WorldWideScience

Sample records for anthropology physical

  1. Sherwood Washburn's New physical anthropology: rejecting the "religion of taxonomy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikels-Carrasco, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Many physical anthropologists and nearly all of those studying primatology today can trace their academic genealogy to Sherwood Larned Washburn. His New physical anthropology, fully articulated in a 1951 paper, proposed that the study of hominid evolution must link understandings of form, function, and behavior along with the environment in order most accurately to reconstruct the evolution of our ancestors. This shift of concentration from strictly analyzing fossil remains to what Washburn termed adaptive complexes challenged not only Washburn's predecessors, but also led Washburn to critique the very system of academia within which he worked. Collaboration across multiple disciplines, linking the four fields of anthropology in order to understand humans and application of our understandings of human evolution to the betterment of society, are the hallmarks of Washburnian anthropology. In this paper I will explore how Washburn's New physical anthropology led him to not only change the research direction in physical anthropology, but also to challenge the academia within which he worked. I will conclude by reflecting on the prospects of continuing to practice Washburnian Anthropology.

  2. Physical anthropology and the dental and medical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogman, W M

    1976-11-01

    The rise of two sub-specialties in Physical Antrhopology traces back to the Anatomy Departments of Schools of Medicine in Germany and France during the nineteenth century. The study of human diversity in bones and bodies was largely by medically-trained anatomists. There developed Medical Antropology and Dental Anthropology, employing osteometry and craniometry on the skeleton, somatometry and cephalometry on the living body. As a result cross-sectional studies gave way to longitudinal studies and X-ray techniques were added to purely mensurational procedures. In Medical Anthropology the specialties most directly concerned are pediatrics, plastic surgery, endocrinology, and orthopaedics. In Dental Anthropology the specialties most directly concerned are pedodontics, orthodontics, oral surgery, and prosthodontics. The contributions of Physical Anthropology to each is discussed.

  3. [Physical anthropology studies at Keijo Imperial University Medical School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ock-Joo

    2008-12-01

    Medical research during the Japanese Colonial Period became systematic and active after the Keijo Imperial University Medical School was established in 1926. Various kinds of research were conducted there including pharmacological, physiological, pathological and parasitological research. The Keijo Imperial University was give a mission to study about Korea. Urgent topics for medical research included control of infectious diseases, hygiene and environmental health that might have affected colonizing bodies of the Japanese as well as the colonized. The bodies of Koreans had been studied by Japanese even before the establishment of the University. The Keijo Imperial University research team, however, organized several field studies for physical anthropology and blood typing research at the national scale to get representative sampling of the people from its north to its south of the Korean peninsula. In the filed, they relied upon the local police and administrative power to gather reluctant women and men to measure them in a great detail. The physical anthropology and blood typing research by the Japanese researchers was related to their eagerness to place Korean people in the geography of the races in the world. Using racial index R.I.(= (A%+AB%)/(B%+AB%)), the Japanese researchers put Koreans as a race between the Mongolian and the Japanese. The preoccupation with constitution and race also pervasively affected the medical practice: race (Japanese, Korean, or Japanese living in Korea) must be written in every kind of medical chart as a default. After the breakout of Chinese-Japanese War in 1937, the Keijo Imperial University researchers extended its physical anthropology field study to Manchuria and China to get data on physics of the people in 1940. The Japanese government and research foundations financially well supported the Keijo Imperial University researchers and the field studies for physical anthropology in Korea, Manchuria and China. The physical

  4. The origins of American physical anthropology in Philadelphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Alan

    2009-01-01

    With its location on a river with easy access to the sea, its central placement between the English speaking colonies to the north and south and its trading connections with the western frontier, there were many reasons Philadelphia became one of the most important towns of prerevolutionary America. In the early 1770s, it was the site of the first meeting organized to deal with the perceived inequities of the British government toward the colonies. It was where Thomas Jefferson wrote much of the Declaration of Independence, whose soaring statements reflecting the Age of Enlightenment spoke of the equality of all men. It was to this debate, centered on just who was included in this declaration that the origins of physical anthropology in America can be traced. Notable men in the early phases of this disputation included Samuel Stanhope Smith and especially Samuel George Morton, considered the founder of American physical anthropology. The American School of Anthropology, which argued for the polygenic origins of human races was substantially founded on Morton's work. Recent accusations that Morton manipulated data to support his racist views would appear unfounded. The publication of The Origin of Species in 1859 and the issuing of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1862-63 effectively ended the earlier debates. By the time of the American Civil War, 1861-65, physical anthropology was beginning to explore other topics including growth and development and anthropometry.

  5. Martial Arts Anthropology for Sport Pedagogy and Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech J. CYNARSKI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to discuss the subject as well as the problem of corporeality and spirituality in the anthropology of martial arts. The authors attempt to show the vision of a new psychophysical education on the way of martial arts and the taking of personal patterns here. Analysies are made in the perspective of the holistic pedagogy and humanistic theory of martial arts.Qualitative methods, such as studying literature, direct interview and long-term participant observation were used. The authors wish to begin with the concept of corporeality as it is found in the available literature on the subject.The first author has been active in an environment of martial arts for over 30 years. Interviews and discussions were conducted with 9 martial arts masters of the highest rank.Results and conclusions. Psychophysical system of self-realization is an educational programme – a way which relates to spiritual development through physical and mental exercise, according to teaching by a particular master-teacher. Within the context of martial arts being used as a psycho-educational form of education, the body fulfills, above all, the role of a tool to be used on the way towards enlightenment and wisdom. It is utilized specifically in spiritual progress. Improving one’s physical abilities is therefore an ascetic journey of physical perfectionism and technical accomplishment all towards achieving spiritual mastery. In some cases, spiritual development is described in terms of energy (qi, ki and connected with the capacity of one’s health.Traditional understanding of martial arts is often mixed with combat sports or systems of meditation are numbered among movement forms. The opportunity to avoid similar mistakes is to adopt a theoretical perspective of the anthropology of psychophysical progress. Paradigm of systematic approach and integral outlook on the human allow for understanding of the sense of being involved in ascetic and

  6. INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Zaenuddin Hudi Prasojo; Reviewed by: Aspari Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Anthropology is the study of mankind (anthropos). Etymologically, anthropology comes from the word anthropos meaning man and logos meaning knowledge. Anthropology looks at humans as something complex in terms of physical, emotional, social, and cultural complexity. Anthropology also refers to the science of humans and their culture.

  7. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    Architecture and anthropology have always had a common focus on dwelling, housing, urban life and spatial organisation. Current developments in both disciplines make it even more relevant to explore their boundaries and overlaps. Architects are inspired by anthropological insights and methods......, while recent material and spatial turns in anthropology have also brought an increasing interest in design, architecture and the built environment. Understanding the relationship between the social and the physical is at the heart of both disciplines, and they can obviously benefit from further...... collaboration: How can qualitative anthropological approaches contribute to contemporary architecture? And just as importantly: What can anthropologists learn from architects’ understanding of spatial and material surroundings? Recent theoretical developments in anthropology stress the role of materials...

  8. Particle physics and the anthropology of right and left

    CERN Multimedia

    Arpita Roy

    We have all looked at ants at some point and wondered where they go about with so much dash and drive. Likewise I ask what drives so many competent and specialized people in this gigantic collaborative enterprise on the LHC at CERN. And I come at an interesting cross-section that is in a process to change soon with the LHC assuming operation from April 2008. But I am also here to learn something about physics. The metaphor of the ant is useful in describing my particular focus of interest: there is no reason why an ant should take one direction, rather than the other; the ant can select any direction. In an otherwise homogeneous space, what does right and left mean ? The distinction between right and left is not embedded in space itself, it is relative to each other and cannot be made unless the perspective from which it could be viewed is specified. Making this distinction of right and left is then a matter of social convention or custom. Physicists, philosophers, anthropologists alike have wondered why nat...

  9. Reconciling "stress" and "health" in physical anthropology: what can bioarchaeologists learn from the other subdisciplines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsema, Laurie J; McIlvaine, Britney Kyle

    2014-10-01

    The concepts of "stress" and "health" are foundational in physical anthropology as guidelines for interpreting human behavior and biocultural adaptation in the past and present. Though related, stress and health are not coterminous, and while the term "health" encompasses some aspects of "stress," health refers to a more holistic condition beyond just physiological disruption, and is of considerable significance in contributing to anthropologists' understanding of humanity's lived experiences. Bioarchaeological interpretations of human health generally are made from datasets consisting of skeletal markers of stress, markers that result from (chronic) physiological disruption (e.g., porotic hyperostosis; linear enamel hypoplasia). Non-specific indicators of stress may measure episodes of stress and indicate that infection, disease, or nutritional deficiencies were present in a population, but in assessing these markers, bioarchaeologists are not measuring "health" in the same way as are human biologists, medical anthropologists, or primatologists. Rather than continue to diverge on separate (albeit parallel) trajectories, bioarchaeologists are advised to pursue interlinkages with other subfields within physical anthropology toward bridging "stress" and "health." The papers in this special symposium set include bioarchaeologists, human biologists, molecular anthropologists, and primatologists whose research develops this link between the concepts of "stress" and "health," encouraging new avenues for bioarchaeologists to consider and reconsider health in past human populations.

  10. Validation of a physical anthropology methodology using mandibles for gender estimation in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Papile Maciel Carvalho

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Validation studies of physical anthropology methods in the different population groups are extremely important, especially in cases in which the population variations may cause problems in the identification of a native individual by the application of norms developed for different communities. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to estimate the gender of skeletons by application of the method of Oliveira, et al. (1995, previously used in a population sample from Northeast Brazil. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The accuracy of this method was assessed for a population from Southeast Brazil and validated by statistical tests. The method used two mandibular measurements, namely the bigonial distance and the mandibular ramus height. The sample was composed of 66 skulls and the method was applied by two examiners. The results were statistically analyzed by the paired t test, logistic discriminant analysis and logistic regression. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that the application of the method of Oliveira, et al. (1995 in this population achieved very different outcomes between genders, with 100% for females and only 11% for males, which may be explained by ethnic differences. However, statistical adjustment of measurement data for the population analyzed allowed accuracy of 76.47% for males and 78.13% for females, with the creation of a new discriminant formula. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that methods involving physical anthropology present high rate of accuracy for human identification, easy application, low cost and simplicity; however, the methodologies must be validated for the different populations due to differences in ethnic patterns, which are directly related to the phenotypic aspects. In this specific case, the method of Oliveira, et al. (1995 presented good accuracy and may be used for gender estimation in Brazil in two geographic regions, namely Northeast and Southeast; however, for other regions of the country (North, Central West and South

  11. Research trends in human osteology: a content analysis of papers published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanowski, Christopher M; Buikstra, Jane E

    2005-09-01

    This paper explores recent research trends in human osteology, based on articles published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology (AJPA) during two 5-year intervals: 1980--1984 and 1996--2000. Topical "visibility" is measured in terms of article counts; "impact" is estimated through citation indices. Our results indicate that human osteologists continue to publish a range of methodological, analytical, and descriptive research papers that address a broad array of subjects. Analytical articles are cited more frequently than descriptive articles and thus have higher impact, reflecting the discipline's continued commitment to problem-oriented research. Differences in publication patterns exist between scholars during early and later stages of their careers. Articles published by students and Ph.D.s within 2 years of their doctoral degree are more frequently descriptive than analytical, when compared to people with longer career histories. Topics such as pathology, forensic anthropology, and biodistance modeling remain highly visible, while articles on the dentition have waned. An increase in functional research directed toward the postcranial skeleton is also reflected in our data. While continued visibility for morphological investigations is apparent, the impact of recently developed applications in bone chemistry and molecular anthropology is amply documented in our data, particularly during the more recent survey years.

  12. A study of physical education and the course of anthropology%人类学的历程与体育研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡小明

    2013-01-01

      研究涉及体育人类学理论与方法研究。通过对人类学的来龙去脉进行全景式的梳理和展现,分析从体质人类学到文化人类学、欧陆和英美的学术传统与研究方法、走向应用与本土化3个人类学发展的视角对体育研究的影响,并强调了人类学文理融通和脚踏实地的两大特征对当今体育理论探索的现实意义。%The author studied theories and methods in sports anthropology. By reviewing and revealing the where-from and whereto of anthropology panoramically, the author analyzed continental, British and American academic traditions and research methods from physical anthropology to cultural anthropology, their influence on physical education study from such three perspectives of anthropological development as application and localization, and emphasized the realistic significance of such two major characteristics of anthropology as being equally good at arts and science and being hardheaded to the exploration of physical education theories nowadays.

  13. Design Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy

    Design anthropology is a call for a different way of involving anthropology and participatory observation within practices of designing technologies, services, policies and infrastructure that does not aim towards changing human behavior. Here design is considered the process and not the object...... of inquiry. The paper presents a short history of design anthropology, its theoretical underpinnings and methodologies. Theoretically, the emerging field is influenced by processual, critical and action orientated approaches in anthropology. I argue that by combining anthropological methodology and knowledge...... with the future orientated imaginative praxis of design skill and collaborative design processes, anthropology and design could learn from each other. I conclude by referring to what theories, methods, and approaches are in use by practitioners of design anthropology....

  14. Annual Review of Anthropology, Volume 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Bernard J., Ed.; And Others

    Seventeen articles focus on current research interests of anthropologists. The volume is part of a five-year project designed to identify interesting directions in physical, linguistic, archaeological, social, and cultural anthropology. Covering a wide range of anthropological subjects, the articles discuss a history of physical anthropology,…

  15. Design Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This edited volume provides an introduction to the emerging field of design anthropology from the point of view of anthropologists engaging in its development. Contributors include young anthropologists with experience in the field and leading theoreticians, who combine to articulate the specific...... style of knowing involved in doing design anthropology. So far design anthropology has been developed mostly in the practice of industry and the public sector, in particular in Scandinavia and the US, and the sustained academic reflection to support this practice is still in its early stages. This book...... will contribute to this theoretical reflection and provide a reference for practitioners, teachers and students of anthropology, as well as design and innovation....

  16. Towards an Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    2016-01-01

    their overlaps and collaboration. However, there are also challenging differences to take into account regarding disciplinary traditions of, for example, communication, temporality, and normativity. This article explores the potentials and challenges of architectural anthropology as a distinct sub......Architecture and anthropology have always had overlapping interests regarding issues such as spatial organisation, forms of human dwellings, and the interplay between social life and physical surroundings. Recent developments in both disciplines make it even more relevant to explore and evolve......-discipline and outlines its possible theoretical, methodological, and applied contributions. It is proposed that the ambition to understand people in a different way than they understand themselves is key in both disciplines, and that architectural anthropology is consequently not only relevant in studies of vernacular...

  17. Towards an Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Architecture and anthropology have always had overlapping interests regarding issues such as spatial organisation, forms of human dwellings, and the interplay between social life and physical surroundings. Recent developments in both disciplines make it even more relevant to explore and evolve...... their overlaps and collaboration. However, there are also challenging differences to take into account regarding disciplinary traditions of, for example, communication, temporality, and normativity. This article explores the potentials and challenges of architectural anthropology as a distinct sub......-discipline and outlines its possible theoretical, methodological, and applied contributions. It is proposed that the ambition to understand people in a different way than they understand themselves is key in both disciplines, and that architectural anthropology is consequently not only relevant in studies of vernacular...

  18. Business Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This essay outlines the overall scope and location of business anthropology within the overall field of the discipline. It outlines its foundations as an applied form of anthropology in early developments in the United States (in particular, in Western Electric's Hawthorne Project and the Human...... Relations School at Harvard University), as well as in the United Kingdom and elsewhere, before turning to five areas of research and practice: academic ethnographies of business practices, regional studies, case studies developed by practitioners, theoretical applications, and methods. The essay then asks...... what a future program for business anthropology might look like and suggests four areas for theoretical development against a background of education, engagement, and comparative work. These are an examination of structures of power in, between, and dependent on business organizations of all kinds...

  19. Anthropology & Philosophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The present book is no ordinary anthology, but rather a workroom in which anthropologists and philosophers initiate a dialogue on trust and hope, two important topics for both fields of study. The book combines work between scholars from different universities in the U.S. and Denmark. Thus, besid......, therefore, also inspire others to work in the productive intersection between anthropology and philosophy....

  20. 75 FR 67998 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI AGENCY: National..., Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from... physical anthropologist in the Anthropology Department at Western Michigan University, studied the...

  1. Changing anthropology, changing society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Heather

    2009-12-01

    Fifty years after the founding of the field of medical anthropology, the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association held its first independent meeting on September 24-27, 2009, at Yale University.

  2. Virtual anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gerhard W

    2015-02-01

    Comparative morphology, dealing with the diversity of form and shape, and functional morphology, the study of the relationship between the structure and the function of an organism's parts, are both important subdisciplines in biological research. Virtual anthropology (VA) contributes to comparative morphology by taking advantage of technological innovations, and it also offers new opportunities for functional analyses. It exploits digital technologies and pools experts from different domains such as anthropology, primatology, medicine, paleontology, mathematics, statistics, computer science, and engineering. VA as a technical term was coined in the late 1990s from the perspective of anthropologists with the intent of being mostly applied to biological questions concerning recent and fossil hominoids. More generally, however, there are advanced methods to study shape and size or to manipulate data digitally suitable for application to all kinds of primates, mammals, other vertebrates, and invertebrates or to issues regarding plants, tools, or other objects. In this sense, we could also call the field "virtual morphology." The approach yields permanently available virtual copies of specimens and data that comprehensively quantify geometry, including previously neglected anatomical regions. It applies advanced statistical methods, supports the reconstruction of specimens based on reproducible manipulations, and promotes the acquisition of larger samples by data sharing via electronic archives. Finally, it can help identify new, hidden traits, which is particularly important in paleoanthropology, where the scarcity of material demands extracting information from fragmentary remains. This contribution presents a current view of the six main work steps of VA: digitize, expose, compare, reconstruct, materialize, and share. The VA machinery has also been successfully used in biomechanical studies which simulate the stress and strains appearing in structures. Although

  3. Anthropologi Untuk Fakultas Kedokteran

    OpenAIRE

    T. Jacob, T. Jacob

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the problem of and justification for teaching anthropology in the medical school. It delineates the aspects and orientation of anthropology for the medical profession by distinguishing and explaining anthropology of medicine, anthropology in medicine and an• thropological medicine. Subsequently, a bioculturai account of the contents of those three subjects pertinent to medicine are presented, with special consideration on anthropology as basic, background knowledge in...

  4. PRACTICING ANTHROPOLOGY IN PORTUGAL

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The rise of anthropology in Portugal is examined within the framework of several cycles of development. The chapter discusses how the consolidation of anthropology at university level was the main focus until the 90’s. Applied anthropology, as distinctive from academic anthropology received very little attention. Consequently, there was an absence of an institutionalization of applied anthropology in the country. Nowadays, however, two main trends converge that supports the gro...

  5. Why all anthropology should be called techno-anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    as an invitation to think in ambitious terms about what techno- anthropology might be(come). The main contribution of the chapter is to introduce Bruno Latour and John Dewey as techno-anthropologists. While these two thinkers are known for many other engagements, and wrote in different times, they share...... turn to Dewey’s understanding of technology as inquiry, a concept that deliberately ignores the physical/psychological dichotomy. The chapter concludes with a couple of empirical examples of how the pragmatist perspective might guide techno-anthropological analysis....

  6. [Man's place and anthropology in bioethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar Romero, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    From the analysis of its epistemological status, the article focuses on the philosophical fundament of bioethics, stressing the need for an authentic anthropology as a reference or starting point. Being an applied ethics, the first fundament of bioethics is in ethics. It shows how only personalistic ethics, which takes as reference the nature or essence of man, can offer objective and universal criteria. Philosophical anthropology studies man as a whole, in an integral manner, from the perspective of its nature or fundamental aspects of his being. It analyzes the distinction and relationship between the philosophical anthropology and the positive anthropologies, as well as with the physical, human and social sciences. Finally, it reflects on the current anthropological crisis and its ethical consequences.

  7. Religious architecture: anthropological perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Verkaaik

    2013-01-01

    Religious Architecture: Anthropological Perspectives develops an anthropological perspective on modern religious architecture, including mosques, churches and synagogues. Borrowing from a range of theoretical perspectives on space-making and material religion, this volume looks at how religious buil

  8. Psychological Anthropology: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module traces the history of psychological anthropology, introducing various schools and perspectives within the field of psychology. First, a discussion is provided of biological determinism, examining its historical development and the…

  9. Teaching anthropology in the medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrese, J A; Marshall, P A

    2000-05-01

    Practicing medicine well requires recognizing the breadth of human experience and attending to the psychological and sociocultural dimensions of patients as well as their physical needs. Central to the concerns of anthropology are the shared beliefs and values expressed in social practices and traditions that give meaning to everyday life. The relevance of anthropology for biomedical practice and research is grounded in the discipline's emphasis on contextual meaning and its unique strategies for data gathering. In this article, we briefly review the field of anthropology and the discipline of medical anthropology. We argue for incorporating anthropological concepts and methods in medical training, and summarize anthropology's role in medical education over the past century. Finally, we present ideas for including anthropology in the medical curriculum, proposing curricular goals and content, and teaching settings and techniques. An anthropological orientation can foster trainee self-awareness, help trainees prepare for the diverse perspectives they will encounter in our pluralistic society, and facilitate critical analysis of biomedicine and its systems of care.

  10. Anthropology Beyond the University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Alden, Ed.

    The purpose of this book is to attempt to illustrate some of the interrelationships between anthropology and other fields, offering students the opportunity to discover inductively some of the core ideas in anthropology. Furthermore, the potential job market for people with training in anthropology, whether consisting of a few courses or a…

  11. Organizational culture, Anthropology of

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Wright, Susan

    2015-01-01

    cultures’ into transnational corporations and organizations concerned with international governance. In such organizations, anthropology graduates are increasingly employed as ‘cultural experts.’ We track the anthropological research on organizational culture and argue that the sensibilities and analytical...... skills acquired and the concepts developed through the ethnographic encounter gives anthropology a unique voice in the study of cultural matters in organizations....

  12. Allostatic load and biological anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edes, Ashley N; Crews, Douglas E

    2017-01-01

    Multiple stressors affect developing and adult organisms, thereby partly structuring their phenotypes. Determining how stressors influence health, well-being, and longevity in human and nonhuman primate populations are major foci within biological anthropology. Although much effort has been devoted to examining responses to multiple environmental and sociocultural stressors, no holistic metric to measure stress-related physiological dysfunction has been widely applied within biological anthropology. Researchers from disciplines outside anthropology are using allostatic load indices (ALIs) to estimate such dysregulation and examine life-long outcomes of stressor exposures, including morbidity and mortality. Following allostasis theory, allostatic load represents accumulated physiological and somatic damage secondary to stressors and senescent processes experienced over the lifespan. ALIs estimate this wear-and-tear using a composite of biomarkers representing neuroendocrine, cardiovascular, metabolic, and immune systems. Across samples, ALIs are associated significantly with multiple individual characteristics (e.g., age, sex, education, DNA variation) of interest within biological anthropology. They also predict future outcomes, including aspects of life history variation (e.g., survival, lifespan), mental and physical health, morbidity and mortality, and likely health disparities between groups, by stressor exposures, ethnicity, occupations, and degree of departure from local indigenous life ways and integration into external and commodified ones. ALIs also may be applied to similar stress-related research areas among nonhuman primates. Given the reports from multiple research endeavors, here we propose ALIs may be useful for assessing stressors, stress responses, and stress-related dysfunction, current and long-term cognitive function, health and well-being, and risk of early mortality across many research programs within biological anthropology.

  13. Veterinary anthropology explored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Veterinary and social scientists came together at the Centre for Medical Anthropology at the University of Edinburgh in April to discuss areas of common interest and the possibility of defining a new interdisciplinary field of 'veterinary anthropology'. Andrew Gardiner, one of the organisers of the international meeting, reports.

  14. Disciplining anthropological demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Randall

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study furthers the epistemological development of anthropological demography, and its role in understanding the demography of Europe. Firstly we situate anthropological demography against the context of an evolving world of research in which boundaries between academic disciplines have become much more permeable. This is achieved via an overview of recent theoretical debates about the role and nature of disciplinarity, including interdisciplinarity, multidisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. Secondly, in order to understand the current state of the art, we sketch out the evolution of anthropological demography, paying particular attention to the different knowledge claims of anthropology and demography. Finally, we flesh out some of the epistemological and theoretical debates about anthropological demography by sketching out the formative research process of our own work on low fertility in the UK.

  15. Medical design anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventura, Jonathan; Gunn, Wendy

    Barnard and Spencer define medical anthropology in the Encyclopedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology as "Medical anthropology is, as the phrase implies, unavoidably concerned with the paradigm of modern Western medicine, whether implicitly or explicitly" (2002: 541). Recently there is a new...... focus in medical sociology and anthropology, which is patient's practices and influence on wider global health environment (see for example vol. 36(2) of Sociology of Health & Illness). While various social science theoreticians have written about agentic abilities of objects, there is a gap...... in literature concerning various levels of socio-cultural influence of the medical environment through medical products. In our research we have outlined the importance of medical design anthropology (MDA) to the practice and theory of design (Ventura and Gunn, 2016). In this paper, we study the ways in which...

  16. Cyber anthropology or anthropology in cyberspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilicić, Niksa

    2012-03-01

    As a variety of anthropology, cyber anthropology is considered to be the fastest growing sub branch in the science. It is based on synergic effects of multimedia systems and hypermedia, using their comparative advantages. One of the least researched fields of cyber anthropology is the relationship of individuals and social groups with a multimedia document in terms of their perception of such subject. This is because the foundation of social-informatics perception in the society is created based on the evidence of a real life, whereas here the perception is established at the level of virtual, i.e. online life. The rhetorical question here is whether an identical content causes the same or different user reactions, depending on whether it was perceived offline or online, i.e. to what extend does the medium (and not the information content) dictate the user perception. In this respect the research titled "Perception of online museum content creators and actual habits of Croatian online museum visitors" can be a "case study" for the impact of "cyber potential" on the classic anthropological paradigm.

  17. Cognitive anthropological fieldwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guen, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    In their introduction, Beller et al. point to important issues regarding the problematic interaction of anthropology and cognitive sciences (CS). I address some of these issues in stressing first some limitations of the current state of the fields of anthropology and CS. In the second half of this article, using data from studies I have been conducting among the Yucatec Mayas (Mexico), I present some concrete cases where anthropological and CS methods and approaches are complementary. Finally, I propose some solutions to find common ground and ways to improve cross-disciplinary collaboration.

  18. Toward a Negative Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Johannssen, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Can philosophy say what man is? What is gained or lost by making theoretical assumptions about the human being? This essay examines the “negative anthropology” of the early Frankfurt School by asking how Max Horkheimer, Theodor W. Adorno and Ulrich Sonnemann engage with the question “What is man?” Negative anthropology turns out to be more than the critique of philosophical anthropology: By understanding the human being as the ensemble of what it is not, negative anthropology avoids the predi...

  19. Anthropology in cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Andrea; Hutchins, Edwin; Medin, Douglas

    2010-07-01

    This paper reviews the uneven history of the relationship between Anthropology and Cognitive Science over the past 30 years, from its promising beginnings, followed by a period of disaffection, on up to the current context, which may lay the groundwork for reconsidering what Anthropology and (the rest of) Cognitive Science have to offer each other. We think that this history has important lessons to teach and has implications for contemporary efforts to restore Anthropology to its proper place within Cognitive Science. The recent upsurge of interest in the ways that thought may shape and be shaped by action, gesture, cultural experience, and language sets the stage for, but so far has not fully accomplished, the inclusion of Anthropology as an equal partner.

  20. Teaching Anthropology through Folklore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Rachel A.

    1985-01-01

    Describes three uses of folklore in teaching college-level anthropology courses: (1) collecting folklore through interviewing; (2) analyzing folklore themes; and (3) using folklore in puppetry and plays. (KH)

  1. The Anthropology of Football

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kovačević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anthropological interest in football has been on the rise since the beginning of the century, which can be attested to by the rising number of studies, papers, collective publications and scientific conferences on the topic. Seeing as anthropology is no longer the study of the culturally bizarre and exotic, it is clear that the first anthropological studies of football as a cultural phenomenon are linked to those environments in which football figures as an important cultural trait, which is the reason why this sub discipline thrived in Europe or in places where football was treated as an esoteric phenomenon and where there as a longer tradition of anthropological study of native cultures. From the first analogies between the game of football and its rules with rituals of so called primitive cultures, the anthropological study of football developed into a relatively encompassing approach which includes interest in all the actors who establish the game as a public, cultural good – players, experts, supporters, journalists, organizers etc. – as well as its various cultural manifestations, in the form of a tool for the construction of identity and cultural symbol, a leisure activity with ties to economy, to a specific apotheosis of the concepts of globalization and commodification of culture. Anthropological studies of football are present in Serbia as well, and their subject matter corresponds to the role and position held by football, as a cultural artefact, in Serbian society and other countries in the region.

  2. Ontological And Anthropological Aspects of the Concept of Human Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Asha Nimali Fernando

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthropology is the study of the origin of the man. It is basically concern with the concept of Homo sapiens, and it is scientifically questioning what are human physical traits as well how do men behave and the variation among different groups of  human with his social and cultural dimensions. Ontology is a subfield in traditional philosophy which is mainly focuses on the nature of being, existence or reality as such. There are some similarities and differences among these two areas. However when we deeply study the philosophical basis of the anthropology it is proof that it was derived from ontology.Anthropology discusses the social and cultural world or the physical entity of human nature. Ontology focuses the invisible aspect of human nature along with the ultimate reality. Therefore, it has a metaphysical aspect of human being; this philosophical notion has in fact, contributed to the development of the subject of anthropology. The present modern day has given very little attention to this philosophical combination of  ontolog y to anthropology, rendering further investigation into the philosophical roots of anthropology.This research paper seeks to evaluate the relationship between ontology and anthropology by paying attention to the ontological arguments about the concept of man and human nature within Greek and modern western thoughts, in comparing with modern anthropological arguments.

  3. The Colonization of Space. An Anthropological Outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Tiziani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The colonization of space implies an adaptation of both physical and cultural type. The human species is characterized by a great adaptive capacity that, in a basically extreme environment, reveals all its plasticity. However, this capacity must be aided by appropriate technological solutions that identify the problems related to long stays in space, and to long space voyages. Anthropology could aid future colonizers rethinking the environment of the spacecrafts, and the habitats of future colonies. Last but not least, anthropology can prepare them to a possible encounter with alien intelligences very different from human way of thinking.

  4. Subdisciplines of Anthropology: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module introduces the idea that anthropology is composed of a number of subdisciplines and that cultural anthropology has numerous subfields which are the specialty areas for many practicing anthropologists. Beginning with a general discussion…

  5. [Physical anthropology and human "zoos": the exhibition of natives as a scientific popularization practice on the threshold of the 20th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Juanma Sánchez

    2010-01-01

    All along the nineteenth century different anthropological exhibitions were held in many countries, in which people from a number of indigenous communities, especially transported from their homeland for the occasion, were exhibited publicly, both for citizenship's instruction and for specialists's "in vivo" studies on human biology. This paper presents a brief description of some of these scientific shows, and tries to relate them to contemporary human biology theories.

  6. Forensic anthropology and mortuary archaeology in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankauskas, Rimantas

    2009-12-01

    Forensic anthropology (in Lithuania, as everywhere in Eastern Europe, traditionally considered as a narrower field--forensic osteology) has a long history, experience being gained both during exhumations of mass killings during the Second World War and the subsequent totalitarian regime, investigations of historical mass graves, identification of historical personalities and routine forensic work. Experts of this field (usually a branch of forensic medicine) routinely are solving "technical" questions of crime investigation, particularly identification of (usually dead) individuals. Practical implementation of the mission of forensic anthropology is not an easy task due to interdisciplinary character of the field. On one hand, physical anthropology has in its disposition numerous scientifically tested methods, however, their practical value in particular legal processes is limited. Reasons for these discrepancies can be related both to insufficient understanding of possibilities and limitations of forensic anthropology and archaeology by officials representing legal institutions that perform investigations, and sometimes too "academic" research, that is conducted at anthropological laboratories, when methods developed are not completely relevant to practical needs. Besides of answering to direct questions (number of individuals, sex, age, stature, population affinity, individual traits, evidence of violence), important humanitarian aspects--the individual's right for identity, the right of the relatives to know the fate of their beloved ones--should not be neglected. Practical use of other identification methods faces difficulties of their own (e.g., odontology--lack of regular dental registration system and compatible database). Two examples of forensic anthropological work of mass graves, even when the results were much influenced by the questions raised by investigators, can serve as an illustration of the above-mentioned issues.

  7. What is Business Anthropology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albu, Oana Brindusa; Larsen, Frederik; Sigurdarson, Hallur

    2013-01-01

    The anthropology of organizations is always political; it might take place over shorter, as well as longer, time spans and in singular, pluralistic, or even virtual, settings. This paper addresses such issues by describing and analyzing fieldwork experiences of an academic workshop, which took pl...

  8. Neuroanthropology or simply Anthropology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, Andreas; Frith, Chris D

    2012-01-01

    Neuroanthropology is a new kid on the academic block. It seems to offer a methodological and conceptual synthesis, which bridges current fault lines within anthropology, both as discipline and as departments. We are not convinced that it will deliver on these grounds. However, it has the potential...

  9. The Anthropology of Nepotism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Simon Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    Nepotism is widespread in organizations in developing countries but has so far received scant attention in cross-cultural management research. The paper seeks to contribute to the underdeveloped research topic suggesting an anthropological explanation of nepotism. It is argued that nepotism...

  10. Anthropology and Multiple Modernities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    Anthropology never had an easy relationship with the concept of modernity. The “reflexive turn” which developed during the 1980s and 1990s tackled the concept of modernity as a culturally constructed narrative underlying Western self-assumptions of self and other– assumptions that needed to be un......Anthropology never had an easy relationship with the concept of modernity. The “reflexive turn” which developed during the 1980s and 1990s tackled the concept of modernity as a culturally constructed narrative underlying Western self-assumptions of self and other– assumptions that needed...... to be unpacked and left behind. The debate was an essential part of a disciplininary reflexivity reconsidering anthropology’s epistemological and political roots in that very modernity. From the mid 1990s modernity was, somewhat surprisingly, reintroduced as a useful if not necessary conceptual tool...... better. This paper will tentatively argue that if anthropology wishes to embrace the concept of multiple modernities, it could profitably do so by taking more seriously the intellectual trajectory that paved the way for the idea of “multiple modernities”. This trajectory moves outside anthropology...

  11. Bayes in biological anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konigsberg, Lyle W; Frankenberg, Susan R

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we both contend and illustrate that biological anthropologists, particularly in the Americas, often think like Bayesians but act like frequentists when it comes to analyzing a wide variety of data. In other words, while our research goals and perspectives are rooted in probabilistic thinking and rest on prior knowledge, we often proceed to use statistical hypothesis tests and confidence interval methods unrelated (or tenuously related) to the research questions of interest. We advocate for applying Bayesian analyses to a number of different bioanthropological questions, especially since many of the programming and computational challenges to doing so have been overcome in the past two decades. To facilitate such applications, this article explains Bayesian principles and concepts, and provides concrete examples of Bayesian computer simulations and statistics that address questions relevant to biological anthropology, focusing particularly on bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology. It also simultaneously reviews the use of Bayesian methods and inference within the discipline to date. This article is intended to act as primer to Bayesian methods and inference in biological anthropology, explaining the relationships of various methods to likelihoods or probabilities and to classical statistical models. Our contention is not that traditional frequentist statistics should be rejected outright, but that there are many situations where biological anthropology is better served by taking a Bayesian approach. To this end it is hoped that the examples provided in this article will assist researchers in choosing from among the broad array of statistical methods currently available.

  12. An Anthropology of Luminosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2007-01-01

    of luminosity in the practice of day-to-day activities. The article surveys an array of past conceptions of light within philosophy, natural science and more recent approaches to light in the fields of anthropology and material culture studies. A number of implications are discussed, and by way of three case...

  13. Applying evolutionary anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Mhairi A; Lawson, David W

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary anthropology provides a powerful theoretical framework for understanding how both current environments and legacies of past selection shape human behavioral diversity. This integrative and pluralistic field, combining ethnographic, demographic, and sociological methods, has provided new insights into the ultimate forces and proximate pathways that guide human adaptation and variation. Here, we present the argument that evolutionary anthropological studies of human behavior also hold great, largely untapped, potential to guide the design, implementation, and evaluation of social and public health policy. Focusing on the key anthropological themes of reproduction, production, and distribution we highlight classic and recent research demonstrating the value of an evolutionary perspective to improving human well-being. The challenge now comes in transforming relevance into action and, for that, evolutionary behavioral anthropologists will need to forge deeper connections with other applied social scientists and policy-makers. We are hopeful that these developments are underway and that, with the current tide of enthusiasm for evidence-based approaches to policy, evolutionary anthropology is well positioned to make a strong contribution.

  14. Culture, Education, Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varenne, Herve

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that the anthropology of education must focus on what people do to educate themselves outside the constraints constituting the problematics of schooling. Anthropologists must do this precisely to fulfill their public role as legitimate participants in the conversations about understanding and transforming schooling. When…

  15. Cultural Anthropology and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Carmel

    After the Second World War, the field of cultural anthropology underwent an explosive development. Sociologists, psychologists, educators, and economists all added to the increasing interest in a discipline which began by assuming that culture is the foundation of social structures and that every institution manifests itself as a system of…

  16. 云南石屏县哨冲镇慕善村祭龙活动的体育人类学阐释%Physical Anthropology Interpretation of Yunnan Shiping County Shao Chong Zhen Mu Shan Village Dragon Festival Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓虎; 梁健; 欧云海

    2015-01-01

    The paper uses the method of literature , case study, field investigation, from the perspective of physical anthropology , the adoption of the participant observation method in Shiping County Shaochong Mu Shan village car -ried out field work , thorough depth description , In order to explain the Huayao Yi people of offering sacrifices to the dragon in the Dragon Dance Sport Anthropology significance of the protection , inheritance , development and in-novation of national culture.At the same time provide theoretical and practical reference for the study of the frontier village of national traditional sports culture and sustainable development.%采用文献资料法、个案研究法、田野调查法,从体育人类学的视角出发,采纳参与观察的方法在石屏县哨冲镇慕善村展开田野工作,对慕善村花腰彝祭龙活动这个“地方性知识”进行深描,旨在阐释花腰彝祭龙活动中的舞龙对保护、传承、发展与创新民族文化的体育人类学意义,同时为边疆村寨民族传统体育文化的研究及可持续发展提供理论借鉴和实践参考。

  17. What is anthropological about The Perfect Human?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Line Hassall

    2015-01-01

    Jørgen Leth has classified The Perfect Human as an anthropological film. But is the film anthropological at all? This article explores Leth’s connections with anthropology and finds that he is more inspired by anthropological framing than he is by anthropological research methods....

  18. Anthropology that counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Nana Katrine

    2015-01-01

    Politicians request clear answers, big data is becoming a big thing, and whole industries have emerged around the ambition of “summing up what we know” in systematic reviews (James and Harden 2008). In this political climate, research funding has in Denmark been given to University Colleges...... and is expected to deliver “practice oriented” research, preferably evidence based and ready to “apply” - or sometimes even in the case of action research supposedly “applied in the process”. The development opens the question of where the borders are between anthropology and consulting business, whether...... professional practices in schools, hospitals, and other welfare institutions that has to “apply research”, or could it also be the political levels, that were subject to “applications”? In any case, anthropology becomes extremely political, and has to find a position between different ideological knowledge...

  19. Cannibalism, kuru and anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbaum, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    This essay discusses the image and practice of cannibalism in a wide range of studies. It also presents the anthropological research on kuru which led to the proposal that cannibalism had enabled transmission of the infectious agent, as well as doubts about the hypothesis, and the assertion by some that cannibalism as a socially approved custom did not exist. The figure of the cannibal as an icon of primitivism took form in the encounter between Europe and the Americas. Cannibalism was to become the prime signifier of "barbarism" for a language of essentialized difference that would harden into the negative racism of the nineteenth century. Anthropological and medical research now challenge the derogatory image of the cannibal as we learn more about the many past consumers of human flesh, including ourselves.

  20. Participant observation, anthropology methodology and design anthropology research inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy; Buch Løgstrup, Louise

    2014-01-01

    of practice. They do so by combining participant observation, anthropology methodology and design anthropology research inquiry engaging with practice based explorations to understand if methods and methodologies, understood as being central to anthropological inquiry, can be taught to interaction design......Within the design studio, and across multiple field sites, the authors compare involvement of research tools and materials during collaborative processes of designing. Their aim is to trace temporal dimensions (shifts/ movements) of where and when learning takes place along different sites...... their relation with the private end user? What kind of ways can engaging within collaborative processes of designing offer opportunities for both designing and anthropological research inquiry simultaneously?...

  1. Ethnocentric ethics in anthropological research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van der Geest

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses the application of ethnocentric ethical rules in anthropological research. The ethnocentrism lies in the fact that North American and European definitions of right and wrong are imposed on anthropological research everywhere in the world. Apparently - and ironically - some anthro

  2. Introduction – an amphibious anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagné, Karine; Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    2016-01-01

    between land and water. This constitutive relationality is the basis of what we call an amphibious anthropology. By foregrounding temporality, movement, and ways of knowing, we aim to grasp the experience of places at the confluence of land and water and to probe into the specificities of life...... in such landscapes or into various amphibious anthropologies....

  3. Physical anthropology and human «zoos»: The exhibition of natives as a scientific popularization practice on the threshold of the 20th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez Arteaga, Juanma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available All along the nineteenth century different anthropological exhibitions were held in many countries, in which people from a number of indigenous communities, especially transported from their homeland for the occasion, were exhibited publicly, both for citizenship’s instruction and for specialist’s in vivo studies on Human Biology. This paper presents a brief description of some of these scientific shows, and tries to relate them to contemporary human biology theories.

    Durante todo el siglo XIX se celebraron en numerosos países diversas exposiciones de carácter «científico» en las que miembros de diferentes comunidades indígenas, especialmente transportadas desde sus tierras, eran exhibidos públicamente, tanto para instrucción del público lego como para el estudio in vivo por parte de especialistas en biología humana. Este trabajo presenta una breve descripción de algunas de estás exhibiciones y trata de ponerlas en relación con el discurso teórico de la biología humana del periodo.

  4. Historical Trends in Graduate Research and Training of Diplomates of the American Board of Forensic Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethard, Jonathan D

    2017-01-01

    The history of forensic anthropology has been documented by numerous scholars. These contributions have described the work of early pioneers in the field and have described important milestones, such as the founding of the Physical Anthropology Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) in 1972 and the American Board of Forensic Anthropology (ABFA) in 1977. This paper contributes to the growing literature on the history of forensic anthropology by documenting the academic training of all individuals who have been granted diplomate status by the ABFA (n = 115). Doctoral dissertation titles were queried to discern broad patterns of research foci. A total of 39 doctoral granting institutions have trained diplomates and 77.3% of board-certified forensic anthropologists wrote dissertations involving skeletal biology, bioarchaeology, or forensic anthropology. Board-certified forensic anthropologists are a broadly trained group of professionals with far-reaching anthropological interests and expertise.

  5. Stigma, community, ethnography: Joan Ablon's contribution to the anthropology of impairment-disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleworth, Russell P; Kasnitz, Devva

    2004-06-01

    Joan Ablon has helped establish the anthropology of impairment-disability and significantly contributed to the role of anthropology in disability studies. In this article, we review the development of and situate Ablon's ethnographic research in the anthropology of impairment-disability. We then address various methodological issues in her work including her ethnographic approach, her grounding in action anthropology and her support for the development of the academic study of disability in anthropology and the careers of disabled anthropologists. The next section of the article examines Ablon's use of the notion of stigma, her understanding of community, and her engagement with disability rights. As examples of themes important to disability studies, we present her discussion of the implications of the ideal of the body beautiful, and gender differences in negotiating intimacy for people with physical differences. We close with a discussion of the future of an anthropology of impairment-disability.

  6. Techno-Anthropology for Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Rune

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents the principles of anthropology-driven design, explaining and examining the ideas and motivations behind basing technology design on ethnography and user participation. That is, anthropology-driven design is presented as a design process where analytical findings derived from...... ethnographic field studies are used in combination with participatory design techniques in order to promote democratic participation as well as mobilize the users knowledge as a resource in the design process. This ‘new move’ may be said to create new types of significant proximity between Anthropology......, Science and Technology Studies (STS), Moral Philosophy, Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Participatory Design (PD) and a range of technical disciplines....

  7. Going beyond representational anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Ida Wentzel

    an education. There is a close connection between: 1) The dream and the desire for education; 2) Mobility (away from the family, home and friends in a very young age for getting an education; 3) Transforming a new and unknown site and space into a known place, where one can make one-self at home ('home one......Going beyond representational anthropology: Re-presenting bodily, emotional and virtual practices in everyday life. Separated youngsters and families in Greenland Greenland is a huge island, with a total of four high-schools. Many youngsters (age 16-18) move far away from home in order to get...... transformation work into the young people and their families. In this presentation I want to screen two sequences from the film, in order to show and clarify how mobility and transformation are made and dealt with both from the youngsters’ and their parents’ perspectives, but in asynchronous loups. I want...

  8. [ANTHROPOLOGY OF CURSES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Malpica, Carlos; Villaseñor-Bayardo, Sergio J; Reyes-Rivas, José Refugio; Mobilli-Rojas, Adele

    2015-01-01

    The symbolic order offers a great number of opportunities for understanding man's greatest fears. Based on Lévi-Strauss' original concept, we can study the symbolic efficacy of curses and enrich it with the most recent contributions of neuroscience, philosophy, and the anthropology of consciousness. This is a report of qualitative research traversed by the methods of phenomenology and symbolic hermeneutics on a rarely addressed subject of unique significance to cultural psychiatry. We have worked on the empirical data of some classic religious curses of great historical value, but we have also inquired into the phenomenon of secular excommunication. Finally, we have interpreted the symbols used in curses and the areas of the psyche that they succeed in mobilizing. We suggest that the primary core of curses is dogma, without which their symbolic efficacy would not be possible.

  9. Nonsecular Medical Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmarsh, Ian; Roberts, Elizabeth F S

    2016-01-01

    A nonsecular medical anthropology insists on the ways medicine and science have constituted 'the secular' itself through the 'secular self'-how medical knowing has been used to craft the secular political subject. As James Boon noted, too often in social theory, "religion gets safely tucked away-restricted theoretically to 'meaning' rather than power" (1998:245). The authors of the six articles in this special issue 'untuck' religiosity from within the norms and numbers of medicine itself, and examine how 'secular' medicine has relied on religious traditions to produce political secularity. These articles demonstrate that 'secular' medicine relies on religious others whose exclusion bespeaks latent religious commitments of citizenship in the modern political realm of health.

  10. Second nature: on Gramsci's anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizza, Giovanni

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to convey the relevance of a Gramscian perspective in medical anthropology, stressing his anti-essentialist way of reasoning about 'nature'. The author claims that Gramsci's understandings of the bodily life of the state can deconstruct naturalized realities in ways that are helpful for the ethnographer engaged in the political anthropology of embodiment and the management of health, persons, and life itself. The paper is presented in three parts. An attempt is made, first, to frame the relevance of Gramsci for Italian medical anthropology and second, to explore the components of the Gramscian concept of 'second nature' within the perspective that he himself calls 'an anthropology'. Third, an example is given of how the proposed Gramscian insights could inform an ethnography on the biopolitical aspects for the early detection of Alzheimer's disease, which is currently being carried out in Perugia.

  11. Design Anthropology in Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Gislev Kjærsgaard, Mette

    2014-01-01

    In this workshop we explore the opportunities of ethnography and design anthropology in Participatory Design (PD) as an approach to design in an increasingly global and digital world. Traditionally, ethnography has been used in PD to research real-life contexts and challenges, and as ways...... opportunities of using design anthropology as a holistic and critical approach to societal challenges, and a way for anthropologists and designers to engage in design that extends beyond the empirical....

  12. Design Anthropology in Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Kjærsgaard, Mette Gislev

    2015-01-01

    This focus section explores the opportunities of design anthropology in participatory design as an approach to research and design in an increasingly global and digital world. Traditionally, ethnography has been used in Participatory design to research real-life contexts and challenges, and as ways...... opportunities of using design anthropology as a holistic and critical approach to addressing societal challenges and change, and a way for anthropologists and designers to engage in participatory research and design that extend beyond the empirical....

  13. [Psychoanalysis and social anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thisted, Jens A

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore some subjects originated in the work of psychoanalysts and social anthropologists that generated an interesting discussion about the transmission of cultural trends along generations, as well as psychological family features from one generation to the other: we refer to the Oedipus complex model, as it was introduced by S. Freud, and to Malinowski's work on children's sexuality and incest. This text examines the emergency of fieldwork methodology (ethnography), that is, living in the place in which the research is conducted, sharing native languages and listening to the meanings attributed by the people to aspects of their lives. We also show another perspective, in which the researchers share place, language and customs but study for their own sake in order to justify a theoretical concept: resilience. This is one of the results of the transdisciplinary works -carried out by the UBA anthropology and education teams- to which we refer, together with the discussion about the category "educability" and some issues related to the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Disorders and Hyperactivity. This article proposes a critical approach on the ontological premises of racionalism, idealism and empiricism that preceded the researches mentioned. Finally it presents a perspective in which the imaginary institution of society and the emergency of psychism in singular subjects merge.

  14. Virtual anthropology meets biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gerhard W; Bookstein, Fred L; Strait, David S

    2011-05-17

    A meeting in Vienna in October 2010 brought together researchers using Virtual Anthropology (VA) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in order to explore the benefits and problems facing a collaboration between the two fields. FEA is used to test mechanical hypotheses in functional anatomy and VA complements and augments this process by virtue of its tools for acquiring data, for segmenting and preparing virtual specimens, and for generating reconstructions and artificial forms. This represents a critical methodological advance because geometry is one of the crucial inputs of FEA and is often the variable of interest in functional anatomy. However, we currently lack tools that quantitatively relate differences in geometry to differences in stress and strain, or that evaluate the impact on FEA of variation within and between biological samples. Thus, when comparing models of different geometry, we do not currently obtain sufficiently informative answers to questions such as "How different are these models, and in what manner are they different? Are they different in some anatomical regions but not others?" New methodologies must be developed in order to maximize the potential of FEA to address questions in comparative and evolutionary biology. In this paper we review these and other important issues that were raised during our Vienna meeting.

  15. History, research and practice of forensic anthropology in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traithepchanapai, Pongpon; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk; Kranioti, Elena F

    2016-04-01

    Forensic anthropology is an increasingly developing discipline born about a century ago in the United States with the objective to contribute the knowledge of bone biology and physical anthropology to the emerging needs of the court of law. The development of research in biological and forensic anthropology has made rapid progress worldwide in the past few years, however, in most countries--with the exception of the United States--forensic anthropology work is still considered within the duties of the forensic pathologist. This paper attempts to summarise the history and development of forensic anthropology in Thailand by providing information on past and current research and practice that can help forensic practitioners to apply existing methods in forensic cases and mass disasters. It is hoped that the lessons learned from the tsunami catastrophe and the emerging need for positive identification in medicolegal settings will lead to rapid advances in education, training and professional engagement of anthropologists from the forensic departments and the law enforcement agencies in Thailand.

  16. History in the gene: negotiations between molecular and organismal anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 to characterize the study of primate phylogeny and human evolution on the molecular level, asserted its claim to the privilege of interpretation regarding hominoid, hominid, and human phylogeny and evolution vis-à-vis other historical sciences such as evolutionary biology, physical anthropology, and paleoanthropology. This process will be discussed on the basis of three key conferences on primate classification and evolution that brought together exponents of the respective fields and that were held in approximately ten-years intervals between the early 1960s and the 1980s. I show how the anthropological gene and genome gained their status as the most fundamental, clean, and direct records of historical information, and how the prioritizing of these epistemic objects was part of a complex involving the objectivity of numbers, logic, and mathematics, the objectivity of machines and instruments, and the objectivity seen to reside in the epistemic objects themselves.

  17. Education science and biological anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    This contribution states deficits and makes proposals in order to overcome them. First there is the question as to why the Biological Anthropology--despite all its diversifications--hardly ever deals with educational aspects of its subject. Second it is the question as to why Educational Science neglects or even ignores data of Biological Anthropology which are recognizably important for its subject. It is postulated that the stated deficits are caused by several adverse influences such as, the individual identity of each of the involved single sciences; aspects of the recent history of the German Anthropology; a lack of conceptual understanding of each other; methodological differences and, last but not least, the structure of the universities. The necessity to remedy this situation was deduced from two groups of facts. First, more recent data of the Biological Anthropology (e.g. brain functions and learning, sex specificity and education) are of substantial relevance for the Educational Science. Second, the epistemological requirements of complex subjects like education need interdisciplinary approaches. Finally, a few suggestions of concrete topics are given which are related to both, Educational Science and Biological Anthropology.

  18. DOSTOYEVSKY'S POETIC ANTHROPOLOGY

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    Vladimir Nikolaevich Zakharov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dostoyevsky proposed a new conception of Man in the world literature. Critics have described such psychological discoveries of the writer as irrationalism, dualism, and underground. Many aspects of his Christian anthropology remained beyond the attention of the researchers. In his conception of Man there are such essential concepts as the common pseudo-human (obshchechelovek and the panhuman (vsechelovek. The common pseudo-human is a special type of a Russian man that appeared after the reforms of Peter the Great. Unlike the British, the Germans, the French, who maintain their nationality, the Russian “common pseudo-human” strives to be anyone but Russian. Being a common pseudo-human is to be an abstract European without roots and soil. Vsechelovek is a rare word in the Russian language. Nikolai Danilevsky used this word with a capital letter to call Christ (1869. Dostoyevsky used the word pan-human without capitalization to denote a perfect Christian. It expressed the inner sense of his Pushkin Memorial speech. It was Dostoyevsky who introduced the word panhuman in Russian literature and philosophy. Konstantin Leontiev did not understand the meaning of this word. He represented “the terrible, in his opinion, pan-human” as a common pseudo-human, European, liberal, and cosmopolitan. This mistaken substitution (obshchechelovek instead of vsechelovek is typical for Russian literary and philosophical criticism of the 20th century. For Dostoevsky, each person carries the image of God. The verbs obrazit' (to restore the image and obozhit' (to divinize imply the restoration of the image of God and thereby the humanization of a person. To be Russian is to become pan-human (vsechelovek, Christian. Dostoyevsky’s hero carries all possible completeness of the Creator and the Creation.

  19. Reflections on the future of anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Richard

    2009-12-01

    In his plenary session entitled Five Questions on the Future, Harvard anthropologist Arthur Kleinman capitalized on the 2009 Society for Medical Anthropology Conference's theme of Medical Anthropology at the Intersections to speculate on the future of the discipline.

  20. Anthropological Studies of Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Žikić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the questions raised at the symposium "Our World, Other Worlds. Anthropology, Science Fiction and Cultural Identity", held in Belgrade in December 2009, is how anthropology is to study contemporary art forms: how research issues are to be defined and approached; how research is to be organized in a specific semantic area, which cannot always and with absolute certainty be said not to be an anthropological construction; whether the subject of research can be said to have the shared nature of cultural communication; whether the anthropologist is to interpret the author/artist’s intention, or that which is produced as a result of that intention, etc. The aim of this paper is to suggest some answers to these questions, from the point of view of a researcher focused on cultural communication.

  1. The Teaching of Visual Anthropology at Temple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Jay; Chalfen, Richard

    The exploration of nonverbal forms of culture and communication has led to the development of visual anthropology courses within the anthropology department at Temple University. Visual anthropology is conceptualized as the study of human nonlinguistic forms of communication involving film making for data collecting and analysis. Several areas of…

  2. Utopian Education and Anti-Utopian Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastephanou, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the connection of education, utopia and anthropology, aiming to tease out some educational implications of anti-utopian anthropological essentialism and to show why these should be staved off. It will be shown how an anthropology that tarnishes human nature operates and how it affects educational intervention in the shaping…

  3. Confessions of an Anthropological Poser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, David Delgado

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the author's confessions about being an anthropological poser. He shares a series of short fragments that evidence the ways he has drawn the line around his work. He draws some lessons about how to work collaboratively and effectively as Natives, scholars, and Native scholars. He closes this confession by admitting that he…

  4. Anthropological reading of science fiction

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    Ljiljana Gavrilović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview of the prevalence of the analysis of science fiction literature and science fiction in other segments of popular culture in Serbian anthropology. This overview is preceded by a consideration of science fiction as a genre while keeping in mind the fluidity of the genre and the interweaving of subgenres as well as the transformations which science fiction is undergoing in certain media (books, films, TV shows and video games. In Serbian anthropology research on science fiction is more prevalent than the study of other phenomena, as the number of anthropologists whose work is represented in the paper is fairly large compared to the size of the anthropological community as a whole. The causes for this can primarily be found in a collective focus on questions such as: who are we and who the others are, what the basis of creating and building identity is or what the role of context in recognition of species is. Anthropology gives answers to these questions through the interpretation, explanation and understanding of the world around us, while science fiction does it through the literary considerations of these same questions.

  5. Forensic anthropology in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işcan, M Y; Olivera, H E

    2000-03-13

    Forensic anthropology has been one of the fastest growing medico-legal disciplines both in its contribution to the practical needs of the legal system and research accomplishments. New anthropological standards were developed to apply to a specific population of a region. The purpose of this paper is to analyze a large sample of anthropological forensic cases and to review pertinent literature that deals with anthropological standards developed for the population of the continent of Central and South America. Using Uruguay as an example, there was not a single office or anthropologist assigned to analyze human skeletal remains in Uruguay. In 1991 the Laboratorio de Antropología Forense at the Morgue Judicial of Montevideo was created. A total of 189 forensic anthropological cases (276 individuals) were analyzed since this date. Twenty six percent of cases involving human remains were positively identified. The majority came from the Departamento de Montevideo, the largest population district of the country. Most of the cases fell into the 60 to 69 years old age range (35%). Females represented 32% of the total. Since the establishment of the laboratory, the number of forensic cases increased considerably from 20 in 1991 to 40 in 1997. The case studies were accompanied with skull-photo superimposition and facial reconstruction when no other evidence for positive identification was available. This service provided by the laboratory was quickly known to coroners, law enforcement agencies, and other legal authorities and thus utilized not only in Uruguay but also in several other countries in the continent. Because of the obvious need for an anthropologist, there are now university programs to provide forensic anthropological education. Yet, research has lagged behind considerably. Deficiencies are obvious in basic osteological standards of estimating age, calculating stature, determining sex and assessing race that can be applied to populations of the continent

  6. An Anthropology of Learning in Epistemic Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    I connect Karin Knorr-Cetina's concept of ‘epistemic cultures’ with an anthropological conceptualization of practice-based learning. The theory of practice-based learning I explore departs from the cultural psychologist Lev Vygotsky’s notion of word-meaning which can be seen as a basic unit...... of analysis in cultural historical activity theory. However in relation to practice-based learning it is necessary further to explore how newcomers learn to perceive ‘epistemic objects’ in a complex process where learning concerns how material artefacts and meaning are connected in actual doing as well...... as learning what not to do. If ‘epistemic cultures’ in science create and warrant knowledge we may follow in closer detail how newcomers as physics students learn to create and warrant knowledge through everyday practices, which over time teach them new words and new meanings tied to words and bodily (re...

  7. Some anthropological aspects of globalization

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    Đurić Jelena B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Awareness about the role of anthropological perspective places each anthropological research within the context of globalization, pointing at the need for making the difference between concepts of globalization as the description and as the political project. This differentiation represents a frame of the research of globalization phenomena in order to understand their influence on concrete people in a concrete situation. The importance of the role of concepts in ubiquitous transformation of human lives is also confirmed in the paper. This is the way the influence of one culture unfolds through the dominant concepts, the culture which symbolically and normatively imposes itself as 'global' in spite of the fact that it is 'local' not only (and/or not any more in territorial sense but in its materialistic approach to the values. Hence, horizontal communication (globally available via the internet could serve to the communication of values as crucial spiritual points. It could contribute not only to the widening of cultural circles, but to the evolution of consciousness about the generalization of values up to the universal. This requires transcending of particular interests, which prevent effective conceptualization of the global anthropological meaning.

  8. Medical anthropology and the physician assistant profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lisa R

    2015-01-01

    Medical anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that investigates how culture influences people's ideas and behaviors regarding health and illness. Medical anthropology contributes to the understanding of how and why health systems operate the way they do, how different people understand and interact with these systems and cultural practices, and what assets people use and challenges they may encounter when constructing perceptions of their own health conditions. The goal of this article is to highlight the methodological tools and analytical insights that medical anthropology offers to the study of physician assistants (PAs). The article discusses the field of medical anthropology; the advantages of ethnographic and qualitative research; and how medical anthropology can explain how PAs fit into improved health delivery services by exploring three studies of PAs by medical anthropologists.

  9. Controlled Vocabulary Standards for Anthropological Datasets

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    Celia Emmelhainz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to outline the use of controlled vocabulary standards for qualitative datasets in cultural anthropology, which are increasingly held in researcher-accessible government repositories and online digital libraries. As a humanistic science that can address almost any aspect of life with meaning to humans, cultural anthropology has proven difficult for librarians and archivists to effectively organize. Yet as anthropology moves onto the web, the challenge of organizing and curating information within the field only grows. In considering the subject classification of digital information in anthropology, I ask how we might best use controlled vocabularies for indexing digital anthropological data. After a brief discussion of likely concerns, I outline thesauri which may potentially be used for vocabulary control in metadata fields for language, location, culture, researcher, and subject. The article concludes with recommendations for those existing thesauri most suitable to provide a controlled vocabulary for describing digital objects in the anthropological world.

  10. Anthropological Component of Descartes’ Ontology

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    Anatolii M. Malivskyi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to outline and comprehend the Descartes’ theory about anthropological component of ontology as the most important part of his philosophy. The accomplishment of this purpose covers the successive solution of the following tasks: 1 review of the research literature concerning the problem of human’s presence and the individual nature of truth; 2 emphasize the ambivalence of the basic intention of his legacy; 3 justify the thesis about constitutivity of human’s presence and comprehend passions as the form of disclosure of ontology’s anthropological component. Methodology. The use of the euristic potential of phenomenology, postpositivism and postmodernism makes it possible to emphasize the multiple-layer and multiple-meaning classical philosophy works, to comprehend the limitation and scarcity of the naïve-enlightening vision of human nature and to look for a new reception of European classics that provides the overcoming of established nihilism and pessimism concerning the interpretation of human nature. Scientific novelty. It is the first time that anthropological component of Descartes’ ontology became an object of particular attention. It previously lacked attention because of following main reasons: 1 traditional underestimating of the fact of Descartes’ legacy incompleteness as an unrealized anthropological project and 2 lack of proper attention to the individual nature of truth. The premise for its constructive overcoming is the attention to ambivalence of the basic intention and the significance of ethics in the philosopher’s legacy. His texts and research literature allow confirming the constitutive nature of human’s presence and passions as the key form of disclosure of the ontology anthropological component. Conclusions. The established tradition of interpretation the Descartes’ philosophizing nature as the filiation process of impersonal knowledge loses its cogency these days. The

  11. Human evolution across the disciplines: spotlights on American anthropology and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    When thinking about human evolution across the disciplines, terms such as "anthropological genetics" or "genetic anthropology" that brazenly defy the existence of the two-cultures divide seem to promise important insights. They refer to the application of genetic techniques to the past of humankind and human groups, a fact emphasized most strongly by the expression "genetic history." Such daring linguistic alliances have been forming since 1962 when the name "molecular anthropology" was introduced in the American context. This was an opportune moment for biochemists and physical chemists to enter anthropology, because in the U.S. a rapprochement between the fields was aimed for. However, a belief in and a discourse of a hierarchy of disciplines structured along the lines of methodology and epistemic object worked as an obstacle to the achievement of transdisciplinarity. Especially the DNA-sequence, initially approached through the proxy of the protein, was regarded as the most informative historical document due to its distance from the environment and its amenability to rigorous scientific techniques. These notions had a particular power at a time when anthropology was confronted with its legacy of race science. For some, the perceived objectivity of the new molecular approaches and the neutrality of molecules would render anthropology more natural-scientific and by inference less culturally contaminated. Others, to the contrary, believed that this legacy demanded a holistic and ethically reflexive anthropology. The different perceptions thus went along with different understandings of such crucial terms as "anthropology" and "history." In the paper, I revisit interfaces between different anthropological fields in the U.S. context and suggest that the beliefs in a hierarchy of approaches as well as in a nature free from culture embodied in the DNA-sequence has worked as one of the primary obstacles to an integration of these fields.

  12. [Cultural anthropology of traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xia; Liu, Jian-ping; Ai, Yan-ke; Li, Liu-ji

    2008-07-01

    Biological, psychological and sociological model of medicine substantializes the old model lacking the social humane attributes. The new medical model makes people take medical anthropology into research and highly evaluate traditional medical system. Cultural anthropology of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is part of medical anthropology with three major characteristics: wide research scope, specificity, and integration. It has developed its own research methods, such as field investigation, comprehensive inspection and comparison study. Cultural anthropology provides an efficient research method for TCM, and its application would further develop TCM theory and form comprehensive evaluation on TCM effects.

  13. Aesthetics and Anthropology of Megacities

    OpenAIRE

    Krieger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the aesthetic and anthropological research on the image of the megacities in the early 21st century, focusing on the case of Mexico City. Since art history has been revised and developed towards a “science of the image” —Bildwissenschaft in German—, objects and methods of research have been widely extended, so that even a topic like “megacities”, formerly monopolized by sociology, geography and economical studies, can be accepted as a contribution to our discipline. Aest...

  14. [The anthropological approach to the "other body"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, Jacques J

    2011-06-01

    Research into the anthropology of the body has tackled this wide-reaching concept of the "other body", highly relevant when applied to the field of nursing care. From the healthy biological body to the sick body, the history of anthropology shows the stages of acceptance and rejection of the "other body", male, female and animal.

  15. ANTH1010 - Cultural Anthropology, Fall 2004

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This course covers the basic areas of anthropology including biological evolution, the prehistoric evolution of early civilizations, language, culture and social life, and the analyses of the nature and variability of human institutions. However, the components that deal with cultural anthropology are heavily emphasized.

  16. Bibliography of Methods in Cultural Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, James, Comp.

    Over 300 resources on methods in cultural anthropology are listed under the following headings: archaeological methods; visual methods, tape recordings, and technical aids; cognitive anthropology and emic methods; community studies and complex societies; cross-cultural and hologeistic methods; ethnohistory; field work techniques and participant…

  17. The Relevance of Anthropology to Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Beverly

    1976-01-01

    The relevance of anthropological theory, methodology, and literature to language teaching is discussed. It is argued that culture should be taught explicitly in the language classroom, and that the anthropological theory of cultural relativity is useful in creating a judgment-free atmosphere. (Author/RM)

  18. Engaged anthropology and corporate volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Blahová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present engaged anthropology and its methodological tools with a specific perspective of the research field and the position of the researcher with regard to research subjects. The study focuses on corporate volunteering as one of the forms of collaboration between the non-profit and the private sectors seeking solutions to social problems and community development. Volunteering projects contribute to the interlinking of the knowledge, skills, experience and resources of corporate employees and the representatives of the non-profit or the public sector. It is a part of the philanthropic strategy of companies which are willing to present themselves as entities responsible towards the environment in which they run their business, and towards their employees, partners and customers. Engaged anthropology can bring, through its methodological tools, a new perspective of corporate volunteering. Community-based participatory research on the process of knowledge creation includes all partners on an equal basis and identifies their unique contribution to problem solution and community development.

  19. [Environmental history as an anthropologic topic. Contribution to "chemical anthropology"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupe, G

    1990-06-01

    Human population history is firmly connected with temporal and regional changes of the environment. Whether natural or anthropogene, alteration of environmental features lead to changes of human life-style and to the development of adaptive strategies. The demand of resources for his subsistence has led man to diverse impacts on his environment since ever. Thus, environmental history is a scientific topic for anthropologists. The research potential of trace element studies of excavated human skeletons for the reconstruction of natural and socio-cultural environments as well as for distribution patterns of hazardous substances is outlined for the European Middle Ages. The scientific value of unravelling past man/environment-interrelationships for both the historical and applied sciences and the place of any "chemical anthropology" within this context is discussed.

  20. Digital-Visual-Sensory-Design Anthropology: Ethnography, Imagination and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In this article I outline how a digital-visual-sensory approach to anthropological ethnography might participate in the making of relationship between design and anthropology. While design anthropology is itself coming of age, the potential of its relationship with applied visual anthropology methodology and theory has not been considered in the…

  1. History and future of visual anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilicić, Niksa

    2011-03-01

    Visual recording of communication processes between communities or individuals by means of filming of photographing is of significant importance in anthropology, as it documents on site the specific features of various social communities in their encounter with the researcher. In terms of film industry, it is a sort of ethno-documentary pursuing originality and objectivity in recording the given subject, thus fulfilling the research mission. However, the potential of visual anthropology significantly exceeds the mere audiovisual recording of ethnologic realities. Modern methods of analysing and evaluating the role of visual anthropology suggest that it is a technical research service aimed at documenting the status quo. If the direction of proactive approach were taken, then the term ,visual anthropology' could be changed to ,anthropology of the visual,. This apparently cosmetic change of name is actually significantly more accurate, suggesting the denoted proactive swift in perceiving visual anthropology, where visual methods are employed to ,provokeanthropology of the visual, is promoted to a new scientific sub-anthropological discipline.

  2. A sociologist's apprentice of social anthropology perplexities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo Humberto Lapa Caria

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is the systematization of Communication presented in thematic panel on "Ethnography" at the Third Congress of Portuguese Anthropology, which took place in Lisbon, ISCTE / ICS, in April 2006. Bring therefore a few critical contributions to the reflection of Sociology in Anthropology in Portugal, only wanting to limit myself to a vision that results of my journey of learning between these two disciplines and at the same time, demand respect certain principles of the method anthropological So that my short words here, a contribution may be interesting for reflection between anthropologists.

  3. [Anthropology, gender, and contemporary nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo Crespo, Manuel

    2002-12-01

    We live in an age when decisive changes occur. Social changes in the field of Genre and Work Cultures will take on a crucial role regarding the development of Nursing. New technological advances, and a higher degree of specialization in the Nursing field, as well as the increase in the number of nursing professionals coming from the male genere, enter into conflict with traditional social structures and act as intellectual tools which are necessary to acquire a critical understanding of the times in which we live, where an anthropological evaluation of the Genre factor is essential as a beginning principle in order to explain the subordination of nursing professionals as this has existed up until our times.

  4. Iberia: population genetics, anthropology, and linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Martínez-Laso, J; Alonso-García, J

    1999-10-01

    Basques, Portuguese, Spaniards, and Algerians have been studied for HLA and mitochondrial DNA markers, and the data analysis suggests that pre-Neolithic gene flow into Iberia came from ancient white North Africans (Hamites). The Basque language has also been used to translate the Iberian-Tartesian language and also Etruscan and Minoan Linear A. Physical anthropometry of Iberian Mesolithic and Neolithic skeletons does not support the demic replacement in Iberia of preexisting Mesolithic people by Neolithic people bearing new farming technologies from Europe and the Middle East. Also, the presence of cardial impressed pottery in western Mediterranean Europe and across the Maghreb (North Africa) coasts at the beginning of the Neolithic provides good evidence of pre-Neolithic circum-Mediterranean contacts by sea. In addition, pre-dynastic Egyptian El-Badari culture (4,500 years ago) is similar to southern Iberian Neolithic settlements with regard to pottery and animal domestication. Taking the genetic, linguistic, anthropological, and archeological evidence together with the documented Saharan area desiccation starting about 10,000 years ago, we believe that it is possible that a genetic and cultural pre-Neolithic flow coming from southern Mediterranean coasts existed toward northern Mediterranean areas, including at least Iberia and some Mediterranean islands. This model would substitute for the demic diffusion model put forward to explain Neolithic innovations in Western Europe.

  5. [Contribution of Stein's Anthropology to Personalistic Bioethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles Morejón, Jeannette Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Juan Manuel Burgos proposes ″a challenge″ to whom aims to consolidate the dignity of the human person as the center of a thought structure. Burgos presents a well-founded trilogy, citing Wojtyla, Sgreccia and he himself, as a perfect combination to support personalist bioethics. However, the possibility of giving a solid anthropological support to this bioethics remains open provided that a substantial list of personalistic authors is revised. This research seeks to collate Stein's anthropological proposal to personalist bioethics needs expressed by Burgos. The study aims to prove how Stein's anthropology can be assembled to the characteristics of personalism, and thus infer that more specific levels of the personalist bioethics can be based on this anthropology.

  6. Between Design and Anthropology: Improvising Embodied Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halse, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    ). It is only against this background that the complex anthropological dimension of Design Culture can be understood, extending far beyond the horizon of a design science concept of design, industry-near design thinking and marketing, or a product-oriented concept of manufacture. «Design Anthropology......D.A.» represents a cultural science handbook of «Design Anthropology», providing an epistemology, phenomenology and survey of the varieties of the extended concept of design. Here the design concept is placed at the centre of the nexus of meaning of cultural production that rests on the three...... pillars Segno, Mythus and Techne. Anthropological design research is trans-disciplinary, developing in the connexion between Visual Culture (signal, in/visibility, image/void, imagination, representation), Doing Culture (act, cooperation, relation, fabrication, exchange), Material Culture (object...

  7. Anthropology and/with/as Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    the notion of ‘learning’ beyond the classroom context(s), considering approaches that intersect across various fields, but which are firmly grounded in anthropological work – understood both as a way of learning in the field, with and through other beings and things, and the work we produce after, in our...... to the world. We therefore begin from an understanding that anthropology is not a method (e.g. ethnography) that can be applied to a particular field (e.g. schooling), but rather a specific approach, one in which epistemology and methodology are entangled. We are interested in anthropological work...... education be considered an anthropological field of endeavour? Notes Collections, including individual contributions, should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. On the basis of the proposals received, the editors of HAU, in consultation with Editorial Board members, will select a shortlist...

  8. Should anthropology be part of cognitive science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, Sieghard; Bender, Andrea; Medin, Douglas L

    2012-07-01

    Anthropology and the other cognitive science (CS) subdisciplines currently maintain a troubled relationship. With a debate in topiCS we aim at exploring the prospects for improving this relationship, and our introduction is intended as a catalyst for this debate. In order to encourage a frank sharing of perspectives, our comments will be deliberately provocative. Several challenges for a successful rapprochement are identified, encompassing the diverging paths that CS and anthropology have taken in the past, the degree of compatibility between (1) CS and (2) anthropology with regard to methodology and (3) research strategies, (4) the importance of anthropology for CS, and (5) the need for disciplinary diversity. Given this set of challenges, a reconciliation seems unlikely to follow on the heels of good intentions alone.

  9. Medical anthropology enters the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Allan; Rees, Tobias

    2011-08-01

    Medical anthropology is the smallest and perhaps least understood of the social and behavioral sciences of medicine. In this article, we indicate what makes the field distinctive and describe significant developments during the past two decades.

  10. [Medical anthropology evidences on the Pishtaco origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pribyl, Rosario

    2010-03-01

    This paper will contribute to the scientific development of a new approach on the pishtaco in Peru by means of medical anthropological analysis. The model emphasizes presentation and analysis of historical, pharmaceutical, and anthropological evidence supporting use of human tissues with specific medical goals in Peruvian and European regions. We can find the origin of this phenomenon around the sixteen and seventeen centuries in Europe: The pishtaco has no an Andean origin. The methodology and main conclusions of this paper could provide to the scientific community an alternative perspective to the conventional anthropological and ethnological research, as an example of a medical anthropological analysis of the pishtaco character. Professionals involved in intercultural health projects could have a new insight on this issue thanks to these results. They will obtain an adequate historical-cultural context for the interpretation and understanding of people and native communities' beliefs about health, body and medical systems.

  11. Italian Microhistory, anthropology and judicial archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eulalia Hernández Ciro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the interceptions between the Italian microhistory and anthropology, this article aims to provide a central debate of contemporary historiography account of popular culture and subaltern classes from the intensive and exhaustive judicial proceedings. To do this, some of the impacts of anthropology will be addressed in the historical work, as the appearance and questioning notion of popular culture, the ethnographic value of court files and finally, some possibilities in the case of Judicial Historical Archive of Medellin.

  12. [Anthropology at the heart of medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Laurent

    2008-10-01

    Anthropology and medicine share many concerns, but have had trouble collaborating in the past. The anthropologist has had to plead both with his colleagues and physicians to move beyond a vision that would confine him to the study of traditional or alternative medicines and representations of populations and the sick. The anthropologist's approach perceived as intrusive has also raised fears in the medical world. These reciprocal misunderstandings and stereotypes need to be overcome by an anthropology that studies the practices and knowledge of modern medicine as they are elaborated daily. Anthropology will dialogue with medicine without judging it. In its turn, medicine will open its sites of healing and teaching to the anthropologist. Anthropology at the heart of medicine is organized around the idea that the paths and expectations of health professionals reflect the specicifities of the local system of health. The individual dimensions of practices cannot be divorced from the functioning of structures of health and decision. Finally, like any other kind of anthropology, medical anthropology must scrutinize its own methods and ethics in a critical way.

  13. Marxist theory and anthropological practice : the application of French Marxist anthropology in field-work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Geschiere, P.L.; Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Geschiere, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Contents: 1. Introduction (is there a case for a Marxist approach in anthropological fieldwork - the structure of our argument). 2. The level of production as a problem in anthropological fieldwork (data on production - the concept of 'mode of production' - variations in the 'lineage mode of product

  14. Deep Mapping and Spatial Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Roberts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an introduction to the Humanities Special Issue on “Deep Mapping”. It sets out the rationale for the collection and explores the broad-ranging nature of perspectives and practices that fall within the “undisciplined” interdisciplinary domain of spatial humanities. Sketching a cross-current of ideas that have begun to coalesce around the concept of “deep mapping”, the paper argues that rather than attempting to outline a set of defining characteristics and “deep” cartographic features, a more instructive approach is to pay closer attention to the multivalent ways deep mapping is performatively put to work. Casting a critical and reflexive gaze over the developing discourse of deep mapping, it is argued that what deep mapping “is” cannot be reduced to the otherwise a-spatial and a-temporal fixity of the “deep map”. In this respect, as an undisciplined survey of this increasing expansive field of study and practice, the paper explores the ways in which deep mapping can engage broader discussion around questions of spatial anthropology.

  15. Forensic anthropology in Europe: an assessment of current status and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranioti, Elena; Paine, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Forensic anthropology is the discipline that traditionally deals with the examination of human remains for legal purposes and it derives from the fields of anatomy, physical anthropology and forensic medicine. For more than a century, forensic anthropologists in the United States have been offering their services in the court of law complementing the medico-legal investigation of other forensic professionals. The current status in European countries is presented here. The development of forensic anthropology varies significantly among the countries of Europe. Whereas some countries show a long history of research activity in the forensic sciences, including forensic anthropology (i.e. France, Germany and Spain), others are exhibiting a recent, rapid development (i.e. United Kingdom). In some cases, forensic anthropologists are employed within the academic realm (i.e. U.K., Denmark, Portugal, Turkey), forensic institutions (Netherlands) or government organizations (Spain, Hungary), although the vast majority of them remain limited to freelance activities on a sporadic basis. Often, European scientists that deal with skeletal remains come from nonphysical anthropology disciplines such as archaeology, forensic medicine and biology. In many cases they do not have adequate training equivalent to the forensic anthropologists in the USA. Naturally, without common training and a common legal system, an accreditation system for Europe will be difficult to implement.

  16. Molecular anthropology in the genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Jobling, Mark A; Rocha, Jorge; Novembre, John; Richards, Martin B; Mulligan, Connie; Batini, Chiara; Manni, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Molecular Anthropology is a relatively young field of research. In fact, less than 50 years have passed since the symposium "Classification and Human Evolution" (1962, Burg Wartenstein, Austria), where the term was formally introduced by Emil Zuckerkandl. In this time, Molecular Anthropology has developed both methodologically and theoretically and extended its applications, so covering key aspects of human evolution such as the reconstruction of the history of human populations and peopling processes, the characterization of DNA in extinct humans and the role of adaptive processes in shaping the genetic diversity of our species. In the current scientific panorama, molecular anthropologists have to face a double challenge. As members of the anthropological community, we are strongly committed to the integration of biological findings and other lines of evidence (e.g. linguistic and archaeological), while keeping in line with methodological innovations which are moving the approach from the genetic to the genomic level. In this framework, the meeting "DNA Polymorphisms in Human Populations: Molecular Anthropology in the Genomic Era" (Rome, December 3-5, 2009) offered an opportunity for discussion among scholars from different disciplines, while paying attention to the impact of recent methodological innovations. Here we present an overview of the meeting and discuss perspectives and prospects of Molecular Anthropology in the genomic era.

  17. Business Anthropology, Family Ideology and Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Japanese." Their research often relies on second than first-hand knowledge, and can therefore be misleading. The author points to the perceived connections between the traditional household system, not just family ideology, and modern economic relations. He reminds us that what distinguishes anthropology......Like those of business and management studies, methodological and theoretical contributions of anthropology to the study of family business cannot be ignored. This article elucidates three interconnected themes relating to the development and practices of business anthropology and family ideology...... in Japan. It also looks at how the family ideology in Japanese business first described and explained by anthropologists has been taken up by those with an interest in the Japanese industrial system, but working in field of management and business studies without any particular specialization in "things...

  18. The Financial World as an Anthropological Object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naymé N. Gaggioli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents existing approaches in Anthropology that have paved the way for the research of a contemporary significant object of study: the field of financial markets. The paper explores some of the most salient socio-cultural research leading to the conception of Social Studies of Finance, and presents some key contributions of these anthropological and sociological studies that challenge and present an alternative to the neoclassical approach. With their attention to detail, diversity and local specificities, this paper argues that anthropological knowledge can provide a unique understanding of the complex contemporary financial world, by which drawing attention to the diversity of forms taken by institutions, actors and practices that constitute the financial markets, particularly analyzing the specificity of local conditions in which these are developed.

  19. AN ANTHROPOLOGY OF THINGS: ETHNOGRAPHY AND METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    messias basques

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This bibliographic essay is based on the book that resulted from a series of discussions promoted by a group of doctoral students in the Department of Social Anthropology at Cambridge University in late 1990s. Despite the diversity of ethnographic contexts, all authors share the challenge of recasting the relationship between anthropological theory and ethnographic method in relation to the study of what is conventionally called material culture. Hence the title Thinking Through Things, besides denoting an anthropological question about what informants do, and how the authors could develop versions on the ways from which they perceive and conceive of things also includes the main character of the meetings that led to the writing of this book.

  20. Social Anthropology and Social Science History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzer, David I

    2009-01-01

    In the 1970s, when the social science history movement emerged in the United States, leading to the founding of the Social Science History Association, a simultaneous movement arose in which historians looked to cultural anthropology for inspiration. Although both movements involved historians turning to social sciences for theory and method, they reflected very different views of the nature of the historical enterprise. Cultural anthropology, most notably as preached by Clifford Geertz, became a means by which historians could find a theoretical basis in the social sciences for rejecting a scientific paradigm. This article examines this development while also exploring the complex ways cultural anthropology has embraced-and shunned-history in recent years.

  1. Approaching and Attending College: Anthropological and Ethnographic Accounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Jill Peterson

    2007-01-01

    Background/Context: This review article draws on the growing body of literature at the interfaces of anthropology and education, as well as other educational studies outside anthropology that have relevance to social and cultural frames. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: Drawing together and analyzing anthropological and…

  2. ASPECTS OF BIOLOGICAL NEWS IN ANTHROPOLOGY OF EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus-Peter Herm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The 9th International Congress of the “Gesellschaft of Anthropology” (GfA has been held in Gottorf during September 2011.The content of lectures and posters were Palaeoanthropology, Archaeology, Pre-historic Anthropology, Humanethology, Forensic Anthropology, Prevention and Clinical Anthropology, Gender studies, Ergonomics, Pedagogic, Mathematics and patent law.

  3. OSL properties of anthropological bone and tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meric, Niyazi [Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: meric@ankara.edu.tr; Kosal, Mehmet [Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: kosal@eng.ankara.edu.tr; Altay Atlihan, M. [Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: atlihan@eng.ankara.edu.tr; Rabia Yuece, Ulkue [Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ulku.yuce@taek.gov.tr

    2008-06-15

    The aim of present work was to investigate whether anthropological bone and teeth can be used in dosimetric and dating studies. The radiation dose responses of anthropological human bone and pig teeth were obtained and studied using infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). The radiation dose responses of these materials were found to be compatible with commonly used feldspar and quartz compounds. The IRSL signal was shown to be linear with a radiation dose until {approx}200 Gy and stable at ambient temperature, which may allow the use of such materials for dating.

  4. [Aspects of fatigue in medieval anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    König-Pralong, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Psychosomatic sympton of the sinful human soul, progress of natural and progressive wear of the psychic or corporeal machinery, exclusive property of the world of bodies or place of the obligatory link between the intellect and the body, fatigue crosses the philosophical and theological medieval literature. The various treatments of fatigue can, in their turn, serve as symptoms to differentiate the medieval anthropologies. This article presents four of their figures: the anthropology of danger elaborated by Augustin, Greek and Arabe medical diagnosis which is passed on the XIth century, and the readings of Aristotle's psychology by Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas in the XIIIth century.

  5. Anthropology and the humanization of space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Ben R.

    Because of its broad evolutionary perspective, and its focus on both technology and culture, anthropology offers a unique perspective on why we are going into space and what leaving Earth will mean for humanity. In addition, anthropology could help in the humanization of space through: (1) overcoming socio-cultural barriers to working and living in space; (2) designing societies appropriate for permanent space settlement; (3) promoting understanding among differentiated branches of humankind scattered through space; (4) deciphering the cultural systems of any extraterrestrial civilizations contacted.

  6. Eight Formulas for Fieldwork:Anthropological Fieldwork Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xudong

    2015-01-01

    In anthropological research,meth-odology is very important,especially the methodol-ogy of fieldwork which we discuss in this article—it has become the modern anthropologists’ skill. Re-garding the methodology of fieldwork,the author states that the best methods and tools should be created by oneself. However,there are also some common questions in methodology. Among them, one of the most important is“what is anthropologi-cal fieldwork?”Actually it is very simple—name-ly,you must be“on the spot”. This is a basic principle of anthropology, especially for modern anthropology.

  7. How to Find Out in: Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Clara K.

    This library handbook is a guide for the anthropology student. It lists some of the more useful materials and reference books basic to general research, and gives their location in the Fogler Library at the University of Maine. Materials are listed in six categories: (1) general, including guides and literature surveys; (2) encyclopedias and…

  8. The Anthropology of Dance. A Selected Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Judith Lynne

    Over 250 monographs, journal articles, and papers are cited in this selected bibliography of resources on the anthropology of dance. Most of the entries were published during the 1960s and 1970s. Entries are arranged alphabetically by author and give information on title, publisher or journal, date, and page numbers. The bibliography is presented…

  9. Anthropology and Education: A General Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Edward, Comp.

    This bibliography of books, articles, and papers reflects a broad coverage of both anthropology within the school curriculum, and as it is applied to the study of education. A few titles will serve to illustrate the scope: The Status of American Indian Education; Schools and Systems of Stratification; Field Anthropologists and Classroom Teachers;…

  10. Computer Algebra, Instrumentation and the Anthropological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, John

    2007-01-01

    This article considers research and scholarship on the use of computer algebra in mathematics education following the instrumentation and the anthropological approaches. It outlines what these approaches are, positions them with regard to other approaches, examines tensions between the two approaches and makes suggestions for how work in this…

  11. The Teaching of Anthropology: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Jacques

    1984-01-01

    College-level anthropology teaching in various countries, including Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and Yugoslavia, is compared. Terminology is examined and historical background is provided. Also discussed are educational crises, the organization of teaching, and teaching methods. (RM)

  12. Electronic Demonstration Portfolios for Visual Anthropology Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfen, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The paper suggests a model for linking the realisation and the articulation of both knowledge and accumulation of skills by fourth year students who have majored in visual anthropology. One central component is the integration of student-generated intellectual autobiographies into electronic demonstration portfolios, a formula and strategy that…

  13. Cognitive anthropology is a cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boster, James S

    2012-07-01

    Cognitive anthropology contributes to cognitive science as a complement to cognitive psychology. The chief threat to its survival has not been rejection by other cognitive scientists but by other cultural anthropologists. It will remain a part of cognitive science as long as cognitive anthropologists research, teach, and publish.

  14. Letter Writing and Learning in Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheld, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Writing has special importance in anthropology. Writing fieldnotes is a central methodology for documenting and analyzing culture, and written personal reflections upon this process are viewed as providing insight into how knowledge is produced by a "situated" researcher. That said, there is little discussion in the discipline about the…

  15. Anthropology with Activism: Settling Its Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Glynda A.

    2014-01-01

    This response to Katherine Schultz's Presidential Address to the Council on Anthropology and Education explores the themes of temporality and reflexivity in activist scholarship, with Schultz's research as prime example. The need to take action to address a crisis, juxtaposed to the counter need to take time for scholarly reflection and…

  16. Political Anthropology and Modern World System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Gačanović

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Review of a book by Vladimir Ribić, Politička antropologija i moderni svetski sistem. [Political Anthropology and Modern World System]. 2011. Beograd: Srpski genealoški centar i Odeljenje za etnologiju i antropologiju Filozofskog fakulteta Univerziteta u Beogradu, Etnološka biblioteka 54, pp. 250.

  17. What is Mathematics? Perspectives inspired by anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyrup, Jens

    The paper discusses the question “what is mathematics” from a point of view inspired by anthropology. In this perspective, the character of mathematical thinking and argument is strongly affected – almost essentially determined, indeed – by the dynamics of the specific social, mostly professional...

  18. ANTHROPOLOGICAL BASIS OF HUMAN DIMENSION IN SPORT AS THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A PERSON'S GENERIC ESSENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ye. Bilogur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to make the theoretical framework of a sportsman dimension concept as the realization of a person's generic essence that is a basis of a new scientific direction formation of sports anthropology and philosophy of sport. Methodology. The understanding of human nature problems, human existence in the form of sports activity, the potential of anthropological picture of the sporting world. In this case sport is considered as a culture which gives a chance to define it as an activity which involves positive results aimed at the realization of human essence as well as destructive ones that are aimed at the destruction of a sportsman personality. Scientific novelty is in the research of insufficiently studied theme of sportsman-dimension from the anthropological point of view. Practical value of the work is in elaborating the theme in context of scientific research performance at the department of theory and physical training methods and sports and the disciplines of Melitopol state pedagogical university named after Bogdan Khmelnitskiy. Philosophy of sport is a new subject and a new scientific direction, in the context of which the problems of sport, development of sporting values and outlook of the youth, their socialization in the sports activity are explored. Conclusions the introduction of the anthropological basis of sportsman-dimension essence in sport promotes the possibility to show entire human nature, its creativity in sporting life, therefore it leads an individual to a self-formation. The anthropological basis of the sportsman-dimension is aimed at the realization of a person's generic essence for increasing the human potential, physical health of young generation due to physical training and sports.

  19. Anthropology and social theory: renewing dialogue via the classics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    Agnes Horvath, Bjørn Thomassen, & Dr Harald Wydra, editors of the Journal,International Political Anthropology “Anthropology and social theory: renewing dialogue via the classics” This paper argues that anthropology may represent a perspective from where social theory can renew itself. The presen......Agnes Horvath, Bjørn Thomassen, & Dr Harald Wydra, editors of the Journal,International Political Anthropology “Anthropology and social theory: renewing dialogue via the classics” This paper argues that anthropology may represent a perspective from where social theory can renew itself....... The presentation therefore inserts itself within the history of a long conversation between anthropology and social theory. This discussion goes back at least to the Durkhemian school which saw the study of modern and "archaic" cultures as part and parcel of the same project. However, the disciplines of sociology...... with anthropology via the "cultural turn". Yet this elevated status of anthropology and its method has involved almost no engagement with the theoretical luggage found within the discipline of anthropology.Our premise is that the modern world may indeed not be so unique in all its features, and that it therefore...

  20. 77 FR 5837 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... the cultural items may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum...

  1. 76 FR 80401 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO... University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO. The human remains and... transferred to Fallis F. Rees, who donated them to the University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

  2. An Anthropological Move Towards Tangible Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Vedel

    2005-01-01

    User interaction design has for many years been concerned with the skills required in operating computers and machines. For keyboard and mouse operated, screen-based user interfaces the main focus has been on the cognitive skills of humans. This paper takes as a basic preamble that a shift from...... keyboards to tangible interaction design requires one to study the skills built through bodily movement. The emerging field of Anthropology of Movement can help in studying and understanding human movement. With inspiration from anthropology, philosophy and sociology, I have analyzed a short video sequence...... of a plant operator operating very tangible machinery. Tangible interaction can be regarded as a series of discrete actions, but based on the analysis I will argue that the movements in between the hands-on actions are crucial to understanding skilled user interaction. Possibly designing with respect...

  3. A critique of anthropological research on homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, T K

    1977-01-01

    Since the 1970 resolutions of the American Anthropological Association, encouraging more research activity among anthropologists on the topic of homosexuality, there has been less than enthusiastic response. Rather than directly attempting to provide reasons for this research failure, this paper takes a look at what actually has been done by anthropologists with an eye to assessment of their major contributions. Thus, summarized are the studies on the role of the "berdache" in primitive cultures, with a critique of the terminological problems associated; a review of some of the ethnographic accounts of homoerotic behavior among primitive folk, with comments on the weaknesses of such treatments; and, finally, a discussion of the current typological approach to the study of the homosexual community, with its multimodal rather than unimodal emphasis. In short, this is a review article that tries to assess the impact of anthropological research for the ultimate understanding of this facet of humankind.

  4. Techno-anthropology and the digital natives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    2013-01-01

    The ethnographic field guide was a short-lived genre in the annals of anthropology. In this chapter I experimentally attempt to revive it. The original guides provided the ethnographer with a set of practical pointers on how to organise fieldwork, set up camp, maintain relations, and negotiate ac...... access in a particular geographical region of the world. The present field guide attempts to do so while entertaining (and eventually discarding) the idea that the World Wide Web has similar areal qualities and constitutes a field in which the techno-anthropologist can go to do work...... of digital natives, and that maintaining relations with these natives presents a challenge of its own. I argue that these challenges must be taken seriously, and that techno-anthropology could be ideally suited to do just that....

  5. Porta Palazzo, Anthropology of an Italian Market

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, F. Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Rachel E. Black, Porta Palazzo, The Anthropology of an Italian Market, Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012, 221 pp. Foreword by Carlo Petrini. Markets are trading spaces of a universal nature. They are places where people buy and sell small quantities of goods – mostly food, though not exclusively. Markets are also prime, symbolic places for fresh products; displayed in an eye-catching way, the goods emanate a whole range of colours, textures, aromas and smells that captivate...

  6. Designing anthropological reflection within an energy company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Louise Buch; Gunn, Wendy; Said Mosleh, Wafa

    2013-01-01

    The move towards a more liberalized energy market and the emergent smart grid technology has forced a Scandinavian energy company to begin rethinking the relation between themselves and private energy end users. Originally a unidirectional relationship, the present and future have potential...... ethnographic methods to investigate the system effect of private households’ participation. Our paper questions why this kind of approach is reproducing the unidirectional relationship instead of creating a bidirectional relationship. We propose an extension of the ethnographic approach whereby anthropological...

  7. Dance Anthropology: a discipline in expansion

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The anthropological approach to dance now has asserted itself as an effective means for understanding dance in its whole context. For this reason, a synthetic view over the last ten years is proposed, analysing the studies appeared on the "Dance Research Journal", a scientific magazine among the most influential in the field. The analysis has given light, for opposed reasons, to those issues as multiculturalism and ballet that, for this reason, have been given here particular attention.

  8. Globalization and the Future of Anthropology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-LoupAmselle

    2004-01-01

    As we well know, anthropology traditionally defined itself as the study of ‘primitive' or ‘exotic' societies-including such sectors of Western societies as rural communities or ethnic minorities. Ever since the Malinowskian revolution, the legitimacy of the discipline has rested on a single foundation; the technique of long-term participant-observation within a clearly-bounded field site. And although

  9. History and Future of Visual Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Sviličić, Nikša

    2011-01-01

    Visual recording of communication processes between communities or individuals by means of filming of photographing is of significant importance in anthropology, as it documents on site the specific features of various social communities in their encounter with the researcher. In terms of film industry, it is a sort of ethno-documentary pursuing originality and objectivity in recording the given subject, thus fulfilling the research mission. However, the potential of visual anthro...

  10. Creative Cultural Anthropology as a Methodology Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Gontcharov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the essence and prospects of creative cultural anthropology in the context of education, economy, labor and social wealth. The anthropology in question can become the methodology principle for a new historical social model arrangement as it originates from the universal abilities of the human race, developed on the moral basis of joint existence; productive creative force of man’s integral subjectivity; and technological power reasonably combining the goals, means of production and creative forces of nature. The author outlines the prospective development ways for cultural anthropology guiding the educational system - the anthropological society basis - with the aim of developing a cultured, moral, socially and professionally competent personality; enforcing individual creative potentials; guaranteeing high status of teachers; and providing social communication forms giving place to self-activity of individuals and groups, and intellectual and cultural work. The author confirms the need for higher education available for everyone; otherwise, education, limited by the empirical level and primary vocational training, results in the rising portion of common labor in the national economy. The consequences lead to growing intellectual heterogeneity in the structure of aggregate activity; functional discord between the common and complex levels of labor; suspension of innovative technology implementation in production and management; aggravation of socio-cultural differences to the level of hostile opposition; abating competitiveness of Russia. The author makes the conclusion that, for the beneficial scenario of society development, the main emphasize should be on the socio-cultural expanded reproduction of man; the educational sphere should receive the A- group status, leaving the B-group status to material production. 

  11. Creative Cultural Anthropology as a Methodology Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Gontcharov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the essence and prospects of creative cultural anthropology in the context of education, economy, labor and social wealth. The anthropology in question can become the methodology principle for a new historical social model arrangement as it originates from the universal abilities of the human race, developed on the moral basis of joint existence; productive creative force of man’s integral subjectivity; and technological power reasonably combining the goals, means of production and creative forces of nature. The author outlines the prospective development ways for cultural anthropology guiding the educational system - the anthropological society basis - with the aim of developing a cultured, moral, socially and professionally competent personality; enforcing individual creative potentials; guaranteeing high status of teachers; and providing social communication forms giving place to self-activity of individuals and groups, and intellectual and cultural work. The author confirms the need for higher education available for everyone; otherwise, education, limited by the empirical level and primary vocational training, results in the rising portion of common labor in the national economy. The consequences lead to growing intellectual heterogeneity in the structure of aggregate activity; functional discord between the common and complex levels of labor; suspension of innovative technology implementation in production and management; aggravation of socio-cultural differences to the level of hostile opposition; abating competitiveness of Russia. The author makes the conclusion that, for the beneficial scenario of society development, the main emphasize should be on the socio-cultural expanded reproduction of man; the educational sphere should receive the A- group status, leaving the B-group status to material production. 

  12. Adam Smith: Anthropology and Moral Philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Lázaro-Cantero, R. (Raquel)

    2010-01-01

    Adam Smith was a moral philosopher. His economic and legal thought can't be separated from his moral psychology which frames his anthropological and social proposal. Experimental Newtonian methodology and Hume's empirism feed his approximation to the reality of human being. In this new context the traditional categories of society are defined and combined in a new way. In this paper I try to argue that the assumed optimism which sometimes is attributed to Smith about the proper functioning of...

  13. Value Formation of Basic Anthropological Connectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    and their political value formations. In this regard, the interdisciplinary contribution of Psychology is to explore how humans as active participants can and will participate in handling such value tasks. The article presents a general, theoretical, political-psychological model, which unites precisely these two...... aspects: The political value formations of the basic anthropological conditions in human life, and the capability and will to participate in solving the subsequent value tasks....

  14. The Anthropology of Potentiality in Biomedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taussig, Karen-Sue; Hoeyer, Klaus; Helmreich, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    At the beginning of the twenty-first century, potentiality serves as a central concept in the life sciences and in medical practices. This special issue of Current Anthropology explores how genes, cells, bodies, and populations as well as technologies, disciplines, and research areas become imbued...... and practices associated with potentiality, we must integrate an awareness of our own social scientific assumptions about potentiality with critical scrutiny of how the word and concept operate in the lives of the people we study....

  15. Integrating forensic anthropology into Disaster Victim Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundorff, Amy Z

    2012-06-01

    This paper will provide mass fatality emergency planners, police, medical examiners, coroners and other Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) personnel ways to integrate forensic anthropologists into DVI operations and demonstrate how anthropological contributions have improved DVI projects. In mass disaster situations, anthropologists have traditionally been limited to developing biological profiles from skeletal remains. Over the past decade, however, anthropologists' involvement in DVI has extended well beyond this traditional role as they have taken on increasingly diverse tasks and responsibilities. Anthropological involvement in DVI operations is often dictated by an incident's specific characteristics, particularly events involving extensive fragmentation, commingling, or other forms of compromised remains. This paper will provide examples from recent DVI incidents to illustrate the operational utility of anthropologists in the DVI context. The points where it is most beneficial to integrate anthropologists into the DVI process include: (1) during recovery at the disaster scene; (2) at the triage station as remains are brought into the mortuary; and (3) in conducting the reconciliation process. Particular attention will be paid to quality control and quality assurance measures anthropologists have developed and implemented for DVI projects. Overall, this paper will explain how anthropological expertise can be used to increase accuracy in DVI while reducing the project's cost and duration.

  16. Itineraries and specificities of Italian medical anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppilli, Tullio

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the birth (or rebirth) of Italian medical anthropology around the middle of the 1950s, and its subsequent complex development up to the present. During this fairly long process, the author played a role that was probably of some importance, that of both a direct witness and active participant. Here these developments are briefly reviewed, in an attempt to single out some of the stimuli and the most significant occasions that have happened, their theoretical and methodological reference points, the main lines of research that have been tackled along the way, as well as the 'social demand' and the 'social use' that have integrated and oriented the practice of the new discipline within the horizon of some of the more general problems of Italian society. In outlining here the profile of and the various events in Italian medical anthropology, this paper takes into account the fact that, although a medical anthropology with that name and the disciplinary set-up that are now internationally attributed to it began in Italy only in the mid-1950s, important lines of research to which we would today attach that name had been undertaken long ago.

  17. Thinking the World, Practicing the Social Environment: Ethnographies and Reflections from an Anthropology of Territorialities

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This article will anthropologically present and analyze the configurations and the forms taken by the definition and location of the world and the social environment as philosophical postulates, and as physical and geographical objectivations among different cultures: the natives and Yanaconas of the Colombian Massif, the “paisas” of the Central Colombian Andes, and the southern France and northern Spain inhabitants in their relationship with immigrants of northern Europe. Even though there i...

  18. The guide from Omelas: Action anthropology with miracle icing

    OpenAIRE

    Ljiljana Gavrilović

    2016-01-01

    Literary piece by Ursula Le Guin, a science fiction author, is linked with theoretical, as well as practical anthropology, in several ways. Her life, education, prose production and reception of her work create a whole, which is in many ways related with anthropology on the one, and the changes in the modern world on the other side. Her work has, owing to its great popularity, contributed to a great extent to the adoption of some primarily anthropological thesis with the broadest population (...

  19. The Anthropology of Horror: Theoretical Challenges and Epistemological Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Pišev

    2016-07-01

    In this thematic issue of Issues in Ethnology and Anthropology, for the first time in Serbian anthropology an opportunity arose to publish a collection of scientific texts about the horror genre in one place. Authors who generously submitted their papers for this thematic issue have shown that horror stories can be interpreted in a number of ways which demand a degree of interdisciplinarity, but without ever leaving the familiar framework of the anthropological focus.

  20. Hegel’s Anthropology, Christology, and Eschatology: a Contemporary View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Chepurin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out to prove that anthropology, Christology, and eschatology in Hegel’s later Berlin period of thought were all inter-related. The author contends that Hegel’s triadic vision of the Christ event (Incarnation-Death-Resurrection is formative for his system of Anthropology, as well as for the structural basis of his philosophy of subjective spirit. In other words, for Hegel, his anthropology reflects his Christology. Moreover, Hegel’s anthropology and Christology lead the way to the formulation of his eschatological thought which itself is built around his interpretations of the Transfiguration and Resurrection events in the life of Christ

  1. Gods, Germs, and Petri Dishes: Toward a Nonsecular Medical Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Elizabeth F S

    2016-01-01

    This commentary calls on medical anthropology to become programmatically non-secular. Despite recent anthropological critiques of secularity, within and outside of anthropology, most contemporary medical anthropologists continue to leave deities and religiosity out of their examinations of healing practices, especially in their accounts of biomedicine. Through a critical, relational constructionist lens, which traces how all entities are both constructed and real, a non-secular medical anthropology would insist that when deities are part of medical practice, they are integral to analysis. Importantly then, within the symmetrical nature of this same constructionist lens, biomedical entities like germs and petri dishes need to be accounted for just as much as deities.

  2. 76 FR 36152 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department.... Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and..., Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the...

  3. 76 FR 14067 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Massachusetts, Department of Anthropology, Amherst...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Anthropology, Amherst, MA and Nantucket Historical Association, Nantucket, MA AGENCY: National Park Service... funerary object in the possession of the University of Massachusetts, Department of Anthropology, Amherst... human remains was made by University of Massachusetts, Department of Anthropology, professional staff...

  4. 76 FR 28078 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department..., Anthropology Department, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... associated funerary objects may contact the Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department....

  5. 76 FR 36145 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... Anthropology, Kalamazoo, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary... may contact Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human...

  6. 75 FR 36671 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department... Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI. The human remains and associated funerary... and associated funerary objects should contact LouAnn Wurst, Department of Anthropology,...

  7. 75 FR 5105 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department... Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI. The human remains and associated funerary... anthropologist in the Anthropology Department at Western Michigan University, studied the human remains....

  8. 75 FR 14462 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA, and Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington... of Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA, and the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum... Henebry-DeLeon, NAGPRA Program Director, Department of Anthropology, Central Washington...

  9. 76 FR 14057 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... possession and control of the University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository... of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, professional staff in...

  10. 78 FR 59962 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Anthropology, Amherst, MA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated... request to the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Anthropology. If no...

  11. 76 FR 14058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY. The human remains were..., Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, professional staff in consultation with representatives...

  12. 76 FR 28075 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit... Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI. The human remains and associated funerary objects... Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, professional staff in consultation with representatives of...

  13. 77 FR 5839 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... item may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology....

  14. The Perils of Public Anthropology? Quiescent Anthropology in Neo-Nationalist Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nordic anthropologists were remarkably absent from the news media in Scandinavia during the Muhammad Cartoon issue of 2005/6. This chapter discusses perils of public anthropology as seen in the research engagement with the lopsided and simplified representation of ethnic and religious minorities...... discrimination, intolerance, political manipulation, and inequalities....

  15. The Perils of Public Anthropology? Quiescent Anthropology in Neo-Nationalist Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nordic anthropologists were remarkably absent from the news media in Scandinavia during the Muhammad Cartoon issue of 2005/6. This chapter discusses perils of public anthropology as seen in the research engagement with the lopsided and simplified representation of ethnic and religious minorities...

  16. How to Present Anthropological Disaster Research-Review on Anthropological Research on Landslide Disasters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan; LAN Jie

    2013-01-01

    After the May 12 , 2008 earth-quake in Wenchuan , China ’ s anthropological disaster research received the opportunity for long-term development .However , its achievements have been relatively few , and most of the achieve-ments are only presented in the form of essays . This reflects that anthropological disaster research in China is still not mature .In particular , there is lack of ethnographic research on the occurrence and causes of disasters , and coping mechanisms . The publication of Anthropological Research on Landslide Disasters---Taking the “August 14 Landslide ” in Xinping Yi and Dai Autonomous County in Yunnan as a Case Study by Prof.Li Yongxiang has helped to address China ’ s defi-ciency in anthropological disaster research . This book is an ethnography about disasters based on a sturdy foundation of fieldwork; it presents a com-prehensive look at the landslide disaster scene of Xinping in the Ailao mountainous area of Yunnan , and provides very insightful discussions on mecha-nisms for preventing and coping with the disaster as well as post-disaster social changes . While studying for his Ph .D.degree at the University of Washington , Li Yongxiang , an Yi scholar who grew up in Ailao mountainous area of Yunnan , had already started his interest in disaster research in minority nationality areas of southwest China .After he received his doctoral degree at the University of Washington in 2005 , he focused his research mainly on anthropological disaster re-search .As one of the pioneer researchers on an-thropological disaster research in China , Li Yongx-iang has had to answer questions regarding the the-oretical significance and realistic value of anthropo-logical disaster research .These questions are not only related to the anthropological view on natural disasters , but also related to the academic position of anthropology in disaster research .Anthropologi-cal Research on Landslide Disasters is a book based on the experiences from

  17. COMPLEXITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES. CONTRIBUTIONS FROM ANTHROPOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Eduardo Maldonado

    2014-01-01

    To be sure, the most complex sciences of all are the socalled human, i.e. social sciences. This is an intuition that goes without saying. In science in general, though, intuition is not enough. We have to as it happens. It is my contention in this paper to prove the complexity of human or social sciences in the very sense that or mathematics to be complex. The analyses and reflections are based upon a revision. At the end, I focus particularly on some contributions anthropology can make in th...

  18. ON ANTHROPOLOGICAL PROBLEMS OF INFORMATION SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Leonidovich Karavaev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In article, the author envisages the anthropological problems of the modern information society. There is a new definition of information society, the main factor of which is the automatization of information processes. Different types of information technology impacts (informational and technological impacts on human being are considered. In addition, the author shows the primary transformation of human being due to modern information technologies, based on computer and telecommunication technique.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-17

  19. Medical anthropology: essays and reflections from an Amsterdam graduate programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, S.; Gerrits, T.; Challinor, J.

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of twenty articles by graduates of the Amsterdam Master’s in Medical Anthropology (AMMA) at the University of Amsterdam. The university is known for outstanding and innovative work in the field of medical anthropology and teaching combines a strong ethnographic basis with

  20. The Teaching of Anthropology: Problems, Issues, and Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottak, Conrad Phillip, Ed.; White, Jane J., Ed.; Furlow, Richard H., Ed.; Rice, Patricia C., Ed.

    This volume brings together the insights of more than 40 contributors who demonstrate that anthropology has timely, important, and enduring messages for students and the public. The book provides the first comprehensive examination of teaching issues across all the subfields of anthropology since the 1963 publication of "The Teaching of…

  1. Course File for "Documentary Film, Visual Anthropology, and Visual Sociology."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaselli, Keyan G.; Shepperson, Arnold

    1997-01-01

    Describes a course that addresses and relocates questions of representation and reconstruction in the context of reflexive explanations for ethnographic films. Examines questions of power/power relations; anthropological and media construction of the Other; and trends in visual anthropology. Contextualizes the course within the human experience of…

  2. Contributions of Anthropology to the Study of Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Alice; Hewlett, Bonnie L.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence researchers can turn to anthropology to learn the methods of ethnography and cultural comparisons, and they can mine its large database of information on cultures worldwide. But anthropology's single most important contribution is the concept of culture, the mosaic of a group's learned and shared, or at least understood, beliefs,…

  3. New trends in the anthropology of Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinen, J.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the question, is there such an entity as a separate field of the anthropology of Southeast Asia? Has the crisis in anthropology in the 1970s and ‘the literary turn’ of the 1980s led to a renewed interest in area studies? A number of topics that originally belonged to the field

  4. Tracking Porters: Learning the Craft of Techno-Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, Maja Hojer; Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Saltofte, Margit

    2015-01-01

    Anthropology attempts to gain insight into people's experiential life-worlds through long-term fieldwork. The quality of anthropological knowledge production, however, does not depend solely on the duration of the stay in the field, but also on a particular way of seeing social situations. The anthropological perspective is grounded in socio-cultural theory and forged by a distinct relativist or contextualist epistemological stance. The point is to understand events, concepts and phenomena from the insiders' point of view and to show how this view relates to the particular social and cultural context. In this chapter, we argue that although anthropology has its specific methodology - including a myriad of ethnographic data-gathering tools, techniques, analytical approaches and theories - it must first and foremost be understood as a craft. Anthropology as craft requires a specific 'anthropological sensibility' that differs from the standardized procedures of normal science. To establish our points we use an example of problem-based project work conducted by a group of Techno-Anthropology students at Aalborg University, we focus on key aspects of this craft and how the students began to learn it: For two weeks the students followed the work of a group of porters. Drawing on anthropological concepts and research strategies the students gained crucial insights about the potential effects of using tracking technologies in the hospital.

  5. Public Anthropology as Public Pedagogy: An Autobiographical Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This autobiographical account provides a historical map of landmarks in the author's personal and professional life that led him to his present understanding of public anthropology as public pedagogy and vice versa. He indicates that his experiences led him to study sociocultural anthropology to investigate learning from experience, a foundational…

  6. Toward a Cultural Anthropology of Disability and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershenson, David B.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the degree to which cultural anthropology's concepts, theories, and methods have been applied to the understanding and conceptualization of disability and rehabilitation as a cultural phenomenon. Reviews the literature of anthropology and the literature of disability and rehabilitation. Results revealed that a lot of anthropologists'…

  7. Medical Anthropology in the Curriculum: A Revisit to the Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Robert E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Although progress has been made in the last 15 years in the development of medical school departments with interests in the various behavioral science fields, including anthropology, based on this study only five percent of U.S. medical students had the opportunity to attend lectures in the field of medical anthropology. (Editor/JT)

  8. Ecce Homo: Science and Society Need Anthropological Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholts, Sabrina B; Bell, Joshua A; Rick, Torben C

    2016-08-01

    Scientific collections are crucial to understanding the biological and cultural diversity of the Earth. Anthropological collections document the human experience and the interactions between people, ecosystems, and organisms. Unfortunately, anthropological collections are often poorly known by the public and face a variety of threats to their permanent care and conservation.

  9. Anthropology of health in Brazil: a border discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Esther Jean; Follér, Maj-Lis

    2012-01-01

    This article traces the development of anthropological research on health in Brazil in light of discussions on modernity/coloniality and world anthropologies. Originating in the 1970s, stimulated by external and internal pressures for scientific production and along with the expansion of graduate programs, a network of anthropologists has consolidated and multiplied in Brazil. We describe the development of research groups, meetings, and publications in order to characterize Brazilian anthropology of health as a research program that distinguishes itself from North Atlantic medical anthropology. We examine the visibility and circulation of references in academic publications to explore the participation of Brazilians in the global discourse and, more specifically, in the North-South dialogue. From a comparative perspective, we argue that anthropological investigations of health reflect a perspective and ethos distinctive to Brazil and its historical and political processes.

  10. Theory and the scientific basis for forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Clifford; Boyd, Donna C

    2011-11-01

    Forensic anthropology has long been criticized for its lack of a strong theoretical and scientific foundation. This paper addresses this problem by examining the role of theory in forensic anthropology at different hierarchical levels (high-level, middle-range, and low-level) and the relevance of various theoretical concepts (taphonomic, agency, behavioral archaeology, nonlinear systems, and methodological theories) to the interpretation of forensic contexts. Application of these theories to a case study involving the search for the WWII Goettge Patrol illustrates the explanatory power these theories offer to the interpretation of forensic events as the end product of an often complex set of environmental constraints and behavioral interactions and choices. It also emphasizes the importance of case studies in theory building and hypothesis testing. A theoretical foundation does indeed currently exist in forensic anthropology; however, a recognition and broader implementation of anthropological (archaeological) theory is warranted and will further define forensic anthropology as a scientific endeavor.

  11. Geostatistics and spatial analysis in biological anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relethford, John H

    2008-05-01

    A variety of methods have been used to make evolutionary inferences based on the spatial distribution of biological data, including reconstructing population history and detection of the geographic pattern of natural selection. This article provides an examination of geostatistical analysis, a method used widely in geology but which has not often been applied in biological anthropology. Geostatistical analysis begins with the examination of a variogram, a plot showing the relationship between a biological distance measure and the geographic distance between data points and which provides information on the extent and pattern of spatial correlation. The results of variogram analysis are used for interpolating values of unknown data points in order to construct a contour map, a process known as kriging. The methods of geostatistical analysis and discussion of potential problems are applied to a large data set of anthropometric measures for 197 populations in Ireland. The geostatistical analysis reveals two major sources of spatial variation. One pattern, seen for overall body and craniofacial size, shows an east-west cline most likely reflecting the combined effects of past population dispersal and settlement. The second pattern is seen for craniofacial height and shows an isolation by distance pattern reflecting rapid spatial changes in the midlands region of Ireland, perhaps attributable to the genetic impact of the Vikings. The correspondence of these results with other analyses of these data and the additional insights generated from variogram analysis and kriging illustrate the potential utility of geostatistical analysis in biological anthropology.

  12. 77 FR 23502 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO, has completed...

  13. 78 FR 36239 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Wayne State University Gordon L. Grosscup Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Anthropology, Detroit, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Wayne State University Gordon L. Grosscup Museum of Anthropology (hereafter WSU Museum) has completed an inventory of... Anthropology, Wayne State University Gordon L. Grosscup Museum of Anthropology, 3056 F/AB, Detroit, MI...

  14. Serious games: Theory in anthropology since the 1980s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Bošković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a critical overview of recent theories in anthropology, particularly following Ortner’s groundbreaking 1984 summary, as well as debates opened up by the Writing Culture symposium and the book that followed (Clifford and Marcus 1986. Beginning with Ortner’s theory of practice, the author presents basic elements of several theoretical currents that influenced anthropology’s development in the last few decades, with particular emphasis on the use of the concept of culture. Post-1980s years provided for increased visibility of other anthropologies, outside of traditional “centers” of anthropological knowledge (i.e. Anglo-American, French and German anthropologies.Some representatives of these traditions, together with certain modifications of structuralism, aided by representatives of the “deconstructionˮ movement (especially in France, additionally influenced the self-questioning in contemporary anthropology, leading gradually to what is sometimes referred to the “ontological turnˮ in contemporary anthropology, exemplified by the Brazilian anthropologist Eduardo Viveiros de Castro. Representatives of this “turn” also see themselves as successors of the theory of practice. The author points to some serious implications of this “turnˮ – including pushing anthropology into the realm of pseudo-science, and making it completely irrelevant for understanding and interpretation of the contemporary world.

  15. Anthropology and cultural neuroscience: creating productive intersections in parallel fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R A; Seligman, R

    2009-01-01

    Partly due to the failure of anthropology to productively engage the fields of psychology and neuroscience, investigations in cultural neuroscience have occurred largely without the active involvement of anthropologists or anthropological theory. Dramatic advances in the tools and findings of social neuroscience have emerged in parallel with significant advances in anthropology that connect social and political-economic processes with fine-grained descriptions of individual experience and behavior. We describe four domains of inquiry that follow from these recent developments, and provide suggestions for intersections between anthropological tools - such as social theory, ethnography, and quantitative modeling of cultural models - and cultural neuroscience. These domains are: the sociocultural construction of emotion, status and dominance, the embodiment of social information, and the dual social and biological nature of ritual. Anthropology can help locate unique or interesting populations and phenomena for cultural neuroscience research. Anthropological tools can also help "drill down" to investigate key socialization processes accountable for cross-group differences. Furthermore, anthropological research points at meaningful underlying complexity in assumed relationships between social forces and biological outcomes. Finally, ethnographic knowledge of cultural content can aid with the development of ecologically relevant stimuli for use in experimental protocols.

  16. Anthropology and business: reflections on the business applications of cultural anthropology.

    OpenAIRE

    Dipak Raj Pant; Fernando Alberti

    1997-01-01

    Today's business have international and intercultural dimensions. The complexity of market, organizational climate and culture and the management of human resources demand interdisciplinary and intercultural approach which are available in anthropological researches and methods. The consumer world has its own developments, diversifications and psycho-cultural fermentation. These changes pose new challenges for the designers and suppliers of products, services, systems and processes. Many chan...

  17. Anthropology and the peasant class: the pertinence of the persistent. Anthropological reflections on peasant internationalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Hernán Contreras Román

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article develops an initial discussion on the persistence of the peasant class in anthropology as an awkward object, which since it has become asubject for the discipline has  obliged anthropologists to re-examine their disciplinary identity and re-think their theoretical  bases. We start from the idea that both the emergence and the decline of peasant studies in the discipline have corresponded with localizable social, intellectual and political contexts. For this  reason we present the current struggle of peasant internationalism, represented by the international movement Vía Campesina, for food sovereignty and international recognition of the  rights of peasant men and women. These struggles are considered to constitute a politically novel space which has the potential to generate political opportunities for peasant claims in the face of  neoliberal despoliation. Finally, we reflect on how these struggles again present the peasant class as an awkward object for anthropology and demand anthropological discussion of the subject.

  18. RACE RELATIONSHIPS: COLLEGIALITY AND DEMARCATION IN PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs Collopy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In 1962, anthropologist Carleton Coon argued in The Origin of Races that some human races had evolved further than others. Among his most vocal critics were geneticist Theodosius Dobzhansky and anthropologist Ashley Montagu, each of whom had known Coon for decades. I use this episode, and the long relationships between scientists that preceded it, to argue that scientific research on race was intertwined not only with political projects to conserve or reform race relations, but also with the relationships scientists shared as colleagues. Demarcation between science and pseudoscience, between legitimate research and scientific racism, involved emotional as well as intellectual labor.

  19. [The anti-philosophical anthropology in the Hippocratic treatise De Vetere Medicina (On Ancient Medicine)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    The Hippocratic treatise De Vetere Medicina (On Ancient Medicine) has been the focus of attention among classical scholars and historians of medicine. The author attacks in ch. 20 doctors and sophists who base their own medical theories and methods on philosophical anthropology taken from the contemporary natural philosophers. Many attempts have been made to elucidate, as opposed to their philosophical inquiry into human nature, the author's way of understanding it, which still remains unclear. I draw attention to the following points to make it clear that the conceptual framework of the author's medical anthropology is different from theirs. Their philosophical inquiry into human nature has its starting point in fundamental element(s), from which human beings were originally formed. The author focuses on human beings as existent in their present states, whose conditions and functions must be investigated through interrelations between them and their external factors, such as foods and drinks. A medical investigation into the interrelations will give us a scientific idea about human body, whose constituents are taken to be a large number of humors, reacting against some external factors and accordingly making us feel pain. This may presuppose that, in the author's medical anthropology, human body is conceptually demarcated as the physical or material aspect of human being, within which all physiological events depending on external factors and the humors take place. In their philosophical anthropology, however, human body doesn't seem to have been clearly conceptualized as such, because our experience of feeling pain should be judged to take place within the actions of the fundamental element(s), which must be supposed to constitute our cognitive self.

  20. The guide from Omelas: Action anthropology with miracle icing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Gavrilović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Literary piece by Ursula Le Guin, a science fiction author, is linked with theoretical, as well as practical anthropology, in several ways. Her life, education, prose production and reception of her work create a whole, which is in many ways related with anthropology on the one, and the changes in the modern world on the other side. Her work has, owing to its great popularity, contributed to a great extent to the adoption of some primarily anthropological thesis with the broadest population (not only among Americans and thus significantly influenced the change of the public discourse-the shaping of the contemporary ideal picture of the world.

  1. Historic perspectives from anthropology. Reflections proposed to Transcultural Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbach Viadas, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    History brings together meanings related to earlier periods, being aware of the past as a panorama to reread the present. Madeleine Leininger presented in 1970 an implicit and respectful message to the Nursing Profession when introducing Nursing and Anthropology. Two Worlds to Blend. Implicitly: Nursing you disregard culture. This article shows the absence of the history of anthropology and of nursing within Transcultural Nursing and it includes how education has influenced theoretic, methodological, and comparative approaches giving researchers the responsibility to decide their fundamentals. Berthoud (2001) has inspired the anthropological and historic perspectives of the author, thus universalism, relativism, and comparison are presented.

  2. Avan-zâde Mehmed Süleyman and the first physical anthropology studies in OttomansAvan-zâde Mehmed Süleyman ve Osmanlılarda ilk fizik antropoloji çalışmaları

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Dinçarslan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The first known study on the physical growth of children in Ottomans was “Şâkirdlerimizin nemâ-yı bedenîsi” by Nafi Atuf (Kansu in 1917 which was on the students living in Bursa. As a result of literature review, we reached the book named “Almanlar Gibi Kuvvetli ve Uzun Boylu Nasıl Olmalı?” written by Avan-zâde Mehmed Süleyman in 1335/1916 in Ottoman Turkish and the transliteration of the book was done by us. With the scope of this study, the content of the book and the data on the author were simplified in accordance with today’s Turkish by keeping to the original. In addition, the book was evaluated with regards to physical anthropology, the history of medicine and sociology. In the book which is one of the first pre-republican physical anthropological studies, the author deals with the factors affecting stature, weight, growth and development in order to raise healthier generations. On the other hand, by the subject of the study (to raise healthier generations the approache of the author related to race and eugenics was evaluated in his period.   Özet Osmanlılarda çocukların fiziksel büyümesi üzerine literatürde bilinen ilk çalışma Nafi Atuf (Kansu tarafından 1917 yılında Bursa’da yaşayan öğrenciler üzerine yapılan, Şâkirdlerimizin nemâ-yı bedenîsi adlı çalışmadır. Bununla birlikte tarafımızdan yapılan literatür taramasında, Avan-zâde Mehmed Süleyman’ın 1335/1916 yılında Osmanlıca olarak kaleme aldığı Almanlar Gibi Kuvvetli ve Uzun Boylu Nasıl Olmalı? adlı kitabına ulaşılmış ve eserin transliterasyonu gerçekleştirilmiştir. Bu çalışma kapsamında eserin içeriği ve yazarı hakkında bilgiler, eserin aslına bağlı kalınarak günümüz Türkçesine uygun biçimde sadeleştirilmiş ve fizik antropoloji, tıp ve toplumbilim tarihi açısından değerlendirilmiştir. Cumhuriyet öncesi ilk fizik antropoloji çalışmalarından biri olma özelliğini ta

  3. Observing the other: reflections on anthropological fieldwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, P

    1994-01-01

    Aspects of anthropological fieldwork are examined from a psychoanalytic viewpoint using two sources: (1) Malinowski's A Diary in the Strict Sense of the Term, a fieldwork journal he kept in New Guinea and the Trobriand Islands "as a means of self-analysis"; (2) the analysis of an anthropologist both before and after she returned from the field. Malinowski's Diary, written in a virtually free-associative form, illustrates how fieldwork stimulates derivatives of significant early infantile conflicts. The patient's analysis revealed the unconscious meaning of, and motivation for, fieldwork for this particular individual. Based on these data, it is postulated that during fieldwork a new, emotionally charged object relationship, with its concomitant transference responses, may be unconsciously established by the anthropologist with the alien society being studied.

  4. Critical Medical Anthropology in Midwifery Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Newnham

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we discuss the use of critical medical anthropology (CMA as a theoretical framework for research in the maternity care setting. With reference to the doctoral research of the first author, we argue for the relevance of using CMA for research into the maternity care setting, particularly as it relates to midwifery. We then give an overview of an existing analytic model within CMA that we adapted for looking specifically at childbirth practices and which was then used in both analyzing the data and structuring the thesis. There is often no clear guide to the analysis or writing up of data in ethnographic research; we therefore offer this Critical analytic model of childbirth practices for other researchers conducting ethnographic research into childbirth or maternity care.

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  6. Homo religiosus : philosophical anthropology Viktor Emil Frankl 's .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Vinícius da Costa Meireles

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work, entitled The Homo religiosus: the philosophical anthropology of Viktor Emil Frankl, is rooted in the anthropology of Frankl and aims to understand Frankl’s anthropology and its spiritual dynamic in religious experience. Using theoretical-bibliographical research with these main works—The Ignored Presence of God (1948, The Unconditioned Man (1949, Patient Man (1950, and The Search for God and Questions about the Meaning of Life (1984—this work traverses through Frankl’s anthropology, the spiritual dimension, the search for meaning, and one’s relationship with God. The work is divided into three parts. The first part consists of contextualization and critique. The second part puts forward a proposal, and the third part discusses the experience of the Homo religiosus.

  7. An Anthropological Perspective: Another Dimension to Modern Dental Wear Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Kaidonis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, research on tooth wear by dental academics has been diametrically opposite to that of anthropological research, with each discipline having a different understanding as to the nature of the wear processes. Dental focus revolved around preventive and restorative considerations while the anthropological focus was a biological understanding related to human evolution, diet, environment, form, and function and included all the craniofacial structures. Introducing the anthropological perspective into modern dentistry gives an insight into the “bigger picture” of the nature and extent of tooth wear. By combining anthropological evidence with clinical knowledge and experience, it is most likely to provide the best-informed and biologically based approach to the management of tooth wear in modern societies.

  8. Race, ethnicity, and racism in medical anthropology, 1977-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravlee, Clarence C; Sweet, Elizabeth

    2008-03-01

    Researchers across the health sciences are engaged in a vigorous debate over the role that the concepts of "race" and "ethnicity" play in health research and clinical practice. Here we contribute to that debate by examining how the concepts of race, ethnicity, and racism are used in medical-anthropological research. We present a content analysis of Medical Anthropology and Medical Anthropology Quarterly, based on a systematic random sample of empirical research articles (n = 283) published in these journals from 1977 to 2002. We identify both differences and similarities in the use of race, ethnicity, and racism concepts in medical anthropology and neighboring disciplines, and we offer recommendations for ways that medical anthropologists can contribute to the broader debate over racial and ethnic inequalities in health.

  9. Introduction to Practice What You Teach: Activist Anthropology at the Sites of Cross-Talk and Cross-Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L. Anderson-Lazo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Constructed as a consciously transnational and interdisciplinary dialogue among eight anthropologists, this group of essays compares methods, strategies and outcomes of expressly political research, collaborative networks, participatory projects, and activist teaching. Here, projected against the backdrop of the 2007 Society for Applied Anthropology meetings’ theme which focused on Global Insecurities, each contributor revisits and updates an ongoing conversation about anthropology as an agent of social transformation. Our written collaboration holds up teaching as a central practice of activist anthropology; and thus our essays taken as a whole reveal how we imagine, construct and inhabit relationships of thinking and learning collectively, across and outside of mainstream political orthodoxies, disciplinary epistemologies, cultural registers, as well as physical, sexual and civil normativities. The moments of convergence, overlap and disjuncture among our various projects, then, offer a broad description of an engaged anthropology that draws on an historical approach, situated perspectives, decolonizing critiques, and embodied practices that include everything from empathetic listening to social disruption. Thus, looking at ourselves through this lens, this collection of essays which might be compared to a reflexive, group ethnography reconsiders and refashions our best practices over time.

  10. Before Franz Boas: Pioneering Women in American Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Tarducci

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One consequence of the impact of the feminist movement in anthropological theory and practice was the recovery of the life and work of women who, despite occupying a peripheral site, made significant contributions to the field. In this paper I focus on the trajectories of these pioneers who, in a time of fast socioeconomic changes (last decades or xix Century and the early xx Century and despite they were self taught, were fundamental to the professionalization of anthropology.

  11. Humans, brains, and their environment: marriage between neuroscience and anthropology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northoff, Georg

    2010-03-25

    How do we define ourselves as humans and interact with our various environments? Recently, neuroscience has extended into other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, questioning the existence of distinct disciplines like anthropology, which describes the relationship between humans and their various environments. However, rather than being incorporated into neuroscience, anthropology may be considered complementary, and a marriage of the two disciplines can provide deep insight into these fundamental questions.

  12. Focus Section on Design Anthropology in Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    This focus section explores the opportunities of design anthropology in participatory design as an approach to research and design in an increasingly global and digital world. Traditionally, ethnography has been used in Participatory design to research real-life contexts and challenges, and as ways...... opportunities of using design anthropology as a holistic and critical approach to addressing societal challenges and change, and a way for anthropologists and designers to engage in participatory research and design that extend beyond the empirical....

  13. 77 FR 23501 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... with the cultural item may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum...

  14. PHILOSOPHY OF DESCARTES: BASIC INTENTION AND STATUS OF ANTHROPOLOGY ABSTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatolii Malivskyi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to emphasize the insufficiency of reductionist interpretation of Descartes’ heritage and to bring into focus the constitutive role of anthropology in Descartes authentic project. Scientific novelty. Substantiation of anthropology in Descartes’ philosophical structure is based upon recognition of key importance of anthropological intention in previous philosophy as well as anthropological one in philosopher’s own works. Therefore, the insufficiency of established de-anthropologised interpretation of essential intention of Descartes’ doctrine becomes evident. Methodology. The use of phenomenology and hermeneutics enables us to comprehend the key philosopher’s ideas as the manifestation of his personality. The concentration on the interpretation of Descartes ideas as the manifestation of determining influence of external factors is the shortcoming of the established reductionist methodology. Conclusions. It was proved that anthropology that should have been the conclusion of Descartes’ philosophy under conditions of domination of reductionist attitude was withdrawn by the de-anthropologised reality image. The comprehension of the authentic image of Descartes’ philosophy provides special attention to the anthropological element in his ontology.

  15. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  18. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  19. Mitochondria in anthropology and forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Tomasz; Rogalla, Urszula

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria's role in crucial metabolic pathways is probably the first answer which comes to our minds for the question: what do these tiny organelles serve for? However, specific features of their DNA made them extremely useful also in the field of anthropology and forensics. MtDNA analyses became a milestone in the complex task of unraveling earliest human migrations. Evidence provided by these experiments left no doubts on modern humans origins pointing to Africa being our cradle. It also contributed to interpretation of putative ways of our dispersal around Asia and Americas thousands years ago. On the other hand, analysis of mtDNA is well established and valuable tool in forensic genetics. When other definitely more popular markers give no answer on identity, it is the time to employ information carried by mitochondria. This chapter summarizes not only current reports on the role of mitochondria in forensics and reconstruction of modern humans phylogeny, but also calls one's attention to a broad range of difficulties and constraints associated with mtDNA analyses.

  20. Deep pharma: psychiatry, anthropology, and pharmaceutical detox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldani, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Psychiatric medication, or psychotropics, are increasingly prescribed for people of all ages by both psychiatry and primary care doctors for a multitude of mental health and/or behavioral disorders, creating a sharp rise in polypharmacy (i.e., multiple medications). This paper explores the clinical reality of modern psychotropy at the level of the prescribing doctor and clinical exchanges with patients. Part I, Geographies of High Prescribing, documents the types of factors (pharmaceutical-promotional, historical, cultural, etc.) that can shape specific psychotropic landscapes. Ethnographic attention is focused on high prescribing in Japan in the 1990s and more recently in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, in the US. These examples help to identify factors that have converged over time to produce specific kinds of branded psychotropic profiles in specific locales. Part II, Pharmaceutical Detox, explores a new kind of clinical work being carried out by pharmaceutically conscious doctors, which reduces the number of medications being prescribed to patients while re-diagnosing their mental illnesses. A high-prescribing psychiatrist in southeast Wisconsin is highlighted to illustrate a kind of med-checking taking place at the level of individual patients. These various examples and cases call for a renewed emphasis by anthropology to critically examine the "total efficacies" of modern pharmaceuticals and to continue to disaggregate mental illness categories in the Boasian tradition. This type of detox will require a holistic approach, incorporating emergent fields such as neuroanthropology and other kinds of creative collaborations.

  1. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.  Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish how ready we are to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the week was thus pac...

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.   Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish (we hoped) the readiness of CMS to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the...

  3. Notes towards an anthropology of the internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Hart

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available What might an anthropology of the internet look like? It require a combination of introspection, personal judgment and world history to explore the universe of cyberspace. This world is not sufficient to itself, nor is it 'the world'. People bring their offline circumstances to behaviour online. The virtual and the real constitute a dialectic in which neither can be reduced to the other and 'virtual reality' is their temporary synthesis. Heidegger's metaphysics are drawn on to illuminate this dialectic. Before this, the internet is examines in the light of the history of communications, from speech and writing to books and the radio. The digital revolution of our time is marked by the convergence of telephones, television and computing. It is the third stage in a machine revolution lasting just 200 years. The paper analyses the political economy of the internet in terms of the original three classes controlling respectively increase in the environment (land, money (capital and human creativity (labour. It ends with a consideration of Kant's great example for a future anthropology capable of placing human subjectivity in world history.Como poderia ser uma antropologia da Internet? Uma tal antropologia exigiria uma combinação de introspecção, de opiniões pessoais e de história mundial para se explorar o universo do ciberespaço. Afinal, esse mundo não é um mundo auto-suficiente, nem mesmo esse é "um mundo". As pessoas carregam consigo suas circunstâncias off-line para junto do seu comportamento on-line. Constitui-se uma dialética do virtual e do real, na qual nenhuma das duas partes pode ser reduzida à outra e na qual a "realidade virtual" é a sua síntese temporária. A metafísica heideggeriana é aqui acionada para esclarecer melhor essa dialética. Antes disso, entretanto, a Internet é examinada sob a luz da história das comunicações, desde a fala e a escrita de livros até o rádio. A revolução digital de nosso tempo est

  4. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    J. Incandela

    The all-plenary format of the CMS week in Cyprus gave the opportunity to the conveners of the physics groups to present the plans of each physics analysis group for tackling early physics analyses. The presentations were complete, so all are encouraged to browse through them on the Web. There is a wealth of information on what is going on, by whom and on what basis and priority. The CMS week was followed by two CMS “physics events”, the ICHEP08 days and the physics days in July. These were two weeks dedicated to either the approval of all the results that would be presented at ICHEP08, or to the review of all the other Monte-Carlo based analyses that were carried out in the context of our preparations for analysis with the early LHC data (the so-called “2008 analyses”). All this was planned in the context of the beginning of a ramp down of these Monte Carlo efforts, in anticipation of data.  The ICHEP days are described below (agenda and talks at: http://indic...

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Joe Incandela

    There have been two plenary physics meetings since the December CMS week. The year started with two workshops, one on the measurements of the Standard Model necessary for “discovery physics” as well as one on the Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT). Meanwhile the tail of the “2007 analyses” is going through the last steps of approval. It is expected that by the end of January all analyses will have converted to using the data from CSA07 – which include the effects of miscalibration and misalignment. January Physics Days The first Physics Days of 2008 took place on January 22-24. The first two days were devoted to comprehensive re¬ports from the Detector Performance Groups (DPG) and Physics Objects Groups (POG) on their planning and readiness for early data-taking followed by approvals of several recent studies. Highlights of POG presentations are included below while the activities of the DPGs are covered elsewhere in this bulletin. January 24th was devo...

  6. Some characteristics of anthropological status of women in Novi Sad – Republic of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATJANA M. PAVLICA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the anthropological status of adult females and the prevalence of females with potential health risk using the indices of obesity. The anthropological study was conducted from 2011 to 2013 in Novi Sad, (the north of Serbia. The tested group consisted of 310 women, with mean age 41.42±6.86, involved in the project "The impact of physical activity on the risk factors in the working population." Nutritional condition was determined using the body mass index (BMI kg/m2 , while the waist circumference and WHR were used for assessing the central obesity. According to the average BMI, the younger females are predominantly with normal weight, while higher percent of older females is characterised with pre-obesity. In total, 45.85% of females are with excessive body weight, 34.62% of them being classified as overweight and 11.23% as obese. Central obesity is more frequent in older females aged up to 40. Potential health risk increases with age, and very high health risk from abdominal and overall obesity was observed in 6.25% of younger and 13,25% of older women. The data therefore point to the necessity of continuous monitoring and a combination of existing programs with other forms of organized physical activity.

  7. 78 FR 34129 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of... County, MI. In 1924, these items were sold to the University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology, by...

  8. 75 FR 5108 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... possession and control of the University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository... notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University of Wyoming,...

  9. 76 FR 36149 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... Anthropology, Kalamazoo, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary... associated funerary objects may contact the Western Michigan University, Department of...

  10. 77 FR 34987 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... & Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology has completed an...: Dr. Richard Hodges, Director, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology &...

  11. 76 FR 28077 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Western Michigan University, Department of...

  12. Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Defined as the scientific study of matter and energy, physics explains how all matter behaves. Separated into modern and classical physics, the study attracts both experimental and theoretical physicists. From the discovery of the process of nuclear fission to an explanation of the nature of light, from the theory of special relativity to advancements made in particle physics, this volume profiles 10 pioneers who overcame tremendous odds to make significant breakthroughs in this heavily studied branch of science. Each chapter contains relevant information on the scientist''s childhood, research, discoveries, and lasting contributions to the field and concludes with a chronology and a list of print and Internet references specific to that individual.

  13. Bruner's Search for Meaning: A Conversation between Psychology and Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Cheryl; Lutkehaus, Nancy C; Throop, C Jason

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a special issue of Ethos devoted to the work of Jerome Bruner and his careerlong attempts to seek innovative ways to foster a dialogue between psychology and anthropology. The articles in this special issue situate Bruner's meaning-centered approach to psychology and his groundbreaking work on narrative in the broader context of the developmental trajectory of both of fields of inquiry. Bruner's work has been enormously influential in the subfields of cultural psychology and psychological anthropology, especially because of his important contributions to our understanding of the intimate relationship between culture and mind. We examine Bruner's past and ongoing engagement with such luminary figures as Lev Vygotsky, Jean Piaget, Alfred Kroeber, Claude Lévi-Strauss, and Clifford Geertz to highlight points of convergence and tension between his version of cultural psychology and contemporary theorizing and practice in psychological anthropology. We also review his practical and theoretical contributions to the fields of medicine, law, and education.

  14. MORAL TECHNIQUES. FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY AND ITS ARTIFACTS FOR DOING GOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIEL GATTI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In many of its applications forensic anthropology is a singular discipline, midway between a bare techno-scientific exercise and a militant involvement in overcoming situations marked by human rights violations. Today, riding on an intense and transnational wave of humanitarian sensitivity, forensic anthropology has acquired a significant scientific, moral and media status, and has become a front line scientific-technical practice in the human rights field at the planetary level. This text, which analyzes some of the artifacts with which forensic anthropology represents and works on its object, aims to understand this discipline through the concept of moral technique, which, in my understanding, captures the particular tensions of this form of working for good.

  15. Forensic anthropology casework-essential methodological considerations in stature estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Menezes, Ritesh G; Ghosh, Abhik

    2012-03-01

    The examination of skeletal remains is a challenge to the medical examiner's/coroner's office and the forensic anthropologist conducting the investigation. One of the objectives of the medico-legal investigation is to estimate stature or height from various skeletal remains and body parts brought for examination. Various skeletal remains and body parts bear a positive and linear correlation with stature and have been successfully used for stature estimation. This concept is utilized in estimation of stature in forensic anthropology casework in mass disasters and other forensic examinations. Scientists have long been involved in standardizing the anthropological data with respect to various populations of the world. This review deals with some essential methodological issues that need to be addressed in research related to estimation of stature in forensic examinations. These issues have direct relevance in the identification of commingled or unknown remains and therefore it is essential that forensic nurses are familiar with the theories and techniques used in forensic anthropology.

  16. Medical anthropology: toward a third moment in social science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, W W

    2001-12-01

    This article about medical anthropology was inspired by the work of Pierre Bourdieu, specifically, his efforts to reconcile the antinomy of a "social structuralist" and a "cultural constructivist" perspective. These perspectives are often opposed in the literature, but, in Bourdieu's view, human life cannot be studied without taking into account both how individuals are situated within and constrained by social structures and how those individuals construct an understanding of and impose meaning on the world around them. I argue that the special subject matter of medical anthropology--human health--demands that a synthetic approach be taken in our theory and research. I illustrate this argument with examples from my own research on social and cultural factors associated with blood pressure, and I point to other examples of this synthesis in medical anthropology. The results of this research hold promise for the continuing refinement of culture theory.

  17. We Need to be Relevant : An Ethnography of Kenyan Anthropology Students

    OpenAIRE

    Grøvik, Ida Skjong

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is based on seven months of ethnographic fieldwork among Kenyan anthropology students at the Institute of Anthropology, Gender & African Studies (IAGAS) at the University of Nairobi. I explore anthropology students 1) everyday life, interests, aspirations and motivations; 2) the relationship between their personal background and approach to anthropology; and 3) how they interpret society and assess their potential to contribute to it as social scientists. A prevalent theme of thi...

  18. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2011-01-01

    Since the last CMS Week, all physics groups have been extremely active on analyses based on the full 2010 dataset, with most aiming for a preliminary measurement in time for the winter conferences. Nearly 50 analyses were approved in a “marathon” of approval meetings during the first two weeks of March, and the total number of approved analyses reached 90. The diversity of topics is very broad, including precision QCD, Top, and electroweak measurements, the first observation of single Top production at the LHC, the first limits on Higgs production at the LHC including the di-tau final state, and comprehensive searches for new physics in a wide range of topologies (so far all with null results unfortunately). Most of the results are based on the full 2010 pp data sample, which corresponds to 36 pb-1 at √s = 7 TeV. This report can only give a few of the highlights of a very rich physics program, which is listed below by physics group...

  19. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Hill

    2012-01-01

    The months that have passed since the last CMS Bulletin have been a very busy and exciting time for CMS physics. We have gone from observing the very first 8TeV collisions produced by the LHC to collecting a dataset of the collisions that already exceeds that recorded in all of 2011. All in just a few months! Meanwhile, the analysis of the 2011 dataset and publication of the subsequent results has continued. These results come from all the PAGs in CMS, including searches for the Higgs boson and other new phenomena, that have set the most stringent limits on an ever increasing number of models of physics beyond the Standard Model including dark matter, Supersymmetry, and TeV-scale gravity scenarios, top-quark physics where CMS has overtaken the Tevatron in the precision of some measurements, and bottom-quark physics where CMS made its first discovery of a new particle, the Ξ*0b baryon (candidate event pictured below). Image 2:  A Ξ*0b candidate event At the same time POGs and PAGs...

  20. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Guenther Dissertori

    The time period between the last CMS week and this June was one of intense activity with numerous get-together targeted at addressing specific issues on the road to data-taking. The two series of workshops, namely the “En route to discoveries” series and the “Vertical Integration” meetings continued.   The first meeting of the “En route to discoveries” sequence (end 2007) had covered the measurements of the Standard Model signals as necessary prerequisite to any claim of signals beyond the Standard Model. The second meeting took place during the Feb CMS week and concentrated on the commissioning of the Physics Objects, whereas the third occurred during the April Physics Week – and this time the theme was the strategy for key new physics signatures. Both of these workshops are summarized below. The vertical integration meetings also continued, with two DPG-physics get-togethers on jets and missing ET and on electrons and photons. ...

  1. The aesthetic imaginary as an anthropological locus. Thinking an Anthropology based on Imaginary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia María Calvo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The process by which man is capable of creating beauty not only gives us a fruitive experience but also knowledge of our human nature. Therefore we intend to understand what epistemological possibilities a work of art opens and, ultimately, what we know of man through it and why. Out of an interdisciplinary and dialogical perspective, projected by authors as Adolphe Gesché and Hans-Georg Gadamer, among others, we propose that the imaginary world opened and established by art becomes a privileged locus for human knowledge. The imagery is the symbolic area built by the artists and the community, which influences and affects every member of it, and where the community builds its identity known.Key Words: Imaginary, aesthetics, poiésis, anthropology.

  2. 75 FR 435 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of... completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the Department of Anthropology... assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology, University of...

  3. Minority Education: Anthropological Perspectives. Social and Policy Issues in Education: The University of Cincinnati Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Evelyn, Ed.; Jordan, Cathie, Ed.

    This volume presents an overview of current anthropological thinking on the education of minority students, bringing the perspectives of educational anthropology to bear on understanding minority education and resolving its inequities. At the core of the book are some papers from an invited session of the American Anthropological Association in…

  4. The Fabric of a Student's Life and Thought: Practicing Cultural Anthropology in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    Describes an approach to college teaching in which anthropology contributes to constructing a problem-posing pedagogy. The following distinctive aspects of teaching anthropology are examined: (1) the teacher's anthropological stance; (2) ethnographic methods; (3) investigation of ethnographies; and (4) examination of interpretive theories of…

  5. 78 FR 5201 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... Washington, Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated...

  6. 77 FR 52058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University... Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes... of Anthropology at the address below by September 27, 2012. ADDRESSES: Dr. Jordan Kerber,...

  7. 78 FR 45962 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver... of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... of Anthropology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human...

  8. 78 FR 22286 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... acting on behalf of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology. If no additional...

  9. 76 FR 80392 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Inventory Completion: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park... Michigan officials and its Museum of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives... accessioned into the Museum of Anthropology. Between 2007 and 2009 the remains were inventoried at...

  10. 76 FR 36151 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Anthropology... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Museum of Anthropology, University of...

  11. 78 FR 56733 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Logan Museum of Anthropology... Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer...

  12. 77 FR 48536 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Logan Museum of Anthropology... associated funerary objects may contact the Logan Museum of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human...

  13. 78 FR 64007 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology has corrected an inventory of...

  14. 77 FR 15802 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Central Washington University Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation... Department of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribe stated below may occur...

  15. 78 FR 19301 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains... Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian...

  16. 75 FR 57493 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies... ] object in the possession of the Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada Las... assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University...

  17. 78 FR 5200 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... Burke Museum acting on behalf of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology....

  18. 78 FR 5198 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains to...

  19. 77 FR 65404 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... Anthropology. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional.... ADDRESSES: Dr. Heather Edgar, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New...

  20. 77 FR 65403 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology.... Heather Edgar, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM...

  1. 78 FR 11673 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in..., Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the...

  2. 77 FR 74868 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of... Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation..., Department of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below may occur...

  3. 78 FR 2432 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State... Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with... associated funerary objects may contact the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

  4. 77 FR 11582 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Central Washington University Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated... Anthropology. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary object to the Indian tribe stated...

  5. 77 FR 51563 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains...

  6. 78 FR 19298 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... Washington, Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated...

  7. 77 FR 74871 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State... Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with... associated funerary objects may contact the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

  8. 78 FR 19308 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that... University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it...

  9. 77 FR 46116 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ...-1100-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico... Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, and... Museum of Anthropology at the address below by September 4, 2012. ADDRESSES: Heather Edgar,...

  10. 78 FR 19297 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... Burke Museum acting on behalf of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology....

  11. 78 FR 25471 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... Burke Museum acting on behalf of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology....

  12. 78 FR 2429 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State... Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with... associated funerary objects may contact the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

  13. 77 FR 59969 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, Department of Anthropology, San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Anthropology, San Francisco, CA; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; correction... Department of Anthropology). The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Marin County... San Francisco State University Department of Anthropology records. In the Federal Register (73...

  14. 76 FR 28073 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit... of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit... Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, professional staff in consultation with representatives...

  15. 77 FR 5841 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of... Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation..., Department of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below may occur...

  16. 76 FR 48178 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University... Anthropology has completed an inventory of a human remain, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes... Anthropology at the address below by September 7, 2011. ADDRESSES: Dr. Jordan Kerber, Longyear Museum...

  17. 78 FR 45961 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver... of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... Denver Museum of Anthropology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the...

  18. 75 FR 14463 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology... Anthropology, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed from Huckleberry Island, Skagit County, WA. This... assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology...

  19. The Review of and Reaction to Selected Anthropology Projects by Professional Anthropologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynneson, Thomas L.; Taylor, Bob L.

    The main concern of this paper is to determine the accuracy and representativeness of anthropology material from: Anthropology Curriculum Project (ACP); Education Development Center's Man A Course of Study (MACOS); Materials and Activities for Teachers and Children (MATCH); University of Minnesota's Project Social Studies; Anthropology Curriculum…

  20. Critical Proximity as a Methodological Move in Techno-Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Andreas; Petersen, Morten Krogh; Elgaard Jensen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    work through two cases—one on the involvement of users in innovation projects and another on commercial web technologies for tracing issues—to show how critical proximity may be practiced. We sum up the lessons derived in four methodological guidelines for doing research with critical proximity.......echno-Anthropology is a new field, operating with a broad range of methodologies and approaches. This gives rise to the question: What does it mean for Techno-Anthropological research to be critical? In this paper, we discuss this question by developing and specifying the notion of ‘critical...

  1. Recent Trend and Perspectives in Forensic Anthropology: A Bibliometric Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela; Fonti, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates research in Forensic Anthropology (FA) in order to report on the state of this field of science. In particular, we carried out a review of all PubMed-listed scientific studies in the past decades using »forensic anthropology « as the keyword. In our »meta-analysis«, we observed variation in the number of publications per 2-year interval throughout the study period. In total, 1589 studies were found in the database and 1292 of them were published in the period 2000–2009...

  2. Contribution of anthropology to the study of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jessica; Dove, Michael; Lahsen, Myanna; Mathews, Andrew; McElwee, Pamela; McIntosh, Roderick; Moore, Frances; O'Reilly, Jessica; Orlove, Ben; Puri, Rajindra; Weiss, Harvey; Yager, Karina

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the challenge that climate change poses and crafting appropriate adaptation and mitigation mechanisms requires input from the breadth of the natural and social sciences. Anthropology's in-depth fieldwork methodology, long engagement in questions of society-environment interactions and broad, holistic view of society yields valuable insights into the science, impacts and policy of climate change. Yet the discipline's voice in climate change debates has remained a relatively marginal one until now. Here, we identify three key ways that anthropological research can enrich and deepen contemporary understandings of climate change.

  3. [Functional somatic syndromes from the view of cultural anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Ayako; Tsujiuchi, Takuya

    2009-09-01

    The functional somatic syndromes have acquired major socio-cultural and political dimensions. Socio-cultural factors clearly affect symptoms, suffering, and disability perception and reporting. And knowledge of explanatory models of bodily distress for patients from different cultural backgrounds is useful in the establishment of a stable doctor -patient relationship. FSS may be an operational category to bridge between medical explanatory model and patient's model. According to medical anthropology, sickness has two faces; illness and disease. "Disease" is the problem from the practitioner's perspective, and "illness" is the human experience of symptoms and suffering. In this paper, the anthropological research on chronic fatigue syndrome as "not real" illness experience was described.

  4. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Darin Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The collisions last year at 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV provided the long anticipated collider data to the CMS physics groups. Quite a lot has been accomplished in a very short time. Although the delivered luminosity was small, CMS was able to publish its first physics paper (with several more in preparation), and commence the commissioning of physics objects for future analyses. Many new performance results have been approved in advance of this CMS Week. One remarkable outcome has been the amazing agreement between out-of-the-box data with simulation at these low energies so early in the commissioning of the experiment. All of this is testament to the hard work and preparation conducted beforehand by many people in CMS. These analyses could not have happened without the dedicated work of the full collaboration on building and commissioning the detector, computing, and software systems combined with the tireless work of many to collect, calibrate and understand the data and our detector. To facilitate the efficien...

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The Physics Groups are actively engaged on analyses of the first data from the LHC at 7 TeV, targeting many results for the ICHEP conference taking place in Paris this summer. The first large batch of physics approvals is scheduled for this CMS Week, to be followed by four more weeks of approvals and analysis updates leading to the start of the conference in July. Several high priority analysis areas were organized into task forces to ensure sufficient coverage from the relevant detector, object, and analysis groups in the preparation of these analyses. Already some results on charged particle correlations and multiplicities in 7 TeV minimum bias collisions have been approved. Only one small detail remains before ICHEP: further integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC! Beyond the Standard Model measurements that can be done with these data, the focus changes to the search for new physics at the TeV scale and for the Higgs boson in the period after ICHEP. Particle Flow The PFT group is focusing on the ...

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      2012 has started off as a very busy year for the CMS Physics Groups. Planning for the upcoming higher luminosity/higher energy (8 TeV) operation of the LHC and relatively early Rencontres de Moriond are the high-priority activities for the group at the moment. To be ready for the coming 8-TeV data, CMS has made a concerted effort to perform and publish analyses on the 5 fb−1 dataset recorded in 2011. This has resulted in the submission of 16 papers already, including nine on the search for the Higgs boson. In addition, a number of preliminary results on the 2011 dataset have been released to the public. The Exotica and SUSY groups approved several searches for new physics in January, such as searches for W′ and exotic highly ionising particles. These were highlighted at a CERN seminar given on 24th  January. Many more analyses, from all the PAGs, including the newly formed SMP (Standard Model Physics) and FSQ (Forward and Small-x QCD), were approved in February. The ...

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Demortier

    Physics-wise, the CMS week in December was dominated by discussions of the analyses that will be carried out in the “next six months”, i.e. while waiting for the first LHC collisions.  As presented in December, analysis approvals based on Monte Carlo simulation were re-opened, with the caveat that for this work to be helpful to the goals of CMS, it should be carried out using the new software (CMSSW_2_X) and associated samples.  By the end of the week, the goal for the physics groups was set to be the porting of our physics commissioning methods and plans, as well as the early analyses (based an integrated luminosity in the range 10-100pb-1) into this new software. Since December, the large data samples from CMSSW_2_1 were completed. A big effort by the production group gave a significant number of events over the end-of-year break – but also gave out the first samples with the fast simulation. Meanwhile, as mentioned in December, the arrival of 2_2 meant that ...

  8. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    the PAG conveners

    2011-01-01

    The delivered LHC integrated luminosity of more than 1 inverse femtobarn by summer and more than 5 by the end of 2011 has been a gold mine for the physics groups. With 2011 data, we have submitted or published 14 papers, 7 others are in collaboration-wide review, and 75 Physics Analysis Summaries have been approved already. They add to the 73 papers already published based on the 2010 and 2009 datasets. Highlights from each physics analysis group are described below. Heavy ions Many important results have been obtained from the first lead-ion collision run in 2010. The published measurements include the first ever indications of Υ excited state suppression (PRL synopsis), long-range correlation in PbPb, and track multiplicity over a wide η range. Preliminary results include the first ever measurement of isolated photons (showing no modification), J/ψ suppression including the separation of the non-prompt component, further study of jet fragmentation, nuclear modification factor...

  9. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      The period since the last CMS Bulletin has been historic for CMS Physics. The pinnacle of our physics programme was an observation of a new particle – a strong candidate for a Higgs boson – which has captured worldwide interest and made a profound impact on the very field of particle physics. At the time of the discovery announcement on 4 July, 2012, prominent signals were observed in the high-resolution H→γγ and H→ZZ(4l) modes. Corroborating excess was observed in the H→W+W– mode as well. The fermionic channel analyses (H→bb, H→ττ), however, yielded less than the Standard Model (SM) expectation. Collectively, the five channels established the signal with a significance of five standard deviations. With the exception of the diphoton channel, these analyses have all been updated in the last months and several new channels have been added. With improved analyses and more than twice the i...

  10. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    The period since the last CMS bulletin has seen the end of proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy 8 TeV, a successful proton-lead collision run at 5 TeV/nucleon, as well as a “reference” proton run at 2.76 TeV. With these final LHC Run 1 datasets in hand, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have been busy analysing these data in preparation for the winter conferences. Moreover, despite the fact that the pp run only concluded in mid-December (and there was consequently less time to complete data analyses), CMS again made a strong showing at the Rencontres de Moriond in La Thuile (EW and QCD) where nearly 40 new results were presented. The highlight of these preliminary results was the eagerly anticipated updated studies of the properties of the Higgs boson discovered in July of last year. Meanwhile, preparations for Run 2 and physics performance studies for Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrade scenarios are ongoing. The Higgs analysis group produced updated analyses on the full Run 1 dataset (~25 f...

  11. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. D'Hondt

    The Electroweak and Top Quark Workshop (16-17th of July) A Workshop on Electroweak and Top Quark Physics, dedicated on early measurements, took place on 16th-17th July. We had more than 40 presentations at the Workshop, which was an important milestone for 2007 physics analyses in the EWK and TOP areas. The Standard Model has been tested empirically by many previous experiments. Observables which are nowadays known with high precision will play a major role for data-based CMS calibrations. A typical example is the use of the Z to monitor electron and muon reconstruction in di-lepton inclusive samples. Another example is the use of the W mass as a constraint for di-jets in the kinematic fitting of top-quark events, providing information on the jet energy scale. The predictions of the Standard Model, for what concerns proton collisions at the LHC, are accurate to a level that the production of W/Z and top-quark events can be used as a powerful tool to commission our experiment. On the other hand the measure...

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    In the period since the last CMS Bulletin, the LHC – and CMS – have entered LS1. During this time, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have performed more than 40 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete 8 TeV dataset delivered by the LHC in 2012 (and in some cases on the full Run 1 dataset). These results were shown at, and well received by, several high-profile conferences in the spring of 2013, including the inaugural meeting of the Large Hadron Collider    Physics Conference (LHCP) in Barcelona, and the 26th International Symposium on Lepton Photon Interactions at High Energies (LP) in San Francisco. In parallel, there have been significant developments in preparations for Run 2 of the LHC and on “future physics” studies for both Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrades of the CMS detector. The Higgs analysis group produced five new results for LHCP including a new H-to-bb search in VBF production (HIG-13-011), ttH with H to γ&ga...

  13. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Christopher Hill

    2013-01-01

    Since the last CMS Bulletin, the CMS Physics Analysis Groups have completed more than 70 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete Run 1 dataset. In parallel the Snowmass whitepaper on projected discovery potential of CMS for HL-LHC has been completed, while the ECFA HL-LHC future physics studies has been summarised in a report and nine published benchmark analyses. Run 1 summary studies on b-tag and jet identification, quark-gluon discrimination and boosted topologies have been documented in BTV-13-001 and JME-13-002/005/006, respectively. The new tracking alignment and performance papers are being prepared for submission as well. The Higgs analysis group produced several new results including the search for ttH with H decaying to ZZ, WW, ττ+bb (HIG-13-019/020) where an excess of ~2.5σ is observed in the like-sign di-muon channel, and new searches for high-mass Higgs bosons (HIG-13-022). Search for invisible Higgs decays have also been performed both using the associ...

  14. Anthropological Contributions to the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakoch, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Three recent annual conferences of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) have included symposia on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). This paper reviews these symposia, which dealt with themes associated with the overarching AAA conference themes for each year: in 2004, the SETI session addressed Anthropology, Archaeology, and Interstellar Communication: Science and the Knowledge of Distant Worlds; in 2005, it dealt with Historical Perspectives on Anthropology and SETI; and in 2006, the session examined Culture, Anthropology, and SETI. Among the topics considered in these symposia were analogues for contact with extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI), examining anthropologists’ experience in the field encountering other cultures-past and present. Similarly, the methodologies of archaeologists provide analogies for making contact with temporally distant civilizations, based on reconstructions from fragmentary information. Case studies helped make such analogies concrete in the symposia. The challenges of comprehending intelligences with different mental worlds was explored through a study of the meetings of Neanderthals and Homo sapiens, for example, while the decryption of Mayan hieroglyphics provided lessons on understanding others of own species.

  15. Giovanni Battista Morgagni: facial reconstruction by virtual anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela; Zaccagni, Luciana; Russo, Valentina

    2015-06-01

    Multidisciplinary research was carried out on human skeletal remains to identify if they belonged to the famous pathologist Giovanni Battista Morgagni, who died at a very old age and was buried in a church in Padua. The purpose of this study was to analyze the skull, creating a virtual model necessary for facial reconstruction, so as to contribute to the identification of the skull. The skeletal remains were found buried in the Morgagni family grave. Based on preliminary anthropological evidence, that the skull might be ascribable to Giovanni Battista Morgagni, a digitized model of the skull was created and restored. From this, a virtual facial reconstruction was developed using an assumed relationship between the soft-tissues and the underlying skeletal structure. Finally, the anthropological profile and the face reconstruction were compared with historical documentation and the portrait of Morgagni by Pietro Danieletti, showing clear similarities. Virtual anthropological techniques create new perspectives for anthropological and medical studies and can be used successfully in the forensic sciences to make a positive identification, such as in this case, which has been examined by different experts with similar results.

  16. Apaches in Three Dimensions: Anthropology, History and Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Leo E.

    As many disciplines as possible should be used in the teaching of Indian Studies. In particular, creative literature adds another dimension to the understanding of Indian culture and the history of Indian-white relations when it is used in conjunction with historical and anthropological material. The serious student should read historical novels…

  17. A Thematic Approach to the Undergraduate Sociology and Anthropology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzbaum, Allan; And Others

    The authors propose a new undergraduate social science curriculum which will enable sociology and anthropology majors to obtain an educational background adaptable to the changing job market. The program, which combines career education and the liberal arts, is organized by different themes which serve as the focus for learning and research within…

  18. Anthropology, Dance, and Education: Integrated Curriculum in Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karli; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Vissicaro, Pegge; Fredrickson, Lynda

    2016-01-01

    The integration of dance into K-12 curriculum can help students to learn better, encouraging deeper exploration and active engagement with content knowledge. The purpose of this intervention study was to determine how the integration of dance and social studies with an anthropological framework affects student learning of content knowledge in…

  19. A Preliminary Report on the Anthropology Department Student Ratings Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, G. M.; Amoss, Panela

    The Department of Anthropology and the Educational Assessment Center (EAC) cooperated in a project to assess the effect of certain variables on student ratings of instruction. For this purpose, the entire teaching faculty of the department was requested by the department's Teaching Effectiveness committee to administer the EAC Student Ratings Form…

  20. Ecological anthropology of households in East Madura, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, W.G.

    2011-01-01

      This dissertation is the result of diachronic and comparative anthropological study of rural households in Northeast Madura, Indonesia, carried out on eight separate visits between August 1985 and March 2009. The aim is to bring time-structured data to bear on key questions regarding the evo

  1. [Theories of stages of life within the anthropology of romanticism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Pia-Johanna; Schweizer, Stefan

    2006-12-01

    The essay discusses the importance and prominence of theories about different stages of life in the anthropological and medical discourse of romanticism. This discourse has clearly a stabilising and restaurative function, favouring the age of moderate manhood. The political and social regulative implications of these theories demand a restaurative roll-back. The essay is based on a concept of sociology of knowledge formation.

  2. Digital technologies, dreams and disconcertment in anthropological worldmaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waltorp, Karen

    2017-01-01

    In this article I explore dreaming and sharing of images in social media (such as Snapchat and Instagram), as future-making action. I propose to view them similarly as techniques to research the future anthropologically. Through my 14-month fieldwork among young Muslim women in Copenhagen...

  3. Searching for Meaning: Visual Culture from an Anthropological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokrocki, Mary

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the importance of Viktor Lowenfeld's influence on her research, describes visual anthropology, gives examples of her research, and examines the implications of this type of research for teachers. The author regards Lowenfeld's (1952/1939) early work with children in Austria as a form of participant observation…

  4. Guidelines for the structure of methodological processes in visual anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilicić, Niksa

    2011-12-01

    Vast majority of visual anthropologists of the 20th century were more focused on general phenomenology of visual anthropology, i.e. the content aspect of their works and their impact on scientific knowledge, leaving behind style of directing and practical principles & processes of creating anthropological film. So far, judging by the available literature, there are no strict guidelines for directorial procedures, nor the precise definition of determining of the methodical processes in production of an anthropological film. Consequently, the goal of this study is to determine the structure and forms of methodical processes as well as to define the advantages and disadvantages of each of them. By using adequate guidelines, the researcher, i.e. the author of the anthropological film, can optimize the production and post-production processes as soon as in preparation (preproduction) period of working on the film, by the technical choice of the approach to the production (proactive/reactive/subjective/objective...) and by defining the style of directing. In other words, it ultimately means more relevant scientific research result with less time and resources.

  5. Why did Kant reject physiological explanations in his anthropology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    One of Kant's central tenets concerning the human sciences is the claim that one need not, and should not, use a physiological vocabulary if one studies human cognitions, feelings, desires, and actions from the point of view of his 'pragmatic' anthropology. The claim is well known, but the arguments Kant advances for it have not been closely discussed. I argue against misguided interpretations of the claim, and I present his actual reasons in favor of it. Contemporary critics of a 'physiological anthropology' reject physiological explanations of mental states as more or less epistemologically dubious. Kant does not favor such ignorance claims--and this is for the good, since none of these claims was sufficiently justified at that time. Instead, he develops an original irrelevance thesis concerning the empirical knowledge of the physiological basis of the mind. His arguments for this claim derive from his original and, up to now, little understood criticism of a certain conception of pragmatic history, related to his anthropological insights concerning our ability to create new rules of action, the social dynamics of human action, and the relative inconstancy of human nature. The irrelevance thesis also changes his views of the goal and methodology of anthropology. Kant thereby argues for a distinctive approach in quest for a general 'science of man'.

  6. Dolphins Who Blow Bubbles: Anthropological Machines and Native Informants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lord, C.

    2011-01-01

    "Dolphins Who Blow Bubbles: Anthropological Machines and Native Informants" engages a reading between an Oscar winning and now ‘cult’ activist film The Cove (Louise Psihoyos 2009) and classical texts on the human-animal threshold. Giorgio Agamben’s The Open (2002) and Jacques Derrida’s "The Animal t

  7. Council on Anthropology and Education Newsletter. Volume III, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, John Ed.

    General information on format, included, materials, broad concerns, objectives, and availability of the newsletter are described in Volume I, ED 048 049. This issue focuses on ethnology, offering two papers presented at the American Anthropological Association symposiums. The lead paper presents a psycho-cultural developmental approach to the…

  8. Ethics in Anthropological Research: Responsibilities to the Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Biswas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, in anthropological research, ethics has become more relevant, more meaningful as well as structured in nature. In USA, specially after World War II, American Anthropological Association enacted code of ethics for anthropological research. However, in India, we have no such ethical guidelines from any of the association of anthropology; rather promote a space where researcher can create and evolve their own code of ethics. Ethical issues for anthropologists are manifold- their relations with research participants, with institution and colleagues, with own and host government and with society and funding agency of the project. Among these, the first one is most important, and present paper intends to identify ethical issues related with research participants; which includes informed consent, privacy, confidentiality, vulnerability, risk-benefit, deception, compensation and so on. The present work also intends to identify issues for which anthropologists criticize some components of bioethics because of their abstract principles derived from arm-chair philosophy, ethnocentric view and lack of cross-cultural analysis for that they prepare a readymade ethical code of conduct which may differ significantly from culture to culture.

  9. Anthropological Approach and Activity Theory: Culture, Communities and Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to evaluate the contribution of the anthropological approach (AA) concurrently to Activity Theory (AT) in view of overarching questions about classroom use of technology for teaching and learning mathematics. I will do it first from a philosophical point of view, presenting the main notions of AA that have been used to…

  10. REALISM AND THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL PRINCIPLE IN RUSSIAN PHILOSOPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobkova S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anthropologism is traditionally considered the main feature of Russian philosophy. The article reviews some anthropological ideas that have received natural development in such direction of thought as philosophical realism in the 2nd part of XIX century. Philosophical realism is positioned as a trend that has emerged within the mainstream of the basic traditions of Russian philosophy. It is noted that this direction is defined as an independent, in the wake of the strengthening of Russian science as a new cognitive paradigm. Substantively, philosophical realism is presented with the theories and concepts of the natural sciences developed in the 2nd part of XIX century. The realistic outlook, ripening in the Science environment, not only supported the anthropological tradition of Russian thought but put them on a scientific basis. It was dominated by the view that only by using scientific methods can reveal the objective laws of coexistence between man, nature and society. The article deals with the anthropological theories of Russian thinkers such as A.N. Radishchev, A.I. Galich, N.G. Chernyshevsky. The anaysis shows that realistic outlook in the natural sciences in the area of human theory relies on the principles of integrity, panmoralizm, cosmism. The conclusion is that the philosophical concepts by realistic scientists are out of attention of modern scholars. In the meantime, the study of these theories can make a significant contribution to the practical experience of comprehension of reality, as well as help to discover new sides of the domestic, national philosophy

  11. Anthropology with an Agenda: Four Forgotten Dance Anthropologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Katrina

    2010-01-01

    In response to postcolonial, feminist and subaltern critiques of anthropology, this article seeks to answer the question, "For whom should research be conducted, and by whom should it be used?" by examining the lives and works of four female dance anthropologists. Franziska Boas, Zora Neale Hurston, Katherine Dunham and Pearl Primus used…

  12. Research Summary of Chinese Ecological Anthropology in 2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shan

    2014-01-01

    The year 2013 was a fruitful year for the study of Ecological Anthropology in China . More than one hundred related papers were been published in 2013 . They can be roughly divided into three categories: research review; theoretical discussion; and case analysis .Among these pa-pers, the research about disaster anthropology was the most significant .However , there are also prob-lems regarding the development of Ecological An-thropology.For example, the concept of the disci-pline is still unclear and theoretical discussion as to what it means continues even today .In addition, the number of results has increased by leaps and bounds, but the areas of study are still unbal-anced.Furthermore, while localized studies have been promoted , professional exchanges with for-eign countries and scholars are still inadequate . Finally, although publishing platforms have in-creased , even one professional journal of Ecologi-cal Anthropology in China is still lacking .With the advancement of the construction of an ecological civilization in China , Ecological Anthropology will usher in a new development opportunity in future .

  13. Transforming Conflict Resolution Education: Applying Anthropology alongside Your Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avruch, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the role graduate students can play in transforming their education in the emergent field of Conflict Analysis and Resolution, as occurs at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (ICAR), at George Mason University, Washington, DC. It also unpacks how anthropology plays a role in the education of these students at…

  14. Beyond critique: rethinking roles for the anthropology of mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Rob

    2014-09-01

    The current supremacy of the 'bio-bio-bio' model within the discipline of psychiatry has progressively marginalized social science approaches to mental health. This situation begs the question, what role is there for the anthropology of mental health? In this essay, I contend that there are three essential roles for the anthropology of mental health in an era of biological psychiatry. These roles are to (i) provide a meaningful critique of practices, beliefs, and movements within current psychiatry; (ii) illuminate the socio-cultural, clinical, and familial context of suffering and healing regarding emotional distress/mental illness; and (iii) act as a catalyst for positive change regarding healing, services and provisions for people with emotional distress/mental illness. My argument is unified by my contention that a credible anthropology of mental health intending to make a societal contribution should offer no opposition without proposition. In other words, any critique must be counter-balanced by the detailing of solutions and proposals for change. This will ensure that the anthropology of mental health continues to contribute critical knowledge to the understanding of mental suffering, distress, and healing. Such social and cultural approaches are becoming especially important given the widespread disenchantment with an increasingly dominant biological psychiatry.

  15. Access to Legal Anthropology: An Approach to Teaching Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, M.E.R.

    1981-01-01

    This description of two courses of college level Legal Anthropology for senior citizens in continuing education shows how students with widely varying backgrounds examined legal dilemmas within their international cultural contexts using mystery stories and other fiction. The need for innovative teaching methods for adult learners is stressed. (AM)

  16. Anthropology, Development and Modernities: Exploring discourses, counter tendencies and violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, N.; Arce, A.

    2000-01-01

    This collection uses anthropological perspectives to explore the diverse interpretations of modernity and development in today's world. For some, modernity and development has brought prosperity, optimism and opportunity, but for others it has brought poverty and a falling quality of life. This book

  17. Active Learning in the Introductory Cultural Anthropology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Serena

    1985-01-01

    Presents three exercises that encourage active participation in cultural anthropology classes: (1) use of a puzzle to demonstrate focal issues about culture; (2) discussion of a specific piece of fieldwork to demonstrate the relationship among fieldwork, ethics, and cultural relativity; and (3) use of study questions in ethnographic films to allow…

  18. A Man Caught Between Bad Anthropology and Good Theology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Else Marie Wiberg

    2010-01-01

    Martin Luther's view of women is as complex as his authorship is vast, encompassing a diversity of gneres and purposes. Luther seems ambivalent toward women like the tradition before and after him. In his reformation enterprise he appears as torn between his good theology and a bad anthropology...

  19. The agency of Gell in the anthropology of art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Faria Alves

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available While delineating the parameters for an anthropology of art, Alfred Gell's famous book, Art and Agency, overlooked, for the most part, anthropological tradition. This raises questions as embarrassing as they are ignored: is it possible to produce good theory with no references to achieved knowledge in this particular field? Are the subjects within anthropology so differently pursued that it is not possible to refer to a common way of approaching them? What exactly do we lose with such a self-centered narrative? My point of view is that theory cannot be treated like a list of sentences that can be added to one another, according to their isolated importance. This article proposes an analysis of Alfred Gell's narrative, of how he connects its propositions. I will examine, overall, his readings, the authors he quotes like Peirce, Sally Price and others, and how he fits them along his argumentation. The objective of this exercise is to put in evidence, beyond Gell's definitions, some conceptions about art contained in his formulations, and to enlarge the range of potential references available for an anthropology of art.

  20. Anthropological perspectives on democratic citizenship education and globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Cervinkova, Hana

    2013-01-01

    The author draws on recent North American scholarship in the anthropology of education to show emerging trends in research on school-based democratic citizenship education. She gives examples of research, both at the level of national policies and individual schools, which addresses ways in which global and local infl uences interact in the creation and implementation of programs on democratic citizenship.

  1. METAPHYSICAL REVOLUTION OF DESCARTES AND TRANSFORMATION OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatolii M. Malivskyi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to reveal and comprehend forms of influence metaphysical' revolution for a way of interpretation of the anthropological project by Descartes on the basis of investigations of modern dekartes's researchers, that is the recognition of a fundamental role of metaphysics. Methodology. As methodological base modern investigations of dekartes's researchers accenting a fundamental role of metaphysics and expediency of unbiassed judgment of heritage of the great thinker are used. The scientific novelty. The transformation of the anthropological project is outlined as manifestation of metaphysical revolution. It is about a transcendencecy of naive anthropology (as an embodiment of reductive mindset, that is interpretations of human nature as its corporality and transition to metaphysical anthropology which consists in upholding of unconditional priority of human thinking as associated with God. As result of transition concentration of attention on intense human nature, that is at tension between sensuality and intelligence, aspiration to truth and tendency to delusion, between Life and Nothing, etc. Conclusions. The appeal to the incomplete anthropological project of Descartes on the basis of innovative researches allows proving the thesis about influence of metaphysical revolution on a way of its interpretation. The main forms of oriented to science ideals of naive anthropology, trust in evidence of the senses, atheism, interpretation of science as the main form of detection rationality of human nature, which Descartes tends constructively to overcome in the text of "meditation", are highlighted. During creation of metaphysical anthropology the attention of the thinker is drawn by the fact of impossibility of comprehension of human nature by means of natural-science rationality and expediency of the appeal to metaphysics. The subject of attention of the thinker is the tension between sensuality and intelligence, need

  2. Millennial medical anthropology: from there to here and beyond, or the problem of global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Atwood D

    2011-03-01

    While much of Medical Anthropology was and is what we can call "Normal" (following Kuhn) Medical Anthropology, I coined the term Millennial Medical Anthropology for that branch of the discipline that, in the 1990s, was departing from the Normal research paradigms and was deserving of a distinct sobriquet. This paper considers the Strong Program in Medical Anthropology's Millennial Medical Anthropology and its key subdivisions, the Cultural Studies of Science and Cultural Bioethics. Specifically it considers Medical Anthropology's movement from the past into an ethical future wherein Normal Biomedicine, Bioethics and Global Health are problematized. This provides the basis for the construction of a truly anthropological global health (i.e., Global, Global Health or Global Health 2.0).

  3. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    V.Ciulli

    2011-01-01

    The main programme of the Physics Week held between 16th and 20th May was a series of topology-oriented workshops on di-leptons, di-photons, inclusive W, and all-hadronic final states. The goal of these workshops was to reach a common understanding for the set of objects (ID, cleaning...), the handling of pile-up, calibration, efficiency and purity determination, as well as to revisit critical common issues such as the trigger. Di-lepton workshop Most analysis groups use a di-lepton trigger or a combination of single and di-lepton triggers in 2011. Some groups need to collect leptons with as low PT as possible with strong isolation and identification requirements as for Higgs into WW at low mass, others with intermediate PT values as in Drell-Yan studies, or high PT as in the Exotica group. Electron and muon reconstruction, identification and isolation, was extensively described in the workshop. For electrons, VBTF selection cuts for low PT and HEEP cuts for high PT were discussed, as well as more complex d...

  4. The anthropology of death or the new anthropology and the religious complex connected to death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kovačević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors give a review of new anthropological work pertaining to dying, death and beliefs in life after death. Dying and the valorization of ways of dying are the subject of a paper by sociologist Todor Kuljić, while other relevant texts commented on by the authors are the results of the work done by anthropologists. Thus, the traditional belief in “prikoljiš” is analyzed in the text of Ivan Kovačević, while the folk belief in dying after death was analyzed by Dušan Bandić, and modern forms of grief in obituaries are analyzed by Ivan Čolović. The traditional belief in the vampire is the subject of analysis in papers by Dušan Bandić and Lidija Radulović, while the analysis of beliefs in immortality, present in a new religion, is the topic of a paper by Danijel Sinani.

  5. Virtual anthropology and forensic identification using multidetector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedouit, F; Savall, F; Mokrane, F-Z; Rousseau, H; Crubézy, E; Rougé, D; Telmon, N

    2014-04-01

    Virtual anthropology is made possible by modern cross-sectional imaging. Multislice CT (MSCT) can be used for comparative bone and dental identification, reconstructive identification and lesion identification. Comparative identification, the comparison of ante- and post-mortem imaging data, can be performed on both teeth and bones. Reconstructive identification, a considerable challenge for the radiologist, identifies the deceased by determining sex, geographical origin, stature and age at death. Lesion identification combines virtual autopsy and virtual anthropology. MSCT can be useful in palaeopathology, seeking arthropathy, infection, oral pathology, trauma, tumours, haematological disorders, stress indicators or occupational stress in bones and teeth. We examine some of the possibilities offered by this new radiological subspeciality that adds a new dimension to the work of the forensic radiologist. A multidisciplinary approach is crucial and involves communication and data exchange between radiologists, forensic pathologists, anthropologists and radiographers.

  6. FREUD, JUNG AND BOAS: THE PSYCHOANALYTIC ENGAGEMENT WITH ANTHROPOLOGY REVISITED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Robert

    2015-06-20

    Sigmund Freud's and C. G. Jung's turn to evolutionist anthropological material after 1909 is usually seen as a logical progression of their long-term interest in such material. It is also seen that they used this material ignorant of the significant challenges to the evolutionist paradigm underpinning such material, in particular the challenges led by Franz Boas. This paper argues otherwise: that both psychologists' turnings to such material was a new development, that neither had shown great interest in such material before 1909, and that their turnings to such material, far from being taken in ignorance of the challenges to evolutionist anthropology, were engagements with those challenges, because the evolutionist paradigm lay at the base of psychoanalysis. It argues that it is no coincidence that this engagement occurred after their return from America in 1909, where they had come into first-hand contact with the challenges of Franz Boas.

  7. Antropologia e alimentação Anthropology and eating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Canesqui

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available Analisa-se a produção antropológica referente às práticas, hábitos e concepções de consumo alimentar de segmentos de trabalhadores rurais e urbanos. Dimensiona-se e critica-se a abordagem antropológica contida nos diferentes estudos, apontando caminhos a serem perseguidos por novas pesquisas, de maneira que a área de nutrição, alimentação e saúde não deixe de prescindir das contribuições antropológicas.The anthropological literature on the practices, habits and conceptions of eating of rural and urban workers in Brazil. Was critically analysed, suggesting theoretical paths to be pursued by further research. In this way, the anthropological method can offer a relevant contribution to the development of the health sciences as far as nutrition and eating are concerned.

  8. Epistemological and Anthropological Thoughts About Neurophilosophy: An Initial Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia París Albert

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE At the dawn of the twenty-first century, neurophilosophy appears as a branch of neurosciences. The aim of this article is to review critically some of the epistemological and anthropological debates which neurophilosophy is putting on question again. In this sense the philosophical research conducted by the UNESCO Chair of Philosophy for Peace will be used as the main thread of the analysis. To accomplish this critical review, the article has been organized into two parts: the first is of epistemological nature, and the second has an anthropological perspective. This analysis will lead us to question the significance of the contributions of neurophilosophy to a better understanding of the human being.

  9. [Female anthropology, physiology and disease in ancient Christian writers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzivalli, Emanuela

    2011-01-01

    Ancient Christian sources are rich in reference to the anthropology and physiology of the female. Christianity in the first centuries had multiple positions as concerns the doctrinal thoughts as well as the social practices. Christian anthropological doctrine has been developed along two exegetical lines, hinging on Genesis 1-3: the first views the human being as a whole psycophysical entity and thereby highlights the protological inferiority of the woman; the second, spiritual and Platonic, emphasizes the inner self and thus, in theory, is more equalitarian. Ancient philosophical theories regarding human generation, in particular those ofAristotle and the Stoics, are used, along with medical notions, by Christian theologians to elaborate the dogma of incarnation. However, in certain cases, as with the post partum virginity of Maria, medical theories are totally put aside. The stories recounting the miracles offer the possibility of understanding medical practices offemale conditions and the emotive reactions of the women.

  10. Digital Visualities and Materialities: paths for an anthropological walk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisenda Ardèvol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses digital technologies from an anthropological perspective, concentrating on ways in which cultural diversity, social inequality and the possibilities of change and social transformation have been discussed. We examine the ways in which the digital domain has been conceived, categories used to describe processes of change and continuity in everyday life, and the impact of digital technology on these. this approach leads us to question up how ethnographers have explored the relationships among local practices, global transits and digital technologies, and the material and visual aspects of the digital in cultural production and media communication. Finally, we discuss how to incorporate digital technologies in ethnographic practice and anthropological knowledge.

  11. A Design Anthropology Critique of Active Aging as Ageism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Tonolli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a design anthropology critique of active aging as ageism in the design of information technologies for seniors. With ageism we refer to narratives coalesced around the label “active aging” in European policies and system design that focus on seniors as a homogeneous group of people in need of help. We discuss the findings of two empirical participatory design projects we have been dealing with: 1 a bottom­-up senior organization in a small village in a mountain area and 2 a series of workshops organized with seniors in an urban area. In both cases, the relations between the anthropologist and the people involved, prompted reflexive moments that brought anthropological relocations of the designers' perspective. In conclusion, we stress how such relocations could benefit participatory designs through the concept of design by subtraction and the adoption of a feminist perspective.

  12. Participatory Challenges in Urban-Environmental Planning: The Anthropological Contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Gravano

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay offers reflections on the anthropological contribution to institutional processes of “community participation” in urban-environmental planning in a metropolitan setting. The case presented is of a participation imposed by law, its difficulties and opportunities, from the different and asymmetrical rationalities in the game. Faced with a concrete demand from the State, we analyze methodological possibilities for adopting a process of effective transformation, through the facilitation of organizational culture issues.

  13. Toward a medical anthropology of sensations: definitions and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Devon E; Howes, David; Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2008-06-01

    In this article, we outline the importance of a medical anthropology of sensations for theories of psychopathology and psychological healing. We define what is meant by ;sensation' (differentiating monomodal and polymodal sensations) and describe some of the mechanisms that generate and amplify sensations. We propose the heuristic use of the concepts of sensation schemas, sensation interpretants, and sensation scripts. We argue against the naive assumption that sensation experience is the same across cultures. Finally, we consider how healing may occur through 'sensation semiosis.'

  14. Bronisław Malinowski: Deus ex machina of anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Borš

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this, popularizing, work is to look back and present fundamental, but also some lesser known, biographical information about the one of the most famous anthropologists, Bronisław Malinowski, and do so in the context of commemorating 130 years from his birth. Therefore, this work primarily traces his education, influences, research and educational activity. The essential contributions of Malinowski to anthropology, that is, his concept of functionalism and participant observation, are briefly presented as well.

  15. [Urban culture and mental health: an anthropological perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrès, Cédric

    2012-01-01

    This article is an anthropological reflection on the trans-cultural issues specific to large urban centers. The author questions how can a person develop and create an identity in this context. He then examines how proximity and isolation relative to urban settings contribute to the mental health of urban populations. Finally, he examines how characteristics of city life conditions assistance to people with mental disorders in urban settings.

  16. [The anatomists who started anthropology in Turkey and their contributions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluçam, E; Gökçe, N; Başağaoğlu, J

    2002-01-01

    The Turkish Institute of Antropology was estabilished in 1925 as a unit of the Medical School of Istanbul University (Darülfünun), named the Antropology Research Center (Antropoloji Tetkikat Merkezi). It was a part of the medical faculty until 1932. After the university reform it was connected to the School of Science and in late 1935 it was transfered to the School of Languages History and Geography (Dil Tarih Coğrafya Fakültesi) in Ankara. The center started to publish "The Journal of Turkish Anthropology" with Dr. Nuretttin Ali Berkols researches in 1925. It was published in two languages, Turkish and French. The faculty members of the institute, Dr. Mouchet, Dr. Süreyya Ali and Dr. Ismail Hakki formed the editorial board of the journal. We see that from the first issue of the journal in 1925 until the special issue prepared for the XVIII. Anthropology and Prehistorical Archealogy Congress in 1939, Dr. Nurettin Ali Berkol and Dr. Mouchet were members of the administrative committee of the journal. In this article; we studied the contributions of the anatomists to the development of anthropology in Turkey.

  17. Elliptical Fourier analysis: fundamentals, applications, and value for forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caple, Jodi; Byrd, John; Stephan, Carl N

    2017-02-17

    The numerical description of skeletal morphology enables forensic anthropologists to conduct objective, reproducible, and structured tests, with the added capability of verifying morphoscopic-based analyses. One technique that permits comprehensive quantification of outline shape is elliptical Fourier analysis. This curve fitting technique allows a form's outline to be approximated via the sum of multiple sine and cosine waves, permitting the profile perimeter of an object to be described in a dense (continuous) manner at a user-defined level of precision. A large amount of shape information (the entire perimeter) can thereby be collected in contrast to other methods relying on sparsely located landmarks where information falling in between the landmarks fails to be acquired. First published in 1982, elliptical Fourier analysis employment in forensic anthropology from 2000 onwards reflects a slow uptake despite large computing power that makes its calculations easy to conduct. Without hurdles arising from calculation speed or quantity, the slow uptake may partly reside with the underlying mathematics that on first glance is extensive and potentially intimidating. In this paper, we aim to bridge this gap by pictorially illustrating how elliptical Fourier harmonics work in a simple step-by-step visual fashion to facilitate universal understanding and as geared towards increased use in forensic anthropology. We additionally provide a short review of the method's utility for osteology, a summary of past uses in forensic anthropology, and software options for calculations that largely save the user the trouble of coding customized routines.

  18. [The dialogues between anthropology and health: contributions to public policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Esther Jean

    2014-04-01

    In order to examine the development of anthropological paradigms and their dialogue with medicine, I divide the discussion into two general, but non-exclusive, approaches: one that focuses on health and disease as social and cultural experience and construction, and another that examines health from an interactional and political perspective. For the first approach, I focus on North American and French theories that find resonance in the anthropological dialogue in Brazil. For the second political approach, the discussion originates in the dialogue among anthropologists in Latin America who have been developing models to contribute to an interdisciplinary approach necessary for health policies and intervention in health. The concepts of practices in self-care and intermedicality, among others, are explored due to their contribution in anthropology to public policies in health. These anthropologists have argued that health practices should be understood through the notions of autonomy, collectivity, agency and praxis, as opposed to the notions of the biomedical perspective characterized as being universalist, biological, individualist and a-historical.

  19. Modernizing Evolutionary Anthropology : Introduction to the Special Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattison, Siobhán M; Sear, Rebecca

    2016-12-01

    Evolutionary anthropology has traditionally focused on the study of small-scale, largely self-sufficient societies. The increasing rarity of these societies underscores the importance of such research yet also suggests the need to understand the processes by which such societies are being lost-what we call "modernization"-and the effects of these processes on human behavior and biology. In this article, we discuss recent efforts by evolutionary anthropologists to incorporate modernization into their research and the challenges and rewards that follow. Advantages include that these studies allow for explicit testing of hypotheses that explore how behavior and biology change in conjunction with changes in social, economic, and ecological factors. In addition, modernization often provides a source of "natural experiments" since it may proceed in a piecemeal fashion through a population. Challenges arise, however, in association with reduced variability in fitness proxies such as fertility, and with the increasing use of relatively novel methodologies in evolutionary anthropology, such as the analysis of secondary data. Confronting these challenges will require careful consideration but will lead to an improved understanding of humanity. We conclude that the study of modernization offers the prospect of developing a richer evolutionary anthropology, by encompassing ultimate and proximate explanations for behavior expressed across the full range of human societies.

  20. Applying anthropology in the development of former colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ribić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available From the sixth to the eight decade of the twentieth century, horizontally integrated and sector approach intermingled, and the renewed interest for the influence of development on the poor in the second half of the seventies, brought about the larger than ever engagement of anthropologists in developmental projects. In the twenties “sustainable” became the credo for development, and for anthropologists, cultural ecologists and human rights representatives, sustainability meant the capability of the people to preserve and maintained their mode of life. The usual stance is that developmental anthropology as a profession is constituted upon the general anthropology, and that one of its perspectives in relation to the development planning arises from the understanding of the process of birocratic decision making and the use of profound knowledge of cultures, institutions and historical trends in a particular country, as well as from the insights obtained from comparative studies of comparable institutions in other countries. The objective is to arrive to an unambiguous and anticipatory assessment of decisions-consequences relating to the distribution of resources, and the foremost trait of such perspective is the focus on, in a cultural pattern based, perceptions, goals, interests, strategies and organizations of the planned clients and members of other groups, including the elite and the administrators, whose cooperation is a precondition of change. On the other hand, anthropologists who reject such understandings of developmental anthropology, rebuff an occidental view of development as a historical necessity.

  1. An Anthropology of Learning in Epistemic Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    of analysis in cultural historical activity theory. However in relation to practice-based learning it is necessary further to explore how newcomers learn to perceive ‘epistemic objects’ in a complex process where learning concerns how material artefacts and meaning are connected in actual doing as well...... as learning what not to do. If ‘epistemic cultures’ in science create and warrant knowledge we may follow in closer detail how newcomers as physics students learn to create and warrant knowledge through everyday practices, which over time teach them new words and new meanings tied to words and bodily (re...

  2. Alien origins: xenophilia and the rise of medical anthropology in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geest, Sjaak

    2012-04-01

    The beginnings of medical anthropology in the Netherlands have a 'xenophile' character in two respects. First, those who started to call themselves medical anthropologists in the 1970s and 1980s were influenced and inspired not so much by anthropological colleagues, but by medical doctors working in tropical countries who had shown an interest in the role of culture during their medical work. Secondly, what was seen as medical anthropology in those early days almost always took place in 'foreign' countries and cultures. One can hardly overestimate the exoticist character of medical anthropology up to the 1980s. It was almost automatic for anthropologists to take an interest in medical issues occurring in another cultural setting, while overlooking the same issues at home. Medical anthropology 'at home' started only around 1990. At present, medical anthropology in the Netherlands is gradually overcoming its xenophile predilection.

  3. Contemporary Food Uses and Meanings from the Anthropology of Food in Latin-America and Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Julián López García; Lorenzo Mariano Juárez; F. Xavier Medina

    2017-01-01

    In this article we propose a review of the anthropology of food in Spain and Latin America from a recent historical perspective. The article analyzes the origin of the anthropology of food in Spain and in Latin America and the difficulties for the establishment of this specialty in the context of the sociocultural anthropology to the present day, and includes an overview of current and emerging subjects. The article is organized mainly around three axes that group the subjects and trends of p...

  4. The Inter-twining of Modern Performance Studies and Current Trends in Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin Carlson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the relation between Performance, Theatre and Anthropology. We present the origins of the relations between performance and anthropology, listing the main ideas from North-American and French pioneers. We compare the connections between artists and anthropologists like Richard Schechner and Victor Turner, Eugenio Barba and Kirsten Hastrup. Finally, we discuss the movements and the different apprehensions of performance and the productive way in which the relation between performance and anthropology has been built in recent years.

  5. Anthropology from a Kantian point of view: toward a cosmopolitan conception of human nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louden, Robert B

    2008-12-01

    Anthropology was a new field of study when Kant first began lecturing on it in 1772, and Kant himself was the first academic to teach regular courses in this area. As is well known, his own approach to anthropology is self-described as 'pragmatic', and Kant's pragmatic anthropology differs markedly from the anthropologies that other early contributors to the new discipline were advocating. In this essay I focus on a fundamental feature of Kant's anthropology that has been under-appreciated in previous discussions; namely, the particular conception of human nature that he believes anthropology, when pursued properly, leads to. I call this conception a cosmopolitan conception of human nature. In addition to establishing the central importance of this idea for Kant's project in anthropology, I also try in this essay to unravel some of its ambiguities and tensions as well as to highlight its underlying moral motives. The cosmopolitan conception of human nature that is central to Kant's anthropology is a further indication of the significance of his anthropology for ethics.

  6. Product Design and Enterprise Anthropology%产品设计与企业人类学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田广; 邵欢

    2014-01-01

    Product design is not only the concept and physical mechanical process in engineering sense, but also a culture process of innovation and creation in the anthropological sense.On the basis of effective combination of product design and enterprise anthropology, more complex relations between design and the essence of human through the design creativity and the appearance of market operation are supposed to be explored.Moreover, by means of observing the users'response, core values of their re-quirements and behavior habits are also to be obtained.In addition, it can help managers, marketing personnel and designers predict effectively before the market changes, and design products which can meet customers'diverse requirements.%产品设计不仅是工程学意义上概念和物化的机械过程,更是人类学意义上创造和创新的文化过程。产品设计与企业人类学的有效结合使其能透过设计创意与市场运作的表象,寻找出更丰富复杂的设计与人的本质的关系。通过观察用户反应,找出用户需求的核心价值和行为习惯,帮助管理者、市场营销人员和设计师在市场变化前进行有效预测,为企业设计出能够满足客户多元化需求的产品。

  7. Techno-Anthropological Sensibilities in Health Informatics: Opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    What kind of knowledges, skills and competences may be required by Techno-Anthropology engaging with health informatics? If we understand Techno-Anthropology to mean conducting anthropological analyses of the interwoven and mutually shaping relationship between organizing, technologies and actors in healthcare, such engagements and interventions can take many forms: Short-term consultancy work dedicated to achieving specific goals, long-term studies of broad changes in healthcare; management support within hospitals and public healthcare administration; or technology development with vendors of healthcare IT. The opportunities would seem to be manifold. Since the healthcare sector is a heterogeneous mix of interests, political agendas, professions et cetera, there is great merit in having people knowledgeable about this heterogeneity; able to facilitate meetings and processes between the various professions and organizations; and skilled in generating analyses and proposing new solutions. Also, people with insight into how action, technologies and organizing are interwoven and redistribute competences, responsibilities and risks are invaluable: Look at from afar, technologies seem to cause and determine social development, whereas detailed studies reveal that determinants and causes are both technical and social. The challenges include the one of making one's knowledge and skills legitimate and relevant to health informatics. Having a degree from arts or social sciences is not necessarily impressive for people with similar degrees in medicine, computer science, and business administration. Another challenge is to design an engagement with health informatics that will generate insights which often requires time, while also providing quick results for project sponsors or collaborators. The chapter points at three issues that seem to be central foundations for appropriate and quality-driven research and interventions of the 'quick and proper' kind: Modes of engagement

  8. The GenoChip: a new tool for genetic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhaik, Eran; Greenspan, Elliott; Staats, Sean; Krahn, Thomas; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Xue, Yali; Tofanelli, Sergio; Francalacci, Paolo; Cucca, Francesco; Pagani, Luca; Jin, Li; Li, Hui; Schurr, Theodore G; Greenspan, Bennett; Spencer Wells, R

    2013-01-01

    The Genographic Project is an international effort aimed at charting human migratory history. The project is nonprofit and nonmedical, and, through its Legacy Fund, supports locally led efforts to preserve indigenous and traditional cultures. Although the first phase of the project was focused on uniparentally inherited markers on the Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), the current phase focuses on markers from across the entire genome to obtain a more complete understanding of human genetic variation. Although many commercial arrays exist for genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping, they were designed for medical genetic studies and contain medically related markers that are inappropriate for global population genetic studies. GenoChip, the Genographic Project's new genotyping array, was designed to resolve these issues and enable higher resolution research into outstanding questions in genetic anthropology. The GenoChip includes ancestry informative markers obtained for over 450 human populations, an ancient human (Saqqaq), and two archaic hominins (Neanderthal and Denisovan) and was designed to identify all known Y-chromosome and mtDNA haplogroups. The chip was carefully vetted to avoid inclusion of medically relevant markers. To demonstrate its capabilities, we compared the FST distributions of GenoChip SNPs to those of two commercial arrays. Although all arrays yielded similarly shaped (inverse J) FST distributions, the GenoChip autosomal and X-chromosomal distributions had the highest mean FST, attesting to its ability to discern subpopulations. The chip performances are illustrated in a principal component analysis for 14 worldwide populations. In summary, the GenoChip is a dedicated genotyping platform for genetic anthropology. With an unprecedented number of approximately 12,000 Y-chromosomal and approximately 3,300 mtDNA SNPs and over 130,000 autosomal and X-chromosomal SNPs without any known health, medical, or phenotypic

  9. Hermeneutyczna antropologia Wilhelma Diltheya (Wilhelm Dilthey’s hermeneutical anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Przyłębski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the above text is presentation and a critical analysis of the vision of human being contained in Dilthey’s hermeneutical philosophy of life. It is well-known that Dilthey based his early epistemology of the humanities on so-called descriptive psychology that anticipated the phenomenology of Husserl. I try to show that this concept is explicitly connected with an anthropology that tries to dicover – on a basis of historical research of human culture – the universal categories describing the essence of human being as such.

  10. The anthropology of Carl Jung: Implications for pastoral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt-Meeks, S

    1983-09-01

    This article examines the basic tenets of Carl Jung's anthropology, including intrapsychic structure, relationships, society, and the process of individuation. It then turns to his ideas about God and religion. Jung builds his understanding of God from his work in psychology, and because of that method, there are several major problems with his theologizing. Nevertheless, his insights are extremely valuable to the field of pastoral care, and ministers would do very well to appreciate his contribution, though always with a critical eye to its limitation.

  11. Anthropology in the cognitive sciences: the value of diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Sara J

    2012-07-01

    Beller, Bender, and Medin (this issue) offer a provocative proposal outlining several reasons why anthropology and the rest of cognitive science might consider parting ways. Among those reasons, they suggest that separation might maintain the diversity needed to address larger problems facing humanity, and that the research strategies used across the disciplines are already so diverse as to be incommensurate. The present paper challenges the view that research strategies are incommensurate and offers a multimethod approach to cultural research that can help to establish common ground while maintaining diversity.

  12. The psychiatric cultural formulation: translating medical anthropology into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews proposed revisions to the DSM-IV Outline for Cultural Formulation for clinical practice. The author begins by exploring the theoretical development of and assumptions involved in the Cultural Formulation. A case presentation is then used to demonstrate shortcomings in the current implementation of the Cultural Formulation based on older definitions of culture. Finally, the author recommends practical questions based on the growing anthropological literature concerning the interpersonal elements of culture and the social course of illness. A simple clear format that clinically translates social science concepts has the potential to increase use of the Cultural Formulation by all psychiatrists, not just those specializing in cultural psychiatry.

  13. Pathogens gone wild? Medical anthropology and the "swine flu" pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Merrill

    2009-07-01

    Beginning in April 2009, global attention began focusing on the emergence in Mexico of a potentially highly lethal new influenza strain of porcine origin that has successfully jumped species barriers and is now being transmitted around the world. Reported on extensively by the mass media, commented on by public health and government officials across the globe, and focused on with nervous attention by the general public, the so-called swine flu pandemic raises important questions, addressed here, concerning the capacity of medical anthropology to respond usefully to such disease outbreaks and their health and social consequences.

  14. Islamic Pedagogy and Embodiment: An Anthropological Study of a British Madrasah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardaker, Glenn; Sabki, Aishah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This anthropological study of a higher education British Madrasah was undertaken to increase our awareness of the spectrum of sensory experiences that shape Islamic pedagogy. We started our anthropological study from an Islamic premise of the inseparable nature of knowledge and the sacred. Pedagogy is defined as not a matter of simple methods and…

  15. A Flexible Pre-Major Model for British Columbia Departments of Anthropology. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinbest, Jerry

    2007-01-01

    The Sociology/Anthropology Articulation Committee has engaged in a project resulting in tandem reports for each of the respective disciplines, which identify flexible pre-majors for both Sociology and Anthropology and summarize the specific types of courses that must be taken by students to allow them to transfer into third year of a major. A…

  16. 77 FR 32983 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology Museum at the University... Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California, Davis, has completed an inventory of human... itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Department of...

  17. 77 FR 32991 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology Museum at the University... Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California, Davis, has completed an inventory of human... itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Department of...

  18. Regulating Emotions and Aiming for a Ph.D.: Excerpts from "Anthropology Matters"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Ingie

    2012-01-01

    In this article I will present a range of experiences of graduate socialisation that have been discussed in past articles in the journal "Anthropology Matters". These are the experiences of social anthropology Ph.D. students in the United Kingdom. The overarching theme for the article is "regulating emotions", and the excerpts presented illustrate…

  19. Rethinking the Anthropology of Violence for the Twenty-First Century : From Practice to Mediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, A.C.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Technological developments in the security field are calling for a new anthropological approach to the study of violence. Th e anthropology of violence shifted during the late 1980s from an emphasis on the structural and symbolic dynamics of violence to a focus on historical and social practices. Th

  20. Deaf Epistemologies as a Critique and Alternative to the Practice of Science: An Anthropological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clerck, Goedele A. M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, and responding to the criticism of orientalism, anthropology has engaged in a self-critical practice, working toward a postcolonial perspective on science and an epistemological stance of partial and situated knowledge (Pinxten, 2006; Pinxten & Note, 2005). In deaf studies, anthropological and sociological studies employing…

  1. Reflections on John Monaghan's "Computer Algebra, Instrumentation, and the Anthropological Approach"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Glen

    2007-01-01

    Reactions to John Monaghan's "Computer Algebra, Instrumentation and the Anthropological Approach" focus on a variety of issues related to the ergonomic approach (instrumentation) and anthropological approach to mathematical activity and practice. These include uses of the term technique; several possibilities for integration of the two approaches;…

  2. A Non-oedipal Psychoanalysis? Clinical Anthropology of Hysteria in the works of Freud and Lacan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haute, P.I.M.M. van; Geyskens, T.A.L.

    2012-01-01

    The different psychopathologic syndromes show in an exaggerated and caricatural manner the basic structures of human existence. These structures not only characterize psychopathology, but they also determine the highest forms of culture. This is the credo of Freud's anthropology. This anthropology i

  3. Anthropology and International Business Research Methods in DBA Teaching: Frameworks for Cultural Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Alma

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for introducing anthropology into a doctoral-level international business research methods course. Describes three anthropological frameworks designed for the course: a cultural awareness model adapted from G. Morgan's (1980) idea of paradigmatic orthodoxy; key organizing principles; and a mapping model allowing researchers…

  4. Teaching Anthropology to Students and Teachers: Reaching a Wider Audience. Publication 82-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Patricia J., Ed.; Selig, Ruth O., Ed.

    These papers, presented at a 1980 American Anthropological Association seminar, address two topics: why the teaching of anthropology should be promoted, especially at the secondary level; and how anthropologists and educators might achieve this goal. Several of the papers have been substantially revised since the symposium. The papers are…

  5. Knowledge Transmission and Professional Community in Higher Education: An Anthropological View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Offers an anthropological perspective by examining the role of knowledge transmission in the maintenance and transformation of professional communities in higher education, exploring the use of the ritual process at academic meetings (such as those of the American Anthropological Association). Emphasizing successful conference rituals, the article…

  6. Neoliberal Individualism in Dutch Universities: Teaching and Learning Anthropology in an Insecure Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Ellen; Grassiani, Erella; Kirk, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on our own experiences and that of several of our colleagues teaching social and cultural anthropology in different Dutch institutions for higher learning. We focus in particular on teaching and learning in two small liberal arts and science (LAS) colleges, where anthropology makes up part of the social science curriculum…

  7. 75 FR 41883 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University Pullman, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University... and control of the Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA. The human remains... in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Museum of...

  8. 76 FR 28072 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in... Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA. The human remains were removed from St. Mary Parish (formerly... assessment of the human remains was made by University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and...

  9. Cultural Models of Domestic Violence: Perspectives of Social Work and Anthropology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cyleste C.; Dressler, William W.

    2008-01-01

    This study employed a unique theoretical approach and a series of participant-based ethnographic interviewing techniques that are traditionally used in cognitive anthropology to examine and compare social work and anthropology students' cultural models of the causes of domestic violence. The study findings indicate that although social work…

  10. 76 FR 43714 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology... Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Oregon State University Department of...

  11. Material Culture and Anthropology-An Interview with Anthropologist Michael Rowlands of the University College London

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAEL Rowlands; BIAN Simei; ZHAO Xiuyun

    2014-01-01

    Prof.Michael Rowlands discusses how to use material culture to explore the for-mation and use of objects , the history of objects , and the relationship between objects and histo-ry .He uses examples drawn from his academic background , and his fieldwork done in Africa and China .He further gives an in-depth discussion on the relationship between material culture and anthropology as well as archaeology and anthropology .He proposes specific views on how to de-velop historical anthropology by using material culture , and the combination of archaeology with anthropology .He states that in the future , the focus of anthropology will shift or move away from America and Europe to the rest of the world , and that it is possible that the current understand-ing of anthropology that comes from European and American Anthropology will no longer be ac-cepted as being the truth .Therefore, finding new ways of thinking is necessary for the future de-velopment of anthropology .

  12. 76 FR 56468 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico has completed an inventory of human remains, in... itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of...

  13. To Mould or to Bring Out? Human Nature, Anthropology and Educational Utopianism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastephanou, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    Against narrow understandings of educational research, this article defends the relevance of philosophical anthropology to ethico-political education and contests its lack of space in the philosophy of education. My approximation of this topic begins with comments on philosophical anthropology; proceeds with examples from the history of…

  14. Regulating Emotions and Aiming for a Ph.D.: Excerpts from "Anthropology Matters"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Ingie

    2012-01-01

    In this article I will present a range of experiences of graduate socialisation that have been discussed in past articles in the journal "Anthropology Matters". These are the experiences of social anthropology Ph.D. students in the United Kingdom. The overarching theme for the article is "regulating emotions", and the excerpts…

  15. 76 FR 43716 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology... Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... affiliated with the human remains may contact ] the Oregon State University Department of...

  16. 75 FR 52364 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology and Ethnic Studies, University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... Completion: Department of Anthropology and Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV... of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV. The human remains... in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of...

  17. 76 FR 28068 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of... intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Museum of Anthropology, University of... affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Carla Sinopoli, Museum of...

  18. 77 FR 23507 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Anthropology... appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human...

  19. Strange, incredible and impossible things: the early anthropology of Reginald Scot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Roland

    2009-06-01

    Reginald Scot has been acclaimed as an early rationalist for his critical consideration of witchcraft in 1584. At the same time, the Discoverie of Witchcraft appears organized much as later classic anthropological monographs. This article considers whether his methods and writing might indeed correspond to what we recognise as the procedures of medical or psychiatric anthropology.

  20. Alien origins: xenophilia and the rise of medical anthropology in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van der Geest

    2012-01-01

    The beginnings of medical anthropology in the Netherlands have a ‘xenophile’ character in two respects. First, those who started to call themselves medical anthropologists in the 1970s and 1980s were influenced and inspired not so much by anthropological colleagues, but by medical doctors working in

  1. Cross-Cultural Literacy: An Anthropological Approach to Dealing with Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvizu, Steven F.; Saravia-Shore, Marietta

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the limitations of Hirsch's concept of cultural literacy and suggests that the anthropological concept of cross-cultural literacy is more appropriate. Reviews (1) the resolutions of the Council on Anthropology and Education that are concerned with cultural diversity; and (2) the controversies surrounding bilingual education. (EVL)

  2. The significance of Calvin' s anthropology for preaching on ethical themes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O.K. Lategan

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author highlights Calvin's anthropology. A main feature of this anthropology is his dualistic view on man. Calvin was very much influenced by the ancient Greek philosophy, which argued that man had two parts: a superior soul and an inferior body. The author argues that this perception is at odds with a Biblical image of man. According to the Bible no part of man is inferior or superior to any other part of his personhood. The article indicates that a Biblical perspective on anthropology will draw different conclusions in ethics compared to a dualistic perception of the nature of man. A correct appreciation of the anthropology of man is therefore needed to guide decisions in ethics, where the focus is constantly anthropological.

  3. [Interfaces between anthropology and the disciplines of the health area: a search for new conceptual approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaut, Claude

    2006-06-01

    In studying how societies consider and deal with the human body both as a symbolic as well as a biological entity, anthropology situates itself at the nexus of two axes. These occupy a central epistemological space in the discipline and consist of: the analysis of social facts, ranging from their manifestations in the lives of individuals, to those manifested in the collective life of groups; and the observation of reality, ranging from its material to its immaterial or ideal aspects. This singular position enriches the anthropology of health and opens up theoretical and methodological perspectives that go beyond those of medical anthropology and the anthropology of illness in their restricted focus upon the social parameters of biological disorders, the causes of suffering, and misfortune. This paper attempts to reflect upon examples which encompass the above two axes showing how the anthropology of health can improve our understanding.

  4. 77 FR 19697 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology...: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined... Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a...

  5. 77 FR 46114 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ...-1100-665] Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of... Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico, has determined... Anthropology at the address below by September 4, 2012. ADDRESSES: David Phillips, Curator of...

  6. 76 FR 44947 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology... with the sacred objects may contact the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology....

  7. 76 FR 28066 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, that meets the... Humboldt County, CA. The belt was donated to the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the...

  8. 76 FR 54485 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the... Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley, has completed an... Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. Repatriation of...

  9. 76 FR 14045 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington.... 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Museum of Anthropology at... given to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University for intended repatriation by...

  10. 78 FR 45963 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology...: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native... the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control...

  11. 76 FR 28066 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington.... 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Museum of Anthropology at... glass beads was given to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University on an unknown...

  12. Theoretical orientation and validity of observation in sociology and anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ilić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses closely related issues of the theoretical orientation and the validity of the application of the method of observation in sociology and anthropology. It was preceded by a text which discussed issues of meeting the principles of objectivity, systematicity and reliability when using observation as a research method. General problem of the relationship between theory and research in the application of observation will be analyzed in the subsequent article. Introductory section shows the general framework of a hypothetical - deductive conception of science and the role of the method of observation in this context. The next section of the article analyzes the effort of finding denying cases and discusses the limits of the method of analytical induction. This section deals with the influence of data analysis in qualitative form obtained by (usually participatory observation and constructing explanations on the validity of the observation. The next section of the article shows the possibility of increasing the validity of the observation by including other sources and methods of data collection. The final section shows the impact of over-emphasizing the epistemological difference between qualitative and quantitative orientation in sociology and anthropology on the possibility of increasing the validity of the observation as a research method.

  13. Biomedical psychiatry and its concealed metaphors: an anthropological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hernáez, Angel

    2013-09-01

    The idea that power relations structure social life is self-evident to most anthropologists. Western medical knowledge or biomedicine, and by extension science or scientific knowledge, however, has until relatively recently been exempt from anthropological scrutiny in political terms. An understanding of biomedicine as a system of knowledge that is not a copy of facts but a representation of them has entailed a break with the traditional separation of folk knowledge and scientific knowledge in anthropology, making it possible to include biomedicine in the repertoire of ethnographic objects. The peculiarity of biomedicine as a cultural system, seen from this perspective, lies in a paradox: its self-characterization as a set of non-ideological discourses and practices is a representation that conceals its ideological and power-saturated nature. Through an analysis of DSM-IV-TR, this article explores some of the representational strategies through which this concealment takes place in biomedical psychiatry: the asocial and universal character of mental illness categories; the neutrality of clinical practice; and the non-moral nature of clinical criteria and judgment. These are concealed metaphors in the true sense, for not only do they speak of something without naming it but they also deny their own existence as metaphors.

  14. Techno-Anthropological Ethics and Health Information Systems Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Børsen, Tom; Danborg, Pia Brandt

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important Techno-Anthropological intellectual virtues is the ability to make contextualized ethical judgments of new and emerging technologies. This Techno-Anthropological core competence is especially relevant in Health Information Systems Technologies, which is a field characterized by inherent ethical dilemmas such as the pros and cons of regulation of research databases with sensitive information, or storing and application of tissue and blood samples. In this paper we present a method to make 'proper and quick' ethical estimates in Health Information. The method guides its user to make ethical judgments by splitting the judgment process into four steps: (1) Identification of intended beneficial consequences, potential misuse, unintended side effects and long-term consequences for culture and society. (2) Linkage of intended consequences, misuse, side effects and cultural implications to appropriate ethical values. (3) Identification of ethical dilemmas related to a specific use of the Health Information Systems Technology under assessment. (4) Formulation of appropriate technological and institution design criteria that can transcend the identified ethical dilemmas. The methodology will be applied to a the discussions at a hearing on ethical challenges accompanying research involving health data organized by the Danish Council of Ethics and the case of risk reducing breast cancer surgery based on diagnosed genetic predisposition to breast cancer.

  15. Culturing the adolescent brain: what can neuroscience learn from anthropology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Suparna

    2010-06-01

    Cultural neuroscience is set to flourish in the next few years. As the field develops, it is necessary to reflect on what is meant by 'culture' and how this can be translated for the laboratory context. This article uses the example of the adolescent brain to discuss three aspects of culture that may help us to shape and reframe questions, interpretations and applications in cultural neuroscience: cultural contingencies of categories, cultural differences in experience and cultural context of neuroscience research. The last few years have seen a sudden increase in the study of adolescence as a period of both structural and functional plasticity, with new brain-based explanations of teenage behaviour being taken up in education, policy and medicine. However, the concept of adolescence, as an object of behavioural science, took shape relatively recently, not much more than a hundred years ago and was shaped by a number of cultural and historical factors. Moreover, research in anthropology and cross-cultural psychology has shown that the experience of adolescence, as a period of the lifespan, is variable and contingent upon culture. The emerging field of cultural neuroscience has begun to tackle the question of cultural differences in social cognitive processing in adults. In this article, I explore what a cultural neuroscience can mean in the case of adolescence. I consider how to integrate perspectives from social neuroscience and anthropology to conceptualize, and to empirically study, adolescence as a culturally variable phenomenon, which, itself, has been culturally constructed.

  16. Anthropology and Epidemiology: learning epistemological lessons through a collaborative venture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhague, Dominique Pareja; Gonçalves, Helen; Victora, Cesar Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration between anthropology and epidemiology has a long and tumultuous history. Based on empirical examples, this paper describes a number of epistemological lessons we have learned through our experience of cross disciplinary collaboration. Although critical of both mainstream epidemiology and medical anthropology, our analysis focuses on the implications of addressing each discipline's main epistemological differences, while addressing the goal of adopting a broader social approach to health improvement. We believe it is important to push the boundaries of research collaborations from the more standard forms of "multidisciplinarity," to the adoption of theoretically imbued "interdisciplinarity." The more we challenge epistemological limitations and modify ways of knowing, the more we will be able to provide in-depth explanations for the emergence of disease-patterns and thus, to problem-solve. In our experience, both institutional support and the adoption of a relativistic attitude are necessary conditions for sustained theoretical interdisciplinarity. Until researchers acknowledge that methodology is merely a human-designed tool to interpret reality, unnecessary methodological hyper-specialization will continue to alienate one field of knowledge from the other.

  17. L’histoire du malade. Croisement de deux anthropologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Labey

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available L’histoire des malades peut intégrer l’anthropologie de deux manières. Tout d’abord, elle peut utiliser l’anthropologie comme source de méthode et de questionnement. En écrivant une histoire de l’homme malade, l’historien se doit de saisir une situation corporelle individuelle et ses conséquences sociales dans un quotidien. Il interroge donc une société sur son rapport au corps, lorsqu’il est atteint par le mal, et sur son rapport à la norme, lorsqu’on s’en écarte. Ensuite, l’histoire des malades peut porter sur l’anthropologie comme discours, produit dans une période donnée. L’anthropologie est dès lors abordée en tant qu’objet de recherche. En croisant pratique et discours, il est possible de saisir les conséquences individuelles de l’évènement maladie. Pour le Moyen Age central, enjeux spirituels et enjeux institutionnels peuvent s’éclairer, grâce à cette double utilisation de l’anthropologie.The history of those who suffer from illness may integrate anthropology in two ways. First, anthropology can be used as method and a mode of questioning. In writing history of the sick, the historian must grasp a particular physiological situation and its social consequences in everyday life. He must question a society about its relationship with the body when it is affected by illness, and about what happens when an individual departs from the norm of health. Second, a history of the sick can use anthropology as a discourse, the product of a given period. In this case, anthropology is used as a subject of research. Combining practice and discourse, it is possible to apprehend individual consequences of an illness-event. This dual use of anthropology may clarify the spiritual and institutional consequences of illness in the central Middle Ages.La storia dei malati può integrare l’antropologia in due modi. In primo luogo, può utilizzare l’antropologia come fonte di metodi e di interrogativi

  18. Thinking the World, Practicing the Social Environment: Ethnographies and Reflections from an Anthropology of Territorialities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nates Cruz, Beatriz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article will anthropologically present and analyze the configurations and the forms taken by the definition and location of the world and the social environment as philosophical postulates, and as physical and geographical objectivations among different cultures: the natives and Yanaconas of the Colombian Massif, the “paisas” of the Central Colombian Andes, and the southern France and northern Spain inhabitants in their relationship with immigrants of northern Europe. Even though there is a cultural, physical and social distance, the contents will frequently have relational postures.

    Este artículo mostrará y analizará desde una visión antropológica la configuración y las formas que toman la definición y ubicación del mundo y el entorno, tanto como posturas filosóficas, que como objetivaciones físicas y geográficas entre culturas diferentes: los indígenas y yanaconas del Macizo Colombiano, los llamados “paisas” de los Andes centrales de Colombia y los habitantes del sur de Francia y norte de España en su relación con los inmigrantes del norte de Europa. Aunque haya distancia cultural, física y social, los contenidos tendrán a menudo posturas relacionales.

  19. Antropologías disidentes Antropologias dissidentes Dissdent Anthropologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Restrepo

    2012-07-01

    artigo examinam-se alguns dos autores que têm abordado essa problemática, para evidenciar como as elaborações conceituais no âmbito das antropologias do mundo inscrevem-se nesse legado. Além disso, expõem-se também algumas das elaborações conceituais das antropologias do mundo como, por exemplo, as antropologias subalternizadas. Por fim, estimulados por questões surgidas a partir da teoria queer, sugere-se o conceito de antropologias dissidentes como um complemento e aprofundamento destes tipos de abordagens.Over ten years ago, anthropologists from different countries started to dialogue about what we called world anthropologies. We were drawn by a shared dissatisfaction regarding certain disciplinary practices that invisibilize multiple traditions, authors and ways of practicing anthropology. In order to shed light on this asymmetrical situation, we engaged in inspiring readings of many colleagues that had written about this and, based on their contributions, we suggested a series of concepts and advanced some research in the interest of better understanding the characteristics and effects of these power relations in and among different anthropologies. Some of the authors that have addressed this subject are examined in this article, aiming to show how conceptualization in the framework of world anthropologies is inscribed in this legacy. Moreover, certain conceptual developments of world anthropologies will be exposed, such as that of subalternized anthropologies. Lastly, stimulated by approaches of queertheory, the concept of dissident anthropologies is suggested as a supplement and strengthening of this type of analysis.

  20. Bio-Anthropological Studies on Human Skeletons from the 6th Century Tomb of Ancient Silla Kingdom in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Joon; Woo, Eun Jin; Oh, Chang Seok; Yoo, Jeong A.; Kim, Yi-Suk; Hong, Jong Ha; Yoon, A. Young; Wilkinson, Caroline M.; Ju, Jin Og; Choi, Soon Jo; Lee, Soong Doek; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In November and December 2013, unidentified human skeletal remains buried in a mokgwakmyo (a traditional wooden coffin) were unearthed while conducting an archaeological investigation near Gyeongju, which was the capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE– 660 CE) of ancient Korea. The human skeletal remains were preserved in relatively intact condition. In an attempt to obtain biological information on the skeleton, physical anthropological, mitochondrial DNA, stable isotope and craniofacial analyses were carried out. The results indicated that the individual was a female from the Silla period, of 155 ± 5 cm height, who died in her late thirties. The maternal lineage belonged to the haplogroup F1b1a, typical for East Asia, and the diet had been more C3- (wheat, rice and potatoes) than C4-based (maize, millet and other tropical grains). Finally, the face of the individual was reconstructed utilizing the skull (restored from osseous fragments) and three-dimensional computerized modeling system. This study, applying multi-dimensional approaches within an overall bio-anthropological analysis, was the first attempt to collect holistic biological information on human skeletal remains dating to the Silla Kingdom period of ancient Korea. PMID:27249220

  1. The Intradisciplinary Affinities of Postmodern Anthropology Part I. The Consequences of Merging Ethics, Politics and Methodology in 1960s Critical Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers an alternative interpretation of the genesis of the literary turn in anthropology, as an "interim solution" in the context of the ideological incorrectness of radical anti-colonial theories in a liberal democracy. Critical anthropology in the 1960s and 1970s drew considerable inspiration from reformational currents in neo-Marxist sociology and social philosophy, arousing ideological opposition among the numerous participants of methodological debates. This opposition would prove crucial for their subsequent modest development. This activistic ideological ballast actually slowed down the development of potent externalist analyses of the social determination of anthropology and academe in general, leaving room for studies of ethnographic writing. Anticipating, in terms of themes and trends, "nonmethodological" solutions to methodological problems, it had a direct effect on the substitution of poetics and contextual reflection for methodological regulation. Thus, paradoxically, extremely externalistically oriented analyses, which attempted to merge ethical, political and methodological debates, reduced the methodological focus of the disciplinary community from issues of research objectivity and the reliability of ethnographic records to issues concerning style and the writing of anthropology. In this context, debates on relativism, realism, representation, authority and reflexivity, typical of 1980s postmodern anthropology, have become a socially acceptable alternative to the critical and neo-Marxist anthropology of Afro-Americans, feminists or of the otherwise oppressed/studied when they in turn become nativistic anthropologists. The "literary turn" in postmodern anthropology is generally interpreted as an externalist critique of traditional ethnographic realism, offering an ethical and political interpretation of reflexivity as per se more correct than traditional positivist ethnography.

  2. 兴起中的技术人类学%The Rising of Technological Anthropology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王皓

    2015-01-01

    技术人类学可分为微观和宏观两种,微观技术人类学以物质文化研究为基础,宏观技术人类学则关注技术与社会的交互作用。技术人类学兴起的标志是莱蒙里尔和普法芬伯格对这两种理解进行总结,提出以社会技术系统为核心的技术人类学。传统人类学危机、科学与技术的区别、技术哲学经验转向和技术人类学的参与者视角是技术人类学得以兴起的四大原因。当前的技术人类学研究存在着学科建制不健全、研究范式不完善和个案研究不足三大问题。%Technological anthropology can be divided into microscopic anthropology and macroscopic anthropology.The former takes the studies of material culture as its basis while the latter is concerned with the interaction between technology and society.The rising sign of technological anthropology is that Pierre Lemonnier and Bryan Pfaffenberger summarized the two types of understanding,and put forward a new anthropology of technology by taking the social technology system as its core. The rising of technological anthropology can be attributed to the four factors—crises of traditional anthropology, differences between science and technology, empirical turning of technological philosophy, and participants’ perspectives of technological anthropology. As to the current research of technological anthropology,such problems do exist as incomplete discipline system,imperfect research paradigm and inadequate case studies.

  3. Between art of movement and science of body: Short history of anthropology of dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njaradi Dunja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper charts the development of dance anthropology from the beginner’s fascination with body techniques through the first scientific explanations of dance. The paper highlights the fact that the development of this branch of anthropology has been burdened with epistemological uncertainties and dilemmas. Hence, we could hardly talk about a consistent sub-discipline when looking at the approaches to dance in anthropology, but we always talk about mushrooming and interconnected traditions. Finaly, the paper will introduce two current and conflicting approaches to dance, textual and kinaesthetic, which open up old questions and dilemmas but which offer fresh perspectives as well.

  4. Visual anthropology as a discipline of words. On the importance of the verbal in visual archives

    OpenAIRE

    Thurnherr, Christof

    2012-01-01

    Paul Hockings’ Principles of Visual Anthropology opened with Margaret Mead’s article ‘Visual Anthropology in a Discipline of Words’. In her prefatory lines Mead lamented that too many research projects “insist on continuing the hopelessly inadequate note-taking of an earlier age.” Today, some forty years after the first publication of Mead’s text, the opposition of the verbal and the visual still seems to loom over the full acceptance of the visual in cultural anthropology.

  5. Anthropology, social change and the reconstruction of South African society1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Jansen van Rensburg

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article it is argued that, since the abuse of anthropology in the colonial and apartheid eras, the responsive relationship between anthropology and society has been re-emphasised. In the reconstruction of South African society, therefore, anthropologists will not be allowed the luxury of evading their social responsibility. In their re-invention of anthropology as a humane science, and the reiteration of their commitment to accountability and relevance, these scientists ought to build their discipline upon the investigation of the major consequences of differential power and inequality. This could be helpful in creating new forms of co-existence in South Africa

  6. An anthropology of learning on nested frictions in cultural ecologies

    CERN Document Server

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    This book has one explicit purpose: to present a new theory of cultural learning in organisations which combines practice-based learning with cultural models - a cognitive anthropological schema theory of taken-for-granted connections - tied to the everyday meaningful use of artefacts. The understanding of culture as emerging in a process of learning open up for new understandings, which is useful for researchers, practitioners and students interested in dynamic studies of culture and cultural studies of organisations. The new approach goes beyond culture as a static, essentialist entity and open for our possibility to learn in organisations across national cultures, across ethnicity and across the apparently insurmountable local educational differences which makes it difficult for people to communicate working together in an increasingly globalized world. The empirical examples are mainly drawn from organisations of education and science which are melting-pots of cultural encounters.

  7. An Anthropology of Luminosity: The Agency of Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the relationship between light, material culture and social experiences. It argues that understanding light as a powerful social agent, in its relationship with people, things, colours, shininess and places, may facilitate an appreciation of the active social role...... of luminosity in the practice of day-to-day activities. The article surveys an array of past conceptions of light within philosophy, natural science and more recent approaches to light in the fields of anthropology and material culture studies. A number of implications are discussed, and by way of three case...... studies it is argued that light may be used as a tool for exercising social intimacy and inclusion, of shaping moral spaces and hospitality, and orchestrating movement, while working as a metaphor as well as a material agent in these social negotiations. The social comprehension of light is a means...

  8. Dental anthropology of a Brazilian sample: Frequency of nonmetric traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco, Rachel Lima Ribeiro; Lima, Laíse Nascimento Correia; Delwing, Fábio; Francesquini, Luiz; Daruge, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Dental elements are valuable tools in a study of ancient populations and species, and key-features for human identification; among the dental anthropology field, nonmetric traits, standardized by ASUDAS, are closely related to ancestry. This study aimed to analyze the frequency of six nonmetric traits in a sample from Southeast Brazil, composed by 130 dental casts from individuals aged between 18 and 30, without foreign parents or grandparents. A single examiner observed the presence or absence of shoveling, Carabelli's cusp, fifth cusp, 3-cusped UM2, sixth cusp, and 4-cusped LM2. The frequencies obtained were different from the ones shown by other researches to Amerindian and South American samples, and related to European and sub-Saharan frequencies, showing the influence of this groups in the current Brazilian population. Sexual dimorphism was found in the frequencies of Carabelli's cusp, 3-cusped UM2, and sixth cusp.

  9. The search for oneself: Introductory notes on ethics and anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. (Kobus Labuschagne

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Human beings make choices, and get caught up by their choices. One cannot escape the choices one has made. Your choices draw the picture of who you really are. Sometimes you are haunted by the dire consequences of the choices you have made. Where does the necessity of taking responsibility for yourself, and the choices you have made, take you? Ethics and moral conduct make sense only in conjunction with the moral agent – humankind. This article is an introductory reflection on ethics and anthropology. The argument develops mainly from the view of a human being as a relational being. People are inescapably relational beings – always being in relation with other human beings, and never able to sever the lifesaving ties to God as the human being’s Maker. Human beings become themselves in relation to other human beings, and ultimately in relation to the One Other, God their Creator and Re-creator.

  10. Career development: domestic display as imperial, anthropological, and social trophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintle, Claire

    2008-01-01

    Analyzing the dynamics of collection and display in the colonial context, this essay considers the South Asian artifacts collected by Sir Richard Carnac Temple, Chief Commissioner of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands from 1894-1904. Temple exhibited the teak carvings, body adornments, and hunting tools that he amassed throughout his career in his home, The Nash, which became the foundation of his public persona as a triumphant colonial chief, a "shining light" in the emerging discipline of anthropology, and a wealthy, upper-class lord of the manor. The politics of consumption, decoration, and self-creation converge in The Nash, offering a glimpse into how material objects removed from India during the late nineteenth century were consumed in Britain and how domestic display contributed to the formation of British identity.

  11. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF FLUIDO-COAGULANT BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Tase

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood fluidity is controlled by complex physiological systems. Normally, the fine balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis prevents both bleeding and thrombosis. The accelerated urbanization we are living last decades modifies the basic environment, confining the human being to biochemical and metabolic remodeling. The alteration of this balance in favour of coagulation leads to thrombosis, the major challenge of the 21st century medicine. There are interesting changes not only in human’s anthropological evolution, but also from birth to death. The HORUS study performed by american and egyptian researchers investigated the prevalence of atherosclerosis in antique and modern Egyptians. Despite the belief that atherosclerosis is a modern disease, it seems to be evidences of atherosclerosis in Egyptian mummies. Despite multiple differences, between 30 and 60 years, the prevalence of atherosclerosis was quite similar in antique and modern Egyptians, respectively.

  12. Welcome home, Descartes! rethinking the anthropology of the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecks, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    For many scholars, the Cartesian mind/body split is one of the fundamental mistakes of the Western scientific tradition. Anthropologists who study notions of the body in cultures around the world regularly take Descartes as their point of departure. Many also suggest that breaking free from Descartes is politically liberating: if the mindful body could be rediscovered, society could move away from its materialist, positivist, and commodity-fetishizing ways. Beyond the Body Proper is anthropology's best and most comprehensive anti-Cartesian manifesto to date. This volume brings together some of the finest studies on the cultural and historical diversity of bodies and minds. Yet anthropologists' blanket rejection of the mind/body dualism seems politically self-defeating. If anthropologists want to criticize racism, gender hierarchies, or discrimination against disabled people, they need to believe that the mind is independent from the body. In other words, they need to uphold the Cartesian split.

  13. Cultural anthropology approach to psychopathology of Muslim murderer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, T; Satoh, S; Morita, N; Konishi, T; Nakamura, T; Tanaka, H; Oda, S

    1994-03-01

    We report a case involving a 31-year-old Islamic male who murdered his associate under particular circumstances. We took the opportunity to test psychiatrically this man who has been diagnosed in his mother country as a schizophrenic. He came to Japan and was working as a laborer. He is an earnest practicing Muslim. We took an interest in this case because of his bizarre behavior previous to the actual crime. We are interested in the actual method of the murder in relation to Mr. A's cultural and religious background. We demonstrated the significance of the religious cultural knowledge relative to the indigenous ritual for expelling satan and the Islamic pilgrimage to Mekka (Hajj). We conclude that a cultural anthropological and religious viewpoint is necessary in objectively understanding the sources of suffering in patients with mental illness who are from foreign countries.

  14. Cultural psychology as a bridge between anthropology and cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryberg, Stephanie A

    2012-07-01

    The theory and methods of cultural psychology begin with the assumption that psychological processes are socioculturally and historically grounded. As such, they offer a new approach for understanding the diversity of human functioning because they (a) question the presumed neutrality of the majority group perspective; (b) take the target's point-of-view (i.e., what it means to be a person in a particular context); (c) assume that there is more than one viable way of being a competent or effective person; and (d) provide a road map for understanding and reducing social inequities. As illustrated in this essay, a cultural psychological approach provides a bridge between anthropology and the cognitive sciences, and in so doing it offers an alternative set of explanations and interventions for group differences.

  15. [Anthropology of medical research in developing countries: a Senegalese experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouvrier, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Medical research is an essential tool of biomedicine that raises many social and ethical questions especially in resource-poor countries where the number of clinical trials has increased significantly over the past two decades. This article presents the way anthropology of medical research critically examines medical research in non-western countries without questioning its strategic importance for advances in scientific knowledge and in public health improvement. This article draws on observations conducted in Senegal in 2007 during a vaccine trial against meningitis and discusses, more broadly, medical research in non western-countries related to: the presence and management of medical research sites, the impact of medical research benefits on its representations and the questions raised by blood-stealing rumours regarding medical research practice itself.

  16. Medical Anthropology in Africa: The Trouble with a Single Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhwanazi, Nolwazi

    2016-01-01

    In the growing number of publications in medical anthropology about sub-Saharan Africa, there is a tendency to tell a single story of medicine, health, and health-seeking behavior. The heavy reliance on telling this singular story means that there is very little exposure to other stories. In this article, I draw on five books published in the past five years to illustrate the various components that make up this dominant narrative. I then provide examples of two accounts about medicine, health, and health-seeking behavior in Africa that deviate from this dominant narrative, in order to show the themes that alternative accounts have foregrounded. Ultimately, I make a plea to medical anthropologists to be mindful of the existence of this singular story and to resist the tendency to use its components as scaffolding in their accounts of medicine, health, and health-seeking behavior in Africa.

  17. Three steps to a historical anthropology of actually existing neoliberalism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Wacquant

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The anthropology of neoliberalism has become polarised betweena hegemonic economic model anchored by variants of market rule and an insurgentapproach fuelled by derivations of the Foucaultian notion of governmentality. Bothconceptions obscure what is ‘neo’ about neoliberalism: the reengineering and redeploymentof the state as the core agency that sets the rules and fabricates the subjectivities,social relations and collective representations suited to realising markets.Drawing on two decades of field-based inquiries into the structure, experience andpolitical treatment of urban marginality in advanced society, I propose a via mediabetween these two approaches that construes neoliberalism as an articulation ofstate, market and citizenship that harnesses the first to impose the stamp of thesecond onto the third. Bourdieu’s concept of bureaucratic field offers a powerfultool for dissecting the revamping of the state as stratification and classificationmachine driving the neoliberal revolution from above and serves to put forth threetheses: (1 neoliberalism is not an economic regime but a political project of state--crafting that puts disciplinary ‘workfare’, neutralising ‘prisonfare’ and the trope of individual responsibility at the service of commodification; (2 neoliberalism entails a rightward tilting of the space of bureaucratic agencies that define and distribute public goods and spawns a Centaur-state that practises liberalism at the top of the class structure and punitive paternalism at the bottom; (3 the growth and glorificationof the penal wing of the state is an integral component of the neoliberal Leviathan, such that the police, courts and prison need to be brought into the political anthropology of neoliberal rule.

  18. Anthropology and/as an applied ethics:Theory and methods "hidden" in the Code of Ethics of the American Anthropology Association

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    Miloš Milenković

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the forthcoming reactivation of the Serbian Ethnology and Anthropology Association and the normalization of the work of professional associa- tions, as well as their occasional adoption of their ethical codes in Serbia, we are analyzing the Code of ethics of the wolrd’sargest professional anthropological associ- ation – that of American Anthropological Association (AAA. Starting from the as- sumption that ethic codes are not "pure" moral algorithms of what is desirable/correct, but that they are laden by "hidden" theoretical and methodological assumptions, whether by their direct authors, or on the level of the tacit disciplinary knowledge, we are examining what can Serbian ethnological/anthropological community learn out of the genesis, structure, function and critique directed at AAA Code of Ethics. We are also considering the thesis that such codes could be approached as legitimizing narra- tive practices, not unlike those of magic, through which the discipline is attempting to transform itself from the status of fluid and generally socially unrecognized (and even obscure occupation into a generally recognized, formally licensed and respecta- ble profession. We suggest for anthropology in Serbia to construct its professional sta- tus by forming an alliance with applied ethics offering the services of customization of ethic codes to other professions, through cultural analysis of moral decision-ma- king, instead of legitimizing itself by a contradictory code of ethics, burdened with hollow magic principles and theoretical and methodological issues.

  19. Reanalysis of Korean War Anthropological Records to Support the Resolution of Cold Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emily K

    2017-01-20

    Re-investigation of previously unidentified remains from the Korean War has yielded 55 new identifications, each with corresponding records of prior anthropological analyses. This study compares biological assessments for age at death, stature, and ancestry across (i) anthropological analyses from the 1950s, (ii) recent anthropological analyses of those same sets of remains, and (iii) the reported antemortem biological information for the identified individual. A comparison of long bone measurements from both the 1950s and during reanalysis is also presented. These comparisons demonstrate commonalities and continuing patterns of errors that are useful in refining both research on Korean War cold case records and forensic anthropological analyses performed using methods developed from the 1950s identifications.

  20. On Not Liking What One Sees: Anthropology and the Visual Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Nick

    1986-01-01

    Maintains that an anthropological perspective offers exciting possibilities for developing intercultural understanding in the visual arts. Examines the problems encountered when applying this perspective to the visual art of radically different cultures. (JDH)

  1. Toward Common Ground: The Uses of Educational Anthropology in Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerath, Peter; Mattheis, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews advances of interest to multicultural educators and researchers in the complementary disciplines of multicultural education and educational anthropology including the culture concept; biological and sociological conceptions of "race;" postmodern understandings of identity and subjectivity; and ethnographic accounts…

  2. 77 FR 34991 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; correction. Notice...

  3. Virtual anthropology: useful radiological tools for age assessment in clinical forensic medicine and thanatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedouit, Fabrice; Saint-Martin, Pauline; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Savall, Frédéric; Rousseau, Hervé; Crubézy, Eric; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    Virtual anthropology consists of the introduction of modern slice imaging to biological and forensic anthropology. Thanks to this non-invasive scientific revolution, some classifications and staging systems, first based on dry bone analysis, can be applied to cadavers with no need for specific preparation, as well as to living persons. Estimation of bone and dental age is one of the possibilities offered by radiology. Biological age can be estimated in clinical forensic medicine as well as in living persons. Virtual anthropology may also help the forensic pathologist to estimate a deceased person's age at death, which together with sex, geographical origin and stature, is one of the important features determining a biological profile used in reconstructive identification. For this forensic purpose, the radiological tools used are multislice computed tomography and, more recently, X-ray free imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound investigations. We present and discuss the value of these investigations for age estimation in anthropology.

  4. El Museo Nacional de Antropologia de Mexico. (The Mexican National Museum of Anthropology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Gilberto

    1970-01-01

    Designed as a potential attraction of tourist income and for popular education, the National Museum of Anthropology provides instruction for children and adults, publications, public lectures, library services, and other educational services. (LY)

  5. Where Could an Anthropological Turn Lead the Humanities and the Arts

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    Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the possible significations of a so-called anthropological turn in the field of the Humanities and Arts. The text focuses on the meaning of Anthropology and its application in these fields. In this sense, two great conceptions of Anthropology are distinguished: an understanding of Anthropology as an attempt at a singular, meta-historical and transcultural determination of a valid definition of what it means to be human; and another whose use predominates in the Anglo-American contemporary context, in which different ways of being human are considered, instead of a single conception. The text also discusses the word ‘reviravolta’ [overturn] which the Humanities and the Arts have been trying to point out and identify as what is or should be the contemporary thought in those fields.

  6. The ambiguities of disciplinary professionalization: The state and cultural dynamics of Canadian inter-war anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The professionalization of Canadian anthropology in the first half of the twentieth century was tied closely to the matrix of the federal state, first though the Anthropology Division of the Geological Survey of Canada and then the National Museum. State anthropologists occupied an ambiguous professional status as both civil servants and anthropologists committed to the methodological and disciplinary imperatives of modern social science but bounded and guided by the operation of the civil service. Their position within the state served to both advance disciplinary development but also compromised disciplinary autonomy. To address the boundaries the state imposed on its support for anthropology, state anthropologists cultivated cultural, intellectual, and commercially-oriented networks that served to sustain new developments in their field, particularly in folklore. This essay examines these dynamics and suggests that anthropology's disciplinary development did not create a disjuncture between professionalized scholarship and civil society.

  7. Event Ethnography: A Modern Approach to Anthropological Research and Writing about Christmas

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    Lidija Radulović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available "Event Ethnography": A Modern Approach to Anthropological Research and Writing about Christmas. Review of the book by Vesna Vučinić-Nešković,  Christmas in Boka Kotorska: anthropological essays of public firings of the Yule log in the time of post socialism. The Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade and "Čigoja publishing". Belgrade 2008. 357 pages.

  8. On the future of anthropology: Fundraising, the job market and the corporate turn

    OpenAIRE

    Duranti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Building on the author's participant observation in academic leadership roles over the last two decades, this article reviews four areas of engagement for anthropology within the larger context of US higher education: a) fundraising; b) training and placing of students; c) the so-called 'corporate turn' and its alleged effects on current evaluation measures; and d) the popularity of anthropology among college students in the context of a highly self-critical discourse among professional anthr...

  9. ["Group" and organization: a dimension of collaboration of anthropology and epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei-ming; Wang, Ning

    2012-04-01

    "Group" is a key concept in epidemiological research and "organization" is a core concept in anthropology. Group takes focus on the specific characteristics of the subjects, while organization takes focus on the relationship between the objects. For the characteristics and relationship of the objects that interacting with each other, the two concepts could be complementary in specific studies, and this will be the basic dimension of Interdisciplinary collaboration of anthropology and epidemiology.

  10. [Understanding and intervention: a dimension of collaboration of anthropology and epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei-Ming; Wang, Ning

    2012-10-01

    'Epidemiological intervention' involves many social and cultural contents and can be recognized as a social cultural practice. If we know more about the relevant social cultural background of the objects on intervention measures and intervention, the goals would more successful and effective be reached. Since anthropology is specialized in understanding relevant social and cultural contents, the understanding of anthropology should be viewed both as important prerequisite and foundation of the epidemiological intervention programs.

  11. The Anthropological Perspective on Disaster and the Key Concept of Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susanna Hoffman; Chen Mei; Peng Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Like Professor Anthony Oliver -Smith, I wish to speak to the theories and analyses of disaster from an anthropological perspective. While Professor Oliver -Smith's paper covers the history of the anthropological concern, the ecologi-cal paradigm, reconstruction, and other positions, the intent of mine is to zero in on what anthropolo-gists consider the foremost factor in the creation, the unfolding, prevention and mitigation of disas-ter, and that is culture.

  12. [Biology and culture: a dimension of collaboration between anthropology and epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Leiming; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Biology is the important basis of epidemiological study. Based on biology, psychology, social and cultural factors can influence human's health and disease incidence. The medical mode has changed from "biomedical mode" to "bio-psycho-social medical model" , but culture factor was neglected somewhat during this process, so paying attention to culture factor in anthropologic study and using it as biologic basis in epidemiologic study might be a dimension of collaboration between of anthropology and epidemiology.

  13. Threads of continuity and change. Fabricating unity in anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brumfiel, Elizabeth M.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I compare backstrap-loom weaving in three cultural contexts: the ancient Maya, the ancient Aztecs, and 20th century Mesoamerica. Although continuities are present, important differences exist in the ways that weaving was situated historically. Among the Classic Maya, weaving defined class; in Aztec Mexico, weaving defined gender; and in 20th-century Mesoamerica, weaving defined ethnicity. A comparison of these cases suggests that historical study is a useful tool for both archaeologists and ethnographers. It promotes recognition of the diversity of practice and belief in ancient societies. It helps to define the scope of contemporary ethnographic study. It combats cultural essentialism and injects agency into our accounts. It enables us to acknowledge both the rich heritage of indigenous peoples and the fact of culture change. Comparative historical study provides a strong rationale for the continued association of archaeology and cultural anthropology as parts of a wider anthropological whole.

    En este artículo comparo el proceso de tejido en telares de cintura de tres contextos culturales: los Maya, los antiguos aztecas y la Mesoamérica del siglo XX. Aunque existen evidentes continuidades, también hay importantes diferencias en sus contextos históricos. En el Maya Clásico el tejido marcó la clase social, el género entre los Azteca de México y el origen étnico en la Mesoamérica del siglo XX. El análisis comparativo de estos casos históricos sugiere que la comparación es una herramienta útil tanto para arqueólogos como para los etnógrafos: promueve el reconocimiento de la diversidad de las prácticas y las creencias de las sociedades antiguas; contribuye a definir el alcance del estudio etnográfico contemporáneo; combate el esencialismo cultural y carga a nuestras narrativas de capacidad transformadora; nos permite reconocer el rico patrimonio de los pueblos indígenas y el hecho cultural del cambio. El

  14. MYSTICAL ASPECT OF EDITH STEIN'S ANTHROPOLOGY: FROM PHENOMENOLOGY TO THOMISM

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    J. A. Shabanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to find mystical elements in Edith Stein's anthropology as a connecting principle between phenomenology and Thomism. Relying on methodological definition of philosophical mystic, as a matching of theological and philosophical doctrines, based upon reflection on experience of ecstatic unity with the Absolute, it was shown that phenomenology is implicitly directed towards research of real structure of immediate experience which in all its limits approaches to mystical experience. Not the mind and not the faith, but will (that directs knowledge to mystical unity of immanent subject and transcendental object in finding the truth is defining for the mystical character of Stein's creative method. Stein, being a bright representative of phenomenology, gradually disagrees with Husserl at some points: 1. Stein considers the world as an immediate contemplation on the entity that transcends the identity of being and thinking; 2. In her opinion, phenomenology neglects the ontological Absolute. As a result, there is misplace of the Absolute by structural-cognitive aims, that, in its turn, was a reason for amalgamation of onthology and epistemology, according to Stein's views. 3. Stein strives to overcome epistemological rationality and achieve a sphere of philosophical mystic where ontological object and epistemological subject are identical in the act of mystical contemplation. 4. Lack of metaphysical elements in phenomenology leads Stein to Thomism in which she potentially seeks a way out of metaphysical limits and the way which leads to the level of transpersonal states of mind. 5. Stein reproaches transcendentalism in loss of the world and she ignores the changes in Husserl's world outlook, his transcendental turn and genealogy of the trustworthy acquaintance with the world. An empathy, as a model of extrapolation of the principle (of to be get used to the experience of the Other onto mystical act of overcoming of subject

  15. From application to implication in medical anthropology: political, historical and narrative interpretations of the world of sickness and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Mônica de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews some of the current writing on medical anthropology, and is guided by political orientation/implication in the choice of its study targets, its analysis and its construction of solutions for the problems investigated. Starting from the narratives of anthropologists, it goes on to show the historical and socio-political bases characteristic of the subject in their countries of origin or migration. Within a general overview of the three principal contemporary trends - critical medical anthropology, the anthropology of suffering and the anthropology of biopower - the focus is on theoretical and thematic choices to meet the demand for "politicization" of the anthropological debate in the field of health, on the basis of which an "implied" medical anthropology is advocated.

  16. The Anthropological Study of “Insect Society” in Evolutionism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bian Quanqin; Zhang Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionism is the first discipline paradigm in the history of anthropology.As early as 1801, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, a French naturalist clearly put forward the notion of evolution.Howev-er,it was not until C.R.Darwin published his book The Origin of Species in 1859,that the theory of evo-lution became widely regarded by the world.In ad-dition to the field of biology, evolutionism also broadly and deeply influenced the fields of anthro-pology,philosophy and psychology,etc.In the study of evolutionism,a comparative investigation between insect society and human society has attracted the special interest of many scholars.In addition to Charles Robert Darwin,Aldous Leonard Huxley,Jo-ham Jakob Bochofen and Henri Bergson published special works on this aspect.These scholars not only lived during the era of evolutionism, their thinking and research were more or less connected with evo-lutionism and insect society.Their research spawned a series of new theoretical thinking on the division of labor,ethics and morality,matrilineal society,and the creation of evolution,etc.Clarifying the research on“insect society” in evolutionism is necessary and important for us to understand the construction of social theories during that time.Hence, this article seeks to review“insect society”in the eyes of these scholars and make comparisons among them.

  17. Giving an account of one's pain in the anthropological interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Mara

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, I analyze the illness stories narrated by a mother and her 13-year-old son as part of an ethnographic study of child chronic pain sufferers and their families. In examining some of the moral, relational and communicative challenges of giving an account of one's pain, I focus on what is left out of some accounts of illness and suffering and explore some possible reasons for these elisions. Drawing on recent work by Judith Butler (Giving an Account of Oneself, 2005), I investigate how the pragmatic context of interviews can introduce a form of symbolic violence to narrative accounts. Specifically, I use the term "genre of complaint" to highlight how anthropological research interviews in biomedical settings invoke certain typified forms of suffering that call for the rectification of perceived injustices. Interview narratives articulated in the genre of complaint privilege specific types of pain and suffering and cast others into the background. Giving an account of one's pain is thus a strategic and selective process, creating interruptions and silences as much as moments of clarity. Therefore, I argue that medical anthropologists ought to attend more closely to the institutional structures and relations that shape the production of illness narratives in interview encounters.

  18. Local Level Perception of Corruption: An Anthropological Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sewanta Kattel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The underlying problem of corruption in Nepal at the micro level stems from the 'capture' of the sustainable number of the policies and implementing rules and regulations of the different laws by vested interests. The long standing collusion between political parties and government officials has resulted in a destructed economy that favors private economic interests over the broader public goods. The situation is compounded by the patterns of non transparent and illegitimate practice that sustain the culture of corruption. Sources of income for individual and employees are unregulated and often arbitrarily determined through the patronage system that is link to the culture of silence underpinning such patronage. The role of civil society is to controlling corruption by working at the grass roots political and bureaucratic, and legal judicial level. Key words: Civil society; problem; power; judicial; corruption DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v3i0.2785 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.3 2009 163-174

  19. Marmosets as model species in neuroscience and evolutionary anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, Judith M; Finkenwirth, Christa

    2015-04-01

    Marmosets are increasingly used as model species by both neuroscientists and evolutionary anthropologists, but with a different rationale for doing so. Whereas neuroscientists stress that marmosets share many cognitive traits with humans due to common descent, anthropologists stress those traits shared with marmosets - and callitrichid monkeys in general - due to convergent evolution, as a consequence of the cooperative breeding system that characterizes both humans and callitrichids. Similarities in socio-cognitive abilities due to convergence, rather than homology, raise the question whether these similarities also extend to the proximate regulatory mechanisms, which is particularly relevant for neuroscientific investigations. In this review, we first provide an overview of the convergent adaptations to cooperative breeding at the psychological and cognitive level in primates, which bear important implications for our understanding of human cognitive evolution. In the second part, we zoom in on two of these convergent adaptations, proactive prosociality and social learning, and compare their proximate regulation in marmosets and humans with regard to oxytocin and cognitive top down regulation. Our analysis suggests considerable similarity in these regulatory mechanisms presumably because the convergent traits emerged due to small motivational changes that define how pre-existing cognitive mechanisms are quantitatively combined. This finding reconciles the prima facie contradictory rationale for using marmosets as high priority model species in neuroscience and anthropology.

  20. HLA in anthropology: the enigma of Easter Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Thorsby, Erik

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we first present four significant cases where human leukocyte antigen (HLA) studies have been useful for the reconstruction of human peopling history on the worldwide scale; i.e., the spread of modern humans from East Africa, the colonization of East Asia along two geographic routes, the co-evolution of genes and languages in Africa, and the peopling of Europe through a main northward migration. These examples show that natural selection did not erase the genetic signatures of our past migrations in the HLA genetic diversity patterns observed today. In the second part, we summarize our studies on Easter Island. Using genomic HLA typing, we could trace an introduction of HLA alleles of native American (Amerindian) origin to Easter Island before the Peruvian slave trades; i.e., before the 1860s, and provide suggestive evidence that they may have already been introduced in prehistoric time. Our results give further support to an initial Polynesian population of the island, but also reveal an early contribution by Amerindians. Together, our data illustrate the usefulness of typing for HLA alleles to complement genetic analyses in anthropological investigations.

  1. Anthropological contributions to historical ecology: 50 questions, infinite prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Iain; Ekblom, Anneli; Szabó, Péter; Lane, Paul J.; McAlvay, Alex C.; Boles, Oliver J.; Walshaw, Sarah; Petek, Nik; Gibbons, Kevin S.; Quintana Morales, Erendira; Anderson, Eugene N.; Ibragimow, Aleksandra; Podruczny, Grzegorz; Vamosi, Jana C.; Marks-Block, Tony; LeCompte, Joyce K.; Awâsis, Sākihitowin; Nabess, Carly; Sinclair, Paul; Crumley, Carole L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a consensus-driven process identifying 50 priority research questions for historical ecology obtained through crowdsourcing, literature reviews, and in-person workshopping. A deliberative approach was designed to maximize discussion and debate with defined outcomes. Two in-person workshops (in Sweden and Canada) over the course of two years and online discussions were peer facilitated to define specific key questions for historical ecology from anthropological and archaeological perspectives. The aim of this research is to showcase the variety of questions that reflect the broad scope for historical-ecological research trajectories across scientific disciplines. Historical ecology encompasses research concerned with decadal, centennial, and millennial human-environmental interactions, and the consequences that those relationships have in the formation of contemporary landscapes. Six interrelated themes arose from our consensus-building workshop model: (1) climate and environmental change and variability; (2) multi-scalar, multi-disciplinary; (3) biodiversity and community ecology; (4) resource and environmental management and governance; (5) methods and applications; and (6) communication and policy. The 50 questions represented by these themes highlight meaningful trends in historical ecology that distill the field down to three explicit findings. First, historical ecology is fundamentally an applied research program. Second, this program seeks to understand long-term human-environment interactions with a focus on avoiding, mitigating, and reversing adverse ecological effects. Third, historical ecology is part of convergent trends toward transdisciplinary research science, which erodes scientific boundaries between the cultural and natural. PMID:28235093

  2. Death in the Vision of Doctors. An Anthropological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona DAMIAN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The research fits a cultural anthropology context, pursuing, at this level, the identification of particular views on death, as reported by doctors from various specialties. The current research took into consideration the meaning of death from the point of view of such doctors, without worrying that the way in which death is regarded will reflect upon the medical practice itself. This topic may be the object of further research. The research was conducted through means of a constructive methodology, using the semi-structured individual interview as the main technique, the questions being asked in an non-specific order. The data interpretation was realized through the successive induction method, correlated with the explorative generative character of the research. The chosen methodology implies a systematic generation process with regard to concepts and theories based on the collected data. The role of data management theory in the research is emphasized in order to provide ways of conceptualizing explanations and descriptions. Respondents usually have a spiritual orientation and don’t accept the idea of death as an ending. The continuity of life after death gives sense to the entire existence and the idea of moral life. The human dimension of medical practice makes the respondents adhere to the need for humanizing existence through the guarantee of a post-existence dimension. Classification-JEL: A23, I18

  3. [Theories of evolution shaping Victorian anthropology. The science-politics of the X-Club, 1860-1872].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondermann, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the role that a group of evolutionists, the X-Club, played in the epistemic and institutional transformation of Victorian anthropology in the 1860s. It analyses how anthropology has been brought into line with the theory of evolution, which gained currency at the same time. The X-Club was a highly influential pressure group in the Victorian scientific community. It campaigned for the theory of evolution in several fields of the natural sciences and had a considerable influence on the modernization of the sciences. Yet, this club also intervened in the anthropological discourse of these years. The X-Club's meddling with anthropology led to the latter's evolutionary turn. The introduction of an evolutionary agenda into Victorian anthropology depended not only on the X-Club's theoretical contributions but also on the structural reformation of the discipline. Its campaigns also aimed at marginalizing the proponents of pre-evolutionary anthropology in its institutions and led to the foundation of a new organization in anthropology: The Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. Thus, evolutionary anthropology emerged in the 1860s also as the result of science-politicking rather than just from the transmission of evolutionary concepts through discourse.

  4. Theology in the flesh – a model for theological anthropology as embodied sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Meiring

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The author proposes a model for theological anthropology as embodied sensing that is based on an interdisciplinary exploration of the corporeal turn from a southern African perspective. The work of James B. Nelson is acknowledged, stating that body theology starts with the concrete, the bodily expressions of life and not with doctrines about God and humanity. The theological anthropology of David H. Kelsey is evaluated as a theological anthropology with a sentiment of the flesh. Based on clearings in the work of David Kelsey and an interdisciplinary research, the author proposes a model for theological anthropology as embodied sensing which functions within the intricate and complex connection of the living body, language and experiencing in a concrete lifeworld with an openness to the ‘more than’. The author considers the use of bodymapping within narrative therapy as a way in which to uncover the intimate and intricate connection between the living body, experience and language, and implementing insights from theological anthropology as embodied sensing.

  5. Identity and dignity within the human rights discourse: An anthropological and praxis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Louw

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The theological discourse mostly focuses on the moral and ethical framework for human rights and human dignity. In order to give theological justification to the value and dignity of human beings, most theologians point to the imago Dei as theological starting point for the design of an anthropology on human dignity. Within the paradigmatic framework of democracy, human dignity and human rights have become interchangeable concepts. This article aimed to focus not on ethics but on aesthetics: man as homo aestheticus, as well as the praxis question regarding the quality of human dignity within the network of human relationships. It was argued that human dignity is more fundamental than human rights. Dignity as an anthropological construct should not reside in the first place in the imago Dei and its relationship to Christology and incarnation theology. Human dignity, human rights and human identity are embedded in the basic human quest for meaning (teleology. As such, human dignity should, in a practical theological approach to anthropology, be dealt with from the aesthetic perspective of charisma, thus the option for inhabitational theology. As an anthropological category, human dignity should be viewed from the perspective of pneumatology within the networking framework of a �spiritual humanism�. In this regard, the theology of the Dutch theologian A.A. van Ruler, and especially his seminal 1968 work Ik geloof, should be revisited by a pneumatic anthropology within the parameters of practical theology.

  6. PHILOSOPHY OF CULTURE YU. M. LOTMAN: COGNITIVE DIALOGUE SEMIOTICS AND HISTORICAL ANTHROPOLOGY PURPOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. SH. Aytov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to study the cognitive interferences philosophical and social sciences and humanities. The aim of the article is to analyze the cognitive interaction of historical anthropology and semiotics in the space of philosophical-cultural concepts Lotman. Methodology. The methodology of this work includes the theoretical approaches, such as system-structural method, interdisciplinary method, comparative and source study methods. Teoretical basis and results. Philosophy of Culture Lotman contains a large number of cognitive dimensions. Significant role in the cognitive universe of his work is semiotics and historical anthropology. However interaction of these semiotic components of Lotman creation little explored yet. The latter applies to the redesign of the historical-anthropological ideas and research scientist. Conclusions. Understanding the interaction of cognitive semiotics and historical anthropology in the space of culture philosophy of Lotman logically leads to the conclusion that the effectiveness of cognitive symbiosis methodological approaches these sciences. In particular, the cognitive structure allows us to study the underlying causes of the motives and actions of individuals and entire societies past. The realization of semiotic, historical and anthropological methods allows us to analyze the underlying mechanisms of the spiritual culture and social and cultural institutions of societies from different historical periods.

  7. Global Health, Medical Anthropology, and Social Marketing: Steps to the Ecology of Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteford, Linda

    2015-06-01

    Anthropology and global health have long been a focus of research for both biological and medical anthropologists. Research has looked at physiological adaptations to high altitudes, community responses to water-borne diseases, the integration of traditional and biomedical approaches to health, global responses to HIV/AIDS, and more recently, to the application of cultural approaches to the control of the Ebola epidemic. Academic anthropology has employed theory and methods to extend knowledge, but less often to apply that knowledge. However, anthropologists outside of the academy have tackled global health issues such as family planning and breast-feeding by bringing together applied medical anthropology and social marketing. In 2014, that potent and provocative combination resulted in the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida being made the home of an innovative center designed to combine academic and applied anthropology with social marketing in order to facilitate social change. This article discusses how inter- and intra-disciplinary research/application has led to the development of Florida's first World Health Organization Collaborating Center (WHO CC), and the first such center to focus on social marketing, social change and non-communicable diseases. This article explains the genesis of the Center and presents readers with a brief overview, basic principles and applications of social marketing by reviewing a case study of a water conservation project. The article concludes with thoughts on the ecology of collaboration among global health, medical anthropology and social marketing practitioners.

  8. Film and television in Croatia today: production, new technologies and the relationship with visual anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilicić, Niksa; Vidacković, Zlatko

    2013-03-01

    This paper seeks to explain some of the most important recent production and technological changes that have affected the relationship between television and film, especially in Croatia, from the aspect of the development of visual anthropology. In the production segment, special attention was given to the role of Croatian television stations in the production of movies, "splitting" the movies into mini-series, interrupting movies with commercial breaks, and to television movies turned into feature films. This paper tries to perceive and define the structure of methodical processes of visual anthropology (reactive process). The development of photographic and film technology and the events which led to the rapid development of visual culture also point to the inseparable duality of observing visual anthropology within reactive and proactive processes, which are indirectly closely related to the technical aspects of these processes. Defining the technical aspect of visual anthropology as such "service" necessarily interferes with the author's approach in the domain of the script and direction related procedures during pre-production, on the field and during post-production of the movie. The author's approach is important because in dependence on it, the desired spectrum of information "output", susceptible to subsequent scientific analysis, is achieved. Lastly, another important segment is the "distributive-technological process" because, regardless of the approach to the anthropologically relevant phenomenon which is being dealt with in an audio-visual piece of work, it is essential that the work be presented and viewed adequately.

  9. Greek Anthropological Thought at the End of the Classical Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benéitez Prudencio, José Javier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aristotle’s interest in human nature ranges impressively over a large number of disciplines. In the last few years there has been an explosion of fresh research into this thinker’s representation of the human being; but above all it is the knowledge of different areas of Corpus aristotelicum —which for long was badly neglected— that has proved the most rewarding. Thus, some specialists have come to realize that Aristotle’s biological works are as interesting and important as his Politics, his Ethics or his Metaphysics for understanding his anthropological thought. The scope of the paper is these neglected areas of Corpus aristotelicum. Aristotle’s model, however, was not the only and decisive anthropological theory available at the end of the Classical Age. The author also discusses the historian and physician Ctesias —who had written a History of India one generation before, yet was very influential in Aristotelian times— as well as the Peripatetic philosopher Theophrastos.

    El interés de Aristóteles por la naturaleza humana abarca un cúmulo impresionante de disciplinas. En los últimos años se ha dado un avance importante en la investigación que sobre la idea del ser humano tenía este pensador, mostrándose reveladora en el conocimiento de diferentes partes del Corpus aristotelicum que durante mucho tiempo han estado postergadas. Por esta razón, algunos especialistas convienen en afirmar que, para la comprensión del pensamiento antropológico de Aristóteles, sus tratados biológicos se muestran de tanto interés y tienen tanta importancia como la Política, las Éticas o la Metafísica. El centro de atención del artículo lo constituyen dichas partes más olvidadas del Corpus. Con todo, el modelo aristotélico no fue la única explicación antropológica que se dio a finales de la época clásica, ni tampoco la más decisiva. El autor

  10. [Sports anthropological investigations on somatotypology of elite karateka].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Jürgen; Raschka, Christoph

    2007-09-01

    The goal of this work was to find differences between the somatotypes of elite karateka. For this purpose the somatotypes of Conrad, Heath & Carter were used. This sports anthropological study was carried out on the assumption that constant karate training causes changes in body composition. It should clarify whether different body types, including sexual dimorphism, are to be found in people practicing the karate disciplines kata and kumite. 80 male and female elite karateka were tested. As a comparison group, 62 leisure sports persons and 66 hobby karateka were used as control groups. The measurements were taken under standardised conditions and the results were examined statistically (ANOVA). The body types of Conrad, which were confirmed by the somatocharts of Heath & Carter, showed differences between the elite karateka in comparison to the control group. According to this, the typical elite karateka is more athletic and smaller. He weighs less than the sports persons of the comparison fitness group. Moreover, within the karate disciplines, the kata practisers are more endomorph than their colleagues. The kumite athletes take more ektomorph positions in the somatocharts (Heath & Carter 1990). On the basis of these results the assumption of a differentiated somatotype can be confirmed in the two groups and also within karate between the disciplines kata and kumite. This study concludes that there is both a kata and a kumite somatotype among karate practisers. Further research is required regarding longitudinal measurements of the change in body composition of young karateka in the course of their competitive careers. The career-affecting factors of training frequency, training age, and frequency of injury, related to the level of achievement, leave room for further investigation. This also applies to possible ethnic body-build differences and the athletes' level of achievement.

  11. Space and Anthropology of Limit: A Philosophical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirni, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    In no other living species does technology (or more precisely the need for technological development) play such an important role as it does in the human species. Almost every animal species is able to implement “techniques” in order to improve its living conditions, that is to produce tools or structures capable of enhancing its ability to procure food and defend itself. No animal, however, to the same extent as the human being, seems unable to do without the constant innovation of its own capacities and their outcomes. This is a constant factor, which unequivocally connotes our being human. It is a constant that we can say is expression of an essentially dual nature: fear of inadequacy, on the one hand, anxiety for perfection, on the other. This rationale remains surely a matter of fact regarding the “traditional” or “common” condition of the man, understood as a being living on the Earth with a specific biological structure. However, any possible understanding of the same issue requires new efforts if and as far we try to maintain it open in a totally different context: “the space”, namely, a not-specific place outside Earth in which the man is trying to give shape to a new path of its own surviving (§ 1). Here rises what we would like to call the "anthropology of limit". In order to grasp a provisional content for such expression, we must proceed “analytically”, first, by reconsidering briefly the two conceptual sides implied in that expression, namely “What is a man?” and “What do we mean with limit?” (§ 2). Secondly, we should try to reconsider the twofold results under a “synthetical” or comprehensive point of view, trying to gather a common area of questioning that opens up if and as far we shift and reconsider both conceptual sides of that expression within the “space-context” (§ 3).

  12. Theater of "bóias-frias": rethinking anthropology of performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Dawsey

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The anthropology of performance, as understood by Victor Turner, provides interesting perspectives for the analysis of what may be referred to as the "theater of bóias-frias". Conversely, this theater may be of special interest for purposes of rethinking some of the main propositions which have arisen on the borders between anthropology and performance. Considering the specificity of "the practice which calculates the place from which one views things" of this theater, several topics present themselves as guidelines for the text which follows: 1 social dramas, 2 relations between social and aesthetic dramas, 3 symbols and montage, and 4 theater paradigms in anthropology. In this exercise to rethink some of the "classic" contributions of Victor Turner, Erving Goffman, and Richard Schechner, "elective affinities" have been found between, on the one hand, the writings of Walter Benjamin and Brechtian theater, and, on the other, the dramaturgical principles of the bóias-frias.

  13. Importance of the comparative anatomy in Forensic Anthropology – case report

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    Rhonan Ferreira da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In forensic sciences, reconstructive victim profile is a commonly used procedure to provide individual data in cases of complex human identifications. In forensic anthropology, valuable data are obtained from skeletal and dental analysis such as gender, age, ancestry, stature, and differentiation between human and non-human remains. Objective: To highlight the relevance of comparative anatomy analysis to differentiate human and non-human remains. Case report: Four bone fragments and one tooth were found on a potential crime scene, and were submitted to forensic examinations. The examinations revealed non-human anthropological remains. Additionally, the analyzed bones and tooth were classified as animal remains, specifically from a domestic dog (Canis lupus familiares. Conclusion: In this context, it is relevant to be trained and aware of the usefulness of comparative anatomy into the forensic anthropology routine in order to perform complete and accurate examinations.

  14. An Update on the Hazards and Risks of Forensic Anthropology, Part I: Human Remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lindsey G; Dabbs, Gretchen R; Spencer, Jessica R

    2016-01-01

    This work reviews the hazards and risks of practicing forensic anthropology in North America, with a focus on pathogens encountered through contact with unpreserved human remains. Since the publication of Galloway and Snodgrass' seminal paper concerning the hazards of forensic anthropology, research has provided new information about known pathogen hazards, and regulating authorities have updated recommendations for the recognition and treatment of several infections. Additionally, forensic anthropology has gained popularity, exposing an increased number of students and practitioners to these hazards. Current data suggest many occupational exposures to blood or body fluids go unreported, especially among students, highlighting the need for this discussion. For each pathogen and associated disease, this work addresses important history, reviews routes of exposure, provides an overview of symptoms and treatments, lists decontamination procedures, and presents data on postmortem viability. Personal protection and laboratory guidelines should be established and enforced in conjunction with the consideration of these data.

  15. The mandible and its foramen: anatomy, anthropology, embryology and resulting clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipski, M; Tomaszewska, I M; Lipska, W; Lis, G J; Tomaszewski, K A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to summarise the knowledge about the anatomy, embryology and anthropology of the mandible and the mandibular foramen and also to highlight the most important clinical implications of the current studies regarding anaesthesia performed in the region of the mandible. An electronic journal search was undertaken to identify all the relevant studies published in English. The search included MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and years from 1950 to 2012. The subject search used a combination of controlled vocabulary and free text based on the search strategy for MEDLINE using key words: 'mandible', 'mandibular', 'foramen', 'anatomy', 'embryology', 'anthropology', and 'mental'. The reference lists of all the relevant studies and existing reviews were screened for additional relevant publications. Basing on relevant manuscripts, this short review about the anatomy, embryology and anthropology of the mandible and the mandibular foramen was written.

  16. SELF-REFERENTIALITY AND INTER-REFERENTIALITY IN ROMANIAN CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (1964–2012

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    MARIN CONSTANTIN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The bibliographic retrospective of the practice of cultural anthropology in Romania is significant for the actuality of a process of changing and renewing the scientific interest and the inquest “field” of Romanian researchers. More precisely, the self-referential or “intra-cultural” knowledge about Romanian communities or groups of population currently appears to be turned into a inter-referential knowledge, with a cross-cultural content. It is through such theoretical and methodological metamorphosis that the study of minority ethno-linguistic communities in Romania takes part to a contextualized understanding of Romanian cultural identities in relation to the groups of Magyars, Germans, Roma, Russian-speaking Lipovans, Turks, Croatians etc. As a result, my text attempts to evaluate the inner dynamics of Romanian cultural anthropology in terms of a critical synthesis of the local specialized literature, in the context of anthropological disciplinary evolution in Central and Southeastern Europe

  17. Anthropological neurology: symptoms and their meanings according to Joseph Prick (1909-1978).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Meulen, B C; Dekkers, W J M; Keyser, A; van Woerkom, T C A M

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the life and work of the Dutch neurologist Joseph Prick (1909-1978) and his idea of an anthropological neurology. According to Prick, neurological symptoms should not only be explained from an underlying physico-chemical substrate but also be regarded as meaningful. We present an outline of the historical and philosophical context of his ideas with a focus on the theory of the human body by the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1908-1961) and the concept of anthropology-based medicine developed by Frederik Buytendijk (1887-1974). We give an overview of anthropological neurology as a clinical practice and finally we discuss the value of Prick's approach for clinical neurology today.

  18. Material proximities and hotspots: toward an anthropology of viral hemorrhagic fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Hannah; Kelly, Ann H

    2014-06-01

    This article outlines a research program for an anthropology of viral hemorrhagic fevers (collectively known as VHFs). It begins by reviewing the social science literature on Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa fevers and charting areas for future ethnographic attention. We theoretically elaborate the hotspot as a way of integrating analysis of the two routes of VHF infection: from animal reservoirs to humans and between humans. Drawing together recent anthropological investigations of human-animal entanglements with an ethnographic interest in the social production of space, we seek to enrich conceptualizations of viral movement by elaborating the circumstances through which viruses, humans, objects, and animals come into contact. We suggest that attention to the material proximities-between animals, humans, and objects-that constitute the hotspot opens a frontier site for critical and methodological development in medical anthropology and for future collaborations in VHF management and control.

  19. [Communique on the present status and future of anthropology taken from the meeting of department heads and principle scientists from the Society of Anthropology (GfA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühli, F; Schiefenhivel, W

    2009-09-01

    The primary goal discussed is to strengthen the scientifically important research discipline of anthropology in the coming years by reinforcing its position in the German university system as a trans-disciplinary field and to edify its image within the public eye. Like many other branches of science, anthropology has witnessed a number of profound changes in the university sphere in recent years. In addition to increased reliance on monetary funding, the fundamental structure of research and teaching in the university sector, the product of centuries-old development, is experiencing a transition phase and progressively operating ever more under the influence of"excellence monitoring" as well as the "Bologna" process. Financial cuts have led to the termination of once fix job positions at all levels, whereby the loss of mid-level positions requisite for a healthy and functional junior academic environment, such as post-doc jobs, is particularly unsettling. The still tangible burden of recent historical events and small number of prominent representatives in the field are problematic, however, the primary concern today involves the seemingly imminent closure of established anthropological centres and discontinuation of department chair positions. Fortunately, this ominous trend does not apply to all leading university departments, many of which are engaged in innovative and novel concepts, and has resulted in their general acceptance and the fortification of anthropology programs. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly difficult to secure adequate funding for projects from money givers such as the DFG, mainly because of the relatively small size of the field. Specialization within the field at the university level obviously poses a serious problem for such a small holistic discipline (with regards to problem statements and methodology). The definition of anthropology as an entity is complicated by external influences such as newly developing research interests that

  20. [Social anthropology and anthropologists of the past and present: from exoticism and the imagined reciprocity to everyday inequalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, María Rosa

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine two moments in anthropology. First we characterize anthropology as a subject specialized in the study of "the others", which developed in those countries that led the European and North American colonial expansion. We underline the links that existed between this historical context, the features of ethnography -the theoretic-methodological approach developed by anthropologistsand the concept of culture, that became the core of this discipline. Secondly, we intend to further the understanding of some trends of contemporary anthropology: the fact that nowadays anthropologists work on the societies they belong to, their operations (documenting the undocumented, unveiling dayliness, de-naturalizing), which find their roots in earlier anthropology. It also highlights the shift of focus from reciprocity relations to power and inequity relations. Finally it sheds light on some original developments in Latin American anthropology, considering some cases in Mexico, Brazil and Argentina.

  1. Ethnographic and Social Interpretation of Interparental Kidnapping of Children from a Juridical Anthropology Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Romero Picón

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The article embarks on a detailed investigation into the juridical, psychological and anthropological aspects of Interparental kidnapping of minor children in Bogotá and the violation of custodial and visiting rights of mothers or fathers with respect to their children. During this research, we became interested in finding out if this problem also appears in indigenous communities, and which factors might contribute to that. The article revises the concepts of juridical anthropology and interlegality or legal pluralism, to understand the role that local juridical systems play in managing this problem. Furthermore, we undertake a brief reflection about the children’s and teenager’s rights in those communities.

  2. Questioning the Search for Illness Narratives in Medical Anthropology: Can we talk about actual pain experiences?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Marie Louise

    of the anthropological literature on pain from the 1950's up to today. RESULTS: The anthropological focus on pain has changed considerably during the last century from exotic tales of cultural codes of pain behaviour to illness narratives of pain experience. This shift in focus not only mirrors changes in our profession......, phenomenological way of understanding pain. CONCLUSION: My empirical findings show that a narrative approach only offer a partial understanding of how we acquire knowledge of other people's pain - this goes for health professionals as well as ethnographers. A more contextual approach - studying pain behaviour...

  3. Ontology and anthropology of interanimality: Merleau-Ponty from Tim ingold's perspective

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    Ana Cristina Ramírez Barreto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores Tim Ingold’s anthropological theory following his references to Merleau-Ponty and the concept of interanimality/interagentivity. It poses some ideas of Ingold’s “poetics of dwelling”, which he highlights from ethnographies of hunter-gatherer peoples, and how these ideas are linked to an ontological consideration which does not dissociate body and person, body and mind, nature and culture, animality and humanity. The paper reviews animal literature in Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy, and Ingold’s critique of “Anthropology of the senses”. It also gives critical clues for the ethical and political implications of this ontology.

  4. Anthropological analysis of taekwondo--new methodological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cular, Drazen; Munivrana, Goran; Katić, Ratko

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the order and importance of impacts of particular anthropological characteristics and technical and tactical competence on success in taekwondo according to opinions of top taekwondo instructors (experts). Partial objectives include analysis of metric characteristics of the measuring instrument, and determining differences between two disciplines (sparring and technical discipline of patterns) and two competition systems (WTF and ITF). In accordance with the aims, the research was conducted on a sample of respondents which consisted of 730 taekwondo instructors from 6 continents and from 69 countries (from which we selected 242 instructors), who are at different success levels in both taekwondo competition systems (styles) and two taekwondo disciplines. The respondents were divided into 3 qualitative subsamples (OST-USP-VRH) using the dependant variable of accomplished results of the instructor. In 6 languages, they electronically evaluated the impact in percentage value (%) of motor and functional skills (MOTFS), morphological characteristics (MORF), psychological profile of an athlete (PSIH), athletic intelligence (INTE) and technical and tactical competence - (TE-TA) on success in taekwondo. The analysis of metric characteristics of the constructed instrument showed a satisfactory degree of agreement (IHr) which is proportional to the level of respondent quality, i.e. it grows along with the increase in instructor quality in all analysed disciplines of both systems. Top instructors assigned the highest portion of impact on success to the motor and functional skills (MOTFS) variable: WTF-SPB=29.1, ITF-SPB=29.2, WTF-THN=35.0, ITF-THN=32.0). Statistically significant differences in opinions of instructors of different styles and disciplines were not recorded in any of the analysed variables. The only exception is the psychological profile of an athlete variable, which WTF instructors of sparring (AM=23.7%), on a significance

  5. XXIth Century Cannibalism: Popular Interest on an Old Anthropological Concern

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    López García, Julián

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I analise the dialogue between western and non-western indigenous cannibalism. I make reference to the cannibal evidences from a western point of view, and to the ideological fight not only to expel it from our culture but also to invest in it the role of fundametal marker or fetish condensing of all evils of Otherness. Yet, starting in the XXth Century, we find a number of episodes approaching cannibalism (real and symbolic to western popular culture, thus refashioning the former relationship between cannibalism and evil to the point of losing its diacritic place as fundamental marker of cultural differences. This paves the way to artistic eccentricities, but also to organ trafficking. I end with a reference to the ways in which the anthropology of ths last century contributed both the the making and unmaking of the myth of cannibalism.

    En el artículo analizo el diálogo entre canibalismo occidental y canibalismo de indígenas no occidentales. Aludo a la contracción entre las evidencias caníbales de inspiración occidental y la lucha ideológica no sólo por expulsarlo fuera de nuestra cultura sino por otorgarle un papel fetiche, condensador de todos los males de la diferencia. Sin embargo a partir del siglo XX asistimos a distintos episodios que acercan el canibalismo (real y simbólico a la cultura popular occidental de manera que se va matizando la relación entre canibalismo y mal y por tanto se va diluyendo su papel como signo diacrítico de la diferencia: eso abona el terreno para excentricidades artísticas pero también para el tráfico de órganos. Termino con una alusión al papel de la Antropología en este último siglo construyendo y destruyendo el mito del canibalismo.

  6. PROJECT - RESOURCE MANAGEMENT OF INNOVATIONS IN EDUCATION: ANTHROPOLOGICAL PROJECTION

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    Galina Aleksandrovna Ignat’eva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to denote a way to solve the problem of education mana-gement ΄s insufficient efficiency considered from the point of view of education opportunities to influence on the formation of mechanisms for sustainable development of society as a whole and its educational component. The concept «project-resource management of innovation in education» regarded on the basis of the anthropological project-transforming paradigm. Conceptually-categorical context presented by conceptual cluster composed of coordinated concepts «project», «resource», «educational reality», «organizational-resource potential», «project commonality». In the theoretical part of the study on the basis of analysis of the normative and exploratory approaches to educational innovations organization and management it was established the search approach ΄s leading role in the methodological substantiation of project-resource management. The study have indicated that in the presence of variable models of innovation management in education, corresponding to various predictive models of continuing education post-industrial society, project-resource management is an universal mechanism for the transition from separate innovation΄s precedents to the an authentic reality of innovative education. In the technological part of the study the main concern was to submit the project-resource management by the management goal’s system, each of which includes the specific management actions, projected results and the organizational forms. The project-resource management ΄s professional – activity context of the study showed evolution of managerial positions: an effective performer – an effective leader – strategist, implemented during the transition from directly directive management to the project management and further to the project-resource management. Based on the findings identified the key factors of initiatively-problem projects

  7. Health, well-being and wellness: An anthropological eco-systemic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes J.L. van der Walt

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    More than two decades ago, Fritjof Capra commended - and indeed advocated – a paradigm shift in health science and care. In his book The Turning Point (1982 he talks of a major shift from the preoccupation with micro-organisms to a careful study of the ‘host organism and its environment’, of ‘significant attempts to develop a unified approach to the mind/body system’ in Western medicine, of  ‘a new holistic paradigm’ (as opposed to ‘the old biomedical paradigm’ regarding the problem of health and healing, of ‘a holistic and humanistic approach to primary care’, and of ‘a holistic therapy’ as opposed to ‘the traditional biochemical practice of associating a physical disease with a specific physical cause’. Our concern in this article is with the paradigm shift advocated by Capra in this book and the progress that has since been made.

    Opsomming

    Meer as twee dekades gelede het Fritjof Capra ‘n pleidooi gelewer vir ‘n paradigmaskuif vanaf die bio- mediese model na ‘n meer holistiese, ekosistemiese model van gesondheid en genesing. Die vraag wat in hierdie artikel aan die orde kom is of praktisyns in die veld van die gesondheidswetenskappe sedertdien daarin geslaag het om die oorgang na die aanbevole paradigma te maak. ‘n Oorsig van die literatuur sedert 1982 toon dat die skuif nog nie regtig gemaak is nie. ‘n Ander literatuuroorsig toon voorts dat die terme ‘gesondheid’, ‘well-being’ en ‘wellness’ as uitruilbaar beskou word en dat hulle betekenisse meermale afhang van die gebruikskonteks. Op grond van hulle bespreking van die antropologiese ekosistemiese benadering tot gesondheid en genesing stel die outeurs voor dat die terme ‘gesondheid’ en ‘wellness’ as korrelatiewe gebruik word, en dat die term ‘well-being’ gebruik word vir al die domeine van menslike lewe en bestaan wat kan bydra tot gesondheid, oftewel ‘wellness’.

    How to

  8. Annotated Bibliography on Cognitive Anthropology and Sociolinguistics. Ecological Theory of Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meihls, Janet Lee; Streeck, Jurgen

    This annotated bibliography focuses on the fields of cognitive anthropology and sociolinguistics. Topics covered include: (1) classroom ethnographies; (2) conversational and discourse analysis; (3) ecological and sociological approaches to the study of education and schooling; (4) ethnomethodology; (5) communication and speech act theory; (6)…

  9. Evaluation of elementary teachers' knowledge on fraction multiplication using anthropological theory of the didactic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putra, Zetra Hainul

    Elementary School for Teacher Education study program, University of Riau, participated in this research in 2015. This research is based on anthropological theory of the didactic (ATD), in particular praxeological reference models, as a framework to analyse the data. The result showed that only 22...

  10. Islam(s) in Context: Orientalism and the Anthropology of Muslim Societies and Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Sean

    2007-01-01

    This article begins to fill a gap in recent discussions of the future of Islamic studies with an account of the nature and significance of Anthropological and Ethnographic contributions to the study of Islam and Muslims. Drawing attention to both the problem of essence in Orientalism and the dissolution of Islam's significance for Muslims in…

  11. Contributions from Techno-Anthropological Ethnography to Innovation and Design Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Krogh

    2013-01-01

    is the significance of the enormous growth of STS scholarship that took place in the following 2-3 decades? And third, what are the challenges today for an STS field that has come of age? Finally, the lecture offers reflections on the promises of the new techno anthropology study programme....

  12. Anthropological Methods of Formation of University Students' Spiritual and Moral Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanov, Rashad A.; Nikonova, Elina I.; Gurbanov, Ramin A.; Svechnikova, Natalia V.; Tumarov, Konstantin B.; Marin, Evgeniy M.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the study is reasoned by the increasing complexity of life activity in modern society, which results in distortion of the moral and value criteria and norms. The purpose of the article is to reveal anthropological methods of formation of university students' spiritual and moral culture. The leading approach to the study is the…

  13. Diaspora and the Anthropology of Latino Education: Challenges, Affinities, and Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villenas, Sofia A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I highlight the challenges, tensions, and affinities between Latino educational anthropology and diaspora studies. Some of the urgent questions include attention to new Latino destinations, transnationalism, and Latino diversity. It concludes by suggesting future pathways through Latina feminist thought.

  14. How to win a football match in Cameroon : an anthropological study of Africa's most popular sport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pannenborg, A.

    2008-01-01

    Footballers Essomba and Ashu, team manager Kalla and spiritual adviser Zé are the key characters in this anthropological study of football in Cameroon, which is based on research carried out in 2003. It might seem that a well-organized club with professional executives, a team of talented players an

  15. Daily health concerns in Kakabo: anthropological explorations in a Bangladeshi village

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van der Geest; N. Selin; S. Zaman

    2008-01-01

    Daily health concerns in Kakabo: Anthropological explorations in a Bangladeshi village is a collection of essays written by students of BRAC James P Grant School of Public Health in 2005, 2006 and 2007. These essays are the results of exploratory studies conducted in a village named Kakabo, about tw

  16. Towards a doubly reflexive ethnography: A proposal from the anthropology of interculturality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunther Dietz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the contemporary debate on ethnographic methodology in anthropology, this paper analyses how new methodological options arise throughout processes of educational interculturality and how these can nourish, rejuvenate and decolonize classica anthropological ethnography. The contrast between a postmodern anthropology and activist ethnography reveals possibilities for fruitfully complement social and political en gagement with the classical canon of ethnography, which is here illustrated for the sphere of Intercultural Studies and the emerging field of what may be called an anthropology of interculturality. The resulting, “doubly reflexive ethnography” completes the contrast of emic and etic approaches through a emic-etic dialectical, structure-oriented perspective, which is particularly suitable for studying institutions and organizations whose actors co-reflect on the same research process as the anthropologist her/himself. This proposal is finally summed up in a three-dimensional heuristic research model, which combines semantic, pragmatic and syntactic dimensions of ethnography and which is particularly suited for “inter-cultural”, “inter-lingual” and “inter-actor” diversity contexts.

  17. [Primordial structures of feminine maturation as reflected in fairy tales. Contribution to the anthropology of sexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, T

    1976-01-01

    Two maturation fairy-tales with a high resonance effect are analysed. The method of interpretation was that of depth psychology, with observation of results of modern biological-anthropological research. The interpretation revealed 'hymenal' or retarding primary structures in the young female subject. These structures postpone the onset of sexual desires to the time after the defloration.

  18. Enduring Inequities, Imagined Futures--Circulating Policy Discourses and Dilemmas in the Anthropology of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Teresa L.

    2012-01-01

    This article is a slightly revised version of the CAE Presidential Address delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association in New Orleans, LA on November 20, 2010. The address inaugurated a CAE program change in which a full evening session was devoted to the talk, including commentaries by Hugh Mehan and Sofia…

  19. Applying Medical Anthropology: Developing Diabetes Education and Prevention Programs in American Indian Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Brooke

    1999-01-01

    Medical anthropology provides a broader contextual framework for understanding complex causal factors associated with diabetes among American Indians and how to minimize these factors in education/treatment programs. Discusses historical, epidemiological, and genetic considerations in American Indian diabetes; cultural factors related to foods,…

  20. Toward a New Philosophical Anthropology of Education: Fuller Considerations of Social Constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Stephen; Garrison, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Philosophical anthropology is philosophical inquiry into human nature that seeks to answer the fundamental question of what generally characterizes human beings and differentiates them from other creatures and things. Political theories considerably influence educational theories. We call attention to the fact that the three main political…

  1. 历史人类学简论%A Brief Introduction to Historical Anthropology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝达居

    2001-01-01

    Historical anthropology is the historied anthropology, that is, to inspect history from the viewpoint of culture. This subject emphasizes the historical orientation of culture, the multi - nature of history as well as the importance of cultural interpretation and memory of history to the making of history. The significance of historical anthropology lies in the exposure of historical faults of some main determinism of history. The reinterpretation of concrete cases in the light of historical anthropology will endow us with the value of introspection about the process of history itself.%历史人类学即人类学的“历史化”,是从文化的角度考察历史。历史人类学强调文化的历史向度,强调历史的多元特征、历史的文化解释和记忆对于历史制作的重要性。历史人类学的意义在于指出一些主流的历史决定论自身的历史缺陷。从历史人类学出发对具体个案进行重新解读,使他们有可能赋予历史过程本身一定的反思价值。

  2. Co-­Teaching Social Research Methods in a Joint Sociology/Anthropology Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthei, Jennifer; Isler, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    In the course of developing and co-­teaching Social Research Methods (SRM), an interdisciplinary, upper-­division undergraduate course at the University of Illinois at Springfield (UIS), the authors discovered that this type of partnership is ripe ground for exploring integration of anthropology and sociology on epistemological and methodological…

  3. Critical Medical Anthropology--a voice for just and equitable healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witeska-Młynarczyk, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a paradigm current in contemporary medical anthropology - Critical Medical Anthropology (CMA), which merges political-economic approaches with a culturally sensitive analysis of human behaviour grounded in anthropological methods. It is characterized by a strongly applied orientation and a devotion to improving population health and promoting health equity. The beginning of CMA dates back to the 1970s when the interdisciplinary movement called the political economy of health was developed. Today, CMA has grown into one of three major perspectives used in anthropological research devoted to health, illness and wellbeing. The author discusses the origins, key concepts and CMA's usefulness for social research, and its significance for the design of effective policies in the realm of public health. Examplary interventions and ethnographic researches are introduced and wider usage is advocated of such works and methods by bureaucrats and medical staff for understanding the patients' behavior, and the influence of social, economic and political factors on the workings of particular health systems.

  4. Comments on Tobin's Contribution to Comparative Research in Anthropology and in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varenne, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Tobin's work has been groundbreaking. Famously, he and his team put together a sophisticated comparative study of three ways of doing pre-school--in Japan, China, and the United States (1989). As such, this study has precedents in anthropology. What is unique in Tobin's work is that he got people from one place to comment on what they saw people…

  5. To naturalize or not to naturalize? An issue for cognitive science as well as anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenning, Keith

    2012-07-01

    Several of Beller, Bender, and Medin's (2012) issues are as relevant within cognitive science as between it and anthropology. Knowledge-rich human mental processes impose hermeneutic tasks, both on subjects and researchers. Psychology's current philosophy of science is ill suited to analyzing these: Its demand for ''stimulus control'' needs to give way to ''negotiation of mutual interpretation.'' Cognitive science has ways to address these issues, as does anthropology. An example from my own work is about how defeasible logics are mathematical models of some aspects of simple hermeneutic processes. They explain processing relative to databases of knowledge and belief-that is, content. A specific example is syllogistic reasoning, which raises issues of experimenters' interpretations of subjects' reasoning. Science, especially since the advent of understandings of computation, does not have to be reductive. How does this approach transfer onto anthropological topics? Recent cognitive science approaches to anthropological topics have taken a reductive stance in terms of modules. We end with some speculations about a different cognitive approach to, for example, religion.

  6. Strengthening Pedagogy and Praxis in Cultural Anthropology and Service-Learning: Insights from Postcolonialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Maryann

    2004-01-01

    This article argues cultural anthropology would make a good partner to service-learning pedagogy because it offers students a theoretical approach for understanding community life and its power structures. Anthropologists have been dealing with power vis-a-vis the people they study using concepts relevant to the reflection process in…

  7. The Unstable Equilibrium. Paul Ricoeur’s Renewal of Philosophical Anthropology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, M. de

    2013-01-01

    The main argument of this study concerns the central relation between anthropology, poetics and ethics. It is the ontological problem – which can easily be summarized by the question “who is this Being for whom being is in question” – that silently binds these sections together. What “we are” does n

  8. The Inventiveness of a tradition : Structural anthropology in the Netherlands from an outsider’s perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Leiden structural anthropology achieved international renown through the work of J. P. B. and P. E. de Josselin de Jong and their colleagues and students. In the 1980s, especially after the retirement of P E. de Josselin de Jong in 1988, it grew quiet around this school. This article investigates th

  9. Inviting Discomfort: Foregrounding Emotional Labour in Teaching Anthropology in Post-Apartheid South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Helen Mary

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the potential and limitations of Megan Boler's "pedagogy of discomfort" in a post-apartheid yet heavily racialised South Africa. Taking an 'ethnographic sensibility' to anthropological teaching, this paper sketches the social and historical context of discomfort produced by everyday classroom…

  10. Anthropology and Language Science in Educational Development Newsletter, No. 2/3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Structures and Content of Life-Long Education.

    This issue of the ALSED newsletter contains: (1) a description of the Anthropology and Language Science in Educational Development (ALSED) program; (2) information on the meeting of experts on diversification of methods and techniques for teaching a second language or foreign languages (Paris, Unesco, 15-20 September, 1975), which discussed such…

  11. Pneumatization of the Temporal Bones in a Greenlandic Inuit Anthropological Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Homøe, P; Lynnerup, N

    1991-01-01

    The degree of pneumatization of the temporal bones correlates with exposure during childhood and adolescence to infectious middle ear diseases (IMED), both acute and chronic. The pneumatized area as seen on cranial X-rays can be measured. This was applied to an anthropological material in order...

  12. Anticipatory Anthropology and the Telemicroelectronic Revolution: A Preliminary Report from Silicon Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Textor, Robert B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Proposes that anthropology improve its capacity to anticipate sociocultural changes, especially the rapid change processes that characterize the current "telemicroelectronic revolution." Presents findings of a study of the introduction of microcomputers into schools near Silicon Valley, California, to illustrate the ongoing development of…

  13. Anthropological Approaches to the Study of Housing Areas: Lessons from Oaxaca City, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Arthur D.

    The anthropological study of the city's role in the evolution of human systems requires the use of both macro and micro levels of analysis. From the macro perspective, the city is viewed as part of a wider complex society, while from the micro point of view, the city provides the context for understanding specific human institutions or processes…

  14. What are genres good for? Divisions, demarcations and classifications in structural and cognitive anthropology, on the example of music culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Žikić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Levi-Strauss’s theoretical-methodological "legatee" – anthropological structuralism was one of the most important theoretical frameworks used in cognitive anthropology. Since it was sometimes too abstract for ‘practical’ minds, trained in British-American empirical traditions, Levi-Strauss thought was mediated through the works of British structural-functionalist, particularly those of Mary Douglas and Edmund Leach, who established its premises as a kind of contextualised particularism of the unquestioned universalism. Ideas about the way in which human cultural mind functions, is one of the corner stones of cognitive anthropology, which cognitive anthropology shares with structural anthropology, and from which cognitive anthropology actually inherits what it shares with structural anthropology – this sounds properly structural – that is: an interest in the processes of division, demarcation and classification in a sense of cultural management of a perceived surrounding reality. An example for such analysis, that I use in this paper, is music, or more precisely music culture, an expression that I use in order to imply that the affinity to a type of music, or musical genre should be understood in a sense of a particular cultural way of thinking and acting.

  15. DISCOURSE OF POWER AND DISCOURSE OF MASSES IN MODERN PHILOSOPHICAL ANTHROPOLOGY: CULTURAL, BIOLOGICAL AND RELIGIOUS DIMENSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Karpenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is the identification of anthropological content of the power and mass discourses in contemporary social transformations. The theme of philosophical and anthropological meaning of discourse communication between mass and power in post-modern society acquires the significant relevance because of technologization of the governance processes and transformation of previously sacred power as a set of standard procedures. Methodology of the paper consists on the disclosure of cultural peculiarities and substantial forms of power discourse and mass discourse properties in major directions of philosophical anthropology of middle XX and at the beginning of the XXI century. Scientific novelty. The directions of the institutional sense expression in the discourse of power supply are disclosed and the process of mixing power and management and representative anthropology is fixed. The biological, cultural and religious levels of displaying the anthropological significance discourse of power are identified. The definition is given to the anthropic content of discursive power of speech activities and methods and philosophical reflection of the discursive self-expression of powerful masses. The specificity of the interaction of power and mass discourses of national and universal semantic spaces are defined. In conclusions it is indicated that the anthropic space of the contemporary mass human is narrowing significantly, because the individuals’ participation in technology of society management is finally excluded. On this basis even the key aspect of mass discourse breaks – the mass narrations about the power, because the power performs the direct intervention in the mass discourse structure of sense-creation by the way of suggestion.

  16. THE DEMAND FOR A NEW CONCEPT OF ANTHROPOLOGY IN THE EARLY MODERN AGE: THE DOCTRINE OF HUME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Malivskyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the investigation is to outline the main points of Hume’s interpretation of the basic anthropological project of the era based on radical cultural transformations of the early modern age; to represent a modern vision of Hume's anthropology as a response to the demand of the era and necessity to complete its basic project. Methodology. The research was based on phenomenological and hermeneutic approaches. Originality. Contemporary understanding of the position of anthropological project in Hume's philosophy is regarded as unsatisfactory by the author. Development of the basic project as anthropological is rooted in scientific revolution and needs to be continued and completed. Contemporary prevalence of deanthropogical versions of Hume's philosophy is the result of underestimated significance of the concept of nature in the broad sense. According to the philosopher's texts, heuristic potential of Hume's position is emphasized by the author. The modern version of the basic project in the early modern age is criticized and demands significant changes to become anthropological. Findings. Modern perception of Hume’s philosophy as an anthropological project is unsatisfactory in terms of historical and philosophical science and needs detailed analysis. In order to understand the conditions of anthropological project significance, it is advisable to focus on: a scientific revolution and the necessity to complete it; b determine the role of the concept of nature in its broad sense. Nowadays the way of Hume's rethinking of the basic project of modern philosophy as insufficiently anthropological is quite heuristic. Empiricism, dogmatism, superstition and skepticism are the manifestations of the latter. For Hume, the era was as an incomplete anthropological project and its legacy as the most complete form of explication. Today the interest in the phenomenon of a human provides a reasonable basis to define that modern period is

  17. Doing physics how physicists take hold of the world

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, Martin H

    2012-01-01

    Doing Physics makes concepts of physics easier to grasp by relating them to everyday knowledge. Addressing some of the models and metaphors that physicists use to explain the physical world, Martin H. Krieger describes the conceptual world of physics by means of analogies to economics, anthropology, theater, carpentry, mechanisms such as clockworks, and machine tool design. The interaction of elementary particles or chemical species, for example, can be related to the theory of kinship-who can marry whom is like what can interact with what. Likewise, the description of physical situations i

  18. Applied anthropology in Colombia. Perspectives and purposes on the basis of an experience in childhood and migrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Claudia Duque-Páramo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper puts forward a notion of applied anthropology incorporating both a critical analysis of cultural diversity and intervention and policy formulation, which help to solve the problems communities we work with face. In order to do this, at a first time we revise several concepts and purposes on applied anthropology in the North American and Colombian contexts. Then, an experience on migrations and childhood is reported, including research, intervention and networking. Finally, a third moment articulates the elements discussed in a final reflection on the relationship between theory and practice in the field of applied anthropology

  19. [Human remains in museums: research, preservation and communication. The experience of Turin University Museum of Anthropology and Etnography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boano, Rosa; Grilletto, Renato; Rabino Massa, Emma

    2013-01-01

    The creation of large scientific collections has been an important development for anthropological and paleopathological research. Indeed the biological collections are irreplaceable reference systems for the biological reconstruction of past population. They also assume the important role of anthropological archives and, in the global description of man, permit the integration of historical data with those from bio-anthropolgical research. Thinking about the role of mummies and bones as scientific resources, best practice of preservation of ancient specimens should be of high priority for institution and researchers. By way of example, the authors mention their experience regarding ancient human remains preserved in the Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography at the University of Turin.

  20. What Do Artifacts Do?-An Anthropological Approach to Materiality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Rowlands; Tang Yun; Zhang Lisheng

    2015-01-01

    Anthropology and Archaeology provide suitable avenues here –i. e. Anthropology has been dedicated to mend the break - e. g. the Anthropology of Art departure from Primitive Art. But we have to ask how does the museum/art gallery/concert hall provide a unique access to au-thenticity by addressing the form of the object or image on display without knowing any of the con-texts? What is so fascinating about “contextless-ness” – i. e. objects to look at which do not speak? Both Valery and Proust argue against return to context–and for the uniqueness of form–where objects are offered for contemplation as ends in themselves. Both are pointing to this legacy of the relic from the counter reformation – the isolation and picking out of the unique object that once iso-lated i. e. can no longer be seen or touched– the power of the object that goes beyond mere fabrica-tion – transcends the spirit. Within the setting of the impact of fetishism in West Africa,anthropologists have rightly striven to isolate the context of ritually empowered objects from the projections of a post counter reformationist fear that being rid of relics in one place – would only lead to their rediscovery as fetish somewhere else. Going Beyond Fabrication Our eponymous African hero – displaying blank misrecognition to the European colonialist or now the Pentecostal pastor–who both condemned as paradoxical that something can be made by hu-man hand and yet its power can transcend its origin as a fetish -but our hero doesn’t understand what they are on about in being supposed to have some reason for not seeing the contradiction. We can sur-mise that this must also be something to do with ac-cess to objects that are deemed to be in themselves powerful. Here I will draw on an analogous situation of conserving,preserving and displaying objects in an indigenous context of artefact creation and display in West Africa. Why do the shrines in annual ritu-als always look like a jumble of things