria, of the Nord Italian Transplant program Center (NITp). Particularly, the age and habits of donors and the presence of a parenchyma contusion were not sufficient per se to exclude donation. We revisited lung ventilation and monitoring modalities during cerebral death before retrieval. In 2008, the application of enlarged criteria for LD enabled us to collect 21 LD, namely 33% of all cerebral deaths, versus 13% in 2007. Seeking to maintain good gas exchange and lung function, we implemented a safe ventilation program avoided high peak pressures, and fluid therapy properly guided by the cardiac index and extravascular lung water index monitoring. Specific actions to improve LD procurement may help cope with the organ-donor shortage. Although our series was small, our results were encouraging; they underline the necessity to continuously review donor criteria and care, allowing good donor/recipient matching. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Inflammatory mechanisms in the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Moldoveanu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available B Moldoveanu1, P Otmishi1, P Jani1, J Walker1,2, X Sarmiento3, J Guardiola1, M Saad1, Jerry Yu11Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA, 40292; 2Department of Respiratory Therapy, Bellarmine University, Louisville, KY, USA, 40205; 3Intensive Care Medicine Service, University Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain 08916Abstract: Inflammation is the body’s response to insults, which include infection, trauma, and hypersensitivity. The inflammatory response is complex and involves a variety of mechanisms to defend against pathogens and repair tissue. In the lung, inflammation is usually caused by pathogens or by exposure to toxins, pollutants, irritants, and allergens. During inflammation, numerous types of inflammatory cells are activated. Each releases cytokines and mediators to modify activities of other inflammatory cells. Orchestration of these cells and molecules leads to progression of inflammation. Clinically, acute inflammation is seen in pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, whereas chronic inflammation is represented by asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Because the lung is a vital organ for gas exchange, excessive inflammation can be life threatening. Because the lung is constantly exposed to harmful pathogens, an immediate and intense defense action (mainly inflammation is required to eliminate the invaders as early as possible. A delicate balance between inflammation and anti-inflammation is essential for lung homeostasis. A full understanding of the underlying mechanisms is vital in the treatment of patients with lung inflammation. This review focuses on cellular and molecular aspects of lung inflammation during acute and chronic inflammatory states.Keywords: inflammation, lung, inflammatory mediators, cytokines

  16. Lung Density Changes With Growth and Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Gregory; Drummond, M. Bradley; Mitzner, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With body growth from childhood, the lungs can enlarge by either increasing the volume of air in the periphery (as would occur with inspiration) or by increasing the number of peripheral acinar units. In the former case, the lung tissue density would decrease with inflation, whereas in the latter case, the lung density would be relatively constant as the lung grows. To address this fundamental structural issue, we measured the CT scan density in human subjects of widely varying size at two different lung volumes. METHODS: Five hundred one subjects were enrolled in the study. They underwent a chest CT scan at full inspiration and another scan at end expiration. Spirometry, body plethysmography, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide were also measured. RESULTS: There was a strong correlation between the size of the lungs measured at full inspiration on CT scan and the mean lung density (r = −0.72, P = .001). People with larger lungs had significantly lower mean lung density. These density changes among different subjects overlapped the density changes within subjects at different lung volumes. CONCLUSIONS: Lung structure in subjects with larger lungs is different from that in subjects with smaller lungs. Tissue volume does not increase in proportion to lung size, as would be required if larger lungs just had more alveoli. These observations suggest that the growth of the lung into adulthood is not accompanied by new alveoli, but rather by enlargement of existing structures. The presence of greater air spaces in larger lungs could impact the occurrence and pathogenesis of spontaneous pneumothorax or COPD. PMID:25996948

  17. Lung density changes with growth and inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, H Brown; Robert, A Wise; Kirk, Gregory; Drummond, M Bradley; Mitzner, Wayne

    2015-10-01

    With body growth from childhood, the lungs can enlarge by either increasing the volume of air in the periphery (as would occur with inspiration) or by increasing the number of peripheral acinar units. In the former case, the lung tissue density would decrease with inflation, whereas in the latter case, the lung density would be relatively constant as the lung grows. To address this fundamental structural issue, we measured the CT scan density in human subjects of widely varying size at two different lung volumes. Five hundred one subjects were enrolled in the study. They underwent a chest CT scan at full inspiration and another scan at end expiration. Spirometry, body plethysmography, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide were also measured. There was a strong correlation between the size of the lungs measured at full inspiration on CT scan and the mean lung density (r = -0.72, P = .001). People with larger lungs had significantly lower mean lung density. These density changes among different subjects overlapped the density changes within subjects at different lung volumes. Lung structure in subjects with larger lungs is different from that in subjects with smaller lungs. Tissue volume does not increase in proportion to lung size, as would be required if larger lungs just had more alveoli. These observations suggest that the growth of the lung into adulthood is not accompanied by new alveoli, but rather by enlargement of existing structures. The presence of greater air spaces in larger lungs could impact the occurrence and pathogenesis of spontaneous pneumothorax or COPD.

  18. The mean lung dose (MLD). Predictive criterion for lung damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyer, Peter; Appold, Steffen [Dresden University of Technology (TU Dresden), Clinic and Polyclinic for Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Carl Gustav Carus Medical Faculty, Dresden (Germany); Herrmann, Thomas

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to prove the validity of the mean lung dose (MLD), widely used in clinical practice to estimate the lung toxicity of a treatment plan, by reevaluating experimental data from mini pigs. A total of 43 mini pigs were irradiated in one of four dose groups (25, 29, 33, and 37 Gy). Two regimens were applied: homogeneous irradiation of the right lung or partial irradiation of both lungs - including parts with lower dose - but with similar mean lung doses. The animals were treated with five fractions with a linear accelerator applying a CT-based treatment plan. The clinical lung reaction (breathing frequency) and morphological changes in CT scans were examined frequently during the 48 weeks after irradiation. A clear dose-effect relationship was found for both regimens of the trial. However, a straightforward relationship between the MLD and the relative number of responders with respect to different grades of increased breathing frequency for both regimens was not found. A morphologically based parameter NTCP{sub lung} was found to be more suitable for this purpose. The dependence of this parameter on the MLD is markedly different for the two regimens. In clinical practice, the MLD can be used to predict lung toxicity of a treatment plan, except for dose values that could lead to severe side effects. In the latter mentioned case, limitations to the predictive value of the MLD are possible. Such severe developments of a radiation-induced pneumopathy are better predicted by the NTCP{sub lung} formalism. The predictive advantage of this parameter compared to the MLD seems to remain in the evaluation and comparison of widely differing dose distributions, like in the investigated trial. (orig.) [German] Es soll unter Reevaluation von Tierversuchsdaten am Minischwein geprueft werden, ob die in der klinischen Praxis zur Beurteilung der Lungentoxizitaet eines Bestrahlungsregims regelhaft verwendete mittlere Lungendosis (MLD) eine zuverlaessige

  19. Application of Voxel Phantoms to Study the Influence of Heterogeneous Distribution of Actinides in Lungs on In Vivo Counting Calibration Factors Using Animal Experimentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamart, S.; Pierrat, N.; De Carlan, L.; Franck, D.; Dudoignon, N.; Rateau, S.; Van der Meeren, A.; Rouit, E.; Bottlaender, M.

    2006-01-01

    Calibration of lung counting system dedicated to retention assessment of actinides in the lungs remains critical due to large uncertainties in calibration factors. Among them, the detector positioning, the chest wall thickness and composition (muscle/fat) assessment, and the distribution of the contamination are the main parameters influencing the detector response. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a numerical approach based on the application of voxel phantoms (numerical phantoms based on tomographic images, CT or MRI) associated to a Monte-Carlo code (namely M.C.N.P.) was developed. It led to the development of a dedicated tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., that allows to easily handle realistic voxel phantoms for the simulation of in vivo measurement (or dose calculation, application that will not be presented in this paper). The goal of this paper is to present our study of the influence of the lung distribution on calibration factors using both animal experimentations and our numerical method. Indeed, physical anthropomorphic phantoms used for calibration always consider a uniform distribution of the source in the lungs, which is not true in many contamination conditions. The purpose of the study is to compare the response of the measurement detectors using a real distribution of actinide particles in the lungs, obtained from animal experimentations, with the homogeneous one considered as the reference. This comparison was performed using O.E.D.I.P.E. that can almost simulate any source distribution. A non human primate was contaminated heterogeneously by intra-tracheal administration of actinide oxide. After euthanasia, gamma spectrometry measurements were performed on the pulmonary lobes to obtain the distribution of the contamination in the lungs. This realistic distribution was used to simulate an heterogeneous contamination in the numerical phantom of the non human primate, which was compared with a simulation of an homogeneous contamination presenting the

  20. Application of Voxel Phantoms to Study the Influence of Heterogeneous Distribution of Actinides in Lungs on In Vivo Counting Calibration Factors Using Animal Experimentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamart, S.; Pierrat, N.; De Carlan, L.; Franck, D. [IRSN/DRPH/SDI/LEDI, BP 17, F-92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Dudoignon, N. [IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/LRPAT, BP 17, F-92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Rateau, S.; Van der Meeren, A.; Rouit, E. [CEA/DSV/DRR/SRCA/LRT BP no 12, F-91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Bottlaender, M. [CEA/SHFJ, 4, place du General Leclerc F-91400 Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    Calibration of lung counting system dedicated to retention assessment of actinides in the lungs remains critical due to large uncertainties in calibration factors. Among them, the detector positioning, the chest wall thickness and composition (muscle/fat) assessment, and the distribution of the contamination are the main parameters influencing the detector response. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a numerical approach based on the application of voxel phantoms (numerical phantoms based on tomographic images, CT or MRI) associated to a Monte-Carlo code (namely M.C.N.P.) was developed. It led to the development of a dedicated tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., that allows to easily handle realistic voxel phantoms for the simulation of in vivo measurement (or dose calculation, application that will not be presented in this paper). The goal of this paper is to present our study of the influence of the lung distribution on calibration factors using both animal experimentations and our numerical method. Indeed, physical anthropomorphic phantoms used for calibration always consider a uniform distribution of the source in the lungs, which is not true in many contamination conditions. The purpose of the study is to compare the response of the measurement detectors using a real distribution of actinide particles in the lungs, obtained from animal experimentations, with the homogeneous one considered as the reference. This comparison was performed using O.E.D.I.P.E. that can almost simulate any source distribution. A non human primate was contaminated heterogeneously by intra-tracheal administration of actinide oxide. After euthanasia, gamma spectrometry measurements were performed on the pulmonary lobes to obtain the distribution of the contamination in the lungs. This realistic distribution was used to simulate an heterogeneous contamination in the numerical phantom of the non human primate, which was compared with a simulation of an homogeneous contamination presenting the

  1. Neonatal opaque right lung: delayed fluid resorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swischuk, L.E.; Hayden, K.; Richardson, J.

    1981-01-01

    Eight newborn infants with opaque right lungs were examined. Clinically, the main problem associated with the opaque right lung is mild respiratory distress, and radiographyically, the findings consist of (a) a totally opaque right lung, (b) a semiopaque right lung, or (c) an opaque right upper lobe only. These findings are usually interpreted as representing pneumonia, empyema, or hydrochlothorax, but the fact that they clear within 24 to 48 hours indicates that none of these diseases is the cause. It is thought that neonatal opaque right lung results from the transient retention of normal fetal fluid in the right lung

  2. Radioimmunoscintigraphy in lung cancer diagnosing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjikostova, H.

    1999-01-01

    As the lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer at males, the exact staging is essential. Monoclonal antibodies marked with radionuclides like 131 I, 111 In, 99m Tc, etc., allow detecting and staging the small cell lung cancer with sensibility 90%, specificity 45% and accuracy 85%. It is suggested this method to be applied simultaneously with computerized tomography. The diagnostic possibility of radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) in earlier detection, recurrence or metastasis as well as follow up the effect of therapy performed at patients with lung cancer are reviewed. RIS is performed with IODOMAB-R-2 (Sorin Biomedica) 131 I antiCEA Mob F(ab') 2 , dose 92.5-185 MBq. Planar images were performed 72 hours after i.v. injection. Four patients with epidermoid squamous cell cancer were examined. Positive results were obtained at 3 patients and one false negative. In general sensitivity of radioimmunoscintigraphy of lung cancer is 75-90%. However there are difficulties at its application linked with necessity of permanent availability of radiolabelled antibodies with high specific activity at the moment of their injection. Despite all radioimmunoscintigraphy is developing as an useful diagnostic method for evaluation and follow up of lung cancer patients

  3. Lung volume reduction for emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pallav L; Herth, Felix J; van Geffen, Wouter H; Deslee, Gaetan; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2017-02-01

    Advanced emphysema is a lung disease in which alveolar capillary units are destroyed and supporting tissue is lost. The combined effect of reduced gas exchange and changes in airway dynamics impairs expiratory airflow and leads to progressive air trapping. Pharmacological therapies have limited effects. Surgical resection of the most destroyed sections of the lung can improve pulmonary function and exercise capacity but its benefit is tempered by significant morbidity. This issue stimulated a search for novel approaches to lung volume reduction. Alternative minimally invasive approaches using bronchoscopic techniques including valves, coils, vapour thermal ablation, and sclerosant agents have been at the forefront of these developments. Insertion of endobronchial valves in selected patients could have benefits that are comparable with lung volume reduction surgery. Endobronchial coils might have a role in the treatment of patients with emphysema with severe hyperinflation and less parenchymal destruction. Use of vapour thermal energy or a sclerosant might allow focal treatment but the unpredictability of the inflammatory response limits their current use. In this Review, we aim to summarise clinical trial evidence on lung volume reduction and provide guidance on patient selection for available therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Lung perfusion scintigraphy by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Takanobu

    1990-01-01

    The initial study reports the characteristic performance using lung segmental phantom filled in Tc-99m pertechnetate. To evaluate the segmental defect in lung perfusion scintigraphy, we applied Bull's-eye analysis in addition to planar image set. Bull's-eye analysis especially facilitated the interpretation in both middle and lower lobes. Subsequently, to evolute the clinical application of Bull's-eye analysis, pulmonary scintigraphy was performed on 10 normal subjects and 60 patients with several pulmonary diseases. Of interest, Bull's-eye analysis, however, encouraged the interpretation in both lower lobes. To calculate the extention and severity of perfusion defect, the present study describes Bull's-eye analysis. Quantitative scoring showed higher in patients with lung cancer than those with pulmonary tuberculosis. The present study focus that Bull's-eye analysis can be useful for evaluating perfusion in patients with a couple of pulmonary diseases. (author)

  5. Interstitial lung disease: Diagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Saha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a final common pathway of a broad heterogeneous group of parenchymal lung disorders. It is characterized by progressive fibrosis of the lung leading to restriction and diminished oxygen transfer. Clinically, the presenting symptoms of ILD are non-specific (cough and progressive dyspnea on exertion and are often attributed to other diseases, thus delaying diagnosis and timely therapy. Clues from the medical history along with the clinical context and radiologic findings provide the initial basis for prioritizing diagnostic possibilities for a patient with ILD. An accurate prognosis and optimal treatment strategy for patients with ILDs can only be after an accurate diagnosis. This review will assist pulmonary physicians and medicine specialist in recognition of ILD. Extensive literature search has been made through PubMed and also Book References has been used for writing this review.

  6. Aspergillus-Related Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia Al-Alawi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus is a ubiquitous dimorphic fungus that causes a variety of human diseases ranging in severity from trivial to life-threatening, depending on the host response. An intact host defence is important to prevent disease, but individuals with pre-existing structural lung disease, atopy, occupational exposure or impaired immunity are susceptible. Three distinctive patterns of aspergillus-related lung disease are recognized: saprophytic infestation of airways, cavities and necrotic tissue; allergic disease including extrinsic allergic alveolitis, asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, bronchocentric granulomatosis and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia; and airway and tissue invasive disease -- pseudomembranous tracheobronchitis, acute bronchopneumonia, angioinvasive aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing aspergillosis and invasive pleural disease. A broad knowledge of these clinical presentations and a high index of suspicion are required to ensure timely diagnosis and treatment of the potentially lethal manifestations of aspergillus-related pulmonary disease. In the present report, the clinical, radiographic and pathological aspects of the various aspergillus-related lung diseases are briefly reviewed.

  7. PET in lung cancer staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, R. E. [Duke University Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The primary clinical application of FDG-PET is in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer and includes diagnosis, staging and restaging of non-small cell lung cancer. PET has a very high accuracy (sensitivity=97%, specificity=78%) for characterizing nodules that are indeterminate by chest radiograph and computed tomography. The major utility of PET in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer is the staging of the entire body. PET is more accurate than the conventional imaging modalities of CT and bone scans in the detection of metastatic disease. PET is accurate in the staging of the mediastinum, adrenal glands, and the skeletal system. PET is not as accurate in the detection of brain metastases because of their small size and the normal cortical accumulation.

  8. Planimetric determination of lung volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieber, M.; Maurer, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The total volume of the lungs was determined by digital planimetry in 102 patients with emphysema and 33 normal controls aged between 30 and 79 years. The results were compared with the findings obtained from spirometric measurements. Mean values showed a significant relationship to age, body size and body surface. Planimetrically determined lung volume did not show a linear relationship with age, but increased after 60 years. Beyong 60 years, spirometric findings were lower because of an increase in the number of patients with emphysema. The results have shown that digital planimetry is a useful addition to spirometry. (orig.) [de

  9. Laryngeal metastasis from lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Umasankar; Madan, Karan; Jain, Deepali; Mohan, Anant; Guleria, Randeep

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic tumors of the larynx are rare. The most common tumors metastasizing to the larynx are melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. Bronchogenic carcinoma metastasizing to the larynx has been rarely described. Herein, we report the case of a 49-year-old, chronic smoker, who incidentally had a laryngeal growth detected during flexible bronchoscopy examination for evaluation of suspected lung cancer. Histopathological examination of the laryngeal nodule and the biopsy obtained from the main bronchus growth confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic squamous cell carcinoma to the larynx from primary lung cancer. PMID:25983415

  10. Laryngeal metastasis from lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umasankar Kalai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic tumors of the larynx are rare. The most common tumors metastasizing to the larynx are melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. Bronchogenic carcinoma metastasizing to the larynx has been rarely described. Herein, we report the case of a 49-year-old, chronic smoker, who incidentally had a laryngeal growth detected during flexible bronchoscopy examination for evaluation of suspected lung cancer. Histopathological examination of the laryngeal nodule and the biopsy obtained from the main bronchus growth confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic squamous cell carcinoma to the larynx from primary lung cancer.

  11. Risk Profiling May Improve Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new modeling study suggests that individualized, risk-based selection of ever-smokers for lung cancer screening may prevent more lung cancer deaths and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening compared with current screening recommendations

  12. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Careers at ACS Careers at ACS About ACS Career Types Working at ACS ... ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation Your Lung Operation DVD ...

  13. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overview ACS-AEI Consortium Quarterly ACS Chapter News Cancer ... American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation Your Lung Operation DVD After Your Operation ...

  14. Dermatomyositis Associated with Lung Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Reina; Takamatsu, Kazufumi; Shinkawa, Yutaka; Yagita, Masato; Fukui, Motonari; Fujita, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    Dermatomyositis is associated with various types of malignancy. However, the association of dermatomyositis with lung neuroendocrine carcinoma is rare. We herein report a case of dermatomyositis with lung neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:28321077

  15. Dermatomyositis Associated with Lung Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Takashima, Reina; Takamatsu, Kazufumi; Shinkawa, Yutaka; Yagita, Masato; Fukui, Motonari; Fujita, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    Dermatomyositis is associated with various types of malignancy. However, the association of dermatomyositis with lung neuroendocrine carcinoma is rare. We herein report a case of dermatomyositis with lung neuroendocrine carcinoma.

  16. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  17. [Lung transplantation in pulmonary fibrosis and other interstitial lung diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berastegui, Cristina; Monforte, Victor; Bravo, Carlos; Sole, Joan; Gavalda, Joan; Tenório, Luis; Villar, Ana; Rochera, M Isabel; Canela, Mercè; Morell, Ferran; Roman, Antonio

    2014-09-15

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the second indication for lung transplantation (LT) after emphysema. The aim of this study is to review the results of LT for ILD in Hospital Vall d'Hebron (Barcelona, Spain). We retrospectively studied 150 patients, 87 (58%) men, mean age 48 (r: 20-67) years between August 1990 and January 2010. One hundred and four (69%) were single lung transplants (SLT) and 46 (31%) bilateral-lung transplants (BLT). The postoperative diagnoses were: 94 (63%) usual interstitial pneumonia, 23 (15%) nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, 11 (7%) unclassifiable interstitial pneumonia and 15% miscellaneous. We describe the functional results, complications and survival. The actuarial survival was 87, 70 and 53% at one, 3 and 5 years respectively. The most frequent causes of death included early graft dysfunction and development of chronic rejection in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans (BOS). The mean postoperative increase in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) was similar in SLT and BLT. The best FEV1 was reached after 10 (r: 1-36) months. Sixteen percent of patients returned to work. At some point during the evolution, proven acute rejection was diagnosed histologically in 53 (35%) patients. The prevalence of BOS among survivors was 20% per year, 45% at 3 years and 63% at 5 years. LT is the best treatment option currently available for ILD, in which medical treatment has failed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Thoracoscopic lung lobectomy for treatment of lung tumors in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdowne, Jennifer L; Monnet, Eric; Twedt, David C; Dernell, William S

    2005-01-01

    To report use of thoracoscopic lung lobectomy (TLL) for treatment of lung tumors (LT) in dogs. Retrospective study. Nine dogs. Dogs that had TLL for tumor removal were included. Using general anesthesia and 1-lung ventilation, TLL was performed using a 30-60 mm endoscopic gastrointestinal anastomosis stapler. If the visual field was obscured, lobe resection was completed via thoracotomy. Metastatic and primary LT were resected by thoracoscopic lobectomy in 9 dogs (6 male, 3 female; mean (+/-SD) weight, 29+/-7 kg; mean age, 10.7+/-1.9 years). Six dogs had a solitary mass and 3 dogs had 2 masses within a single lobe. The left caudal lobe was removed in 3 dogs. In 5 dogs, TLL was used alone whereas conversion to thoracotomy was required in 4 dogs because of poor visibility. There were 7 metastatic LT and 2 primary LT. Mean duration of thoracoscopic surgery was 108.8+/-30.3 minutes compared with 150.75+/-55.4 minutes in dogs requiring conversion to thoracotomy. Mean hospitalization was 3.1+/-1.3 days. Provided the visual field is not obscured, TLL can be performed effectively in dogs. Dogs with metastatic or primary LTs should be considered for TLL, particularly for small masses positioned away from the hilus in the left caudal lung lobe.

  19. Hot tub lung: an intriguing diffuse parenchymal lung disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hot Tub Lung(HTL) is a perplexing pulmonary disease attributed to the Mycobacterium Avium-intracellulare Complex (MAC). MAC is a ubiquitous atypical mycobacterium present in moist environment, and is not considered pathogenic, without the predisposing conditions like immunosuppression. However, HTL is a unique ...

  20. Soluble ICAM-1 activates lung macrophages and enhances lung injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B

    1998-01-01

    Because of the important role of rat ICAM-1 in the development of lung inflammatory injury, soluble recombinant rat ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) was expressed in bacteria, and its biologic activities were evaluated. Purified sICAM-1 did bind to rat alveolar macrophages in a dose-dependent manner and induced ...

  1. Airway complications following pediatric lung and heart-lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaditis, A G; Gondor, M; Nixon, P A; Webber, S; Keenan, R J; Kaye, R; Kurland, G

    2000-07-01

    Obstruction at the airway anastomosis is a recognized complication of adult heart-lung transplantation (HLT) and lung transplantation (LT). Data for pediatric transplantation have been scarce. We reviewed our experience in pediatric HLT and LT to determine the frequency of airway complications and to document the therapeutic modalities used for their treatment. Fifty-three patients (median age: 13.8 yr; range: 1.3 to 28.2 yr) underwent HLT (n = 25), SLT (n = 3), DLT (n = 25), or repeat DLT (n = 3) and survived for more than 72 h. Major anastomotic airway complications requiring intervention affected one of the 25 HLT (4%) and seven of the 28 LT (SLT + DLT) patients (25%) (p = 0.05). Four patients with granulation tissue occluding the airway were treated with forceps resection, laser ablation, or balloon dilatation. Three patients with fibrotic strictures received silicone stents, laser ablation, or balloon dilatation. Two patients with bronchomalacia or diffuse stricture below the anastomosis underwent metal stent placement. Five of seven patients who were treated for anastomotic complications had satisfactory relief of airway obstruction. As compared with previously studied adults, pediatric heart-lung transplant recipients had the same or a lower frequency, and pediatric lung transplant recipients had a higher frequency of major anastomotic airway complications. A variety of treatment modalities were necessary to achieve adequate relief of airway obstruction.

  2. Fludeoxyglucose F-18-PET in Planning Lung Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-19

    Stage I Lung Cancer; Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage II Lung Cancer; Stage II Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7

  3. Syndrome of pathologically changed lung image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, M.A.; Kinoshenko, Yu.T.

    1987-01-01

    Syndrome of pathologically changed lung image unites radiological signs arising on the basis of vascular, stromal and bronchial lung structures. Intrasyndrome differential diagnosis of pathologically changed lung image is presented. Elements of the lung image are characterized from the view point of their localization and extension of changes, quantity, size and form of shadows, their intensity and configuration (contours). Dynamics of syndrome changes in different variants is taken account of. Methods of roentgenological study in case of different syndromes are discussed

  4. Nationwide quality improvement in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik Winther; Green, Anders; Oesterlind, Kell

    2013-01-01

    To improve prognosis and quality of lung cancer care the Danish Lung Cancer Group has developed a strategy consisting of national clinical guidelines and a clinical quality and research database. The first edition of our guidelines was published in 1998 and our national lung cancer registry...... was opened for registrations in 2000. This article describes methods and results obtained by multidisciplinary collaboration and illustrates how quality of lung cancer care can be improved by establishing and monitoring result and process indicators....

  5. Effects of ischemia on lung macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aigul Moldobaeva

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis after pulmonary ischemia is initiated by reactive O(2 species and is dependent on CXC chemokine growth factors, and its magnitude is correlated with the number of lavaged macrophages. After complete obstruction of the left pulmonary artery in mice, the left lung is isolated from the peripheral circulation until 5-7 days later, when a new systemic vasculature invades the lung parenchyma. Consequently, this model offers a unique opportunity to study the differentiation and/or proliferation of monocyte-derived cells within the lung. In this study, we questioned whether macrophage subpopulations were differentially expressed and which subset contributed to growth factor release. We characterized the change in number of all macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, alveolar macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, CD11B- and mature lung macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, CD11B+ in left lungs from mice immediately (0 h or 24 h after left pulmonary artery ligation (LPAL. In left lung homogenates, only lung macrophages increased 24 h after LPAL (vs. 0 h; p<0.05. No changes in proliferation were seen in any subset by PCNA expression (0 h vs. 24 h lungs. When the number of monocytic cells was reduced with clodronate liposomes, systemic blood flow to the left lung 14 days after LPAL decreased by 42% (p<0.01 compared to vehicle controls. Furthermore, when alveolar macrophages and lung macrophages were sorted and studied in vitro, only lung macrophages secreted the chemokine MIP-2α (ELISA. These data suggest that ischemic stress within the lung contributes to the differentiation of immature monocytes to lung macrophages within the first 24 h after LPAL. Lung macrophages but not alveolar macrophages increase and secrete the proangiogenic chemokine MIP-2α. Overall, an increase in the number of lung macrophages appears to be critical for neovascularization in the lung, since clodronate treatment decreased their number and attenuated functional angiogenesis.

  6. Nicotine transport in lung and non-lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Mikihisa; Kamei, Hidetaka; Nagahiro, Machi; Kawami, Masashi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2017-11-01

    Nicotine is rapidly absorbed from the lung alveoli into systemic circulation during cigarette smoking. However, mechanism underlying nicotine transport in alveolar epithelial cells is not well understood to date. In the present study, we characterized nicotine uptake in lung epithelial cell lines A549 and NCI-H441 and in non-lung epithelial cell lines HepG2 and MCF-7. Characteristics of [ 3 H]nicotine uptake was studied using these cell lines. Nicotine uptake in A549 cells occurred in a time- and temperature-dependent manner and showed saturation kinetics, with a Km value of 0.31mM. Treatment with some organic cations such as diphenhydramine and pyrilamine inhibited nicotine uptake, whereas treatment with organic cations such as carnitine and tetraethylammonium did not affect nicotine uptake. Extracellular pH markedly affected nicotine uptake, with high nicotine uptake being observed at high pH up to 11.0. Modulation of intracellular pH with ammonium chloride also affected nicotine uptake. Treatment with valinomycin, a potassium ionophore, did not significantly affect nicotine uptake, indicating that nicotine uptake is an electroneutral process. For comparison, we assessed the characteristics of nicotine uptake in another lung epithelial cell line NCI-H441 and in non-lung epithelial cell lines HepG2 and MCF-7. Interestingly, these cell lines showed similar characteristics of nicotine uptake with respect to pH dependency and inhibition by various organic cations. The present findings suggest that a similar or the same pH-dependent transport system is involved in nicotine uptake in these cell lines. A novel molecular mechanism of nicotine transport is proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Different Lung Lavage Solutions on Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicran Gündoğdu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Experimental animal studies showed that lactated Ringer solution have beneficial effects over isotonic saline solution (0.9% NaCl for mucociliar activity and clearance of upper respiratory tract. In this study we evaluated the effect of lactated Ringer solution and isotonic saline solution on rat lungs for lung injury. Material and Method: Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Experimental Animal Researches Study Institute ethical committee approval was obtained for 24 Sprague-Dawley rats each weighing between 250-300 g. Rats were tracheostomized under general anesthesia and ventilated using pressure controlled ventilation mode. As the first part of our study, we aimed to find the adequate lavage volume of isotonic saline and lactated Ringer solutions to induce ARDS. After finding the adequate lavage volume and count; the mean lavage count that induce ARDS, rest of the rats were randomly divided into two groups and tracheal lavages were performed according to predetermined lavage volume and count in the second part of the study. Wet/dry body weight counts, arterial blood gas sampling and microalbumin levels of bronchoalveolar lavage were analyzed for assessment of lung injury. Results: ARDS was developed following 11.4 lavages with isotonic saline solution and 10.57 lavages with lactated Ringer solutions. In the second part of the study, wet/dry body weight and BAL microalbumin levels were found lower in isotonic saline group however the difference between groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: We were not able to demonstrate the superiority of using lactated Ringer solution over isotonic saline in terms of lung injury when used for lung lavage in rats. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9:48-52

  8. Investigation of lung nodule detectability in low-dose 320-slice computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, J. D.; Paul, N. S.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C6 (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Low-dose imaging protocols in chest CT are important in the screening and surveillance of suspicious and indeterminate lung nodules. Techniques that maintain nodule detectability yet permit dose reduction, particularly for large body habitus, were investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which radiation dose can be minimized while maintaining diagnostic performance through knowledgeable selection of reconstruction techniques. A 320-slice volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion ONE, Toshiba Medical Systems) was used to scan an anthropomorphic phantom at doses ranging from {approx}0.1 mGy up to that typical of low-dose CT (LDCT, {approx}5 mGy) and diagnostic CT ({approx}10 mGy). Radiation dose was measured via Farmer chamber and MOSFET dosimetry. The phantom presented simulated nodules of varying size and contrast within a heterogeneous background, and chest thickness was varied through addition of tissue-equivalent bolus about the chest. Detectability of a small solid lung nodule (3.2 mm diameter, -37 HU, typically the smallest nodule of clinical significance in screening and surveillance) was evaluated as a function of dose, patient size, reconstruction filter, and slice thickness by means of nine-alternative forced-choice (9AFC) observer tests to quantify nodule detectability. For a given reconstruction filter, nodule detectability decreased sharply below a threshold dose level due to increased image noise, especially for large body size. However, nodule detectability could be maintained at lower doses through knowledgeable selection of (smoother) reconstruction filters. For large body habitus, optimal filter selection reduced the dose required for nodule detection by up to a factor of {approx}3 (from {approx}3.3 mGy for sharp filters to {approx}1.0 mGy for the optimal filter). The results indicate that radiation dose can be reduced below the current low-dose (5 mGy) and ultralow-dose (1 mGy) levels with knowledgeable selection of

  9. Lung-protective ventilation in neonatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kaam, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is considered an important risk factor in the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and is primarily caused by overdistension (volutrauma) and repetitive opening and collapse (atelectrauma) of terminal lung units. Lung-protective ventilation should

  10. Myricetin attenuates lung inflammation and provides protection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The euthanasia was followed by the collection of lung samples for subsequent experimental analysis. Estimation of 'wet-to-dry' weight ratio. After euthanasia, the extent of pulmonary edema in the experimental groups was assessed by measuring the 'wet-to-dry' weight of the lungs. For this, the left lung was removed and.

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The lungs are a pair of cone-shaped breathing organs that are found in the chest. The lungs bring oxygen into the body when you breathe in and take out carbon dioxide when you breathe out. Each lung has sections ...

  12. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The lungs are a pair of cone-shaped breathing organs that are found in the chest. The lungs bring oxygen into the body when you breathe in and take out carbon dioxide when you breathe out. Each lung has sections ...

  13. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The lungs are a pair of cone-shaped breathing organs that are found in the chest. The lungs bring oxygen into the body when you breathe in and take out carbon dioxide when you breathe out. Each lung has sections ...

  14. Mass preserving image registration for lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Sporring, Jon; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mass preserving image registration algorithm for lung CT images. To account for the local change in lung tissue intensity during the breathing cycle, a tissue appearance model based on the principle of preservation of total lung mass is proposed. This model is incorporated...

  15. High resolution CT in diffuse lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    High resolution CT (computerized tomography) was discussed in detail. The conclusions were HRCT is able to define lung anatomy at the secondary lobular level and define a variety of abnormalities in patients with diffuse lung diseases. Evidence from numerous studies indicates that HRCT can play a major role in the assessment of diffuse infiltrative lung disease and is indicate clinically (95 refs.)

  16. Computational modeling of a forward lunge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Wieland, Maja Rose; Andersen, Michael Skipper

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the function of the cruciate ligaments during a forward lunge movement. The mechanical roles of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament (ACL, PCL) during sagittal plane movements, such as forward lunging, are unclear. A forward lunge movement contains a knee joint fle...

  17. Optical and Functional Imaging in Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.H. van der Leest (Cor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the second most common cancer in men and women, and is the leading cause of cancer related death. In industrialized countries the mortality rate of lung cancer is higher than the mortality rate of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer combined 1. When lung cancer is

  18. Acute Lung Injury: Making the Injured Lung Perform Better and Rebuilding Healthy Lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Hence, those398 Cell Stem Cell 10, 398–411, April 6, 2012 ª2012 Elsevier Inc.interested in purifying thyroid, lung, liver, or pancreatic stem or... pancreatic lineage (Micallef et al., 2005), no tools have been engineered that can allow the isolation of the most primor- dial murine lung and thyroid...timed pregnancy , identification of the vaginal plug was considered as embryonic day (E) 0.5. To activate CreERT2, 1 mg tamoxifen (TAM) (5 mg/ml, Sigma

  19. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the foreign antigens on the surface of cancer cells and help destroy them. Recent studies indicate this approach holds promise. Bevacizumab and chemotherapy: Last year, scientists announced a new development in treating advanced lung cancer. In a large study, people taking bevacizumab (Avastin) ...

  20. Obesity, adipokines, and lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Akshay

    2010-03-01

    This review summarizes the state of the current literature relating to the associations of lung disease on obesity and adipokines (proteins produced by adipose tissue) in humans. Obesity is an independent risk factor for asthma. Recent studies suggest that obesity is also an independent risk factor for chronic airflow obstruction, as is seen with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The mechanistic basis for these associations in humans is not established, although a possible role for adipokines has been invoked. Leptin, a proinflammatory adipokine, and adiponectin, an anti-inflammatory adipokine, are causally associated with asthma in mice. Although human studies are currently inconclusive, high-serum leptin and low-serum adiponectin concentrations predict asthma, independent of obesity, in select population groups, such as premenopausal women in the United States. In contradistinction, low-serum leptin and high-serum adiponectin concentrations are associated with stable COPD, although these associations are likely confounded by fat mass. Interestingly, leptin may promote systemic and airway inflammation in stable COPD patients. On the other hand, COPD may upregulate systemic and lung adiponectin expression. The precise mechanism and significance of the associations between these adipokines and lung disease at the current stage is confusing and frankly paradoxical in places. This area of research needs additional study that may open up novel therapeutic strategies for these lung diseases.

  1. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out of this tunnel. Rotating around you, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray detectors are located opposite ... to Cancer Therapy (Radiation Oncology) Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Chest Tube Placement (Thoracostomy) and Pleurodesis Thoracentesis Lung Cancer Treatment ...

  3. Mucoepidermoid Lung Carcinoma in Child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    usually includes asthma, pneumonia, atelectasis, middle lobe syndrome and pleural effusion. Recurrent pneumonia in the same region of the lung should raise clinical suspicion of an endobronchial lesion or mass, such as mucoepidermoid carcinoma.[1] Because MECs are most commonly found in the segmental or lobar ...

  4. LUNG FUNCTION TESTING IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Fležar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lung function testing in children above five years old is standardised similarly as is in adult population (1. Nevertheless bronchial provocation testing can be more hazardous since the calibre and reactivity of childhood airway is different. We analysed the frequency of different lung function testing procedures and addressed the safety issues of bronchial provocation testing in children.Methods. We analysed lung function testing results in 517 children, older than 5 years, tested in our laboratory in threeyear period. Spirometry was done in every patient, metacholine provocation test was used as a part of diagnostic work-up in suspected asthma. In case of airway obstruction, bronchodilator test with salbutamol was used instead of a metacholine provocation test.Results. The most common procedure in children was spirometry with bronchial provocation test as a part of diagnostic work-up of obstructive syndrome (mostly asthma. 291 children required metacholine test and 153 tests were interpreted as positive. The decline in expiratory flows (forced expiratory flow in first second – FEV1 in positive tests was greater than in adult population as was the dose of metacholine, needed to induce bronchoconstriction. The compliance of children was better than in adults.Conclusions. Lung function testing in children is reliable and safe and can be done in a well-standardised laboratory that follows the regulations of such testing in adults.

  5. in Patients with Mustard Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShahrzadM Lari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD secondary to sulfur mustard exposure, known as mustard lung, is an important late pulmonary complication. The BODE (Body mass index, Obstruction, Dyspnea, and Exercise index has been established as a valuable tool for determining the adverse consequences of COPD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the BODE index in patients with mustard lung.   Materials and Methods: Eighty-two consecutively stable patients with mustard lung with all levels of severity were entered this study. The following parameters were recorded in all patients: standard spirometry, pulse oximetry, health-related quality of life, the BODE index. Additionally, the severity of COPD was determined by GOLD (Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease staging. The correlation of the BODE index with pulmonary parameters was determined. Results: The mean age of the patients was 47.30±7.08 SD years. The mean BODE index was 3.16±2.25 SD. There was a statistically significant inverse correlation between the BODE index and oxygen saturation (r=-0.30, p=0.007. Also a statistically significant correlation was found between the BODE index and quality of life (r=0.80, p=0.001. The BODE index was not correlated with age of the patients and duration of disease. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the BODE index is correlated with important clinical parameters and can be used in clinical practice

  6. Lung volume reduction for emphysema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, Pallav L.; Herth, Felix J.; van Geffen, Wouter H.; Deslee, Gaetan; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    Advanced emphysema is a lung disease in which alveolar capillary units are destroyed and supporting tissue is lost. The combined effect of reduced gas exchange and changes in airway dynamics impairs expiratory airflow and leads to progressive air trapping. Pharmacological therapies have limited

  7. CT triage for lung malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Martin Weber; Karstoft, Jens; Mussmann, Bo

    2015-01-01

    : To assess detection performance using only coronal multiplanar reformations (MPR) when triaging patients for lung malignancies with CT compared to images in three orthogonal planes, and to evaluate performance comparison of novice and experienced readers. Material and Methods: Retrospective study of 63...

  8. Smoking Marijuana and the Lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... O P Y PATIENT EDUCATION | INFORMATION SERIES Smoking Marijuana and the Lungs Marijuana, also known as cannabis (can-a-bis) is the second most commonly smoked substance after tobacco. Despite marijuana’s legalization in many states, it may be harmful ...

  9. Lung Cancer and Tobacco: What Is New?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialous, Stella Aguinaga; Sarna, Linda

    2017-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Tobacco use remains the single most important preventable cause of cancer and is responsible for 80% of all cases of lung cancer. Implementation of tobacco control measures, including preventing initiation and treating dependence, are pivotal to address the lung cancer epidemic. New evidence continues to emerge on the significant positive impact of incorporating tobacco dependence treatment within all lung cancer treatment protocols. Evidence and guidelines on how to implement these strategies exist and present an opportunity for nurses to make a difference in reducing suffering and preventing deaths from lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radionuclide diagnosis of interstitial lung edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodzhibekov, M.Kh.

    1991-01-01

    Perfusion scintigraphy of the lungs has shown that a reverse direction of postural reactions of the pulmonary blood flow is observed in patients with mitral valvular disease. It is accounted for by the action of gravitation on capillary hydrostatic pressure resulting in the localization of interstitial edema in pulmonary venous hypertension mainly in the lower lung, its microcirculatory bed being compressed and the blood flow redistributed to the opposite upper lung. Therefore successive perfusion scintigraphy of the lungs in the vertical position and in the lateral position with a RP administered twice, can serve as a sensitive test for diagnosis of interstitial lung edema

  11. Hedgehog signaling in neonatal and adult lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Kugler, Matthias C; Loomis, Cynthia A; Samdani, Rashmi; Zhao, Zhicheng; Chen, Gregory J; Brandt, Julia P; Brownell, Isaac; Joyner, Alexandra L; Rom, William N; Munger, John S

    2013-06-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is essential during embryonic lung development, but its role in postnatal lung development and adult lung are not known. Using Gli1(nlacZ) reporter mice to identify cells with active Hh signaling, we found that Gli1(nlacZ)-positive mesenchymal cells are densely and diffusely present up to 2 weeks after birth and decline in number thereafter. In adult mice, Gli1(nlacZ)-positive cells are present around large airways and vessels and are sparse in alveolar septa. Hh-stimulated cells are mostly fibroblasts; only 10% of Gli1(nlacZ)-positive cells are smooth muscle cells, and most smooth muscle cells do not have activation of Hh signaling. To assess its functional relevance, we influenced Hh signaling in the developing postnatal lung and adult injured lung. Inhibition of Hh signaling during early postnatal lung development causes airspace enlargement without diminished alveolar septation. After bleomycin injury in the adult lung, there are abundant Gli1(nlacZ)-positive mesenchymal cells in fibrotic lesions and increased numbers of Gli1(nlacZ)-positive cells in preserved alveolar septa. Inhibition of Hh signaling with an antibody against all Hedgehog isoforms does not reduce bleomycin-induced fibrosis, but adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Shh increases collagen production in this model. Our data provide strong evidence that Hh signaling can regulate lung stromal cell function in two critical scenarios: normal development in postnatal lung and lung fibrosis in adult lung.

  12. Estimation of absorbed and effective dose in {sup 18}F-FDG em PET- CT exams for diagnosis of lung cancer; Estimativa de dose absorvida e efetiva em exames de {sup 18}F-FDG em PET- CT para diagnostico de cancer de pulmao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Guilherme Neto de Pinho; Santana, Priscila do Carmo, E-mail: guinpc1@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de; Reis, Lucas Paixao dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents an evaluation of tissues and organs absorbed doses as well as the effective dose resulting from PET-CT scans performed with {sup 18}F-FDG radiopharmaceutical for lung cancer diagnosis in whole body scans. The ICRP-106 biokinetic model was used to estimate the absorbed and effective doses from the radiopharmaceutical for both male and female patient according to the characteristics of anthropomorphic Alderson Rando® simulators. Computer Tomography doses were evaluated using thermoluminescent detectors inserted in the same anthropomorphic simulators. Optimization protocols for image acquisition and the use of automatic exposure control were used in order to reduce patient doses, taking into account the equipment model and its system. The effective dose in female patients was 5.8 mSv. The effective dose in male patients was 8.4 mSv. The dose values estimated for the {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT scan are below the values described in the literature. This is because the CT was not used for diagnostic but for morphological mapping. (author)

  13. Estrogen, Estrogen Receptor and Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Han Hsu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen has been postulated as a contributor for lung cancer development and progression. We reviewed the current knowledge about the expression and prognostic implications of the estrogen receptors (ER in lung cancer, the effect and signaling pathway of estrogen on lung cancer, the hormone replacement therapy and lung cancer risk and survival, the mechanistic relationship between the ER and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and the relevant clinical trials combining the ER antagonist and the EGFR antagonist, to investigate the role of estrogen in lung cancer. Estrogen and its receptor have the potential to become a prognosticator and a therapeutic target in lung cancer. On the other hand, tobacco smoking aggravates the effect of estrogen and endocrine disruptive chemicals from the environment targeting ER may well contribute to the lung carcinogenesis. They have gradually become important issues in the course of preventive medicine.

  14. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  15. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G., E-mail: kng@cardio-tomsk.ru [Research Institute of Cardiology, Kievskaya Street 111a, Tomsk, 634012 (Russian Federation); Efimova, Nataliya Y., E-mail: efimova@cardio-tomsk.ru; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B. [Research Institute of Cardiology, Kievskaya Street 111a, Tomsk, 634012 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  16. Desired Turbulence? Gut-Lung Axis, Immunity, and Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rea Bingula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbiota includes different microorganisms consisting of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and protozoa distributed over many human body surfaces including the skin, vagina, gut, and airways, with the highest density found in the intestine. The gut microbiota strongly influences our metabolic, endocrine, and immune systems, as well as both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Recently, a dialogue between the gut and lung microbiota has been discovered, suggesting that changes in one compartment could impact the other compartment, whether in relation to microbial composition or function. Further, this bidirectional axis is evidenced in an, either beneficial or malignant, altered immune response in one compartment following changes in the other compartment. Stimulation of the immune system arises from the microbial cells themselves, but also from their metabolites. It can be either direct or mediated by stimulated immune cells in one site impacting the other site. Additionally, this interaction may lead to immunological boost, assisting the innate immune system in its antitumour response. Thus, this review offers an insight into the composition of these sites, the gut and the lung, their role in shaping the immune system, and, finally, their role in the response to lung cancer.

  17. Chronic lung disease in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, M Jeeva; Agarwal, Ramesh; Deorari, Ashok K; Paul, Vinod K

    2008-04-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) occurs in preterm infants who require respiratory support in the first few days of birth. Apart from prematurity, oxygen therapy and assisted ventilation, factors like intrauterine/postnatal infections, patent ductus arteriosus, and genetic polymorphisms also contribute to its pathogenesis. The severe form of BPD with extensive inflammatory changes is rarely seen nowadays; instead, a milder form characterized by decreased alveolar septation due to arrest in lung development is more common. A multitude of strategies, mainly pharmacological and ventilatory, have been employed for prevention and treatment of BPD. Unfortunately, most of them have not been proved to be beneficial. A comprehensive protocol for management of BPD based on the current evidence is discussed here.

  18. Placental Transmogrification of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woo; Park, Il Hwan; Kwon, Woo Cheol; Eom, Min Seob; Kim, Young Ju; Hwan, Joong Hwan [Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Placental transmogrification is a very rare lung disease, where the alveoli resemble the chorionic villi of placenta, and this change is a characteristic finding. A 31-year-old female patient presented with cough and dyspnea that had begun 2 weeks prior to admission. Along with giant bulla found in the left upper lung field, subsegmental consolidation was also identified in the lingular segment on plain chest radiograph and CT scan. Wedge resection was performed to remove the bulla. Pathologic examination of the resected bulla revealed destruction of the normal structures and characteristic villous and papillary changes. These changes led to a diagnosis of placental transmogrification. We made an encounter of an unusual placental transmogrification which had different image findings from other reported transmogrification cases. Thus, we report an atypical placental transmogrification case where both consolidation and giant bulla coexist.

  19. Bioreactor Development for Lung Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Much recent interest in lung bioengineering by pulmonary investigators, industry and the organ transplant field has seen a rapid growth of bioreactor development ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems. A comprehension of the findings from these models is needed to provide the basis for further bioreactor development. Objective The goal was to comprehensively review the current state of bioreactor development for the lung. Methods A search using PubMed was done for published, peer-reviewed papers using the keywords “lung” AND “bioreactor” or “bioengineering” or “tissue engineering” or “ex vivo perfusion”. Main Results Many new bioreactors ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems have been developed by both academic and commercial entities. Microfluidic, lung-mimic and lung slice cultures have the advantages of cost-efficiency and high throughput analyses ideal for pharmaceutical and toxicity studies. Perfused/ventilated rodent whole lung systems can be adapted for mid-throughput studies of lung stem/progenitor cell development, cell behavior, understanding and treating lung injury and for preliminary work that can be translated to human lung bioengineering. Human-sized ex vivo whole lung bioreactors incorporating perfusion and ventilation are amenable to automation and have been used for whole lung decellularization and recellularization. Clinical scale ex vivo lung perfusion systems have been developed for lung preservation and reconditioning and are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Conclusions Significant advances in bioreactors for lung engineering have been made at both the microfluidic and the macro scale. The most advanced are closed systems that incorporate pressure-controlled perfusion and ventilation and are amenable to automation. Ex vivo lung perfusion systems have advanced to clinical trials for lung preservation and reconditioning. The biggest

  20. New estimates for human lung dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Christine; Sidavasan, Sivalal; Kramer, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The currently used lung dimensions in dosimetry were originally estimated in the 1940s from Army recruits. This study provides new estimates of lung dimensions based on images acquired from a sample from the general population (varying age and sex). Building accurate models, called phantoms, of the human lung requires that the spatial dimensions (length, width, and depth) be quantified, in addition to volume. Errors in dose estimates may result from improperly sized lungs as the counting efficiency of externally mounted detectors (e.g., in a lung counter) is dependent on the position of internally deposited radioactive material (i.e., the size of the lung). This study investigates the spatial dimensions of human lungs. Lung phantoms have previously been made in one of two sizes. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Torso Phantom (LLNL) has deep, short lungs whose dimensions do not comply well with the data published in Report 23 (Reference Man) issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute Torso Phantom(JAERI), has longer, shallower lungs that also deviate from the ICRP values. However, careful examination of the ICRP recommended values shows that they are soft. In fact, they have been dropped from the ICRP's Report 89 which updates Report 23. Literature surveys have revealed a wealth of information on lung volume, but very little data on the spatial dimensions of human lungs. Better lung phantoms need to be constructed to more accurately represent a person so that dose estimates may be quantified more accurately in view of the new, lower, dose limits for occupationally exposed workers and the general public. Retrospective chest images of 60 patients who underwent imaging of the chest- lungs as part of their healthy persons occupational screening for lung disease were chosen. The chosen normal lung images represent the general population). Ages, gender and weight of the

  1. Cancer of lung in miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolenic, J.; Jurgova, T.; Volckova, A.; Zimacek, J.

    1995-01-01

    In the period of 1983-1994 was registered at Clinic of occupational diseases 87 cases of professional cancer of lung. Mostly /85/ of cases was related to miners, by whom act as risk factor alpha ionisation from radon. Average age group was 60.2 y, average time of exposition was 21.6 y. Epidermoid carcinoma was the most frequent type of tumor /46.5 %/ of cases/. Smoking plays a supportive role. (authors)

  2. Alternative Splicing in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pio, Ruben; Montuenga, Luis M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Alterations in alternative splicing affect essential biologic processes and are the basis for a number of pathologic conditions, including cancer. In this review we will summarize the evidence supporting the relevance of alternative splicing in lung cancer. An example that illustrates this relevance is the altered balance between Bcl-xL and Bcl-xS, two splice variants of the apoptosis regulator Bcl-x. Splice modifications in cancer-related genes can be associated ...

  3. Method of exact lung puncture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, L.

    1986-01-01

    The accuracy can be improved, and the risk of complications can be reduced in the case of cytodiagnostic lung puncture, if one optimises the method whereby the puncture needle is inserted into the lesion. The author describes such a procedure incorporating the use of technical aids for marking the exact puncture point of the cannula. At the same time the procedure results in a reduction of radiation exposure of both doctor and patient.

  4. Curbing the burden of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urman, Alexandra; Hosgood, H Dean

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancer contributes substantially to the global burden of disease and healthcare costs. New screening modalities using low-dose computerized tomography are promising tools for early detection leading to curative surgery. However, the screening and follow-up diagnostic procedures of these techniques may be costly. Focusing on prevention is an important factor to reduce the burden of screening, treatment, and lung cancer deaths. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has identified several lung carcinogens, which we believe can be considered actionable when developing prevention strategies. To curb the societal burden of lung cancer, healthcare resources need to be focused on early detection and screening and on mitigating exposure(s) of a person to known lung carcinogens, such as active tobacco smoking, household air pollution (HAP), and outdoor air pollution. Evidence has also suggested that these known lung carcinogens may be associated with genetic predispositions, supporting the hypothesis that lung cancers attributed to differing exposures may have developed from unique underlying genetic mechanisms attributed to the exposure of interest. For instance, smokingattributed lung cancer involves novel genetic markers of risk compared with HAP-attributed lung cancer. Therefore, genetic risk markers may be used in risk stratification to identify subpopulations that are at a higher risk for developing lung cancer attributed to a given exposure. Such targeted prevention strategies suggest that precision prevention strategies may be possible in the future; however, much work is needed to determine whether these strategies will be viable.

  5. Bronchoplastic operations for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicenas, S.; Naujokaitis, P.; Jackevicius, A. and others

    2002-01-01

    Objective of our work was to evaluate efficacy of bronchoplastic operations for lung cancer and time to progression in combined treatment. From 1997 till 2001, 57pts were operated for early I-IIB stages of lung cancer. Operations were: tracheal resections in 3pts (5.2%), window right pneumonectomies in 5pts (8.7%), window left pneumonectomies in 2pts (3.5%), window right upper lobe in 22pts (38.5%), bifurcation resections 2pts (3.5%), sleeve right upper lobe resections 7pts (12.2%), sleeve left upper lobe resections in 11pts (19.2%). We had complications: in 7pts (12.2%) suture failure, 26pts (45.6%) obstructive pneumonia, 3pts (5.2%) kinking of anastomosis, 2pts (3.7%) bronchial bleeding, 6pts (10.5%) covered bronchial fistulas, 5pts (8.7%) died after operations. 32pts (56%) underwent radiation after surgery, 13pts (22.8%) radiation and chemotherapy. Three-year survival was in 82.4% (47pts), in 10pts (17.4%) disease progressed. Bronchoplastic operations are sufficient for early lung cancer treatment. Three-year was in survival 82.7% of pts. Seventeen percent of patients failed after combined treatment. (author)

  6. Lung imaging in pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taplin, G.V.; Chopra, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    Although it has been recognized for several years that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can cause lung perfusion defects which may simulate pulmonary embolism, relatively little use has been made of either the radioxenon or the radioaerosol inhalation lung imaging procedures until the last few years as a means of distinguishing pulmonary embolism (P.E.) from COPD is reported. Recent experience is reported with the use of both of these procedures in comparison with pulmonary function tests for the early detection of COPD in population studies and also in P.E. suspects. Equal emphasis is given to simultaneous aerosol ventilation-perfusion (V/P) imaging in the differential diagnosis of P.E. Finally, this paper is concerned with new developments in regional lung diffusion imaging following the inhalation of radioactive gases and rapidly absorbed radioaerosols. Their experimental basis is presented and their potential clinical applications in pulmonary embolism are discussed. As a result of these investigations, a functional (V/P) diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in patients may be possible in the near future with a sequential radioaerosol inhalation procedure alone

  7. Chemoradiotherapy for youngster lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Tingfeng; Jiang Guoliang; Fu Xiaolong; Wang Lijuan; Qian Hao; Zhao Sen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To define the clinico-pathologic characteristics and survival of young-robust patients ( 2 vs 70 mg/m 2 , P<0.001), and more cycles of chemotherapy 6 vs 4, P<0.001) were observed in the youngster group. There was no difference between the two groups in family history of cancer, cigarette smoking, weight loss, and KPS. The median survival intervals of all stages (10 months vs 12 months), and the 2-and 5-year survival rates (11.1% vs 23.1% and 3.1% vs 5.4%) were comparable (P=0.090) between them. For stage IIIb, there was a trend that young patients would give better outcome than the older ones with median survivals of 11 months to 9 months and the 2-year survivals of 3.8% to 0% (P=0.071). Conclusions: The different clinico-pathologic features of the young lung cancer patients are confirmed from that of old patients, but without any survival disparity. In order to enhance our understanding and reduce the mis-diagnosis rate, it is rational to define the lung cancer in relative young people as the youngster lung cancer, which may be beneficial to the clinical practice

  8. Extracellular Vesicles in Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. These vesicles include exosomes, ectosomes (ie, microparticles, extracellular vesicles, microvesicles, and shedding vesicles), and apoptotic bodies. Exosomes are generated by inward budding of the membrane (endocytosis), subsequent forming of multivesicular bodies, and release by exocytosis. Ectosomes are formed by outward blebbing from the plasma membrane and are then released by proteolytic cleavage from the cell surface. Apoptotic bodies are generated on apoptotic cell shrinkage and death. Extracellular vesicles are released when the cells are activated or undergo apoptosis under inflammatory conditions. The number and types of released EVs are different according to the pathophysiological status of the disease. Therefore, EVs can be novel biomarkers for various lung diseases. EVs contain several molecules, including proteins, mRNA, microRNA, and DNA; they transfer these molecules to distant recipient cells. Circulating EVs modify the targeted cells and influence the microenvironment of the lungs. For this unique capability, EVs are expected to be a new drug delivery system and a novel therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene therapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloza, Eric M; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2006-09-01

    Lung cancer patients suffer a 15% overall survival despite advances in chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery. This unacceptably low survival rate is due to the usual finding of advanced disease at diagnosis. However, multimodality strategies using conventional therapies only minimally improve survival rates even in early stages of lung cancer. Attempts to improve survival in advanced disease using various combinations of platinum-based chemotherapy have demonstrated that no regimen is superior, suggesting a therapeutic plateau and the need for novel, more specific, and less toxic therapeutic strategies. Over the past three decades, the genetic etiology of cancer has been gradually delineated, albeit not yet completely. Understanding the molecular events that occur during the multistep process of bronchogenic carcinogenesis may make these tasks more surmountable. During these same three decades, techniques have been developed which allow transfer of functional genes into mammalian cells. For example, blockade of activated tumor-promoting oncogenes or replacement of inactivated tumor-suppressing or apoptosis-promoting genes can be achieved by gene therapy. This article will discuss the therapeutic implications of these molecular changes associated with bronchogenic carcinomas and will then review the status of gene therapies for treatment of lung cancer. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Bioengineered Lungs: A Challenge and An Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Ramon; Otero, Jordi; Almendros, Isaac; Navajas, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Lung biofabrication is a new tissue engineering and regenerative development aimed at providing organs for potential use in transplantation. Lung biofabrication is based on seeding cells into an acellular organ scaffold and on culturing them in an especial purpose bioreactor. The acellular lung scaffold is obtained by decellularizing a non-transplantable donor lung by means of conventional procedures based on application of physical, enzymatic and detergent agents. To avoid immune recipient's rejection of the transplanted bioengineered lung, autologous bone marrow/adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells, lung progenitor cells or induced pluripotent stem cells are used for biofabricating the bioengineered lung. The bioreactor applies circulatory perfusion and mechanical ventilation with physiological parameters to the lung during biofabrication. These physical stimuli to the organ are translated into the stem cell local microenvironment - e.g. shear stress and cyclic stretch - so that cells sense the physiological conditions in normally functioning mature lungs. After seminal proof of concept in a rodent model was published in 2010, the hypothesis that lungs can be biofabricated is accepted and intense research efforts are being devoted to the topic. The current experimental evidence obtained so far in animal tests and in ex vivo human bioengineered lungs suggests that the date of first clinical tests, although not immediate, is coming. Lung bioengineering is a disrupting concept that poses a challenge for improving our basic science knowledge and is also an opportunity for facilitating lung transplantation in future clinical translation. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Study of limiting dosimetric parameters on lung pathology. Differences in the use of the lung-gtv and lung-ptv volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granero Cabanero, D.; Almendros Blanco, P.; Garcia Hernanez, T.; Vicedo gonzalez, A.; Brualla, L.; Hernandez, A.; Solera, C.; Serrano, A.; Rosello, J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the differences between the use of the volume of lung-GTV and lung-PTV to assess pulmonary toxicity and also to study the relationships between parameters V13, V20, V30, and mean dose of volumes lung, lung-PTV and lung-GTV. It was studied also the possible relationship between volumes of GTV, PTV and volume of lung with the dosimetric parameters described above. (Author)

  12. RANK rewires energy homeostasis in lung cancer cells and drives primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shuan; Sigl, Verena; Wimmer, Reiner Alois; Novatchkova, Maria; Jais, Alexander; Wagner, Gabriel; Handschuh, Stephan; Uribesalgo, Iris; Hagelkruys, Astrid; Kozieradzki, Ivona; Tortola, Luigi; Nitsch, Roberto; Cronin, Shane J; Orthofer, Michael; Branstetter, Daniel; Canon, Jude; Rossi, John; D'Arcangelo, Manolo; Botling, Johan; Micke, Patrick; Fleur, Linnea La; Edlund, Karolina; Bergqvist, Michael; Ekman, Simon; Lendl, Thomas; Popper, Helmut; Takayanagi, Hiroshi; Kenner, Lukas; Hirsch, Fred R; Dougall, William; Penninger, Josef M

    2017-10-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Besides smoking, epidemiological studies have linked female sex hormones to lung cancer in women; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB (RANK), the key regulator of osteoclastogenesis, is frequently expressed in primary lung tumors, an active RANK pathway correlates with decreased survival, and pharmacologic RANK inhibition reduces tumor growth in patient-derived lung cancer xenografts. Clonal genetic inactivation of KRas G12D in mouse lung epithelial cells markedly impairs the progression of KRas G12D -driven lung cancer, resulting in a significant survival advantage. Mechanistically, RANK rewires energy homeostasis in human and murine lung cancer cells and promotes expansion of lung cancer stem-like cells, which is blocked by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. Our data also indicate survival differences in KRas G12D -driven lung cancer between male and female mice, and we show that female sex hormones can promote lung cancer progression via the RANK pathway. These data uncover a direct role for RANK in lung cancer and may explain why female sex hormones accelerate lung cancer development. Inhibition of RANK using the approved drug denosumab may be a therapeutic drug candidate for primary lung cancer. © 2017 Rao et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. [Development of the lung cancer diagnostic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, You-Jiang; Yu, Shou-Yi

    2009-07-01

    To develop a lung cancer diagnosis system. A retrospective analysis was conducted in 1883 patients with primary lung cancer or benign pulmonary diseases (pneumonia, tuberculosis, or pneumonia pseudotumor). SPSS11.5 software was used for data processing. For the relevant factors, a non-factor Logistic regression analysis was used followed by establishment of the regression model. Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 system development platform and VB.Net corresponding language were used to develop the lung cancer diagnosis system. The non-factor multi-factor regression model showed a goodness-of-fit (R2) of the model of 0.806, with a diagnostic accuracy for benign lung diseases of 92.8%, a diagnostic accuracy for lung cancer of 89.0%, and an overall accuracy of 90.8%. The model system for early clinical diagnosis of lung cancer has been established.

  14. A Comparative Study of Rat Lung Decellularization by Chemical Detergents for Lung Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Tebyanian

    2017-12-01

    CONCLUSION: Decellularized lung tissue can be used in the laboratory to study various aspects of pulmonary biology and physiology and also, these results can be used in the continued improvement of engineered lung tissue.

  15. The accumulation of nickel in human lungs.

    OpenAIRE

    Edelman, D A; Roggli, V L

    1989-01-01

    Using data from published studies, lung concentrations of nickel were compare for persons with and without occupational exposure to nickel. As expected, the concentrations were much higher for persons with occupational exposure. To estimate the effects of nickel-containing tobacco smoke and nickel in the ambient air on the amount of nickel accumulated in lungs over time, a model was derived that took into account various variables related to the deposition of nickel in lungs. The model predic...

  16. Local immunotherapy in experimental murine lung inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Caroline Uebel, Sonja Koch, Anja Maier, Nina Sopel, Anna Graser, Stephanie Mousset & Susetta Finotto ### Abstract Innovative local immunotherapy for severe lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or lung cancer requires a successful delivery to access the desired cellular target in the lung. An important route is the direct instillation into the airways in contrast to delivery through the digestive tract. This protocol details a method to deliver a...

  17. Ultrasound lung comets in extravascular fluid diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. Н. Алехин

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the analysis of ultrasound lung comets (ULCs that may be observed during ultrasound lung examination in cardiac patients in the case of accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lungs. Recent data on the mechanisms of these artefacts, examination and outcome evaluation methods are discussed. Differential diagnostics problems in patients with cardiac and pulmonary genesis of ULCs are also covered.

  18. Computed tomography in opportunistic lung infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartelius, H.

    1988-01-01

    Chest radiography in two teenage boys, one with Wiscott-Aldrich's syndrome and one with acute lymphatic leucemia in remission showed increased interstitial pattern. In both computed tomography (CT) of the lungs showed heavy interstitial pneumonia, rather different in appearance but in both cases equal to the CT findings in opportunistic lung infections known from immunoincompetent patients with for instance pneumocystis carinii and/or cytomegalo virus infections. In both patients the CT findings led to lung biopsy establishing the etiologic agent. (orig.)

  19. Lung Surfactant and Its Use in Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Rosenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The review considers the present views of lung surfactant (LS functions with emphasis on its protective and barrier properties and ability to maintain local and adaptive immunity. The composition of commercial LS formulations is analyzed. Data on qualitative and quantitative LS abnormalities are presented in various diseases in neonates and adults. The results of clinical trials of different LS formulations in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults are analyzed in detail. Recent data on the results of and prospects for surfactant therapy for bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary tuberculosis are given. 

  20. Early detection of acute lung injury uncoupled to hypoxemia in pigs using ultrasound lung comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargani, Luna; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Di Cristofano, Claudio; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Recchia, Fabio A; Picano, Eugenio

    2007-12-01

    Oleic acid-induced lung injury is an established experimental model of acute lung injury in pigs and is considered to reproduce the early exudative phase of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Ultrasound lung comets are an echographic sign of extravascular lung water, originating from thickened interlobular septa. The objective of this study was to evaluate the timing and relationship between the number of ultrasound lung comets, the Pao2/Fio2 ratio, and the static respiratory compliance in an experimental model of oleic acid-induced lung injury in pigs. Laboratory experiment. Research institute. Ten anesthetized pigs. Acute lung injury was induced by injection of oleic acid (0.1 mL/kg, intravenously). Ultrasound lung comets, Pao2/Fio2, and static respiratory compliance were measured at baseline and at 15, 30, 60, and 90 mins after the injection of oleic acid. We evaluated ultrasound lung comets by transthoracic echography (7.5-MHz vascular probe), scanning on right and left hemithoraxes at 12 predefined scanning sites. Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome was present in all pigs at 90 mins. The number of ultrasound lung comets increased over time and was consistently earlier than the decrease in Pao2/Fio2. At 15 mins, ultrasound lung comets were markedly increased, but no significant changes in Pao2/Fio2 were observed. Accordingly, static respiratory compliance was dramatically reduced at 15 mins compared with baseline (17.04 +/- 1.82 vs. 34.84 +/- 2.62 mL/cm H2O, p comets, assessed by transthoracic echography, detected extravascular lung water accumulation very early in the course of the oleic acid lung injury in pigs, in the presence of a normal Pao2/Fio2. These results suggest that ultrasound lung comets could be a very early, noninvasive, and simple method to detect and quantify pulmonary edema in acute lung injury.

  1. Factors influencing the decline in lung density in a Danish lung cancer screening cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Shaker, Saher; Dirksen, Asger; Lo, Pechin; Skovgaard, Lene; Bruijne, Marleen; Pedersen, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer screening trials provide an opportunity to study the natural history of emphysema by using computed tomography (CT) lung density as a surrogate parameter. In the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial, 2,052 participants were included. At screening rounds, smoking habits were recorded and spirometry was performed. CT lung density was measured as the volume-adjusted 15th percentile density (PD15). A mixed effects model was used with former smoking males with,30 pack-yrs and...

  2. Traumatic Lung Herniation following Skateboard Fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafney L. Davare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung herniation (LH is a rare clinical entity involving the protrusion of lung outside the thoracic cage. It has a variety of etiologies and clinical presentations, making diagnosis difficult. We present a case of a 20-year-old male who reported pleuritic pain after falling from a skateboard. Evaluation through computed tomography (CT scanning of the chest revealed an anterior lung hernia associated with rib fractures. This case emphasizes the need for clinicians to include lung herniation in the differential diagnosis of patients with trauma and inexplicable or persistent pulmonary issues.

  3. Exhaled CO, a predictor of lung function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Peder; Scharling, Henrik; Løkke, Anders

    2007-01-01

    and whether CO could provide additional information to usual measures of smoking regarding prediction of present lung function and decline in lung function over an extended period of time. METHOD: Cigarette smokers from the Copenhagen City Heart Study with valid measures of lung function and exhaled CO.......001). Increasing CO levels were correlated to a lower FEV(1)%pred and to an accelerated decline in lung function. However, in multiple linear regression analyses these correlations were not significant. CONCLUSION: Inhalation and type of cigarette affects exhaled CO levels. CO measures have no predictive value...

  4. Lung transplantation in children. Specific aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Galdó, Antonio; Solé Montserrat, Juan; Roman Broto, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Lung transplantation has become in recent years a therapeutic option for infantswith terminal lung disease with similar results to transplantation in adults.In Spain, since 1996 114 children lung transplants have been performed; this corresponds to3.9% of the total transplant number.The most common indication in children is cystic fibrosis, which represents between 70-80% of the transplants performed in adolescents. In infants common indications areinterstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension.In most children a sequential double lung transplant is performed, generally with the help ofextracorporeal circulation. Lung transplantation in children presents special challenges in monitoring and follow-up, especially in infants, given the difficulty in assessing lung function and performing transbronchial biopsies.There are some more specific complications in children like postransplant lymphoproliferative syndrome or a greater severity of respiratory virus infections .After lung transplantation children usually experiment a very important improvement in their quality of life. Eighty eight per cent of children have no limitations in their activity after 3 years of transplantation.According to the registry of the International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) survival at 5 years of transplantation is 54% and at 10 years is around 35%. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Positron emission tomography of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollmer, P.

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography enables the distribution of positron emitting isotopes to be imaged in a transverse plane through the body and the regional concentration of the isotope to be measured quantitatively. This thesis reports some applications of positron emission tomography to studies of pulmonary pathophysiology. Measurements in lung phantoms showed that regional lung density could be measured from a transmission tomogram obtained with an external source of positron emitting isotope. The regional, fractional blood volume was measured after labelling the blood with carbon-11-monoxide. Regional extravascular lung density (lung tissue and interstitial water per unit thoracic volume) was obtained by subtracting fractional blood volume from lung density. Measurements in normal subjects revealed large regional variations in lung density and fractional blood volume in the supine posture. Extravascular lung density showed a more uniform distribution. The technique has been used to study patients with chronic interstitial pulmonary oedema, pulmonary sarcoidosis and fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension and patients with intracardiac, left-to-right shunt. Tomographic measurements of pulmonary tissue concentration of radionuclides are difficult, since corrections for the blood content and the inflation of the lung must be applied. A simultaneous measurement of lung density and fractional blood volume allows such corrections to be made and the extravascular tracer concentration to be calculated. This has been applied to measurements of the tissue penetration of carbon-11-labelled erythromycin in patients with lobar pneumonia. (author)

  6. Intermittent cranial lung herniation in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmini, Carlo; De Simone, Antonio; Valbonetti, Luca; Diana, Alessia

    2007-01-01

    Two aged dogs with chronic obstructive airway disease were evaluated because of intermittent swelling of the ventral cervical region. Radiographs made at expiration and caudal positioning of the forelimbs allowed identification of intermittent cervical lung herniation of the left and right cranial lung lobe in both dogs. Pulmonary hyperinflation, increased expiratory effort, and chronic coughing were considered responsible for the lung herniation. Cervical lung hernia should be included in the differential diagnoses of intermittent cervical swelling in dogs with chronic respiratory disorders associated with increased expiratory effort and chronic coughing.

  7. Pharmacological studies of the lung with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, A.

    1986-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET), known to be used for lung ventilation and perfusion studies, can also be used in pharmacology to obtain information that is otherwise not available. The lung takes up biologically active substances which can be inactivated or activated, and synthesises and releases others. Such information in man has been obtained from samples of human lungs, or from in vivo first-pass studies, invasive or not, as well as from in vivo kinetic studies using external detection methods with scintillation cameras. PET provides now quantitative regional data in the human lung

  8. Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis: a rare interstitial lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, John C; Mayo, John R; Levy, Robert; Yee, John; Leslie, Kevin O

    2015-01-01

    Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) is a newly described form of interstitial lung disease that originates in the upper lung zones and typically progresses to involve the entire lung. The disease may be idiopathic but is often associated with other pre- or coexisting conditions. Pneumothorax is a common complication and can occur at presentation or at other times during the course of the disease. Pathologically, interstitial fibrosis takes the form of a dense consolidation with some preservation of alveolar septal outlines and demonstrates a distinctly abrupt interface with residual normal lung. Unrecognized cases of PPFE may be incorrectly diagnosed as sarcoidosis, atypical idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, or other unclassifiable interstitial pneumonias. PMID:26090119

  9. American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A.; Church, Timothy R.; Ettinger, David S.; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R.; Gazelle, G. Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K.; LaMonte, Samuel J.; Michaelson, James S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C.; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M. D.; Brawley, Otis W.; Smith, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute’s National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. PMID:23315954

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension in Parenchymal Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsangaris, Iraklis; Tsaknis, Georgios; Anthi, Anastasia; Orfanos, Stylianos E.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) has been extensively investigated, although it represents a less common form of the pulmonary hypertension (PH) family, as shown by international registries. Interestingly, in types of PH that are encountered in parenchymal lung diseases such as interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and many other diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, some of which are very common, the available data is limited. In this paper, we try to browse in the latest available data regarding the occurrence, pathogenesis, and treatment of PH in chronic parenchymal lung diseases. PMID:23094153

  11. [Innovation in Surgery for Advanced Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Yasunori, Sohara; Endo, Shunsuke

    2016-07-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery can be one of less invasive surgical interventions for early stage lung cancer. Locally advanced lung cancer, however, cannot avoid aggressive procedures including pneumonectomy and/or extended combined resection of chest wall, aorta, esophagus, etc. for complete resection. Surgical approach even for advanced lung cancer can be less invasive by benefit from new anti-cancer treatment, innovated manipulations of bronchoplasty and angioplasty, and bench surgery( lung autotransplantation technique). We herein reviewed the strategy to minimize invasive interventions for locally advanced lung cancer, introducing 2 successful cases with advanced lung cancer. The 1st patient is a 62-year old man with centrally advanced lung cancer invading to mediastinum. Right upper sleeve lobectomy with one-stoma carinoplasty following induction chemoradiation therapy was successful. The operation time was 241 minutes. The performance status is good with no recurrence for 60 months after surgery. The 2nd is a 79-year old man with advanced lung cancer invading to the distal aortic arch. Left upper segmentectomy following thoracic endovascular aortic repair with stentgraft was successful with no extracorporeal circulation. The operation time was 170 minutes. The performance status is good with no recurrence for 30 months after surgery. The invasiveness of surgical interventions for local advanced lung cancer can be minimized by innovated device and new anti-cancer drugs.

  12. Registry of the Japanese society of lung and heart-lung transplantation: the official Japanese lung transplantation report 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oto, Takahiro; Okada, Yoshinori; Bando, Toru; Minami, Masato; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Chida, Masayuki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Date, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Kondo, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    The Japanese Organ Transplant Law was amended, and the revised law took effect in July 2010 to overcome extreme donor shortage and to increase the availability of donor organs from brain-dead donors. It is now possible to procure organs from children. The year 2011 was the first year that it was possible to examine the results of this first extensive revision of the Japanese Organ Transplant Law, which took effect in 1997. Currently, seven transplant centers, including Tohoku, Dokkyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Okayama, Fukuoka and Nagasaki Universities, are authorized to perform lung transplantation in Japan, and by the end of 2011, a total of 239 lung transplants had been performed. The number of transplants per year and the ratio of brain-dead donor transplants increased dramatically after the revision of the Japanese Organ Transplant Law. The survival rates for lung transplant recipients registered with the Japanese Society for Lung and Heart-lung Transplantation were 93.3 % at 1 month, 91.5 % at 3 months, 86.3 % at 1 year, 79.0 % at 3 years, and 73.1 % at 5 years. The survival curves for brain-dead donor and living-donor lung transplantation were similar. The survival outcomes for both brain-dead and living-donor lung transplants were better than those reported by the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. However, donor shortage remains a limitation of lung transplantation in Japan. The lung transplant centers in Japan should continue to make a special effort to save critically ill patients waiting for lung transplantation.

  13. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanca, F.; Jacobs, A.; Crijns, W.; De Wever, W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure

  14. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanca, F., E-mail: Federica.Zanca@med.kuleuven.be [Department of Radiology, Leuven University Center of Medical Physics in Radiology, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Imaging and Pathology Department, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, Box 7003 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Jacobs, A. [Department of Radiology, Leuven University Center of Medical Physics in Radiology, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Crijns, W. [Department of Radiotherapy, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); De Wever, W. [Imaging and Pathology Department, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, Box 7003 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Radiology, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  15. Estimation of lung tissue incompressibility variation throughout respiration for tumor targeting in lung radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzadi, Zahra; Samani, Abbas

    2013-03-01

    A novel technique is proposed to characterize lung tissue incompressibility variation during respiration. Lung tissue incompressibility variation stems from significant air content variation in the tissue throughout respiration. Estimating lung tissue incompressibility and its variation is critical for computer assisted tumor motion tracking. Continuous tumor motion during respiration is a major challenge in lung cancer treatment by external beam radiotherapy. If not accounted for, this motion leads to areas of radiation over dosage for the lung normal tissues. Since no effective imaging modality is available for real-time lung tumor tracking, computer based modeling which has the capability for accurate tissue deformation estimation can be a good alternative. Lung tissue deformation estimation can be made using the lung Finite Element (FE) model where its accuracy depends on input tissue biomechanical properties including incompressibility parameter. In this research, an optimization algorithm is proposed to estimate the incompressibility parameter function in terms of respiration cycle time. In this algorithm, the incompressibility parameter and lung pressure values are varied systematically until optimal values, which result in maximum similarity between acquired and simulated 4D CT images of the lung, are achieved for each respiration time point. The simulated images are constructed using a reference image in conjunction with the deformation field obtained from the lung's FE model in each respiration time increment. We demonstrated that utilizing the calculated function along with respiratory system FE modeling leads to accurate tumor targeting, hence potentially improving lung radiotherapy outcome.

  16. Factors influencing the decline in lung density in a Danish lung cancer screening cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Saher B.; Dirksen, Asger; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer screening trials provide an opportunity to study the natural history of emphysema by using CT lung density as a surrogate parameter.In the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial, 2,052 participants were included. At screening rounds, smoking habits were recorded and spirometry was performed...

  17. Lung development requires an active ERK/MAPK pathway in the lung mesenchyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucherat, Olivier; Landry-Truchon, Kim; Aoidi, Rifdat; Houde, Nicolas; Nadeau, Valérie; Charron, Jean; Jeannotte, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    Reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal communications are critical throughout lung development, dictating branching morphogenesis and cell specification. Numerous signaling molecules are involved in these interactions, but the way epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk is coordinated remains unclear. The ERK/MAPK pathway transduces several important signals in lung formation. Epithelial inactivation of both Mek genes, encoding ERK/MAPK kinases, causes lung agenesis and death. Conversely, Mek mutation in mesenchyme results in lung hypoplasia, trachea cartilage malformations, kyphosis, omphalocele, and death. Considering the negative impact of kyphosis and omphalocele on intrathoracic space and, consequently, on lung growth, the exact role of ERK/MAPK pathway in lung mesenchyme remains unresolved. To address the role of the ERK/MAPK pathway in lung mesenchyme in absence of kyphosis and omphalocele, we used the Tbx4 Cre deleter mouse line, which acts specifically in lung mesenchyme. These Mek mutants did not develop kyphosis and omphalocele but they presented lung hypoplasia, tracheal defects, and neonatal death. Tracheal cartilage anomalies suggested a role for the ERK/MAPK pathway in the control of chondrocyte hypertrophy. Moreover, expression data indicated potential interactions between the ERK/MAPK and canonical Wnt pathways during lung formation. Lung development necessitates a functional ERK/MAPK pathway in the lung mesenchymal layer in order to coordinate efficient epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Developmental Dynamics 246:72-82, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Azygous Lobe of the Lung: in the Case of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlong, L M; Ram, Dharma; Sharma, Ashwani; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Iqbal, Sayed Assif; Nagar, Anand; Hazarika, Dibyamohan

    2017-06-01

    The azygous lobe of the lung is an uncommon developmental anomaly. Its surgical importance is hardly being described in literature. Here, we are presenting a case of lung cancer with incidental azygous lobe, with its surgical relevance during lung cancer surgery.

  19. Airway Complications After Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Laura; Machuzak, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Airway complications remain a significant source of morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. The incidence of complications is wide-ranging depending on the definition of the event, and there is still no universally accepted grading system for airway findings after transplantation. Additionally, although surgical technique and organ preservation have improved, other modifiable risk factors remain unclear. The management is as wide-ranging as the definitions. A multimodality approach is often needed with airway stenting reserved for refractory cases and stent management by a transplant team with expertise in placement and management of long-term complications." Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Bronchoplastic and lung preservation surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.H.; Templeton, P.A.; Grillo, H.C.; Shepard, J.A.O.; McLoud, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    Candidates for bronchoplastic surgery include patients previously considered inoperable because of central endobronchial tumors or inability to tolerate pneumonectomy, patients at risk for a second primary neoplasm, and young active patients. The authors reviewed over 50 bronchoplastic procedures, including carinal resections with bronchial reimplantations, carinal pneumonectomies, sleeve resections, and resections of the left interlobar carina. Conventional tomography provided the most accurate assessment of endobronchial anatomy. Computed tomography, unsuitable for intraluminal disease due to volume averaging of obliquely oriented bronchi, provided information about the extraluminal extent of disease, nodes, and the lung parenchyma. Complications including stricture, air leak, atelectasis, pneumonia, and residual tumor